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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County School Board voted unanimously on Monday night to approve an 8.43 millage levy and a $41 million total budget. The one citizen who spoke on the budget was Missy Rudd, Wakulla Classroom Teacher Association president, who indicated the teachers unions support for the budget, which includes payraises for district employees. There were only a handful of citizens present when the school board voted on the budget, and the audience included two newly elected school board members, Verna Brock and Jo Ann Daniels, who have not yet been sworn-in. Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce praised the school board for its courage in going forward with the budget, noting the payraises make amends for what the district could not nancially in past years because of the economy. The millage of 8.43 represents $8.43 in school board taxes for every $1,000 of assessed property value. An average home valued at $100,000 with a $50,000 homestead exemption would pay $632 in school board taxes. The local millage rate amounts to $7.4 million of the $36 million in revenues. There is more than $4.3 million in fund balances that are being carried forward to create the $41 million budget. The school board dipped into the fund balances for nearly $1 million to cover pay raises for personnel and other expenses this year, leaving fund balances with some $2.4 million. The bulk of the revenues for schools comes from the state, $28 million, or almost four times the revenue from local taxes. Most of the expenditures in the budget, more than $21 million, are for teacher salaries. Operation of Plant is the next biggest budget item at more than $4.4 million. Pearce said the district had seen some growth at the high school level of more than 140 students, though that wont become of cial until the October student counts. Of the local tax assessment, this is the last year of the .56 mill levy that paid for renovations at Wakulla High School 10 years ago as the debt will be paid off. A local option half-mill, passed by referendum last year, will expire the next year, 2016. Public Notices .............................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ........................................Page 4A Street Beat ..................................................Page 5A Church .........................................................Page 6A Obituaries ...................................................Page 7A Community ..................................................Page 8A Outdoors ................................................. Page 10A Water Ways ...............................................Page 11A Weekly Roundup .......................................Page 12A Week in Wakulla ........................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .........................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla .........................................Page 16A Sports .........................................................Page 1B In The Huddle ..............................................Page 2B Thinking Outside the Book ..........................Page 3B Classi eds ...................................................Page 4B Legal Notices ..............................................Page 4B Comics ........................................................Page 7BINDEX OBITUARIES Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 CentsServing Wakulla County For More Than A Century Serving Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyPublished Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyOur 119th Year, 37th Issue Thursday, September 11, 2014Sports SportsWakulla falls in OT, 42-41 School board approves $41M budgetCampaign underway to buy uniforms for countys Ability United cheerleadersStarting on Page 1B Ability United: Looking the partnews ewsThe Wakulla The Wakulla Beth ODonnell retiresCalvin C. Langston Mahaley Ruth Sanders WattsBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@wakullanews.net While leadership can be learned and developed, it is just an inherent quality in some people, like Beth ODonnell. ODonnell was honored at a retirement party at the Legacy Cafe on Sept. 3 after 33 years in education. The room was filled with colleagues, several of them former students, who stood and paid tribute to her service in the Wakulla County School System. Photos ashed on the big screen of good times at home and work, with fun facts about ODonnell and her career. She said all she ever wanted to do was teach, but ODonnell ended up attaining top leadership positions throughout her tenure. Early in her teaching career, she prayed to be placed somewhere she could make a difference. Its the teaching thats the heart of this place, she said. Its a phenomenal place to work. Just know this school district will be around a long time as a fantastic place to raise your kids and send your kids to school. She thanked her family for unconditional support, gave a shout out to dozens of colleagues, and Bobby Superintendent Robert Pearce. I have to call him Bobby, even though he calls me Ms. ODonnell, she said. Because he is younger than I am, and because I was in on your hiring when you were rst a teacher at Wakulla High School. Its time for me to go, when the superintendent is calling me Ms. ODonnell and Im calling him Bobby. Pearce presented ODonnell with a plaque, saying that he realized her true value when she worked as a guidance counselor, showing compassion and making things happen. To a really beautiful lady, with a beautiful heart, Pearce read, presenting the plaque. Now that shes retired, ODonnell said she will be spending a lot of time with family. My mom is 93, and Ill be able to spend more time with her, ODonnell said. I have an almost2-year-old grandson, and a grandbaby on the way in about a month. So I will be working with both ends of that spectrum, and enjoying both ends of it. ODonnell said she will still be available to district employees for questions and help. Ive taught half the county I think, she said. Im so proud of them. It makes me feel good to retire to see those young people in administration and teachers doing a great job. Megan Crombie, ODonnells daughter, said her mother went back for so many degrees, because the school system wanted her to have more and more responsibility. You might be thinking, those poor kids, she was never at home, she was always at school from our perspective, we never saw any of that. Crumby said their mom taught all day, would come home for dinner and family time with daughters Megan and Shannon, and then work on her studies after putting the kids to bed.Turn to Page 2ABy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netIt is important to look the part, especially when inclusion is the name of the game. Ability United currently gives 27 students with intellectual and physical disabilities at three schools Spirit Wings at Wakulla High School, Spirit Claws at Wakulla Middle School and Spirit Paws at Riversprings Middle School the opportunity to perform and show ability. But they need uniforms to complete the look of the cohesive squad they have become. A campaign is underway to raise money for at least 30 uniforms by Oct. 3, which will cost upwards of $4,200. The peer-driven program, led by cheerleaders, teaches the Ability United squad members jumps, stunts and cheers to be performed and football games and exhibitions. Micah Pafford, a 15-year-old freshman at Wakulla High School, was a cheerleader at RMS where the program originated three years ago. Cheer coach and guidance counselor Catherine Harris Small, also known as Coach Cat, asked Pafford and another friend to pick up teaching the Spirit Paws where the previous squad had left off. Pafford said learning to communicate, and understanding how the Spirit Paws learn, was a challenge at rst. They are almost just like us, but it takes them a little longer to learn, Pafford said. With the right help, they can do it in the end. We learn in other ways too. They all have special place in my heart. After a couple years working with the Spirit Paws at RMS, Pafford was recommended to carry on with Ability United at WHS, even though she was not cheering anymore.Turn to Page 5ALongtime educator steps down as assistant superintendent of schools At left, Ability United Spirit Paw cheerleader Ally Smith works on a stunt with the help of Amy Bryan. Spirit Paw Jenna Strickland waits her turn. Above, Micah Pafford. NICOLE ZEMABeth ODonnell says goodbye to colleagues, thanks her friends and family, and gives a hug to her daughter Megan at her retirement party at the Legacy Cafe on Sept. 3. School millage set at 8.43 mills, which is $7.4M of budget CONNOR HARRISONThe Navarre eld at game time. CANDIDATE FORUM AT THE ONE-STOP COMMUNITY CENTERThursday, Sept. 25 at 7p.m.Sponsored bythe Wakulla Democratic Party & the Wakulla Republican Party.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Enjoy a great meal and pick up a copy of The Wakulla news at one of these partner locations: LUNCH PARTNER FREE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER Special to The NewsA 21-year-old Panacea man was arrested Aug. 29 following an extensive methamphetamine investigation by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Narcotics Unit, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel Jacob John Oliver Sparks was arrested at a Crawfordville pharmacy while having a friend attempt to purchase materials needed to manufacture methamphetamine. The WCSO Narcotics Unit had an ongoing investigation underway to locate Sparks who was wanted on multiple felony drug charges. Investigators observed him during the afternoon hours and arrested Sparks from inside a vehicle without incident. The Narcotics Unit arrested Sparks for active warrants for possession of methamphetamines, manufacture of methamphetamines and possession of narcotics equipment and sale of methamphetamines and possession of methamphetamines from two previous investigations from earlier this year. He was also arrested on new charges of possession of methwith intent to sell and possession of drug equipment. During the search of the vehicle, deputies discovered drug paraphernalia and a substance believed to be meth. Other items were located inside the vehicle trunk that had been used to manufacture meth. Additional charges are possible as deputies sent a broken pill they found to FDLE for chemical analysis. Sparks was transported to the Wakulla County Jail where he remains under a $303,000 bond. Meth investigation concludes with arrest of Panacea man Complete Medical Care. Here in Wakulla. Now Accepting New PatientsOur Our physicians physicians have have been been providing providing comprehensive comprehensive medical medical care care for for the the families families of of Wakulla Wakulla County County for for 15 15 years. years. Treating Treating the the entire entire family family through through all all stages stages of of life, life, we we provide provide the the medical medical care care that that your your family family needs. needs. Infant, Infant, child, child, adult adult and and geriatric geriatric care care Womens Womens healthcare healthcare Minor Minor surgical surgical procedures procedures Diabetes Diabetes education education On On site site lab lab The The support support of of TMH TMH specialists specialists and and services services SAME DAY Appointments Available Our medical team invites you to call to make your appointment today at 850-926-7105. 15 Council Moore Road | Crawfordville, FL 32327 TMH Physician PartnersWAKULLA IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms WE HAVE LIVE SHRIMP!FRESH WATER TOO! IN SHOREFISHING IS F ( 850 ) 926-GOLF ( 4653 )Opening Soon! GOLF COURSE FAMILY MEMBERSHIP PKG. $300 Annually Includes FAMILY MEMBERSHIP PKG. $300 Annually Includes A A M M L Y Y M A A A A M M M I L L L Y Y M A A M M I L Y Y M I L Y FA FA F F A A F F A A A A M M M M M L M M I I I I I L L L L L Y Y L Y Y M M SOCIAL SOCIAL GOLF MEMBERSHIPS* JOIN NOW for BEST RATES Individual $1,200 Annually GOLF MEMBERSHIPS* JOIN NOW for BEST RATES Individual $1,200 Annually 20% OFF2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FLBadcock.com 850926When you OPEN a New Badcock Account Your Entire Purchase From the Front PageThis is before online degrees, she said. She was part of a mom study group that actually used to meet at McDonalds at midnight, and study together so they would not miss time with their kids. Yall know how hard working she is, but never once did it take away from our family, and I think there is something to be said about that. Several colleagues stood to speak about their friend and leader. ODonnells husband, Tim, also an educator, was so overwhelmed he could hardly speak. I am the luckiest man in the world, he said, kissing her head. Wakulla High School Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson said ODonnell was his ninth grade English teacher, and a life model to him. He said as a black male, and an athlete, he thought sports were the only path to success. I really didnt think I was that smart of a student, Nelson said. But she always made me feel like I was, that I could do it, and not just athletic-wise. I just want to say thank you. I love you, and appreciate you. ODonnell started teaching English at FSU in 1979 as a graduate assistant. She moved on to Wakulla High School in 1981, teaching the litany of English-related studies to all grade levels as department chair drama, newspaper, speech, English and humanities, for a decade. While ODonnell had a Masters in English, she subsequently attained another MA for guidance and counseling, which she did for three years. Then ODonnell served as WHS assistant principal of curriculum for nine years, for which she earned another MA in educational leadership. From there she went to the district of ce when requested by former Superintendent David Miller, where she was director of instruction. The job title changed to assistant superintendent of instruction. Besides her family, ODonnell attributes her 33 years of success to three in uential administrators in particular Judy Myhre, David Miller, and Randy Newland. When it comes to advice ODonnell gives to upcoming teachers and administrators, she said to always make decisions based on what is best for the students. Not what is easiest for you, or what might be please someone else, she said. Make a decision rst with students in mind. Thats what were there for. There have been challenges along the way. ODonnell said the hardest thing was trying to balance family, work, and still keep herself centered, And feeling like youre making a difference with both family and work. And there has been no shortage of rewards especially seeing students go on to be successful in any line of work from law to welding. But its really a great thing to see former students go into teaching, ODonnell said. Its not high paying, and its a tough job, but thats why Wakulla has great school system the teachers. Jacob J.O. Sparks Beth ODonnell retires

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 3A Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.comGov. Rick Scott is coming to Wakulla on Friday, Sept. 12, for a campaign stop on whats being billed as Lets Keep Working Tax Cut Tour. In addition to Gov. Scott, the Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee will also welcomes Gov. Bobby Jindal of Louisiana, Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey, and former congressman J.C. Watts, along with Congressman Steve Southerland and Florida House Representative Halsey Beshears. Scott is scheduled to be at the Old Courthouse at 3:30 p.m. for the campaign event.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Christian Coalition in cooperation with New Bridge Hope Missionary Baptist Church will be presenting a candidate forum on Thursday, Sept.18, in the recreation room of the church at 7 p.m. New Bridge Hope is located across from Macks Meats, 1282 Spring Creek Highway. The forum will be held for the county commission candidates in districts 2 and 4. All candidates for the races have been invited and we hope they all will attend, said Derek Howard, pastor of New Bridge Hope. We look forward to having all members of the community attend. This years format will be different. There will be no questions from the oor. We thought that this years issues are pretty clear cut, so in lieu of a question and answer format, we will ask each candidate to make a short statement on the each of the following issues. We feel that this will give each candidate an opportunity to express his position, said Jennie Jones, President of the Coalition. Each candidate will be allowed three minutes to speak on the following issues: 1) Wetlands initiative A on the ballot this Nov. 4 2) Taxes, fees and MSBUs 3) 319/98 Intersection 4) Airport 5) What you will bring to the county if elected Were excited about the forum and hope everyone has a chance to attend, said Ms. Jones. There are two things of concern to the coalition this year: Citizens knowing every candidates position and turning out to vote. So many have given so much for our right to vote. And, this being the 50th year of the civil rights act, that we have thought to make it the cornerstone of this years activitites. Refreshments will be provided.Christian Coalition to host candidate forum Sept. 18 at New Bridge HopeSpecial to The NewsAs election season gears up across Northwest Florida, DOT is reminding all citizens that state law prohibits political signs on state right of way. In Section 479.11(8), Florida Statutes provide that no signs shall be erected, used, operated, or maintained on the right of way of any highway on the State Highway System. Political signs placed on state right of way will be removed by DOT staff and placed at one of the departments operations centers. DOT personnel will make reasonable attempts to preserve campaign signs that are taken down and to provide campaign of ces an opportunity to claim the signs. The roadway right of way includes the roadway surface, concrete or grassy median, intersections, entrance and exit ramps, and a strip of land, usually bordering either side of the road, which is reserved for shoulders, drainage ditches, sidewalks, traffic signs/signals, fencing, electrical trafc signal control boxes, utility lines and future road expansion. Improperly located signs on state right of way poses a traf c safety hazard that can distract motorists or block their view, endanger the safety of individuals who are erecting signs along busy highways and present obstacles to crews who maintain roadways.Reminder on campaign sign regulationsSpecial to The NewsOn Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 6 p.m. the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce and The Wakulla News will be hosting the biennial Wakulla Chamber Political Forum at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center located at 318 Shadeville Hwy, Crawfordville (corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Hwy). The forum will present an opportunity for the candidates for Wakulla County Commissioner Districts 2 and 4 to meet the public and discuss questions submitted by voters. Questions for the forum will be accepted at wakullachamberforum.com or on a printed form published in The Wakulla News in the coming weeks, or your letter to be mailed to: Wakulla Chamber Political Forum P.O. Box 148 Crawfordville FL 32326. Deadline for submitting questions is Sept. 30. Questions will be screened and approved by the forum committee based on the following guidelines: 1. The question must be directed to all candidates. 2. The question must be concise and relevant to the current issues. If there are questions or concerns, contact Chuck Robinson, chairman of the Wakulla Chamber Political Forum Committee via email chuck@bricklauncher.com. A link to the chamber forum website is also supplied on the chamber website home page. 2014 GENERAL ELECTION CANVASSING BOARD MEETING NOTICE Audit report to state: www.wakullaelection.com The Wakulla County Canvassing Board will meet in the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections Ofce at 3115-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida on the following dates. All candidates, citizens and press is invited to attend.Henry F. Buddy Wells & Team Members SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 Notice of ComprehensiveThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled a Public Hearing before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, September 22, 2014, beginning at 6:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled:Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com.SEPTEMBER 11, 2014 Plan Text Amendment Adoption Public Hearing Applicant: Ben C. Boynton Proposal: Adoption of Comprehensive Plan text amendment to Policy 1.2.10 of the Future Land Use Element POLITICAL NOTESPolitical signs picked up recently by DOT crews on rights-of-way. Gov. Scott coming to Wakulla with big political names Chamber forum is set for Oct. 7

