Wakulla news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins ( Crawfordville Fla )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 401960
oclc - 33429964
System ID:
UF00028313:00529


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

Public Notices .............................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ........................................Page 4A Street Beat ..................................................Page 5A Church .........................................................Page 6A Obituaries ...................................................Page 7A Community ..................................................Page 8A School .........................................................Page 9A Outdoors ................................................. Page 10A Water Ways ...............................................Page 11A Arts & Entertainment ................................Page 12A Green Scene ..............................................Page 13A Week in Wakulla ........................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .........................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla .........................................Page 16A Sports .........................................................Page 1B In The Huddle ..............................................Page 3B Thinking Outside the Book ..........................Page 3B Classi eds ...................................................Page 4B Legal Notices ..............................................Page 4B Comics ........................................................Page 7BINDEX OBITUARIES Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 CentsServing Wakulla County For More Than A Century Serving Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyPublished Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyOur 119th Year, 38th Issue Thursday, September 18, 2014Sports SportsWakulla rolls, 47-20 Water district increases local monitoringOperation Santa application period opens in October at Community CenterStarting on Page 1B Operation: Giving backnews ewsThe Wakulla The Wakulla 9/11 RememberedCheryl Jean Long Robert Eugene Peregrin Nicholas Kent Strauss10 stations, including 5 new, will help develop minimum ow levels for Wakulla Springs, St. Marks River RiseKEN FIELDSThe War Eagles take the eld. CANDIDATE FORUMAT THE ONE-STOP COMMUNITY CENTERThursday, Sept. 25 at 7p.m.Sponsored bythe Wakulla Democratic Party & the Wakulla Republican Party. Special to The News The Northwest Florida Water Management Districts Governing Board approved a joint funding agreement with the United States Geological Survey for stage and discharge monitoring at 10 stations. This agreement includes the continuation of ve existing stations, as well as the initiation of ve new sites in support of the Districts development of minimum ows and levels (MFLs) for Wakulla Springs and St. Marks River Rise. Data collection plays an essential role in the Districts efforts to protect our water and natural resources, said Director of Resource Management Guy Gowens. By expanding and enhancing our monitoring network, were ensuring that we develop MFLs and implement other activities based on sound science and the best information available. Monitoring stations provide valuable water resource data that the District can use for a variety of purposes, including MFL development, consumptive use regulation, ood warning and other water resource management functions. The joint funding agreement includes $170,900 in district funding for Fiscal Year 2014-2015. The USGS is providing matching funds in the amount of $92,500 to cover the total operational cost of the network of $263,400. The cost of gauges along Spring Creek is being split evenly between the NWFWMD, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and the City of Tallahassee. Under the agreement, ve new stations will be installed at Fisher Creek, Black Creek, St. Marks River Sink and two sites along Lost Creek to collect data that is vital to the development of effective and protective MFLs. The agreement also includes continued monitoring at Telogia Creek, Yellow River, Spring Creek and two sites along the Apalachicola River. The USGS will operate all 10 stations for continuous discharge and stage monitoring. The data will be updated in real time and available on the USGS website. By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.net Christmas was coming whether Marion Russ family was going through a hard time or not. When Russ (pictured below) was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010, not only did she have to stop working, her husband had to stop working too, to care for her throughout chemotherapy and radiation treatments. With four children under age 14, just getting by was difcult enough. We found ourselves in a hard time, Russ said. When it came to Christmas, and the kids asked to make out their Christmas list, I broke down and cried. It broke my heart to tell them no. I had no earthy idea how to provide Christmas for them. Russ said she was not aware of Operation Santa until some friends involved with the organization submitted her name. Thanks to them, my children had a Christmas, Russ said, who met with volunteers for a brief interview. The Wakulla charity provided toys, books, makeup and CDs the children had requested. As Russ completed her treatments, she wanted to give back in some way. Financially I still wasnt able would like to donate money back to the organization, she said. But in my heart, I appreciated everything they did, so I volunteered my time. That was my way to give back for them saving my familys Christmas. While Russ is the Relay for Life chair this year, she is still making time to volunteer again, and encourages others in the community to donate time, money, gifts, or to sponsor a family even multiple families if community members are blessed with the means to do that. Its a really good cause, she said. A lot of people with sickness or unemployment cant provide Christmas. Finding a doll under tree brightens their day, and eases the burden to know an organization out there give kids a Christmas. It might not be a big Christmas but a Christmas for a kid that puts a smile on their face. Operation Santa Wakulla, an extension of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, helped 300 local families (1,100 individuals) have a happy Christmas last season. There have been major changes to Operation Santa Wakulla this year, and organizers want the community donors, volunteers and applicants to be aware of the changes. Would you believe that right here in our beautiful county, the gifts provided by the Operation Santa project are the only gifts children will receive? said Janice Eakin, director. Turn to Page 5A Staff Report A small crowd turned out at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce for the annual memorial observance for those lost in the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The sheriffs color guard and the Wakulla High School NJROTC color guard raised the flag to half staff as a trumpeter played Taps. Sheriff Charlie Creel presented Norman Peak with a ag that ew over the sheriffs office on Sept. 11 last year. County Commissioner Ralph Thomas recalled the 2001 terrorist attack as intended to dimish Americas resolve. Thomas praised those first responders who rushed toward death that day. May our fallen heroes rest in peace, Thomas said. of the Wakulla Count y C h fa d a m T m t S t o w c of the Wakulla Count y C oa l ition f or Yout h h e lp e d 300 l oca l fa mi l ies (1,100 ind ivi d ua l s) h ave a h appy C h ristm a s l a st se a so n. Th er e h a ve b ee n m a jo r c h an ge s o O pe rat i on S an t a Wa kull a h is y ear, an d o rgan i zers w an t t he com PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comGov. Scott makes campaign stop in WakullaCrowd of 200 turn out at old courthouse to see Scott with Gov. Chris Christie, Rep. Steve Southerland, other GOP o cials WILLIAM SNOWDEN NICOLE ZEMAGov. Rick Scott at the podium with, from left, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, held of Republican Governors Association, behind him state Rep. Halsey Beshears, Congressman Steve Southerland, state Rep. Jimmy Patronis, and to Scotts left, Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera. Gov. Christie, left, shakes hands before the rally. Jean Dykes, above, cheers.By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netGov. Rick Scott made a campaign stop in Crawfordville last week, stopping by the historic courthouse for a rally of local Republicans. Along with Scott was New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, head of the Republican Governors Association, who blasted Scotts Democratic challenger Charlie Crist as someone who doesnt know who he is or what hes for. Christie pointed out that Crist has been a Republican, an independent and a Democrat. Scott told the crowd, I have a major announcement: Crist is a slick politician, a smooth talker, and Im not... Hell promise you anything. The rally, held on Friday, Sept. 12, in the upstairs courtroom at the historic courthouse, was packed with Republican supporters, including a group of students from Wakulla Christian Academy who held up letters spelling FLORIDA and posters supporting the governor. It was hot, and the air conditioning in the old building couldnt keep up one student swooned in the heat and was taken to a chair to sit. U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, running for re-election against Democrat Gwen Graham, told the crowd that the policies of Rick Scott are working. Scott praised Southerland, and urged voters to return him to Washington. Also praised was Wakullas state representative, Halsey Beshears, who didnt expect to speak and joked that theres nothing like being asked to say a few words when youre unprepared. Beshears was returned to of ce without a challenger. Outside the courthouse, a handful of protestors held up signs critical of Scott and Republican policies. Nikki Barnes, president of the local Democratic Womens group, and Audrey Dutrow, a 14-year-old Wakulla High freshman, said one man in crowd called them heifers and threatened to take off his belt and spank them. Republican County Commissioner Jerry Moore reportedly told the protestors to Get a job. Scott and Christie started the day with a campaign rally at Capt. Andersons restaurant in Panama City. The Republican Governors Association has chipped in $8.5 million this summer toward Gov. Scotts re-election effort. Gov. Christie said the association, which he chairs, isnt done assisting the Sunshine States governor. The associations contributions, including $2 million earlier this month to the Scottaligned Lets Get to Work political committee, are a sign of the importance the national political parties place on the race between Scott and Crist. Recent polls show Scott with an edge over Crist, as Scotts campaign has spent heavily to highlight negatives about Crist, who was governor while Florida and the nation went into a recession. Crist ran as an independent for a U.S. Senate seat rather than seeking a second term as governor in 2010.Nicole Zema and The News Service of Florida contributed to this report.By MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAWomens issues have taken center stage in the erce battle between Republican incumbent Steve Southerland and Democratic challenger Gwen Graham in a Northwest Florida congressional district. The issues range from a male-only Southerland fundraiser to dueling ads about the Republicans vote for a controversial version of the federal Violence Against Women Act. And with pundits saying the race is too close to call, the candidates in Congressional District 2 are trying to shore up support among women voters. The sprawling district includes 14 counties and ranges from heavily Democratic Leon and Gadsden counties, in the east, to the heavily Republican Panama City area and smaller, more rural counties to the west. Democrats are counting on the fact that theres more Democratic women than Republican women, and that these hot-button issues will draw younger, Democratic-leaning women to the polls at a higher rate, said University of South Florida political scientist Susan MacManus. Ultimately, Southerlands path to victory is turning Graham into more of a national Democrat than a Florida Panhandle Democrat, said Kyle Kondik, who analyzes House races for Larry Sabatos Crystal Ball project at the University of Virginia. The race has drawn high-profile coverage, with Graham daughter of former Gov. and U.S. Sen. Bob Graham considered one of the Democrats few chances to gain a seat in the Republican-controlled House this year. But it gained even more attention recently with the revelation that the host of a March fundraiser for Southerland had invited his guests to leave the misses at home while the men discussed policy over whiskey and cigars. But Kondik said the race is still Southerlands to lose. Based on the district fundamentals and just the year it is, I think that if Southerland loses, hell really have to look in the mirror about it, Kondik said.Womens issues add to congressional race Since 1973, the Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program has graduated 345 physicians, with 147 practicing in the Big Bend region. At TMH, we have a longstanding commitment of providing the best possible care and thats why we train our residents in a variety of specialties, including emergency care, gynecology and obstetrics and rural medicine. As a result, our graduates continue the tradition of compassionate medical care with their patients and thats why TMH is my hospital. DONALD ZORN, MD DIRECTOR, TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM WHY PHYSICIANS CHOOSE TMH LEARN MORE AT TMH.ORG IS M Y Hospital. TMH

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Board of Commissioners had two meetings last week one regular board meeting, and another to discuss the tentative budget and new millage rate at the rst of two public hearings. Both meetings featured deep discussion of Animal Controls startup adoption program. At the regular meeting, the board heard updates on the RESTORE Act, road and sidewalk projects, and the Big Bend Maritime Center. They also approved multiple paving projects and rate resolutions, and amended the litter ordinance. BUDGET, MILLAGE RATE At the tentative budget hearing, the new tentative aggregate millage rate was unanimously approved, decreasing to 8.5 mills from 8.6 mills, which is a drop of 2 percent. The overall scal year 2014-15 budget dropped 2.9 percent from last year, from $43.3 million to $42 million. The millage rate of 8.5 mills represents a tax levy of $8.5 per $1,000 of property value. For an average $100,000 home with homestead exemption, the annual taxes would be $425. County Administrator David Edwards outlined budget increases for the general fund, library state aid grant, building fund, mosquito control, RESTORE Act fund, ne and forfeiture fund, road department 2 cent gas tax fund, fire MSBU fund, tourist development fund and the solid waste grant fund. The budget does not include pay raises for county employees this year. The tentative budget passed 3-2, with Commissioners Howard Kessler and Jerry Moore voting no. The nal public hearing for approval of the nal millage rate and budget will be held at 6 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 22. ANIMAL CONTROL ADOPTION PROGRAM A pilot program to see how well an adoption center will perform at Wakulla County Animal Control was subject to hopeful comments and also criticism. The startup will cost the county $10,000, intended to be offset by adoption revenue. Ivanhoe Carroll, director of animal control, said people come by the center all the time asking to see and adopt animals. But since the CHAT adoption group left the facility others say they were forced out Carroll has to turn would-be adopters to other resources, which is confusing to people. The lack of adoption data also keeps animal control from competing for grant funding. Commissioner Kessler asked Edwards, why only $10,000 is being requested when it cost CHAT $100,000 to run the facility. To try it on a limited basis, Edwards said. To see what the outcome is, test market it, and then well come back to you guys with the results of that. Edwards said if the program shows a 25 percent margin loss, it will be re-evaluated. We do not anticipate making money at this, he said. We anticipate either breaking even, or losing a little bit of money. Carroll said, We need access to low-cost spay and neuter vouchers. In order to do that, we need to have data that says weve done X amount of adoptions per year of a certain percentage of your animal intake. When we go to make applications for grants we cant compete, because we dont have any data. This is an effort, with your approval, to get our foot in the door and try it on. Kessler asked Edwards why CHAT was forced out of the adoption center, and Edwards said they were not forced out, but chose to leave. After data showed adoptions were decreasing and the euthanasia rate went up, Edwards said something had to be done. Cauzican, another adoption resource, was brought in, and the euthanasia rate dropped. Turn to Page 7ABoard weighs budget, startup of new pet adoption program General Fund 8.5000 General Fund Special Revenue Funds Capital Project Funds Enterprise Funds Total All Funds Taxes: Millage Per $1,000 95% Ad Valorem Taxes 8.5000 1,034,308 7,411,199 8,445,507 Sales, Use, U lity & Fuel Taxes 2,068,650 1,172,385 1,897,916 5,138,951 Licenses and Special Assessments 40,000 1,112,152 1,152,152 Intergovernmental Revenues 4,884,862 3,393,161 1,764,000 90,909 10,132,932 Charges for Services 1,750,998 2,804,497 3,930,522 8,486,017 Fines and Forfeitures 58,750 36,587 95,337 Miscellaneous Revenues 71,072 4,690 3,595,691 3,671,452 Total Revenues Sources9,908,639 15,934,670 3,661,916 7,617,121 37,122,347 Transfers In 203,392 154,587 505,908 863,887 Fund Balances Carried Forward 711,273 1,648,903 1,164,054 822,652 4,346,882 Total Revenues, Transfers & Fund Balances 10,823,304 17,738,161 4,825,970 8,945,681 42,333,116 General Governement 3,194,579 10,070 3,204,650 Public Safety 2,463,662 11,108,751 428,327 14,000,740 Physical Environment 180,792 20,000 7,951,858 8,152,650 Transporta on 6,176 2,404,930 1,765,369 4,176,475 Economic Environment 21,111 1,858,761 1,879,872 Human Services 652,793 50,000 15,000 717,793 Culture and Recrea on 861,068 1,181,129 1,078,358 3,120,556 Court Services 55,000 190,341 245,341 Debt Service 243,968 604,157 400,031 1,248,156 Total Expenditures Uses7,435,182 17,067,951 3,891,211 8,351,889 36,746,232 Transfers Out 2,749,005 368,288 295,000 465,858 3,878,151 Fund Balances Reserves 639,118 301,922 639,759 127,934 1,708,732 Total Expenditures, Transfer s & Fund Balanc es 10,823,304 17,738,161 4,825,970 8,945,681 42,333,116 Final Budget SummaryWakulla County, FloridaFiscal Year 2014/2015Es mated Expenditures: Proposed Millage Levy Es mated Revenues: NOTICE OF FINAL BUDGET HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on September 22, 2014 at 6:01 p.m., in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL. 32327, to Consider Adopting the FY2014/2015 Final Millage Rate and Final Budget. This is the second of two required public hearings.If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com. SEPTEMBER 18, 2014 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGS Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com.SEPTEMBER 18 2014 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/ or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 13, 2014, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, October 20, 2014 and Monday, November 3, 2014, beginning at 6:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. WAKULLAS FLOODPLAINFlooding can threaten at any time of the year from various sources. Wakulla County regulates construction and development in the oodplain to ensure that buildings will be protected from ood damage. All developments in the oodplain, not just construction of buildings, need permits. Filling and similar work are prohibited in certain areas, so check with the Planning and Community Development Department before you begin a project to build, ll or otherwise. Should unauthorized development in the oodplain be witnessed by a citizen, they can report it to the Countys Code Enforcement at (850) 926-3695. It is also important to know that houses in the oodplain that are substantially damaged by events such as re or ood must be repaired to new construction standards. This includes elevating the structure to or above the base ood elevation when it is repaired. Damage is considered to be substantial when the cost of reconstruction equals or exceeds 50% of the buildings market value. When damage of this type occurs to a structure and repairs are necessary, visit the Planning and Community Development Department for a Development Permit Application to begin your permitting process. A recorded warranty deed and site plan, showing the improvements/repairs to the property, will be required to complete this Application. Once obtained from Planning and Zoning, the Development Permit Application should be submitted to the Building Division for permitting. Depending upon the types of work performed additional materials will be requested from the Building Division and/or other Departments to complete the permitting of repairs to the structure. Applicable fees are due for Development Permit Applications and Building Division permits, unless otherwise waived by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners for widespread storm damage. An important protection measure in regards to ooding is ood insurance. Homeowners insurance policies do not cover damage from oods, so obtaining a ood insurance policy can help you should you experience a ood. Since Wakulla County and the City of St. Marks participate in the National Flood Insurance Program, you can purchase a separate ood insurance policy in these areas. This insurance is backed by the Federal government and is available to properties that have been previously ooded. Dont wait for the next ood to buy insurance protection. In most cases, there is a 30 day waiting period before National Flood Insurance Program coverage takes effect. Also, consider obtaining contents coverage if it is not already included in your current insurance policy. Contact your insurance agent for more information on rates and coverage. For further information on these topics contact the Planning and Community Development Department at (850) 926-3695. SEPT. 18, 2014

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Poseys hosts Chamber luncheon Sheriffs Report September 4, 2014 Gulf Specimen Lab provides species for The Photo Ark Problems and solutions discussed at springs event Wakulla Middle beats Riversprings School board approves $41M budget Gov. Scott coming to Wakulla with big political names Underwater Wakulla September 11, 2014 thewakullanews.com Another reason to shop locally in WakullaCorrection ank you for letting me serve Sept. 22-27 is Banned Books Week ank you for reminding us to say anks Dismayed by attendance at 9/11 memorialSpeed date your candidate at forum next week Follow us onYou have your choice of candidate forums for county commission candidates over the next several weeks: The Christian Coalition is having a forum on Thursday at New Bridge Hope beginning at 7 p.m. The Wakulla Chamber and The Wakulla News have a forum on Oct. 7 at the One-Stop Community Center. Both of those forums will be more traditional formats of question-and-answer, but in an effort to try something a little different, a forum on Sept. 25 will offer voters a chance to Speed date your candidate. This forum, sponsored by The Wakulla News and the Democratic and Republican parties, is based on modern speed dating, where individuals move from table-to-table meeting and talking with people within a certain time period, and then moving to the next one. Candidate forums using that format have been done in some big cities and worked, and we thought we would try it here. As each candidate goes to a table for 10 minutes, questions will be drawn and the candidate answers them. More questions can be drawn if theres time. At the end of the 10 minutes, the candidates move to the next table and more questions are drawn. There will be moderators at each table to ensure that the conversation stays on topic and is civil. All ve county commission candidates have agreed to participate. Ive heard skepticism from some people who dont believe we can have a civil discourse on politics. Im hopeful that we can have a real dialogue about the issues. But remember, candidates are there to participate in a discussion, not to he harrangued or harassed. All that said, if you would like to sit at a table with the candidates, please send me an email to RSVP and reserve a seat. The email is editor@thewakullanews. net. You can also submit questions to be considered at the same email address. Whether seated at a table or not, you can also just come out and observe. It should be interesting. It will certainly be different.AGAIN, OVERWHELMED WITH LETTERSWith political season comes a glut of political letters. I am, once again, overwhelmed with them theres a couple of candidate endorsements and a lot about the wetlands amendment. A lot of the letters I get are long some are very long. Ive never liked word counts on letters I tell people who want to submit something to write as long it takes to make their point and then stop. Some of our letter writers are pretty artful at expressing their point of view, and sometimes I feel like theyre chasing mental rabbits. I will make every effort to get all the letters in print before the election. Thanks for sending them in. William Snowden is editor at The Wakulla News. READERS WRITE: William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.netChristian Coalition forum is Sept. 18 Editor, The News: First a thank you to the Wakulla News for printing the notice of our candidate forum to be held Thursday, Sept. 18 at New Bridge Hope Church. New Bridge Hope is located at 1282 Spring Creek Highway, across from Macks Meats. Theres plenty of parking and everyone is invited. The event starts at 7 p.m. and will run approximately one hour. We have invited all the commission candidates currently running for of ce in both District 2 and District 4. We will not be taking questions from the oor, but will have each candidate speak three minutes on all of the following topics, which seem to be popular this campaign season. The format will be a series of the following topics: 1). The wetlands ballot initiative A and the wetlands ordinance generally 2). Taxes & Fees can we nd other ways? 3). US 98/319 intersection should it be changed from its current alignment? 4). Our airport should it be supported with county funds? 5). What you will bring to the county if elected? No questions will be allowed from the oor. Candidates will be available before and after the forum to answer any more questions individually, and we encourage that. This election, there seems to be a pretty clear choice of which direction the countys future will be going Of course, all of this is useless unless we all voter. The primary, with its exceptionally low turn-out was very discouraging and wed like all citizens to become informed of all the candidates positions on matters affecting the county, and, vote! Its a privilege won, not given, to us all. Thank you again. We hope to see all candidates and many citizens on the 18th. Jennie V. Jones Chair Wakulla County Christian Coalition Ruth Francis Secretary Editor, The News: Thank you, thank you, thank you. To the many families, friends and citizens of Wakulla County, thank you for allowing me to serve you as your School Board Member for nearly 16 years. To my family and extended family, thank you for enduring the many trials of running for of ce and supporting me in doing what I love serving the needs of children. I have been truly honored to represent the children and families of Wakulla County in a position that allowed a voice for the continued success of the greatest school system in the State of Florida. People all across the county have been so gracious as to pass along their heartfelt concerns to me about the election outcome. As I expressed my appreciation for their concern, I hope I shared my excitement for the other possibilities God has in store as He always opens a door upon the close of one. I have served the children and families of Wakulla County for over 20 years in many capacities, and with Gods blessing I will continue to serve because there is so much more still to come. Best wishes to Mrs. Brock in her new role. My only suggestion is to continue to start every meeting by asking Gods guidance in the decisions for our children. Ray Gray Crawfordville Editor, The News: Last week we needed to have one of our dogs groomed and decided to try a new business in Wakulla County. We took our pet to Ms. Marias Grooming LLC in the row of shops between Talk o the Town Deli and Sundance (two other great Wakulla businesses). We were very impressed and satis ed with Marias new business. Her service was very good, in a very inviting environment with a polite and friendly staff. Maria exceeded all our expectations. We recommend her to anyone seeking a pet groomer. Another great reason to shop locally in Wakulla County! Mike Eakin CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: As a librarian, I have always found the American Library Associations celebration and promotion of Banned Books Week an exciting topic. As one reads the long list of books that have been challenged or even removed from libraries, bookstores, or classrooms either by choice or by theft one nds many titles of favorite adventure stories from childhood or modern fairy tales of magic and mystery that transports readers into grand worlds of creativity. Even the Bible makes this list quite continuously. The topic of banned books and censorship always makes me wonder if people know what lengths their library staff goes to in order to protect the communitys right to read. Libraries, including the Wakulla County Public Library, adhere to a Library Bill of Rights that was created by the American Library Association Council in 1939 and has been most recently reaf rmed in 1996. These six, simple guidelines for library services help libraries maintain their status as forums for information and ideas. I. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background, or views of those contributing to their creation. II. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval. III. Libraries should challenge censorship in the ful llment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment. IV. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas. V. A persons right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views. VI. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or af liations of individuals or groups requesting their use. Please visit us the week of Sept. 22-27 and celebrate your freedom to read by checking out a book that someone somewhere might have considered just dangerous enough to think that you shouldnt read it. It might be a book by J. K. Rowling, John Steinbeck, Maya Angelou, Mark Twain, Toni Morrison, Harper Lee, Lois Lowry, or even Judy Blume. The list goes on and on. When you read, celebrate every word, on every page, and the joy of reading it just because you can! For more information about Banned Books Week, please visit the American Library Association at http://www.ala.org/bbooks/about. Robyn Drummond Director of Library Services Editor, The News: I attended the 9/11 memorial service at the sheriffs of ce grounds last Thursday, Sept. 11, and was dismayed at the turnout of the private citizens of Wakulla County. I nd it hard to believe that one could not take about 30 minutes of their day to honor the memory of those that lost their lives on that terrible day. NEVER FORGET. Harriet Rich CrawfordvilleA story last week on a contribution from Bay Leaf Market to CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment) gave the wrong email address for those who want to volunteer or help CHAT identify feral cat populations. The correct address is chatwakulla@yahoo.com. We regret the error. Editor, The News: I want to thank Donna Dickens for reminding all of us that we should be saying Thank you everyday to those who cross our paths and make our lives better. I cried when I read her letter of Sept. 11 (Thank you from someone you helped) and I will be thinking of her when I say thank you. One more time thank you, Donna. Diane Lanter Blakely, Ga.