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThe drawing that took place on Friday afternoon was not for a new atscreen TV, FSU Homecoming game tickets, Bath and Body Works gift basket, or anything tangible. It was a drawing for scrupulousness. The drawing kicked off a follow-up process to all county elections, called the manual audit. I had assumed Elections Supervisor Buddy Wells and the canvassing board could sit back and relax until November, but I was wrong. Youve got to make sure the equipment does what its supposed to do, Wells said. I know it does. They are tested tremendously before hand. But this ensures that the ballots are all accounted for. Wells brought two (washed and empty) biscotti containers over and let me draw from them rst to randomly select a precinct, and second to draw a race that would be audited to ensure accuracy. I would rather have dug around for biscotti, but Im a good sport. Though the canvassing board and volunteers were shouting that I draw a small precinct, I closed my eyes and dug around in the bucket, ultimately drawing Precinct 10, which is Ochlockonee Bay. Then I closed my eyes and shed for a race, and selected Republican County Commission District 4. Wells brought the locked bag of early voting ballots to the table where I sat with three ladies who volunteered to help audit. Just like the night of the primaries, Wells had someone verify the numbered tag on the lock. We broke the ballots into stacks, and carefully separated Ochlockonee Bay ballots from the pile. Then those ballots were separated Republican from Democrat, counted and veri ed. The canvassing board and other volunteers worked to separate Precinct 10 from the rest of the ballots. While we picked through the stacks, Wells talked about the primary election. Were not pleased with the turnout, he said, which was 30.7 percent in Wakulla County. But even with low turnout, we still had the sixth highest turnout in the state. Statewide, Wells said the turnout averaged around 17.5 percent out of 11.8 million voters for Aug. 26s primary election. I also had an opportunity to inquire about the race we were randomly auditing, which was very close between incumbent Jerry Moore and candidate Steve Fults. Because they were separated by only 33 votes, I asked why there was not a recount. Wells said there is an automatic recount if votes are one-half of 1 percent. This race was separated by about 1.5 percent. Wells said even though a recount was not required, he was glad that I happened to draw this one. When I asked what happens to the old ballots, Wells said they are kept for 22 months. Records retention, its called, in case there is ever a question. I was surprised when one of the volunteers came across a completely blank ballot. Wells said he remembered the woman who cast it. I dont want to vote for any of these people, he quoted her as saying. He said its actually not uncommon for people to submit blank ballots. I wonder why one would bother to vote at all. But Wells said some people want to exercise their right to vote, even if they dont know, or respect, the candidates. Then I wondered, what if the audit is off? Wells said he would set up a new machine, and run all of the ballots again. I pray that never happens, he said. At the end of the hour, all of the ballot counts were veri ed and double-checked. Wells said he sends the audit results to the state. New numbered seals were locked onto the bags and recorded. I like it when it turns out right, Wells said. Nicole Zema is reporter at The Wakulla News. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Poseys hosts Chamber luncheon Problems and solutions discussed at springs event Remembering Finleys Brigade War Eagles beat Florida High WCSO patrols weekend water activities Underwater Wakulla August 28, 2014 Wax myrtle were used to scent candles Election complaint against candidate is rejected thewakullanews.com ank you from someone you helped Questioning Merritts views on wetlands Endorsing Bill Anderson for commission e manual audit: Random but reliable Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.net Follow us onREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I agree with another reader that Commissioner Randy Merritts letter rationalizing his position on the wetlands demonstrated intelligence and, as such, it deserves a serious response that looks more closely at each of his points. His rst claim, which he emphasized in bold print, was that the Wetlands Ordinance is not about protecting the Wetlands but about buffers. This is like saying that bumpers and airbags on cars are not about protecting people. The whole point of buffers is that they do protect wetlands and their functions of water puri cation, ood protection, providing fish and wildlife habitat, groundwater recharge and streamow maintenance. When we remove vegetation from the immediate proximity of wetlands, pollutants and surface runoff are not absorbed but go un ltered into wetlands, further stressing their capacity to function effectively. You dont have to fill in a wetland to harm it. There are countless projects where communities are actively planting grasses, bushes and trees to control air and water pollution, reduce noise, increase wildlife habitat and stabilize shorelines and stream banks. It is a lot more ef cient and less expensive to keep what we already have than restore it when we realize our error. Think about the Everglades. Merritt next makes a dubious distinction regarding the value of coastal and inland wetlands, calling the latter swamps presumably to make them sound less deserving of protection. He might want to consult his beekeeping relatives about that. To be sure, there are differences in these environments, but the functions of the wetlands in both instances are essentially the same, and the science done in the Wakulla Springs watershed could not be clearer that the inland and coastal ecosystems are inextricably connected. He then exaggerates the issue of people not having buildable lots due to being unable to get variances closer than 35 feet of a wetland. According to the Planning and Zoning Department, the very few variance denials have been because landowners wanted to either build closer to wetlands or bigger homes on their lots, not because the lots were unbuildable. Mr. Merritt knows full well that the wetlands repeal has been driven and well funded by developers and real estate interests, not a few people on tiny lots surrounded by swampland. The concern he expresses about representative government would have more validity had these commissioners actually campaigned on removing the wetlands ordinance when they ran. I remember signs about more jobs but none about less wetlands. A slap in the face to the voters of Wakulla County would be if, after the Wetlands Referendum passes in November, the same four commissioners voted to repeal it. The referendum process was a steep mountain to climb and the voters loud voice should not be easy to overturn or amend. Forcing the commission to compromise and reach unanimity on such an important issue would not be a bad thing. Lastly, Mr. Merritt uses the increasingly familiar tactic of suggesting that the county will be swamped with takings lawsuits if the ordinance is reinstated. He says this knowing that there was not a single lawsuit claiming a taking when the ordinance was in place. If the commissioners were truly concerned about this they could have held off their repeal until after the election, but they seemed to have other priorities. In any event, these tactics should not intimidate citizens from doing the right thing and reversing the wrong-headed, shortsighted repeal of our local wetland protections. If we live in fear of lawsuits, we might as well not do anything that challenges the wealthy and powerful. I am grateful that I live in such a beautiful, unique place and I believe our citizens will want to reassert our stewardship of this land in November. I also hope we will then have a commission that values what makes our county special as much as its citizens do. James Hennessey CrawfordvillePassage of referendum would be bad Editor, The News: Even for those who do not follow national and world events there is a belief that our country is heading in the wrong direction. Many are laying the blame at the feet of those who work for us in Washington. And the voter is blaming both political parties for what they see as the slow job recovery, the destruction of the health care system, the increase in world tensions and the rapidly growing control of personal lives through regulations and restrictions. Few are pleased with what they see as increasingly heavy handed tactics at the federal level. So how is it that the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance has managed to change the argument when it comes to the wetlands referendum from one of too much government control to one of not enough? When four of our commissioners clearly stated that individual property owners should control their own lands and that the government has no right to take property away from its rightful owner, there was and continues to be a concerted effort to portray them as the bad guys. People would be furious if the state or federal agencies came to Wakulla and took 75 feet of a persons land but many want the county to do exactly that. The people who are pushing for Referendum A are determined to convince the voter that their commissioners are working against them in spite of the fact that the commissioners are the very ones who are attempting to preserve private ownership rights. The wetlands supporters, like robots, repeatedly say that the commissioners repealed the ordinance out of self-interest rather than from a conviction that people should have the right to manage their own property or an understanding that prohibitive restrictions are not nancially in the best interest of the county. Accusation and innuendo seem to be considered legitimate tactics. Approximately 66 percent of the county is owned by government agencies but that is not enough for the Wetlands Alliance. The alliance wants the county to control the very few pieces of undeveloped, privately owned land left along the coast as well as many of the interior properties that may have wetland vegetation growing beside a drainage ditch, a pond or a small creek. If Referendum A passes no area of Wakulla County is safe from takeover. It is important to know what you are voting for and then vote NO on Referendum A. Jeff Andrews Crawfordville Editor, The News: Bill Anderson is an excellent choice to help lead Wakulla County as a member of the County Commission. I have been in many meetings where I observed that Bill is a man who chooses his words carefully. We have all seen and heard people who are passionate about the issues and jump at every opportunity to speak out. Often it seems they do not so much have something valuable to offer, but simply want their voice to be heard. The ability to do that is what makes our system of government work. However, oftentimes, what someone does not say also speaks volumes. As a commissioner, I believe Bill will be an excellent listener who offers not just his opinion but a constructive opinion. He is fair-minded rather than single-minded, an increasingly rare character trait. Bills extensive background in business and law will make him a very valuable member of the Commission who can help us formulate solutions for issues that will affect our county for generations to come. I urge anyone who has not had the opportunity to speak with Bill to please do so. You will nd him to be attentive, thoughtful, and genuinely committed to a better future for all citizens of the county. Please support Bill Anderson for Wakulla County Commission District 4. Donna M. Watkins dwew83@embarqmail.comEditor, The News: I am in a wheelchair/crutches and grew up with a disability so life is a little more complicated. So thank you Lindys Chicken for the curbside service and the lady who delivered the food told me to Have a blessed day and I did! Thank you to Mike and Chris Lumber Liquidators for bringing, loading, exchanging and refunding my purchases three times without me ever leaving my vehicle.Thank you to Hutton Seafood for your curbside service and excellent food. Thank you El Jalisco for the curbside service, and thank you to the gentleman behind the counter at 3Y who went to the truck to get my purse so that I would not have to walk on the gravel. Thank you to the greeter lady with the pretty grey hair in Wal-Mart. Thank you Wal-Mart for the electric cart that make it possible for me to shop. Thank you Centurylink guy in the parking lot at Wal-Mart for loading my dog food. Thank you to the young man in Wal-Mart for unloading my buggy (he smiled the whole time showing a full golden grill to perfection and I smiled back!). Thank you to Bay Leaf Market for the service and carryout! Thank you West plumbing for all your help. John at the St Marks Post of ce, thank you for your carry in and out service. All of these people touched my life in a positive way. If I have forgotten anyone, I am sorry. Thank you, Donna Dickens Double D Storage LLC

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked at the Working Waterfront photo Exhibit Panacea Welcome Center:What is your favorite seafood?JONAS PORTERCOMMERCIAL FISHERMANMullet, peanut butter and syrup. Thats what we lived on during the war. We caught our sh and made our own syrup. KINSEY MILLERSTUDENTFlounder. That is the only sh I eat, and my grandpa Noah Posey has to cook it for me, then its the best! BETTY GREEN RETIRED TEACHERShrimp! Fried, sauteed... all shrimp. Its my favorite and I never really get enough. Blackened mullet. I created a special seasoning that does not include any salt and it smells and tastes wonderful on mullet. THOMAS E. CLARKCOMMERCIAL FISHERMAN ELOISE CRUMCRUMS MINI MALLFried soft shell crab that I make myself. I bet Ive eaten more soft shell crab sandwiches than anyone in the state of Florida... just ask Noah Posey! Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Pirates Landing Free Appetizer of your choice Ouzts Too Grilled Shrimp w/rice dinnerWinner Penelope Grant drawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days y s y s y s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant FRESH SEAFOODStraight from the Docks of St. Marks!785 Port Leon Drive, St Marks Wed. Fri. 11am until Sat. Sun. Open for Breakfast at 6:30amWe have Gator & A Full Bar 850 925-64487968 Coastal Hwy. 98 Newport Historic Bridge WED.HOME COOKED MEALS THURS.PICKIN & GRINNINOUZTSTOO.COMFOOD BEVERAGEENTERTAINMENT$4 Daily Specials!Includes Chips and DrinkCuban SandwichCuban Ham & Pork, topped with Swiss cheese, dill pickle, yellow mustard on a Cuban Roll Includes Chips and Drink$895 926-3500 SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida From the Front PageIt was different going into high school, she said. I had known the other kids with disabilities for three years, so its different learning how they need me to teach them. Its really rewarding, because you can see how happy and excited they are. And other people see they can learn whatever we can do. Right now all three schools have uniform shirts and patches for Ability United members, but Small has struck a deal with an athletic out tter that is offering a special price on genuine, high-quality gold and black uniform packages at $140 per student. The best way to donate is to mail or drop a check by Riversprings Middle School, made out to the school. We wanted one color for everyone to represent all of Ability United, to be used throughout middle and high school, Coach Cat said. This has united the abilities of two groups who communicate differently. But what seemed to be great differences no longer were there when they performed. So I wanted them to have some kind of uniform. Coach Cat is committed to the program not costing any parent a dime. Ten uniforms have been funded so far. While the current goal is 30 uniforms, Coach Cat would like to push it up to 35 or 40, if more Exceptional Student Education (ESE) students want to join. Pafford said even if folks cannot afford a whole package, whatever can be donated still means a lot. Coach Cat said she wants all students to have a sense of ownership of their school, and the new uniforms will further that goal. Back when I want to school, a lot of students who didnt learn like other students did they were in a cubicle off to the side, she said. When we have pep rallies and basketball games, we have Spirit Paws in uniform right next to the cheerleaders. It teaches the whole school to understand that everybody has abilities. We are more alike than we are different. Coach Cat said Ability United only works if the program is peer-generated. She said when a student walks down the hall and is highved by a cheerleader, ve other kids will do it too. That builds a powerful force of acceptance that youre not going to get with me doing a guidance lesson in front of a class, she said. They have more power than I do. ESE Teacher Anne Thurmond said, When the program started, I saw it more as bene ting my students. But its bene ting all the students who work with them just as much. From my perspective, the cheerleaders come in the classroom twice a week, and socially, (ESE students) get more comfortable, and I can see their con dence growing. It will help in every area of your life when you have con dence. My kids most of them cant join a sports team. They dont have the athletic ability. But this is a great opportunity for them to be part of a team. They can do it no matter what their disability is. Melinda Wilde, who has two sons in the ESE program, said her son Michael loves being involved in Ability United. Michael, who has cerebral palsy, participates with pom poms tied to his hands, and is noticeably engaged when cheerleaders walk into the room. Wilde said while her boys have enjoyed participating, Ive seen the other kids open up, and its just amazing to watch them. In addition to football games, the Ability United squad joined the cheerleaders at an exhibition at Florida State. Youre sitting in front of 1,000 people looking at you, so thats a whole new experience for anyone, Coach Cat said. It was amazing. These are kids who have never gotten up in front of anyone. There is no stopping the Ability United program now, Coach Cat said. It has a life of its own. When people donate to this, I want it to be their soul and heart to do it. I want them to say, I heard about the program, I want to help.Ability United

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station The Reverend Bert MatlockBible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor850 745-8359Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchSunday School 10 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. PASTOR ALAN GAYLORD 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.org Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchYour church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Cleaning messes, parsonage style Promise Land holds post-game concertsPromise Land Ministries Lighthouse is reaching out to the youth of Wakulla County by providing free concerts after the home football games. Each Friday Night Promise Land will open their doors immediately following the game to provide a free Concert with open dance oor, lights, and fog. These concerts will host a variety of Bands from Christian metal, rap, hip-hop, and contemporary music. Make plans to join Wakullas only War Eagle after party. Each event is scheduled to end at 11:30 p.m., all events are supervised, safe and secure. Rocky Mount to hold pastor appreciation Rocky Mount Church of Christ at 58 Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville will be having a Pre-program for their Pastor Appreciation on Friday, Sept. 12, at 7 p.m. Elder Fredrick Bell and Thessalonia will render service. Also on Saturday, Sept. 13, at 6 p.m., Rocky Mount will be having a Pastor Appreciation Dinner at the Livestock Pavilion in Crawfordville. The Seineyard will be catering. Wakulla Springs Baptist to hold sh fry Sept. 26Wakulla Springs Baptist Church will hold a sh fry on Friday, Sept. 26, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. The event is a fundraiser for the churchs Thailand Mission Team for an upcoming mission trip to Thailand. Price is $10 a plate and includes sh, cheese grits, coleslaw, hushpuppies, drink and dessert. Please email ampaarlberg@ yahoo.com or call the church of ce at 926-5152 to RSVP. You can eat at the church or take your plate to go. Come and enjoy some good food and also support a great cause. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t. The ministry is free. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton to hold holiday craft fairSt. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold its 2nd annual Holiday Craft Fair sale on Saturday, Oct. 25. We wish to showcase local crafters. Anyone wishing to sell items they have created is welcome to join us. You will be able to set up inside the hall or outdoors. There will be free admission for all shoppers. For more information, contact Phylllis Berninger at 926-1453 or Nicky Lepp at 926-9750. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERThroughout the glorious years of our marriage, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and Yours Truly has had few disagreements. I suppose I could count them all on my one hand, but I am not sure if it is my right hand or my left hand so I will just leave it at that. I hear, of course, of many couples who do nothing but bicker and fight from morning till night. I have always wondered what the purpose of all that was and what it ever accomplished. I think there is a better way to live together. There are several phrases I have memorized and used throughout the years of our marriage that has kept me in good standing. Yes, dear. Youre right, dear. Ill do it right away, dear. I have found that if I include the word dear, with all of my responses it fares better for me. Of course, I am the kind of person that does not have to be right all the time, which makes me the perfect husband. Admitting you are wrong, even if you do not think you are, is really not the end of the world. In fact, it may be the beginning of a bright new world. I said few disagreements, and I need to explain what I meant by that. The major disagreements that my wife and I have had throughout the years can be boiled down into one phrase, Its a mess. Usually, actually all the time this phrase is being used, it is coming from the lips of my wife. Our disagreement is in the de nition of mess. She has one definition and I have another de nition, and the twain shall never meet. Mark my words on that. If you would come into our home, you will discover that every room in the house is well organized and very neat. Well, not every room. The one room that does not come up to that criterion is the room in which I occupy. It is my space. My wellorganized wife will walk by my room, pause, look in and say, Its a mess. It took me a long time to realize what she was talking about. Eventually, I got to the point where I understood that what she was referring to was my space. Unfortunately, we did not share the same vision of my space. I am of the mindset that if I am working I need to have organized messes all around me. I have tried explaining to my wife that I am a messologist. I had to explain to her that a messologist is someone who specializes in organizing intentional messes. I am not sure I have convinced her yet of this. I really think that one persons mess is another persons workspace. I cannot really work efficiently unless there are intentional messes around me, protecting me, giving me the incentive I need to pursue the job at hand. My basic philosophy is simply this, if I cannot nd what I need when I need it, I probably do not really need it. It has worked for me most marvelously. The real trick of a messologist is knowing where to find what you need when you need it. My wife can walk into my space and look around and be utterly confused by what she calls a mess. Of course, it looks like a mess to her. It is not her mess! If it was her mess she would understand it and be comforted by it. My wife is of the idea that organization has to do with numerical or alphabetical order. Now that works for some people, I suppose. But, as I keep telling her, that is not the only circus in town! I cannot tell how many times something new has developed in my thinking while I was searching for something I could not really find. That is the genius of a messologist. Some people, like my wife, like to go from 1 to 2 to 3 to 4; or, A to B to C to D all the way to Z. To a normal person, and I am guessing my wife is normal, that makes a lot of sense. But to a messologist, that kind of thinking is rather confusing. What I want to know is, what do you do when you come to the end of the alphabet? Where do you go from there? Then, it is rather important that you have the alphabet in alphabetical order. If I would ever try to do that I would end up being so confused, they would have to admit me in some rehab facility to clean my mind out. So, the thing that makes our marriage so blissful is that we have an agreement and that she does things her way and I do things my way. This has been the recipe for blissfulness in our marriage. I do not make her do it my way and she cannot make me do it her way. We both have brains, but they tick after a different tock. I then thought of a verse of Scripture that rather t my situation. There is a way which seemeth right unto a man, but the end thereof are the ways of death (Proverbs 14:12). My way has to be in complete harmony with His way or my life will be completely destroyed.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. OUT TO PASTOR In depth home bible studies are available 3055 Crawfordville Hwy.Sun. Services 2:30 orthoinfo.org/patientsafety The safest, most successful surgeries happen when physicians and patients team up as active partners. Which means plenty of candid questions and honest answers from each. Bone up on patient safety at orthoinfo.org/patientsafety. A public service message from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, reminding patients and doctors that communication is the best medicine. Patient Safety. It takes a team.GOING IN FOR SURGERY? DONT JUST LI E THERE.