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked around town:How much time do you spend on Facebook each week? BRETT ROBBINSCONSTRUCTIONMaybe ve hours. My ance would say she is on a lot more. I just keep up with my family and friends. ERIKA SIMMONSCNAWhooooo... A lot! I would say around four or more hours throughout the week, mostly keeping up with my friends! JOEY FAIRCLOTH FAIRCLOTH AUTOMOTIVENone! I cant even remember my password right now. I might get on once a month or so. I just really dont have the time. Each week? Maybe seven to 10 hours! Is that a lot? I look at my news feed I keep up with the news and my friends! ZACH WELLSWINN DIXIE BUTCHERVANESSA LOSEYUSPS MAIL CARRIERI dont really get on much, maybe an hour a week. I lost my cell phone in the Wakulla River, so I would get on a lot more when I had my phone! Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Pirates Landing Free Appetizer of your choice Ouzts Too Grilled Shrimp w/rice dinnerWinner Penelope Grant drawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days y s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant FRESH SEAFOODStraight from the Docks of St. Marks!785 Port Leon Drive, St Marks Wed. Fri. 11am until Sat. Sun. Open for Breakfast at 6:30amWe have Gator & A Full Bar 850 925-64487968 Coastal Hwy. 98 Newport Historic Bridge WED.HOME COOKED MEALS THURS.PICKIN & GRINNINOUZTSTOO.COMFOOD BEVERAGEENTERTAINMENT$4 Daily Specials!Includes Chips and DrinkCuban SandwichCuban Ham & Pork, topped with Swiss cheese, dill pickle, yellow mustard on a Cuban Roll Includes Chips and Drink$895 926-3500 SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida From Front PageAPPLICATIONS The application period for Operation Santa Wakulla will be open throughout the month of October. Applications may be submitted from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center located on the corner of Shadeville Highway and Trice Lane. Operation Santas organizers what people to be aware of the Oct. 31 deadline, as families often assume the application period goes on until Christmas. Applicants are also encouraged to apply early, and visit www. operationsantawakulla. org to get a head start by printing the application, learning more details, and viewing an informational video. Applicants must bring a photo id, reside in Wakulla County, and can be individuals, parents, grandparents, foster care providers and of cial caregivers. Applications can also be found at the library. FAMILY ADOPTION Operation Santa helpers are hoping to increase the number of families adopted this year. An individual, church, neighborhood, club, school, or business can make a big impact by adopting a family, or multiple families. One local church adopted 20 families last year, and a total of 103 families were adopted. Some adopters prefer to adopt families with which they can identify, or request a family of a certain size. When families submit an application, they are given the opportunity to request three presents with a retail cost not to exceed $25 each. Of course, some items requested only cost $10 to $15, or can be bought on sale. Adopters are not limited to how much can be purchased for a family. Adoption Team Lead Robin Lunn can provide information at 926-1233 or 561818-5366; or email RMLunn@comcast.net. DONATIONS The nonpro t has undergone a change of address. While the application and interview location is at the community center, the Episcopal Diocese of Florida are lending their vacant church at 1255 Rehwinkle Road (at the corner of US 98) to serve as Santas Workshop this year. Donations may be dropped off at this location, or at the green box at retail stores, banks and various locations in Wakulla County, not at the community center like years past. A list will be posted to Faceook and the website. Good items to donate: Empty plastic laundry detergent bottles (rinsed with lids) for homemade laundry detergent for every family; current styles of clothing (clean, new and like new); unopened toiletries, beauty tools and products; toys, games, art supplies, movies and music; books for all ages; baby stuff including diapers; linens and towels of all kinds; non perishable foods; appliances, furniture, mattresses and bed frames; wheelchairs, adult diapers and walkers; and gift certificates from restaurants and fast food establishments. Home repair experts are encouraged to donate their skills and time. Wrapping materials and supplies are needed too. New sponsorship levels have been announced this season. All donations will be publicly recognized unless anonymity is requested: $25 Rudolph; $50 Elf; $100 Angel; $365 Dollar a Day; $500 Santa; $1,000 Christmas Tree; $2,000 Christmas Star and $5,000 Christmas Miracle. Checks are accepted, and PayPal donations can be made through the website. Donors will be mailed a receipt for tax records. Mail checks to: WCCY, Operation Santa, PO Box 1688, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Or call Rhonda Sapp at 544-2110 for more information. VOLUNTEERS Volunteers of every ability level are needed. Like the Facebook page to stay updated on volunteerism opportunities. In November, volunteers will be sorting, cleaning and mending clothes, shopping for requested items, boxing items and more. Christmas Day will be Saturday, Dec. 13 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Call Janice Eakin for volunteerism opportunities 524-1818.Operation Santa

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station The Reverend Bert MatlockBible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor850 745-8359Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchSunday School 10 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. PASTOR ALAN GAYLORD 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.org Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchYour church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Closer than my cell phone Sopchoppy Block Party will feature music, food A block party in Sopchoppy will be 5 to 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 20 by the old depot. The event will feature the Bread of Life Broken at 5 p.m., free barbecue at 6 p.m., music, preaching, praying and singing. Bring a lawn chair and a friend. Wakulla Springs Baptist to hold sh fry Sept. 26Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will hold a sh fry on Friday, Sept. 26, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The event is a fundraiser for the churchs Thailand Mission Team for an upcoming mission trip to Thailand. Price is $10 a plate and includes sh, cheese grits, coleslaw, hushpuppies, drink and dessert. Please email ampaarlberg@ yahoo.com or call the church of ce at 926-5152 to RSVP. You can eat at the church or take your plate to go. Come and enjoy some good food and also support a great cause. First Pentecostal to host Williams Family The Williams family from Havana, Florida will be ministering in Word & Song at the First Pentecostal Church of Crawfordville on Sunday, Sept. 21, at 2:30 p.m. Come worship with us. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERTraveling, especially by air, is not my favorite pastime. I know some people who just delight in ying from one point to another point. If you would count all of those people who do, I would be nowhere on that list. Recently I had to travel involving changing planes, which involved spending a night at the Orlando airport. I could have come home, which is about two hours away, or I could spend the night and catch the plane the next day. It would cost me about the same to stay overnight at the airport as it would to travel back home and then return to the airport the next day. So, after all of my meticulous calculations, I decided to spend the night at the airport. I determined while there to get the most of my nights stay at the airport. The hotel at the airport was one of those big international hotels. It had more stories than a politician on the campaign trail. As is usually the case, my room was on one of the top oors of the hotel. Checking in at the front desk, I then went to my room and settled down for the evening. I was not going to waste my time huddled in my hotel room, rather, I was going to look around and experience the nightlife at this international hotel. I decided to get some supper around 8 oclock in the evening. This, I found out, was the time high society folk eat. Why they eat so late, I will never know. But, since I was with high society, I decided to act and eat like high society. The restaurant in this international hotel was one of those highfalutin restaurants where you really do not know what is on the menu. The menu was in every language except English. Fortunately, they had some pictures and fortunately, my index nger was still in good working order. I ordered my supper, set back and observed the high society all around me. One thought that stumbled through my brain at the time was, I wonder if these people in this restaurant know that I am not part of high society? About this time the wine steward, I guess that is what he is called, came by to take my wine order. The only wine I know is spelled with an H. When I declined the wine, people began to suspicion I was not part of high society. I guess you cannot be part of high society unless you wine a little. I nished my supper and decided to wander around in the huge lounge area on this oor. Everybody there was talking and so I got an order of coffee, went to a couch, sat down and just observed what was going on around me. One thing I noticed was that most people seemed to be on their cell phone. What would happen in our society if cell phones suddenly stopped working for three minutes? There would be such a panic across our country that nobody would actually survive. I decided I should call someone on my cell phone. After all, I am trying to t in with this high society. My dilemma came when I tried to gure out who in the world I should call at 10 oclock at night. Then it dawned on me. I will call the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. So I pressed the speed dial and the phone started ringing. As soon as the phone started ringing, a thought danced in my mind. What in the world am I calling her for? What in the world would I talk about? Before nishing all of the questions floating around my cranium my wife answered the phone. The rst words out of her mouth were, What did you forget now? It seems that whenever I go on a trip, before I get too far down the road I remember something I forgot. When I assured her that I had not forgotten anything, I sensed a slight pause on the other end and then she said, Did you miss your plane? Within the next few minutes I was bombarded with question after question, all I did was call, and at this point, I could not remember why I had called her. It just seemed like the thing to do at the time. After she settled down a little bit and her panic seizure ceased, I told her I just called to call. Oh, she said, not knowing how to answer that. I was shocked. It had never happened before. I am going to cherish this memory for as long as I live. I actually caught her when she had nothing to say. Needless to say, I relished that moment because it will probably never happen again. After I hung up, I sat sipping some more coffee when one of my favorite verses came to mind. And it shall come to pass, that before they call, I will answer; and while they are yet speaking, I will hear (Isaiah 65:24). My comfort rests in the fact that God is closer to me than my cell phone.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. OUT TO PASTOR In depth home bible studies are available 3055 Crawfordville Hwy.Sun. Services 2:30 orthoinfo.org/patientsafety The safest, most successful surgeries happen when physicians and patients team up as active partners. Which means plenty of candid questions and honest answers from each. Bone up on patient safety at orthoinfo.org/patientsafety. A public service message from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, reminding patients and doctors that communication is the best medicine. Patient Safety. It takes a team.GOING IN FOR SURGERY? DONT JUST LI E THERE. By SHERYL H. BOLDT Anytime I am at the end of my rope, or when I dont know which way to turn, I am inclined to go to Someone Who knows exactly what to do every time. And that is exactly what I am praying my president (and every political and spiritual leader) will do. I try to imagine the stress President Obama is under. And whether I agree with his politics or not, he is my president, the leader of my country. President Obama is the highest representative of the country I love: the United States of America. That alone gives me reason to pray. It is my hope that President Obama will recall (and gain encouragement from) the way some of the leaders in the Bible handled extreme stress: Davids men were so angry at him that they spoke of stoning him. But David encouraged and strengthened himself in the Lord his God. He then inquired of the Lord, saying, Shall I pursue this troop?(1 Samuel 30:6, 8 Ampli ed Bible). And when Jehoshaphat was facing a great army that was coming against them, he prayed as he stood before his people, O Lord, God of our fathers, are You not God in Heaven? And do You not rule over all the kingdoms of the nations? In Your hand are power and might, so that none is able to withstand You. And ended the prayer with, We do not know what to do, but our eyes are upon You. (2 Chronicles 20:6, 12 Ampli ed Bible). David and Jehoshaphat made their choices after inquiring of the Lord. One more thought: I cant help but remember the many times God has used dif cult times in my life to mold me to become more like Him. Therefore, I am convinced God can use anything any trial, any occurrences in anyones life to draw him or her to Gods love and for His purposes. My prayer for President Obama: Father God, I pray President Obama will have the courage to do what is right and wise for all; that the leader of this wonderful country will ask You for wisdom and direction about what is best for the United States of America; that he will seek clear direction regarding everything he is facing. And, Lord, please help President Obama, during these demanding times, to grow in the revelation of Your Word. Help him to personally experience Your love, Your faithfulness, and Your purposes for him. That is my prayer for my president. What is yours? Sheryl H. Boldt is a sales executive for Wave 94 and the author of the Memorizing Scripture Blog. You can email Sheryl at sherylhboldt. wave94@gmail.com.My prayer for my president

PAGE 7

From Page 3A Since the county pays for the facility, There have to be parameters, Edwards said. You need to perform at this level to keep the county funding or we have to change the whole program up. Edwards went to CHAT with the new, hard-driving contract. I dont put together stuff thats not harddriving, he said. We are willing to negotiate. I said, and whatever you do, dont react because its hard-driving, but theres stuff in there we can work on. Next thing I get a phone call saying theyll be out in six weeks. That was their decision. Kessler said it was insult that CHAT was presented with a hardball contract after a good 20-year record, while raising a lot of their own funds. Kessler said he veri ed with two CHAT officers that adoption numbers for 2013 were 334, not a lower gure expressed by Edwards. At the budget meeting, Kessler was clear in saying CHAT was forced out. It was an impossible contract, he said. I dont think we should be playing hardball with a group of volunteers that have served our community for 20 years. Commissioner Randy Merritt said he understands that Kessler does not like what happened to CHAT, But its .024 percent of the budget were sitting here arguing about. Kessler said he wants county adoption services to be successful, but this is a recipe for failure. He did offer a solution: advertise another adoption service provider bid to use the facility. RESTORE ACT UPDATE There has been some movement in RESTORE Act activity recently, so Intergovernmental Affairs Director Sheree Keeler organized a linear presentation to explain how the grant funds would be applied for and allocated. While there are not tens of millions in funds available yet, the county is prepared for the opportunity. RESTORE is an acronym for Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies. In 2012, President Obama signed the RESTORE Act into law, which established the Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund in the U.S. Treasury Department to help restore the Gulf after the massive BP oil spill in 2010. Eighty percent of the civil penalties will be deposited into the fund and invested. Wakulla County is eligible for a percentage of that money, but the county must show the funds will be used for environmental and limited economic projects. There is a state level fund too through the Gulf Consortium, which has a committee Keeler was selected to head up with four other individuals in the state. We are not missing a stroke, County Administrator Edwards said. They are going to see to it that the county gets every dollar that can come to us. The process is uid right now, Keeler said. A total of $2 million is expected from a final Transocean payment, and the BP trial is not yet settled. The next BP trial will determine the level of negligence, and establish a price per barrel, which could bring in millions locally to be used in restoration efforts. But I just want to be sure everyone understands, we dont have $20 million, Keeler said. The money doesnt go away. There is no deadline, no schedule. We can get everything in place so when and if the BP money does happen to come available, well be better prepared for it in a very methodical way. US 319 AND SIDEWALKS Merritt, who sits on the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency board, said at its next meeting he will recommend that the US 319 project be put on the regional mobility plan. He said the secretary seemed very confident that funding can be obtained for the project. If we can get 319 on that list, Merritt said, I feel really good that DOT will start throwing some more money at it. He added that, of nine priority projects on a regional transportation alternatives list, ve are for sidewalks in-county at COAST School, St. Marks, and three in Panacea. He said funding is secured for sidewalks from Crawfordville Elementary to the courthouse, and from the Senior Center to the Arran Road intersection. Edwards said a future project will tie the Senior Center sidewalk down to the community center. BIG BEND MARITIME CENTER For a decade, Florida Foresight has struggled to make the Big Bend Maritime Center a reality, said President Roger Pinholster. The center, which is on ve acres near Woolley Park in Panacea, was originally planned to be a multi-million-dollar multi-site maritime center, but the group is refocusing its efforts and gathering ideas. Were looking for partners, Pinholster said. Were looking for a coalition thats going to put forward time, effort and money. Edwards said, The county does not have the funds, nor is there grant funding out there for this to build and maintain it. Its got to be a community effort. If the community is not willing to support this and get it off the ground, then well look at returning the land back to the state. Edwards suggested a six month timeframe to get a grasp on the centers possibility, but Pinholster said he only needs until Christmas to know if people want it or not. In other matters: The annual rate resolution for solid waste services was adopted, and the cost to WastePro customers will stay the same at $196 annually. The annual rate resolution for re services will also stay the same. Rate resolutions to pave Northwood Subdivision, Tupelo Ridge and Brooke Forest were approved. Commission Chairman Richard Harden said only the tax rolls of the residents in those areas will be affected. The striping on Smith Creek Road has been completed, and a drastic improvement to safety, Harden said. Roads due for striping: Harvey Mill, Cajer Posey, Wakulla-Arran, Arran Road, MLK, East Ivan, Songbird Avenue, Bridlegate, Bonnie Raker Lane, Ivan Church Road and Wakulla Springs north and south for about seven miles. Harden said Forest Highway 13 is rife with wide and deep potholes, and as soon as they are fixed, more break open. Edwards said the Forestry Service (which owns it) is working toward paving it. Harden said he will bring back a resolution to make the road a bigger priority to the Federal Highway Administration. Kessler asked the board to consider a resolution to mirror the letter sent to DOT, requesting a re-evaluation and safety study of the US 98/319 intersection realignment. Commissioners were not on board with writing another letter.Nicholas Kent Strauss died Sept. 5, 2014, at Big Bend Hospice House. He was born on Aug. 9, 1928, to Alex Strauss and June (Beroud) Strauss. He was predeceased by his sons, Robert Henry Strauss and Louis Charles Strauss; his brother, Theodore (Buddy) Strauss; and sisters, Doris Mruz and Marguerite Cureton. Survivors include his wife, Bess Strauss; daughter, Susan (Dale) Thompson; son, Kent (Susan) Strauss, all of Tallahassee; his stepdaughter, Sandy Hennessy (George Mays) and stepsons Michael (Susan) Miles, also of Tallahassee, and David (Marianne) Miles, Loxahatchee; 13 grandchildren, and ve great-grandchildren. A memorial service was held at Good Shepherd Catholic Church at 11 a.m. on Monday, Sept. 15, 2014. Memorial donations may be made to the American Cancer Society Tallahassee, 2619 Centennial Blvd. Suite 101, Tallahassee FL, 32308, or The Alzheimers Project Inc., 301 E. Tharpe St., Tallahassee FL 32303. Beggs Funeral Home is handling arrangements.Robert Bob Eugene Peregrin, 49, of Crawfordville died on Sept. 8, 2014 in Tallahassee. He was born in Springfield, Ill., and was a First Responder.Survivors include his wife, Roberta Peregrin; sister, Pat Pierce of Thayer, Ill.; brother, Jim Peregrin of St. Louis, Mo.; son, Robert Peregrin (Anna) of Olney, Ill.; daughter, Kayla Peregrin of Illinois; stepsons, Aron (Cassie) and Andy Perez (Lindsey), Ross Hasty (Demi), all of Crawfordville; stepdaughter, Joy Howell of Crawfordville; and one granddaughter. He was predeceased by his parents, Stephen and Virginia Peregrin; and brother, Mike Peregrin. A memorial service will be held Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014, at 1 p.m. at station 3 St. Marks Fire Department. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to Relay for Life Team Peregrin. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 7A Cheryl Jean Long, 52, of Sopchoppy, passed away Sunday, Aug. 31, 2014, from injuries received in an automobile accident. She was born in Tampa and had been in this area for 18 years coming from Clayton, Ga. She had an AA Degree in Business from Western International University, worked for the Wakulla County School System for 17 years (Oct. 1, 1997 Sept. 31, 2014). She was a published Poet, Pen Pal to author Phyllis A. Whitney, and an award winning photographer. She was a loving mother, girlfriend, sister, friend, aunt and Mom to many of the schoolchildren. Cheryl loved to camp, hike, sh, and dance, sing, read, write poems and listen to music. Memorial services will be Saturday, Sept. 20, 2014 at 11 a.m. at the St. Marks Lighthouse in St. Marks. Family will receive friends from noon to 2 p.m. at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church Social Hall, 3609 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327. Survivors include her son, Daniel Long; partner, Phillip Rankin; sister, Rebecca Sweat; brothers, Milan LeDuc, Lawrence LeDuc, Dennis Schamber and Woodie Schamber. David Conn and Amber Miller of Bevis Funeral Home of Crawfordville are assisting the family with arrangements (www. bevisfh.com or 850-926-3333).Obituaries Cheryl Jean Long Robert Eugene Peregrin Nicholas Kent StraussCheryl Jean Long Robert Eugene Peregrin Nicholas Kent Strauss Board weighs budget, startup of new pet adoption program 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org You can eat at the church or take your plate to go. Come and enjoy some good food and also support a great cause! Sept. 26, 2104 from 5:30-7:30pm To benet Thailand Mission TeamWe are trying to raise funds for our upcoming mission trip to Thailand.$10 PER PLATEPrice includes: sh, cheese grits, coleslaw, hushpuppies, drink and dessert.Email ampaarlberg@yahoo.com or call the church ofce at 926-5152 to RSVP. 1391 Crawfordville Hwy.