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By BLYTHE NEWSOMEI remember so vividly the moment the doctor told my family there was nothing else they could do to treat my fathers illness. There were so many thoughts and emotions going through my mind; primarily that there was no way that my dad could die. He was only 66 years old, much too young to die. Through my tears I asked the doctor, How long does dad have? It could be weeks or even months, I just dont know, the doctor said. You need to focus on making it about the quality of the time you have with your dad, not the quantity of time. That is a hard concept to grasp when you are talking about someone you love. The doctor suggested we might want to talk to someone with Hospice. Deep down I felt like accepting care from Hospice meant that I was giving up and that his death was imminent. I never thought that what it really meant was making the most of the time we still had together as a family. We agreed to meet with someone from Hospice to learn more about the services offered and so began our journey with Covenant Hospice. Covenant Hospice had been serving the Tallahassee and surrounding counties since 2003 and is widely recognized as one of the largest and most comprehensive hospices in the nation, providing quality time for over 30 years for patients with life-limiting illnesses, their families and loved ones. Covenant Hospice provided us with Social Workers, Chaplains and Volunteers that were able to provide us with a wide range of comfort and care that we all needed. I have a very big family and from the moment we called Covenant Hospice it was as if our large family grew even more to make room for our Covenant Family. One of the primary objectives of Covenant Hospice is to give patients the opportunity to receive care in their own home or a homelike setting while maintaining a strong emphasis on quality of life. Hearing that meant so much to me since getting home was one of my dads primary objectives as well. As a daughter I could not bear to see my dad suffer in any way. The burden and fear of him suffering in any way was taken off of our shoulders by Dr. Jean Murphy, Covenant Hospice physician, and the wonderful Covenant Hospice nursing staff. Dr. Murphy would come to the house to check on my dad, which took away much of his anxiety about being put back in the hospital. Her compassion and care for him and towards all of us endeared her quickly to our hearts. Knowing that dad was being cared for and kept comfortable allowed my family to really focus on the time we spent with him. We will forever hold precious the memories of the nightly rounds of Jeopardy and the laughter that lled the room as we attempted to shout out the correct answer rst. There were priceless visits from my dads high school and college friends where we all got to sit around and hear them reminiscing about the good old days. I learned even more stories about my dad that I will treasure forever and pass on to my children and their children someday. On the morning that my dad died, his nurse Connie was there with us as he peacefully took his last breath. She had stayed with him all through the night, never leaving his side, so that my mom could get some rest. Dr. Murphy came and spent time with us as we processed what had just happened and shared stories and tears about dad. At one point, I remember looking around the room and thinking about something my dad once told me: Family is not just the people you were born to and you are related to, he said. Family is also the people you meet along your journey in life who love you and are always there for you. He was so right. At that moment I looked around the room and realized I was surrounded by family not just the family I was born into, but our Covenant Hospice family who we had all grown to love so much. I miss my dad every single day but I take great comfort in the fact that he died free from pain and with all of us together. We were given the gift of quality time with this wonderful man and that is a gift I will forever be grateful to them for giving to us. I like to think that my dad is smiling down on me seeing that today I am working for Covenant Hospice to make sure that other patients and families are given that same special care and quality time that Covenant Hospice gave to my family. To learn more about Covenant Hospice and the services and programs offered go to www. covenanthospice.org or call (850) 575-4998. Additional programs offered by Covenant Hospice: We Honor Veterans Covenant Hospice provides outreach and education to area veterans and health care professionals. Covenant Alzheimers Services, an af liate of Covenant Care, provides respite for caregivers through community education, support and resources for families dealing with Alzheimers disease and other form of dementia. Bereavement Services Grief is a normal, natural response that is individual and personal. Through support groups, educational workshops and remembrance celebrations, Covenant Hospice provides comfort and assistance to families and loved ones. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 7ACalvin C. Langston, 88, of Smith Creek, died on Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014 in Tallahassee. He was born in Perry, on April 8, 1926, to the late Wade Hampton and Nellie Mae (Whiddon) Langston. He was a veteran of World War II serving in the U.S. Army. He was predeceased by his parents; his daughter, Donna Langston Fairbank; and a brother, Curtis L. Langston. Survivors include his wife of 65 years, June Langston of Smith Creek; three sons, Mark Langston (Carol) of Crawfordville, Greg Langston (Patsy) of Dothan, Ala., and Bruce Langston (Dana) of Fort Walton Beach; nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. The family received friends at 10 a.m., Tuesday, Sept. 9, 2014 at Mount Elon Baptist Church in Smith Creek. Funeral services followed at 11 a.m. in the church with the Rev. Gordan Beal of ciating. Interment was in Smith Creek Community Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Boulevard, Tallahassee FL 32308 or Mount Elon Baptist Church Building Fund, 2416 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy FL 32358. Adams Funeral Home in Blountstown was in charge of the arrangements. Phone is (850)674-5449 and you may offer the family online condolences at adamsfh. com.Obituaries Calvin C. Langston Mahaley Ruth Sanders WattsCalvin C. LangstonBy TRACY RENEE LEESadly, we face another 9-11 anniversary this week. Has it really been 13 years since America was attacked? To me it seems as though it were last week. That day, September 11th, will forever be imprinted into my brain. I can remember exactly what I was doing at the very instant the breaking news ash appeared on my television screen. It was a horri c loss, frozen in time. This past week, my husband and I were at our dentists of ce for our yearly check-ups. We needed additional appointments, so the receptionist proceeded to engage us into booking the necessary follow-up visits. As I nished booking my follow-up, she turned her attention to my husband. As I walked out into the lobby, I heard her suggest Sept. 11th as the day he should return. My husband hesitated for a moment, and then called out to me, asking if that would be a satisfactory date. I, as my husband, was taken aback. Although both the dentist and her receptionist are young adults, I know they are both old enough to have witnessed Sept. 11th. I found my voice quickly and gave a denitive, No, that will not do. We will observe and mourn the loss of innocent life suffered on that tragic day. September 11th will not be a routine day for us. It never will be ever again. As we left the dental of ce, I was lost in thought. I saw the expression on the receptionists face when she realized that I was offended down to my core at her suggestion. I was disturbed that many in our nation look at Sept. 11th as just another day. I felt sorrow in my heart for the families that lost so much on that horrific and dreadful day. When a loved one has been lost, grief is a powerful emotion to overcome. When a loved one has been viciously lost, grief is complicated and can become almost impossible to overcome. I do not think 13 years is too long to ask a nation to remember a tragic attack on its citizens. I do not think 313 years is too long to ask a nation to remember a tragic attack on its citizens. Forgetting this tragedy invites it to happen again. Remember 9-11. Remember the tragedy so many suffered with the loss of their loved ones. Re-engage with your family and express your love and commitment for each other. Doing so will improve the quality of your life and your happiness. Remember, none of us knows the day of our death and one day, someone we love will be gone. Make your moments count by creating memories and strengthening your bonds together. Do it because one day, may just be too late.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Follow my blog at pushin-up-daisies. blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @ PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome. com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Mourning losses of Sept. 11 BEREAVEMENT COLUMN Mahaley Ruth Sanders WattsMahaley Ruth Sanders Watts, 80, died on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 at Tallahassee Regional Medical Center. Memorial services were held Saturday, Sept. 6, 2014, at 2 p.m. at Panacea Full Gospel Church with Brother B.B. Barwick officiating. Covenant Hospice: A daughters re ection on compassionate care www.coastalgems.comCrawfordville, FL850566-9293 Est. 2000Carol Ann Williams, Licensed Real Estate Broker/Owner 33 Years Experience Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 Ms Marias Grooming LLC PET GROOMING & BATHINGNow Taking Appointments850-519-1994OPEN HOUSE AUGUST 519 Years of Experience facebook.com/getyourgroomwithme ED GARDNER, O.D.Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50 O D O.D O.D Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterSchedule your Back to School Eye Exam today Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsCommissioner Ralph Thomas was accepted to the Florida Forum for County Leaders, an advanced leadership program designed for graduates of the Certified County Commissioners (CCC) Program. The ACC program is organized as a series of three seminars, with 27 hours of course work. The course content focuses on leadership with an overarching theme of growth and development in Florida. Participating Commissioners must commit to fully participate in all three seminars in order to graduate. Topics Include: Leadership in These Turbulent and Transformative Times, Leading Your Communities During Turbulent Times, Understanding and Working with Stakeholders and County Decision Makers during these Turbulent Times. All graduates of the (CCC) Program are encouraged to participate in this program. Thomas will be one of only 30 Certi ed County Commissioners to participate in the ACC program this year. The cost for the three sessions is $450. Commissioner Thomas received one of eight full Scholarships, available to small counties with populations of less than 75,000. Commissioner Thomas said, I am thankful to the Florida Association of Counties for my acceptance into the ACC program. The knowledge and experience I receive from FAC, makes me a better Commissioner and a better servant to the citizens of Wakulla County. Thomas accepted to leadership programBy ERIC WESTBROOK4-H Program AssistantWakulla County 4-H had much to celebrate at its recent awards and recognition banquet on August 16. As the new school year begins 4-H completes the 2014 program and gets ready for another great year. 4-H youth members worked hard with the help of adult volunteers and partners in the community since last year to as the 4-H motto says, to make the best better. Volunteers recognized for their achievements over the past year include the adult leader for the Wakulla 4-H Kapra kids, Priscilla Weaver. Weaver was presented with an Outstanding Service to 4-H award for her 31 years of service as volunteer leader. Lee Kendall was presented with the 4-H Leader of the Year award for taking on the challenge of being the adult leader of the 4-H Target Smashers club during his senior year of high school at age 18. The Friend of 4-H award was given to Dustin Grubbs of Centennial Bank in recognition of service above and beyond professional duty. Throughout the year Grubbs provided special care, attention and expertise to help shepherd the Wakulla County 4-H Association budget during trying times. 4-Hers who were awarded at the banquet include Kyle Weaver, who earned a coveted blue ribbon for his record book representing a professional level of work in the dairy goat project. Weaver also was awarded Kapra Kids Outstanding Senior and Emilee Brown was awarded the Kapra Kids Outstanding Junior Award. 4-H Horsemasters club members were awarded for their participation, junior Ada Rye and senior Samantha Dunaway earned recognition for outstanding project results. 4-H Lego Robotics member Levi Fincher was recognized for his participation in the Robotics project as well as having earned an impressive nineyear pin for his time in 4-H. Sadie Hobby a member of the 4-H Quilt Doctors earned recognition for her Intermediate Quilt project and her participation in the quilting project. Andrew Buchleitner represented the 4-H Green Team who garnered plant science and horticultural Pins for their hard work at the gardens of Medart Elementary. The 4-H Association, all its advisors and volunteers deserve to celebrate too for their hard work in the past year. The 4-H Association was able to provide $6,300 in scholarships to provide 4-Hers and youth in the community access to summer camps, educational programs, materials and equipment which allowed youth in Wakulla County to learn valuable life skills such as team work, civic engagement and personal accountability. For more information about joining or volunteering with 4-H contact the UF|IFAS Wakulla County Extension of ce at 926-3931, email 4-H Program Assistant Eric Westbrook at ewstbrook@u .edu.Wakulla County 4-H recognizes volunteers, servicePHOTOS BY ERIC WESTBROOKPhotos, from left: Sadie Hobby completed the intermediate quilting project; 4-H Kapra Kids leader Priscilla Weaver was presented with the Outstanding Service to 4-H Award. THE ST. MARKS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE announced that new roofs will be installed at the picnic and restroom shelters until Sept. 26. The project will require closure of the area into the picnic grounds when contractors are working and closure of the Otter Lake Rd. electronic gate at the end of the work day. This will ensure the safety of visitors, refuge staff and contractors. Signage will be posted at the entrance gate to inform visitors of speci c times for the closures. SPONSORSHIPS are available for the rst annual RELAY FOR LIFE Harvesting for a Cure fall festival and chili cook off at Hudson Park 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18. Sponsorship levels are for $100, $300 and $500. For more information contact Marion Russ at 322-2652, or email relayforlifewakulla@gmail. com. The 2014 BIG BEND SEAFOOD FESTIVAL, a one-day outdoor event in Woolley Park located on the waterfront in Panacea, is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 11. Submit your VENDOR BOOTH APPLICATION as soon as possible. Entry Requirements: We reserve the right to turn down vendors of certain products. We prefer original arts and crafts but we also accept food products (preserves, honey, etc.) and certain manufactured products. For more information you can email me at rpinholster@ gmail.com or call 850-7282121 daytime only please. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold its second annual HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR SALE on Saturday, Oct. 25. We wish to showcase local crafters. Anyone wishing to sell items they have created is welcome to join us. You will be able to set up inside the hall or outdoors.There will be free admission for all shoppers. For more information, contact Phylllis Berninger at 926-1453 or Nicky Lepp at 926-9750. This year, the EMPTY BOWLS hunger fundraiser will be Nov. 15 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Center. The purpose of this event is to help raise money for local food banks. Individuals, shops or churches are being asked to PREPARE A SOUP that will be served for the event. Folks who would like to cook and serve a savory specialty may call Taylor Biro at 850-294-6044 for more information, or email emptybowlswakulla@gmail. com.Ongoing...Special to The News Hands are needed to pitch in for 2014 Coastal Cleanup beginning at 9 a.m. on Sept. 20 at Woolley Park headquarters or your chosen site. At 11:30 a.m., meet at Woolley Park in Panacea for lunch and prize giveaways. Site Locations: St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Lighthouse Road; Shell Point at the Pavilion; Bottoms Road at the boat launch; Mashes Sands at the park area; St. Marks San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park at the gate. We encourage groups of ve or more to pre-register by sending an email to helpkwcb@gmail.com. All volunteers may either select a site location and go directly there on Saturday morning, or go to Woolley Park in Panacea to be assigned a site. All volunteers are provided trash bags and directions to areas to be cleaned. Please return to the site captain with garbage by 10:30 a.m. to turn in your completed data card, drop off your bags and head over to Woolley Park for lunch. Free commemorative t-shirt and lunch goes to the rst 500 participants following the morning cleanup volunteers are invited to a free lunch hosted by Wal-Mart at Woolley Park. Come out and be part of this great event and have fun working for our community. For more information call KWCB at (850) 745-7111, email us at helpkwcb@gmail.com, visit our website: www.kwcb.org and follow us on FACEBOOK at keepwakullacountybeautiful.By JANICE EAKINDirector, Operation SantaMerry Christmas! Nope! This is not a misprint. Its our goal to help everyone in Wakulla to have a Merry Christmas! And, thanks to the Episcopal Diocese of Florida, Operation Santa of Wakulla has a home for this years event. Through their generosity, Santas Workshop is up and running at 1255 Rehwinkel Rd. near Hwy. 98. Last year, you, our community joined together and provided a brighter Christmas for more than 1,200 people in Wakulla County. The amount of effort to pull this off requires us to start now and we need to VOLUNTEERS. If you are interested in helping in any way and want to learn about the many opportunities, please come to a meeting next Tuesday, Sept. 16 at 6:30. We will meet at the One Stop Community Center at the corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Hwy. Please come and bring a friend, or two! Like us on Facebook Operation Santa Wakulla and share our announcements so the word spreads. We will also provide information on our website: www. OperationSantaWakulla.org. Operation Santa kicks off Tuesday, Sept. 16 2014 Coastal Cleanup is Sept. 20 PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS $1,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of person or persons who have stolen 50 large campaign signs and 40 small signs from roadway private property. If you have seen someone removing signs please call-in color, make and/or model of vehicle. (All calls will remain condential)Call Jerry Moore at 363-5382$$ REWARD $$ anks for your vote and condence during the primary election. We now go to the general election to see in what direction the county shall go in the future. In my opinion we must defeat the ballot initiative that supports having a Wakulla County wetlands buer placed upon a State of Florida wetlands buer. Where would it stop? Maybe by taking 35 feet more of your property or maybe by taking 135 feet, commissioners would decide. We must take Wakulla County forward with controlled growth that benets everyone not just a privileged few. Our children need recreation facilities, we now have the opportunity to exchange land with the forest service that will allow a new recreation park across from WalMart which is so desperately needed. As our economy grows we need to lower taxes as we are primarily as county of seniors and retirees who can least aord taxes as we now have. ere has been an eort to expand the airport at the Tarpine Subdivision which is owned by the county and used exclusively by TARPINE subdivision as a y in community. at is OK but the citizens of the county should not have to pay the bill for what I consider a PRIVATE AIRPORT. I will continue to vote against any county taxpayers money funding the airport. On a side note the FAA allows you to count trac at the airport as ANY AIRCRAFT IN SIGHT OF THE AIRPORT, therefore you can count jets ying over and probably the spacecraft if the FAA determines they are aircraft. at is the way aircraft were counted for the expansion of Tarpines airport with your tax dollars. Take 10 aircraft in sight multiply by 365 days in a year you come up with 3,600 ights, and you want the public to believe that. My count of maybe 52 landings a year was way more accurate. Sincerely Yours, Jerry Moore JUST ONE MOORE TIME A vote for JERRY MOORE is a vote for COMMON SENSE GROWTH, not for political FANATICS Political advertisement paid for and approved by Jerry Moore, Republican, for Wakulla County Commission, district 4

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 9ASpecial to The NewsRep. Halsey Beshears was presented the Florida League of Cities 2014 Legislative Appreciation Award at the Monticello City Council meeting Aug. 5 by Ryan Matthews of the Leagues advocacy team. Matthews spoke of Representative Beshears steadfast support of small cities within House District 7 saying, Hes passionate about small communities and local governments. Legislative Appreciation Award recipients are legislators who work closely with the Leagues advocacy team and demonstrate strong and consistent support of municipal home rule issues, stated Florida League of Cities legislative director Scott Dudley. The League of Cities legislative agenda this past session included the protection of home rule powers and the prestigious award was presented to the freshman legislator for his consistent efforts to protect the home rule powers during the 2014 regular Session. On behalf of Floridas 410 cities and the thousands of municipal of cials, elected and unelected, the Florida League of Cities is happy to recognize Representative Beshears for his support, Dudley said. Rep. Beshears has been a great partner to rally support for League positions. It is clear that he believes that the level of government closest to the people should make the decisions that affect the quality of life of the citizens they have been elected to represent. We owe him a great deal of thanks.Special to The NewsFriends of Wakulla Springs State Park are now stepping outside of the 6,000-acre state park boundary. They have prepared free and fun programs that will bring some of the science gathered during explorations at the park directly to citizens. On Saturday, Sept. 13, 11:30-12:30 p.m., Wakulla County Public Library, Medart, the program spreads outward from springs to the wetlands that protect and feed these springs. Entitled Do Bladderworts Make a Sound?, visitors will be invited to learn to imitate the rhythms of nature with Sandy and Sammy Tedder. Wetlands biologist, Katherine Gilbert of the Beechwood community, promises an up-close look at the flora and fauna of a wetland. The carnivorous bladderwort, for instance, snaps up the invertebrates in a wetland but can you hear that? By DAVID EARLESpecial to The NewsThis weekend of Aug. 23, Hot Rodders in the Sopchoppy community came together to help promote a new soon to be open restaurant. For this group of vintage car enthusiasts, who are always looking for a reason to cruise, this nostalgic s themed diner couldnt be a more perfect place. The remodeled vintage building and the old classic vehicles made it feel like one had traveled right back to that charmed era of the late s and 1960s. Restaurant owner Pam McKenzie was inspired to create Joes Diner as a tribute to her late husband. Joe McKenzie loved old trucks and tractors and had purchased a 1952 Ford truck to restore and drive. Joes untimely passing left the truck un nished, so Pam teamed up with local body shop owner, Phillip Simpson, to nish the truck as a tribute to Joe. Joes dream was to nish it with a candy apple red paint job, and a white top. With Phillips skills, that dream became a reality, and the truck turned out so well that it inspired Pam to use the trucks colors and its vintage vibe as the theme for the eatery. The retired old truck will now have a new job as a gleaming marquee. It will proudly be parked out front using its vintage charm to beckon folks to stop by for a taste of the good ole days. Like the old truck, Joes Diner has been a challenging project itself. Thankfully, some of the talented folks in the community have come forward with their construction skills to help Pam make her dream come true. There is still more work to do on the total renovation, but she is nally seeing a light at the end of the tunnel. Among other things, Pams vision includes diner style hamburgers, classic hot dogs and an authentic Soda Fountain, with milkshakes and sundaes. Yum! With her eye rmly on this goal, she is working hard and is hoping the diner will be open for business in a month or two. Ladies and Gentlemen, start your engines, because soon enough youre going to be able to make your way down to Sopchoppy, take a relaxing step back in time, and relive some of those magical Happy Dayz! Car enthusiasts enjoy blast from the past in SopchoppyPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Find out if bla dderworts make sounds on Sept. 13 FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGSSPECIAL TO THE NEWSBay Leaf Market presented CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment) with their rst rewards check on Aug. 20. The nonpro t earned rewards for their organization through the sale of books donated in their name, and also from points accumulated through purchases made when shoppers used their CHAT rewards card. Pictured from left: Janice Eakin of CHAT, Petra Shuff of CHAT, and Mary K. Westmark of Bay Leaf Market. In other news, C hat Wakullas Trap Neuter Return event will be Saturday and Sunday. To volunteer or identify feral cat populations, send an email to CHATofWakulla@yahoo.com, and provide your name and phone number.CHAT bene ts from Bay Leaf Market, announces next TNR eventBeshears honored by League of Cities PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBeshears was presented the Florida League of Cities 2014 Legislative Appreciation Award by Ryan Matthews of the Leagues advocacy team. FREEThis Saturday, September 13WAKULLA PUBLIC LIBRARY, MEDART 11:30 am 12:30 pm Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park invite you to: Do Bladderworts Make a Sound? A program for the entire family. Discover the critters and plants that live in our freshwater wetlands. How are they different from coastal wetlands? There are many reasons. Touch specimens that wetlands expert Katherine Gilbert and Gulf Specimen Marine Lab's Jack Rudloe will bring with them. Watch as a carnivorous wetland plant called bladderwort snaps up food, but don't blink! Can you hear the sound it makes? You will hear nature's sounds. Sopchoppy musician Sammy Tedder and wife Sandy promise that you can learn to imitate nature's rhythms. Make a connection to your own and nature's rhythms Small things do matter. Will you protect them? Friends ofWakulla Springs State Park But thats just the start. Insure your life. Assure your legacy.State Farm Life Insurance Company (Not licensed in MA, NY or WI) State Farm Life and Accident Assurance Company (Licensed in NY and WI) Bloomington, IL1311016Ill show you how life insurance can also help you reach other nancial goals, like retirement. We put the life back in life insurance. CALL ME TODAY. Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com The Wakulla Springs Christian School, Inc. admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration or its educational policies, admissions, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.SEPTEMBER 11, 2014NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS

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Florida freshwater anglers target at least 25 species of native shes. Most are within a 45-minute drive of anyone wanting to wet a line. In addition to those, the free Florida Big Catch angler recognition program (BigCatchFlorida.com) features six species of exotic shes from other countries and several fish species that expanded their ranges from farther north. Of those nonnative fishes, only butterfly peacock bass were stocked intentionally by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissions (FWC) predecessor, during the early 1980s. At the time, expansion of numerous nonnative sh species in south Florida was causing concern. Walking cat sh and several types of tilapia were well established. Species, such as piranha, electric eels and freshwater stingray had the potential to be imported by the aquarium industry and posed a threat to native species and a concern to people. Accidental introductions were largely attributed to the aquaculture industry or to individual aquarists. To safeguard native resources, restrictions on introduction of nonnative species into the state had been passed. Two lists exist for species that require permits for possession. Conditional species require strict adherence to detailed rules intended to prevent escape, primarily from commercial facilities. Prohibited species permits are available only under very stringent conditions for research or public display at secure facilities. There are 41 nonnative freshwater sh species that have been observed or are known to reproduce in Florida. Another 14 species have naturally died out or been eliminated by the agency. To see the list, go to MyFWC.com/ WildlifeHabitats, select Nonnative Species then Freshwater Fish. Prior to introducing peacock bass in 1984, discussions were held with leading experts from around the country. The purpose was to convert a large biomass of established nonnative shes, which were too small to attract anglers, into a valuable recreational shery. Researchers documented the lower lethal temperature of peacock bass and determined they would be able to overwinter consistently only in a limited area of south Florida. The originally imported sh were not stocked, to prevent introducing foreign parasites or diseases. Instead, they were spawned and their eggs grown to ngerling size prior to stocking the offspring. Chris Collins, associate editor of Florida Sportsman magazine, just wrote a story about recovery of this multimillion-dollar recreational shery following the ultra-cold winter of 2010. Butch Moser, a local fishing guide on and around the Lake Osborne-Ida chain of lakes in Palm Beach County, targets nonnative sh. He agrees peacock bass are back. Sight-fishing for peacocks using small goldcolored Rapalas or topwater chug baits can be extremely productive. If the water is opaque, try a live minnow. Peacock bass are the only nonnative sh designated by the FWC as a gamefish. The bag limit is two, only one of which may be 17 inches or longer in total length. Any peacock bigger than 18 inches or 4 pounds quali es for Big Catch recognition. Not only peacocks were slammed by the cold and are now recovering, said Moser. In late August, he said he had never seen the shing as good as the past few weeks. Several locks along the canal are open, and running water is attracting sunshine bass, peacock bass, clown knife sh -the whole gamut. One of his favorites, the unique clown knifesh, are running from 3 to 10 pounds. They are often full of shad but aggressively take any 3to 4-inch minnow. According to Moser, when hooked they back up, then make a quick run and jump like a tarpon. They are tough to net since they back away and jump, so Mosers tip is to get the net under them when they jump. He recommends watching for a round boil and bubbles on the surface. Cast directly to the disturbance or sh a oat with a live bait 3to 4-feet deep and kept down with light weights. In the heat of the day, shade around bridges or pilings is productive. Since clown knifefish are a relatively new (1994) introduction, with a limited range in the Osborne-Ida chain, they are not included in the Big Catch program. Catches should not be transported alive elsewhere. Moser also enjoys catching Mayan cichlids on poppers or minnows. Youll nd them in shallow water. They provide a great fight and meal. As with all nonnative fish, other than peacock bass and triploid grass carp, there is no size or bag limit; take all you catch. Those longer than 11 inches or heavier than 1 pound are eligible for a Big Catch certi cate. Vance Crain, an FWC fisheries biologist in the South Region, has observed increased catch rates for oscars. You can catch oscars throughout the L67A, as well as Alligator Alley, Miami Canal, Tamiami and WCA II. Cane pole anglers do well with crickets and worms, but beetle spins, small Rapalas or topwater poppers all work. Oscars have been in Florida waters since at least 1969 and are recognized in the Big Catch program. To qualify, submit a photo of one 11 inches long or longer, or 1.25 pounds or heavier. Brightly colored Midas cichlids shine in Miami-Homestead canals; look for clear water and sightsh for them with little jigheads and a worm, using ultralight gear. Crain describes them as bluegill on steroids. Although these species have not caused major disruptions in native ecosystems or reduced harvest of native sport fishes, you should not release them (except peacock bass and triploid grass carp). Releasing fish from aquariums or moving them between water systems could produce detrimental effects and is illegal. Check current sheries forecasts, because conditions can vary drastically. Go to MyFWC.com/Fishing, select Freshwater Fishing then Sites and Forecasts. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHuntin season is nally here!Non-native fish provide exotic fishing alternatives www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Outta the Woods BY TONY YOUNG CHAINSAW $17995 SPECIAL OF THE WEEKMS170 Even though you can hardly tell, summer is almost over. Kids have returned to school, football is back on TV, and hunting season has already been going on for a month now in south Florida. Finally, the time of year weve been waiting for is here. And although some of us still have to wait just a bit longer for our season to come in, most of us have already finished our preseason scouting, and weve hung our tree stands along well-traveled deer trails, next to a mature oak thatll soon begin dropping acorns. I dont know about yall, but I got a bad case a BUCK FEVER! Hunting season always comes in rst in Zone A in south Florida. Archery and crossbow seasons there started Aug. 2. But the boundary line between zones A and C has changed this year. The new line now begins at the Gulf of Mexico and runs northeast through Charlotte Harbor and up the Peace River until it intersects with State Road 70. The line then follows S.R. 70, running east until it meets U.S. 441 north of Lake Okeechobee. It then follows U.S. 441 south, where it proceeds around the eastern shore of Lake Okeechobee. The line then turns off U.S. 441 and onto S.R. 80 and runs just a few miles before turning east and following County Road 880, running just a few miles before joining back up with U.S. 98/441/S.R. 80/ Southern Boulevard until it reaches the Atlantic Ocean. Zone B, which makes up part of the Green Swamp Basin, lies south of S.R. 50, west of U.S. 441 and the Kissimmee Waterway, north of S.R. 60 and east of the Gulf of Mexico. This year, archery and crossbow seasons there start Oct. 18. The line that divides zones C and D begins at U.S. 27 at the FloridaGeorgia state line (in Gadsden County) and runs south on U.S. 27 until it meets S.R. 61 in Tallahassee. From there, it follows S.R. 61, running south until it hits U.S. 319. There, the line follows U.S. 319, continuing south to U.S. 98. It then runs east along U.S. 98 until it gets to the Wakulla River, where the river becomes the line, heading south until it meets the St. Marks River and continues going downriver until it meets the Gulf. If you hunt west of that line, youre in Zone D, where archery and crossbow seasons begin on Oct. 25 this year. In Zone C (east of that line), archery and crossbow seasons open Sept. 13. To hunt during archery season, youll need a Florida hunting license and an archery permit. During crossbow season, youll need a hunting license and crossbow permit. If youre a Florida resident, an annual hunting license will cost $17. Nonresidents have the choice of paying $46.50 for a 10-day license or $151.50 for 12 months. Archery and crossbow permits cost just $5 each, and all deer hunters must have the $5 deer permit. Anyone planning on hunting one of Floridas many WMAs must purchase a management area permit for $26.50. And dont forget to pick up the WMA brochure for the area you wish to hunt, because hunting season dates on many of the areas often differ from zonal dates. You can pick up a copy of WMA brochures at your local tax collectors of ce or read them at MyFWC.com/Hunting. During archery season and that part of crossbow season that runs concurrent with archery, you can take both legal bucks and antlerless deer (except for spotted fawns). But after archery ends, during the remaining portion of the crossbow season, only legal bucks may be taken. The daily bag limit on deer is two. Bag limits for deer on WMAs can differ, so check the speci cs of the area before you hunt. You can hunt wild hogs on private lands year-round with no bag or size limits. On most WMAs, theres also no bag or size limits, and hogs are legal to take during most hunting seasons except spring turkey. On a few WMAs though, bag and size limits do apply, so be sure to check the brochure for the specific area to be certain. Its also legal to shoot gobblers and bearded turkeys during archery and crossbow seasons, assuming you have a turkey permit ($10 for residents, $125 for nonresidents). You can now take two turkeys in a single day on private lands, but the two-bird fall-season limit still applies, and the daily bag limit for turkeys is still one on WMAs. Its against the law to hunt turkeys in Holmes County in the fall, and its illegal to shoot them while theyre on the roost, over bait, when youre within 100 yards of a game-feeding station when bait is present or with the aid of recorded turkey calls. The archery permit allows you to bow hunt during the archery season. On private property, a crossbow permit enables you to hunt during the crossbow season with either a crossbow or a bow. On WMAs, only hunters with a disabled crossbow permit are allowed to use crossbows during archery season. All bows must have a minimum draw weight of 35 pounds, and hand-held releases are permitted. For hunting deer, hogs and turkeys, broadheads must have at least two sharpened edges with a minimum width of 7/8 inch. Tony Young is the media relations coordinator for the FWCs Division of Hunting and Game Management. He can be reached with questions about hunting at Tony. Young@MyFWC.com. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 11A UnderwaterWakullaBy Dr. J Hess The Auxiliary has a very long history dating back to 1939, however there is reference that the idea of an auxiliary was oating around long before. As the auxiliary evolved, the mission changed based on the needs of the country. In 1947 two of what would be the four cornerstones of the modern Auxiliary were established: vessel examination and education. Later in 1958, with the beginning of National Safe Boating Week, the third cornerstone is Operations evolved. The Auxiliary assists the Coast Guard in several of its nonmilitary functions, including search-andrescue (SAR), safety, regatta, and harbor patrols, and checking aids to navigation (ATON). Since 1964, the forth cornerstone, Fellowship has been regularly practiced with the fall National Meeting, which features an address by the Commandant of the Coast Guard. This past Sunday, members from Flotilla 12 came together for a fellowship event. Members and their families met at Beef O Bradys for a meal and to share in good company. Often, members are giving their time on weekends to participate in auxiliary events, taking time away from their families. With out support from members families, we could not do the things we do. While some were not able to attend due to scheduling con icts, a group of 25 came together for good food, good stories and great company! Amidst our busy schedules, it is important to remember to take time out to have fellowship! Thank you to Stephanie Guttman for taking photos! If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux. net then contact our Flotilla Staff Officer for Human Resources, Raye Crews, at Rayec@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at Duanet@uscgaux.net. If youre interested in a free vessel examination, send an email to our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Vessel Examinations, Steve Hults, at Steveh@uscgaux. net. To read more about the history of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, check out https:// www.uscg.mil/auxiliary/administration/ aux-history.asp. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident have fun, but be vigilant!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ........................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown ............................................................ (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) ................................... (850) 942-7500 or .............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Somewhere between Wrangell and Sitka, Alaska. Yes, occasionally we must escape from the Dog Days of Wakulla County. This year, I am invited to Sitka Alaska for the American Academy of Underwater Sciences meetings. My wife and I are aboard the Alaskan Ferry Taku somewhere along the high islands that comprise eastern Alaska. We just passed by a very small oating block of ice in the channels between islands. Im guessing the water is cold. The folks in Sitka invited me to join them on a dive. Well, well see. The weather outside is bright, warm and requires only a thin jacket to protect from the breeze. I have been brought to northern diving research sites before, and for two seasons, near the South Pole. So I understand the hand-crippling, bonechilling, dif cult-breathing, exhilarating nature of such work. Earlier today we slowed to pass by a vessel with obvious problems with their rigging, but did not stop. Im sure the captain offered, which is more than I got when stranded off Bamf, Vancouver Island several decades ago. I had been left to serve (impromptu) as the Dive Of cer for a marine lab when the standing Of cer unexpectedly left for a vacation. The project I was assisting was otherwise left high and dry for the two weeks of his absence, so I agreed to assist. They had a great heated support facility down on the water front. Cold water required that we dress in dry suits and the open boats required we dress before leaving the dock. Our research sites were located among small islands near the coast, which left a sense of obvious security. But the weeks I was attending were far from ideal, what with one gale after another passing through the area. The need for specimens and data pressed the group out in conditions we Floridians would not dare trod. But the locals were not fazed by such weather. Not wanting to appear an obstructionist, I agreed and dressed out for the dives. For several days, we seemed to do just ne. We stayed out longer each day as the research ramped up. Sea Urchins were very large and numerous in this area. We were both collecting and surveying the many species that occupied the near shore down to the deep channel rocks. I would drop off a pair of researchers in a bay and pull out to drop the anchor such that they could be picked up more easily. We would rotate and I would get dropped off and later swim out to the anchored boat. Fortunately I was aboard one day when I casually noticed the anchor had slipped and we were caught in the outgoing tide. Since the boat operator was underwater this shift, I tried to start the engine, with no success. It would not turn over. When the divers surfaced and saw we were adrift (the anchor line was very short) and headed for Japan (between islands), they swam back to the unoccupied island to await rescue. I then reached for the radio, to nd it had been left back at the heated facility! I was later informed the radios lasted longer this way before replacement was required. I was at rst left with waving at passing ferries, none of which even slowed down to offer assistance. I then tore into the console of the boat and hot-wired the engine, which promptly red off and thus began our diver rescue efforts. I thought I would return to the dock a hero, but instead found the dock master furious that I had violated his console. He admitted the wiring was problematic, that diver stranding had happened before, but after a while, he would have considered coming out to look for us. He did nally x the longstanding faulty ignition switch. These days I always look carefully when passing a vessel not underway to see if I might help. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 11, 14 Fri Sep 12, 14 Sat Sep 13, 14 Sun Sep 14, 14 Mon Sep 15, 14 Tue Sep 16, 14 Wed Sep 17, 14 Date 4.0 ft. 3:58 AM 4.0 ft. 4:28 AM 3.9 ft. 4:57 AM 3.7 ft. 5:28 AM High 0.2 ft. 10:24 AM 0.2 ft. 11:09 AM 0.4 ft. 11:56 AM 0.7 ft. 12:50 PM 1.8 ft. 12:11 AM 2.0 ft. 12:59 AM 2.2 ft. 2:16 AM Low 4.0 ft. 4:44 PM 3.6 ft. 5:29 PM 3.3 ft. 6:18 PM 2.9 ft. 7:14 PM 3.5 ft. 6:04 AM 3.2 ft. 6:53 AM 3.0 ft. 8:29 AM High 1.0 ft. 10:34 PM 1.3 ft. 11:05 PM 1.6 ft. 11:36 PM 1.0 ft. 1:59 PM 1.1 ft. 3:30 PM 1.1 ft. 4:59 PM Low 2.7 ft. 8:30 PM 2.6 ft. 10:08 PM 2.7 ft. 11:27 PM High p Thu Sep 11, 14 Fri Sep 12, 14 Sat Sep 13, 14 Sun Sep 14, 14 Mon Sep 15, 14 Tue Sep 16, 14 Wed Sep 17, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 3:50 AM 3.0 ft. 4:20 AM 2.9 ft. 4:49 AM 2.8 ft. 5:20 AM High 0.1 ft. 10:35 AM 0.2 ft. 11:20 AM 0.3 ft. 12:07 PM 0.5 ft. 1:01 PM 1.3 ft. 12:22 AM 1.5 ft. 1:10 AM 1.6 ft. 2:27 AM Low 3.0 ft. 4:36 PM 2.7 ft. 5:21 PM 2.5 ft. 6:10 PM 2.2 ft. 7:06 PM 2.6 ft. 5:56 AM 2.4 ft. 6:45 AM 2.3 ft. 8:21 AM High 0.7 ft. 10:45 PM 0.9 ft. 11:16 PM 1.2 ft. 11:47 PM 0.7 ft. 2:10 PM 0.8 ft. 3:41 PM 0.8 ft. 5:10 PM Low 2.0 ft. 8:22 PM 1.9 ft. 10:00 PM 2.0 ft. 11:19 PM High p Thu Sep 11, 14 Fri Sep 12, 14 Sat Sep 13, 14 Sun Sep 14, 14 Mon Sep 15, 14 Tue Sep 16, 14 Wed Sep 17, 14 Date 3.7 ft. 4:34 AM 3.7 ft. 5:04 AM High 0.2 ft. 11:28 AM 0.2 ft. 12:13 PM 1.2 ft. 12:09 AM 1.4 ft. 12:40 AM 1.7 ft. 1:15 AM 1.8 ft. 2:03 AM 2.0 ft. 3:20 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:20 PM 3.4 ft. 6:05 PM 3.6 ft. 5:33 AM 3.4 ft. 6:04 AM 3.3 ft. 6:40 AM 3.0 ft. 7:29 AM 2.8 ft. 9:05 AM High 0.9 ft. 11:38 PM 0.4 ft. 1:00 PM 0.6 ft. 1:54 PM 0.9 ft. 3:03 PM 1.0 ft. 4:34 PM 1.0 ft. 6:03 PM Low 3.0 ft. 6:54 PM 2.7 ft. 7:50 PM 2.5 ft. 9:06 PM 2.4 ft. 10:44 PM High p Thu Sep 11, 14 Fri Sep 12, 14 Sat Sep 13, 14 Sun Sep 14, 14 Mon Sep 15, 14 Tue Sep 16, 14 Wed Sep 17, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 3:42 AM 3.1 ft. 4:12 AM 3.0 ft. 4:41 AM 2.9 ft. 5:12 AM 2.7 ft. 5:48 AM High 0.2 ft. 10:03 AM 0.2 ft. 10:48 AM 0.4 ft. 11:35 AM 0.7 ft. 12:29 PM 0.9 ft. 1:38 PM 2.0 ft. 12:38 AM 2.1 ft. 1:55 AM Low 3.1 ft. 4:28 PM 2.8 ft. 5:13 PM 2.6 ft. 6:02 PM 2.3 ft. 6:58 PM 2.1 ft. 8:14 PM 2.5 ft. 6:37 AM 2.4 ft. 8:13 AM High 1.0 ft. 10:13 PM 1.3 ft. 10:44 PM 1.5 ft. 11:15 PM 1.8 ft. 11:50 PM 1.1 ft. 3:09 PM 1.1 ft. 4:38 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:52 PM 2.1 ft. 11:11 PM High p Thu Sep 11, 14 Fri Sep 12, 14 Sat Sep 13, 14 Sun Sep 14, 14 Mon Sep 15, 14 Tue Sep 16, 14 Wed Sep 17, 14 Date 4.1 ft. 3:55 AM 4.0 ft. 4:25 AM 3.9 ft. 4:54 AM 3.8 ft. 5:25 AM High 0.2 ft. 10:21 AM 0.3 ft. 11:06 AM 0.5 ft. 11:53 AM 0.7 ft. 12:47 PM 2.0 ft. 12:08 AM 2.2 ft. 12:56 AM 2.3 ft. 2:13 AM Low 4.1 ft. 4:41 PM 3.7 ft. 5:26 PM 3.3 ft. 6:15 PM 3.0 ft. 7:11 PM 3.6 ft. 6:01 AM 3.3 ft. 6:50 AM 3.1 ft. 8:26 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:31 PM 1.4 ft. 11:02 PM 1.7 ft. 11:33 PM 1.0 ft. 1:56 PM 1.2 ft. 3:27 PM 1.2 ft. 4:56 PM Low 2.7 ft. 8:27 PM 2.6 ft. 10:05 PM 2.8 ft. 11:24 PM High p Thu Sep 11, 14 Fri Sep 12, 14 Sat Sep 13, 14 Sun Sep 14, 14 Mon Sep 15, 14 Tue Sep 16, 14 Wed Sep 17, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 3:44 AM 3.1 ft. 4:08 AM 3.2 ft. 4:36 AM 3.2 ft. 5:10 AM 3.2 ft. 5:51 AM High 0.7 ft. 9:43 AM 0.6 ft. 10:33 AM 0.6 ft. 11:29 AM 0.6 ft. 12:34 PM 0.7 ft. 1:49 PM 1.9 ft. 12:34 AM 1.9 ft. 2:09 AM Low 3.1 ft. 4:51 PM 2.9 ft. 5:51 PM 2.7 ft. 6:57 PM 2.6 ft. 8:15 PM 2.5 ft. 9:44 PM 3.1 ft. 6:43 AM 2.9 ft. 7:51 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:55 PM 1.6 ft. 10:23 PM 1.7 ft. 10:53 PM 1.8 ft. 11:32 PM 0.7 ft. 3:07 PM 0.7 ft. 4:15 PM Low 2.6 ft. 11:07 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 12 Sept. 18First Oct. 1 Full Oct. 8 Last Sept. 16 New Sept. 243:28 am-5:28 am 3:55 pm-5:55 pm 10:01 am-11:01 am 9:42 pm-10:42 pm 4:21 am-6:21 am 4:48 pm-6:48 pm 11:04 am-12:04 pm 10:26 pm-11:26 pm 5:14 am-7:14 am 5:41 pm-7:41 pm 12:04 pm-1:04 pm 11:12 pm-12:12 am 6:07 am-8:07 am 6:32 pm-8:32 pm --:-----:-1:02 pm-2:02 pm 6:58 am-8:58 am 7:23 pm-9:23 pm 12:00 am-1:00 am 1:55 pm-2:55 pm 7:48 am-9:48 am 8:13 pm-10:13 pm 12:49 am-1:49 am 2:45 pm-3:45 pm 8:37 am-10:37 am 9:01 pm-11:01 pm 1:39 am-2:39 am 3:31 pm-4:31 pm Good Average Average Average Average Average Average7:19 am 7:47 pm 9:43 pm 10:02 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:20 am 7:46 pm 10:27 pm 11:05 am 7:20 am 7:45 pm 11:13 pm 12:05 pm 7:21 am 7:43 pm --:-1:03 pm 7:21 am 7:42 pm 12:01 am 1:56 pm 7:22 am 7:41 pm 12:50 am 2:46 pm 7:22 am 7:40 pm 1:40 am 3:32 pm83% 76% 69% 62% 55% 49% 42%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Auxiliarists Dave Rabon, David Guttman, Stephanie Guttman and Terry Hoxworth at the fellowship event.Coast Guard Auxiliary shares fellowship at Beef OBradys on Sunday