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBy CHERYL CREELNAMI WakullaNAMI Wakullas barbecue and sh fry will be at Hudson Park in Crawfordville between 4 and 7 p.m. on Friday, Sept. 19. Plates come with sh or barbecue chicken, and coleslaw, potato salad, hushpuppies, dessert and tea/water. The cost is $8 per plate and $10 for a combo. Ages 8 and under are free. This event helps raise money to defray costs of continuing education classes and support programs which are offered free to the community. NAMI Wakullas Septembers public programs topic will be Personal Stories of Mental Illness. We will hear from individuals living with mental illness and how they live successful lives as well as their family members on Monday, Sept. 22, at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Hwy. NAMI Basics begins at 6 p.m. Sept. 22 at the Community Center. NAMI Basics is a free program designed for parents/caretakers of a child who is exhibiting signs of a mental illness or a child who has behavioral issues. The parent/caretaker receives coping skills, education, support, potential treatment plans for the child, and other information for the entire family. For information for the NAMI Wakulla programs or event, please contact the NAMI Wakulla Of ce at 926-1033.Staff ReportJo Ann Palmer, executive director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, presented updates from the group at the Sept 8 meeting of the Wakulla County Board of Commissioners. Amendments to the county littering code were adopted to include community service penalties as well as larger nes for litter violations.. Coastal Cleanup will be Saturday, Sept. 20 beginning at 9 a.m. Participants will be given bags, gloves and assignments to clean up coastal areas, headquartered at Woolley Park in Panacea. On Saturday, Sept. 27, more than 300 new plants will be planted at the county commission complex with funding from a La Florida wild owers grant, KWCB, and Lynn Artz. Green Drinks will be at 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 30 at Wakulla Springs Lodge. Roger Pinholster will give a presentation about the Big Bend Maritime Centers boat building classes. A Household Hazardous Waste Day will be from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 11 at ESG Services, 340 Trice Lane. Fluorescent tubes (in small quantities), lithium batteries, paints, gas, electronics and more will be accepted. E-mail helpkwcb@gmail.com with questions. The APPLICATION PERIOD FOR OPERATION SANTA Wakulla will be open throughout the month of October. Applications may be submitted from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center located on the corner of Shadeville Highway and Trice Lane. To learn more, and see an informational video, visit www.operationsantawakulla.org. The 2014 BIG BEND SEAFOOD FESTIVAL, a one-day outdoor event in Woolley Park located on the waterfront in Panacea, is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 11. Submit your VENDOR BOOTH APPLICATION as soon as possible. For more information email: rpinholster@gmail.com or call 850-728-2121 daytime only please. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold its second annual HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR SALE on Saturday, Oct. 25. We wish to showcase local crafters. Anyone wishing to sell items they have created is welcome to join us. You will be able to set up inside the hall or outdoors. There will be free admission for all shoppers. For more information, contact Phylllis Berninger at 9261453 or Nicky Lepp at 9269750. This year, the EMPTY BOWLS hunger fundraiser will be Nov. 15 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Center. The purpose of this event is to help raise money for local food banks. Individuals, shops or churches are being asked to PREPARE A SOUP that will be served for the event. Call Taylor Biro at 850-2946044 for more information, or email emptybowlswakulla@gmail.com. THE QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA presents the 2014 Opportuity Quilt tickets $1 donation per ticket, or $5 for 6 tickets. All proceeds from donations are used for materials for making quilts to go to community service, currently, Hospice in Wakulla. Tickets are available Fridays 9:30 a.m. until noon at the Wakulla Library, or at the chamber of ce during regular business hours, or you may call Kay at 926-1437. Drawing will be held Dec. 12.Ongoing announcementsBorn Aug. 19, 2013 to Chase and Jessica Wells of Crawfordville. Bowen Lee celebrated his rst birthday with his family and several cupcakes. Paternal grandparents Bobby and Karen Wells of Crawfordville. Maternal grandparents Danny and Wendy Riggs of Ft. Walton. Bowen Lee and his older brother, Roedy Caedem, along with his aunt and uncles, DAunn, Kobe and Coleman all enjoyed the festivities of his rst birthday. 1st Birthday: Bowen Lee WellsBy STEVE CUSHMANKWCB PresidentOver the years, I have spent a great deal of my free time dedicated to protecting the fragile environment of Wakulla County. I moved here almost three years ago. I found a home located on the bay and immediately fell in love with the nature it offers. Having moved here speci cally for the unique cave diving Wakulla offers, I also found more than I realized when it comes to Wakullas natural surroundings. It wasnt long before I fell into my usually acts of volunteering for the community in which I live. After a chance meeting with the executive director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Jo Ann Palmer, it wasnt long before she had sparked my interest in the mission of KWCB. My wife and I joined the organization and a year later I became the president. KWCB focuses on beauti cation through many events such as; the national forest cleanup, hazard waste days, the coastal cleanup being held on Saturday September 20th as well as many community events to landscape, educated the community about responsible stewardship of our environment and remove as much litter as possible through our adopt a road program. Over the past few months, one site in particular has been used as an illegal tire dump. We have located and removed more than 300 tires. We are aggressively working to nd those responsible for the dumping. Meanwhile we continue to remove the tires so they do not harm our environment. Tires decomposing on the ground release many hazardous chemicals, one being arsenic, along with multiple heavy metals. These elements leach into our aquifer through our natural wetlands or through our sand-covered limestone karst, ending up in our water supply. I do not need to spell out just how serious this is to human health and safety. It must be stopped. I take our water supply seriously as a cave diver using it for recreation and also as a local Florida resident who consumes this water. Our aquifers travel thousands of miles underground so the implications for waste put in here does effect people far away and vice versa. I always commend the efforts of all those who work to protect our environment but we all need to think about the damage caused by acts like this. Not just locally but worldwide. We all owe it to ourselves and each other to act responsibly when it comes to out resources. We must nd the balance between their use and protection. Senseless dumping of hazardous materials or even keeping of them where they cause harm is not a right, its a responsibility we all must share to keep our plant safe for our children and their childrens children. If you see tires or hazardous waste please report it. There are many organizations who will help in removal of these wastes.By ROGER PINHOLSTER Director, Big Bend Seafood FestivalThe 2014 Big Bend Seafood Festival will be Saturday, Oct. 11, from 7 a.m. until 4 p.m. at Woolley Park in Panacea. We are thrilled to announce we will be holding our rst annual Seafood Gumbo Cook-off and 5K race. The festivities start with a 5K race, beginning at Woolley Park. Registration is from 7 to 8:15 a.m. and the race begins at 8:30 a.m. Download registration forms at: bigbendseafoodfestival.com/5k-run. There will be a Seafood Gumbo Cookoff, naming the Big Bend Gumbo Master of the year. Anyone can enter this event, and there is no fee to enter. Judging will begin at 11 a.m. Gumbo Cookoff rules and entry forms are available at: bigbendseafoodfestival.com/ gumbo-cookoff. Enjoy entertainment, food vendors, maritime demonstrations, games, arts and crafts for kids, and t-shirts for sale. Vendor applications are still being accepted. The Big Bend Seafood Festival is produced by a core of volunteers. Proceeds from the event will bene t the Big Bend Maritime Center, which proudly keeps the art of wooden boat building alive through hands-on boat building workshops and camps for adults and youth throughout the year. The center will be open for tours during the festival and attendees can talk with boatbuilders, and view boats in various stages of the building process. For more information about the event, please like us on the Facebook community page: Big Bend Seafood Festival, or email: bigbendseafoodfestival@gmail.com. A tiresome problem A tiresome problemSTEVE CUSHMAN/Special to The NewsMore than 300 tires have been dumped illegally over the past few months at a wooded site in Wakulla County. NAMI o ers monthly events Keep Wakulla County Beautiful news and events 2014 Big Bend Seafood Festival announced SPONSORED BY: Huttons Seafood & More!WITH SPECIAL GUESTCHIPOLA SHANACHIESopchoppyOpry.com Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information WITHMS. JOAN ALDERMANpresentsSOUTH BOUND BAND Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse ED GARDNER, O.D.Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50 O D O.D. O.D. Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterSchedule your Back to School Eye Exam today

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools School Enjoy a great meal and pick up a copy of The Wakulla news at one of these partner locations: LUNCH PARTNER F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER By EMILY SPINDLERKindergarten TeacherAlthough we have only been in school a month, the Stingrays at COAST Charter School have been working hard and learning many, many things. Our students, parents, and staff make a great team and are excited to see the school year get underway. Our middle school student of the month is seventh grader, Aden Mullins. Aden has demonstrated trustworthiness since the very rst day of school and models our three Rs every day he is Responsible, Respectful, and Ready to Learn. Fourth grader, Joshua Bentley is our elementary student of the month. A true demonstrator of trustworthiness, Josh has completed all his work and studied hard for all of his tests. Way to go, boys! We are very proud of you and the examples you are to others. We are always in the middle of fun events at COAST. Pre-K and Kindergarten had an exciting Pete the Cat unit which culminated in a special concert featuring Pete the Cat tunes. Our middle school students enjoyed an engaging presentation from Julie Carrier of MTVs series, Made, which focused on being con dent and following your dreams. Thursday, Sept. 18 is our Annual Title I Dinner and Parent Night at 5:30. Families can come join us for a barbecue dinner and then experience what a day in their childs classroom is like. We hope to see all of our Stingrays and their families there! Our school is again running the Kid Zone section of the Stone Crab Festival on Oct. 25. PTO is hard at work planning and coordinating for this event. The Kid Zone is COASTs largest fundraiser of the year and all proceeds support the school. Please come out and visit us! Upcoming events: Sept. 18 Title I Dinner, 5:30 p.m. Sept. 21 PTO Meeting, 6 p.m. Sept. 22 to 26 Book Fair Sept. 24 Teacher Planning Day By BETH ODONNELLWakulla County SchoolsWakulla County public school system is seeing a 29.5 percent decrease in funds being spent on its water, sewer, electric, and propane bills over the last two years. This is not only a savings for the school district to be able to use these dollars more effectively in the classrooms, it is also a wiser use of the taxpayers dollars, states Superintendent Bobby Pearce. Plus, this greenhouse gas reduction improves the environment as Wakulla partners with Cenergistic, an Energy Conservation Company whose mission includes, To empower our clients to reduce their energy and water footprint by 30 percent and more. Wakulla County School Board rst partnered with Cenergistic in 2012 by hiring former Medart Elementary teacher Beth Brown as its Energy Education Specialist. After extensive training with Cenergistic, she spent a full year gathering baseline data at each school site on their water, sewer, electric, and propane usage. Cenergistic works by analyzing the infrastructure of a system and giving ways for the Energy Education Specialist to help people change their behavior to reduce consumption, much like getting into the habit of turning off lights when you leave a room at home. Brown works on establishing relationships with the people at each school site and is appreciative of how receptive they have been to helping the school district improve, plus helping to improve the environment. Observes Brown, This success would not be possible without all the Wakulla County School District stakeholders help. During the school year, faculty and staff turn off lights, computers, and more when not in use. We schedule HVAC to be on only when areas are occupied. We unplug everything we can during the summer. The Operations Foremen and custodial staffs work in groups so that we can run the air conditioning in speci c areas. Cafeteria Managers unplug kitchen equipment when the kitchens are unoccupied. It truly is a systemic effort. Cenergistic was founded in 1986 as Energy Education and is headquartered in Dallas, Texas. Their clients are in 48 states and include school districts, colleges, healthcare institutions, and churches. One concrete way to explain the almost 30 percent cost avoidance since 2012 is to compare the Wakulla School District energy reduction of 27,687,238 kilowatts (kBTU) to 900 passenger cars not driven for one year, or to 110,748 tree seedlings grown for 10 years. Many of our teachers and staff are passionate about the environment, especially living in beautiful Wakulla. They appreciate having more tools to help teach their students about why we should care about our energy consumption and how we can make the world a better place, notes Superintendent Pearce. The School District is a great practical example to use.School District energy ef cient Stingrays in the Spotlight at COAST PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCOAST middle school student of the month is seventh-grader Aden Mullins. Fourth-grader Joshua Bentley is elementary student of the month. Staff Report Sometimes young people go to college and experience life away from their parents for the first time. However, Luke McManus will be seeing someone he knows very well around the FSU campus his mother, Leah. Alan McManus said his wife of 26 years, Leah, wanted to be a music major since 18, but she put that off to raise a husband and two kids. She homeschooled her two sons, Luke and Seth, since kindergarten. It goes without saying that the family is musical. Seth is a senior in high school, an accomplished pianist and tuba player and currently captain of Wakulla High Marching Band. Luke is now a senior at FSU in the College of Music majoring in music education. He is an accomplished pianist and percussionist and plans to teach middle school or high school band. My wife Leah has always been an exceptional vocalist and awesome violinist, Alan said. She always dreamed of pursuing music as a career. She gladly put off that dream to raise two exceptional boys. After successfully preparing Luke for college, he looked at his mom and said Now you go do it! She accepted the challenge and decided to do just that. After obtaining her A.A. from TCC, she applied to FSU and in February she auditioned for the College of Music at FSU and was accepted. She has entered the music therapy program which will take four years to complete. She began her rst day of realizing her dream delayed on Monday, Aug. 25 as a freshman at FSU. She is often mistaken for the professor in most of her classes which has become a point of humor for her and other students. We have used the Napoleon Dynamite line on Luke more than once Your mom goes to college! Whats so awesome is that they are in the College of Music together for at least one year, Alan said. Luke has been a good sport about it all. Seth just returned from a mission trip to Cameroon, Africa and is making plans to attend Johnson University to major in intercultural studies. His current long range plan is to become a Christian missionary in Africa. As you can see Leah has poured her life into preparing her sons for their future and her ability in that area cannot be exaggerated, shes phenomenal, Alan said. Leah has spent the last 13 years involved in many aspects of Wakulla County life. She sings with the Silver Bells, sings each year with the Community Choir at Christmas (Messiah), has played the roles of Cinderella, Maria and Beauty in the Wakulla County Community Theatre.Local mom pursues dream at FSU Leah McManus 4679 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FLwww.EdenSpringsRehab.comEden Springs Nursing and Rehab( 850 ) 926-7181Private Rehab Suites Physical Therapy Stroke Specialist Come by for a tour and see our facility and services!REHABRECOVERENJOY LIFE! INVITES EVERYONE TO THEIRFifth Annual Senior Prom50s SOCK HOP 2014! Friday September 26 7:00pm 9:30pm www.coastalgems.comCrawfordville, FL850566-9293 Est. 2000Carol Ann Williams, Licensed Real Estate Broker/Owner 33 Years Experience MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233

PAGE 10

Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARJ LAWWhile at a yard sale on vacation, Joe and I came across someone selling organic eggs, homemade slippers, rocks to hold business cards, and an old H&C Scott 12 gauge side-byside shotgun made in London, England. Of course, we had to check out that gun. With the two rabbit ears above the wooden stock, this gun looks like an old percussion gun. Its not. Made around 140 years ago, the shotgun is like a transition piece from the percussion guns. However, instead of placing ignition caps on the nipples, the ears are actually hammers. The hammer strikes a firing pin which sets off the primer in a cartridge. Thats why it has the appearance of a percussion gun. The barrel is called Damascus twist. Roughly, this means a flat sheet of metal has been heated and hammered around a mandrel to form the barrel. Unfortunately, right behind the foregrip, a crack mars the finely-checkered wooden stock. I see a tiny crack here, notices Joe. Yes, admits the owner. Were it not for the crack, Id charge $20,000! As it is, Ill sell it to you for $250. Joe keeps a poker face, so I know he isnt interested. When were out of earshot, I ask him, OK, Joe, why wasnt that gun a good deal? I know you were fascinated! You have to be really careful when you purchase a gun, and especially so when you find a very old gun, cautions Joe. Although this is a cartridge gun, the old cartridges were made quite differently. First, he said, the brass cap of the shell is the primer, just like today, except in the old days, mercury was used in that primer. We dont use mercury today. After the primer was the gunpowder which, when exploded, propelled the shot down the barrel. In those old days, it was composed of black powder. Because the old black powder was not as powerful as todays smokeless powder, if you use a today-made 12 gauge shot, the power will be greater and you run the risk of damaging the gun or yourself. You just cant substitute new cartridges for the old ones. After the primer and powder is the wad. It used to be made of fabric or cardboard. This separated the powder from the lead shot. You dont want to mix the powder with the shot because it will degrade the pattern of the shot. Those old shells had a paper covering. Today we use plastic. Bottom line, the old shot was less powerful than what is made today. You dont want to use too powerful a cartridge in an old gun. You can, however, purchase some black powder cartridges. They are usually twice the price of ones made for newer guns, and are limited in source. Old metal barrels were handmade and not so strong as the metals we use today. Between a weaker shot and weaker metal barrel, you can understand why shooting today and shooting of yesterday is comparing apples and oranges and can be dangerous. The crack in this particular rifle makes it suitable for being a wall hanger. Id never shoot it without having had it worked on by a true master gunsmith. And this is a caution Id tell anyone about the purchase of an old gun or rifle. If you are seriously interested, though, make sure you take a flashlight and look down the barrel to see if the rifling is accurate and that there is little or no rust. You want a clean and shiny bore. Check to see if the mechanism is working correctly. In this gun, the wood stock and the metal receiver do not sit tightly. Theres a wobble. Not good. Make sure all the parts are on the gun. Is there a butt plate? Are the sights intact? Are there chips on the stock or barrel? Do you see rust? Also, if you are out of your own state, how will you transport the gun home? If it is made after 1898, you will have to take it to a dealer and have it sent to a dealer near you. This will cost another $50 or $100, depending on what the dealers charge. Or you can unload it, and lock it in the trunk of your car and drive it home. Some airlines will not transport any guns at all, so you will have to investigate. Finally, and I cant stress this enough, if you really are intent on purchasing the gun and you want to use it and not hang it on the wall, take it to your favorite master gunsmith and let him or her check it out and fire it. You dont want a piece of history to blow up in your face.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsOn old guns and wallhangersState may expand use of silencers for hunting HOME ON THE RANGE www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 CHAINSAW $17995 SPECIAL OF THE WEEKMS170 SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAn H&C side-by-side shotgun about 140 years old. You should always have a gunsmith check out any antique gun for safety. By JIM TURNER THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAHunting game in Florida could become a little less noisy by the end of the year. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission on Wednesday, Sept. 10, advanced a proposal that would remove a prohibition on the use of noise-suppressors, or silencers, with rifles and pistols when hunting deer, gray squirrels, rabbits, wild turkeys, quail and crows. The proposal will now be advertised in the Florida Administrative Register, and the commission is expected to vote on the new rule in November. While critics said muzzling rifle shots could increase the risk of people being struck by wayward bullets or cause people to wander unaware into hunting areas, backers of the proposal said such concerns are unfounded. Commissioner Brian Yablonski noted that suppressors take out some of the big bang and recoil, but they dont silence weapons as depicted in the movies. It still makes a very loud sound and this was in all cases, Yablonski said during a commission meeting in Kissimmee. Were talking louder than a rock concert, louder than a jackhammer with the suppressor. Commission staff, hunters and a representative from the suppressor industry defended the proposal as a means to protect hunters hearing, lessen the impact of hunting on others and even help while introducing people to the sport. Knox Williams, president of the American Suppressor Association, estimated that 40,000 suppressors are already owned in Florida. Florida currently allows the use of suppressors on shotguns for game hunting. A suppressor can also be placed on a ri e or pistol when hunting on private lands for non-game wildlife, which includes hogs, bears and armadillos. Buck Holly, an owner of C&H Precision Weapons in LaBelle, projected that by lifting the ban, sales of suppressors at his Hendry County business would grow from about two to ve a month to up to 10 a month. He said that would allow him to add one or two jobs. I know in most counties one to two jobs isnt a big blip on the radar, but in Hendry and Glades counties, one or two is a tremendous economic boost, Holly said. Patricia Brigham, chair of the League of Women Voters Gun Safety Committee, cautioned that a proliferation of silencers would reduce public safety. Theyre going to be used in such a way that theyre not intended to be used, which is to harm other human beings, Brigham warned. Katherine McGill, a founding member of the National Urban Wildlife Coalition, said more time should be given to the review. I have no problem with suppressors personally. If someone is target-shooting near my property Id be glad that they are using them. Id like them to be put on reworks, too, McGill said. But I dont want to be riding my horse in the woods and not hear that hunter out there. Suppressors are allowed in 32 states for all hunting. Division of Hunting and Game Management Director Diane Eggeman said lifting the prohibition isnt expected to lead to a widespread proliferation of the use of suppressors. She estimated a ri e suppressor costs between $750 and $2,000, while individuals also have to pay $200 for a federal criminal background check. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Dawn ReedRealtor, GRI 850-294-3468 ofce 745-8046 www.FloridaBigBendRealty.com Joi HopeBroker 850-210-7300One acre with Ochlockonee River frontage below the 319 Bridge. Beautiful high lot with wide river frontage comes with a dock, well, power, and covered boat parking located on Rio Vista Rd. Florida Big B end RealtyFull Service Real Estate Company including Property Management 14 Medallion Lane Crawfordville FL 32327 (next to Gulf Coast Lumber)DawnJReed@yahoo.com Joi@JoisHouses.com Ochlockonee River frontage $350,000

PAGE 11

This report represents some events the FWC handled over the past week; however, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. FRANKLIN COUNTY: Officer Allen received information about individuals harvesting oysters at night in closed waters in Apalachicola Bay. Of cer Allen set up surveillance in the area the information was given and observed two boats and occupants actively harvesting oysters. Officer Allen attempted to stop the vessels and was able to get one stopped. He found the individuals on board had a full deck of oysters and were harvesting them in closed waters. Two individuals on board were issued citations for harvesting oysters between sunset and sunrise and harvesting oysters in a closed area. Also, several boating safety warnings were issued. Of cers conducted oyster size tolerance inspections to coincide with the opening of the winter harvest areas in Apalachicola Bay this week. During the inspections, Of cer Allen and Investigator Cook issued four misdemeanor citations for possession of undersized oysters. While fueling his vessel at a local marina, Of cer Cook noticed a vessel operating in the idle speed zone of the Carrabelle River at what appeared to be full speed. After refueling, Officer Cook located the vessel and performed a vessel stop and vessel safety inspection. During the inspection, it became quite clear to Officer Cook that the vessel operator was under the in uence of some type of alcoholic beverage. After attempting several field sobriety tasks, the operator of the vessel admitted to consuming alcohol pretty much the entire day and a breath sample of the operator revealed that he was almost twice the legal limit (.159 ml). The vessel operator was cited and jailed for the violation. OKALOOSA COUNTY: Officer H. Rockwell was working in plain clothes near the Shalimar Bridge when he observed a subject land an oversized red drum. The subject asked Officer H. Rockwell if he would take a photo of himself with his catch and send it to his phone. He then stated, This ones going in the cooler... were having redfish tonight. A short time later, another subject landed an undersized ounder and multiple undersized Spanish mackerel. Officer H. Rockwell called Of cers P. Rockwell and Corbin to assist. When the subjects began packing up their gear, Of cer H. Rockwell announced himself as an FWC ofcer and conducted a fisheries inspection. The inspection revealed a second oversized red drum. Of cers P. Rockwell and Corbin arrived on scene and two subjects were issued citations for possession of oversized red drum and undersized ounder. Warnings were issued for possession of undersized Spanish mackerel. The two red drum, ve Spanish mackerel and flounder were seized as evidence. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 11A With Labor Day behind us for this year, school back in session and the signs of fall approaching are all around us, many may not be thinking about the dangers from heat exhaustion and heat stroke. While both of these have been discussed before, it is important to revisit them from time to time to keep it fresh in mind. While some parts of our nation are already seeing their rst snowfall, we are still being greeted with high humidity early in the morning and temperatures soaring up into the 90s during the day. It is hard to walk outside without breaking into a sweat! When out on the water, the temperature can be intensi ed by the sunlight re ecting off the water. Heat exhaustion is often caused by dehydration, which can also lead to low salt levels in the body. When the body sweats excessively and the loss of water and salt is not replaced, it can lead to confusion, headache, nausea and loss of consciousness. As heat exhaustion progresses, it can turn into heat stroke as the core body temperature rises. High body temperatures can lead to internal organ damage and death if left untreated. Packing plenty of water or sports drinks is critical to prevent dehydration the leading cause for heat related illness. By the time you feel thirsty, you are already beginning to become dehydrated. Being out in the sun and out on the water, can cause you to become dehydrated quicker than you may expect. A good rule of thumb is 12 ounces of water for every hour out on the water. Caffeine and alcohol can speed up dehydration as well. Be sure to counteract their effects with additional water. If you suspect you or another person is suffering from a heat related illness, seek medical help immediately. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net then contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources, Raye Crews, at Rayec@ uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at Duanet@ uscgaux.net. If youre interested in a free vessel examination, send an email to our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Vessel Examinations, Steve Hults, at Steveh@uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident a water an hour gives you more time to enjoy the water!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Glass Ball. During my short acceptance speech for the prestigious Conrad Limbaugh Life Time Achievement Award for Leadership in Scienti c Diving, hosted by the American Academy of Underwater Sciences in Sitka Alaska, I commented on my journey which lead me to this point in time. Destined to be a diplomat by my parents because I could enculturate easily, my parents took me for a visit to the Bay of Siam in 1962. With a mask and one n, I became mesmerized by their reef, and dragged away after 8 hours of sheer exploration. I was hooked on the sea. But today those reefs are gone! By the age of 16, I resided in Hawaii, became a certi ed diver at Pearl Harbor trained by R&R UDT sailers and soon spent every weekend either diving or sur ng. In 1966, a newly formed NAUI offered an 8 day instructor exam. I passed but was only provisionaly certi ed because of my age. During my freshman year at college, I began my rst collegiate dive program. With a degree in Zoology, several years working for the Cooperative Fisheries Unit monitoring Hawaiian reefs and now married, I departed the Islands for Florida. By 1972 I began my second college program at Indian River Community College in collaboration with Harbor Branch Foundation Lab, where I worked as a Diving Lab Tech. I turned my professional career around when I joined the Scientist-in-the-Sea (SITS) Program in 1974, taught by Captain (Dr.) George Bond in Panama City, where I met my mentor Dr. William Herrnkind from Florida State University. All this time I sought to de ne a Diving Scientist, and here I found one. I soon began developing my third collegiate dive program, which came to be called Academic Diving, and was emulated by six other institutions in later years. With graduate degree and a faculty position secured by the end of the decade, I settled into an aggressive multidisciplinary research and training agenda, resulting in producing thousands of highly dive-quali ed college students based upon aquatic research on Earth from Antarctica to the equatorial islands. In 2000, I moved to the FSU Panama City campus to collaborate the the U.S. Navy and teach the SITS Program and set up my fourth college dive program. By 2002, we were developing the standards for Underwater Crime Scene Investigations. After I retired from FSU, I continued to pursue rebreathers, cave research and mixed-gas deep diving, ultimately opening a large private facility in Wakulla County, and soon found myself developing my fth college dive program with the Wakulla Environmental Institute, this time as a consortium. I continued my work with other universities from around the country, Europe, and as far south as Bogota, Colombia, studying the reefs of our ocean. I ended my comments at the awards banquet by re ecting upon a recent and very bright graduate student that came to me for cave training. When asked, she very con dently said she was going to Mars and fully expected to dive the caves of that planet. I believe her. She is currently at Stanford University studying Astrophysics. I offered to the room full of Diving Of cers at most of the Universities that support underwater science, that they too will have the opportunity to train the next generation of extraterrestrial diving scientists. There was a momentary silence as disbelief settled in to the audience. I now better understand why we face great loss to our marine reefs worldwide. Few can take what we know now and project ahead to logical conclusions. I now understand what happened to the rst reef I visited, the one that so completely changed my lifes journey. See AAUS story here: http://www.aaus. org/2014_cl_award Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 18, 14 Fri Sep 19, 14 Sat Sep 20, 14 Sun Sep 21, 14 Mon Sep 22, 14 Tue Sep 23, 14 Wed Sep 24, 14 Date 2.9 ft. 12:18 AM 3.1 ft. 12:55 AM 3.3 ft. 1:27 AM 3.5 ft. 1:56 AM 3.6 ft. 2:22 AM 3.7 ft. 2:47 AM High 2.1 ft. 4:04 AM 1.9 ft. 5:30 AM 1.5 ft. 6:27 AM 1.2 ft. 7:11 AM 0.9 ft. 7:48 AM 0.7 ft. 8:23 AM 0.5 ft. 8:57 AM Low 3.1 ft. 10:46 AM 3.3 ft. 12:00 PM 3.5 ft. 12:47 PM 3.6 ft. 1:26 PM 3.8 ft. 2:00 PM 3.8 ft. 2:33 PM 3.9 ft. 3:06 PM High 1.0 ft. 6:03 PM 0.9 ft. 6:48 PM 0.8 ft. 7:23 PM 0.8 ft. 7:53 PM 0.8 ft. 8:19 PM 0.8 ft. 8:43 PM 0.9 ft. 9:07 PM Low p Thu Sep 18, 14 Fri Sep 19, 14 Sat Sep 20, 14 Sun Sep 21, 14 Mon Sep 22, 14 Tue Sep 23, 14 Wed Sep 24, 14 Date 2.2 ft. 12:10 AM 2.3 ft. 12:47 AM 2.5 ft. 1:19 AM 2.6 ft. 1:48 AM 2.7 ft. 2:14 AM 2.8 ft. 2:39 AM High 1.5 ft. 4:15 AM 1.4 ft. 5:41 AM 1.1 ft. 6:38 AM 0.9 ft. 7:22 AM 0.7 ft. 7:59 AM 0.5 ft. 8:34 AM 0.4 ft. 9:08 AM Low 2.3 ft. 10:38 AM 2.4 ft. 11:52 AM 2.6 ft. 12:39 PM 2.7 ft. 1:18 PM 2.8 ft. 1:52 PM 2.9 ft. 2:25 PM 2.9 ft. 2:58 PM High 0.7 ft. 6:14 PM 0.7 ft. 6:59 PM 0.6 ft. 7:34 PM 0.6 ft. 8:04 PM 0.6 ft. 8:30 PM 0.6 ft. 8:54 PM 0.6 ft. 9:18 PM Low p Thu Sep 18, 14 Fri Sep 19, 14 Sat Sep 20, 14 Sun Sep 21, 14 Mon Sep 22, 14 Tue Sep 23, 14 Wed Sep 24, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 12:03 AM 2.7 ft. 12:54 AM 2.9 ft. 1:31 AM 3.1 ft. 2:03 AM 3.3 ft. 2:32 AM 3.4 ft. 2:58 AM 3.5 ft. 3:23 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:08 AM 1.7 ft. 6:34 AM 1.4 ft. 7:31 AM 1.1 ft. 8:15 AM 0.8 ft. 8:52 AM 0.6 ft. 9:27 AM 0.5 ft. 10:01 AM Low 2.9 ft. 11:22 AM 3.0 ft. 12:36 PM 3.2 ft. 1:23 PM 3.4 ft. 2:02 PM 3.5 ft. 2:36 PM 3.6 ft. 3:09 PM 3.6 ft. 3:42 PM High 0.9 ft. 7:07 PM 0.8 ft. 7:52 PM 0.8 ft. 8:27 PM 0.7 ft. 8:57 PM 0.7 ft. 9:23 PM 0.7 ft. 9:47 PM 0.8 ft. 10:11 PM Low p Thu Sep 18, 14 Fri Sep 19, 14 Sat Sep 20, 14 Sun Sep 21, 14 Mon Sep 22, 14 Tue Sep 23, 14 Wed Sep 24, 14 Date 2.3 ft. 12:02 AM 2.4 ft. 12:39 AM 2.6 ft. 1:11 AM 2.7 ft. 1:40 AM 2.8 ft. 2:06 AM 2.9 ft. 2:31 AM High 2.1 ft. 3:43 AM 1.8 ft. 5:09 AM 1.5 ft. 6:06 AM 1.2 ft. 6:50 AM 0.9 ft. 7:27 AM 0.7 ft. 8:02 AM 0.5 ft. 8:36 AM Low 2.4 ft. 10:30 AM 2.5 ft. 11:44 AM 2.7 ft. 12:31 PM 2.8 ft. 1:10 PM 2.9 ft. 1:44 PM 3.0 ft. 2:17 PM 3.0 ft. 2:50 PM High 1.0 ft. 5:42 PM 0.9 ft. 6:27 PM 0.8 ft. 7:02 PM 0.8 ft. 7:32 PM 0.8 ft. 7:58 PM 0.8 ft. 8:22 PM 0.8 ft. 8:46 PM Low p Thu Sep 18, 14 Fri Sep 19, 14 Sat Sep 20, 14 Sun Sep 21, 14 Mon Sep 22, 14 Tue Sep 23, 14 Wed Sep 24, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 12:15 AM 3.2 ft. 12:52 AM 3.4 ft. 1:24 AM 3.6 ft. 1:53 AM 3.7 ft. 2:19 AM 3.8 ft. 2:44 AM High 2.3 ft. 4:01 AM 2.0 ft. 5:27 AM 1.7 ft. 6:24 AM 1.3 ft. 7:08 AM 1.0 ft. 7:45 AM 0.8 ft. 8:20 AM 0.5 ft. 8:54 AM Low 3.1 ft. 10:43 AM 3.3 ft. 11:57 AM 3.5 ft. 12:44 PM 3.7 ft. 1:23 PM 3.8 ft. 1:57 PM 3.9 ft. 2:30 PM 4.0 ft. 3:03 PM High 1.1 ft. 6:00 PM 1.0 ft. 6:45 PM 0.9 ft. 7:20 PM 0.9 ft. 7:50 PM 0.9 ft. 8:16 PM 0.9 ft. 8:40 PM 0.9 ft. 9:04 PM Low p Thu Sep 18, 14 Fri Sep 19, 14 Sat Sep 20, 14 Sun Sep 21, 14 Mon Sep 22, 14 Tue Sep 23, 14 Wed Sep 24, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:40 AM 2.8 ft. 1:10 AM 2.8 ft. 1:35 AM 2.9 ft. 1:55 AM 2.9 ft. 2:12 AM 3.0 ft. 2:28 AM High 1.9 ft. 3:44 AM 1.7 ft. 4:55 AM 1.5 ft. 5:50 AM 1.3 ft. 6:35 AM 1.2 ft. 7:14 AM 1.0 ft. 7:50 AM 0.9 ft. 8:22 AM Low 2.9 ft. 9:16 AM 2.9 ft. 10:43 AM 2.9 ft. 11:57 AM 2.9 ft. 12:55 PM 3.0 ft. 1:45 PM 3.0 ft. 2:30 PM 3.0 ft. 3:13 PM High 0.7 ft. 5:12 PM 0.7 ft. 5:59 PM 0.8 ft. 6:39 PM 0.9 ft. 7:13 PM 1.0 ft. 7:40 PM 1.1 ft. 8:04 PM 1.3 ft. 8:24 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 18 Sept. 24First Oct. 1 Full Oct. 8 Last Oct. 15 New Sept. 249:24 am-11:24 am 9:47 pm-11:47 pm 2:30 am-3:30 am 4:13 pm-5:13 pm 10:10 am-12:10 pm 10:32 pm-12:32 am 3:22 am-4:22 am 4:52 pm-5:52 pm 10:54 am-12:54 pm 11:16 pm-1:16 am 4:14 am-5:14 am 5:29 pm-6:29 pm 11:38 am-1:38 pm --:-----:-5:06 am-6:06 am 6:03 pm-7:03 pm 12:21 pm-2:21 pm --:-----:-5:58 am-6:58 am 6:37 pm-7:37 pm 12:42 am-2:42 am 1:04 pm-3:04 pm 6:50 am-7:50 am 7:11 pm-8:11 pm 1:25 am-3:25 am 1:47 pm-3:47 pm 7:43 am-8:43 am 7:45 pm-8:45 pm Average Average Average Good Better Best Best7:23 am 7:38 pm 2:31 am 4:14 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:23 am 7:37 pm 3:23 am 4:53 pm 7:24 am 7:36 pm 4:15 am 5:30 pm 7:25 am 7:35 pm 5:06 am 6:05 pm 7:25 am 7:33 pm 5:58 am 6:38 pm 7:26 am 7:32 pm 6:51 am 7:12 pm 7:26 am 7:31 pm 7:44 am 7:46 pm36% 30% 24% 18% 12% 6% 0%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Special to The NewsThe St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge announced that new roofs will be installed at the picnic and restroom shelters until Sept. 26. The project will require closure of the area into the picnic grounds when contractors are working and closure of the Otter Lake Road electronic gate at the end of the work day. This will ensure the safety of visitors, refuge staff and contractors. Signage will be posted at the entrance gate to inform visitors of speci c times for the closures. FWC Law Enforcement report New roofs for shelters at refuge Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies

PAGE 12

Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com & By JENNY ODOMSpecial to The NewsIf it werent for the sign out front that reads The Funky Fiddler Open, you might drive on past. But people are starting to turn their cars around, because the doors of Kelli Boxbergers once popular gallery in Wakulla County have re-opened. A small sh pond is built inside a repurposed old boat that sits under the front porch of the former service station. It is a unique outside feature that offers a glimpse of the creativity that youll nd in this eclectic shop along Highway 98 in Panacea. The Funky Fiddler rst opened in May of 2002, when Boxberger rented another small building across the street. This little place came up for rent, and I decided to give it a try. At rst it was just my paintings and some used furniture, she says. But its always been called The Funky Fiddler. I got a tiny scroll saw for my birthday present one year and that gave me the ability to do cut-outs of sh and animals, she says about how her artwork began to be noticed in the area. It was growing so fast, and people were asking for custom orders. Originally from Charlotte, N.C., Kelli and her husband Mike then decided to purchase their current building, located at 1373 Coastal Highway. Boxberger uses her talents, and has developed a well-known moniker that carries original designs, hand-built furniture and one-of-a-kind artwork. At one point, they began developing a design for standing ice chests, and they are now one of the most popular items they sell. We call it generational furniture. says Boxberger. The custom ice chests are a signature item. The wood is cypress, and the hardware is stainless steel. Then we add a marine sealer, and its all UV protected. Weve been making these for nine years. Weve seen a lot of others try to do it, but they dont compare to ours, she says. The custom ice boxes range in price from $395 to $750. Two small, spotted dogs greet customers at the door, tails wagging. Their names are Sweet Pea and Daisy. Inside The Funky Fiddler, colorful paintings of sh, birds, and coastal themed artwork is neatly arranged. They also carry a variety of housewares, gifts and other artists work. One entire wall is hung with cutout fish in all shapes, sizes and mediums. We cant make everything, but everything is hand selected, she explains. Boxberger closed the Panacea location to retail traf c about three years ago, when she explained there was an opportunity to occupy a large space in downtown Apalachicola. The Funky Fiddler retail shop moved to Apalachicola, but they kept their building in Panacea. It became the workshop and studio for the business. For the last few years they have commuted back and forth from Panacea to Apalachicola, about a 40 mile drive. Theyd build it in Panacea, and sell it in Apalachicola. The building they were renting in Apalachicola changed hands and the new landlord was planning to raise the rent, so the decision was made to return to Panacea. Ive always been artsy, and enjoyed drawing and painting, says Boxberger. Although, not always an artist, Boxberger attended college for nursing, and worked as a hospital neurological nurse for over a decade. She worked mainly in the operating room, and intensive care unit of the hospital. After she became a mother, giving birth to twins Brandon and Bryce, Boxberger decided she wanted to change pace and take a break from her high stress life as a nurse. She left nursing, spent more time at home with her young children, and then she began working with her husband in his business. Both from Charlotte, N.C., where they met, Mike Boxberger ran a successful janitorial supply company in Atlanta. Kelli worked in sales until they decided to sell the business in 2002. This is when they decided to relocate to Wakulla County. She designs and sketches the art and furniture. Then Mike, and their son Brandon, transfer the ideas to wood, and Kelli finishes up with paint. Together, through a process theyve developed, they transform wood into beautifully designed furniture, art and coastal decor. We make generational furniture. Its not IKEA, its not disposable. Its the kind of furniture we pass down to our kids someday, she explains. We depend on our repeat customers and word of mouth referrals. Their son, Brandon, 26, of Crawfordville, takes the Funky Fiddlers show on the road. He has opened his own branch of the business, called The Funky Fiddler and Son. He has developed his own style of whimsical wood art, furniture and designs, and travels the extensive art fair and festival circuit in Florida and beyond. Prices for his whimsical wood art range from $65 to $135. And, keeping with the family business, her sister, Leigh Whicker, makes the candles that are sold at The Funky Fiddler. Based in Charlotte, her hand-made scented candles are poured into ball jars, with classic, simple labels. She creates unique scents with names like Music City and Cent Limeade. They are soy candles, and they burn so long, and smell so good, Boxberger says. I should start getting the holiday scents in about ve days, she mentions. Shell be sending us Pumpkin Souf e, Hot Apple Cider and Under the Mistletoe. In addition to the shipment of holiday candles, Boxberger is also preparing for the holidays, making ornaments, coastal themed stockings, and beach house Christmas decorations. Asked about being back in Panacea, after making the regular trek to Apalachicola, Boxberger releases a sigh of relief, Im just comfortable in my own skin again. Its home. And she has found renewed energy as she discusses the possibility of expanding The Funky Fiddler to other coastal markets, possibly south. Id like to have more than one location along the coast, she says. I have a needed product, that is custom made with an affordable price. The Funky Fiddler in Panacea is open Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., and you can nd them on Facebook. They are located at 1373 Coastal Highway at the corner of U.S. 98 and Walker Street, next door to the Big Top grocery store.Funky FiddlerArtist Kelli Boxberger re-opens colorful gallery in Panacea Artists of WakullaArtists of Wakulla is a monthly feature that highlights an individual artist living and working in Wakulla County. If you are an artist, or know an artist, who is interested in being featured, please contact Jenny Odom at jenny@iggyart.com.Kelli Boxberger, above, is the owner and creative mind at her shop in Panacea, The Funky Fiddler. PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOM Ms Marias Grooming LLC PET GROOMING & BATHINGNow Taking Appointments850-519-1994OPEN HOUSE AUGUST 519 Years of Experience facebook.com/getyourgroomwithme Call 7 days a week 8am 11pm EST Promo Code: MB06141-800-831-1867 CALL NOW LIMITED TIME SAVINGS! mo Promotional Packages Starting At...FOR 12 MONTHSNot eligible for Hopper or HD