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 5 The election is a little more than two months away, but the candidate list is still in a state of ux. There have been lawsuits and letters about who should and shouldnt be in the race, minor quibbles that have for the most part only altered things a bit. But the biggest shakeup remains out there: the push from Sen. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, to take over as president of his alma mater, Florida State University. At the end of the week, Thrasher was tantalizingly close to his goal, becoming one of 11 remaining candidates for the job. Also in ux? The state rules for a limited form of medical marijuana, a set of guidelines that seem to get changed or delayed every time theyre considered by regulators. THRASHER FOR PRESIDENT? Ever since the hunt for a new FSU president began, Thrasher has loomed over the proceedings. The initial consultant for the search suggested that Thrasher be interviewed before any other candidates were considered, something that prompted the consultants exit and led the school to restart the process. But Thrasher is still very much in the running, making the shortened list of 11 candidates that will interview next week to be the next president of Florida State University --despite opposition from students and faculty to the in uential Senate Rules chairman taking over the institution. The universitys 27-member Presidential Advisory Search Committee also Friday, in a meeting interrupted by students seeking more input into the process, placed interim president Garnett Stokes on the interview list. Thrasher, a former House speaker who is chairman of Gov. Rick Scotts re-election campaign, said Wednesday hes refrained from personally speaking with members of the committee and didnt go to the FSU football teams season opener Saturday in Texas because he thought it would have been inappropriate while the search is underway. Ive hung in there this long, Im going to hang in until they tell me Im not a candidate anymore, Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, said. Im at peace. Ive been through a lot of these things, elections and that kind of stuff, but what happens, happens. Im going to give it my best and let the chips fall where they may. Thrasher was hardly the only politically-connected candidate seeking the presidency, but Rep. Michelle Rehwinkel Vasilinda, D-Tallahassee, and Supreme Court Justice Ricky Polston did not make the cut. The whittled-down pool will be asked to come to Tallahassee for interviews Monday and Tuesday. A smaller group of nalists will be invited for additional interviews the week of Sept. 15, when the nalists will also meet with groups on campus. The committee is scheduled to make a recommendation to the board of trustees on Sept. 22, with a meeting of the full board scheduled for the next day. OTHER CANDIDATES OUT Thrasher would have to be replaced by another candidate for November if he were to get the nod as FSUs president. But other would-be contenders for the Legislature were also dropping or getting pushed off the ballot this week. A divided appeals court rejected pleas from a Republican state House candidate who contended she was improperly kept off the November ballot because of a bank error on a qualifying check. The 1st District Court of Appeal, in a 2-1 ruling Wednesday, upheld a Leon County circuit judges decision that kept Laura Rivero Levey off the ballot in MiamiDade Countys House District 113. Incumbent Rep. David Richardson, D-Miami Beach, is unopposed with Levey out of the race. Levey submitted a check with her qualifying papers June 17, but the check was not honored by her bank, according to the ruling. State election of cials were not notied until after the qualifying period ended June 20. Levey tried to submit a cashiers check for the qualifying fee, accompanied by a letter from the bank indicating it had made an error in returning the original check, but the state would not accept the cashiers check because qualifying was nished. The statute at issue is clear and unambiguous, said the majority opinion, written by appeals-court Chief Judge Joseph Lewis and joined by Judge Stephanie Ray. Although we agree with the trial court that this result is harsh, it is mandated by the clear language of the statute. If a candidates qualifying check is returned for any reason, the candidate must pay the qualifying fee by cashiers check before the end of the qualifying period. Leveys check was returned, the reason for that occurring is immaterial, and she failed to cure the de ciency within the time allotted by the statute. RULES GOING TO POT It was hard enough to get Republican lawmakers to approve a limited form of medical marijuana this spring at the same time that many in the GOP are opposing a broader legalization proposal on this Novembers ballot. But that might be nothing compared to the in ghting going on over setting up rules for the production of Charlottes Web. The rule, which has already been kicked around for several weeks now, took on more critics when a legislative panel that plays a key role in overseeing state agencies joined the chorus seeking changes to a proposed soup-to-nuts rule setting up the new industry. A 19-page letter from the Joint Administrative Procedures Committee to the Department of Healths general counsel questioned nearly every aspect of the proposed rule, beginning with who would be allowed to apply for one of ve licenses to grow, manufacture and distribute a type of cannabis approved during this years legislative session. The rule, proposed by health of cials last month, was slated for what was expected to be a third and nal public vetting Friday but even that ended with likely delay. Among the problems cited by the letter: The rule expands eligible applicants to include businesses in which qualied nurseries have just 25 percent ownership, meaning the nurseries would not be required to have controlling shares of the entities. But that de nition is at odds with the law overwhelmingly approved this spring by the Legislature and supported by Gov. Rick Scott, according to Marjorie Holladay, chief attorney for the legislative committee. Under the law, an applicant must possess a valid certi cate of registration from the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services to cultivate more than 400,000 plants, be operated by a nurseryman as de ned by state law and have been operated as a registered nursery in this state for at least 30 continuous years, Holladay wrote Friday to Department of Health General Counsel Jennifer Tschetter. Thus, it appears that the applicant must be a nursery that meets the criteria of this statute, not an entity with at least a 25 percent ownership by a nursery meeting the statutory criteria, Holladay wrote, asking Tschetter to explain the departments statutory authority to authorize a phrase used repeatedly in the letter the requirement. The Legislature legalized strains of marijuana low in euphoria-inducing tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, and high in cannabadiol, or CBD, and gave the newly-created Of ce of Compassionate Use within the Department of Health until Jan. 1 to come up with a regulatory framework for the substance. Supporters of the low-THC, high-CBD strains of cannabis believe the substance can eliminate or dramatically reduce life-threatening seizures in children with severe forms of epilepsy. Under the new law, patients with other spasm-causing diseases or cancer would also be eligible for the strains of marijuana if their doctors order it, and if their doctors say they have exhausted all other treatments. At what was expected to be the Department of Healths nal day-long hearing on the proposed rule on Friday, Office of Compassionate Use Director Linda McMullen told a packed conference room that changes are likely. STORY OF THE WEEK: Sen. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, moved closer to the presidency of Florida State University as the school continued to whittle down its list. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Good men sitting around discussing & solving political & social problems over ne food & drink date back to the 12th Century with King Arthurs Round Table. ... Tell the Misses not to wait up because the after dinner whiskey and cigars will be smooth & the issues to discuss are many. An invitation to a March fundraiser for Republican Congressman Steve Southerland. The invitation was published this week by the website BuzzFeed.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)State of ux WHITES WINESNapa Valley rallies after earthquakeBy DAVID WHITEJohn Trinidad, a wine industry attorney who lives on Main Street in Napa, was cleaning up from a party when his home started shaking. At rst, I thought it was a little roller, he explained. But then, it got pretty violent, with full-on shaking. I had already braced myself, so just kind of rode it out but heard a lot of things crashing around me. After the shaking stopped, I looked around and yep, a lot had come out of the cupboard broken glass, broken plates, lots of things on the ground. The 6.0 magnitude earthquake that struck southern Napa County on Aug. 24 was the strongest California had experienced in 25 years. The media quickly turned its attention to wine and the economic impact of the quake. Although Napa Valley accounts for less than 4 percent of Americas total wine production, its the countrys bestknown wine region. And its a big moneymaker. The regions wine industry has an economic impact of $50 billion annually. At its heart, though, Napa Valley is a working-class, farming community. And in the wake of the earthquake, brand Napa Valley $300 cult Cabernets, Michelin-starred restaurants, and the like was overshadowed by kinship and kindness. Alexandra Evans moved to the region from Washington, D.C., just nine months ago. She was oored by the generosity she witnessed. People up north Calistoga, St. Helena really werent affected. But they were offering to help in any way they could, she said. Coming from a big city, you dont necessarily expect to know your neighbors. Here, people loaded up their cars with food and water to help neighbors theyd never even met. The presence of community was impressive. Evans proceeded to talk about all the activity she saw on social media. On Facebook, Back Room Wines, a wine shop in downtown Napa, urged locals to bring by stained and slightly damaged bottles to share. Talk about your week if you want, or just listen, the invite urged. Cadet Wine & Beer Bar, a popular hangout that lost more than $15,000 in wine, took to Facebook and Instagram to invite locals by for beer. We lost some wine but the beer taps are untouched, the owners urged. Come by today for beer on us. As vintners posted heartbreaking photos, locals responded with an all-hands-on-deck mentality. Wineries offered tank space, barrels, forklifts even just elbow grease to the wineries that were hit, Evans continued. Area wine writers like Elaine Brown of Hawk Wakawaka Wine Reviews and Fred Swan of NorCal Wine brought attention to charities offering housing, food, and other crisis relief. Esteemed winemaker Steve Matthiasson tweeted devastating photos. The earthquake sent all his 2013 barrels tumbling to the ground and forced his family to move out of their 1905 farmhouse. Yet when the Matthiassons turned to their customers for support, it was to raise money for the Napa Valley Community Disaster Relief Fund through a limitedrelease wine. As wine writer John Brooks noted in an email to friends, This strikes me as extraordinary. At a time when theyve suffered signi cant damage to their home and their business (just look at the pictures), the Matthiassons have chosen to prioritize others ahead of themselves. Stories like this abound. After touring Napas wreckage for much of the morning on Aug. 24, John Trinidad rested on his front porch with friends. As stories were shared, Matt Naumann, assistant winemaker at Failla, walked by with his young daughter. Howd you guys do? Trinidad asked. Last night, we wiggled! replied Naumanns daughter, dancing to animate the answer. For Trinidad, the response was deeply insightful. To see a kid with that reaction was perfect, he explained. Were all healthy. No one is hurt. Napa is an amazingly strong, resilient community. Well be OK.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 13A Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the 8 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m. NAMI CONNECTION FREE every Tuesday morning at the library in Medart, beginning at 10 a.m., and every Tuesday evening at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway, (just south of Lindys), beginning at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 12 Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, selfdefense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042. Saturday, Sept. 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the SECOND SATURDAY of the month for a breakfast meeting at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Sunday, Sept. 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Sept. 15 VFW POST 4538 monthly meeting at the post the SECOND MONDAY of each month. Dinner at 6 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. for post and auxiliary members only. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the FIRST MONDAY of every month, 1 p.m. Respite care is available during the meeting at the church. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, Sept. 16 C.O.R.E. Challenging Obstacles Require Effort FREE Fitness for the whole family. Tuesday 5-6 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Contact 850-745-6045 or CORE at 850-224-1177. Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, selfdefense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. Wednesday, Sept. 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Thursday, Sept. 11 Sheriff Charlie Creel and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of cewill hold the 13th annual 9/11 MEMORIAL CEREMONY in honor of those who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001 at 8:46 a.m., at the agpole, 15 Oak St. Refreshments will be served. Friday, Sept. 12 FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE WAR EAGLES AFTER PARTY, hosted by Promise Land Ministries, will present Yt Super y, SuperY and Bane from 10 to 11:30 p.m. after the football game, at 3167 Coastal Hwy. by Dollar General and WHS. Free admission, supervised, limited seating. Saturday, Sept. 13 FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARKS next stepping out event is called Do Bladderworts Make Sounds? from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library. Take a look at the creatures, plants and rhythms of nature. Presenters are Katherine Gilbert, local wetlands expert, and Jack Rudloe of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab. The audience can participate with Sammy and Sandy Tedder who will be teaching how to imitate rhythms of nature. A FREE HEALTH AND COMMUNITY PARTNER EVENT will be at Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be several organizations providing health screenings, free tax service, FLOW mobile, Veterans Mobile and other information. FARM SHARE will distribute free food to residents of Wakulla County. A CAREGIVER SUPPORT MEETING will be at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. The topic will be: Sharing resources with others. CHAT WAKULLAS TRAP NEUTER RETURN event will be Saturday and Sunday. Love cats? Want to volunteer for an amazing event? Or, do you know where some feral cats are and youd like to help make their lives better, send an email to CHATofWakulla@yahoo.com and provide your name and phone number and well contact you. Tuesday, Sept. 16 The Sarracenia Chapter of the FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will meet at the Wakulla Public Library for the rst meeting of the 2014-15 season, featuring guest D. Bruce Means, Ph.D., with Islands in the Sky: A Biodiversity Hotspot on Unexplored South American Mesas Called Tepuis. The illustrated presentation is informed by more than 30 expeditions to the tepuis by Dr. Means, adjunct professor of biology at FSU. The meeting, free and open to the public, begins at 6:30 p.m. Social time, with refreshments for everyone, will begin at 6 p.m.Upcoming EventsThursday, Sept. 18 The WAKULLA COUNTY CHRISTIAN COALITION in cooperation with New Bridge Hope Missionary Baptist Church will be presenting a CANDIDATE FORUM in the recreation room at 7 p.m. New Bridge Hope is located across from Macks Meats, 1282 Spring Creek Hwy. The forum will be held for the county commission candidates in Districts 2 and 4. THE TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA PARTNERSHIP will host its quarterly meeting from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library at 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. The meeting is open to the public and all community members are encouraged to attend. To request information, please contact the County Tobacco Prevention Specialist Tonya Hobby at (850) 926-0400. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. Spouses, Caregivers and Friends are welcome. For more information, call 926-6050. The 2014 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS BANQUET at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville will feature a social hour at 6 p.m. followed by the program at 7 p.m. Please make your reservation by replying to this email, or call (850) 926-1848 no later than Monday, Sept. 15.Friday, Sept. 19 NAMI WAKULLAS BBQ and FISH FRY will be at Hudson Park between 4 and 7 p.m. Plates come with sh or BBQ chicken, and coleslaw, potato salad, hushpuppies, dessert and tea/water. The cost is $8 per plate and $10 for a combo. Ages 8 and under FREE. For information for the NAMI Wakulla programs or event, please contact the NAMI Wakulla Of ce at 850-926-1033. FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE WAR EAGLES AFTER PARTY, hosted by Promise Land Ministries, will present the band The Ransomed from 10 to 11:30 p.m. after the football game, at 3167 Coastal Hwy. by Dollar General and WHS. Free admission, limited seatGovernment MeetingsTuesday, Sept. 16 The PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Park Ofce, 79 Recreation Dr. Crawfordville.Monday, Sept. 22 The BOCC will have its regular meeting at 6 p.m. at the County Commission Chambers. Monday, Sept. 29 The HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMITTEE is holding a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room.Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Friday Night Live Football After Party 3167 Coastal Hwy. 10 to 11:30 p.m. Friends of Wakulla Springs ProgramWakulla Library11:30 a.m.Health Event with Farmshare Harvest Fellowship 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.CHAT Trap, Neuter and Return event voluneers needed FridaySaturdayWednesdayThis weekend Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla Sept. 11 Sept. 13NEW COMPUTER CLASS We have a new computer class for those who want to learn more about the features and uses of their iPad. iPad Beyond the Basics Series begins Tuesday, Sept. 16 from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and continues on Tuesday, Sept. 23 at the same time. Topics covered will include downloading apps, organizing your screen, grouping apps, navigating iTunes, and synchronizing your device with your computer or the iCloud. Bring your iPad (including USB Dock Connector/ Charger) along with your Apple ID and password. Pre-registration is required, so please come by the library or call 926-7415 to register in advance. If you have any ideas or suggestions for new computer classes, please let us know. FREE FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE Our movie for Friday, Sept. 19, features Americas favorite super hero. Awakening after decades of suspended animation, Steve Rogers struggles to embrace his role in the modern works and battles a new threat, a mysterious Soviet assassin. Join us for this action-packed movie at 7 p.m. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. Children must be accompanied by an adult. NEW RESOURCE AT THE LIBRARY AND FROM HOME! If you havent tried it already, see what the new resource LearningExpress Library has available nearly 1,000 online tutorials, practice tests, and eBooks to help patrons of all ages. LearningExpress Library offers job search and workplace skills improvement, skill building in reading, writing, math, and basic science, career certi cation and licensure exam prep, college and grad school entrance test prep, GED test prep, and more. Check it out through our website www. wakullalibrary.org; click on the research tab and choose databases. You will need to sign up for a free account and may need your library card number when accessing from home. Call the library at 926-7415 if you have any questions. FRIENDS FUNDRAISER Dont miss your favorite college football games on a new Toshiba 50 inch LED at screen TV! There is still time to get your ticket to win one. Tickets are available at the library for $5 each or 5 tickets for $20. The drawing will be held at our next Book Extravaganza on October 4. The money raised supports childrens programs and other services at the Wakulla County Public Library, and we appreciate your support. MEETING ROOM SCHEDULE If you or your group has a regular meeting on the schedule at the library, please update your contact information with Linda by coming in or calling 926-7415. If your group has a scheduled meeting and will no longer be meeting or will skip a meeting, please call us at 926-7415 to cancel. Our meeting rooms are in frequent demand, and we are trying to update the schedule and contact information for every group. If you have a group that would like to meet at the library, call us to see if an appropriate room is available at the desired time. Remember that all meetings held at the library are free and must be open to the public. Library News... Blues & Rock, Sept. 12, 13, 14 at Riverside Cafe, St. Marks The Common Taters & Turn-Ups play live music on Sunday, Sept. 14 at Cooter Stew Cafe in St. Marks from 3-6 p.m. Rogue (rock) Sept. 19, 20, 21 at Riverside Cafe, St. MarksLive music in Wakulla