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 13ABy LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSON of the Extension Of ceThe beginning of autumn is less than two weeks away and many gardeners already have their fall vegetable gardens in the ground. Plants are breaking the surface on some crops with others only a few days away from sprouting. Still, there are remnants of summers bounty. One warm weather producer which is still going strong is a southern favorite, black-eyed peas. As the name implies, these legumes do have a prominent black spot or eye on each pea. This open pollinator distinct subspecies, Vigna unguiculata, is part of a larger group identi ed as cowpeas which includes Crowder peas, Pinkeye purple hulled peas, Cream peas and others. The origins of this regionally popular vegetable are uncertain. Historical evidence suggests they were rst cultivated in India and Africa, both warm latitudes. Their user-friendly handling characteristics and excellent shelf life when dried made them excellent candidates for long distance trade. Over time they became a staple of ancient Greek and Roman diets. Like all legumes, blackeyed peas have the ability to x atmospheric nitrogen to their root. This means they produce their own nitrogen fertilizer, but they may require additional fertilizer to meet other soil nutrition requirements. The black-eyed peas grown in the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Demonstration Garden were cultivated in mushroom compost. As such they did not require additional fertilizer or soil nutrients. Black-eyed peas grow on a variety of soils but grow best in soils with a pH between 5.5 and 6.5. Avoid planting peas in highly fertile soil since excessive nitrogen level stimulates vine growth and delays the time to harvest. Peas should be planted after all danger of frost has passed. These peas can survive drought, but adding mulch will help the soil retain moisture. Frequent harvest, every two to three days, to encourage continuous owering and pod production is recommended. Clip rather than pull the pods from the plant No summertime Southern meal is complete without black-eyed peas on the table. While not considered traditional health food, these local legumes have many positive nutritional features, depending on how they are prepared. Black eyed peas are low in fat and sodium, saturated fat free and cholesterol free. They are an excellent source of vitamin B1 and a good source of ber, magnesium, phosphorous and zinc. Eating black-eyed peas on New Years Day symbolizes prosperity and good luck in the New Year. The remainder of the year they complement most any other dish or recipe prepared. Along with most Wakulla County residents, many garden pests enjoy blackeyed peas. Common insect pests are leaf-feeding caterpillars, leaf-footed bugs, stinkbugs, aphids, thrips and spidermites. Another significant pest is the cowpea curculio. This insect probes the pods, lays eggs in the developing peas so the growing curculio grub can eat the infested seed. Old-time gardeners referred to these peas as stung. They wrongly assumed the peas had been stung by wasps. Wasps do congregate around black-eyed peas, but they are not there to sting the pods. These insect gather the nectar secreted at the base of the pods. Contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u .edu/ to learn more about growing black-eyed peas in Wakulla County. Les Harrison is UF/ IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director and Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent. ww w w. w. h th th e ew ew ak ak ul ul la la ne w Green Scene By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Often in conversations, I am asked to give my de nition of sustainability. Many criticize the term as being vague and hard to understand. Have you determined your de nition? The fundamental concept of sustainability is living in a way that does not jeopardize future generations. I have adopted the de nition that was offered in Oregons publication, Living Sustainably: Its Your Choice (http://extension.oregonstate.edu/catalog/ pdf/wec/ec1415.pdf). Former Wakulla County FCS Agent, Michelle Adamski helped write this publication. The authors describe sustainability as a deliberate effort to live sustainably affording individuals the chance to re-evaluate lifes priorities. Sustainable living is developing a life that is deeply satisfying, ful lling and appealing because it is socially, environmentally and economically responsible. I like it! How does your interpretation of this word differ? The publication identi es three main barriers to Americans seeking greater sustainability. They include the time crunch, too much stuff, and our disconnection from nature and spirituality. We all face the time crunch. Making changes to incorporate more sustainable living practices does take time to re-evaluate purchases, alter behaviors and incorporate changes into our daily lives. Those who have not spent time in nature enjoying the incredible county in which we live are not reminded of the impact of bad decisions and how they negatively impact our environment. And then there is the American way of having too much stuff. American consumption exceeds consumption in any other country. In fact, if everyone is the world lived an American lifestyle, it would require four Earths to sustain that level of consumption. In my lifetime I have seen the development of storage units. I would anticipate that most young people cant image driving in any part of the county while screening the landscape without seeing one. Storage units just did not exist when I was a child. How many cars do you see in driveways because the garage is being used for a storage unit? We have grown to love our stuff! I have to admit that in August I attended the longest yard sale in the world and returned to my home in Wakulla County with many treasures to incorporate into my work and at home. In addition, I say with pleasure, that one of the charities I support is having a rummage sale this week-end and I have a collection of things to donate. Every time I pass through a room in my house and at the of ce, I am looking for additional items. It gives me pleasure and almost relief to think that someone may nd a use for something that I have enjoyed but dont want anymore. Cutting down on stuff can be a very freeing experience. There are all kinds of advice I can offer to encourage you start the process of de-cluttering. How about walking around your home and nd ve things a day that you could donate or discard? Do that for a week or two and see if you start seeing some space that you have not seen in years. How about devoting 15-30 minutes a day to clearing out clutter? Cleaning a room or even a drawer at a time may be your solution. I know a home organizer who lives in Wakulla County. Would you like to employ her to start or totally complete the process? Let me know and I will make the referral. As with so many things, small steps can result in big dividends. Start thinking about where you would like to donate your items. There are many worthy places in Wakulla County that accept them. Consider a yard sale. This year at the Green Living Expo we hosted a section of the event to giving away items that individuals decided were not needed. It was exciting to see how discarded items were chosen by others with intended uses in mind. Sometime we think we are too small to make a difference in this big world. Our actions seem insigni cant in comparison to global issues. The reality is that action on your part is exactly how big change are made. It really does come down to you and me. OK now, go clean a closet! Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent.Whats your de nition of sustainable?PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPeas in the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Demonstration Garden. Black eyed peas are low in fat and sodium, saturated fat free and cholesterol free. They are an excellent source of vitamin B1 and a good source of ber, magnesium, phosphorous and zinc.Black-eyed peas keep producing for fall In the garden now: In the garden now:Black-eyed Peas Black-eyed Peas The best walk-in tub just got better with breakthrough technology! Introducing the all new Safe Step Walk-In T ub featuring heated seating and two new foot massaging jets. Finally, our Walk-In Tub with a Heated Seat!NOW enjoy warm comfort NEW PRODUCT Safe Step Tubs have received the Ease-of-Use Commendation from the Arthritis Foundation MADE IN THE U.S.A.WITH PRIDE For more information call now1-800-912-4104 Financing available with approved credit. Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

PAGE 14

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Thursday, Sept. 4, Daniel Shores of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the loss of jewelry and cash valued at $1,091. Off-duty Deputy Taff Stokley interrupted the residential burglary in progress. A forced entry was observed and damage to the home was estimated at $150. The suspect was identi ed. Deputy Matt Hedges and Sgt. Ryan Muse also investigated. Later, a BOLO was issued for the suspect and Deputy Gibby Gibson picked up Christopher Clay Ward, 38, of Tallahassee from a Leon County Sheriffs Office deputy at the county line. Ward had been picked up in Tallahassee and was charged with criminal mischief, burglary and grand theft in the incident. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Department:THURSDAY, SEPT. 4 Wal-Mart staff contacted the WCSO about turning over returned property found in the store. A wallet, 14 miscellaneous credit cards and four Florida driver licenses were turned in to Deputy Mike Zimba. Two credit cards were returned to their owners. The rest of the found property was turned into the Property and Evidence Division. Daren Laird of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Cash was removed from the victims property. Suspects have been identi ed. Deputy Kyle Hanks investigated. Brittany Harrell of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle. The victim noted that a suspect, who has been identi ed, took the vehicle without permission. The vehicle was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Lonnie West of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The vehicle was taken at a Crawfordville area convenience store. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated.FRIDAY, SEPT. 5 Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. A male suspect stole $87 worth of food products from the store. The suspect stuffed the items in his clothing prior to leaving. Store staff recognized the suspect from previous visits. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. A bicycle was found on Inez Lane in Crawfordville. The 10 speed bike was found at a home and was run through the NCIC/FCIC data base but did not come back as stolen. The bike, valued at $75, was placed in the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Gabriela Gaeta, 24, of Lafayette, Ind. was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked-habitual offender following a traf c stop. Sgt. Danny Harrell observed a vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed on Bloxham Cutoff Road. Gaeta was also issued a Uniform Traf c Citation for speeding and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The subjects driver license was suspended for approximately two years. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks conducted a trafc stop on U.S. Highway 319 in northern Wakulla County. The vehicle was suspiciously parked at a Wakulla County business after hours. The vehicle left the scene and did not stop right away. A short time later while talking to the driver and passenger during the traf c stop, Deputy Middlebrooks detected the strong odor of marijuana emitting from the vehicle. David Walter Dickman, 44, of Tallahassee was found to have a suspended driver license. During the search of the vehicle, marijuana was found. Dickman and April Wimberley Arrington, 40, of Tallahassee were charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Dickman was also issued a citation for driving while license is suspended or revoked without knowledge. They were issued notices to appear in court and released. The marijuana weighed 15.7 grams. Sgt. Derek Lawhon also investigated. Teresa Lavale McCalvin, 41, of Tallahassee was observed failing to maintain a single lane in Panacea. A check of her driver license determined that the license was suspended. A citation was issued for driving while license is suspended or revoked without knowledge and the vehicle tag was seized by order of the Florida Department Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated.SATURDAY, SEPT. 6 On Sept. 6, Acie Langston of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim had a suspect, who has been identied, do some work for him on a vehicle. During the process the suspect cashed a check for himself that was earmarked for an auto parts store. The check is valued at $69. Charges of passing a forged instrument and exploitation of the elderly are pending against the suspect. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated.SUNDAY, SEPT. 7 An off-duty law enforcement of cer reported juveniles cursing in the parking lot of a Crawfordville fast food restaurant. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated and detected the strong odor of alcohol coming from the suspect. Marijuana was observed inside the vehicle along with a smoking pipe. Caleb Dayne Vernon, 22, of Crawfordville was arrested for possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. The marijuana weighed 1.2 grams and was seized. A second subject at the scene was detained brie y and released. Milton Holcombe of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported that someone damaged his mailbox and stole two political signs. Damage to the mailbox was estimated at $28. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Deputies responded to a Crawfordville disturbance call. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks arrived on scene and observed a male subject inside a vehicle. Deputy Middlebrooks had knowledge that the subject did not possess a valid driver license and he was observed behind the wheel of a vehicle with the engine running. Eugene Charles Schmitt, 41, of Crawfordville was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. The marijuana weighed 10.3 grams. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Mark Christopher Allen, 20, of Crawfordville was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge after he was observed driving a vehicle. Deputy David Pienta was seeking another subject at the time of the arrest.MONDAY, SEPT. 8 Two 16-year-old Wakulla High School juveniles were involved in a traf c crash at the school. There were no injuries. Deputy Mike Crum and Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. DAaron Tyler of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left his wallet inside a book bag inside an unsecured vehicle. The wallet and contents are valued at $51. Some items from the wallet were located nearby, but the wallet was not found. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Kimberly Collins of Woodville reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. Damage was reported to the home as a result of a window being left open during a rain storm. Damage is estimated at more than $1,000. Two televisions were also stolen from the home at a value of more than $300. A suspect has been identi ed. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Jerry Moore of Panacea reported the theft of campaign signs. The victim reported a total of 90 signs of different sizes being stolen throughout the county. The value of the signs is estimated at $1,850. Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Deputy Lisa Crum investigated a stalking complaint by a middle school student. A male student made inappropriate comments about another students physical appearance. An investigation of the student conduct discovered that the male student received detention for similar activities during the previous school year. The 13-year-old student was issued a Juvenile Civil Citation for stalking in lieu of a misdemeanor arrest. Sgt. Ray Johnson also investigated.TUESDAY, SEPT. 9 William Fuller of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim noted that two of his vehicle tires were slashed. The tires are valued at approximately $200 and the vehicles were damaged at his home. Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Robert Talbot of Crawfordville reported the theft of gasoline from his boat. The gasoline and gas can that were stolen are valued at $100. The incident occurred at the victims home. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Dorothy G. Hammock of Bristol reported a traf c crash at Wakulla Correctional Institution. She backed into a vehicle owned by William Byrd of Tallahassee in the parking lot. Byrd was not in his vehicle at the time. There were no injuries. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated.WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 10 Wes Coleman of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A GPS unit, valued at $150, was removed from an unsecured vehicle at the victims home. The GPS was recovered in the area of the vehicle burglary. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Christopher Williamson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victims unsecured vehicle was entered but nothing of value was taken. The stolen GPS from the Wes Coleman incident report of the same day was recovered in a nearby ditch. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. David Jedzinak of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported that his vehicle was entered and $45 worth of personal property was removed. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Randall Box and Martha Heuring of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Deputy Clint Beam was investigating other vehicle burglaries in the area of the Songbird neighborhood when he found business cards and a Social Security card belonging to Box. A check of the victims unsecured vehicle noted the theft of a purse, wallet, currency and various credit cards, valued at $1,325. Annie Francis of Crawfordville reported the theft of campaign signs. A total of 12 signs were removed from her yard. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Kyle Burdeshaw of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wallet. The wallet and contents are valued at $30. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Dorothy A. Preston of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traf c crash on the Woodville Highway at Owen Drive. The motorist struck a dog which caused airbag deployment. The vehicle was towed from the scene. Preston was not injured. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 989 calls for service during the past week including: 11 business and residential alarms; 17 bus stop checks; 97 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 19 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 4 E-911 abandoned calls; 19 E-911 calls; 48 investigations; 50 medical emergencies; 24 school security checks; 265 business and residential security checks; 35 special details; 28 traf c enforcements; 156 traf c stops; and 14 wanted people. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Featuring: Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae Price of Admission Includes Dinner and Show Tickets: $30.00 The most fun you will ever have at dinner Proceeds to support Meals on Wheels and other services provided at the center. Thank you for your generous support ALL STAR CAST A Murder Mystery Dinner Theater AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION THURSDAY, SEPT. 25TH 6:30PM R.H. CARTER SENIOR CITIZENS COMPLEX Wakulla Senior Citizens Center Presents: Tickets on sale now. Call for more information 850.926.7145

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 15A Historic Tully-McLaughlin House relocated Sept. 10By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netTraf c going through Crawfordville was slowed on Wednesday, Sept. 10 as the Tully-McLaughlin house slowly rolled north toward Old Zion Road. Drivers seemed more curious than frustrated as many could be seen with smart phone cameras extended to snap photos of the relocation. The house, built in 1892, will rest in a staging area before becoming part of Heritage Village, a historical park created by the Wakulla County Historical Society. Historical Society members and family descendants escorted the house on foot as Pigotts Movers hauled it by Hudson Park. Terry Crum, 77, was born in the house where his grandparents, John Archie and Annie Carraway McLaughlin, lived. Before that, Crum said it was the rst permanent structure in Medart, and had served as a post of ce and a store. He said there was a three-sided porch where he could play, no matter how rainy it was. The pecan trees in the backyard kept the house shady in the summer, and warm in the winter when the leaves fell off. Crum said the Tullys, who built the house, planned it that way. The Tullys had a reason for everything they did, Crum said. Crum said he lived in the house onand-off several times before he married Lessie and settled near Pigott Pond. He said the old house will always be considered home in some ways, even in its new location. If they would plant two pecan trees behind it where they put it he said. Im glad theyre preserving the old house like it was. I know where there are initials on the wall. The house has been through a lot, Crum said. It stood through the 1899 hurricane which wiped out this part of the world, and the hurricane which took the tin off of it, from one end to the other, he said. Residents of the home went through a lot too births, deaths and illness. I had rheumatic fever there the measles, mumps and the day-to-day things. Crum said it was always so cold in the room he slept in during the winter. It would be bitter cold, so I would warm my pillow on the heater until it was just about ready to scorch, he said. Then I would run like crazy and jump in that cold bed, and have that warm pillow. When electricity was finally installed, Crum said he remembers his grandmother lighting every bulb in the house, and then walking away, so she could stand in the dark see it all lit up from afar. The McLaughlin siblings Jamie, Murray and Betty Sue Bruce, cousins of Terry Crum, were there to witness the moment on Sept. 10, and joined others at a reception afterward. Jamie was born in the south end of the house, but lived nearby growing up in Medart. He often visited his grandparents there. The laundry was done outside in a wash pot with an old scrub board, Jamie said. My grandma and my mom would do their laundry together. I would play in the yard. Betty Sue said the McLaughlin house had an indoor bathroom, which was rare, especially for such an old house at the time. Jamie said he remembers when the bathroom was installed, and the kerosene lamps that were used before the house was wired for electricity. Murray said he remembers the pecan trees, and the old pump house at the back of the house. When the pump was running it had a wheel with a pump and a motor, Murray said. Whenever it would kick on, it fascinated me, and I would want to go over. My grandfather would pick up pecan limbs from the ground, come over and switch me with it to get me away from that. The McLaughlin siblings are thrilled that visitors can enjoy the house, which will be refurbished for the park. Betty Sue said, I love the idea of people being able to know what it was like.HISTORYThe McLaughlin house was first known as the Tully Place. George W. Tully, who built the Historic Wakulla County Courthouse, also built the original structure. Tully moved his sawmill to the wilds of Medart in 1892, but his wife remained in their Crawfordville home. George built a one-room structure near the sawmill to accommodate himself and his sons in a bunkhouse through the week as they worked at the sawmill, and returned home in Crawfordville on the weekends located at 84 Ochlockonee Street. Later, Tully sold the Medart building to the McLaughlins, who parented nine children. The McLaughlins added rooms to the original building and established a store nearby. One of their sons, Alton James Buddy and Sedav Raker, his wife, lived and operated a store near the home for more than half a century. PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMATerry Crum holds a photo of his grandparents John Archie and Annie Carraway McLaughlin, who lived in the 122-year-old house that was relocated last week. The Tully-McLaughlin house was relocated from Medart to Old Zion Road on Sept. 10. Planning underway for Relay fall festStaff ReportThe rst annual Relay for Life Harvesting for a Cure Fall Festival and chili cook off will be at Hudson Park 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18. While there is still a month before the event, Relay for Life Chair Marion Russ wants local organizations, vendors and candidates to know the Relay Fall Festival will be an ideal place to interact with the community. Russ said vendors dont have to be crafts people or bakers any nonpro t, business, club or individual is welcome to sign up for a table. If an organization just wants to come out and promote their services... We have tables for them, Russ said, adding that Operation Santa recently con rmed a table, as well as a local political candidate. Besides vendors, local organizations are encouraged to sign up for the chili cook off as well. This is a good opportunity for local re departments, clubs and businesses to show off their culinary talents, and maybe even take the prize for Best Chili. We already have the Democratic Women signed up, and a rehouse, Russ said. I encourage more re departments to sign up. Relay team registration is still ongoing. Parade registration is open too, with a prize going to the Best Fall Float. Different organizations can work together make it a better community and help one another, Russ said. The fall fest will be an ideal autumn outing for the family, featuring a parade, food, activities for the kids, entertainment, vendors and more. To reserve a vendor table, sign up for the chili cook off, learn more about forming a Relay team, or register for the parade, call Marion Russ at 322-2652 or email: relayforlifewakulla@gmail.com. RELAY FOR LIFE Cushman meet and greet is Sept. 24Staff ReportA meet and greet for Steve Cushman, Candidate for County Commissioner, District 4 will be Wednesday, Sept. 24 at the home of Joan Hendrix, 438 Beechwood Dr., Crawfordville on at 6:30 p.m. If you havent met Steve and would like to get to know him, we hope you will come, Hendrix said. He is ready to speak to you about his ideas to make Wakulla County a better place for all of its citizens. Cushman will be available to answer questions on special concerns, including wetlands issue, US 319 changes, taxes, budget, and any other issues. Attire is casual and guests are welcome to bring a partner. Food and drinks will be served. GET RECYCLED MATERIALSRACE IT. 3RD ANNUAL REGATTA AT THE FSU COASTAL MARINE LAB IN ST. TERESAJOIN US FROM 12PM-5PM**_________***----; **FOOD from Coastal Restaurant! *LIVE MUSIC! *Participate or come watch! *People s Choice *Most spectacular failure First boat to cross finish line *Most creative use of materials SEE RULES AND REGISTRATION AT: http://marinelab.fsu.edu/outreach/regatta/ m t t t t C C C C C o r r r r r h h h h * * P * * * * M * * * * * * * * * * F Fi F * * * * * M M NEWExtendedSaturday Hours8am 3pmNow Accepting Appointments on SaturdayOpen: Wakulla Animal Hospital850-926-7153 WkllAilHitl IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms WE HAVE LIVE SHRIMP!FRESH WATER TOO! IN SHOREFISHING IS F

PAGE 16

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comEating locally and seasonally are both quite fashionable today with some who consider it as a path to good health and low impact on natures resources. Before the days of large, specialized agricultural operations and high speed transportation, residents of Wakulla County and elsewhere had no choice but to eat locally and seasonally. Every local farm and homestead had, as part of their objective, to produce enough meat and vegetables to keep everyones body and spirit intact. The springs and summers delivered multiple opportunities to add nutrients and calories to the menu before nature through the local insect population blunted the efforts late in the growing season. Nature, however, compensated the early inhabitants with sweet and useful native fruits at the end of each growing season. Persimmons and crabapples still grow wild in Wakulla County even though most contemporary residents are not acquainted with them. The American persimmon (Diospyros virginiana) is native to much of the eastern United States and has long been a late season food source of people and wildlife. Members of the persimmon genus also grow in Asia and southwest Europe. The word persimmon originated with the Powhatan tribe in eastern Virginia. It literally means dried fruit and likely refers to those which remained on the trees until they dried late in the year. Its closest botanical relative is ebony, a highly valued tropical hardwood which is very dense and mostly black in color. Contrasting this, persimmon lumber is a sandy tan in color but still dense and rigid. It is occasionally stained and used as a substitute for ebony, but has also been used to manufacture wooden golf club heads. It is one of the hardest native lumbers in the country. Timber qualities aside, persimmons were once widely known for their unique taste qualities. If sampled while still green, the astringent taste is so extreme the experience was long remembered and never repeated. The ripe fruit of the American persimmon is a completely different experience. It is very sweet, but with a large pit and an almost slimy texture. Folklore advised potential consumers to wait until the fruit had dropped from the tree and the ies found it. Many flying insects, including bees and wasp, are attracted to the thinskinned, sweet fruit. Crabapples are another native fruit with a unique taste and specific uses. They are members of the apple family (Malus), but are found in a wider geographic range than the hybrid cultivars which produce the popular fruit. The blooms are white to pink, emerging in the late spring and can be quite showy. There are many hybrid cultivars which have been developed for their bright blooms and are a popular landscape plant or small tree. The native varietys fruit ripens in early autumn. This bitter fruit was the basis for crabapple jelly, but was also included in other jelly recipes because the high pectin content helped the jelly solidify. Both persimmons and crabapples are popular with a variety of wildlife species. Deer hunters long ago realized the advantage of staying close to these trees when trying to bring home the venison so they could eat seasonally and locally. To learn more about American persimmons and wild crabapples in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas. u .edu/ Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 9263931.American persimmons are currently ripening on trees in Wakulla County.Persimmons and crabapples grow wild in Wakulla Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Expert physicians.Quality care. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32327 | CapitalRegionalMedicalGroup.comRobert Frable, DOSpecializing in: Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Group accepts Capital Health Plan and most all other insurance carriers.850 9266363 Aida Torres, ARNP Flu and pneumonia vaccination

PAGE 17

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Marianna Bulldogs came to Wakulla High School last week with an upset on their minds. The opening kickoff from Marianna was an onside kick recovered by the Bulldogs, and then a quick score on a run for a touchdown the point-after was blocked and Wakulla was down 6-0 with only seconds ticked off the clock. The War Eagles stormed back, with a pass from quarterback Feleipe Franks to receiver Keith Gavin for a touchdown. The Franks PAT would put Wakulla up 7-6. Marianna stormed back down the field and threatened with a rst and goal at the 3, but safety Caleb Fell rushed the QB on a blitz, de ected the attempted pass, caught it, then ran it 95 yards for a score. The point-after was missed, but Wakulla was up 13-6 and never looked back. Caleb Fells 95-yard interception was a game changer, said Head Coach Scott Klees. By halftime, Wakulla was up 30-6 after another Franks-to-Gavin TD, a eld goal after a Bulldog fumbled punt, and a TD pass to receiver Ethan Davis. Coach Klees said he purposefully focused on passing during the rst half, and running during the second half. Turn to Page 2B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014sports news and team views SportsCross Country: Haleigh Martin notches second win of seasonPage 8BMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL:Wakulla Middle goes to 3-0Page 2B Wakulla stomps Marianna, 47-20 NEXT GAME: The War Eagles host the Taylor County Bulldogs on Friday, Sept. 19, at 7:30 p.m. Falling Into Fashion The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs Annual Fashion Extravaganza Auction and Raffle Wakulla Senior Center Thursday October 9, 2014 6:30 pm For tickets see any Optimist member or call Sally Gandy at 850-984-2203 Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480 Fashions From The Little Black Dress Sundance Crums Mini Mall Maurices Delicious Dinner catered by Poseys SteamRoom Entertainment by Jerry Evans and Friends All proceeds go towards Scholarships for Wakulla Co unty Students TICKETS $30.00 each T h A rtin s o o o n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n n TWO GOOD PLAYS BY ETHAN DAVIS: Marianna punt returner fumbled, left, Davis tackled the returner to keep him from the ball. The War Eagles recovered the fumble and it led to a 39-yard eld goal by Feleipe Franks. Before the half, Davis went up and grabbed a pass in the end zone for a touchdown to put Wakulla up 30-6.Feleipe Franks, Keith Gavin have great night for o ense, connecting for three TD passes; Caleb Fells 95-yard interception for TD credited with being a game-changer KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDEN Feleipe Franks drops back to pass behind the protection of the War Eagles offensive line. He would pass for 345 yards and ve touchdowns on the night. Receiver Keith Gavin speeds past two defenders down the sideline for a score. He caught ve passes for 159 yards and three of those went for touchdowns. The War Eagles marching band res up the home crowd at J.D. Jones Stadium. 2592 Crawfordville Hwy. 926-6740 www.ccbg.com JOIN US TO CELEBRATE!

PAGE 18

Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsPlayers of the WeekKEITH GAVIN 5 catches for 159 yards, 3 TD FELEIPE FRANKS 16 of 28 passing for 345 yards, 5 TDs COLE REAMS Interception, 4 tackles, 2 assists, 86% FELEIPE FRANKS 2 punts, avg. 57 yds.; 39 & 28 yd. FGO ense O ense Defense Special Teams Sponsored by 850926-1011Your Home Town Realtor By EDDIE METCALFWMS CoachThe Wakulla Middle School Wildcats improved to 3-0 on the season with wins over the Florida High School Seminoles 38-0 and the Madison County Central Broncos 56-22. The second game of the season saw the Wildcats travel to Florida High School in Tallahassee and score on their first five possessions, and come away with a 38-0 win. The Wildcats received the opening kick-off and scored two plays later on a Lamonte Peterson 55 yard run. The 2-point conversion was added by Jeremy Harvey. The Wildcat defense forced the Seminoles to punt on their first possession, and Jeremy Harvey scored on a 10 yard run following a Peterson 20 yard run. DJ Reynolds added the 2-point conversion. The Wildcats third score of the night was set up when Noah Melton recovered a Seminole fumble and came on a Jared Roddenberry 5 yard touchdown, Roddenberry added the 2-point conversion to make the score 24-0. The Wildcats seventh grade offense scored the last two touchdowns of the night on a Keyshawn Greene 46 yard run (Roddenberry added the conversion) and a Lyric Oaks 1 yard quarterback sneak. The nal score was set up when Hunter Lawhon forced a fumble and Hunter Nichols recovered it on the Seminole 24 yard line. Thanks to some great blocking by Tristion Brown, Noah Melton, Reece Barwick, Trenton Lawhon, Hunter Reeves and Hunter Lawhon. Lamonte Peterson rushed 4 times for 80 yards and 1 touchdown, DJ Reynolds rushed 5 times for 32 yards and added a 2-point conversion and Jared Roddenberry had 4 rushes for 35 yards 1 touchdown and two 2-point conversions. Hunter Nichols, Chandler Crum, Andrew Carter and Brandon Tucker opened some huge holes and allowed Keyshawn Greene to rush two times for 50 yards and a touchdown and Sage Bowell three rushes for 6 yards. The Seminole offense was unable to gain a yard against the sti ing Wildcat starting defense. The Wildcats traveled to Madison County to take on the Madison County Central Broncos on Thursday and came away with a 56-22 win. Thanks to some great blocking from the offensive linemen, WMS had 10 different players rush 34 times for 373 yards and seven touchdowns during the game. Lamonta Peterson rushed eight times for 93 yards and two touchdowns, DJ Reynolds ran nine times for 54 yards and two touchdowns, Jared Roddenberry ran three times for 66 and a touchdown, Mykel Keith ran three times for 42 yards and one touchdown and Keyshawn Greene rushed three times for 32 yards and a touchdown. Wakulla converted on all 72 point conversions with Dorian Allen and Lyric Oaks both converting two, and Andrew Eskelund, Keyshawn Greene and Lamonte Peterson converted one respectfully. Dorian Allen was 2-2 passing for 32 yards with both completions coming to Jamey Harvey. Jeremy Harvey returned 3 kick-offs for 57 yards, returned a punt for 39 yards and rushed two times for 26 yards. The Wildcats nish a three game road trip this week when they travel to Marianna to take on the Bull Pups at 7 p.m. Eastern Time. Come out and support the Wildcats.WMS improves to 3-0MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL From First Sports Page There were some things we needed to work on, he said, but also acknowledged that the Bulldogs were loading the box with defenders during the rst half, meaning run plays werent going to work. For the most part, we executed, he said. Talking about the achievements of Franks and Gavin, both Division I commitments Franks to LSU and Gavin to FSU Klees called them special players. He praised Fell as well, noting that, going into the Marianna game, the senior safety led the state in sacks with six. Klees also praised adjustments made by Defensive Coordinator Grady Guess at halftime with cooling off the Marianna offense. The win improved the War Eagles record to 2-1. Up next are the Taylor County Bulldogs, who the War Eagles defeated last year 20-14. Klees called it a rivalry game. Its gonna be hard-fought, he said. It could go either way. Theyre 2-1 and were 2-1, he said.Wakulla stomps Marianna, 47-20 PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHard running by Cody Ochat, above, and Justin Davis, below. 20% OFF2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FLBadcock.com 850926When you OPEN a New Badcock Account Your Entire Purchase D ed i cated to t h e r escue & r e h ab ili tat i o n o f in ju r ed a n d o r p h a n ed wil d m a mm a l s a n d b ir ds GIANT YARD SALE Thurs Oct 2nd 8am 3pm (Set Up) Fri Oct 3rd 4 8am 3pm Sat Oct 4th 4 8am 1pm At Townsend's Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit A32 or brought to the Yard Sale (before Friday afternoon) For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.fwma.org 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission FEDERAL CREDIT UNION *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 36 months and as low as 1.99% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and renances. Renances and used car purchases 2007 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. Get Crawfordvilles Best Rate for Your Auto LoanView more loan options at GoGulfWinds.com.New, Used, or Renance 1.49%APR*36 months as low asMonthly payments per $1,000 for 36 months at 1.49% APR is $28.42.1.99%APR*60 months as low asMonthly payments per $1,000 for 60 months at 1.99% APR is $17.52.

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 3B By MARTY COHEN OK gather round the camp re for some virtual Smores as we dissect what weve seen from the 2014 Florida bunch through the first three weeks and two games of the season. Anyway, here goes: Well start at the top, no not with head coach Will Muschamp or even offensive coordinator Kurt Roper, lauded after the initial 65-0 stroll over Eastern Michigan then questioned a bit when the offense managed just 20 points in regulation time (despite mega-yards gained and plays run) against a Kentucky out t that certainly appears improved compared to the recent editions, but well see down the road how much of that was due to the Wildcats climb or the Gators inconsistent play. No, were talking about quarterback Jeff Driskel, the shaky straw that stirs the uncertain drink. Of all the things to take away from the 172 snaps in the triple-overtime affair with the Wildcats, the sight of some cringeworthy decisions under duress from Driskel has to be the most disheartening as we look down the line. Weve seen this play out before, to disastrous results, from Driskel. From all accounts, the added maturity and experience plus the comfort level and the ease of execution of Ropers new scheme were supposed to alleviate this burden from Driskels shoulders. Yet late in the first quarter here was the 2013 flashback No. 1, when a pressured Driskel made an ill-advised throw to really no one in the at that was picked off and returned to near mid eld. Through the years weve witnessed scads of players who performed like Hall of Famers in practice only to come up small on Saturday, the ones we used to dub Mr. Wednesday, the anti gamers if you will. While we kept seeing mercurial sophomore receiver Demarcus Robinson make dynamite plays during the open preseason drills, it always came with the caveat about performing in the same manner on Saturdays. Well, Robinson showed us all what happens when the lights come on, putting on a dazzling display as the only target for Driskel, who threw for 295 yards against Kentucky, but only 79 of those yards and 10 of the 25 completions went to someone other than Robinson. His touchdown on fourth-and-9 in the rst overtime period, amidst chaos and the appearance of a delay of game infraction (followed by Driskels finest throw of the night) may have saved the season at this juncture. The tally: 15 catches for 216 yards and two touchdowns, leaving a two-game mark of 21 receptions for 339 yards and three touchdowns, although as weve mentioned before, counting statistics accumulated in overtime, a glorified Red Zone practice drill, is beyond absurd. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators By TIM LINAFELT A few weeks ago, Derrick Mitchell raised eyebrows when his name topped Florida States defensive end depth chart. Its since taken two games for Mitchell to blossom from surprise starter into perhaps one of FSUs best defensive linemen. So said head coach Jimbo Fisher last week. I think Derrick Mitchell is playing as good as anyone we have up front, Fisher said. I think Derricks doing a great job. Hes really emerging into a very good football player. Under other circumstances, Mitchells emergence might come as a pleasant surprise. But given FSUs current situation on the defensive line, it could prove to be crucial. The Seminoles saw three defensive tackles starters Eddie Goldman and Nile LawrenceStample, along with reserve Justin Shanks suffer leg injuries in their win over The Citadel. Even though Goldman returned to practice on Monday, the other two have yet to resume as full participants. Which means Mitchell could be called upon in a big way both to play heavy snaps at either end or tackle, and also to help guide the younger players that FSU might have to thrust into action. Hes evolving into his role, said FSU left guard Josue Matias, who often matches up with Mitchell in practice. Hes become a great player for us, which we need right now with a couple guys hurt. Its an awfully long way to come for a player who entered fall camp with questions about whether hed ever play at all, much less contribute in a meaningful way. A series of injuries sidelined Mitchell, a Jacksonville native, for almost all of his rst three years at FSU. When he made it through offseason conditioning drills without any ill effects, Mitchell had a feeling he might be on the right track. Asked if the last month has been the best of his time in Tallahassee, Mitchell smiled. Best time of my FSU career, he said. Since being named the starter and not just being named the starter but going out there and being able to play. It feels great every time I put my hand in the dirt. I think God and I thank Coach Fisher and Coach Odell [Haggins] for never giving up on me. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Coastal Carolina at Florida A&MSaturday, Sept. 20 at 5 p.m.The game can be seen online at famuathletics.com.Florida at AlabamaSaturday, Sept. 20 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS, Online at CBSSports.com or can be heard on the Gator Sports Network.#22 Cemson at #1 Florida State Saturday, Sept. 20 at 8 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC.HERES SOME HERES SOME EARLY SEASON EARLY SEASON OBSERVATIONS OBSERVATIONSThe Seminole defense, including No. 11 Derrick Mitchell, swarm The Citadel.Derrick Mitchell is considered one of FSUs best defensive linemen.Receiver Demarcus Robinson makes a move.Derrick Mitchell blossomsPHOTO BY KEN FIELDS PHOTO BY TRAVIS REGISTER GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON

PAGE 20

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy DARA KAMTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept.12 It may be an off week for the Seminoles in the land of football, but the spotlight is still hot on the garnet and gold. Florida State University alum John Thrasher whose resume includes stints as a lawyer, lobbyist, state Republican Party chairman and House speaker has made it to the Final Four in the schools search for a new president. And speaking of gold, health regulators are wasting no time getting Florida ready for the green rush already sweeping the state as they craft a framework for the new medical marijuana industry. Meanwhile, the just say no crowd is letting loose with the green, fanning the ames in the ght over a proposed constitutional amendment that would legalize weed for a variety of medical reasons. (GARNET AND) GOLDEN GOOSE THRASHER: I CAN GET ER DONE The wrangling over Florida States next president is getting as raucous as a Doak Campbell Stadium throwdown. The universitys 27-member Presidential Advisory Search Committee on Tuesday named four nalists, including state Sen. Thrasher, to succeed former President Eric Barron. Barron, an academic and ace fundraiser, left FSU to take the same post at Penn State University earlier this year. The other nalists, chosen after the committee spent two days interviewing a pool of 11 applicants, are Richard B. Marchase, University of Alabama at Birmingham vice president for research and economic development; Michele G. Wheatly, who until June had been provost at West Virginia University; and Michael V. Martin, Colorado State University System chancellor. Thrasher, the only nontraditional candidate among the 11 interviewed this week, has been a golden goose for FSU in the Legislature, including getting a medical school for the university. Thrasher currently serves as the powerful head of the Senate Rules Committee and also chairs Gov. Rick Scotts re-election campaign. During his one-hour, 15-question interview Tuesday, Thrasher spoke of his passion for the university and his desire to make a difference at the school where he received his undergraduate and law degrees. I want to be president of Florida State University. If you give me the opportunity to do it, I promise you, I will make you proud, Thrasher said. I dont particularly have a greater skill set than anybody else, but I know how to get things done. The committee is scheduled to make a recommendation Sept. 22 to the universitys board of trustees. The trustees, who would still have to forward the nal choice to the university systems Board of Governors, are scheduled to meet Sept. 23. Thrasher made the cut despite objections of students and faculty who have been skeptical about the politicos potential presidency and the selection process for months. The universitys presidential search has roiled since Thrasher threw his hat into the ring early in the process. In June, the search committee put the quest on hold, presumably to focus on Thrasher as the next chief, after being told that the politicians interest would discourage other potential candidates from applying. But the search was instead restarted with a new consultant at the helm. Tuesdays decision prompted more fallout from the universitys Faculty Senate. Wanting the schools next president to be a scholar with higher-education leadership experience, the academicians voted 39-23 on Wednesday to oppose Thrashers inclusion as a nalist. Meanwhile, a small group of students, rooted in the fraternity and sorority systems, started SupportJohnThrasher.com, a website intended to counter opposition to the St. Augustine Republican. STATE: GET THAT POT TO SICK KIDS ASAP! Its sort of a pot rush, even if the type of weed that will soon be spreading across the state supposedly doesnt get users high. The Department of Healths Of ce of Compassionate Use this week hurriedly published a revised rule governing everything from stems and seeds to serving the substance to sick kids. The latest version of the rule included tweaks to who can own the ve dispensing organizations that will eventually get licensed by the state to grow, process and distribute newly-authorized strains of cannabis. The Legislature, in approving a pot law this spring, required each applicant to have a valid registration from the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to cultivate more than 400,000 plants, be operated by a nurseryman as defined by state law and have operated as a registered nursery in the state for at least 30 continuous years. At least 60 nurseries meet the criteria. A preliminary rule oated by health regulators would have allowed nurseries to have just 25 percent ownership in the entities applying for a license. That option drew a rebuke from the Legislatures Joint Administrative Procedures Committee, which helps oversee state regulations. The original proposal also neglected to speci cally address whether the nursery would be required to have a continued role in running the pot operation. Under Tuesdays revised proposal, a nurseryman would have to serve as the operator, alleviating some concerns that growers would have little or nothing to do with the grow operation despite lawmakers intention that the nascent pot business be controlled by companies with a long agricultural history in Florida. The proposal would require a nursery to have at least 25 percent ownership of the organization that gets a license, but also would offer another alternative that would allow percent of the owners of a nursery to ful ll that 25 percent requirement. That ownership change appears aimed at appeasing some nursery owners who expressed concerns about nancing the marijuana operations. Because pot is still illegal under federal law, nearly all banks are refusing to lend money to marijuana-related businesses. Converting other areas of operations into cashonly business could pose major problems for growers interested in participating in the medical marijuana startups, a lawyer for Costa Farms told the Department of Health at a day-long public hearing last week. With Scotts blessing, lawmakers this spring legalized marijuana that contains .8 percent or less of euphoriainducing tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, and more than 10 percent cannabidiol, or CBD. Supporters believe the compound, which hasnt been approved by the feds, can eliminate or drastically reduce life-threatening seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy. Under the law, doctors can also order the low-THC, high-CBD substance usually delivered in paste or oil forms for patients with other spastic disorders or cancer, as long as they have exhausted all other treatments. Many GOP lawmakers jumped on the doesnt get you high pot bandwagon this spring hoping to thwart Amendment 2, a proposed constitutional change that would legalize traditional medical marijuana. While the state moves toward getting the low-THC, high-CBD regulatory framework in place by Jan. 1, the battle over Amendment 2 bankrolled heavily by Orlando trial lawyer and Democratic fundraiser John Morgan is starting to smoke. The Vote No on 2 campaign recently nailed down the backing of seven former Florida Supreme Court justices, who joined associations representing Florida sheriffs and police chiefs in opposition. And the amendments foes are planning to spend $1.6 million on television ads, slated to start running in October, condemning the proposal. Like all constitutional proposals, at least 60 percent of the voters must approve the amendment for it to pass. Polls have shown widespread support for legalizing medical marijuana, but that support is expected to drop in the wake of a full-frontal attack. Las Vegas casino magnate Sheldon Adelson has pledged to double the $2.5 million hes already dropped on the Drug Free Florida political committee, launched by Tampa Bay developer Mel Sembler. Both are mega-GOP money men. STORY OF THE WEEK: St. Augustine Republican John Thrasher makes the list of four nalists in the search for a new Florida State University president. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Is the First Lady not good enough? Jackie Schutz, a spokeswoman for Gov. Rick Scotts campaign, after being asked why the governor remained on the campaign trail instead of attending a Missing Childrens Day event at the Capitol. First Lady Ann Scott took part in the event.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Garnet, gold and green -Janet The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com HOME COUNTRYOne of those small, but important, miraclesBy SLIM RANDLESWhen we rst noticed the baby sparrow, here at the house, it saddened us all. He had fallen from his nest and was slowly walking around the front yard under the tree while his mother and father had an absolute t. We knew we were looking at a dead baby bird, as it was only a question of who does it, where it is done, and how long before it happens. Years of experience in these kinds of things have taught us the nality of a baby bird falling out of a tree. Would the end come from a cat, or from a raccoon wandering up from Lewis Creek, or a snake? One of the problems with being a baby bird is that almost everything with teeth wants to eat you, and if you cant y, theres not much you can do about it. We learned that picking the baby up and putting him back in the nest wouldnt work, so we were forced to just watch his timid movements around the yard and whisper to him, Im sorry, pal. You might think that the older we get, the tougher our shells become to these little natural tragedies, but it doesnt seem to work that way. Maybe its because weve now had children of our own, and grandchildren too. Maybe thats why it actually hurts more to see a helpless baby bird today than when we were 11 and riding our bikes on the river trails. Back then we were bulletproof, exible, and immortal. But we learned things over the years. We saw people our age die. We saw younger people die. We accumulated our own little collection of personal tragedies. Then the baby found the drain spout. Yep, that little rascal hopped into the drain spout coming off the roof and had sense enough to stay in there, coming to the edge of his cave only for meals from his anxious mother. A week later, I thought I recognized him sitting on a tree branch, looking smug. He wasnt in the drain spout and I didnt see any feathers around on the ground. We live in an age of small, but important, miracles. Listen to the Home Country Hour podcast on your computer or other electronic marvels, at www.slimrandles.com. ridicule old people.