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comIn other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week:THURSDAY, AUG. 28 Calvin Huff of Kangaroo Express in Wakulla Station reported a retail theft. A subject entered the store and removed a case of beer without paying for it. The beer is valued at $15. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Amber Wortwick of Crawfordville reported the theft of a plastic container. The container contained aluminum clamps and is valued at $30. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Joseph Humphries of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of knives, an air conditioning unit, TV and a push mower, valued at $720. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated.FRIDAY, AUG. 29 Sgt. Ryan Muse observed a vehicle that failed to stop at a stop sign at the intersection of Trice Lane and Wakulla Arran Road. The vehicle had an expired tag and the decal had been altered by a marker. Marilyn Joyce Houston, 25, of Youngstown, was found to have a suspended driver license. The tag was seized as evidence. Houston was issued two notices to appear in court for driving while license suspended second or subsequent conviction and unlawful altering of a vehicle tag. She was also given a verbal warning for failing to stop at the stop sign. Deputy Ross Hasty also investigated. Jeffrey Proper of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims garage and removed a crossbow, quiver and a toolbox and tools, valued at $1,500. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated.SATURDAY, AUG. 30 Jeane English of St. Marks reported the theft of a wallet, phone and keys from a St. Marks establishment. The vehicle keys were recovered but the rest of the items were not. The missing items were valued at $820. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Izette VanderMerwe of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim left the country to attend to family matters and discovered two bank accounts had been emptied. The ATM transactions were made in New York City. The total monetary loss was $13,960. Deputy Ross Hasty and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Joseph Brown of Promise Land Thrift Shop reported the donation of ammunition. Brown told Sgt. Ryan Muse that he could not accept the donation and the shotgun shells and other rounds of ammunition were turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. Valerie Bradford of Panacea reported a grand theft. Jewelry and coins valued at $730 were removed from her home. Suspects have been identified. Deputies Stephen Simmons and Kyle Hanks investigated.SUNDAY, AUG. 31 Danny Langley of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traf c crash on Wakulla Arran Road. The motorist was forced to swerve to avoid a motorcycle traveling in his lane. The victim hit a road sign but there were no injuries. The investigation was turned over to the Florida Highway Patrol. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. Sarah Morgan of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The vehicle was left unsecured and a wallet was taken. The wallet and contents are valued at $31. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated.MONDAY, SEPT. 1 Angela ONeal of Panacea reported a vehicle burglary and the theft of gasoline. The victim reported that someone siphoned gasoline out of her vehicle. Damage was also observed to the ignition switch. The stolen gas is valued at $20 and the damage to the ignition switch is estimated at $500. Suspects have been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Jason Marshall of Attapulgus, Ga., and Waste Pro reported a re. A citizen contacted the driver that he had flames and smoke coming from the back of the truck. The driver dumped the trash at a safe location off Shadeville Highway and Wakulla Fire Rescue arrived on scene to extinguish the fire. There was some paint damage to the truck. Waste Pro cleaned up the dumped trash. No foul play was observed. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Lisa Bishop of Crawfordville reported the theft of a lawn mower. The push mower was removed from the side of the victims home. The mower is valued at $200. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Matthew Bennight of Crawfordville reported a burglary at his Crawfordville Self Storage unit. Manager Ralph Meadows noticed the lock missing from the Bennight unit. The victim is missing $1,005 worth of items from the unit including electronics, tools and a home theater system. Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Audrey Chandler of Hibbett Sports reported a retail theft. A customer was observed concealing a shirt and leaving the store without paying for it. The shirt is valued at $28 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated.TUESDAY, SEPT. 2 Michelle Posey of Crawfordville reported a 17-year-old male did a brake stand stepping on the brake and gas at the same time to produce smoke and tire marks at the intersection of U.S. Highway 319 and Wakulla Arran Road. Some melted pieces of tire landed on the victims vehicle due to her being unable to back up at the intersection. The tires caused damage to the victims vehicle paint. Contact was made with the student and his father and the victim was satis ed with the student being warned. No charges were led, but the student was recommended for the WCSOs Teen Driver Challenge. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Brenda McKown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported a cut in her fence. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Amy Brown of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Best Buy contacted the victim and told her she would be receiving a store charge card. The victim investigated and discovered that ve other store charge cards had been opened in her name. Two of the locations were determined to be New York and New Jersey. The victim was given an identity theft brochure. Sgt. Ray Johnson and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Vikas Kapoor of Tallahassee reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. A condenser to an air conditioning unit was stolen. The stolen property is valued at $1,000 and damage to the home is estimated at $200. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated.WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 3 Ernest Price of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone created unauthorized charges on the victims bank card. The bank card was used five times for a total of $475 worth of charges. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Kyle Hanks investigated. A 14-year-old girl reported being grabbed on the buttocks while she waited for her bus in Crawfordville. The victim gave Deputy Billy Metcalf a description of the male suspect who left the scene. A bus stop check was set up in the area of the victims bus stop. Wal-Mart Asset protection staff reported a retail theft. A male subject was reportedly observed stealing food items from the store. The subject left the store without paying for $38 worth of food products. Deputies Stephen Simmons and Kyle Hanks investigated. Bruce Duncan of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A Crawfordville rental home was found to be in complete disarray and damage was observed to the walls and door jambs. Damage to the home is estimated at $8,000. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. James Timmons of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received correspondence from the IRS in regards to false employment information. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,199 calls for service during the past week including 27 residential and business alarms; 12 assists to other agencies; 12 bus stop checks; 91 citizen contacts; 17 disturbances; 33 E-911 calls; 45 investigations; 50 medical emergencies; 24 school security checks; 414 business and residential security checks; 26 special details; 42 traf c enforcements; 181 trafc stops; 11 disabled vehicles; 12 reckless vehicles; and 11 wanted people. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Featuring: Wakulla High School Dramatis Personae Price of Admission Includes Dinner and Show Tickets: $30.00 The most fun you will ever have at dinner Proceeds to support Meals on Wheels and other services provided at the center. Thank you for your generous support ALL STAR CAST A Murder Mystery Dinner Theater AUDIENCE PARTICIPATION THURSDAY, SEPT. 25TH 6:30PM SUNDAY MATINEE SEPT. 28TH 2:30PM R.H. CARTER SENIOR CITIZEN S COMPLEX Wakulla Senior Citizens Center Presents: Tickets on sale now. Call for more information 850.926.7145 Call 7 days a week 8am 11pm EST Promo Code: MB06141-800-831-1867 CALL NOW LIMITED TIME SAVINGS! mo Promotional Packages Starting At...FOR 12 MONTHSNot eligible for Hopper or HD

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 15A By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netIf Noah had a digitized image database of the occupants in his Biblical ark, it would look something like the long-term species portrait project called The Photo Ark. Jack Rudloe, founder and operator of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, lined up at least 50 of the labs specimens though not necessarily two by two to be photographed by Photo Ark founder Joel Sartore, National Geographic Society contributing photographer and fellow. The objective of The Photo Ark is to photograph every captive species on earth over a 20-year period. Sartores goal is to photograph 10,000 species, and he hoped to pass the 4,000 mark at GSML on Monday. The pictures are archived and distributed by National Geographic, and will be seen by millions of people. Sartore wants individuals to connect with the images, and care more about conservation. We want to shoot as many species as we can, make them look beautiful, and get people to care, Sartore said. Thats the goal. He uses black and white backgrounds, studio lighting and photo tents to photograph the animals. Before lunchtime at GSML, Rudloe and staff assisted Sartore in lighting tanks of small, translucent squid that were captured in stunning detail. Sartore said he was having a tough time shooting through the reflective glass. He covered himself in a black tarp to cut down on the glare. Its a pain to shoot through glass, he said. Its really time consuming. We Photoshop these things to pure black or pure white, but we dont move pixels around, and we dont put two animals there when there was one. And we certainly cant take my ugly mug out of the picture if Im re ected in the glass. The photos collected at the GSML will be the most marine species Sartore has shot at one time, he said. This is a world class place, Sartore said. And they have a collection unlike anyone else I know of, especially when it comes to marine invertebrates, in North America certainly. I dont know if people realize it here, but its world famous. Rudloes experience with National Geographic is nothing new. While Sartore worked, Rudloe pulled some back issues of the magazine from a shelf, and shared four articles he and his late wife Anne Rudloe wrote dating back to the 1970s. A big part of Sartores documentation includes delicate wetlands species found locally. People dont realize how important wetlands are, and take them for granted, Sartore said, adding that he hopes people can identify more with wetland vitality when they see the pictures. Rudloe said at rst he did not understand the scope of the project, but became a convert when he realized its critical importance, especially because of aboriginal mentality toward resources in the county and nationwide. We have to document this stuff, Rudloe said. Its a ght for the survival of the planet, biodiversity, and clean water. But people can connect to images. To see the images and learn more about the project, visit www.photoark. com.Gulf Specimen Lab provides species for The Photo ArkNICOLE ZEMANational Geographic Society contributing photographer and fellow Joel Sartore photographs tiny squid for The Photo Ark conservation project. Gulf Specimen Marine Lab founder Jack Rudloe assists with lighting. The Wakulla Working Waterfronts photo exhibit has come home to the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea; on display there for two months. Above, Kay McCord, a volunteer with the Welcome Center, admires the group photo of local maritime workers. At right, Burt Cox, Tricia Collins, Herb Donaldson and Jack Rudloe. NICOLE ZEMAIn May, FSU College of Motion Picture Arts students used Hugh Taylor and Mary Corteses house on Martin Luther King Drive as a set for the lm The Pink Goat House. Pictured from left, Melisse Sporn, director of photography; Brittney Rothal, director; Freddy Poey, rst assistant director; Ra Lorie, producer; and Aileen Carpenter, second assistant director. They are pictured checking the monitor to keep track of continuity. Taylor was given a line in the lm. FSU lmmakers work in Wakulla FSU lmmakers work in WakullaLYNDA KINSEY BEST Local News, Events, Coupons and More! Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Please accept my 12 month subscription at the price of $27Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:TheWakulla newsor go to www.thewakullanews.com and click subscribeSavings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.Promo Code: FALL Expires: 09-30-14 $27All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $27. Local delivery area only. COASTAL CLEANUPSATURDAY, SEPT. 20 9:00 a.m.:00 noonHEADQUARTERS Woolley Park in PanaceaCALL FOR VOLUNTEERS THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS Air Con of WakullaFLAG Credit Union Cook Insurance AgencyPublix City of St. MarksWakulla Senior Citizens Center Ray & Linda BolesHarrison Bail Bonds Edwin Brown & AssociatesWhole Foods Market Shepard Accounting & Tax Service Hydra Engineering & ConstructionMarpan Florida Department of Health, Wakulla 180 Florida Department of Health, Wakulla Healthiest Weight Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park Homestead ImprintsThe Wakulla Sign Company Gulf Coast Lumber, WakullaPurple Frog LLC Paul G. Johnson & AssociatesRotary Club of Wakulla Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin Realtors Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & SuitesWHS NJROTC Free COMMEMORATIVE T-SHIRT AND LUNCH *Coastal Cleanup quali es for community service BRIGHT FUTURES HOURS St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Lighthouse Road Shell Point at the Pavilion at the boat launch Booms Road Mashes Sands at the park area St. Marks San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comMysterious disappearances have long held the publics interest and fuelled speculation about what really happened to a particular person. Amelia Earhart and Jimmy Hoffa are two good examples of the gone-but-not-forgotten mystery subjects which inhabit popular imagination and generate headlines. Earhart went missing more than 75 years ago while ying in the Paci c, but is still the subject of searches and conjecture about her fate and whereabouts. Hoffa, a controversial labor union leader, vanished after a steak dinner with some associates and has had investigators looking for him ever since. Novelists have used this type of storyline for countless pages of entrainment, if not literature, for many generations of readers who relish the brain teasing challenge of solving the mystery. Even Wakulla County had a vexing disappearance recently, the vanishing oak leaves on the trees around the courthouse in Crawfordville. Young oaks on the south side of the building were stripped of their foliage, but were otherwise unharmed. Luckily, there was plenty of evidence to point to the culprits that defoliated these trees. Local oakworms are hard at work preparing in the waning days of summer. Their numbers have built up in the favorable weather conditions of a wet summer which produced bountiful foliage to consume and support their reproductive efforts. The guilty parties for the damage at the Wakulla County Courthouses trees are the Spiny Oakworms (Anisota stigma). This is one member of a moth genus which is actually a caterpillar, not a worm. The difference between worms and caterpillars is substantial, but caterpillars are often identi ed as worms. The tubular shape is a stage of life for a caterpillar which ultimately becomes a butter y or moth. The tubular shape is usually the development pinnacle of the worms life cycle. Most caterpillars tend to eat live vegetation while worms consume dead plants and animals accelerating their decomposition and return to the nutrient base. Healthy small oaks usually have enough vigor to leaf-out and survive the assault carried out by the Oakworms. Larger oaks have enough leaf producing capacity to out-produce the caterpillars collective ability to eat. In addition to the Spiny Oakworms, there are Red-humped Oakworms and Yellow Striped Oakworms which are native to Wakulla County. As their name implies, oak leaves are the nourishment of choice. All the oakworms are about an inch in length with bristly hairs, especially in the case of the Spiny Oakworm. Colors and body patterns are the simplest way to identify the species in this genus. These caterpillars are rarely seen alone in a tree. They are commonly found in colonies of 50 or more, each dining on a leaf. When threatened, they curl into a U shape and remain still. Predators are confused by the behavior and seek other meal choices. Home owners and landscape managers sometimes seek methods for controlling these caterpillars, but nature does the best job. Caterpillar populations will peak in late summer to early autumn with birds, bats and others feasting on the defenseless moths before they can lay eggs. Soon cold weather will halt oakworms for the year. A disappearance, but it is not mysterious. Contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of ce at (850) 9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.ufl.edu/ to learn more about Oakworms in Wakulla County. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Spiny Oakworms are caterpillars, not worms. They stripped some oaks at the courthouse. Oakworms are culprits in courthouse tree mystery Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY DR. BRENT SELLERS, UF/IFAS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS CANDIDATE FORUMAT THE ONE-STOP COMMUNITY CENTERThursday, Sept. 25 at 7p.m.Sponsored bythe Wakulla Democratic Party & the Wakulla Republican Party. As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney NEWExtendedSaturday Hours8am 3pmNow Accepting Appointments on SaturdayOpen: Wakulla Animal Hospital850-926-7153 W k ll A i l H i t l GET RECYCLED MATERIALSRACE IT. 3RD ANNUAL REGATTA AT THE FSU COASTAL MARINE LAB IN ST. TERESAJOIN US FROM 12PM-5PM**_________***----; **FOOD from Coastal Restaurant! *LIVE MUSIC! *Participate or come watch! *People s Choice *Most spectacular failure First boat to cross finish line *Most creative use of materials SEE RULES AND REGISTRATION AT: http://marinelab.fsu.edu/outreach/regatta/ m t t t t C C C C C o r r r r r h h h h * * P * * * * * * M * * * * * * * * * * * * * F Fi F * * * * * * * M M

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIt was unbelievable, said Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees after the War Eagles loss at Navarre. That was a wild game. And while he acknowledged his players were disappointed by the loss, but he said these kinds of games teach kids about themselves from the three and a half hour bus ride over, to playing a ranked bigger school. Klees said hes been asked why he plays teams that are bigger, and his answer is We play them to prepare our kids for life. There are things we go against in life that are bigger than us. Asked if there was any second-guessing his decision to go for two points and the win, Klees chuckled and said, Im gonna go for it 90 percent of the time if weve got a chance to try to win the game, I think you should try to win the game. At that point in the game overtime, on the road, players exhausted because they hardly had enough for substitutions, you have to play to win at that point. Klees praised his own War Eagles and the Navarre team, saying that both continued to ght throughout the game. Both teams showed great character, he said. Klees said this weeks opponent, Marianna, is very athletic, very talented. It will be a test to see how we bounce back, Klees said. Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014sports news and team views SportsCross Country season opens at Cougar ChallengePage 8BMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL:Wakulla Middle shuts out RiverspringsPage 5B Wakulla falls to Navarre in OT NEXT GAME: The War Eagles host the Marianna Bulldogs on Friday, Sept. 12, at 7:30 p.m. Players of the WeekDEMARCUS LINDSEY 7 rushes for 44 yds, 3 catches for 83 yds. TD CALEB FELL Safety 8 tackles, 4 sacks JUSTIN DAVIS Kick returner Had 40 yd punt returnO enseDefenseSpecial Teams Sponsored by 850926-1011Your Home Town Realtor War Eagles lose 42-41 in shootout when they cant convert 2-point play for win By CONNOR HARRISONwakullasports.comTo open the game, Navarres returner took the kickoff 80 yards, eventually pushed out of bounds by Feleipe Franks. Wakullas defense stood tall and the Raiders were pushed backwards out of eld goal range, forcing a punt. The War Eagles defense was stout throughout the first half, not allowing any points in the rst quarter and only 9 in the second. Wakullas offense was clicking and at one point was up 20-0 before the defense allowed a eld goal and a touchdown (missed PAT) late in the half. Halftime: Wakulla 20, Navarre 9. Navarres offense kicked it into high gear in the second half, outscoring the War Eagles 26-15 throughout the third and fourth quarters. With 13 seconds left in the game, Wakulla was on top 35-28. Navarre was in the red zone and rolled out to the left; completing the pass for the touchdown and nailed the PAT to tie the game up. Wakulla, in overtime, chose to be on defense first. Navarre scored in just three plays and had a successful PAT to go up by 7. Wakulla quickly followed up with a touchdown by Monterious Loggins. Coach Klees then decided to go for two to win the game. Franks rolled out to his right, looking for an open receiver, couldnt nd one and tried to cut it up and run it in himself. He was met just short of the goal line, the entire Raider football team ran out onto the eld in excitement. Final: 42-41 Navarre. Feleipe went 13 of 26 for 266 yards and 4 touchdowns in passing. The killer was his two interceptions. As a team, Wakulla rushed for 219 yards, with leading rusher Chance Duhart having 60 of those yards. The yards overall rushing were pretty well spread around with runners, such as Monterious Loggins 56 yards. Demarcus Lindsey 44 yards. Justin Davis had 35 yards and Feleipe carried a couple of times for 24 yards. Keith Gavin had ve catches for 127 yards and a pair of touchdowns. Demarcus Lindsey had three catches for 83 yards and one touchdown which occurred in the fourth quarter. Kelton Donaldson also had an over the shoulder touchdown catch in the rst quarter. Bucky McGlammery had Wakullas lone interception of the game in the third quarter, returned 13 yards.PHOTOS BY CONNOR HARRISON/WAKULLASPORTS.COM/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS CONNOR HARRISON/WAKULLASPORTS.COM/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle quarterback Feleipe Franks looks for a receiver on the two-point play he would tuck the ball and run and be tackled just short of the goal line. War Eagle kick returner Justin Davis leaps over Monterious Loggins. War Eagle safety Caleb Fell tries to sack the Navarre quarterback. Falling Into Fashion The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs Annual Fashion Extravaganza Auction and Raffle Wakulla Senior Center Thursday October 9, 2014 6:30 pm For tickets see any Optimist member or call Sally Gandy at 850-984-2203 Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480 Fashions From The Little Black Dress Sundance Crums Mini Mall Maurices Delicious Dinner catered by Poseys SteamRoom Entertainment by Jerry Evans and Friends All proceeds go towards Scholarships for Wakulla Co unty Students TICKETS $30.00 each T h A FEDERAL CREDIT UNION *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 36 months and as low as 1.99% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and renances. Renances and used car purchases 2007 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. Get Crawfordvilles Best Rate for Your Auto LoanView more loan options at GoGulfWinds.com.New, Used, or Renance 1.49%APR*36 months as low asMonthly payments per $1,000 for 36 months at 1.49% APR is $28.42.1.99%APR*60 months as low asMonthly payments per $1,000 for 60 months at 1.99% APR is $17.52. Coach Klees calls the game one of the Top 5 games of his career Haleigh Martin wins for girls.