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 5B Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the 8 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m. NAMI CONNECTION FREE every Tuesday morning at the library in Medart, beginning at 10 a.m., and every Tuesday evening at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, (just south of Lindys), beginning at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19 Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, selfdefense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042. Saturday, Sept. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the SECOND SATURDAY of the month for a breakfast meeting at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Sunday, Sept. 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Sept. 22 VFW POST 4538 monthly meeting at the post the SECOND MONDAY of each month. Dinner at 6 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. for post and auxiliary members only. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the FIRST MONDAY of every month, 1 p.m. Respite care is available during the meeting at the church. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, Sept. 23 C.O.R.E. Challenging Obstacles Require Effort FREE Fitness for the whole family. Tuesday 5-6 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Contact 850-745-6045 or CORE at 850-224-1177. Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, selfdefense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, meets at the library in Medart at 10 a.m.; and also meets at 6:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce 2140-C Crawfordville Highway (just south of Lindys). CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Sept. 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Thursday, Sept. 18 The WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION in cooperation with New Bridge Hope Missionary Baptist Church will be presenting a CANDIDATE FORUM in the recreation room at 7 p.m. New Bridge Hope is located across from Macks Meats, 1282 Spring Creek Hwy. The forum will be held for the county commission candidates in Districts 2 and 4. THE TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA PARTNERSHIP will host its quarterly meeting from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library at 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. The meeting is open to the public and all community members are encouraged to attend. To request information, please contact the County Tobacco Prevention Specialist Tonya Hobby at (850) 926-0400. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. Spouses, Caregivers and Friends are welcome. For more information, call 926-6050. The 2014 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS BANQUET at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center will feature a social hour at 6 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Reservation deadline passed. Call 926-1848. Friday, Sept. 19 NAMI WAKULLAS BBQ and FISH FRY will be at Hudson Park between 4 and 7 p.m. Plates with sh or BBQ chicken, and coleslaw, potato salad, hushpuppies, dessert and tea/water. The cost is $8 per plate and $10 for a combo. Ages 8 and under free. For information for the NAMI Wakulla programs or event, please contact the NAMI Wakulla Of ce at 850-9261033. FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE WAR EAGLES AFTER PARTY, hosted by Promise Land Ministries, will present the band The Ransomed from 10 to 11:30 p.m. after the football game, at 3167 Coastal Hwy. by Dollar General and WHS. Free admission, limited seating. Saturday, Sept. 20 2014 COASTAL CLEANUP begins at 9 a.m. on at Woolley Park headquarters or your chosen site. At 11:30 a.m., meet at Woolley Park in Panacea for lunch and prize giveaways. Site Locations: St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Lighthouse Road; Shell Point at the Pavilion Bottoms Road at the boat launch; Mashes Sands at the park area; St. Marks San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park at the gate. Visit our website: www.kwcb.org and follow us on FACEBOOK. Join Jim Stevenson, Florida Springs expert, on a guided tour through the WAKULLA SPRINGS BASIN with nine different stops of interest. Follow along the journey of water as it ows from Tallahassee to Wakulla Springs. Departs by car caravan from Tallahassee Community College parking lot at 8 a.m. Tour concludes overlooking Wakulla Springs at noon. $18 per person, $10 per student, includes admission into Wakulla Springs State Park. For reservation, call 850-926-3376. A BLOCK PARTY IN SOPCHOPPY will be 5 to 8 p.m. by the old depot. The event will feature free barbecue at 6 p.m., music, preaching, praying and singing. Bring a lawn chair and a friend. Monday, Sept. 22 NAMI Wakullas Septembers public programs topic will be Personal Stories of Mental Illness. We will hear from individuals living with mental illness and how they live successful lives as well as their family members on at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Hwy. NAMI Basics begins at 6 p.m. at the Community Center. NAMI Basics is a free program designed for parents/caretakers of a child who is exhibiting signs of a mental illness or a child who has behavioral issues. The parent/caretaker receives coping skills, education, support, potential treatment plans for the child, and other information for the entire family. Upcoming EventsWednesday, September 24 A MEET AND GREET FOR STEVE CUSHMAN, Candidate for County Commissioner, District 4 will be at the home of Joan Hendrix, 438 Beechwood Drive, Crawfordville on at 6:30 p.m. Ask him questions about your special concerns. Attire is casual and guests are welcome to bring a partner. Food and drinks will be served. Thursday, Sept. 25 A CANDIDATE FORUM sponsored by The Wakulla News will be at 7 p.m. at the Community Center. The event is hosted by the countys Democratic and Republican parties. Wakulla Senior Citizens Center Presents: MURDER AT THE FOUR DEUCES on Sept. 25 at 6:30 p.m. and Sept. 28 at 2:30 p.m. at the R.H. Carter Senior Citizens complex featuring Wakulla High School dramatis personae. This will be fun, a murder mystery dinner theater, with audience participation. Tickets $30, includes dinner and show. Proceeds to support Meals on Wheels and other services provided at the center. Call 926.7145 or visit: www.wakullaseniorcitizens.com.Friday, Sept. 26 A BARBECUE FUNDRAISER for Jenna Strickland and family will from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Shriners Club at 4141 Crawfordville Hwy. Jenna will be going to Boston Childrens Hospital to have her sixth open heart surgery. The family is in need of help with medical, travel and lodging expenses associated with the surgery. Barbecue plates are $8 pulled pork sandwich, baked beans and coleslaw. Pre-ordered lunch delivery is available to local organizations. Contact Paige 528-2647 or Rhonda 528-1990. EDEN SPRINGS NURSING AND REHAB provider invites everyone to join them from 7 to 9:30 p.m. for their Fifth Annual Senior Prom. This year the theme is s Sock Hop. Heavy hor doeuvres will be served, refreshments and entertainment. Come and have fun with us at 4679 Crawfordville Hwy., 850-926-7181. FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE WAR EAGLES AFTER PARTY, hosted by Promise Land Ministries, will present the musician Jeremy Vanderloop from 10 to 11:30 p.m. after the football game, at 3167 Coastal Hwy. by Dollar General and WHS. Free admission, supervised, limited seating.Saturday, Sept. 27 THE SOPCHOPPY OPRY and South Bound Band welcomes Chipola Shanachie featuring Joan, Amy and Kathrine Alderman in a debut performance at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. Tickets are $12 and may be reserved by calling 962-3711 or purchased at the door. NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY is the largest volunteer event on behalf of our public lands. At WAKULLA SPRINGS, volunteers are needed to plant trees along Cherokee Sink from 9 a.m. to noon. This project will help prevent soil erosion and restore the natural vegetation. To register, call Jackie Turner 5617281.Tuesday, Sept. 30 GREEN DRINKS, hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, will be at 6:30 p.m., at Wakulla Springs Lodge. Roger Pinholster will give a presentation about the Big Bend Maritime Centers boatbuilding classes. Friday, Oct. 3 FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE WAR EAGLES AFTER PARTY, hosted by Promise Land Ministries, will present the band Canopy Red from 10 to 11:30 p.m. after the football game, at 3167 Coastal Hwy. by Dollar General and WHS. Free admission, supervised, limited seating. Government MeetingsMonday, Sept. 22 The BOCC will have its regular meeting at 6 p.m. at the County Commission Chambers. The RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE public meeting will be at 6 p.m. at the Community Center, to provide feedback to commissioners, staff and the parks director relating to the recreational programs of the department.Monday, Sept. 29 The HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMITTEE is holding a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room.Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Wakulla Commission Candidate Forum New Bridge Hope 7 p.m. NAMI Barbecue and Fish FryHudson Park4 to 7 p.m.2014 Annual Coastal CleanupWoolley Park, Panacea9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.Sopchoppy Block Party Old Depot 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday FridaySaturdayThis Saturday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla Sept. 18 Sept. 22 Rogue (rock) Sept. 19, 20, 21 at Riverside Cafe, St. Marks Mae West Band, Sept. 26, 27 at Riverside Cafe, St. MarksLive music in Wakulla

PAGE 22

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 thewakullanews.com Also Annoying Arab Beast Calm Cant Club Cows Deed Disk Distant Done Drama Easy Eats Enables Ends Forth Hail Hoped Indians Individual Inside Into Jaws Joining Laid Leaned Lent Lets Lose Lungs Must Near Netted News Oral Partial Pies Polar Prints Putting Queue Rake React Rice Riots Roar Rocks Rubs Sake Seek Skip Spaced Streak Suns Team Tear Term Thud Tidy TreeUnderstandingUpon Used The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 7B Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSUREDA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 850528-2371 or 850926-7461 Call for All of Your Lawn Care Needs!FREE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Specialty Cuts F lat TopsCuts F eather Locks Low Lights Low L i g g h h t t s s 850 926-602027 AZALEA DR. Behind CVS & Bealls, Crawfordville F acial WaxingsColor Highlights Perms FREE ESTIMATESWorry Free with A to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414 Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Call Jerry Payne Today! Lowest Rates in the Area A/C Compressors and Evaporator A/C Leak check Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Todays New Ads $$$ CASH REWARD$$$ BAG LOST ON HWY98 on Sat. 9/6/14 Multi-color, Fish print, duffel bag. Contains Personal/sentimental items (shoes, cheap jewelry, etc.) Bad blew off back of truck in/near Sopchoppy. PLEASE, PLEASE CALLLYNN at #706-540-8277 CASH REW ARD!! FSBO Woodville Hwy Double wide on 2 1/2 acres $39,000. cash (850) 421-1140 $$$ CASH REWARD$$$ BAG LOST ON HWY98 on Sat. 9/6/14 Multi-color, Fish print, duffel bag. Contains Personal/sentimental items (shoes, cheap jewelry, etc.) Bad blew off back of truck in/near Sopchoppy. PLEASE, PLEASE CALLLYNN at #706-540-8277 CASH REW ARD!! LOST Elderly neutered Male Boston Terrier black/white, lost Sunday 8/31 in the vicinity of Longleaf Drive area. pls call (850) 556-0666 *W ANTED T AX PREP ARERS Jackson Hewitt Tax Service is seeking motivated tax preparers with exceptional customer service skills and the ability to learn and grow with our fast paced organization. Our tax preparation classes are scheduled to begin on 9/22/2014. Satisfactory completion of this tax course will provide the ideal candidates with the opportunity to earn extra income this coming season. If you are interested in growing and joining our professional team, contact us at (850) 514-2727 or you can email us at jhtaxschool@outlook.com. EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Heavy Equipment Operators Needed Nationwide Get Hands-On training working Bulldozers, Excavators, Backhoes. Certifications also offered. Lifetime job placement assistance. VABenefits Eligible! Call (904) 549-6055 BUSY Growing Automotive Shophas a Full Time opening for a General Shop Helper work will consist of doing Alignments, Tire work, Oil Changes and Minor Repair. Training available for motivated individual with room to grow. Pay equal to ability. Apply in person at: Crawfordville Auto and Tire 2170 Crawfordville Hwy. btwn 10:00am and 2:00pm M-F Church PianistLocal Church seeking someone who desires to serve The Lord with their gift of playing the piano/ keyboard in worship services. If you or someone you know is interested in such an opportunity to use that gift in Gods service please contact (850) 294-0972 DRIVERSCDL-A:Home EVERY Weekend! ALL Loaded/ Empty Miles Paid! Dedicated Southeast! Or Walk Away Lease: No Money Down,1-855-971-8525 AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here -Get FAAcertified with hands on training in Aviation Maintenance. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 CRAWFORDVILLE9/20 & 9/21 8a-2p Crafts and household items. 214 Duncan Dr. ATTENTION: VIAGRAand CIALIS USERS!Acheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special $99. FREE Shipping! 100% Guaranteed. CALLNOW: 1-800-943-8953 DIRECTV starting at $24.95/mo. Free 3-Months of HBO, St arz, SHOWTIME & CINEMAX. FREE RECEIVER Upgrade! 2014 NFLSunday Ticket Included with Select Packages. Some exclusions apply -CALL 1-800-915-8620 DISH TV RETAILERStarting $19.99/ mo. (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SA VE Up to 50% Ask About SAME DA Y INST ALLA TION!! CALL1-800-605-0984 Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors.Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800-605-6035 for $750 Off. Stop scratching & gnawing. Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch No More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet... Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703 www.happyjackinc.com Wakulla Gardens Large 2 BR, 2 BA SWMH, Updated. $615. + deposit. References. 850-524-4990 FSBO Woodville Hwy Double wide on 2 1/2 acres $39,000. cash (850) 421-1140 Online Only Auction244+ Acres in Ocilla GA, Timberland & Recreational Tract Alpaha River Frontage. Bidding ends October 2nd 4pm Rowellauctions.com 800-323-8388 Bank Foreclosed UNRESTRICTED Acreage 40 acres up to 350 acres from 49,900 Excellent hunting, Deer, Turkey Creek frontage, Mountain views Towering hardwoods, Road frontage. Financing available Call 877-502-6719 or Remax 423-756-5700 24 HR. ELDERL Y CARE Fullfilling the special needs, that are unique to the Elderly in a Private Home Setting. Rebecca Darfus 850-524-5217 5231-0918 TWN 10/13 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Vehicle will be sold for towing and storage. Charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78 at 1502 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville, FL SaleDate10/13/2014, 9AM 2002 Chevy S-10 Vin # 1GCCS195828218106 Hobbys Towing & Recovery reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 1502 Shadeville Rd Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-7698 Published Sept.18, 2014. 5230-0918 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida Statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Lauren R. Torchia 25 Helena Street, Crawfordville, FL 32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failur e to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 Published September 18, 2014. 5239-0925 TWN vs. Blackwood, Christopher M. 65-2014-CA-000092 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 65-2014-CA-000092 MOREQUITY, INC., Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER M. BLACKWOOD; JANICE L. BLACKWOOD; CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sept. 3, 2014, and entered in 65-2014-CA-000092 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein MOREQUITY, INC., is the Plaintiff and CHRISTOPHER M. BLACKWOOD; JANICE L. BLACKWOOD; CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC. are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse Crawfordville FL 32327, at 11:00 AM on October 9, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 35 AND 36, BLOCK WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5 day of September, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before 5240-0925 TWN vs. Johnson, Susan L. 2013 CA 000370 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2013 CA 000370 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. SUSAN L. JOHNSON, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: BRIAN C. JOHNSON, JR. 51 CONCORD ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 OR 3208 SPRINGDALE DRIVE, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32312 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HERBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: LOT 11, BLOCK GREINERS ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, on Nathan Ferris Stenstrom, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 8 day of Sept., 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Published 18 & 25, 2014. B&H# 336550 APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE COMMERCIAL1,500 sq. ft. $1,500HOUSE3BR2.5BA 1,664 sq. ft. $1,100TOWN HOME3BR/2.5BA 1,440 sq. ft. $900MOBILE HOMES4BR/2BA 1,680 sq. ft. $875 3BR/2BA 1,296 sq. ft. $900 RENTALS: Wakulla Realty 850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. 8AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDS!AUTUMNSEPT 19 & 20SEPTEMBERSYARD SALEBIG Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad inFor As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Please Recycle