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 thewakullanews.com By MARTY COHEN So last week in a column for the website, I decided to tally up the numbers concerning the volume of games this writer has covered since coming to the University of Florida in 1978, along with how many times weve sat in the Florida Field press box. The total stands at 347 overall and 190 in The Swamp since my rst game at old Tampa Stadium back in 1980, the glorious 41-13 s h e l l a c k i n g of Cal that e f f e c t i v e l y slapped the winless season out of the picture. The reason for bringing this back up is because of the events of last Saturday night, a night of frightful weather that wed never witnessed around these parts on a football Saturday. Weve had some weather delays in the midst of games, at the beginning of games and even at the end of games, mercifully dispensing with the nal eight-plus minutes of the 2007 season opener against Western Kentucky, blunting the Hilltoppers chances for a rally out of a 49-3 de cit. Wed been part of a weather delay on the road at Georgia Tech in 1980, when it rained so hard the water was coming through the numerous cracks in the press box at Grant Field, a creaking old stadium even back then. Wed sat through the 1992 Gator Bowl, where the fog rolled in so thick off the river that it engulfed the stadium to the point where literally, no lie, you could not see the eld from the press box and sections of the stands. Were told Florida beat North Carolina on New Years Eve But wed never quite sat through a storm like the one which hovered over Florida Field last Saturday night, a lightning display that reportedly cited nearly 1,200 strikes in the eight-mile radius around the stadium between 5:00 and just past midnight. We know fans wanted to see more electricity on the eld from the Gators this season, but we could have done without the seven hours of it above the stadium. And the nice little knee-deep mud quagmire my car sat in at Flavet Field wasnt all that necessary either (somehow stuck in the swamps of Gainesville isnt as romantic as being stuck in the mud in the swamps of Jersey). And in an earlier Express column a few weeks back, we offered the notion that after the misfortune of last season (which followed the good vibes of 2012), Gator head coach Will Muschamp and his team were due for some positive bounces from the football gods. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators By TIM LINAFELT Jesus Wilson traveled to Dallas as part of the team. He dressed out and warmed up as part of the team. But once Florida State kicked off its season against Oklahoma State last week, Wilson stayed glued to the sideline, punishment for his involvement with a stolen scooter earlier this summer. Having to sit and watch while his teammates competed, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said, can hurt worse than being home. Coach didnt sit me out for the worse, Wilson said. He sat me out for the better. He wants whats best for me and I learned from that. And it made Wilsons 2014 debut just a little bit sweeter. Chomping at the bit to get back into action, Wilson checked into the game later into the rst quarter and immediately made an impact. Facing a second down at The Citadels 12-yard line, quarterback Jameis Winston receiver a shotgun snap, looked to his right and connected with Wilson on a short swing pass. Wilson, affectionately nicknamed Bobo, did the rest, sprinting past The Citadels defense and into the end zone for a touchdown. I couldnt believe it, Wilson said. I overcame a lot of adversity and it just felt great being back out there with my brothers and catching a touchdown pass from Jameis. He told me he was going to get me one. Wilson nished the day with 35 yards on three catches and added an 18-yard punt return. (He fumbled on the return but a teammate recovered it.) Even though he didnt play, Wilson didnt miss any practice time during his suspension, which allowed his chemistry with Winston and his fellow receivers to ourish. Thats good news for an FSU passing attack that looked a little uneven in its inaugural outing. The Seminoles were much more balanced against The Citadel. Winston completed 22 of 27 passes after starting 19 for 20 and, even better, no one caught more than ve passes. Wilson might not have contributed to all of that. But his presence certainly didnt hurt. (Wilson is) such a dynamic player, Winston said. Its good to have a guy like him and Kermit (Whit eld) out on the eld. You can give them the ball, and they can make something happen. We were very glad to have him back. Wilson said he likes to play fast and aggressively, which he believes can open up both the passing and running attacks. And, he hopes, hell stand to bene t when opposing defenses focus all their efforts on slowing down star senior Rashad Greene. For now, though, Wilson is just thankful to be back on the eld. He says hes gained wisdom from his mistake. Its great to be back with the team, Wilson said. Im very blessed. I just want to thank God, my coaches, my family and my team for supporting me through everything. Im happy to be back out there. What I did was wrong and I learned from it. Ive just got to make better decisions. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M Bye Week Kentucky at FloridaSaturday, Sept. 13 at 7:30 p.m.The game can be seen on SEC Network, Online at WatchESPN or can be heard on the Gator Sports Network.#1 Florida State Bye WeekSURREAL NIGHT SURREAL NIGHT MEANS MEANS BYE TO IDAHOBYE TO IDAHOJesus Bobo Wilson makes a catch in the game against The Citadel.FSU tight end Nick OLeary catches a pass, prepares for contact.The UF vs. Idaho game was cancelled.Jesus Wilson was ready to playPHOTO BY TRAVIS REGISTER PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS GATOR BAIT / RYAN JONES

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 3B Alike Armor Ashes Asking Bleed Boxer Boxes Canal Ceased Chair Curls De nite Depth Didnt Disco Enable Entry Fables Fewer Finish Foxes Gains Given Grasp Ideas Ironing Kissed Lanes Living Maiden Manufacture Mercy Messed Meter Narrow Ocean Old-fashioned Other Press Proud Refrigerators Richly Rivers Roofs Sevens Shelf Skills Stony Train The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 thewakullanews.com Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSUREDA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 850528-2371 or 850926-7461 Call for All of Your Lawn Care Needs!FREE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Specialty Cuts F lat TopsCuts F eather Locks Low Lights Low L i g g h h t t s s 850 926-602027 AZALEA DR. Behind CVS & Bealls, Crawfordville F acial WaxingsColor Highlights Perms FREE ESTIMATESWorry Free with A to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414 B&T MARINE850566-786385042 1-SAIL2923 Shadeville hwy.Trailers Engines Boat Repair g Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Call Jerry Payne Today! Lowest Rates in the Area A/C Compressors and Evaporator A/C Leak check Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED LOST Elderly neutered Male Boston Terrier black/white, lost Sunday 8/31 in the vicinity of Longleaf Drive area. pls call (850) 556-0666 *W ANTED T AX PREP ARERS Jackson Hewitt Tax Service is seeking motivated tax preparers with exceptional customer service skills and the ability to learn and grow with our fast paced organization. Our tax preparation classes are scheduled to begin on 9/22/2014. Satisfactory completion of this tax course will provide the ideal candidates with the opportunity to earn extra income this coming season. If you are interested in growing and joining our professional team, contact us at (850) 514-2727 or you can email us at jhtaxschool@outlook.com. 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References. 850-524-4990 NOWjust what you wanted Lots of space inside and a small yard! **Community life** **Gr eat Location !** 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, luxurious home, with pretty kitchen cabinets, stainless steel appliances, beautiful wood floors, lots of windows and much more! Crawfordville. Only 127,700. MLS #248242 Call Carol Ann Williams, Coastal Gems Real Estate, Inc. 850-926-2811. AUCTION -4 ESTATE-SIZE LOTS on Fort Loudon Lake, Lenoir City, Tennessee. Sept. 20, 10:30 AM. Furrow Auction Co. 1-800-4FURROW or www .furrow .com. TN Lic. 62 Foreclosure -NC Mtns. Handcrafted log cabin on 2 ac. w/stream. Lg loft open living area private setting needs work. Only $67,100 wont last! 828-286-2981 Hunters Paradise 49,900 Own 40 to 350 acres From 1250 per acre Private road frontage, Creek frontage, Mountain views, Excellent hunting. Adjoins 347 acres state land Call 877-520-6719 or Remax 423-756-5700 COASTALWATERFRONT LIQUIDATION SALE! Sat 9/13 ONLY. Ocean Access Homesite ONLY $29,900, was $149,900. World-class amenities all completed! Deep, dockable waterfront available. Best bargain in America! Low financing. Call 877-888-1416, x 138 5215-0911 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida Statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Tyson L. Scott 48 Carolina Ct., Crawfordville, FL 32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 Published September 11, 2014. 5218-0918 TWN vs. Thomas, Cecelia B. 65-2012-CA-000422 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 65-2012-CA-000422 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CECELIA B. THOMAS; MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOIMINEE FOR LEHMAN BROTHERS BANK, FSB, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK; OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 22nd day of April, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000422, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is the Plaintiff and CECELIA B. THOMAS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR LEHMAN BROTHERS BANK, FSB, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; and UNKNOWN TENANT N/K/A SCOTT MCFARLAND are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 25 day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 20 OF OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE RE-PLAT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE(S) 102, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 20 day of May, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk 5219-0918 TWN vs. McMullen, Margaret 65-2012-CA-000317 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000317 U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2006-EMX6, Plaintiff, VS. MARGARET MCMULLEN; LISA WHIDDON; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on January 24, 2014 in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000317, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, U.S. BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR RASC 2006-EMX6 is the Plaintiff, and MARGARET MCMULLEN; LISA WHIDDON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARGARET MCMULLEN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LISA WHIDDON N/K/A DENNIS WHIDDON; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A JAMES GLAVEY; UNKNOWN TENANT #2 N/K/A CAROL GLAVEY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Brent X. Thurmond will sell to the highest bidder for cash at front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 am on the 2 day of October, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 32, BLOCK A, AMELIA WOOD SUBDIVISION, UNIT NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on August 28, 2014 CLERK OF THE COURT Brent X. Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Aldridge/Connors, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, Florida 33445 Phone: 561-392-6391, Fax: 561-392-6965 IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published September 11 & 18, 2014. 1113-600905 5220-0918 TWN vs. Cotton, Alzada 65-2008-CA-000269 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000269 DIVISION: CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ALZADA COTTON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 26, 2014 and entered in Case NO. 65-2008-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC (1) is the Plaintiff and ALZADA COTTON; THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 2nd day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: (1) Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. LOT 42, THE FARM, PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 80 CHURCHILL DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 323270000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on August 27, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published September 11 & 18, 2014. F 08109025 APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE HOUSES 2BR/2BA 1,044 sq. ft. $725 3BR/2BA 1,248 sq. ft. $1,000 3BR2.5BA Gated $1,100TOWN HOME3BR/2.5BA 1,440 sq. ft. $850MOBILE HOMES4BR/2BA 1,680 sq. ft. $875 3BR/2BA 1,296 sq. ft. $900 RENTALS: Wakulla Realty 850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. YARD SALE: THU-FRI-SAT!Antiques, Race Jackets, Ammo, New Large clothes and much more! 572 Mashes Sands Rd. 8 am-until. Must not miss! For more info: 334-452-9403. Selling Something? Classified Ads For As Little As $12 A Week 1-877-401-6408

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 5B Choice Legal Group, P.A.P.O. Box 9908, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33310-9908 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com Published September 11 & 18, 2014. 11-22721 5185-0911 TWN vs. Revell, George N. Estate 2014-CA-165 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-165 LAWRENCE B. MOORE, JR., LISA A. REVELL, T.L. STRICKLAND, and ALICE MARIE REVELL, Plaintiffs, vs. ESTATE OF GEORGE N. REVELL, ESTATE OF NELL M. REVELL, ROY N. REVELL, JAMES M. REVELL, GEORGE P. REVELL, BRENDA F. LASSITER, LISA M. WALKER, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF GEORGE N. REVELL, AND KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF NELL M. REVELL, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ESTATE OF GEORGE N. REVELL, ESTATE OF NELL M. REVELL, ROY N. REVELL, JAMES M. REVELL, GEORGE P. REVELL, BRENDA F. LASSITER, LISA M. WALKER, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF GEORGE N. REVELL, AND KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF NELL M. REVELL YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action seeking determination of beneficiaries, declaratory relief and partition of real property encumbering three (3) parcels of real property located in Wakulla County, Florida as described in Exhibit A and Exhibit B attached hereto has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe and Jaken E. Roane, Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is 1983 Centre Pointe Boulevard, Suite 200, Tallahassee, Florida 32308-7823, on or before a date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on 5210-0911 TWN vs. Fricchione, Lisa 65-2012-CA-000270 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 65-2012-CA-000270 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. FRICCHIONE, LISA, et. al, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000270 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, and, FRICCHIONE, LISA, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, the FRONT DOOR of the Courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 25 day of September, 2014, the following described property: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEG24 50 ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 32, A DISTANCE OF 171.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POB, CONTINUE NORTH 01DEG 24 50 EAST, 509.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEG 34 53WEST, 625.58 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEG 10 11 WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 100.00 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHTHAVING A RADIUS OF 180.0 FEET; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 90.09 FEET (CHORD SOUTH 14 DEG 30 28 WEST, 89.15 FEET); THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEG 08 52 EAST, 743.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT. TOGETHER WITH: MOBILE HOME ID #GAFLH05A13899CH AND #GAFLH05B13899CH. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 131 SUMMERWIND CIRCLE EAST, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 23 day of May, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk **IMPORTANT** If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at Shelia Sims, Chief Deputy Court Administrator, Office of Court Administration at the M.C. Blanchard Judicial Building, 5th Floor, Pensacola, FL 32502, 850-595-4400, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published September 4 & 11, 2014. 26675.0073 5217-0918 TWN vs. Graffeo, Alexander S. 2013 000365 CA AXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2013 000365 CA AXMX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. ALEXANDER S. GRAFFEO; DIANNE J. GRAFFEO; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 12, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2013 000365 CA AXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff and ALEXANDER S. GRAFFEO; DIANNE J. GRAFFEO; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE in WAKULLA County, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 2nd day of October, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Begin at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of Lot 35 of Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 19 25 East along the Westerly boundary of the Northwest quarter of said Lot 35 a distance of 366.25 feet, thence run North 70 56 52 East 656.78 feet thence run North 19 27 05 West, 176.92 feet, thence run South 70 53 50 West, 121.05 feet thence run North 18 43 34 West, 189.43 feet thence run South 70 56 52 West, 537.91 feet to the Point of Beginning. Subject to a 30.00 foot roadway and utility easement over and across the Easterly 30.00 feet thereof. Together with a 30.00 foot wide non-exclusive easement for ingress and egress over and across the following described property, to wit: Commence at the Northwest corner of the Northwest Quarter of Lot 35 of Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run South 19 25 00 East 785.06 feet to a point, thence run North 71 20 35 East 657.08 feet, thence run North 19 27 05 West 600.25 feet to a concrete monument marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of beginning, run thence North 70 53 50 East 531.10 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 19 11 14 East 315.20 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 70 49 06 East 380.50 feet to a point on the West boundary of State Road S-365, thence run in a Southerly direction along the West boundary of said State Road S-365 a distance of 31.68 feet, more or less, thence run South 70 49 06 West 375.83 feet, more or less, thence run North 19 11 14 West 315.20 feet, more or less, thence run South 70 53 50 West 500.97 feet, thence run North 19 27 05 West 30.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 13 day of August, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services) Kahane & Associates, P.A.8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954)382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954)382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com Published September 11 & 18, 2014 13-05919 Plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: August 6, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A PARCEL 1 BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION TWELVE (12), TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST AND RUN EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 12 THE DISTANCE OF 845, THENCE RUN NORTH 176 FEET, THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIRECTION AT AN ANGLE SO THAT THE DISTANCE TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE COMMUNITY ROAD LEADING SOUTH FROM THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY DOWN THE EAST SIDE OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER WILL BE 845 FEET, TO THE EASTERN BOUNDARY LOINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID ROAD, THENCE RUN IN SOUTH-WESTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE EASTERN BOUNDARY LINE OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID COMMUNITY ROAD, THE DISTANCE OF 353 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS ONE ACRE OF LAND LYING IMMEDIATELY IN THE SOUTHWEST CORNER SAID SECTION TWELVE, TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, RANGE THREE WEST, CONVEYED TO HARDY REVELL BY MARY CRUM BY DEED DATED NOVEMBER 8, 1937, AND RECORDED ON PAGE 210 OF DEED BOOK 32 OF THE PUBLIC IS RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CONTAINING 5 ACRES MORE OR LESS. PARCEL 2 BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIPE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF HARDY REVELLS YARD RUNNING SOUTH ONE HUNDRED (100) FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE EAST FIVE HUNDRED NINTY FEET (590) TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH ONE HUNDRED FEET (100) TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WEST FIVE HUNDRED NINTY FEET (590) TO PLACE OF BEGINNING, ALL BEING IN SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, RANGE THREE WEST, CONTAINING 1.33 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. PARCEL 3 THE NORTH WEST QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER (NW 1/4) AND ALL OF THAT PART OF THE NORTH ONE HALF OF THE NORTH EAST QUARTER OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER (N 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4) LYING WEST OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE GEORGIA, FLORIDA AND ALABAMA R. WY IN SECTION THIRTEEN (SEC.13) TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, OF RANGE THREE WEST (TSS, R3W) CONTAINING IN ALL FORTY THREE AND ONE HALF (43 AND 1/2) ACRES MORE OR LESS, ALSO NORTH WEST (NW) QUARTER (1/4) OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, CONTAINING 43.50 ACRES MORE OR LESS. EXHIBIT B 5.02 ACRES PARCEL #1 Commence at a nail and cap marking the Northwest corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida also being the Southwest corner of Section 12, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 26 minutes 08 seconds West 19.79 feet to an iron pipe said point lying on the Easterly maintained right of way of Park Avenue, said point also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said maintained right of way run along the Southerly boundary line of said Section 12 and the Northerly boundary line of said Section 13, South 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds East 590.00 feet to a re-bar; thence run South 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds East 235.13 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Southerly and said Northerly boundary lines run North 00 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds East 176.00 feet; thence run North 77 degrees 46 minutes 59 seconds West 849.00 feet to a point lying on the Easterly maintained right of way of said Park Avenue; thence run South 00 degrees 38 minutes 46 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right of way for a distance of 353.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 5.02 acres more or less. 1.35 ACRES PARCEL #2 Commence at a nail and cap marking the Northwest corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida also being the Southwest corner of Section 12, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 26 minutes 08 seconds West 19.79 feet to an iron pipe said point lying on the Easterly maintained right of way of Park Avenue, said point also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said maintained right of way run along the Southerly boundary line of said Section 12, and the Northerly boundary line of said Section 13, South 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds East 590.00 feet to a re-bar; thence leaving said Southerly and said Northerly boundary lines run South 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds West 100.00 feet to a re-bar; thence run North 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds West 590.00 feet to a re-bar; thence run North 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds East 100.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.35 acres more or less. 41.70 ACRES PARCEL #3 Begin at the Northwest corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida also being the Southwest corner of Section 12, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida, said point lying in the approximate centerline of Park Avenue, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said Point of Beginning run along the West boundary line of said Section 13 South 00 degrees 15 minutes 50 seconds West 1324.64 feet; to the Northwest corner of property described in Official Records Book 487, Page 485 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said west boundary line of said Section 13; thence run along the North boundary line of said property described in Official Records Book 487, Page 485 as follows South 89 degrees 44 minutes 08 seconds East 14.96 feet; thence North 88 degrees 49 minutes 28 seconds East 285.15 feet to a point marking the Northeast corner of said property described in Official Records Book 487, Page 485, said point also marking the Northwest corner of property described in Official Records Book 779, page 58 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence run along the North boundary line of said property described in Official Records Book 779, Page 58 North 88 degrees 50 minutes 53 seconds East 500.39 feet to the Northeast corner of said property described in Official Records Book 779, Page 58 said point also marking the Northwest corner of property described in Official Records Book 692, Page 350 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence run along the North boundary line of said property described in Official Records Book 692, Page 350 North 88 degrees 52 minutes 04 seconds East 528.69 feet to a point marking the intersection of said Northerly boundary line with the Easterly boundary line of the Northwest 1/4, of the Northwest 1/4, of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run along said Easterly boundary line North 00 degrees 13 minutes 19 seconds East 630.89 feet to a point marking the Southwest corner of the North 1/2, of the Northeast 1/4, of the Northwest 1/4, of said Section 13; thence leaving said Easterly boundary line run along the South boundary line of the North 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4, of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 13 South 89 degrees 54 minutes 11 seconds East 145.42 feet to a point marking the intersection of said Southerly boundary line with the Westerly right of way line of the Georgia, Florida & Alabama Rail Road (abandoned); thence leaving said South boundary line run along said Westerly right of way line as follows North 10 degrees 34 minutes 39 seconds East 123.37 feet; thence North 10 degrees 49 minutes 10 seconds East 548.11 feet to a point marking the intersection of said Westerly right of way line with the North boundary line of said Section 13 thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, run along said Northerly boundary line as follows North 89 degrees 35 minutes 10 seconds West 751.32 feet; thence North 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds West 235.13 feet; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run South 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds West 100.00 feet; thence North 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds West 590.00 feet; thence North 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds East 100.00 feet to a point lying on the Northerly boundary of said Section 13; thence run along said Northerly boundary line North 89 degrees 26 minutes 08 seconds West 19.79 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 41.70 acres more or less. SUBJECT TO THE MAINTAINED RIGHT OF WAY OF PARK AVENUE LYING OVER AND ACROSS A WESTERLY PORTION OF THE ABOVED DESCRIBED PROPERTY. Published August 21, 28, Sept. 4 & 11, 2014. 16546855 5213-0911 TWN Kimberl, David Andrew 2014-CP-72 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION 5216-0918 TWN Dee, Wendy Sue 2014-CP-81 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 2014-CP-81 IN RE: THE ESTATE OF WENDY SUE DEE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE: You are hereby notified that an Order of Summary Administration has been entered in the estate of WENDY SUE DEE, deceased, File Number 2014-CP-81, by the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327; that the decedents date of death was June 18, 2014; that the total value of the estate is $12,000 and that the names and addresses of those to whom it has been assigned by such order are: Name Address DAVID L. DEE, II 3102 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the estate of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent other than those for whom provision for full payment was made in the Order of Summary Administration must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE. ALL CLAIMS AND DEMANDS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER APPLICABLE TIME PERIOD, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this Notice is September 11, 2014. Petitioner: David L. Dee, II 3102 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Petitioner: Deirdre A. Farrington, Florida Bar No. 488690 Farrington Law Office, P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 Telephone: (850) 926-2700 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com Published September 11 & 18, 2014. File No. 2014-CP-72 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID ANDREW KIMBERL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DAVID ANDREW KIMBERL, deceased, whose date of death was January 16, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 773.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 4, 2014. Personal Representative: By: /s/ Donald Eugene Dempsey, Jr. c/o Daniel W. Dobbins, Esq. 1330 Thomasville Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Attorney for Personal Representative: By: /s/ Daniel W. Dobbins, Florida Bar # 0263176 Daniel W. Dobbins, P.A. 1330 Thomasville Road Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Phone: (850)222-1910 Fax: (850) 254-7238 Email: dobbins@nettally.com Published September 4 & 11, 2014 5214-0911 TWN 9/19 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage September 19th, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. Publish: Sept. 4&11, 2014. will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, September 19th, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouses containing personal property of: Samuel Brinson Michael Zanco Before the sale date of 5195-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 036 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1368 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-077-014-10389-001 5196-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 037 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1440 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10779-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOT 56 DB 58 P 381 Name in which assessed Lawson & Bernice Woodham Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5197-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 038 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1443 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10786-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOT 64 DB 59 P 52 OR 594 P 103 OR 627 P 840 Name in which assessed Carlos Alberto Giraldo Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5198-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 039 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1512 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-11077-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK J LOT 17 DB 59 P 81 Name in which assessed Howard E Martin Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5199-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 040 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PPF HOLDINGS III L TD the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2090 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 00-00-073-112-10189-016 Description of property: AMELIAWOOD SUBD BLOCK C LOT 13 OR 52 P 43 & OR 54 P 888 OR 687 P 802 ORDER Name in which assessed Lisa Sanders Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5200-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 041 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DA VID OR TINA SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 8 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 18-3S-04W-000-00152-008 Description of property: 18-3S-4W P-8-8-M-8 A PARCEL 70 X 100 FT IN SEC 18 OR 71 P 292 & OR 87 P 357 OR 175 P543 Name in which assessed Janie D Davie & Howell Toney Williams Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3BR/1BA, $875 Sec. Dep. $875 Rent. No Smoking/No Pets 3BR/2BA Mobile Home, $800 Sec. Dep. $750 Rent 3BR/2BA, $750. Mo., $800. Deposit. No Smoking/No Pets. 3BR 2B home, partially furnished $1200 Deposit/ $1200 Mo. No Smoking/No Pets Available September 15, 2014 Long-Term & Vacation RentalsCheck out our Alligator Point Beach Rentals at www.obreatly.comLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2619 Surf Rd. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 54 Cardinal Lane Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyEED TO RET YOUR HOUE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 thewakullanews.com Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Description of property: GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 1 LOT 1 LESS ST RD R/W DB 31 P 405 & OR 50 P 277 OR 50 P 277 & OR 104 P 337 OR 179 P 187 OR 196 P 153 Name in which assessed R. E. M. Developers LLC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5193-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 034 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR OR DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 168 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 03-5S-02W-000-02488-000 Description of property: 3-5S-2W P-15-M-40A .08 OF ACRE IN SE 1/4 OF SEC 3 OR 23 P 311 OR 912 P 840 DC OR 913 P 260 ORDER OR 913 P 262 ORDER 5194-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 035 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1245 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-060-000-10077-003 Description of property: A PRCL IN HS LOT 60 BEING .50 ACRES M/L DESC IN OR 600 P 605 Name in which assessed ARTHUR & SHELBY W JEFFERSON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Name in which assessed RONNETTE CRUSE Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. Brain Teaser 12345 6789 101112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2122 23 24 25 262728 293031 32 33 343536 37 38 39 40 41 42 4344 45 46 4748 49 5051 52 535455 56 5758 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Across 1 Mugged for the camera 6 "Now!" 10 Jelly's cousin 13 Excuse 14 Chorus syllables 15 Healing agent 16 Where Oscar the Grouch lives 18 "Come right ___!" 19 Peeper 20 Dog's warning 21 Put one on top of the other 23 Use a pen 25 Lays down the lawn 26 "Rah rah!" 29 Julius ___ 32 Morning wakerupper 33 Not mincing words 34 Picasso pieces 37 Doing nothing 38 Uninteresting 39 ___ Pea (Popeye's kid) 40 Inquire 41 Apples and pears 42 Astronaut John 43 Person who can't look away 45 Dudley and Mandy 46 Celebrity 47 Fashionable grain 49 "Seriously?" 52 "What else?" 53 Not hers 56 "___ first you don't succeed..." 57 "Good riddance to ___!" 60 Scottish girl 61 Give off 62 Supermarket section 63 Cigar stuff 64 Woman 65 Valentine's Day flowers Down 1 ___-turner (exciting book) 2 Oil of ___ 3 "Milord" 4 Go back, as the tide 5 Illustration type 6 On your toes 7 ___ fly (baseball play) 8 "Poor me!" 9 Gasp for air 10 Where random items are tossed 11 One astrological sign 12 Fix 15 Hot chocolate 17 Not very cheerful 22 Abbr. in job titles 23 Used to be 24 French desserts 26 Earth goddess 27 Former GM make, for short 28 Insults one's opponent 30 Uncle's wife 31 Finish 33 Feeling sad 35 Actress Russo 36 Some bills 38 "It's cold!" 39 ___ machines 41 Cab money 42 Valuable brick 44 Some pastries 45 Waiter's item 46 Couches 48 Birthday celebration 49 Sneakers brand 50 Cain's brother 51 Dalai ___ 53 Snake or cat sound 54 Small piece of land in the water 55 "___ the One" 58 Performed 59 Prefix with engineering Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 12 3 4526 7381 9 74 2619 815 5 628 9142 375 00 9 HometownContent 912 7643 8 5 348195267 765328491 139 576842 256843179 487219536 574 632918 891457623 623981754 POSED ASAP JAM ALIBI LALA CURE GARBAGECAN ONIN EYE GRR STACKED WRITE SODS GOTEAM CAESAR ALARM BLUNT ART IDLE BLAND SWEE ASK FRUIT GLENN STARER MOORES STAR SPELT FORREAL AND HIS IFAT BADRUBBISH LASS EMIT AISLE ASH LADY ROSES NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, September 19, 2014 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self-Storage Unit containing Household items of: Starlette Taylor Raker and Scott and Dawn Miller Before the sale date of September 19, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327.September 4, 11, 2014

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 Page 7B 1. ASTRONOMY: Which planet in our solar system is closest in size to Earth? 2. TELEVISION: Who is the voice of Moe the bartender on The Simpsons? 3. MOVIES: In which movie did Bill Murray deliver the line, Well, theres something you dont see every day? 4. MYTHOLOGY: In Greek mythology, who rules the underworld? 5. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Which U.S. president served the shortest tenure in history? 6. LITERATURE: When was the novel Goodbye, Columbus by Phillip Roth published? 7. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of food is a peanut? 8. GEOGRAPHY: How much of the Earths surface is covered by the oceans? 9. LANGUAGE: What is another name for a lexicon? 10. MATH: How many different letters are used in Roman numerals? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Venus equatorial diameter is about 95 percent the size of Earths. 2. Hank Azaria 3. Ghostbusters in reference to the giant Stay-Puft marshmallow man 4. Hades 5. William Henry Harrison died of pneumonia only 32 days after taking office. 6. 1959 7. A legume 8. 71 percent 9. Dictionary 10. Seven ARIES (March 21 to April 19) An offer to help with a stalled project should reassure you that you have a workable plan in spite of the problems in getting it up and running. The weeks end brings more positive news. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) A past problem about a workplace situation reemerges early in the week. Talking things out helps ease tensions by midweek, but some hurt feelings could linger a few more days. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) Optimistic aspects dominate your efforts. However, expect to confront some criticism, some of which might be valid, so keep an open mind. But overall, its your views that will count. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Social interaction with new people, especially on the job, could be a bit strained in the early part of the week. But the awkwardness passes as you get to know each other better. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Expect news about a follow-up to a workplace change that could make a difference in your career path. Meanwhile, new friends widen the circle for all you Social Lions who love to party. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Enjoy your well-earned plaudits for a job well done. But be aware that some people might not share your colleagues admiration, and you might have to work harder to win them over. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Its a good week to recheck your probably already overlong to do list and decide what to keep and what to discard. Lose the clutter and focus your energy on whats really important. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) This is a good time to take a new perspective on what youve been offered. Expanding your view could help to uncover any plusses or minuses that werent apparent at rst. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Applying the usual methods to this weeks unique challenges might not work too well. Instead, use your creativity to nd a way to resolve any impasse that develops. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) So what if fate throws some obstacles in your path this week? Just keep in mind that the surefooted and resolute Goat can get past any barrier by focusing on the goals up ahead. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) This week calls for better communication with people in both your private life and the workplace. Start by asking questions, and then pay close attention to the answers. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Potentially beneficial workplace changes could be closer than you realize. Make sure you know whats going on so that youre not left high and dry when the good things happen. BORN THIS WEEK: Youre not timid about pushing to have your aims realized once youve set your mind to accomplishing your goals. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 11, 2014 thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy EDDIE METCALFWMS CoachThe Wakulla Middle School Wildcats opened the season with a dominating win over their county rivals 38-0. The game format was such that the 6th graders played the rst quarter, 7th graders played the second quarter and the starters played the second half. Mykel Keith scored the only touchdown of the rst half on a 32 yard run, and Finley McMillan added the 2 point conversion to bring the score to 8-0. The second half started with the Wildcats taking possession on their own 35 yard line, when the Riversprings kickoff went out of bounds DJ Reynolds ran for 25 yards on the rst play and Dorian Allen ran a quarter back sneak for 3 more, before Lamonte Peterson ran for a 37 yard touchdown. Dorian Allen completed a pass to Jamey Harvey for the 2 point conversion. The Wildcats second possession was a one play scoring drive that started on their own 19 yard line. Lamonte Peterson ran for an 81 yard touchdown behind some great blocking by Tristion Brown, Noah Melton, Reece Barwick, Trenton Lawhon, Hunter Reeves and Hunter Lawhon. The 2 point conversion failed. The third score of the half would come when a stingy Wildcat defense forced Riversprings to punt, and Jeremy Harvey returned it for a 49 yard touchdown. Dorian Allen completed a pass to Jamey Harvey for the 2 point conversion. The final score of the night was set up when Dorian Allen intercepted a pass from Riversprings quarterback Paxton Tomani. It too was a one play drive with DJ Reynolds running it straight up the middle for a 41 yard touchdown. Allen again passed to Harvey for the 2 point conversion. Reynolds had 2 carries for 66 yards and 1 touchdown and Lamonte Peterson had 2 carries for 118 yards and 2 touchdowns. The Wildcat defense only allowed 3 yards rushing in the second half with strong play from line backers Jared Roddenberry and Jazonte Hicks, and safety Hunter Lawhon. The Wildcat kick-off team, led by Keyshawn Greene played lights out. The Wildcats travel to Florida High School in Tallahassee on Thursday for a 6 p.m. game against the Seminoles. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe 2014 cross country high school season kicked off Saturday, Sept. 6, as the local harriers traveled to Phipps Park north of Tallahassee to participate, along with 14 other teams in the Cougar Challenge hosted by Godby High School. WHS was represented by 24 boys and nine girls. The day started with the high school girls race, with 12 full teams toeing the line. From the gun it was apparent that it would be a two-person race between two sophomores, Maclays Caroline Willis and WHSs Haleigh Martin. Those two quickly separated from the rest of the eld and ran shoulder to shoulder until the last half mile, when Martin was able to open a gap and nished 15 seconds ahead of Willis for the overall girls title in the excellent time of 21:08. Connie Lewis was the next local nisher in 10th place in 23:56, with Lydia Wiedeman immediately behind in 11th place in 23:58. Emily Lawrence (26:47, 33rd) and Juliana Presha (28:38, 51st) rounded out the scoring for the local squad. The girls team finished in 3rd place behind Leon and Maclay high schools. Next up were the high school boys teams. Leon, one of the best 3A teams in the state, was the pre-race favorite, with perennial powerhouse Maclay expected to be a strong competitor. Leon didnt disappoint and claimed 8 of the top 11 places, with one Maclay and two Wakulla runners capturing the other 3 places. Local standout Bryce Cole led the way for the WHS team, nishing in 8th place in 18:04. WHSs Albert Smythe was not far behind, nishing in 18:33 and 11th place. Other WHS scorers included Lane Williams (19:19, 21st), Dylan Peebles (30th, 19:41) and Travis Parks (31st, 19:43). When the nal points were tallied, the WHS boys nished in second place, 3 points ahead of Maclay High School. This is the rst time that the WHS boys have ever nished ahead of a Maclay team. Others setting new cross country PRs (personal records) included Jeanna Prisco, Alyssa McIver, Peri Thompson, and Natalie Henderson for the girls and Alex Smythe, Willaim Thomas, Sam Roddenberry, Dylan Peebles, Jacob Dismuke, Dalton Gray, Dalton Wood and Scott Lloyd for the boys. The teams will compete next at the Bay Invitational in Panama City, next Saturday, Sept. 13, with the girls running at 8:30 a.m. CT and the boys at 9:15 a.m. CT. 000IWYWwww.chronicleonline.com/divanight Sponsored by AAA Western Wear Alpaca Magic Arbonne Baiter Body Transformations Citrus County Jazzercise Citrus Pest Management Color Me Wicked Complete Family Connollys Connors Gifts Crystal Auto Dental Cosmetic Dr Santa Cruz Eclectic Ends Salon Everyones Massage Florida Department of Health Citrus County Frame Design The Garden Shed Gardner Audiology Georgieos Hair Designs Gold Rush Heart of the Garden HPH Hospice Inverness Yoga It Works Wraps Jafra Cosmetics John Meyers Locks/ Mamas Juice Plus Karma La Te Da Boutique Complete Family Dentistry and Implant Dentistry M Hair Studio and the Spa at M Mez Mer Eyes Mosaic Tile Oragami Owl Rock Solid Creations Rodan & Field Skin Care Silipada Tracy Specialty Gems Suncoast Dermatology & Skin Surgery Center Suncoast Plumbing & Electric Susan Reynolds The Honey Hole The New Image Med Spa Thirty One by Valorie Timberlane Chiropractic Todd F Sisto MD FACS Towne and Country All Waverley Florist Whalen Jewelers Wine Shop Zebra Candles Zen Zone Will Construction Zibye Weight 50+ Vendors 000IXDP Saturday, October 4, 2014 VIP Preview 5-6pm Event 6-9pm *Limited Availability. Taxes not included. *For tickets only go to the Chronicle site listed below.Vip $55 advance only$149 General Admission $25 advance $30 at the door Get Your Tickets Now!Call 800-632-6262to reserve your room www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com A weekend to get away, have fun and be treated like a Diva!Shop Til You Drop Cocktails Hors doeuvres Massage Jewelry Clothing Cosmetics & More! Over $3500 in Door Prizes 9301 Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL 1 Night Stay & 2 General Admission Diva Tickets Wakulla Middle beats RiverspringsMIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL Cross Country opens season at Cougar Challenge MICHELE EDDY/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHaleigh Martin nished rst overall in 21:08.