PAGE 24

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 thewakullanews.com the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 Published September 18 & 25, 2014. 13-1721514-43655 5217-0918 TWN vs. Graffeo, Alexander S. 2013 000365 CA AXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2013 000365 CA AXMX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. ALEXANDER S. GRAFFEO; DIANNE J. GRAFFEO; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 12, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2013 000365 CA AXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff and ALEXANDER S. GRAFFEO; DIANNE J. GRAFFEO; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE in WAKULLA County, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 2nd day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Begin at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of Lot 35 of Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 19 25 East along the Westerly boundary of the Northwest quarter of said Lot 35 a distance of 366.25 feet, thence run North 70 56 52 East 656.78 feet thence run North 19 27 05 West, 176.92 feet, thence run South 70 53 50 West, 121.05 feet thence run North 18 43 34 West, 189.43 feet thence run South 70 56 52 West, 537.91 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to a 30.00 foot roadway and utility easement over and across the Easterly 30.00 feet thereof. Together with a 30.00 foot wide non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described property, to wit: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of Lot 35 of Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 19 25 00 East 785.06 feet to a point, thence run North 71 20 35 East 657.08 feet, thence run North 19 27 05 West 600.25 feet to a concrete monument marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of beginning, run thence North 70 53 50 East 531.10 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 19 11 14 East 315.20 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 70 49 06 East 380.50 feet to a point on the West boundary of State Road S-365, thence run in a Southerly direction along the West boundary of said 5218-0918 TWN vs. Thomas, Cecelia B. 65-2012-CA-000422 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 65-2012-CA-000422 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CECELIA B. THOMAS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOIMINEE FOR LEHMAN BROTHERS BANK, FSB, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK; OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000422, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is the Plaintiff and CECELIA B. THOMAS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LEHMAN BROTHERS BANK, FSB, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANT N/K/A SCOTT MCFARLAND are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 25 day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 20 OF OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE RE-PLAT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 102, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 20 day of May, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Choice Legal Group, P.A.P.O. Box 9908, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-9908 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com Published September 11 & 18, 2014. 11-22721 5219-0918 TWN vs. McMullen, Margaret 65-2012-CA-000317 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000317 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2006-EMX6, Plaintiff, VS. MARGARET MCMULLEN; LISA WHIDDON; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on January 24, 2014 in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000317, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2006-EMX6 is the Plaintiff, and MARGARET MCMULLEN; LISA WHIDDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARGARET MCMULLEN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LISA WHIDDON N/K/A DENNIS WHIDDON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A JAMES GLAVEY; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A CAROL GLAVEY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Brent X. Thurmond will sell to the highest bidder for cash at front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 am on the 2 day of October, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 32, BLOCK A, AMELIA WOOD SUBDIVISION, UNIT NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 28, 2014 CLERK OF THE COURT Brent X. Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Aldridge/Connors, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, Florida 33445 Phone: 561-392-6391, Fax: 561-392-6965 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published September 11 & 18, 2014. 1113-600905 5220-0918 TWN vs. Cotton, Alzada 65-2008-CA-000269 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000269 DIVISION: CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ALZADA COTTON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 26, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 65-2008-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC (1) is the Plaintiff and ALZADA COTTON; THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 2nd day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: (1) Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. LOT 42, THE FARM, PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 80 CHURCHILL DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 323270000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on August 27, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled 5234-0925 TWN vs. Shiver, Mark Worth 12-194-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-194-CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-10, PLAINTIFF, VS. MARK WORTH SHIVER A/K/A MARK W. SHIVER A/K/A MARK SHIVER, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on Oct. 9, 2014, at 11:00 AM, at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for the following described property: COMMENCE AT AN OLD IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF LOT 76 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 76, A DISTANCE OF 732.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 76, A DISTANCE OF 133.65 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 76, RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 00 WEST 208.71 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 7 OF BLOCK T OF HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT NO 4, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 38 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARIES OF LOTS 7 AND 6 OF SAID BLOCK T, 133.65 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 00 EAST 208.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.641 OF AN ACRE, MORE OR LESS. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein DATED: July 9, 2014 [COURT SEAL] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of the Court Gladstone Law Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Published September 18 & 25, 2014. 12-003055 5235-0925 TWN vs. Bailey, Charles T. 65-2011-CA-000009 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000009 Section: ________ CITIMORTGAGE, INC Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES T. BAILEY; PAMELA J. BAILEY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 6, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 65-2011-CA-000009 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 9th day of October, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statues, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 29 CASORA ESTATES UNIT NO. 1 (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (WITH BRASS CAP) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 90, (ALSO BEING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 85) OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 274.40 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 755.26 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF RUTLAND ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 428.94 FEET TO A ONE INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 243.32 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 429.99 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RUTLAND ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 243.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 2.40 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 1995 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, ID GAFLR75A61585WE, FLORIDA TITLE NO. 67119525. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida this 29th day of August, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Published September 18 & 25, 2014. FL-97004559-10 5236-0925 TWN vs. McGhee, Paul E. 65 2013 CA 000395 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO: 65 2013 CA 000395 MOREQUITY, INC., Plaintiff, vs. PAUL E. MCGHEE A/K/A PAUL MCGHEE; GAIL MCGHEE; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sept. 3, 2014, and entered in 65 2013 CA 000395 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein MOREQUITY, INC., is the Plaintiff and PAUL E. MCGHEE A/K/A PAUL MCGHEE; GAIL MCGHEE; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse Crawfordville FL 32327, at 11:00 AM on October 9, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 2, BLOCK B, AMELIAWOOD SUBDIVISION, UNIT 2, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 26, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5 day of September, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 Published September 18 & 25, 2014. 13-1721513-16634 5237-0925 TWN vs. Blades, John M. 65-2013-CA-000212 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000212 SPARTA GP HOLDING REO CORP, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN M. BLADES, ET AL, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sept. 9, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000212 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which SPARTA GP HOLDING REO CORP, is the Plaintiff and John M. Blades; Rena Blades AKA Rena M. Blades and St. Marks Rivers Edge Homeowners Association, Inc., are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 9th day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 11, ST. MARKS RIVERS EDGE COMMUNITY, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 44 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 103 ST. MARKS RIVERS EDGE DR ST. MARKS FL 32355 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 9 day of September, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 Published September 18 & 25, 2014. 020473 F01 5238-0925 TWN vs. Dunn, Erik W. 652014CA000087CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 652014CA000087CAAXMX FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FANNIE MAE), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA Plaintiff, vs. ERIK W. DUNN; ASHLEY L. LYNCH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIK W. DUNN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ASHLEY L. LYNCH; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sept. 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 652014CA000087CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (FANNIE MAE), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA is Plaintiff and ERIK W. DUNN; ASHLEY L. LYNCH; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIK W. DUNN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ASHLEY L. LYNCH; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE in WAKULLA County, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 9 day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 32, BLOCK 19, WAKULLA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 4 day of September, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services) Kahane & Associates, P.A.8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954)382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954)382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com Published September 18 & 25, 2014 14-00573 court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published September 11 & 18, 2014. F 08109025 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3BR/1BA, $875 Sec. Dep. $875 Rent. No Smoking/No Pets 3BR/2BA Mobile Home, $800 Sec. Dep. $750 Rent 3BR/2BA, $750. Mo., $800. Deposit. No Smoking/No Pets. Long-Term & Vacation RentalsCheck out our Alligator Point Beach Rentals at www.obreatly.comLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2619 Surf Rd. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 54 Cardinal Lane Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyEED TO RET YOUR HOUE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 9B State Road S-365 a distance of 31.68 feet, more or less, thence run South 70 49 06 West 375.83 feet, more or less, thence run North 19 11 14 West 315.20 feet, more or less, thence run South 70 53 50 West 500.97 feet, thence run North 19 27 05 West 30.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 13 day of August, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services) Kahane & Associates, P.A.8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954)382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954)382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com Published September 11 & 18, 2014 13-05919 5216-0918 TWN Dee, Wendy Sue 2014-CP-81 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 2014-CP-81 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF WENDY SUE DEE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of WENDY SUE DEE, deceased, File Number 2014-CP-81, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was June 18, 2014; that the total value of the estate is $12,000 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address DAVID L. DEE, II 3102 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is September 11, 2014. Petitioner: David L. Dee, II 3102 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Petitioner: Deirdre A. Farrington, Florida Bar No. 488690 Farrington Law Office, P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 Telephone: (850) 926-2700 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com Published September 11 & 18, 2014. 5233-0925 TWN Amison, Karen Melinda 14-77-CP Notice of Admin. & Notice to Cred. PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 14-77-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF KAREN MELINDA AMISON NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL PERSONS INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE: YOU ARE NOTIFIED that the administration of the Estate of Karen Melinda Amison, file number 2014-77-CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, the address of which is the Wakulla County Courthouse. The Personal Representatives attorney is set forth below. All persons having claims or demands against the Estate are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file with the Clerk of the above Court a written statement of any claim or demand they may have. Each claim must be in writing and must indicate the basis for the claim, the name and address of the creditor or his agent or attorney and the amount the claim, if secured, the security shall be described. The claimant shall deliver sufficient copies of the claim to the Clerk to enable the Clerk to mail a copy to the Personal Representative. All persons interested in the Estate to whom a copy of this Notice of Administration has been mailed are required, WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE, to file any objection they may have, or the qualifications of the Personal Representative, or the venue or jurisdiction of the Court. Dated this 2nd day of September, 2014. /s/ Barbara Jean Throne Florida Bar No. 776505 Chipola Law P.A. 17451 Main Street North, Blountstown, FL 32424 (850) 674-3333/Fax (850) 674-3335 ChipolaLAW@aol.com Counsel for Personal Representative Kathryn Edenfield Personal Representative 17345 NW 4th Street, Blountstown, Florida 32424 Published September 18 & 25, 2014. 5241-0925 TWN Britt, William Howard 14-CP-000080 Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 14-CP-000080 IN RE: ESTATE OF WILLIAM HOWARD BRITT Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of WILLIAM HOWARD BRITT, deceased, whose date of death was July 10, 2014 and whose social security number is xxx-xx-0092, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of the notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTIONS 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 18, 2014. /s/ HOWARD DALE BRITT Personal Representative 12 Roland Harvey Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 /s/ Steve M. Watkins, III Fla. Bar No.: 0794996 Attorney for Personal Representative 41 Commerce Street, Apalachicola, FL 32320 (850) 653-1949 Published September 18 & 25, 2014. 5193-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 034 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR OR DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 168 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 03-5S-02W-000-02488-000 Description of property: 3-5S-2W P-15-M-40A .08 OF ACRE IN SE 1/4 OF SEC 3 OR 23 P 311 OR 912 P 840 DC OR 913 P 260 ORDER OR 913 P 262 ORDER Name in which assessed RONNETTE CRUSE Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5194-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 035 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1245 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-060-000-10077-003 Description of property: A PRCL IN HS LOT 60 BEING .50 ACRES M/L DESC IN OR 600 P 605 Name in which assessed ARTHUR & SHELBY W JEFFERSON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5195-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 036 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1368 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-077-014-10389-001 Description of property: GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 1 LOT 1 LESS ST RD R/W DB 31 P 405 & OR 50 P 277 OR 50 P 277 & OR 104 P 337 OR 179 P 187 OR 196 P 153 Name in which assessed R. E. M. Developers LLC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5196-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 037 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1440 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10779-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOT 56 DB 58 P 381 Name in which assessed Lawson & Bernice Woodham Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5197-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 038 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1443 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10786-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOT 64 DB 59 P 52 OR 594 P 103 OR 627 P 840 Name in which assessed Carlos Alberto Giraldo Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5198-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 039 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1512 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-11077-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK J LOT 17 DB 59 P 81 Name in which assessed Howard E Martin Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5199-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 040 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PPF HOLDINGS III L TD the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2090 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 00-00-073-112-10189-016 Description of property: AMELIAWOOD SUBD BLOCK C LOT 13 OR 52 P 43 & OR 54 P 888 OR 687 P 802 ORDER Name in which assessed Lisa Sanders Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5200-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 041 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DA VID OR TINA SIMMONS the holder of the following 5221-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 026 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property as amended, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1086 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-034-012-09561-000 Description of property: WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 5 BLOCK 48 LOT 32 OR 42 P 401 OR 610 P 563 Name in which assessed SELASSIE, INC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 23, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5222-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 042 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DA VID OR TINA SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 485 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 24-2S-01W-000-03980-000 Description of property: 24-2S-1W P-14-1-M-65 5.06 AC M/L IN THE SW 1/4 OF THE SE 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 IN SEC 24 OR 68 P 847 OR 225 P 18 Name in which assessed CODY BLAKE SMITH Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 28, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5223-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 043 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DA VID OR TINA SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 164 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 01-5S-02W-000-02440-000 Description of property: 1-5S-2W P-9-M-52 LYING IN NW 1/4 OF SEC 1 DB 41 185 & OR 96 P 732 Name in which assessed THOMAS P POSEY Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 28, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5224-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 044 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK CUSTODIAN FOR TLCF 2012A, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1023 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 17-3S-01E-000-05261-000 Description of property: 17-3S-1E P-7-M-72 W 1/2 OF SE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 DB 11 P 284 Name in which assessed JANE GILMORE Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 28, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5225-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 045 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that ALL SEASON the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 142 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 25-3S-02W-332-01601-052 Description of property: SAVANNAH FOREST S/D LOT 52 OR 726 P 628 OR 730 P 401 Name in which assessed WAKULLA FOREST GENERAL PARTNERSHIP Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5226-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 047 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1030 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 22-3S-01E-236-05401-007 Description of property: DOE FOREST RECORDED SUB LOT 3 CONTAINING 5.01 AC M/L OR 302 P 689 Name in which assessed SHERRI S CHASON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5227-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 048 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1672 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 00-00-043-000-09801-029 Description of property: LOT 43 HS P-1-29-M-11 TRACT 60 OF UNRECORDED PLAT OF RAKIRK RANCHETTES IN W 1/2 OR 77 P 648 & 871 OR 179 P 846 OR 181 P 21 Name in which assessed HEIRS OF JESSE C PALMER JR Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. 5228-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 049 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as5229-1009 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 050 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 12, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 380 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 23-5S-02W-056-02817-013 Description of property: JOSEPH LEE ESTATES BLOCK B LOT 6,7,8,9 OR 37 P 117 & OR 67 P 963 Name in which assessed DALE & ESSIE LONG Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices sessed are as follows: Certificate # 1676 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 00-00-043-000-09807-000 Description of property: LOT 43 HS P-8-M-11 A PARCEL OF .43 AC IN E 1/2 OF LOT 43 HS LESS STATE RD R/W OR 22 P 197 & OR 66 P 764 OR 309 P 219 Name in which assessed DONNA J BASSIN Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on November 5, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: August 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published September 18, 25, October 2 & 9, 2014. certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 8 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 18-3S-04W-000-00152-008 Description of property: 18-3S-4W P-8-8-M-8 A PARCEL 70 X 100 FT IN SEC 18 OR 71 P 292 & OR 87 P 357 OR 175 P543 Name in which assessed Janie D Davie & Howell Toney Williams Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. Brain Teaser 1234 5678 9101112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2122 23 24 25 2627 282930 313233 34 35 363738 39 4041 42 43 44 45 46 4748 4950 51 5253 5455 56 575859 60 616263 64 65 6667 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 Solutions SHAM TAIL SPAS TOTO GHANA TENT OUTOFREACH SANE PRY OAT ARM CIA SUMAC ETHEL MOTELS HARLEM IRENE BETA NEST NEA DILEMMA LEO DOCS COTS DABAT HATETO AVIATE TEMPO SEWER ARE MAD MAR PAC COHO MIAMIBEACH ODOR ENDAT LIRA SEWS NODS FRED Across 1 Pillow cover 5 What a dog wags 9 Health resorts 13 The Wizard of Oz barker 14 African nation whose capital is Accra 15 Shelter for a boy scout 16 Impossible to get 18 All there 19 Ask nosy questions 20 Cracklin ___ Bran (cereal brand) 21 Hand holder? 23 FBIs sister organization 24 Poison ___ 26 Merman or Mertz 28 Places to stay for the night 31 Section of Manhattan 34 Actress Dunne or Cara35 Second Greek letter 36 Hawks home 39 Teachers org. 40 Tough choice 43 Astrological sign 44 Physicians, for short 46 Army beds 47 Touch lightly with a tissue 49 I ___ do this... 51 Take to the skies 52 Pace 54 Underground tunnel 56 ___ you kidding? 57 Irate 60 Ruin 61 ___-Man (video game)64 Salmon variety 66 Florida city 69 Stench 70 Finish by 71 Italys old currency 72 Uses a needle 73 Indicates agreement 74 One of ScoobyDoos pals Down 1 Cut it out! 2 60 minutes 3 Lawyer: abbr. 4 Cows sound 5 Letter before iota 6 Small battery 7 ___ Empire 8 Bert who played the Cowardly Lion 9 Paul and John: abbr. 10 Fruity dessert 11 Musical about an orphan 12 Take whats not yours14 Small weights 17 Committed a basketball infraction against 22 Director Gibson 24 One of 100 in D.C. 25 Orange snack food 27 Perfect score, maybe 28 Do you ___? 29 Two-color cookie 30 Students request 32 Bank conveniences 33 Aries animal 35 Ink stain 37 Chair 38 Carry 41 Cold cubes 42 Word like happily45 Tree stuff 48 Put on TV 50 Male cat 51 Expect 52 Mexican snacks 53 Eat away 55 Samms and Watson 58 I agree! 59 The Flintstones pet 61 Poker duo 62 Land measurement 63 African nation thats also a mans name65 Hospital places: abbr. 67 Do some math 68 One of Santas little helpers

PAGE 26

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 thewakullanews.com 1. GEOGRAPHY: The Yakima River flows through which U.S. state? 2. TELEVISION: What was the theme song to the sitcom Friends? 3. MUSIC: What pop music group had a hit album in 1969 titled The Age of Aquarius? 4. COMICS: Which comic strip featured a character called Dragon Lady? 5. MEDICINE: How long is the average adults spinal cord? 6. FOOD AND DRINK: What fastfood franchise featured the story of Jared S. Fogle, who lost a lot of weight eating their products? 7. LITERATURE: Where did the Grinch live in the Dr. Seuss story How the Grinch Stole Christmas!? 8. MOVIES: What was the name of the mad scientist in The Rocky Horror Picture Show? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the significance of the acronym ROY G BIV? 10. FAMOUS QUOTES: What comedian and actor once said, A day without sunshine is like, you know, night? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Washington 2. Ill Be There For You (The Rembrants) 3. The 5th Dimension 4. Terry and the Pirates 5. 17 to 18 inches 6. Subway 7. Mount Crumpit 8. Dr. Frank-N-Furter 9. A mnemonic device to remember the colors of the rainbow 10. Steve Martin g ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Travel plans could be interrupted by the re-emergence of a workplace problem that was never quite fully resolved. Deal with it at once, and then take off on that well-deserved trip. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Aspects favor cultural activities for sensuous Bovines. Attend a concert or an art show. Better yet, create something yourself (a poem, perhaps?), and dedicate it to someone special. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Respect any doubts you might now be feeling about a new situation. They could be re ecting your inner awareness that some essential information might be missing. Check it out. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Its important to start the new month with as clean a slate as possible. Either complete all those unfinished tasks or pass them on to others who would be more than happy to take them on. LEO (July 23 to August 22) This is a good time to cut down on expenses and tame that urge to splurge. Applying some nancial discipline now could help the Big Cat ride out a possible monetary crunch later on. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Money matters are dominant this week. Recheck your accounts and make sure theyre up-todate. Also, pay more attention to personal issues before they become major problems. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) You might be tempted to employ the same tactics as your adversary, but that could backfire. Better to use the same balanced approach that has worked for you before and could again. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A changing workplace environment could stir up confusion as well as apprehension. Best to ignore the rumors and get the facts. You could nd that the changes bring positive elements. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Communication is easier this week with people ready and eager to hear what you have to say. Also, check for possible technical problems before you start your new project. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Aspects favor change for the usually traditional Goat. Opening your mind to possibilities you had ignored could lead you to make decisions you once considered improbable. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Making personal as well as professional adjustments to changing conditions might be easier with more information explaining the hows and whys of the situations in question. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) With a growing tide of positive reactions to buoy your con dence, this could be the right time to put the nishing touches to your new project and get it well and truly launched. BORN THIS WEEK: You have a gift for setting an example of quiet, calm reasoning in the midst of chaotic conditions. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 Page 11B 000IWYWwww.chronicleonline.com/divanight Sponsored by AAA Western Wear Alpaca Magic Arbonne Baiter Body Transformations Citrus County Jazzercise Citrus Pest Management Color Me Wicked Complete Family Connollys Connors Gifts Crystal Auto Dental Cosmetic Dr Santa Cruz Eclectic Ends Salon Everyones Massage Florida Department of Health Citrus County Frame Design The Garden Shed Gardner Audiology Georgieos Hair Designs Gold Rush Heart of the Garden HPH Hospice Inverness Yoga It Works Wraps Jafra Cosmetics John Meyers Locks/ Mamas Juice Plus Karma La Te Da Boutique Complete Family Dentistry and Implant Dentistry M Hair Studio and the Spa at M Mez Mer Eyes Mosaic Tile Oragami Owl Rock Solid Creations Rodan & Field Skin Care Silipada Tracy Specialty Gems Suncoast Dermatology & Skin Surgery Center Suncoast Plumbing & Electric Susan Reynolds The Honey Hole The New Image Med Spa Thirty One by Valorie Timberlane Chiropractic Todd F Sisto MD FACS Towne and Country All Waverley Florist Whalen Jewelers Wine Shop Zebra Candles Zen Zone Will Construction Zibye Weight 50+ Vendors 000IXDP Saturday, October 4, 2014 VIP Preview 5-6pm Event 6-9pm *Limited Availability. Taxes not included. *For tickets only go to the Chronicle site listed below.Vip $55 advance only$149 General Admission $25 advance $30 at the door Get Your Tickets Now!Call 800-632-6262to reserve your room www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com A weekend to get away, have fun and be treated like a Diva!Shop Til You Drop Cocktails Hors doeuvres Massage Jewelry Clothing Cosmetics & More! Over $3500 in Door Prizes 9301 Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL 1 Night Stay & 2 General Admission Diva Tickets BEST Local News, Events, Coupons and More! Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Please accept my 12 month subscription at the price of $27Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:TheWakulla newsor go to www.thewakullanews.com and click subscribeSavings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.Promo Code: FALL Expires: 09-30-14 $27All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $27. Local delivery area only. COASTAL CLEANUPSATURDAY, SEPT. 20 9:00 a.m.:00 noonHEADQUARTERS Woolley Park in PanaceaWAKULLA SPRINGS GREEN DRINKSTUESDAY, SEPT. 30 6:30 p.m.Special Guest Speaker: Roger Pinholster, President of Florida Foresights and Chief Builder and Instructor at Big Bend Maritime Center, Larry Tucker Boat Building Center Panacea, FL THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS Air Con of WakullaFLAG Credit Union Cook Insurance AgencyPublix City of St. MarksWakulla Senior Citizens Center Ray & Linda BolesHarrison Bail Bonds Edwin Brown & AssociatesWhole Foods Market Shepard Accounting & Tax Service Hydra Engineering & Construction Florida Department of Health, Wakulla 180 Florida Department of Health, Wakulla Healthiest Weight Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park Homestead ImprintsThe Wakulla Sign Company Gulf Coast Lumber, WakullaPurple Frog LLC Paul G. Johnson & AssociatesRotary Club of Wakulla Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin Realtors Best Western Plus Wakulla In & Suites Free and Open to the Public

PAGE 28

Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 18, 2014 thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, September 13, the WHS cross country teams traveled to Harders Park in Panama City, along with 16 other full teams for the Bay Invitational Meet. The local runners last attended this meet about ve to six years ago, but found a radically new course and venue. The course was challenging, but in great shape, with the sti ing hot weather the only drawback. The girls varsity race once again led off the competition with 12 full teams in attendance and 90 runners in their race. A quarter mile into the race, it had turned into a four person battle with two Choctawhatchee girls, one Arnold runner and local standout, Haleigh Martin. The four were together at the one mile mark and then entered a portion of the course where the runners couldnt be seen. When they emerged, Martin had opened about a ve second lead on the other three. At the two mile mark, she was holding her lead with the Choctaw girls still about five seconds behind and the Arnold girl about two seconds behind them. At this point, the Chactaw coach was overheard saying that his girls were just pacing off Martin and would pass her in the last mile. However, apparently Martin didnt know the plan and over the nal mile, not only held her lead, but increased it to 13 seconds as she won the overall title in a the ne time of 20:53. This was Martins second overall win in the last two weeks. The Choctow girls both nished in 21:06. Senior Lydia Wiedeman ran a strong race and cracked the top 15, nishing 14th in 23:11. Connie Lewis ran a solid race, nishing in 20th place in a time of 23:42. Rounding out the scoring for WHS was Emily Lawrence (29th, 25:16) and Juliana Prestia (35th, 26:36). Overall, the girls team placed fourth. BOYS VARSITYThe boys varsity race was next on tap with 16 full teams and almost 120 runners toeing the starting line. The local team fought hard with three runners cracking the top 20. Sophomore Bryce Cole once again led the way for the WHS boys squad and was the only one to place in the top 10, nishing ninth in a good time of 18:07. Senior Lane Williams was next, nishing in 18th place in 18:42, with Junior Albert Smythe next in 18:53 and 20th place. Rounding out the scoring for WHS were Travis Parks (24th, 19:15) and Dylan Pebbles (35th, 19:49). The depth of the boys team showed, as they placed third overall, trailing only Bleckley County High School from Georgia and Niceville High School from the Panhandle. JUNIOR VARSITY Next on tap was the Open/Mixed 5000 Meter Run that also served as the JV competition for the day. WHS was represented by 20 JV boys, three JV girls, two coaches and four parents. With the race not starting until almost 11 a.m., it afforded a great opportunity for all to share the race experience, enjoy the new course and suffer in the brutal heat. Evan Guarino (2nd/20:07) and Riley Welch (6th/20:32) were the top two local nishers and the only ones to place in the top 10. The girls were led by Peri Thompson (28:54) and Jeanna Prisco (29:00). Doug Cole (Bryces dad) was the top male parent and Nancy Lewis (Connies mom) was the top female parent. Coach Greg James was the top coach. The big news from the race, however, was that the local squad had 11 boys run between 21:30 and 22:50, including freshman Shawn St. Martin who ran 22:08 in his rst ever 5K. A great showing for a group of young runners. Runners setting new PRs (personal records)this week included Natalie Henderson (38:55), Jeanna Prisco (29:00), Peri Thompson (28:54), Juliana Prestia (26:36) and Alyssa McIver (29:36) for the girls and Christian Glover (28:26), Bryce Jolly (26:01), Scott Lloyd (22:50), Jacob Dismuke (22:50), Riley Carrier (22:49), Dalton Gray (22:46), Dalton Wood (22:19), Alex Smythe (22:17), and Caleb Wiedeman (22:09). The teams have a bye week this week and will resume competition on Sept. 27, at the Marlin Dash, in Panama City, hosted by Arnold High School. CROSS COUNTRYMartin notches second win of the seasonPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAbove, local standout, Haleigh Martin won the overall title in the time of 20:53. Below, WHS boys team placed third overall. Discover exciting new professional opportunities and tap into the high-demand healthcare market today with online courses to fit your schedule.FREE* Course Options for the first 100 students age 50 and over! Health Information Management HIV & Bloodborne Pathogens Broaden your career horizons with TCCs Plus 50 online classes! Tallahassee Community College Division of Workforce Development (850) 201-8760 workforce@tcc.fl.edu www.TCC.fl.edu/Plus50 *Students under 50 may enroll for $15/course TCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc..edu for full statement. ( 850 ) 926-GOLF ( 4653 )Opening Soon! GOLF COURSEBe A Member Today $250$125mo payments start March 1, 2015 As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney