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By BETH ODONNELLAssistant Superintendent Wakulla High Schools Senior Class of 2014 outscored their counterparts in Florida on the American College Test (ACT) in all areas tested: English, mathematics, reading, science, and the composite score. This is one of the common tests used for college entrance quali cations, including meeting requirements to take dual enrollment college courses while still in high school. On the ACT, WHS students averaged 20.2 in English (state 18.7). In mathematics, WHS was at 20.8 (state 19.5). WHS reading scores averaged 22.4 (state 20.7). WHS science scores came in at 21.0 (state 19.1). The overall average composite score for WHS graduates was 21.2 (state 19.6). WHS students also improved scores from the prior years WHS graduates in every area tested. Of exceptional note were improvements in reading averaging 22.4 over the prior years 20.9, and in science, improving to 21.0 from last years 19.8. The trend for our students to improve on a nationally standardized college entrance exam every year is a tribute to the hard work being done in our Wakulla public schools to graduate every student college and career ready, said Superintendent Bobby Pearce. We keep looking for more ways to capture every childs interests through more Career and Technical (Vocational) programs, more dual enrollment college courses offered on the WHS campus, and more attention to each students unique needs. The number of WHS seniors taking the ACT has increased over the past ve years from 129 students in 2010 to 152 seniors in 2014, even though the number of graduates has remained similar. More participation is partly due to WHS offering the ACT on the WHS campus twice a year instead of students having to drive to Tallahassee. Students are encouraged to take the ACT and/ or the SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) in order to broaden their options for after high school. Turn to Page 7A Public Notices .............................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ........................................Page 4A Street Beat ..................................................Page 5A Church .........................................................Page 6A Obituaries ...................................................Page 7A Community ..................................................Page 8A School .........................................................Page 9A Outdoors ................................................. Page 10A Water Ways ...............................................Page 11A Business News ...........................................Page 12A Chamber News ..........................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .........................................Page 14A Senior Citizens ..........................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla .........................................Page 16A Sports .........................................................Page 1B In The Huddle ..............................................Page 3B Week in Wakulla .........................................Page 4B Weekly Roundup .........................................Page 5B Thinking Outside the Book ..........................Page 6B Classi eds ...................................................Page 7B Legal Notices ..............................................Page 7B Comics ......................................................Page 10B Travel ........................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Christmas in July Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 CentsServing Wakulla County For More Than A Century Serving Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyPublished Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyOur 119th Year, 36th Issue Thursday, September 4, 2014Sports SportsWakulla wins, 40-12 School Superintendent Bobby PearceWakulla 2014 grads exceed state on ACTWakulla newlyweds request only pet food, supplies, to be given as wedding giftsStarting on Page 1B Unusal wedding gift registrynews ewsThe Wakulla The Wakulla Problems and solutions discussed at springs eventMaureen Chouinard William Andrew Vincent Clark Michael Vincent Costigan Janice Faye Toliver Mahaley Ruth Sanders WattsPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNewlyweds Michele Thorsen and Emile Red Barnes wedding invitation said in lieu of any gifts, to donate pet food and supplies for local animals in need. By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@wakullanews.net To the Friends of Wakulla Springs, the future is not a place we go, but a place we create. On Aug. 23, 150 community members had an opportunity to learn about the history of Floridas springs and wetlands, their precarious ecological position, and what we can do to make a difference. The event at the community center was part of the Friends stepping-out series, that brings springs education outside of Wakulla Springs State Park, and into the public. John Moran, a nature photographer, shared his photos of Florida springs taken throughout his career. Many of the photos depicting carpets of emerald sea grass in the pools of enchantment that are Florida springs were compared to recent photographs in the same locations. The images show the inundation of nitrates from spray elds and fertilizers that cause green algae to cover everything. Moran uses his photos to reach people in a way that words alone cannot. Moran said the tie that binds is the gift we share to call Florida home. His photos of alligators, beaches, birds, rivers, lakes, trees, turtles, owers and people show that water is our spiritual lifeblood. He said, Florida springs are incredible gems of the Florida landscape, but the magic fountains are in peril, which is nothing less than economic suicide. The photos are a catalogue of what once was, Moran said. Few Floridians know what healthy springs look like. I just want to be a nature photographer who shoots pretty pictures. But Im obligated to tell the truth as I see it. Moran said that 90 percent of Floridas drinking water comes from springs. Clean water is like a good reputation, Moran said. When youve got it, you dont think about it. But when its gone, thats all you can think about. He closed by promoting the organization called Springs Eternal, and learn how to take action by visiting the website www.springseternalproject.org. He said, The measure of a civilization is not what it creates, but what it refuses to destroy. Dr. Bob Knight, director of the Florida Springs Institute in Gainesville, discussed the function and values of wetlands, and how they factor into springs restoration efforts. He said Florida has 11 million acres of wetlands, but agriculture exemptions that destroy wetlands are an increasing problem. The problem in Wakulla County, Knight said, are the wetlands buffers. Why do we need them? Wetlands are complex plant and animal communities. If you dont protect its edge, you dont protect them at all. People cant bulldoze to the edge of something and expect it to be protected. Knight showed graphs and data of nitrate concentrations, and said that for every dollar it costs to put nitrates into the ground (and eventually the springs), it costs $100 to clean up. Wakulla County is in a zone of high nitrate levels, he said. The sources of the nitrates are from any place where there is farming near exposed aquifers, septic tanks and fertilization. Almost every one of the springs are contaminated, Knight said. And Wakulla Springs is on that list. Turn to Page 2ABy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netMichele Thorsen and Emile Red Barnes did not need atware, a new blender, Egyptian cotton pillowcases or fancy bath towels when they married on Aug. 9. Instead, they asked for gifts that would never be used in their newlywed nest. The couples wedding invitation said in lieu of any gifts, to donate pet food and supplies for Wakulla County critters. Low and behold, they loaded us up, Thorsen said. My husband and I are in mid-50s. We have everything we could ever want and more. Its better to give than receive sometimes. Some of our friends were so incredible. They lled up our garage. That was amazing. More than 1,000 pounds of food went to Cauzican Care and the Senior Centers Meals on Wheels program, which also services local pets. Included in the wedding gifts were bowls, toys, litter, scratching posts and blankets. $300 in checks were gifted to the couple as well, which were given to the animal shelter. I have a love for animals that need to be cared for, Thorsen said. When I moved to Wakulla County from Leon County three and a half years ago, my eyes were opened to the animal problem. Im living out in the county, and the feral cats running through here were staggering to me. Thorsen said she started feeding a couple of animals. Its a problem, Thorsen said. People need to spay and neuter. When I retire, I want this to be more a calling for me to be involved at some level. There is a huge need. I feel responsible. Giving helps satisfy the feeling of responsibly that all of us have in taking care of each other, and that includes animals as well. I commend the people who work tirelessly. I cant do what they do, but I can help in other ways. Thorsen praised CHATs Trap, Neuter and Release program, saying it is an excellent idea, and she looks forward to being involved. The couple hopes to start a wedding trend. Wed like to start a wave for people to think differently than spending money on gifts, Thorsen said. Its about the bigger picture. Maurice Langston, director of the Senior Center, said he has never met Ms. Thorsen, And furthermore, Ive never, ever heard of a bride doing such a wonderful and worthy deed, he said. Its one of the most sel ess and self-sacrificing performances of giving and compassion Ive ever witnessed. I hope I have the opportunity to meet her some day, as people like her are usually ordinary folks who always strive to do the extraordinary. She took love from out-of-the-box to into-the-bag when we off-loaded a cart full of bagged cat-food and supplies at the Senior Center. Turn to Page 5A JOHN MORAN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBefore and after photos of Peacock Springs in North Florida shows algae inundation from nitrates, which chokes out plant and animal life. War Eagles take the eld.WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netA distinguished guest was among citizens, county staff and commissioners at the Aug. 18 Wakulla County Board of Commissioners meeting. Director of Intergovernmental Affairs Sheree Keeler presented a certi cate of appreciation to Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee. Keeler spoke from the heart. You and your staff are wonderful, she said to Montford. Your door is always open, and you have always greeted me and commissioners when we walk in without an appointment. When we need you, youre there. And I think that Wakulla, in the legislative process, faired better this year than ever. Montford said it was the rst award of its kind he has ever received from a county, and he praised the meeting format, which gives citizens ample opportunity to weigh in on issues. Wakulla County is a very, very special place, Montford said. Let me just say from an outsiders standpoint you do a tremendous job. Wakulla County is facing challenges that very few, if any other county in the state, is facing. Youre growing quite rapidly. Youve got issues on the table that are not mundane that are controversial. Thats how good government operates when you invite people and encourage people of different opinions to come up and speak their piece. In other matters: There was a public hearing to consider prohibiting the county from accepting anonymous code enforcement complaints. The motion to do away with anonymous complaints passed 4-1, with Commissioner Howard Kessler voting no. A few meetings back, Kessler offered to le anonymous complaints for anyone who might be hesitant to give their name for fear of retaliation. Since then he has received some, which were evaluated for legitimacy, and passed on if necessary. Kessler said he has perceived almost all of them as legitimate. He added that anyone who wishes to remain anonymous, may still contact him, but should not give him his or her name. Chris Rietow, executive director of the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, talked about the councils focus on economic development. Commission Chair Richard Harden noted that the ARPC can bene t local small businesses who take advantage of its revolving loan fund as a secondary lending source. Kessler encouraged the public to sign up to the Saving Wakulla Springs Over Land caravan/hiking tour, which will be Saturday, Sept. 20. Jim Stevenson, expert biologist, will lead the tour of the Wakulla Spring Basin which examines the sources, and traces the waters journey to Wakulla Springs. Call (850) 926-3376 to sign up. Kessler honored veteran Bonnie Sturchio, who was part of a tribute for taking last years honors ight for World War II Veterans to visit the memorial in Washington, D.C. The board approved a resolution accepting the subordination of county utility interests agreements with state Department of Transportation for an easement located on US 319, near the intersection of US 98. Citizen Dana Peck urged the board to hold off on the subordination, so Wakulla County has some bargaining power. County Administrator David Edwards said the existing easement is not being utilized, nor will it be utilized in the future. This will also allow the county to require DOT to build a sleeve under the asphalt to run a sewer line through it in the future. The board approved an item to direct the Marine Advisory Committee to make arti cial reef projects its priority; schedule an arti cial reef workshop in October; seek partnerships with neighboring counties on marine projects; and improve the letter-of-support process. Citizen Bill Anderson said he applauds the procedure, But theres a huge hole in this one, he said. He indicated that marine project applicants are not required to provide enough information before receiving letters of support. Eugene Watkins and Chuck Hess offered scienti c perspectives, both saying arti cial reefs alone will not necessarily bring back grouper populations. Hess said it is better to focus on harvest rates. Thomas said any tweaks can be applied at the workshop. Ivanhoe Carroll of the Wakulla County Animal Control discussed a sample startup program for an adoption center, that would mean at $10,000 budget increase. Carroll said the animal shelter is totally different from an adoption center, where animals are not ready for interaction with the public. She said the program would start small, utilizing part of the prior adoption center. Edwards said the county can decide what to do next after assessing the pilot programs level of success, and available grants. Some commissioners expressed concern about the impact on the budget. Sen. Montford honored by commission, staffNICOLE ZEMACommissioners Ralph Thomas, Howard Kessler, Richard Harden, Jerry Moore and Randy Merritt pose with Senator Bill Montford.From Front Page But he did offer a solution man-made wetlands. Constructed wetlands can work as a filter around areas where nitrates runoff toward springs basins. A triple bonus is the cost effectiveness of constructed wetlands, which can also be a draw for eco-tourism, and a habitat for wetlands critters. He used the Tram Road spray eld in Tallahassee as an example that would be ideal for a man-made wetland. To learn more, visit www.springsforever.org. Friends President Madeline Carr moderated a panel of wetlands and springs experts including Knight, Moran, Jim Stevenson and Dr. Todd Kincaid. One audience member asked about fertilizing lawns. Knight said there is enough nitrogen in the rain, that lawns in Florida dont need fertilizing at all. Moran said, Fertilizer is as healthy to the springs, as smoking is for your lungs. Jack Rudloe asked if the exponential growth of nitrates can be linked to cancer and other diseases. Knight said while there are no of cial studies, he has heard of high incidents of possibly nitrate-related cancers in the Suwannee Basin, and in the Midwest. Stevenson asked how many county commissioners were at the event, and only Commissioner Howard Kessler was present, along with candidates Bill Anderson and Taylor Phillips. Ron Piasecki asked the audience to vote yes on the wetlands buffer amendment, to reinstate local protections. The next stepping out event is called Do Bladderworts Make Sounds? on Saturday, Sept. 13, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Take a look at the creatures, plants and rhythms of nature. Presenters are Katherine Gilbert, local wetlands expert, and Jack Rudloe of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab. The audience can participate with Sammy and Sandy Tedder who will be teaching how to imitate rhythms of nature. Problems, solutions at springs event Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111 Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties Since 1973, the Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine Residency Program has graduated 345 physicians, with 147 practicing in the Big Bend region. At TMH, we have a longstanding commitment of providing the best possible care and thats why we train our residents in a variety of specialties, including emergency care, gynecology and obstetrics and rural medicine. As a result, our graduates continue the tradition of compassionate medical care with their patients and thats why TMH is my hospital. DONALD ZORN, MD DIRECTOR, TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL FAMILY MEDICINE RESIDENCY PROGRAM WHY PHYSICIANS CHOOSE TMH LEARN MORE AT TMH.ORG IS M Y Hospital. TMH

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netMost people consider it a pain to move. But members of the Wakulla County Historical Society will be celebrating on Wednesday, Sept. 10, as the Tully-McLaughlin house is relocated to a staging area near its new home at Heritage Village Park on Old Zion Road. Moving the 122-yearold structure is no small feat, but thanks to successful fundraising efforts, proactive volunteerism and local generosity, the historical house can be a time capsule of Big Bend life at the turn of the 20th century. Historical Society and McLaughlin family members will proceed to Hudson Park at 10 a.m. on Sept. 10 to cheer as the old home slowly makes its way up Crawfordville Highway. The public is invited to witness the spectacle. Historical Society member Murray McLaughlins grandfather lived in the house located across from Pigotts store in Medart since at least the mid1930s. The house was built in 1892 by George Washington Tully who built the old wooden courthouse. McLaughlin said the family sold the property in 2005. The new landowner assured them he would call if he ever considered tearing down the old house. But in 2006 McLaughlin got a call from Betty Green, who heard rumors of demolition. The property owner said anyone who cared about the house had two weeks to move it. McLaughlin said Betty Green dug into her own pockets to have the house and attached kitchen moved, and Marshall Spears offered to hold it on his property since then. McLaughlin said Freeman Pigott, who owns a moving company, agreed to move the house at a discount. What would cost us $5,000 to $6,000, will cost us a third of that, McLaughlin said. Finally its going to happen. Its amazing what movers can do. Sheriffs deputies will help with traf c control, since the oversize load will take up one-and-a-half lanes. McLaughlin said the house will come through Crawfordville at 10 a.m., and stop by the First Baptist Church parking lot. An entourage with flag detail, a atbed with banjo pickers, and vintage cars will proceed in front, with family members on foot, accompanying the house up to Dogwood Drive at Hudson Park. McLaughlin said the Historical Society submitted a $50,000 grant application to the Florida Historic Preservation Board for weatherization and stabilization to prevent further deterioration, until it can be fully restored. If awarded, the grant would do the same for the Smith Creek School House, which has already been relocated to the park, and moving one additional structure there. He said the next step in terms of funding is engineering. The creation of Heritage Village Park will be a local economic and cultural boost as it comes together, piece by piece. Volunteers have worked to make the park a reality, and Ben Boynton donated the 37 acres for the park. Some might wonder why it is important to preserve old structures. Its so generations to come will have physical evidence of what it looked like to live in 1900s, McLaughlin said. They are time capsules for people to look back on, to open, to walk into, and say this is what it looked like at home where real families lived. No electricity, no running water, no air conditioning.Tully-McLaughlin house to be moved LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com NOTICE OF SPECIAL PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Special Public Hearing on September 9, 2014 at 5:01 p.m., in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL. 32327, to Consider Adopting the FY2014/2015 Tentative Budget & Tentative Millage Rate. This is the rst of two required public hearings.If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com. SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 General Fund 8.5000 General Fund Specia l Revenue Funds Capita l Project Funds Enterprise FundsTotal All Funds Taxes: Millage Per $1,000 95% Ad Valorem Taxes 8.5000 784,308 7,411,199 8,195,507 Sales, Use, U lity & Fuel Taxes 2,068,650 1,172,384 1,897,916 5,138,950 Licenses and Special Assessments 40,000 1,112,152 1,152,152 Intergovernmental Revenues 4,884,862 3,393,161 1,764,000 90,909 10,132,932 Charges for Services 1,758,635 2,451,385 3,919,159 8,129,179 Fines and Forfeitures 51,250 36,587 87,837 Miscellaneous Revenues 69,832 4,690 3,595,691 3,670,212 Total Revenues Sources9,657,536 15,581,558 3,661,916 7,605,759 36,506,768 Transfers In 203,392 154,587 685,908 1,043,887 Fund Balances Carried Forward 711,273 2,004,015 1,164,054 643,879 4,523,221 Total Revenues, Transfers & Fund Balances 10,572,201 17,740,160 4,825,970 8,935,545 42,073,877 General Governement 3,193,477 10,070 3,203,548 Public Safety 2,463,662 11,108,751 419,327 13,991,740 Physical Environment 180,792 20,000 7,761,722 7,962,514 Transporta on 6,176 2,404,930 1,935,369 4,346,475 Economic Environment 21,111 1,858,761 1,879,872 Human Services 652,793 50,000 15,000 717,793 Culture and Recrea on 861,068 1,181,129 1,078,358 3,120,556 Court Services 55,000 190,341 245,341 Debt Service 243,968 604,157 400,031 1,248,156 Total Expenditures Uses7,434,079 17,067,950 4,052,211 8,161,753 36,715,993 Transfers Out 2,749,005 322,222 295,000 645,858 4,012,085 Fund Balances Reserves 389,118 349,988 478,759 127,934 1,345,798 Total Expenditures, Transfers & Fund Balances 10,572,201 17,740,160 4,825,970 8,935,545 42,073,877 Tenta ve Budget Summary Wakulla County, Florida Fiscal Year 2014/2015Es mated Expenditures: Proposed Millage Levy Es mated Revenues: LEGAL NOTICE ROAD CLOSING NOTICE IS GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, October 6, 2014, beginning at 6:00 PM or as soon thereafter as time permits in the County Commission Chambers located west of the Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 to consider a request to close that portion of platted but not constructed Magnolia Street lying south of Dans Drive and abutting Lots 42 through 46 of Block F of Magnolia Gardens Subdivision to the east and abutting Lots 5 through 9 of Block I of Magnolia Gardens Subdivision to the west. Also located as shown on the le in the ofce of the Planning and Community Development Department, Wakulla County Commissioners Complex, 11 Bream Fountain Road and as further shown below as number 1.These administrative actions are in accordance with the provisions of Section 336.10, Florida Statutes. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Of- ce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@ mywakulla.com.SEPTEMBER 4, 2014 City of Sopchoppy Public Meetings to Adopt the 2014-15 BudgetThe City of Sopchoppy will hold two public meetings on Ordinance 2014-06, An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2014-2015 scal year. The rst public hearing, followed by the rst reading of Ordinance 2014-06, will be held Monday, August 11, 2014 at the regular meeting of the Council. The second public hearing and adoption of Ordinance, 2014-06 will be held September 8, 2014 during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Friday. If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks ofce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting.AUGUST 7, 28, 2014 SEPTEMBER 4, 2014,

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comI asked the Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells, What time did you get up this morning? He said 3 a.m. By 6:40 p.m. on primary election night, Wells was still running wide open, thanks to a couple of B12 vitamins, he said. His wife Letha asked if he wanted a plate of food, but Wells was too busy to eat. There was a stack of 1,309 absentee ballots that needed to be recounted, and the public was starting to le in to the viewing room to see election results. It was crunch time. While I have covered probably six or seven elections throughout my journalism career, Ive never had a front row seat to the action like I did Tuesday night. I was welcomed into the room, and had to sign a list to account for all observers present. Citizen Sue Damon signed it too, and sat beside me to watch the process. Wells said any community members are invited to sit in on the process, as long as they sign in. The three-member canvassing board worked as an assembly line one person opening the envelopes, another removing the security sleeves from the ballots, and yet another stacking the ballots in a pile. This is done for the sake of privacy, Wells said, so not one canvassing board of cial can see who voted or how. One of ce employee made a few trips to the post of ce to gather any last minute ballots that were dropped in the evening. Wells said straggler ballots that arrived the next day are not valid. Some of the ballots were considered spoiled. Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker, who sits on the canvassing board, is the only one authorized to create a new ballot for the bad ones some of them stained, wrinkled, checked instead of bubbled, and one voter submitted a sample ballot by mistake. The spoiled ballots are recorded and placed into special envelopes. Most of the absentee ballots had been counted the day before, and Wells made sure everyone was aware of that number. He called out the number off the ballot scanner, and had other people in the room check to con rm it. It had been recorded on a form, which was also checked and doublechecked. He also had people double check the serial number of the scanners, and the numbered lock on the scanner bags, to ensure they matched, and that a scanner had not been switched out. When the numbers of absentee ballots didnt match the number on the ballot scanner, which was off by two, Wells knew what they had to do count all of the ballots again. But rst, he unlocked and checked all of the ling cabinets, and the secure box under the ballot scanner. The canvassing board checked every envelope and security sleeve for the two rogue ballots. When the two ballots never appeared, Wells packed up the scanner, which will be shipped back to the company, Dominion, to be checked out. He retrieved a new scanner from the shelf, and had the security lock number checked against the scanners serial number. I was impressed with the meticulous integrity of the process. I am too lazy and impatient to ever make a good elections supervisor or canvassing board member. Canvassing board members took turns feeding all 1,309 ballots through the fresh scanner. Damon and Brent Thurmond alternated watching the number on the scanner, to be sure each and every ballot fed through was counted. The fresh scanner was more accurate, and every ballot was accounted for. Wells printed off a long report on receipt paper, called out the nal number, and had the canvassers sign it. By this time it was approaching 7:15, when the absentee and early vote numbers had to be submitted to the state. Around the same time, results started rolling in from the 12 Wakulla County precincts. Wells didnt miss a beat. He switched modes and seemed relieved to hear the healthy screeching of the modem line transferring data from the precincts. The votes were in. Hopefully Wells got some rest, because November will be here before we know it.Nicole Zema is reporter at The Wakulla News. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Medarts Dale Langston, one of Americas finest Wakullas youth the focus of town hall meeting In the garden now: Okra Its still hot, but the fishing is just fine A doggie to dye for Fox grapes grow throughout North America Proposed intersection generates controversy Election complaint against candidate is rejected thewakullanews.com Waste Pro cans shouldnt be left in road Lack of understanding about wetlands Operation Santa countdown begins ank you for supporting candidacyMethod to the madness: Behind the scenes at primary Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.net Follow us on Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: A few weeks ago I was involved in an accident on Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Drive. I hit a Waste Pro can that was left in the road. As I was approaching the can, I noticed it close to the edge. I started slow my speed, and the tailgating truck behind got closer as I think he was going to pass me as soon as the oncoming car passed. I had to make a split second decision to slam on brakes or hit the can since I could not move to the other lane, I chose to hit the can. I led a claim to have my mirror repaired which in turn was turned down when I asked why the man who was in charge said I should have avoided the can AT ALL COSTS. I asked did that mean even causing an accident and maybe getting someone killed? He said again I had the responsibility to avoid it AT ALL COSTS. This in my opinion is just plain WRONG. We, as a county, have got to get together and get Waste Pro to make sure the cans are not left in the roads before someone is killed. Thanks, Phyllis Smith CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: The wetlands controversy continues, and it reminds me of the climate change problem. Due to lack of understanding of the harm being done to our environment through inadequate pollution controls, lack of adequate sewer containment, over fertilizing, and damage to our ground cover and wetland buffer plants, we sometimes perpetuate problems that lead to negative consequences for the environment. In our local area one of the big ways we can make a difference in our environment is by providing adequate wetland buffers. One reason we need to get back our 75 foot wetland buffer zone is to help filter the runoff from contaminants which are ruining our fragile ecosystem. My daughter used to collect seaweed from the shore for her garden, but the seaweed is now so full of impurities that it cannot be used anymore. Another good reason for the 75 foot wetland buffer is to keep the wetlands healthy so that they help to control ooding and provide living and breeding places for wildlife and sea life. Extinction is a scary word, but in the future much of our sea life could be extinct because of a lack of clean water and breeding areas in our marshes. We need to make sure these areas are protected as well as we can. A 75 foot buffer is not too much for us to leave for the animals, birds and sea life that need it in order to thrive. Please vote YES in November to protect our wetlands. Bonnie Sturchio Sopchoppy Editor, The News: It seems only yesterday that Wakulla County came together to bring a brighter Christmas to over 300 families, and now we are less than four months away from our next Operation Santa Distribution Day, December 13th. This community event is made possible because folks are willing to volunteer, donate and adopt families. An important meeting for anyone interested in VOLUNTEERING (or wanting to know more about Operation Santa) is scheduled for Tuesday, Sept. 16th at 6:30 so please mark your calendar and join us at the One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Hwy. Light refreshments will be served and a brief overview of volunteer activities. You do not have to commit to anything; just come listen and learn. Come from work, before or after you exercise, come in a dress, or with your hair in a mess, we dont care, just COME! Look for our routine announcements in the Community Section of The News and stay up to date with us on Facebook; just LIKE Operation Santa Wakulla or visit our website www.OperationSantaWakulla.org. We apologize if you signed up in the past and were not called on. We have made MAJOR changes; come learn about them at this meeting. Janice Eakin Director Robin Lunn, Assistant Director Editor, The News: The election for School Board is over and I would like to thank everyone who supported my campaign. I am grateful to all the people who had signs in their yard, waved at the polls, wrote letters, shared my Facebook posts, rode in the parades, and talked to their friends and neighbors about my quali cations. I am especially thankful to all those who exercised their American right and voted in the Primary. Thank you for taking the time to learn about the candidates and going to vote. Thank you for teaching your children and grandchildren how democracy works. I would also like to thank my wonderful family and friends for all their help. Success wouldnt have been possible without them. Also, thanks go to the Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells and his staff. They were extremely helpful and professional. Thank you, Wakulla County, for having confidence in me. I will work very hard for our children and our school system. Gratefully, Jo Ann Daniels School Board District 5WMS excited about Myhre as principalEditor, The News: The Wakulla Middle School Wildcats are excited about this new school year with our leadership team. Where some districts may experience unrest with a change in leadership, WMS is energized. An esprit de corps attitude and focus on providing the best for our students permeates throughout the school. Our new principal, Rick Myhre, was selected as the number one choice as WMS Principal by a seven member interview panel consisting of a retired Calhoun County Superintendent, the Madison County HR Director [minority], a current Wakulla principal, an HR specialist from the legislative branch of the state, the districts current Chief Financial Ofcer, a retired Wakulla Principal and three Wakulla Middle School teacher leaders. For those who may not know, the WMS Principal was the 1997 WHS Valedictorian, an IT specialist, teacher and U.S. Army soldier. He received multiple commendations including the Bronze Star Award for service in Iraq. Sgt. Rick Myhre was noted as among the best for his loyalty, duty, respect, sel ess service, honor, integrity and personal courage while in the U.S. Army including his tour of duty in Iraq and Afghanistan. He returned to Wakulla County to raise his family because of his love and dedication to Wakulla County. He has been a successful teacher and applauded Dean of Students. WMS has a deep tradition of a strong learning community. Rick Myhre had demonstrated his belief in the sum being greater than the individual parts as he has placed us where our strengths contribute the most. He inspires us by sharing in our motivation for success and encouraging all of us to grow professionally. Rick Myhre has received meritorious achievement in all his endeavors. I am con dent his service as our Wildcat Principal will be no different as he has already proven the importance of visibility, effective communication and the safety of all stakeholders. We are excited as a faculty to have Mr. Myhre and are beyond excited about serving the students of this great district. Educationally Yours, Catherine Cutchen WMS Guidance Counselor Sandy Byars Charlotte Hoover WMS 6th Grade Teachers

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked around town:Do you have a football team you follow?JOEY HODGESREHAB COORDINATORGators! My 5 year old says Florida State. I hope the Gators tighten their game up this year. KENNY GLOVERSOUTHWAY CRANEYeah Florida State. I expect them do really well this year. MITCH BARANOWSKI CNA/TRANSPORTATIONFlorida State. I am hoping they will do really good this year, not get overly con dent. If they work together they should do well. The Tennessee Titans. I look for them to play an average game. I go to Nashville to see them play. CLAYTON BUSENCSG SYSTEMS KEITH RAULERSONFSU. I think they will do well this year. I dont want to say I think they will win the title again. I dont want to jinx them! Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Pirates Landing Free Appetizer of your choice Ouzts Too Grilled Shrimp w/rice dinnerWinner Merphis Ellis drawn from Pirates Landing in St. Marks The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.comLooking for Looking for the latest the latest Local Sports Local Sports News? News?By SUSIE BOWENExecutive Assistant to Sheriff CreelThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce invites the public to the 13th annual Sept. 11 Memorial Service at the agencys parking lot and agpole, at 15 Oak St., Crawfordville. The service will begin at 8:46 a.m., when the rst commercial airplane struck the rst World Trade Center tower. The event is in memory of those who died in those terrorist attacks. The ceremony will include a raising of the ag, singing, playing of Taps and honoring the military, re ghters, law enforcement and rst responders from Wakulla County. Refreshments will be served.Remember heroes, loss on Sept. 11By MARION RUSSRelay for LifeToday I sat at Hospice House with a good friend who has cancer. His wife had to leave his bedside so she could go get her cancer treatment. Right next door to his room is another good friend of mine whose cancer has taken over her body; along with other families trying to say goodbye to their loved one. When a person first hears the words, you have cancer, its one of the hardest things in life. The other is putting on a brave face to tell family and friends, assuring them that it will be OK. Everyday I say a prayer to God that my cancer doesnt come back, and that we will nd a cure for this deadly disease. Also, that I will not have to say goodbye to another loved one and watch them suffer from the pain of cancer. To nd a cure for this deadly disease, there has to be research and this takes funding. So from 1 to 6 p.m. on Sept. 9, come to Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville and sign up your team for Relay for Life Wakulla 2015. Its FREE to register. Or if you wish to make a donation, you can contact me at 850-322-2652 or relayforlifewakulla@ gmail.com Together lets help raise funds to aid in the research to nd a cure for cancer, so the next time a person hears those words, they know there is a cure, and they will survive.Why join, or donate to Relay for Life Wakulla? From the Front Page Our seniors and their pets, which are now companions in many cases, are deeply thankful for the food, Langston said. Id normally call it a donation, but this was an act and gift of love. You can put a price on a donation but gifts of love are priceless! Langston thanked the couple for their gift. Did we appreciate your love gift? I think it appropriate to say, I do! Unusual gift registry Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days y s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant FRESH SEAFOODStraight from the Docks of St. Marks!785 Port Leon Drive, St Marks Wed. Fri. 11am until Sat. Sun. Open for Breakfast at 6:30amWe have Gator & A Full Bar 850 925-64487968 Coastal Hwy. 98 Newport Historic Bridge WED.HOME COOKED MEALS THURS.PICKIN & GRINNINOUZTSTOO.COMFOOD BEVERAGEENTERTAINMENT$4 Daily Specials!Includes Chips and DrinkCuban SandwichCuban Ham & Pork, topped with Swiss cheese, dill pickle, yellow mustard on a Cuban Roll Includes Chips and Drink$895 926-3500 SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station The Reverend Bert MatlockBible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor John S. Quinton850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor850 745-8359Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchSunday School 10 a.m. Worship 11 a.m. PASTOR ALAN GAYLORD 926-7209Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.org Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchYour church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE A severe case of yuck-itis Charlottes Faith will have three-day revivalCharlottes Faith and Deliverance Temple will hold a threenight night revival from Sept. 3 through Sept. 5 at 7:30 p.m. nightly with Prophet Michael Turner presiding. Bishop Alice WIlliams is pastor at the church, located at 150 Brown-Donaldson Road in Crawfordville. Everyone is invited. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t. The ministry is free. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton to hold holiday craft fairSt. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold its 2nd annual Holiday Craft Fair sale on Saturday, Oct. 25. We wish to showcase local crafters. Anyone wishing to sell items they have created is welcome to join us. You will be able to set up inside the hall or outdoors. There will be free admission for all shoppers. For more information, contact Phylllis Berninger at 926-1453 or Nicky Lepp at 926-9750. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERMy schedule recently called for me to do some travel involving airplanes. I am not a fan of airplanes, but airports are something else altogether. They seem to be like a mall. Whatever you want, you can nd it in an airport. The bigger the airport, the more you can nd. I was sitting in an airport restaurant waiting for my plane and simply enjoying myself. I watched the people go by and inside I was laughing and making fun of them. I play a little game when I am all by myself. If only they knew what I was thinking about as they walked by, they would come over and give me a stern look. I have never seen a person that I cannot make fun of, including that raspy looking person in my bathroom mirror. It is the sort of game you can play when you are all by yourself with nothing else to do. I was sipping my umpteenth cup of coffee when I happened to notice several people walking by who were sneezing. At rst I did not think too much of it, but then I began to notice more and more people sneezing. Is there a sneezing epidemic going on that I have not heard of yet? I tried not to pay attention to it and went back to my game of Who Can I Make Fun of Now? Maybe it was programmed into my head at the time, but I could not help noticing every other person walking by heading for an airplane was either sneezing or snif ing or coughing. I thought to myself, Self, I sure hope they are not on our plane? I nally got to my gate and waited to board the airplane and then take off. I was checking some things on my cell phone when I heard a person behind me sneeze. Not only did they sneeze, but they sneezed half a dozen times and it just about drove me crazy. I know the road to crazy for me is rather a short drive, but I hate taking that road. It dawned on me at the time that the person behind me doing all the sneezing was also waiting to get on the same plane I was going to board in a few minutes. Why cant they check your sneezing at the gates before you come in so that you do not have to take it on board the plane? I mean, after all, they check for everything else! Finally, my number was called and I began boarding the airplane. I noticed in front of me was the man who was going all of the sneezing. I whispered to myself, Self, I hope he has certainly got all of the sneeze out of him. We nally were seated and it takes me quite a while to get buckled in. Whoever designed planes designed them with the seven Disney dwarfs in mind. To get that belt around me and buckled is a great accomplishment. I would not say I am oversized, just that I am post thin, and by the time I squeezed myself into the seat and strapped myself in with the buckle it is about all I can do to breathe. On this ight, I happen to be seated in the middle. There would be a person on my right and a person on my left. It was at that time I prayed that they would be skinny and healthy. Two gentlemen came in, one on my left, the other on my right. By the time we all got in and buckled, none of us could move one way or the other. We smiled at each other and then the plane took off and we were airborne. I happened to notice at the time that nobody on the plane was sneezing, coughing, or even snif ing. I sighed a deep sigh and then it happened to me. I am not quite sure how all of this happens, but I felt the in the bottom of my lungs a presneeze condition. At that point, I knew exactly what was coming and I did not know how to deal with it. When you sneeze on an airplane, you cannot turn to your left or to your right because people are sitting there. What is a person to do? If I look up and sneeze, it will all come down on me. Then I remembered the people I knew when they had to sneeze, sneezed into their arm. I raised my right arm just as I was about to sneeze, and boy did I sneeze. Whenever I sneeze, it always has to be in triplets. I sneezed three times in my arm and when I come out from that arm, it was drooping and dripping with all sorts of gunk that came from somewhere deep inside of me. What do you do with gunk like that on an airplane? As I was trying to think about what to do, a verse of Scripture came to my mind. How is it then, brethren? when ye come together, every one of you hath a psalm, hath a doctrine, hath a tongue, hath a revelation, hath an interpretation. Let all things be done unto edifying (1 Corinthians 14:26). It is hard to discipline yourself to do only those things that edify other people. That is the challenge of the Christian life.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att.net. OUT TO PASTOR In depth home bible studies are available 3055 Crawfordville Hwy.Sun. Services 2:30 First Baptist Church of Crawfordvilles Revolution Student Ministries would like to invite you to the annual county-wide, back-toschool blowout! The event will be held from Wednesday, Sept. 3, through Friday, Sept. 5, from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Christian Life Center at the church, located at 3086 Crawfordville Highway. Food will be served at 6 p.m. each night. On Saturday, Sept. 6, the church will host Pack the Ranch at 3Y Ranch from 5 to 9 p.m. The event will feature games, food and worship. 3Y Ranch is located at 195 Harvey-Young Farm Road. The event will feature special speaker Jason George, the Founder and President of Narrowtrail Ministries Inc. He travels the country speaking in churches, schools, camps, retreats, conferences, and missions. Happily married to Stephanie for more than 18 years with three children and a fat yellow lab, he currently resides in Nixa, Mo. Also appearing will be the Ticket Band, who are originally from Jacksonville and grew up as a local church student praise and worship band. Now they travel the southeast and perform in various events such as DNow, summer camps and weekend worship events. For more information about the events, call Jim Posey at (850) 443-5834. orthoinfo.org/patientsafety The safest, most successful surgeries happen when physicians and patients team up as active partners. Which means plenty of candid questions and honest answers from each. Bone up on patient safety at orthoinfo.org/patientsafety. A public service message from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, reminding patients and doctors that communication is the best medicine. Patient Safety. It takes a team.GOING IN FOR SURGERY? DONT JUST LI E THERE. First Baptists Revolution youth events are underway The Ticket Band from Jacksonville are scheduled to perform at Pack the Ranch.

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Michael Vincent Costigan, 27, passed away on Aug. 24, 2014 in Crawfordville. Michael was funny and had a very outgoing personality; he loved watching football, especially the Giants and FSU. He was a loving father, son and brother and will truly be missed. Michael is survived by his daughter, Emily Costigan (1); parents, William Costigan and Judy Costigan; two brothers, William Costigan, Matthew Costigan and fianc, Jessica Pace. He was predeceased by his grandparents, William J. and Cloris Costigan, and Vincent and Grace Saner. In lieu of owers, donations can be made to a memorial fund for Emily, Michaels daughter, at www. gofundme.com. The family received friends on Thursday, Aug. 28, 2014 from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville, with the service starting at 5 p.m. Amber Miller and David Conn of Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel are assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com). www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 7AObituaries Maureen Chouinard William Andrew Vincent Clark Michael Vincent Costigan Janice Faye Toliver Mahaley Ruth Sanders WattsMichael Vincent CostiganBy TRACY RENEE LEEAs a funeral director, I often see families who have lost a loved one without the necessary funds to provide for the nal expenses. The problem is that there is a dead body and something must be done within a short period of time, to properly accomplish final disposition with kindness, dignity and respect. What are survivors in this very undesirable situation supposed to do for funds? If the funeral home accepts credit cards, the survivor can utilize his or her preestablished credit and then make the necessary payments to the credit card carrier. I nd that survivors do not like this option. It is possible that most of them think the interest is too high, or they do not carry enough space on their credit cards to be able to afford such a substantial expense. The funeral funds, however, must be provided before services can be rendered. If the next of kin is unable to raise the necessary funds through his or her own credit, they may choose to ask additional family members and friends to contribute. This can be embarrassing and many survivors do not care for this option either. Some families are under the misconception that if they refuse or cannot provide the necessary funds, the government will cover their loved ones funeral expenses. While it may be true that some counties have funds for paupers, these funds are reserved for indigents. If a decedent has family members or relatives, he or she does not qualify for the funds. Unfortunately, funds that must be quickly obtained usually end up carrying extremely high fees. Whoever loves the decedent enough to step up to his or her deserted plate, usually ends up paying a far greater price and burden than the decedent would have if he or she had just taken care of this issue before his or her inevitable death. The easiest and most cost effective way to provide funds for ones funeral expenses is called pre-need insurance, and it is purchased prior to ones death. Paying for a decedents funeral after his or her death is called an expensive burden. If you are setting your loved ones up for this very unfair situation, they will be suffering the burden of your debt for a very long and laborious time.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Follow my blog at pushin-up-daisies. blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @ PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome. com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Funding an unfunded funeral BEREAVEMENT COLUMN Maureen Chouinard, 57, of Spring Creek, died Aug. 26, 2014. She was originally from New Britain, Conn., and had lived in the Spring Creek area for the last 25 years. Survivors include her husband, Rick Chouinard; daughter, Carla Chouinard; and son, John Brenkus Jr., all from Crawfordville. She was predeceased by her parents, Raymond and Gertrude Bannon of New Britain, Conn. Visitation was held Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014 at Pioneer Baptist Church in Spring Creek at 10 a.m., and the service followed at 1p.m., followed by the burial. Arrangements by A.M. White Mortuary, Anthony M. White, L.F.D. 904-397-0783. William Andrew Vincent Will Clark, 24, of Crawfordville, died on Saturday, Aug. 16, 2014. He was a 15-year resident of Wakulla County. Survivors include his father, Charles E. Hoke of Crawfordville; a son, Vincent Tucker Clark of Crawfordville; a daughter, Emma Jade Clark of Crawfordville; sister, Catherine Nicole Hoke; and his anc, Gabrielle Denise Brown of Crawfordville. He was predeceased by his mother, Pamela Lynn Hoke. A celebration of his life was held at 11 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 30, 2014 at Christian Worship Center in Crawfordville, with the Rev. Steve Taylor of ciating. The family received friends from 6 to 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 29, 2014 at Christian Worship Center. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, Lake City. 386-752-5212. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net.Janice Faye ToliverJanice Faye Toliver, 76, of Bainbridge, Ga., died on Sunday, Aug.31, 2014 at her residence. The memorial service was held at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 3, 2014 at Ivey Funeral Home Chapel. The family received friends immediately following the service. Online visitors may sign the guest register at www.iveyfuneral. com. She was born March 7, 1938 in Cairo, Ga., the daughter of Broward Bass and Alice Steele Bass. Survivors include her children, William Leonard Toliver (Rachel) of Marianna, Tommy Toliver (Mary) of Bainbridge, Ga., Van Toliver (Marilyn) of Bainbridge, Ga., Jessie Toliver (Teresa) of Bainbridge, Ga., Gary Toliver of Bainbridge, Ga., and Pat Hilton (Charlie) of Wray, Ga.; her siblings, Sherry Quigg of Crawfordville, Bobby Bass of Crawfordville, and Kathy Lietz of Mobile, Ala.; 13 grandchildren; and eight great-grandchildren. In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her husband, William Gary Toliver; two siblings; and a grandson, Keith Toliver.Maureen Chouinard William Andrew Vincent Will Clark Mahaley Ruth Sanders Watts From Front PageStudents can prepare for doing well on the ACT and on other college entrance exams by taking advantage of the rigorous curricula offered at Wakulla High School such as Tallahassee Community College dual enrollment courses and Advanced Placement courses. In addition to dual enrollment courses offered on the WHS campus or at the TCC Center in Crawfordville, distance learning equipment was purchased from the Gifted and Talented STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Scholars grant through the Panhandle Education Consortium. Wakulla High is using this equipment to offer dual enrollment STEM courses that do not have enough WHS students to offer a class. Through distance learning, the WHS students can virtually become part of the actual TCC class in Tallahassee while remaining on the WHS campus. Furthermore, Advanced Placement courses are high school classes taught at a challenging college level with an internationally recognized standardized test at the end of the course. Students earn high school credits and can also earn college credits through the AP program. Students will be better prepared to score higher on the ACT and on the SAT if they have chosen a challenging course of studies. They are encouraged to take the tests several times to improve their scores, starting in the fall of their junior year at the latest. Wakulla High School has increased information and awareness efforts, including Parent Nights several times a year. For more information on taking the ACT or the SAT, contact the Wakulla High School Guidance Department or WHS Assistant Principal of Curriculum Sunny Chancy (sunny. chancy@wcsb.us). All school counselors, Career Specialist Sarabeth Jones, and Assistant Principal Chancy are now located in the new one stop counseling center for student and parent convenience at 926-2221.Wakulla grads exceed state on ACT Mahaley Ruth Sanders Watts, 80, died on Wednesday, July 30, 2014 at Tallahassee Regional Medical Center. Memorial services will be held Saturday, Sept. 16, 2014, at 2 p.m. at Panacea Full Gospel Church with Brother B.B. Barwick officiating. Please Recycle BEST Local News, Events, Coupons and More! Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Please accept my 12 month subscription at the price of $27Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:TheWakulla newsor go to www.thewakullanews.com and click subscribeSavings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.Promo Code: FALL Expires: 09-30-14 $27All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $27. Local delivery area only. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBy MICHELLE KIRBYSpecial to The NewsA rare event recently occurred in our Capital City. Finley Lamar McMillan, Florida resident and longtime resident of Ochlockonee Bay, was recognized with a Grandson medal from Finleys Brigade Camp 1614, Sons of Confederate Veterans. Mr. McMillans grandfather was Angus M. McMillan, Captain of Company K, 6th Florida Infantry. The Camps name re ects the common Confederate leader, Jesse J. Finley, for whom Mr. McMillan and Finleys Brigade is named. Mr. Finley McMillan, along with his daughter Michelle McMillan Kirby and grandson Andy Gowan, both of Tallahassee, recently gave a presentation about Angus McMillan to Finleys Brigade where Mr. McMillan and his grandson Andy are members. To Mr. McMillans complete surprise, the bestowal of the medal by Camp Commander Kelly Crocker occurred after their presentation. Finley will be 86 years young this October 27th. He was born in Marianna with family anecdotes of his grandfather Angus being friends and an advocate for Governor John Milton, Floridas governor during the War. Mrs. Kirby serves as a District Director for the Florida panhandle for the Florida Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and also Chapter president of R. Don McLeod 2469 in Crawfordville. It was such an honor to pin my father and to hear my son speak of honoring his grandfathers father, shared Kirby. Its all about family. Angus M. McMillan saw plenty of action during the War Between the States at Chickamauga, Franklin, Resaca, Murfreesboro, Atlanta, and Nashville. Captain McMillan was captured on Shys Hill on December 16, 1864 during the Battle of Nashville and taken prisoner and kept at Johnsons Island POW camp in Ohio until the end of the War. Upon return to the South, Angus was instrumental in the founding of Chipley. He was a generous man and donated land for the building of the Presbyterian Church in Chipley, was on the educational board of trustees, and was known to give land as wedding presents. He fathered 11 children whose descendants extend as far as the state Washington. More information about Angus can be found at www.rdonmcleod.org. 50 members are needed to make a WAKULLA NAACP CHAPTER of cial. Application deadline is Sept. 8. Email Wakulla SPEAKS! at wakullaspeaks@gmail.com to get your application. An envelope with your application and fee addressed to Anginita Rosier can be left at the front desk of the Wakulla Library; or contact Anginita Rosier directly: 850-556-7696; email: anginita.rosier@ gmail.com; or nd her on Facebook. SPONSORSHIPS are available for the rst annual RELAY FOR LIFE Harvesting for a Cure fall festival and chili cook off at Hudson Park 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 18. Sponsorship levels are for $100, $300 and $500. For more information contact Marion Russ at 322-2652, or email relayforlifewakulla@ gmail.com. The 2014 BIG BEND SEAFOOD FESTIVAL, a one-day outdoor event in Woolley Park located on the waterfront in Panacea, is scheduled for Saturday, Oct. 11. Submit your VENDOR BOOTH APPLICATION as soon as possible. Entry Requirements: We reserve the right to turn down vendors of certain products. We prefer original arts and crafts but we also accept food products (preserves, honey, etc.) and certain manufactured products. No ea market vendors allowed. For more information you can email me at rpinholster@gmail,com or call 850-728-2121 daytime only please. St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church will hold its second annual HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR SALE on Saturday, Oct. 25. We wish to showcase local crafters. Anyone wishing to sell items they have created is welcome to join us. You will be able to set up inside the hall or outdoors.There will be free admission for all shoppers. For more information, contact Phylllis Berninger at 926-1453 or Nicky Lepp at 926-9750. This year, the EMPTY BOWLS hunger fundraiser will be Nov. 15 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Center. The purpose of this event is to help raise money for local food banks. Individuals, shops or churches are being asked to PREPARE A SOUP that will be served for the event. Folks who would like to cook and serve a savory specialty may call Taylor Biro at 850-2946044 for more information, or email emptybowlswakulla@gmail. com.Ongoing announcementsBy BETTY GREEN Wakulla County Historical SocietyThe Wakulla County Historical Society is looking forward to another season of interesting programs relating to the history of Wakulla Countys people and places! Our September meeting will be held in the historic Sopchoppy High School auditorium at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 9, when we will once again be Looking Back at the communities of Sanborn and Smith Creek, established in the 19th century to the northwest of Sopchoppy. Many wellknown and accomplished Wakulla citizens have roots in these communities that we now consider outposts of Sopchoppy. Sondra Brown will bring stories and pictures of the community of Sanborn and Maurice Langston will share memories of Smith Creek. We appreciate both Sondra and Maurice being willing to take the time and make the effort to share information about these communities and their families. We hope others will attend the meeting and be ready to share memories and/or photographs as well as enjoy being in the historic auditorium of the Sopchoppy High School. Mark your calendars and remind your friends! Sept. 9, at 7 p.m., at Sopchoppy High School Auditorium, WCHS Program Looking Back at Sanborn and Smith Creek. Look back at Sanborn, Smith Creek PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAt left, survivors of Company K 6th Florida Infantry after a United Confederate Veterans reunion. The group had just gotten off the train in Chipley from the event and posed for the photography. At right, Camp Commander, Kelly Crocker of Vernon, Finleys Brigade SCV Camp 1614, presents Finley McMillan with a Grandson certi cate and medal. Also included are Mr. McMillans daughter, Michelle McMillan Kirby, and grandson Andy Gowan. Remembering Finleys Brigade Remembering Finleys Brigade Downtown Panacea, Scenic Coastal Hwy. 98

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolBy BRENDA CROUCHProject Manager FloridaLearns STEM ScholarsThrough the Panhandle Area Educational Consortiums, FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project STEM Talent Development Program, talented and gifted high school juniors and seniors from small and rural districts across Florida had the opportunity to take part in locally-available Field Site/Workplace Experiences this summer. These experiences, made possible through partnerships with leaders in STEM (Science, Technology Engineering, and Math), such as industries, local businesses, agencies, the military, and higher education faculty, gave students an opportunity to actively engage in doing real STEM work. Water is vitally important to every aspect of life on Earth and Floridas bodies of water are treasured resources. STEM Scholars from Wakulla High School had a unique opportunity to learn this first hand through an eight-day eld experience, provided by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. Throughout the experience Scholars were engaged in conducting a watershed survey at various area sites including Lake Lafayette, Lake Munson, Tallahassee Wastewater Treatment Facility, Leon Sinks Geological Area, Wakulla Springs State Park, San Marco de Apalache, and St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. This handson learning opportunity involved thematic mapping of the watershed boundaries, conducting water quality monitoring using the World Water Monitoring Challenge system and a variety of water quality monitoring equipment, and applying what was learned to develop a watershed teaching packet for educators. Students learned from and worked alongside experts from the Department of Environmental Protection, the City of Tallahassee, and the Northwest Florida Water Management District. Greg Ira, Director, and Kennedy Hanson and Jacquelyn Zimmerman, Environmental Education Specialists, all with the Office of Environmental Education and Sustainable Initiatives, Florida Department of Environmental Protection coordinated student activities and led the eld work. Wakulla School District teachers, Suzanne Fielder and Nicholas Weaver were the onsite teacher leaders. Three days into the experience, Wakulla High School teacher Suzanne Fielder said, I am thankful for the privilege of leading these students. The activities have been well planned and fun for the kids. The people from DEP have an amazing wealth of knowledge and the students have learned a lot already. Greater insights into STEM career options and a keener understanding of the relevance of the rigorous STEM courses they are taking while in high school were important outcomes for students. They also benefited by learning why ongoing water quality monitoring is critical to protect our waterways from pollution and how monitoring is carried out. By KAREN J. WELLSWCSD Chief Human Capital Of cerWakulla County Schools Employee of the Year: Patricia Baker Ms. Baker has been employed with the food service department in the District for 14 years. During that time she has participated in continuing education meal pattern implementation training and maintained certi cation with the Florida School Nutrition Association and the National School Nutrition Association. Gail Mathers notes, Ms. Baker began her career with food service as a part time worker, however her knowledge and work ethic quickly moved her to a full time position. She is motivated, organized and dependable and assumed any role with an upbeat can-do positive approach. Baker currently serves as the district Resource Manager and will represent Wakulla County School District in the annual State School Related Employee of the Year event. Superintendent Pearce shares, Ms. Baker provided an energizing back-toschool speech at our luncheon last week, including a display of her musical talents on the keyboard. Her dedication, loyalty and commitment to the students and the school system make her an excellent choice for this prestigious award. Wakulla County District-Level Administrator of the Year: Beth ODonnell Ms. ODonnell has retired her full-time position from the district, as of July 2014. She will continue to assist the district on a part-time basis as the instructional and curriculum departments transition and individuals assume new duties. Ms. ODonnell has provided a long career of service to the students, faculty and staff of the Wakulla County School District and will be sorely missed. Superintendent Bobby Pearce, retired Superintendent David Miller and Chief Academic Of cer Beth Mims all cited examples of ODonnells exceptional service to the Wakulla County School District that brought tearful reminders to many. Wakulla County School-Level Administrators of the Year: The Riversink Elementary School Team of Jackie High and Melinda Young Upon receipt of the State Assessment Data, the administrative team of the school with the highest aggregated math and reading school VAM scores is recognized. Riversink improved 100 points as compared to SY 2012-13 with 627 total points. Wakulla Middle School was a close second with a total of 625 total points. Congratulations to the Riversink Team for an exceptional year. Wakulla Schools high performers recognized PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLocal STEM students study water through eld experience Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Thank YouA thank you note may seem a bit outdated, however I must share a word with each citizen of Wakulla County. I treasure the smiles and greetings we share, the way we help each other when we see a need, our love for nature, and being committed to keeping it pure and wholesome for future generations to enjoy. I admire our loyalty and spirit, acknowledging each others right to their own opinion and our right to agreeably disagree. I salute our tenacity and ingenuity when faced with adversity. I appreciate our dedication to the children and youth of our county, and their school system. I will continue to volunteer wherever I am needed to provide the best possible education for all of our students. The success of our lives will be evidenced in the success of theirs, for success is not measured in dollars, but in the differences we make! I am Proud to represent Wakulla, and to be re-elected as Your School Board Member, Dist. 3 Thank you for allowing me to be your Public Servant. Rebecca S. Becky CookYour Voice In Education Paid by Rebecca S. Cook for School Board, District 3 Plan a weekend in October for the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival Monarch Butterly Festival Visit our website at VISITWAKULLA.COM to make your plans. WuaCuntyOCTOBER IS FALL FESTIVAL TIME IN www.coastalgems.comCrawfordville, FL850566-9293 Est. 2000Carol Ann Williams, Licensed Real Estate Broker/Owner 33 Years Experience Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThese past couple of weeks have been brutal. Temperatures in the mid to higher 90s and it appears it still isnt over. Add to that all the grass floating on the ats and it makes trout shing pretty tough. I just got off the phone with Capt. Randy Peart and he is still shing over at St. George Island. He said for the most part shing has been slow most of the summer, but this is the busiest season he has ever had over there. Some trout are still being caught and quite a few reds are coming from Bob Sikes Cut. Randy keeps up with shing around the Econ na and he said some trout are being caught and a very few reds. Everyone down there is looking forward to cooler weather and hoping the reds find their way back. Capt. David Fife has been catching a few reds but said not too many. He said he anchored on a bar the other day with some young boys and their mother and on the rst cast one of the boys caught and released a 29inch red. After that no more bites. David rigged up some lights and went oundering Saturday night. No ounder but he did see lots of big sheepshead around the bars. He also didnt see a single red which is a little disturbing. One of my neighbors down here does a lot of shing, and lately more diving. He said they went diving last weekend and dove both deep and shallow and did not see one legal grouper and in fact didnt see many grouper. When they got back to the marina he talked to one of the employees and he had not seen any grouper come in at all. Dr. Julian Hurt said he fished this weekend and caught quite a few small trout and some flounder but it was tough shing. The weekend it was so hot I shed Friday and Saturday and I dont remember being any hotter. I called the folks I was going to sh with the day before to see if they wanted to cancel. She said no but at about noon when the wind quit and the tide stopped she said she didnt ever remember being any hotter. Despite the heat we came in with eight ounder, 10 Spanish, three mangrove snapper and three reds. We caught everything on live shrimp. Even though we had been out all day in the blaring heat, Chuck Harris said he was going out that evening alligator hunting. I believe they went to the Ochlockonee River and they got a 12 foot gator. On Saturday I shed with Gordon Beal and his friends from Alabama. We caught seven ounder, three sheepshead, two Spanish and four nice trout. We shed for reds with no success and should have spent that time on the ats. We had a good high tide and we probably caught and released 50 small trout. As it cools off we should start having some good shing. Scallop season is in for a few more weeks and now is the time to go to Keaton Beach. Kids are back in school so the weekday crowds are gone and there are still plenty of scallops. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Also drink plenty of water and Gatorade. Good luck and good shing!By MARJ LAWLast Wednesday morning, like most Wednesdays, women of the range got together to practice their handgun skills. Anyone can join in. We arrive at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office range in Sopchoppy somewhere between 9:30 and 10 a.m. and we all help each other understand range safety and share knowledge of handguns. Our friend, Jim, is at the pistol range too. He debates whether to shoot two or three of his handguns. If he shoots all three, he reasons, hed have to clean all three later! Cleaning takes time, I sympathize. Sure does, he replies. And then Im going to have to clean the magazines too. Thats why I only use one mag at a time. The magazines in the .22 pistols get dirty really fast, especially with those lead bullets! Now, I always make a big deal about cleaning handguns, especially the .22s. They seem to be particularly sensitive to dirt and will often have a failure to feed or ejection failure if they are dirty. I find the .22 Rugers more difficult to clean than the higher caliber guns because assembly and disassembly seems more complicated than I think it should be. Thats just my opinion. But cleaning the magazines? Frankly, it never occurred to me. And the very thought of it makes my heart sink to my toes. Jim can tell this is a new idea. Its not hard, he says kindly. Do you want me to show you how to take them apart? We women are always ready to learn. We cluster around him. Jim takes an ordinary pen and points to the end of the magazine opposite the end where you put in bullets. This is called the floorplate. See this depression? he asks. Put the point of the pen into it and press down. You are pushing down the nib that locks it into this hole. Now you can slide the floorplate of the magazine to open it. When you do this, cover the hole with your hand because a spring inside is coiled up and ready to jump out. Carefully pull out the spring by taking out the follower button (it looks like a small screw) which attaches to the spring assembly to the magazine. Do this by sliding the button up the slot and it will fall right out. Now you can take out the spring and the attached follower piece. Now, look into the magazine. Notice the black flecks? Thats dirt! And you want it out! Take a clean patch or white Tshirt piece and attach it to a cleaning rod. Dip it into the solvent you use to clean your gun. Now, swipe the inside of the magazine until it is all cleaned out. With a clean patch, clean out the excess fluid. Otherwise, the oils will attract more dirt. To put it back together, just reverse how you took it apart. The only difficult part is getting the spring in place. Its long in a .22, and quite strong! Gently push it down into the magazine. Hold it down and in place while you slide back the floor plate. Dont let that spring get away from you! It can fly a good distance! I went home and tried it myself. Sure enough, after two years of shooting, all five magazines from my .22 were dirty, dirty, dirty. By the fourth magazine, I had the procedure down pretty well. And remember your safety glasses, just in case. Only our cats know if one spring got away from me and went sailing down the hallway. And theyre not telling.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHigh temperatures make shing toughYou also need to clean your magazines HOME ON THE RANGE From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Please RecycleParts of a disassembled magazine, above. A pen points to the lock plate button in the magazine oorplate. When fully depressed, oorplate will slide all the way off of the magazine body. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS CHAINSAW $17995 SPECIAL OF THE WEEKMS170

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 11A UnderwaterWakullaBy Dr. J Hess With Labor Day behind us for this year, summer is beginning to wind down. There are only a few short weeks until Fall of cially begins. While it may not feel like Fall is approaching with the hot and humid days we have, it is. Now is a good time to begin thinking about what you will do with your boat over the cooler months will it be in dry dock, trailered to your home, left in the water or many other possibilities? A little preparation now can make the transition much easier. When you are out and about on your boat, take time to inventory what you have and what you may need. Make sure items are in good working condition and not damaged. Note items that you may need to purchase many retailers are clearancing items this time of year. For important items, it is a good idea to have a spare for easy replacement. In the spirit of Labor Day, members of Flotilla 12 are holing a fellowship meeting this month. Members are encouraged to bring their families and come together for a meal Sunday Sept. 7. While we may not always be seen out on the water, we work hard to educate boaters about being safe on the water, how to handle the unexpected and how to be good stewards of our waterways. Several members held a ramp day this past Saturday inspecting boats for required safety equipment and providing information about safe boating. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net then contact our Flotilla Staff Ofcer for Human Resources, Raye Crews, at Rayec@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at Duanet@uscgaux.net. If youre interested in a free vessel examination, send an email to our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Vessel Examinations, Steve Hults, at Steveh@uscgaux. net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident be prepared! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Change of the Season The summer is still in full swing, with colder temperatures far off. I was just swimming in the gulf in bath-tub water. Based on previous years experience, however, we expect the diving community to shift its focus. After the summer break, the kids are back in school, and business in general is busy again. This usually means less time for the weekend diving trip. It is yet still too hot out for the cave diving community to emerge, as they prefer the colder days in the then warm springs. For the Diving Center this means a less hectic daily schedule, trying to satisfy the customers on the spot. We still have long days of checking equipment, and lling tanks, but start again on long-term projects. With the increase in personnel, and services offered, so rose the demand for our IT infrastructure. We barely fended off a cyber-attack from China earlier in the year. Our server was not breached, but everything became really slow. The whole system just received an upgrade, with additional high-end safety systems (called re walls), and faster network connections. The transition went without a glitch. We could now manage over two hundred employees at multiple locations not that we would want to. Gone are the days of simple home-style computer equipment. We learn, and we grow, and it is a lot of fun. Unlike the general trend, however, to have all the data in the cloud and internet-based, we stick to the basics, for safety reasons. The tank-logging database with customer information, and the cash register, will not get connected to the internet at all, and never have been. And, as any cave diver will know, everything has a back up, ready to be deployed should the rst unit fail. The nancial investment is substantial, however the cost of failure much higher. Our hydro-station, the pressure-testing facility, is about to receive the latest addition. It has been in the works for over a year, but had to be put off during the busy summer. Although we had had help from four interns, there was no time to bring this urgent project to its conclusion so far. With the new addition, we will be able to test tanks up to the size of Kasks (the welding tanks). Once nalized, we will also get our drive-through back. Research at the center happens all year long. Four long-term projects, and two mediumterm projects are running simultaneously. It is tedious, and usually happens quietly in the background, but the next year promises to become interesting. The Center is much more than just a dive store, as the avid follower of Greggs column has gure out by now. In fact, the store is by far the smallest component. Speaking of Gregg, he is nally taking some well-deserved time off, and travels cross-country to Alaska. Compared to Florida, Alaska is probably about as diagonally opposite as it can possibly be, and not just in a geographical sense. The American Academy of Underwater Science (AAUS) presents Gregg with a life-time award for his contribution to underwater science long overdue if you ask me. Unlike most self-promoters who are rather vocal about their perceived achievements, as long as I have known Gregg, he has always been quiet about his contributions. Especially at times like these, we need more people like him, dont you think? WCSO patrols weekend water activities Special to The NewsOn Aug. 30, while assigned to the WCSO Marine Unit, Detective Richard Moon conducted several area checks located along the Wakulla River. These checks included local businesses/boat ramp checks. While patrolling the river, he made contact with Lt. Travis Hooker with FWC. They worked together in regards to ensuring safe vessel operations. There was minimal boat traf c on the river this day. Two verbal warnings were given today in reference to unsafe boating operations. These operations included wake and load capacity. Both subjects were from out of town on vacation and were instructed on proper operating and safety procedure. Detective Moon had positive contact with all citizens and was advised by several homeowners located on the river that they were glad to see the Marine Unit on the water. Saturday on the Wakulla River: Total area checks: 11 Business Checks: 2 Bridges/Boat Ramp Checks: 9 Total contacts: 65 Citizen contacts: 53 Juvenile contacts: 12 Total Boat stops: 2 Boat safety checks: 2 Arrests: 0 Citations: 0 Warnings: 2 Verbal Reports: 0 On Aug. 31,WCSO Marine Unit saw a steady stream of water vessel traffic. An estimated 300 boats/ kayaks were encountered on the water. Even with the high volume of traf c, spirits were high and no obvious violations or issues were observed. Lt. Brad Taylor encountered a pod of manatee in both the Wakulla River and St. Marks River. Warnings to nearby vessel trafc were given as to the presence of the manatee and a vigilant watch was maintained until they were safely out of traf c patterns. Staff at Shell Island Marina was pleased with the Sheriffs Of ce boat being moored at their establishment and they extended an open invitation to us for anytime we need or want to tie up at their docks. All-in-all contacts were positive as usual and the public enjoys seeing their sheriffs office on the water. The boat is once again moored at Shell Island Marina due to anticipated high holiday traf c volume and the watch order for the boat remains in effect. Sunday on the Wakulla and St. Marks Rivers: Contacts: 171 Calls for service: 0 Boat ramp checks: 6 Bridge checks: 5 On Monday, Sept. 1, Water Patrol started at Shell Island Fish Camp, continuing out the St. Marks River to the area of the ats and shoals off St. Marks. Sgt. Whaley and Deputy Hudson made contact with a boat that was disabled, however the owner was able to power back up and return to the boat ramp. The patrol continued up the Wakulla River where they encountered many canoes and kayaks along with several party boats. They conducted approximately 50 boating safety checks. Everyone was in compliance with all safety requirements. One boater did not have his registration and was advised he needed to keep it in his possession. The deputies were agged down by several boaters and homeowners who thanked them for their presence. They advised the river has been much safer this summer and would like the patrol to continue. The river maintained heavy traf c throughout the day, however everyone was following the rules of the water and having a good time. Monday on the Wakulla and St. Marks Rivers; ats and shoals off St. Marks: Contacts: 350 Calls for service: 0 Boat ramp checks: 6 Bridge checks: 5 Business Checks: 4 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday p Thu Sep 4, 14 Fri Sep 5, 14 Sat Sep 6, 14 Sun Sep 7, 14 Mon Sep 8, 14 Tue Sep 9, 14 Wed Sep 10, 14 Date 3.2 ft. 12:05 AM 3.4 ft. 12:58 AM 3.6 ft. 1:41 AM 3.8 ft. 2:19 AM 3.9 ft. 2:54 AM 4.0 ft. 3:27 AM High 2.0 ft. 3:41 AM 1.9 ft. 5:09 AM 1.6 ft. 6:19 AM 1.2 ft. 7:17 AM 0.8 ft. 8:08 AM 0.5 ft. 8:55 AM 0.2 ft. 9:40 AM Low 3.5 ft. 9:53 AM 3.7 ft. 11:24 AM 4.0 ft. 12:34 PM 4.2 ft. 1:31 PM 4.4 ft. 2:23 PM 4.4 ft. 3:12 PM 4.2 ft. 3:58 PM High 0.4 ft. 5:30 PM 0.1 ft. 6:31 PM -0.0 ft. 7:23 PM -0.0 ft. 8:09 PM 0.1 ft. 8:50 PM 0.4 ft. 9:27 PM 0.7 ft. 10:02 PM Low p Thu Sep 4, 14 Fri Sep 5, 14 Sat Sep 6, 14 Sun Sep 7, 14 Mon Sep 8, 14 Tue Sep 9, 14 Wed Sep 10, 14 Date 2.6 ft. 12:50 AM 2.7 ft. 1:33 AM 2.9 ft. 2:11 AM 2.9 ft. 2:46 AM 3.0 ft. 3:19 AM High 1.5 ft. 3:52 AM 1.4 ft. 5:20 AM 1.1 ft. 6:30 AM 0.8 ft. 7:28 AM 0.6 ft. 8:19 AM 0.3 ft. 9:06 AM 0.2 ft. 9:51 AM Low 2.6 ft. 9:45 AM 2.8 ft. 11:16 AM 3.0 ft. 12:26 PM 3.2 ft. 1:23 PM 3.3 ft. 2:15 PM 3.3 ft. 3:04 PM 3.2 ft. 3:50 PM High 0.3 ft. 5:41 PM 0.1 ft. 6:42 PM -0.0 ft. 7:34 PM -0.0 ft. 8:20 PM 0.1 ft. 9:01 PM 0.3 ft. 9:38 PM 0.5 ft. 10:13 PM Low 2.4 ft. 11:57 PM High p Thu Sep 4, 14 Fri Sep 5, 14 Sat Sep 6, 14 Sun Sep 7, 14 Mon Sep 8, 14 Tue Sep 9, 14 Wed Sep 10, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 12:41 AM 3.2 ft. 1:34 AM 3.4 ft. 2:17 AM 3.5 ft. 2:55 AM 3.6 ft. 3:30 AM 3.7 ft. 4:03 AM High 1.8 ft. 4:45 AM 1.7 ft. 6:13 AM 1.4 ft. 7:23 AM 1.1 ft. 8:21 AM 0.7 ft. 9:12 AM 0.4 ft. 9:59 AM 0.2 ft. 10:44 AM Low 3.3 ft. 10:29 AM 3.5 ft. 12:00 PM 3.7 ft. 1:10 PM 4.0 ft. 2:07 PM 4.1 ft. 2:59 PM 4.1 ft. 3:48 PM 3.9 ft. 4:34 PM High 0.3 ft. 6:34 PM 0.1 ft. 7:35 PM -0.0 ft. 8:27 PM -0.0 ft. 9:13 PM 0.1 ft. 9:54 PM 0.3 ft. 10:31 PM 0.6 ft. 11:06 PM Low p Thu Sep 4, 14 Fri Sep 5, 14 Sat Sep 6, 14 Sun Sep 7, 14 Mon Sep 8, 14 Tue Sep 9, 14 Wed Sep 10, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:42 AM 2.8 ft. 1:25 AM 3.0 ft. 2:03 AM 3.1 ft. 2:38 AM 3.1 ft. 3:11 AM High 2.0 ft. 3:20 AM 1.8 ft. 4:48 AM 1.5 ft. 5:58 AM 1.1 ft. 6:56 AM 0.8 ft. 7:47 AM 0.4 ft. 8:34 AM 0.2 ft. 9:19 AM Low 2.7 ft. 9:37 AM 2.9 ft. 11:08 AM 3.1 ft. 12:18 PM 3.3 ft. 1:15 PM 3.4 ft. 2:07 PM 3.4 ft. 2:56 PM 3.3 ft. 3:42 PM High 0.4 ft. 5:09 PM 0.1 ft. 6:10 PM -0.0 ft. 7:02 PM -0.0 ft. 7:48 PM 0.1 ft. 8:29 PM 0.4 ft. 9:06 PM 0.6 ft. 9:41 PM Low 2.5 ft. 11:49 PM High p Thu Sep 4, 14 Fri Sep 5, 14 Sat Sep 6, 14 Sun Sep 7, 14 Mon Sep 8, 14 Tue Sep 9, 14 Wed Sep 10, 14 Date 3.3 ft. 12:02 AM 3.5 ft. 12:55 AM 3.7 ft. 1:38 AM 3.9 ft. 2:16 AM 4.0 ft. 2:51 AM 4.1 ft. 3:24 AM High 2.2 ft. 3:38 AM 2.0 ft. 5:06 AM 1.7 ft. 6:16 AM 1.3 ft. 7:14 AM 0.8 ft. 8:05 AM 0.5 ft. 8:52 AM 0.3 ft. 9:37 AM Low 3.6 ft. 9:50 AM 3.8 ft. 11:21 AM 4.1 ft. 12:31 PM 4.3 ft. 1:28 PM 4.5 ft. 2:20 PM 4.5 ft. 3:09 PM 4.3 ft. 3:55 PM High 0.4 ft. 5:27 PM 0.1 ft. 6:28 PM 0.0 ft. 7:20 PM -0.0 ft. 8:06 PM 0.1 ft. 8:47 PM 0.4 ft. 9:24 PM 0.7 ft. 9:59 PM Low p Thu Sep 4, 14 Fri Sep 5, 14 Sat Sep 6, 14 Sun Sep 7, 14 Mon Sep 8, 14 Tue Sep 9, 14 Wed Sep 10, 14 Date 2.6 ft. 12:39 AM 2.7 ft. 1:22 AM 2.8 ft. 1:54 AM 2.8 ft. 2:20 AM 2.8 ft. 2:42 AM 2.9 ft. 3:03 AM 2.9 ft. 3:23 AM High 2.1 ft. 2:43 AM 2.0 ft. 4:27 AM 1.8 ft. 5:37 AM 1.6 ft. 6:33 AM 1.3 ft. 7:22 AM 1.1 ft. 8:10 AM 0.8 ft. 8:56 AM Low 3.2 ft. 8:59 AM 3.3 ft. 10:22 AM 3.3 ft. 11:41 AM 3.4 ft. 12:53 PM 3.4 ft. 1:56 PM 3.4 ft. 2:56 PM 3.3 ft. 3:53 PM High 0.4 ft. 5:17 PM 0.3 ft. 6:12 PM 0.3 ft. 7:00 PM 0.4 ft. 7:43 PM 0.6 ft. 8:21 PM 0.8 ft. 8:55 PM 1.1 ft. 9:26 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 4 Sept. 10First Oct. 1 Full Sept. 9 Last Sept. 16 New Sept. 249:20 am-11:20 am 9:50 pm-11:50 pm 2:18 am-3:18 am 4:19 pm-5:19 pm 10:19 am-12:19 pm 10:48 pm-12:48 am 3:21 am-4:21 am 5:12 pm-6:12 pm 11:17 am-1:17 pm 11:46 pm-1:46 am 4:26 am-5:26 am 6:01 pm-7:01 pm --:-----:-12:15 pm-2:15 pm 5:34 am-6:34 am 6:48 pm-7:48 pm 12:43 am-2:43 am 1:11 pm-3:11 pm 6:42 am-7:42 am 7:33 pm-8:33 pm 1:39 am-3:39 am 2:07 pm-4:07 pm 7:50 am-8:50 am 8:16 pm-9:16 pm 2:34 am-4:34 am 3:01 pm-5:01 pm 8:56 am-9:56 am 8:59 pm-9:59 pm Average Average Good Better Best Best Better7:15 am 7:56 pm 4:20 pm 2:19 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:16 am 7:54 pm 5:13 pm 3:21 am 7:16 am 7:53 pm 6:02 pm 4:27 am 7:17 am 7:52 pm 6:49 pm 5:35 am 7:17 am 7:51 pm 7:34 pm 6:43 am 7:18 am 7:50 pm 8:17 pm 7:51 am 7:19 am 7:48 pm 9:00 pm 8:57 am63% 71% 78% 86% 94% 98% 91%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBUSINESS NEWS By JENNY ODOMSpecial to The NewsWhen you walk into the old store at Shell Island Fish Camp, youre walking back in time. This place is one of the oldest sh camps in Wakulla County. Shell Islands original building was built in the mid50s, according to the owners, Jimmy and Sherie Bevis. Theyve been helping run the business for about a decade, but took it over a few years ago from Jimmys aunt and uncle, Allen and Ruthie Hobbs, when they retired. It has been in the Hobbs family for 35 years. Its pretty much the same, says Sherie. Weve done a little refurbishing here and there, but what you see here is pretty much what it was like 35 years ago. Large, lidded jars, with fading logos Toms and Lance, sit on a low shelf lled with crackers and candy bars, easy for kids to reach. On bulletin boards, and framed along the walls are old photographs of shermen over the years with their catch. One photograph shows a giant alligator hanging from a rope on the front porch of the store. Prior to the Hobbs, it was owned by Rufus Bullock, and before that it was owned by Bo Lynn. Lynn died in a goose hunting accident, along with friend Kermit Jacobs, and Bos dog, Butch, in the days before modern weather forecasting, reads a historic marker located at the entrance to the camp. The store opens at 6:30 a.m. every morning selling bull minnows, live shrimp, frozen bait and anything you need to go shing. They ( shermen) are usually waiting when we get here, Sherie smiles. And then theyre off shing, and things quiet down a little. On a hot summer day in late August, kids run around barefoot with their shing poles and cast nets in hand, casting in the river or the creek. Outside the old store is a long, narrow porch where regular visitors, customers, and newcomers sit and talk about the news of the day, which usually includes shing and weather. One of the services offered at the camp is boat rentals. They have two kinds of boats customers can rent, center console and pontoon. Both boat types are designed for navigating the ats of the Gulf. Center console boats can hold up to ve people, and pontoon boats hold up to six. Prices start at $160 per day. If someone is interested in boating for the day, but unfamiliar with the area, Sherie says someone will show you where to go, and how to navigate the buoy markers in the river. The boys will take you out for a preride, and show you how things work, she says. If you want to hire a guide, one can be arranged. She says there are a few around, but theyre limited. They run about $100 a day, in addition to the boat rentals. The best shing is in the spring and fall, according to Sherie. Fish are kinda like bears, they hibernate in the winter, she says. In the spring, they are eager to eat, and in the fall they are fattening up for the winter ahead, she explains. Those are our busiest times here. They also offer mechanic services and boat storage, where customers have kept their crafts for decades. In keeping with its historic nature, they have the oldest working forklift in Florida, a 1974 Clark.. The camp also offers lodging, with three different kinds of rentals available. There is a motel, with regular rooms; park models, with small kitchens; and cabins, which include full kitchens and screened porches. All rentals have heat and air. In addition, they offer camp spots for RVs, and tents, with hookups. In the early days of the sh camp, when Bullock owned it, a brochure advertised, Shell Island is located on the banks of the beautiful Wakulla River, only 19 miles from Tallahassee. Take U.S. 319 to one of Americas outstanding shing resorts. Cabins rented for just $5, and the phone number had only three digits, 996. Prices are still reasonable, with motel rooms starting at $55, and a full cabin for a family of four for only $96. They can, and do, accommodate large groups for retreats and reunions. There is a large green grassy area, a playground with swings for kids, along with picnic tables, grills and lots of large shady oak trees. Its a place where regular customers run a tab, and are sent a bill at the end of the month. They employ ve full-time employees to operate and manage the marina, camp store, lodging and boat services. The term Old Florida generally denotes Florida the way it was at least two generations ago, writes Florida Secrets website. There is no need to go on a scavenger hunt to nd Old Florida, because its right here in Wakulla County at Shell Island Fish Camp. Shell Island Fish CampBit of Old Florida at the St. Marks business Wakulla Works is a monthly article pro ling a business based in Wakulla County. If youd like to nominate a business to be pro led, please contact Jenny Odom at jenny@iggyart.com.Wakulla Works Shell Island Fish Camp 440 Shell Island Road St. Marks, Florida 32355 www.shellisland shcamp.com (850) 925-6226 PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMThe store at Shell Island Fish Camp, above. An old promotional card for the sh camp, right. 6 pm Social Meet & Greet 6:30 pm Forum Wakulla One Stop Community Center 33 Michael Dr., Crawfordville Questions for the forum will be accepted by going to wakullachamberforum.com or by lling out the form provided below. Wakulla County Chamber of Commercepresents 2014 Candidates ForumTuesday, October 7th, 2014At theRefreshments provided by Wakulla County Rotary Club Seating is limited The forum will present an opportunity for the candidates for Wakulla County Commissioner Districts 2 and 4 to meet the public and discuss questions submitted by, YOU, the voter.First name ________________________________________ Question ___________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________ __________________________________________and The Wakulla News mail to: Wakulla Chamber Political Forum, P. O. Box 148, Crawfordville, FL 32326.or on a separate sheet of paper list your rst name and mail question to: Wakulla Chamber Political ForumP.O. Box 148, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Deadline for submitting questions is September 30th, 2014 Questions will be screened and approved by the forum committee based on the following guidelines: 1. The question must be directed to all candidates. 2. The question must be concise and relevant to the current issues. COASTAL CLEANUPSATURDAY, SEPT. 20 9:00 a.m.:00 noonHEADQUARTERS Woolley Park in PanaceaCALL FOR VOLUNTEERS THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS Air Con of WakullaFLAG Credit Union Cook Insurance AgencyPublix City of St. MarksWakulla Senior Citizens Center Ray & Linda BolesHarrison Bail Bonds Edwin Brown & AssociatesWhole Foods Market Shepard Accounting & Tax Service Hydra Engineering & Construction Florida Department of Health, Wakulla 180 Florida Department of Health, Wakulla Healthiest Weight Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park Homestead ImprintsThe Wakulla Sign Company Gulf Coast Lumber, WakullaPurple Frog LLC Paul G. Johnson & AssociatesRotary Club of Wakulla Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin Realtors Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites Free COMMEMORATIVE T-SHIRT AND LUNCH *Coastal Cleanup quali es for community service BRIGHT FUTURES HOURS St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Lighthouse Road Shell Point at the Pavilion at the boat launch Booms Road Mashes Sands at the park area St. Marks San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 13A Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from By KEVIN VAUGHN Chamber President Your Chamber represents the collective voice for our vital business community. It is our responsibility as members to be sure the voice of business is at the table and is heard when any issue comes before our great community. Thanks to hard working volunteers within our membership, we are fortunate that this important work is taking place on an ongoing basis. One of the ways we celebrate the success of our members is our annual Business Excellence Awards Banquet. This year the banquet will take place Sept. 18. With over 100 nominations this year, its sure to be a fun and exciting event. Categories include Business of the Year, Start-up Business of the Year, Non-Profit Organization of the Year, Environmental Stewardship Business of the Year, Member of the Year and Director of the Year. Each category is judged based on achievement of excellence in the members respective field and their outstanding achievements and contributions to our community. Its always exciting to see entrepreneurial spirit alive and well in our county as recognized by the Start-Up award. As a Chamber, we strive to continue to be your voice in support of continuing the excellent business environment we enjoy in our County. This allows that entrepreneurial spirit to be converted to real live businesses that contribute to our economy in many ways. We look forward to seeing you at the Business Excellence Awards Banquet. We hope you can attend this special event and help us celebrate another successful year for our members!Kevin Vaughn is president of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. Time for Business Excellence Awards Business Women of Wakulla includes: Paparazzi Accessories by Cynthia Ward, (850) 519-5900. Libby McFalls Photography by Libby McFalls, (850) 556-0747 Thirty-One Gifts by Gena Green (850) 6311947 & Kim McMillan (850)879-0252 & Julie Neet (850) 408-6007. Blue Lamb Photography by Kristin Lambert (850) 766-1943 AdvoCare by Alison Bussey (850) 5672526. Taylor Accounting, LLC by Karen Taylor (850) 591-9131. Legal Shield by Jo Ann Daniels (850) 5097630. Beachbody Fitness by Sabrina Hayes (850) 251-1009. Effortless Travel by Veronica Forns Wold (850) 321-5477. Annabums by Heather Hofmann (850) 5089856 Monet Handbags by Angelena Turvaville Lang (850) 321-2862. Melaleuca and Bramazing by Pamela Moss (850) 559-3080. Alterations by Ann by Ann Allshouse (850) 926-7505. Plexus Slim by Rhonda Sapp (850) 5442110. BeautiControl by Cyndi McKuhen (850) 447-1030. Anytime Fitness & Jamberry Nails by Michelle Roberts (850) 519-0366. Jafra Cosmetics and LKR Translations by Catherine Cameron (850) 926-7955. The Little Black Dress by Tina and Victoria Brimner (850) 9264222. The Pampered Chef by Lisa Wilson (850) 510-5561. Tell us about your business: The Business Women of Wakulla is a group of female business owners/operators that utilize the group to network and serve the community. What services, products do you offer? A number of different services, products and ideas. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? To be welcome by any of our group members and have a wonderful experience with anyone in our group. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since April 2014. Why did you join the Chamber? To help our group show all the amazing things that are available in the local community. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Networking at Chamber luncheons as well as attending the Social Media Workshop. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Support your local community If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Facebook page Business Women of Wakulla. Additional Comments: We have already had a Christmas Vendor Event last year that brought a great number of the community out to see the showcase of products and services our group has to offer. We have also hosted a Blood Drive in cooperation with the One Stop Community Center just this past June. We had a wonderful turnout and through the efforts of our group gathered enough blood donations to save 60 lives! We are currently gearing up for our next big event on Nov. 1 at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center for our 2nd Annual Christmas Shopping Bazaar from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. This event will feature vendors from our group as well as various non-profit organizations within our community. It will be a fun day for the entire family! Spotlight: Business Women of Wakulla By JO ANN PALMER and MARY WALLACE Poseys Steam Room has hosted the Chamber membership in the past, but this time, Sherrie, John and Mr. Noah outdid themselves. The banquet room was set for 77 members and guests who had made a reservation, and the buffet spread was an abundant display of fresh-tossed salad with choice of dressings, cole slaw, cheese grits, fried chicken tenders, fresh fried shrimp, hushpuppies and mini desserts. Mary Wallace introduced our new members for July, Titanium Motors, Trinity Lutheran Church and Leslie Linka of Nerium International. Leslie was present and gave everyone an invitation to get in touch with her to receive a complimentary one week trial of her anti-aging products. There were introductions of several guest members: Gena Green introduced her guests, Heather Hoffman, owner of Anna Bums Cloth Diapers and children and adult clothing all handmade; Heather Green, her sister-in-law whose husband is the new pastor for the Assembly of God Church. Rachel Pienta introduced Jeanie Booth, the new Chief Development Of cer with Big BrothersBig Sisters. Trish Akins guest was Wanda Schilb who is an independent insurance agent. Wakulla Medical introduced George Martinez, the interim director, and reiterated they are in the process of hiring a full-time director. Our spotlight was on Capital City Bank. Amy Geiger, Courtney Armitage and Rene Millender did an outstanding job of explaining how Capital City bank began and has evolved. They were a tag team, with photo props, beautifully displayed by their very own Vanna White, Renee Millender. Tallahassees oldest bank opened its doors in 1895 with one location, ve directors and three associates. Since then, Capital City Bank has survived depressions, natural disasters and world wars to become one of the largest nancial institutions headquartered in Florida. In recent years, Capital City Bank has expanded outside of the Tallahassee area, serving a geographic circle inside Jacksonville, Atlanta, Birmingham and Orlando. After 119 years, with 15 acquisitions, Capital City has grown its client base in 25 communities in Florida, Georgia and Alabama. We had several announcements: Zoe Mansfield invited us all to the Stone Crab Festival in St. Marks on Oct. 25. The theme of the parade is pirates and she invited us to dress out and come walk in the short parade. Vendor space and sponsorships are available. Contact Ethel at 925-6224 for more information. Charlean Lanier passed out order forms for Gospel Food Ministry and explained that everyone is invited to participate. Please contact her at Harvest Fellowship Church for more information. She also announced there will be a food distribution event by Harvest Fellowship in conjunction with Farm Share and DCF on Sept. 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be a variety of community partners providing information and services. Jo Ann Palmer reminded everyone of the upcoming Business Excellence Awards Banquet on Sep. 18. The event will be held at the Senior Center and this year will be an outstanding event full of surprises. She also announced that the annual International Coastal Cleanup hosted by KWCB is coming up on Sept. 20 from 9 a.m. to noon. KWCB is looking for sponsorships and door prizes, if you are interested in more information, go to their website kwcb.org or contact Jo Ann. The opening of the Wakulla Waterfronts Photo Exhibit on Thursday, Sept. 4 at the Welcome Center in Panacea. This photo display was most recently exhibited at the Apalachicola Center for History and Culture. Myrtle Hoffman also encouraged anyone who might need a customized gift in the future to consider the students at the Legacy Caf. Ms. Dorothy at Outzs Too Oyster Bar & Grill in Newport will host our networking luncheon in September.On Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 6 p.m. the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce and The Wakulla News will be hosting the biennial Wakulla Chamber Political Forum at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center located at 318 Shadeville Hwy, Crawfordville (corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Hwy). The forum will present an opportunity for the candidates for Wakulla County Commissioner Districts 2 and 4 to meet the public and discuss questions submitted by YOU the voter. Questions for the forum will be accepted here at wakullachamberforum.com or on a printed form published in The Wakulla News, or your letter to be mailed to: Wakulla Chamber Political Forum PO Box 148 Crawfordville FL 32326. Deadline for submitting questions is Sept. 30. Questions will be screened and approved by the forum committee based on the following guidelines: 1. The question must be directed to all candidates. 2. The question must be concise and relevant to the current issues. If you have questions or concerns about this website you can read more about it here or contact Chuck Robinson, chairman of the Wakulla Chamber Political Forum Committee, at chuck@ bricklauncher.com. Leslie Linka, one of our newest Chamber members and a new brand partner with Nerium International Anti-Aging Skincare, launched her business on Aug. 15 with a ribbon-cutting at Menagerie and a launch party at Bay Leaf Market. Leslie, who is better known around town as The lady with all the hats, lives in Crawfordville with her four rescue dogs, Sir Alfred, Miss Rella, Mr. Mojo, and King Kelo. For more information about Nerium call Leslie at (850) 926-5868. Next ribbon cutting will be West Plumbing, 11:30 a.m., Friday, Sept. 12 at the Chamber ofce, 23 High Drive.Poseys hosts Chamber luncheon PHOTOS BY LYNDA KINSEY LYNDA KINSEYCapital City Banks Courtney Armitage, Rene Millender and Amy Geiger at the spotlight. Mary Wallace with Sherrie Miller.Chamber forum is Oct. 7 Nerium International has ribbon cutting

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On Friday, Aug. 22, The sheriffs office received a 911 complaint about a man ring a gun on Dispenette Drive in Crawfordville. The subject was identi ed by witnesses and deputies found William Wayne Barick, 18, at his Crawfordville home. Barwick allegedly admitted to deputies that he had previously stolen items from the Rehwinkel Road area. A firearm, bullets, magazine and cannabis were located at the Dispenette location. Barwick was arrested for discharging a rearm in public, possession of a firearm by a convicted felon, disorderly conduct and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. The cannabis weighed 3.4 grams. Consent to search the home was granted and several items were recovered at the scene that deputies believe were stolen. Sgt. Ryan Muse, Deputy Matt Hedges, Deputy Ross Hasty and Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce:THURSDAY, AUG. 21 Anilio Perez of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left his wallet in his vehicle while inside Winn-Dixie. The vehicle was left unsecured when the property was taken. The wallet and contents are valued at $71. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Karen Stroba of Crawfordville reported the theft of yard ornaments. A gazing ball, moon design and wind chimes, valued at $75, were stolen. A person of interest has been identi ed. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. A 17-year-old from Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left his vehicle unsecured at a Medart convenience store and a subject removed medications and a knife from inside. The stolen property is valued at $85. A person of interest has been identi ed. Another 17-yearold from Crawfordville reported another vehicle burglary at the same Medart convenience store. A sound system installed in the vehicle was stolen while the victim was at school. The vehicle was left unsecured. The sound system is valued at $210. A person of interest has been identi ed. Deputy Kyle Hanks investigated both cases. Robert Marks of Sopchoppy donated boxes of goods to Goodwill. Later, it was discovered that a purse owned by Jackie Goodson of Crawfordville was included. The purse was recovered and the contents were found except for $45. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated.FRIDAY, AUG. 22 Deputy Matt Hedges conducted a traf c stop on U.S. Highway 98 near Carraway Cutoff for an expired tag. The driver, Lisa Woodbery McMillan, 48, of Panacea, had an active warrant out of Decatur County, Ga. with extradition orders. During the search of the vehicle, drug paraphernalia was observed and seized. McMillan was transported to the Wakulla County Jail where she is being held for Decatur County. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Deputy Stephen Simmons also investigated. Evelyn Hires of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A suspect, who has been identi ed, poured water over the victims cable and computer modem and surge protector. The damaged equipment is valued at $175. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Deputy Stephen Simmons conducted a traffic stop on a vehicle for failure to maintain a proper lane. After a traffic stop, the deputy reported a strong odor of marijuana coming from the interior of the car. A 17-year-old passenger in the car was arrested for an active Wakulla warrant. A search of the juvenile discovered a bag of marijuana that weighed 23 grams along with five narcotic tablets. He was arrested for possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of a Schedule 1 narcotic. The juvenile was transported to the juvenile detention center. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Angelia Smith of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone stole the victims identity and used her name and Social Security number. The identity theft was reported to the Federal Trade Commission. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. A 45-year-old New York City resident was detained by Deputy Ward Kromer after the deputy reportedly observed the driver driving recklessly. The driver allegedly attempted to hide his vehicle behind an Ochlockonee Bay business, but was found by the deputy. Inside the vehicle was a 5-year-old child. A DUI investigation was conducted. The driver allegedly resisted efforts to be handcuffed and was charged with DUI and resisting arrest without violence. The Florida Department of Children and Families was contacted and located a grandmother of the child in Tallahassee. The juvenile was taken to the grandmothers home by DCF until his mother can y down from New York and retrieve him. Deputy Matt Helms and FHP Trooper Andy Stone also investigated.SATURDAY, AUG. 23 David Thomas of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Tire tracks were observed in the victims front yard. Ruts on the grass created $150 worth of damage. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Franklin Spears of Sopchoppy reported the theft of items from Sopchoppy City Park. A fan, trash cans and two step ladders, valued at $90, were missing. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. David Arnett, 65, of Crawfordville was charged with aggravated battery following a disturbance at the Kangaroo Express in Medart. Deputy Ashley McAlister allegedly observed the subject chasing and striking the 52-yearold female victim with a stick. The female victim also reported being struck in the face by the suspect earlier while inside a vehicle. Deputy Matt Helms investigated.SUNDAY, AUG. 24 Erica Payne of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim returned home to discover that property had been stolen including a television, radio, vacuum and cash, valued at $725. A forced entry was observed at the home. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputies David Pienta and Anthony Paul investigated. Kristina Boyd of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle. The bike was in the victims yard when it was stolen. The bike is valued at $69. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Eldon Theodore Hicks Jr., 32, of Panacea was arrested for resisting an officer without violence. Lt. Mike Kemp was attempting to make an arrest for an outstanding warrant when Hicks ran from the deputy. Lt. Kemp injured his leg as he attempted to chase Hicks. Wakulla EMS was called to the scene to assist Lt. Kemp and Hicks was discovered a short time later at the home of a relative. He was served his warrant for violation of probation and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Lt. Sherrell Morrison, and Deputies Ross Hasty, Anthony Paul, David Pienta, Vicki Mitchell, Matt Helms and Ward Kromer also responded to the scene of the injured of cer.MONDAY, AUG. 25 Lee Larisay of Coastal Corner in Panacea reported a retail theft. A suspect, who has been identied, took pizza and a lottery ticket from the store without paying for it. The stolen property is valued at $7. Deputy Ross Hasty and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Ellen Mahnke of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Jewelry was taken from the victims home. Suspects have been identi ed. The jewelry is valued at $3,000. Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Stanley Clark of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Five fraudulent charges were observed on the victims bank account. The charges totaled $212 and were created at Wal-Mart in Crawfordville. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Thomas Bourgeois of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Several subjects spun vehicle tires on the victims grass. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated.TUESDAY, AUG. 26 Sgt. Ryan Muse observed a motorist driving at a high rate of speed on Highway 267. The vehicle tag had an expired registration and Sgt. Muse conducted a traffic stop. Robert Benson Hanway, 30, of Crawfordville was found to have a suspended driver license. Hanway has four prior convictions for driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge. He was arrested for driving with a suspended license with knowledge third or more convictions and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Patrick Langston of Crawfordville reported nding two bicycles on his Crawfordville property. The bikes were entered into the NCIC/FCIC computer as found and transported to the bike impound yard. The two bikes are valued at $300. Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Thomas Pitz of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received notice that one of his checks was cashed at a Piggly Wiggly in Pelham, Ga. The check was on an account from a bank that no longer exists. The check value was $490 and the Pelham Police Department was also contacted. Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Susan Schatzman of Crawfordville reported the theft of a business sign. A custom for sale sign was stolen from a home the victim was attempting to sell. The sign is valued at $200. Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. John Whiddon of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim received correspondence that he owed Kohls money. A $244 purchase was made in Plantation. The victim has never had an account with Kohls. The victim also received noti cation that someone was denied credit cards and lines of credit from four other stores. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated.WEDNESDAY, AUG. 27 A clerk at the Kangaroo Express in Medart reported a retail theft. Three suspects left the store without paying for a beer. The suspects have been identified. Deputies Jeff Yarbrough and Gibby Gibson investigated. Joseph Slater of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A relatives shed was entered and items were stolen. The property also had damage to it. Damage to a gate and shed is estimated at $100. Stolen property included scaffolding, a plow and tool box valued at $550. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Amy Everheart of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. An unauthorized charge was observed on the victims bank account. The charge was created in South Florida and totaled $141. Another two unauthorized charges were observed at gas stations in Belleview that totaled $140. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,091 calls for service during the past week including: 22 business and residential alarms; 132 citizen contacts; 20 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 9 E-911 abandoned calls; 20 E-911 calls; 39 investigations; 40 medical emergencies; 30 school security checks; 321 business and residential security checks; 25 special details; 10 thefts; 29 traf c enforcements; 164 traf c stops; and 13 wanted people. Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Ms Marias Grooming LLC PET GROOMING & BATHINGNow Taking Appointments850-519-1994OPEN HOUSE AUGUST 519 Years of Experience facebook.com/getyourgroomwithme Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 ED GARDNER, O.D.Call today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50 O.D O.D. O.D. Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterSchedule your Back to School Eye Exam today

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 15AThe entire team at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center is so very proud to announce that this years Queen of the Senior Center is Jerline Cooper. Ms. Jeri, as she is affectionately known, is so deserving of this honor, and we could not be happier for her. Ms. Jeri has been a huge blessing to this community for so many years. She has worked tirelessly for many organizations to help raise much-needed support so that the people of Wakulla could bene t in some way. Her passion and care for people is obvious in the rst few minutes of a conversation with her. She loves to talk about her family and friends and how she feels blessed to have so many people who care for her. Her dedication and years of service to this county are to be commended, and we are proud to have her as the centers representative. She will represent the Senior Center over the next year at various festivals and events throughout the county. The team at the Senior Center wishes to thank Ms. Jeri for her hard work, dedication, and above all, her smile that always brings joy to those around her. By JERRY EVANSOf the Senior CenterAs we begin to look at the end of summer and usher in the coolness of fall, we tend to remember those special summer memories that made the season so great. Here at the Senior Center, thinking back on the month of July, we remember not only the hot days, but the fun times and laughter that filled the center. These active seniors managed to throw a huge Fourth of July party, play drums, do a little belly dancing and celebrate Christmas! On July 3, our seniors were treated to some great gospel music in the morning, then enjoyed a terri c Fourth of July party complete with hot dogs off the grill and ice cream. The room was lled with red, white, and blue as everyone dressed for the occasion. The center was decorated with patriotic colors and ags. The Drumming Circle that took place in July was not only a blast for all those who participated but it was also a great learning experience. Kent Hutchinson taught us all the art of drumming as an actual form of communication. Kent will be back in October for another round. The month of July also brought the Dancing Divas to the center. These artistic ladies entertained the crowd with belly dancing, complete with costumes. These ladies were beautiful, funny, entertaining, and each had their own story. The real fun started when a few staff members decided to give it a try! Christmas in July was a huge success. This being our 19th year produced the biggest crowd to date. With the renovation to the dining room complete an interior wall was taken down which enabled us to expand our capacity considerably we were able to increase the number of tables and chairs and still maintain the comfort and functionality of the room. Our staff served well over 200 plates of traditional Christmas dinner complete with turkey, dressing, and all the xins. The entertainment was exceptional as was the food. Our silent auction boasted lots of very nice items which lined the hallways. R.H. Carter, past executive director, even read his special version of The Night Before Christmas, and, as always, entertained the crowd. The funds raised will go directly towards maintaining our programs and services here, especially those that feed our homebound seniors. Our Meals on Wheels program is one of the most crucial for our community and it is through the generosity of people that support events such as Christmas in July that enable us to carry forward with such important services. We can never overstate our gratitude to this community for the support we receive from all of our friends of the center. The way people choose to give in support of this senior citizens center is overwhelming, as was witnessed at Christmas in July. Those of us directly involved with the centers daily activities are truly blessed to see the speci c impact on peoples lives as a result of the communitys generosity. As we grow and expand, our vision and mission will remain and we will continue to be a place to enjoy where our seniors can age gracefully, comfortably, and independently, and together, we can all learn more about how to Celebrate Life! Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Seniors enjoy Fourth of July, play drums, enjoy belly dancing and more during July activitiesJeri Cooper crowned queenSPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSenior Center Queen Jeri Cooper and family. Dancing Divas belly dancers with senior citizens. 850.926.7900 RGVI.com facebook.com/RogersGunterVaughnInsurance @RGVIWAKULLA INSURANCE AGENCY WERE ALL ABOUT YOU!Wakulla Insurance Agency, a division of Rogers, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance, is your team of risk reduction advisors. The agencys trained professionals work closely with you to build a comprehensive, customized protection plan for your family and your business that mitigates, prevents and insures against relevant forms of risk. Schedule a meeting with our team today at 850.926.7900 RGVI.com facebook.com/RogersGunterVaughnInsurance @RGVI

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFor the most part trees have past 2014s blooming period in Wakulla County as autumns beginning will be here in less than three weeks. The last weeks of summer are when next years seed are maturing, hidden under the leafy canopies. Blending into the foliage background has its advantages. It is easy to pass unnoticed and left undisturbed to await the following spring and germination. The native Wax Myrtles, Morella cerifera, take a different approach, producing many obvious and easily available berries which contain small hard seed. Birds and other small animals eat the berries and deposit the seed over a wide area. Wax myrtle trees are a member of the Myricaceae plant family with the words base, Myrica, originating from a Greek word for fragrance. A family member of this plant is found in a majority of the inhabited world. Sometimes known commonly as a bayberry, it has been collected commercially to produce the popular candle scent. Before the advent of massmarket candles with artificial scents, wax myrtles were used in many North Florida homes. The wax myrtle is a native Florida plants. It is a small tree or large shrub which can be grown anywhere in the state. Wax myrtle does well in a moist environment. It can grow in poorly drained soils, but grows better in drier soil conditions. This durable plant can serve many uses in the landscape. Wax myrtles have male and female owers produced on separate plants. Female flowers grow in close bunches producing light green round fruits about an eighth of an inch in diameter. The fruits are coated with a thick, bluish wax useful in making candles. Wax myrtles can reach a height of 25 feet. Their leaves are evergreen narrow at the base and broader toward the upper end of the leaves. About midway up the leaf toward the tip, coarse teeth appear on the leaf edges. Wax myrtles produce suckers, small plants which sprout from the roots. The suckers grow into large clumps, or clusters, and eventually grow into very large, dense thickets. Suckers can be removed from around the main trunk to produce an attractive, small tree in manicured landscapes. The trunk of the wax myrtle is grayish white in color similar to northern birch. These trees are used extensively in patio planting and as landscape screens. Wax myrtles can be grown from seeds, cuttings, and simple layering techniques. Seeds can be started in a mixture of equal parts sand and peat moss. Another method for propagating wax myrtle is to dig established plants during the winter months. Cut the plants back to within a few inches of the ground. Dig out the root clumps and set them in containers. In a few months, the plant will regrow. A small tree 10 to 12 feet in height will take a few years to grow using this method. Being a native plant, wax myrtles are well suited to Wakulla Countys drier soils and climate. The plant is cold hardy, salt tolerant, and relatively free of diseases and insects. The only one serious pest of wax myrtle is a caterpillar which chews leaves and ties terminal leaves together. This native plant is the obvious source for nutrition and cover for many of Wakulla Countys wild residents. To learn more about wax myrtles in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension of ce at 850926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu/ Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Wax Myrtles are proli c producer of berries for birds and wildlife. Wax myrtle were used to scent candles Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY DR. BRENT SELLERS, UF/IFAS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS 20% OFF 2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FLBadcock.com 850926When you OPEN a New Badcock Account Your Entire Purchase GET HER BACK IN THE JUNGLE QUICKER.Kids will be kids. And when the backyard magically turns into a jungle, accidents can happen. So when that inevitable break, cut or bruise occurs, bring them to the ER at Capital Regional Medical Center. Our dedicated pediatric ER is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. So we will have her back to swinging through the jungle in no time. For more information about when to take your child to the ER, talk with our nurses 24/7 by calling 850-325-3627 or visit us at www.CapitalRegionalMedicalCenter.com. Check our current average ER wait time by texting ER to 23000.Message and data rates may apply. For more information, visit TextERHelp.comPediatric Emergency Care, 24/7

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Explore Cologne, Germany Page 12BSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014sports news and team views SportsInevitable battle beginsWeekly RoundupPage 5BWeek in WakullaPage 4B War Eagles beat Florida High NEXT GAME: The War Eagles travel to Navarre High on Friday, Sept. 5, at 7 p.m. CT/8 p.m. ET. Players of the WeekKYLE WEAVER Offensive line Graded 81 percent ANTONIO MORRIS Linebacker4 tackles, caused 2 fumblesANDREW GAYLORD Played well in every aspect, said KleesO enseDefenseSpecial Teams Sponsored by 850926-1011Your Home Town Realtor Wakulla capitalizes on turnovers, dominates second half in 40-12 victory in season openerBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netIf you just saw the 4012 nal score, you might assume the War Eagles won in a cakewalk. But the game was far from a blowout in fact, with only 2.9 seconds remaining in the half, Wakulla was ahead on the scoreboard 11-6 and the Florida High Seminoles were threatening to score and take the lead. Solid defensive play batted away a pass and kept Wakullas lead. A very athletic Florida High team was also hampered with a number of turnovers, including a couple caused by linebacker Antonio Morris, including one play in which he ripped the ball away from a receiver. Turnovers were the difference, said Wakulla Head Coach Scott Klees. They had four of them and we had none. And we managed to take advantage of those turnovers. Besides the turnovers, Klees credited his teams summer conditioning with keeping them ahead of a Florida High team that was obviously wilting by the end of the game. It wasnt depth, Klees said. By the end of the game we had ve or six kids going both ways and so did they. I really think it was our summer conditioning. Klees was pleased with his offense that generated 500 yards and scored 40 points. Quarterback Feleipe Franks was 11 of 16 passing with 226 yards and a touchdown, and he ran for another touchdown. Wide receivers Keith Gavin caught ve passes for 131 yards and Kelton Donaldson had three catches for 60 yards, including a 2-point conversion. On defense, Monterious Loggins led the way with 9 tackles, and Hunter Hurst had 5 tackles. Klees praised special teams for their play kickoffs, kicks and punts saying they excelled in all aspects of play. GAME RECAP Florida High fumbled on their rst possession of the game, and Wakulla recovered at the 17. That set up a Franks -toGavin pass to the 1, and then Antonio Morris took it in from there.Turn to Page 2BWILLIAM SNOWDENWar Eagle wide receiver Keith Gavin spins away from a Seminole tackler after catching a pass over the middle. The pursuing defenders would push him out of bounds at the 1 yard line. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2013. Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage are HMO plans with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage depends on contract renewal. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., seven days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_DP 610 CMS Accepted 12252013 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield AssociationLive Well. Choose Well. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd and at 5:30 p.m. on Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQA September 12 S eptember 26 September 11 October 9November 13 October 10 October 24 November 14 November 28 Falling Into Fashion The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs Annual Fashion Extravaganza Auction and Raffle Wakulla Senior Center Thursday October 9, 2014 6:30 pm For tickets see any Optimist member or call Sally Gandy at 850-984-2203 Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480 Fashions From The Little Black Dress Sundance Crums Mini Mall Maurices Delicious Dinner catered by Poseys SteamRoom Entertainment by Jerry Evans and Friends All proceeds go towards Scholarships for Wakulla Co unty Students TICKETS $30.00 each T h A WE ARE HEREFOR YOU For more Information and to Schedule a Portfolio ReviewTrustYourPlan.comBob Beargie, Wealth Advisorbob.beargie@raymondjames.com 850-562-6702Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS.The Raymond James Wealth Advisors at Gulf Winds are ready to help you create a Life Well Planned. Conveniently located in Crawfordville, we offer the nancial strength of Raymond James and the reliability of being local. If you would like to get started with your nancial plan, or if you just need a second opinion, give us a call. We are here for you.1447 Mahan Drive Tallahassee, FL 32308

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms WE HAVE LIVE SHRIMP!FRESH WATER TOO! IN SHOREFISHING IS F NEWExtendedSaturday Hours8am 3pmNow Accepting Appointments on SaturdayOpen: Wakulla Animal Hospital850-926-7153 W k ll A i l H i t l As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney From 1B A 2-point extra point was good and the War Eagles were up, 8-0. On the ensuing kickoff, Wakulla lost Jake McCarl with an ankle injury. During that series, Monterious Loggins stripped the receiver of the ball, and the War Eagles took over near mid eld. Franks connected to Donaldson on a bomb that gave them rst and goal, but they couldnt convert and kicked a eld goal to go up 11-0. At the end of the rst quarter, Florida High took a punt to give them eld possession at the 44 and they mounted a drive that culminated in a touchdown in the second quarter. The PAT was no good to make it 11-6. Wakulla drove deep into Florida territory and had a 4th down and 3 at the 5 but the ball bounced out of the receivers hands and Florida High drove down the eld with time running out in the half. With 2.9 seconds, the Seminoles were at the Wakulla 5, but couldnt score. On the opening drive of the 3rd quarter, Wakulla took over on its own 35, Morris carried it to mid eld, then Gavin caught a pass and dove to the 1. Morris carried it in from there, and Donaldson caught a pass for a 2-point conversion to go up 19-6. Florida High wouldnt go away, and their quarterback Ronnie Harrison, an Alabama commitment as a safety, showed his athleticism, leading a drive that nished with a 25-yard run for a score. The point-after was no good and the score was 1912. On the next series, Wakulla was forced to punt from its own end zone, and Florida took over at the Wakulla 39. Another Florida fumble, recovered by Demarcus Lindsay, and Gavin caught a pass over the middle and fought off Seminole defenders until he was pushed out at the 1. Herbert Franklin caught a TD pass and the extra point was good, 26-12. Another Florida fumble gave Wakulla the ball at the 26, and Donaldson hauled in a catch at the 4 and took a big hit but held on. On the next play, Franks looked to Gavin, completely drawing the defense that way, then ran the ball in for a score to make it 33-12. Bucky McGlammery came in as quarterback on the next series and, after a couple of running plays, the War Eagles had driven to the 12. Lindsay took the ball in from there, and Caleb Fell, backup kicker to Franks, kicked the extra point to make it 40-12. NEXT UP: NAVARRE Whens the last time Wakulla was underdog two weeks in a row? Klees asked, speaking of Navarre High School after Florida High had been picked to win against Wakulla. Navarres a bigger school, ranked in the Top 10 in Division 6A, plus theres a threehour ride for the War Eagles to travel there. Last year, Wakulla won on a last-second TD catch from Franks to Gavin in the corner of the end zone. Its going to be a good test, Klees said. Gregory Jackson II hangs on as he watches the game from the shoulders of his dad, Gregory Jackson I.War Eagles beat Florida HighThe War Eagles trot onto the eld. The student section makes some noise. Demarcus Lindsay rushes the ball. War Eagle cheerleaders. The War Eagle marching band. Players, cheerleaders, band members take the eld to sing the alma mater after the game. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 3B By MARTY COHEN For months leading up to the 2013 season, Florida head coach Will Muschamp told anyone who would listen, This is Jeffs team. Indeed after a protracted battle with Jacoby Brissett the previous year, sophomore Jeff Driskel earned the starting quarterback spot and although the Gators won an impressive 11 games, Driskel was mostly the caretaker of a modest offensive attack. A season later it was going to be different. With more experience, and Brissett no longer in the picture having transferred to North Carolina State, Driskel was handed the keys to the kingdom, directing an offense expected to produce considerably more than the previous season. The plan was to open up the playbook and take advantage of Driskels physical ability. Best laid plans, eh? Perhaps symbolic of the entire disastrous fall, Driskel threw for a careerhigh 291 yards in the Game Two at Miami, but a pair of awful interceptions undermined the effort in a sloppy, five-turnover, gut-wrenching loss to the Hurricanes. There would be no redemption the following contest. Barely ve minutes into the SEC home opener against Tennessee, Driskel suffered a broken leg while being hit as he released a pass that was picked off in the at and returned for a touchdown. Season over. So much for Jeffs team. We all know what followed, the brief run of success behind backup Tyler Murphy before he got hurt as well, as the Gators limped home with a hard-to-fathom sevengame losing streak, resulting in the worst campaign since the infamous 0-10-1 debacle way back in 1979. The fall guy became offensive coordinator Brent Pease, replaced by Kurt Roper, who brought a high-tempo, successful scheme from Duke. But the more things change, the more they stayed the same, because Muschamp wasnt going anywhere despite some strident cries from a faction of the fan base, and neither was Driskel. In fact, in theory Florida is in the same place it was 12 months earlier, for while Muschamp has cut back on the rhetoric, the Gators are once again Jeffs team. Both Muschamp and Driskel have plenty to prove in 2014, the overall plight of the team intertwined with the fate of the head coach and the production of the quarterback. The Gators need Driskel to perform at a premium level, and so does Muschamp the two are inexorably tied together. This isnt much of a deviation from many high-profile programs, since the current milieu of college football revolves around the quarterback. But given Muschamps slippery footing, plus the up-and-down nature of Driskels play, the link between quarterback and head coach is a critical, albeit precarious, one for Florida. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators By TIM LINAFELT The numbers say that Mario Edwards Jr. had five tackles, three tackles for loss and a sack in the BCS National Championship Game. On paper, thats a nice, if not eye-popping, performance. Edwards teammates, though, say that his effort in corralling Auburns run-heavy offense in Pasadena was a huge reason the Seminoles were able to complete their comeback and win the national title. He played his behind off, FSU left tackle Cameron Erving said. He realized his potential in that game. It was a Come to Jesus (moment) for him. Edwards, a defensive end who stands a startling 6-3, 294 pounds, arrived at FSU as the topranked high school football player in the country. With a highly-touted defensive end comes expectations for a high sack total. And the numbers say that, so far, Edwards hasnt delivered. Despite two years as a starter, he only has ve sacks on his career ledger. Those numbers, though, dont tell the whole story. Not even close. FSU coach Jimbo Fisher bristled recently when a reporter asked about Edwards 3.5 sacks last year and perhaps hinted that Edwards had a disappointing year. Sacks dont equate to greatness, Fisher said. Youd better go watch that lm. If you watch that lm, that guys a heck of a football player. Fishers early tenure was marked by a steady stream of defensive ends who compiled gaudy sack totals. Brandon Jenkins, Bjoern Werner and Cornellius Carradine all racked up big-time numbers on the way to becoming NFL draft picks. Fisher insists that Edwards can rush the passer just ne, but that his value to Florida States defense is measured in more than just pressure and sacks. Hes so big that opposing tight ends are almost useless when trying to block him. And hes fast enough, for a man who weighs 300 pounds, that he can often simply rush past an opposing tackle. And, Fisher says, Edwards is athletic enough to drop back into coverage on occasion. That guy there is as big and athletic as any of the ends weve had, Fisher said. And that other group, hes as good as any one of those guys. It was all on full display at the Rose Bowl, when Edwards could often be found overwhelming his blocker or at the bottom of the tackle pile. Edwards and the Seminoles limited the Tigers to 232 rushing yards a high number, but well below Auburns 329 yards-per-game average. Late in the fourth quarter, Edwards perfectly sniffed out an Auburn read-option play. He then stayed stride for stride and juke for juke with 6-1, 210-pound quarterback Nick Marshall before bringing him down for a deep loss. What a great play by a 280-pound defensive lineman, ESPN analyst Kirk Herbstreit said at the time. Out in space against Nick Marshall, a former point guard and a dynamic athlete, and the big fella holds his own. Added FSU running back Karlos Williams: Hes a different beast. Sacks may not equal greatness, but that doesnt mean Edwards doesnt want them. He says he missed out on six to seven sacks last year just by not knowing enough of the playbook, being out of position or being tired. I wasnt consistent, he said, and those are things I can control. Edwards doesnt plan to make those mistakes this year. I want double digits, he said. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at MiamiSaturday, Sept. 6 at 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3. Eastern Michigan at FloridaSaturday, Sept. 6 at 4 p.m.The game can be seen on SEC Network, Online at WatchESPN or can be heard on the Gator Sports Network.Citadel at #1 Florida State Saturday, Sept. 6 at 7:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3.DRISKELDRISKELMUSCHAMP MUSCHAMP TIED TOGETHER TIED TOGETHERDefensive end Mario Edwards Jr. is measured by by more than just sacks. Florida QB Jeff DriskelMario Edwards Jr. looking to make an impact on defensePHOTO BY TRAVIS REGISTER GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Sept. 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 5249103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the 8 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday, Sept. 5 Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, self-defense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042. Saturday, Sept. 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the SECOND SATURDAY of the month for a breakfast meeting at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 9845277. Sunday, Sept. 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Sept. 8 VFW POST 4538 monthly meeting at the post the SECOND MONDAY of each month. Dinner at 6 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. for post and auxiliary members only. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. ALZHEIMERS AND DEMENTIA SUPPORT GROUP is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church the FIRST MONDAY of every month, 1 p.m. Respite care is available during the meeting at the church. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, Sept. 9 C.O.R.E. Challenging Obstacles Require Effort FREE Fitness for the whole family. Tuesday 5-6 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Contact 850-745-6045 or CORE at 850-224-1177. Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, self-defense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. Wednesday, Sept. 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Wednesday, Sept. 3 The WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB will be hosting their monthly meeting, at 6:30 p.m. at Myra Jeans in Crawfordville. All future meetings will be held the rst Wednesday of each month at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4 The homecoming of Wakullas WORKING WATERFRONTS PHOTO EXHIBIT will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea. Saturday, Sept. 6 NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National Button Society) will meet at the central location of Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. Wakulla, Franklin, Okaloosa, Leon, and guests welcome. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson 926-7812, President Don/Barbara Lanier 729-7594, email bardon56@ aol.com, Linda Wood 850-899-0025, or a local email: skpsky2000@comcast.net. Short presentations about unique buttons are given at meetings. Monday, Sept. 8 GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP JOURNEY TO HOPE AND HEALING meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This Support Group is for those experiencing the loss of a loved one and together can offer the kind of care, understanding, and healing help that is needed. Tuesday, Sept. 9 A meeting for OPERATION SANTA 2014 VOLUNTEERS will be at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center. Operation Santa is a 100 percent volunteer organization. If you are interested in learning more about the many different types of volunteers needed, please attend this informative, fun meeting. The HISTORICAL SOCIETY will feature the communities of Smith Creek and Sanborn in our continued Looking Back series at 7 p.m., at Sopchoppy School Auditorium. Enjoy local history and stories of Wakulla Countys wonderful history. Sign up your team for RELAY FOR LIFE WAKULLA 2015 from 1 to 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Its FREE to register. Or if you wish to make a donation, you can contact Marion at 850-322-2652 or relayforlifewakulla@gmail.comUpcoming EventsWednesday, Sept. 10 The HISTORICAL SOCIETY will be celebrating the relocation of the Tully-McLaughlin house at 10 a.m. which will stop by the First Baptist Church parking lot. An entourage with ag detail, a atbed with banjo pickers, and vintage cars will proceed in front, with family members on foot, accompanying the house up to Dogwood Drive at Hudson Park. The public is invited to witness the spectacle. Thursday, Sept. 11 Sheriff Charlie Creel and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of cewill hold the 13th annual 9/11 MEMORIAL CEREMONY in honor of those who lost their lives in the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in 2001 at 8:46 a.m., at the agpole, 15 Oak St. Refreshments will be served. Friday, Sept. 12 FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE WAR EAGLES AFTER PARTY, hosted by Promise Land Ministries, will present Yt Super y, SuperY and Bane from 10 to 11:30 p.m. after the football game, at 3167 Coastal Hwy. by Dollar General and WHS. Free admission, limited seating. Saturday, Sept. 13 FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARKS next stepping out event is called Do Bladderworts Make Sounds? from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Take a look at the creatures, plants and rhythms of nature. Presenters are Katherine Gilbert, local wetlands expert, and Jack Rudloe of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab. The audience can participate with Sammy and Sandy Tedder who will be teaching how to imitate rhythms of nature. A FREE HEALTH AND COMMUNITY PARTNER EVENT will be at Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be several organizations providing health screenings, free tax service, FLOW mobile, Veterans Mobile and other information. FARM SHARE will distribute free food to residents of Wakulla County. A CAREGIVER SUPPORT MEETING will be at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. The topic will be: Sharing resources with others. Thursday, Sept. 18 THE TOBACCO FREE FLORIDA PARTNERSHIP will host its quarterly meeting from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library at 4330 Crawfordville Hwy. The meeting is open to the public and all community members are encouraged to attend. To request information, please contact the County Tobacco Prevention Specialist Tonya Hobby at (850) 926-0400. Government MeetingsTuesday, Sept. 9 The BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will hold a special public hearing at 5 p.m. in the Commission Chambers to consider adopting the tentative budget and tentative millage rate. This is the rst of two required public hearings. Wednesday, Sept. 10 The CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will hold a public hearing at 5:30 p.m. in the Commission Chambers. Wednesday, Sept. 10 The TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 3 p.m. at the Best Western Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville.Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Working Waterfronts Exhibit comes home Welcome Center 6 to 8 p.m. Looking Back at Smith Creek, SanbornSopchoppy Auditorium7 p.m.Historical Society House Relocation Hudson Park 10 a.m.Sept. 11 Memorial Ceremony Sheriffs Of ce 8:46 a.m.ThursdayTuesdayWednesdayNext Thursday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla Sept. 3 Sept. 9NATIONAL LIBRARY CARD SIGN-UP MONTH September is National Library Card Sign-up Month. A library card is the most important school supply of all. Its the key to success as a student or as a citizen. Its your passport to the world without ever leaving your home town. If you dont already have a library card, come by the library and sign up for one. You are never too young or too old for a library card, but those under 18 years of age must have a parent or legal guardian accompany and sign for them when they apply for a library card. WAKULLA PURLS KNITTING GROUP With fall and cooler weather on the way, its time to begin knitting sweaters, scarves, hats, and mittens. Come join the Wakulla Purls at their weekly knitting session on Wednesdays at 4 p.m. in the childrens room of the library. Whether you are a beginning knitter, an experienced knitter, or just want to learn to knit or crochet, everyone is welcome. There are no formal classes, but there are friendly people willing to help you with your knitting and crochet projects, or just provide good company while you sit and knit. CHESS, ANYONE? Do you play chess? Need a partner? Come to the librarys new Puzzle Room and add your name to the Chess Connection notebook to connect with other players. The Puzzle Room has a chess board set up, ready for anyone who wants to play. FRIENDS FUNDRAISER AND BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA Catch the NFL games on a new Toshiba 50 inch LED at screen TV! Get your ticket to win one at the library. Tickets are $5 each or 5 tickets for $20. The drawing will be held at our next Book Extravaganza on Oct. 4. Dont miss your chance to win! Dont miss the Book Extravaganza on Oct. 4 from 9 a.m. to noon. There will be hundreds of books to choose from, along with audiobooks, videos, DVDs, and puzzles. Please respect our limit of 5 bags per patron with a monetary donation. The money raised supports childrens programs and other services at the Wakulla County Public Library, and we appreciate your support.Library News... RIVERSIDE CAFE ST. MARKS Swingin Harpoons, Sept. 5, 6, 7 Blues and Rock, Sept. 12, 13, 14 Rogue, (rock n roll) Sept. 19, 20, 21 Live music in Wakulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 5BBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 29 With the unof cial beginning of campaign season just around the corner, Florida voters headed to the polls this week to choose their nominees for governor and seats in the Legislature. Or, at least, to nish the predetermined coronations in many of those races. There never seemed to be any real danger that either of the leading gubernatorial candidates would lose their primaries. And virtually every incumbent on the ballot Tuesday was still standing on Wednesday. But the election wasnt the only battle that moved into a new phase. As candidates began to turn their attention to the broader electorate, opponents of the states de facto school-voucher program were going from the court of public opinion to the actual courts. Almost four months after the Legislature followed through on a promise to expand eligibility for the voucher program, groups opposed to the move led a lawsuit that could lead to the entire system being overturned. NOW FOR THE MAIN EVENT For the most part, there were few surprises in the primaries Tuesday night. Republican Gov. Rick Scott and former Republican Gov. Charlie Crist, now a Democrat, cruised through primaries against lesser-known candidates. Crist easily defeated former Senate Minority Leader Nan Rich and was of cially welcomed by his new party as its nominee. Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz, a congresswoman from Broward County, praised Crist and running-mate Annette Taddeo as working-class champions. Charlie and Annette have embraced policies that will help Floridas middle-class families, a stark contrast to the current governor, Republican Rick Scott, who is beholden to special interests and radical tea party ideology, she said in a statement. Scott handily defeated two obscure GOP opponents, Yinka Abosede Adeshina and Elizabeth Cuevas-Neunder. But the Scott teams primary focus has long been on Crist. The next few months are about talk versus action, Scott said. That means Florida will have a choice between a governor who sent our state into a tailspin and a governor who gets results. In a marginally competitive statewide race, former Department of Children and Families Secretary George Sheldon beat House Minority Leader Perry Thurston in the Democratic primary for attorney general. I believe the attorney general is the peoples lawyer, not the governors lawyer, and not the Legislatures lawyer, Sheldon told supporters during a victory party at the Wine Loft Wine Bar in Tallahassee. Help me give Pam Bondi the job she really wants, as an anchor on FOX News. Bondi wasted little time in both congratulating Sheldon and challenging him to a debate. The voters will have a clear choice between candidates in this election, and they deserve to hear directly from us on the distinct difference in visions and leadership that each candidate will offer to the attorney generals Of ce, Bondi said in a prepared statement. Races in the House provided the sole state-level incumbent to go down and the usual bit of Florida elections drama. In Central Florida, Rep. Ricardo Rangel, D-Kissimmee, was defeated in his bid for a second term by John Cortes, vice chairman of the Democratic Hispanic Caucus of Florida. State Democratic Party Chairwoman Allison Tant seemed just ne with Cortes beating the incumbent. From his time as a police of cer to his extensive work as an activist in Osceola County, John has always put his fellow community members ahead of himself, Tant said in a statement. I look forward to working with John to ensure that the residents of District 43 continue to have representation that puts the middle class rst this fall. SCHOOLING THE ELECTORATE Scott didnt wait until he had of cially dispatched his challengers to start rolling out what will clearly be one of the central themes of his campaign. He unveiled an education agenda Monday that included promises to review the number of tests being administered to Florida students and to take further steps to rein in the cost of college if he wins a second term in November. We want to make sure that our students have every opportunity to succeed in the classroom and in their careers, and we want to make sure our teachers have every tool they need to make that possible, Scott said. The call for an investigation of standardized testing is noteworthy, given that Republicans interested in education reform have long looked at assessments as a way to judge how well schools are educating children. In 2011, Scott signed a bill that more closely tied teacher pay to student performance on standardized tests A brochure outlining Scotts proposals seemed to place the blame for the amount of testing on local school districts. But Kathleen Oropeza, cofounder of the advocacy group Fund Education Now, said blaming local school districts was disingenuous, because many of the tests they require are tied to state laws. Districts will have to create tests for some courses under the teacher-pay law that Scott signed, Oropeza said. On higher education, Scott said he would push for a requirement that colleges outline the costs of textbooks and other materials before students register for classes. In his of cial capacity, the governor joined Education Commissioner Pam Stewart on a jaunt across the state to welcome students back to school. Crists campaign cried foul on that. Floridians should not be fooled by Rick Scotts shameful, taxpayer-funded campaign events this week, spokesman Brendan Gil llan said in a statement. Scotts back-to-school tour should be an apology tour for the $4.8 billion he wanted to cut and the $1.3 billion he did cut from education. WERE NOT GONNA TAKE IT Thats all I can stands; I cant stands no more, the cartoon character Popeye used to say and a coalition of groups including the states largest teachers union essentially said the same thing this week in launching a legal assault on Floridas de facto school-voucher program. The lawsuit comes after the Legislature approved a bill this spring that would expand eligibility for the program and increase the value of scholarships given to participating students. While one of the central claims of the lawsuit that the program gets in the way of the states responsibility to provide a quality education to all children could have been made for years now, those ling the challenge said the expansion forced their hand. Ron Meyer, an attorney for the groups, said while education advocates were willing to allow the program to go forward initially, this has become an industry. Its a money-maker for scholarship-funding organizations, Meyer said. And its a program that we think is a dereliction of the constitutional requirement (to provide public education). The Tax Credit Scholarship Program, which could raise as much as $357.8 million this year, provides tax credits to companies that donate money to nonpro t entities that pay for children to go to private schools. Without the scholarship program, critics say, those tax dollars could be used to help fund public education. But supporters say the program provides better opportunities for lowor middle-income children trapped in failing public schools. Republicans, who led the charge to institute and then broaden the voucher program, saw things a bit differently. Those attacking the scholarships were actually the special interests. This lawsuit is just the latest attack on parental choice by an entrenched education establishment more concerned about protecting the status quo than providing families the opportunities afforded by a great education, said former Gov. Jeb Bush, who signed the legislation creating the program and is still an in uential gure in the states education debates. STORY OF THE WEEK: Primary elections cleared the way for general elections, including the long-awaited battle between Gov. Rick Scott and former Gov. Charlie Crist for control of the Governors Mansion. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Were not the Rick Scott campaign. We cant go whenever and whatever we want on TV. We have to make choices. So why would we make the choice to go spend a bunch of money in a primary that we know were going to win? Steve Schale, a consultant for the Crist campaign, on why the former governor essentially ignored primary opponent Nan Rich.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)The inevitable battle begins -Janet The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com HOME COUNTRYTime when thoughts turn to speculatingBy SLIM RANDLESThe speculating began Thursday again. You see, when its either too hot or too cold or too windy or the snows too deep or we just get tired of thinking about work, we speculate. Its one of our favorite sports. Theres speculating about why Sarah down at the Read Me Now book store has a section called Love and other Fiction. Shes never given us satisfaction on that score, and we even sent ol Doc over to ask her. He struck out. Then theres the speculating about Steves cabin. Well, not the cabin itself, as every cowboy needs a hole-up spot, but we still speculate about Steves turret. Not every cabin has a turret. Steves does. Sure we asked him. He just looked at us and said, If you had a cabin, wouldnt you build a turret, too? Well, yes, but that still doesnt But this summer, our speculating settled on Mrs. Doc once more. We know from written-down historical fact that she must have a first name. Doesnt everyone? But with Mrs. Doc, she just introduces herself to people as Mrs. Doc. Doc just calls her Honey, and he wont tell us her name, either. He says its one of those old-fashioned womens names and she doesnt like it. I mean, even the other ladies in the Ladies Literary League and Garden Society dont know. So the speculating goes on. Herb even walked up behind Mrs. Doc one day in the store and said, Hi there, Ermaline. Didnt work. So the speculating ran to names like Abyssinia, Charity, Murgatroyd, Sassafras, Chlorophyllis and Fred. Bounced them off Doc. He just shook his head. Not even close, he said. Maybe we could bribe someone at the drivers license department in the city Lets speculate on that for a while. When you listen to the Home Country Hour podcast at www.slimrandles. com, please remember its not polite to ridicule old people.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 thewakullanews.com Africa Ages Angel Arch Atom Bend Bleed Cause Cloud Desk Diet Ended Enemy Firing Firm Fits Hail Hair Hawk Helpless Helps Herds Hold Huge Hums Idea Kite Lime Lips Mass Mere Mice Much Mugs Nests Operas Ought Pegs Pile Plan Plunged Prayer Ready Real Reasons Rubs Rung Rush Said Score Seeds Sees Select Should Smile Snapped Soup Starvation Stir Sure Tear Unpleasant Unseen Visual Witch Yarn Yeah The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Only DirectTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137 DISH TV RETAILERStarting $19.99/ mo. (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SA VE Up to 50% Ask About SAME DA Y INST ALLA TION!! CALL1-800-605-0984 Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors.Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800-605-6035 for $750 Off. Stop scratching & gnawing. Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch No More, Apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet... Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703 www.happyjackinc.com WAKULLA2/2 on 5 acres 4 mi. south of Woodville in Wakulla. Back yard faces State forest. Fenced yard. $675/mo First & Sec (850) 574-4354 Crawfordville3bd/1ba Stilt House $700. + utilities (330) 394-5227 COASTALWATERFRONT LIQUIDATION SALE! Sat 9/13 ONLY. Ocean Access Homesite ONLY $29,900, was $149,900. World-class amenities all completed! Deep, dockable waterfront available. Best bargain in America! Low financing. Call 877-888-1416, x 138 UNRESTRICTED ACREAGE Timber, Hunting, Recreation 40 to 350 from 1250 per acre Mature hardwoods, Road frontage Power, Creek frontage, Mountain views, Private, Excellent huntingDeer and Turkey Call 877-502-6719 or Remax 423-756-5700 We buy all vehicles with or without title. Any condition, running or not, bank liens-no problem. We pay top dollar. 813-516-0847, 813-505-6939 5212-0904 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting Public Hearing on Final Budget DATE: Monday, September 8, 2014 TIME: Regular Meeting 5:45 p.m. Budget Hearing 6:00 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting Public Hearing on Final Budget For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850-926-0065 Published September 4, 2014. 5211-0904 TWN 9/16 & 9/23 sales PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction, for towing and storvehicle(s): SALE DATE: 9/16/2014 1998 Ford Vin # 1FTYR10U19WTA22295 SALE DATE: 9/23/2014 2002 GMC P/U Vin# 2GTEC19T021115169 Published Sept. 4, 2014. age, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at: 3325 Crawfordville Hwy., at 9:00 a.m. on the following www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 7B Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSUREDA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEP IT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 850528-2371 or 850926-7461 Call for All of Your Lawn Care Needs!FREE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Specialty Cuts F lat TopsCuts F eather Locks Low Lights Low L i g g h h t t s s 850 926-602027 AZALEA DR. Behind CVS & Bealls, Crawfordville F acial WaxingsColor Highlights Perms FREE ESTIMATESWorry Free with A to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414 WESTPlumbingServicesService is what we do.Locally Owned & OperatedLic# CFC 1428128850745-6649Rob West B&T MARINE850566-786385042 1-SAIL2923 Shadeville hwy.Trailers Engines Boat Repair Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 8AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDS!BIG AUTUMNSEPT 5 & 6 SEPT 19 & 20SEPTEMBERSYARD SALES Susan Jones, Realtor 566-7584 Check out this privacy! Mobile home with some furniture located on beautiful 1.4 acres. Property comes with 2 workshop/ sheds with concrete slabs!! Charming, Cozy & Immaculate 3BR/2.5BA. 1,678 sq.ft w/oversized 1 car garage. Spacious & open great room w/tall windows boasting an abundance of natural light, perfect for entertaining. Immaculate 4BD/2BA home in established quiet kitchen counter tops! Spacious living room with closet for extra storage. Spring Creek Hwy $29,500 9 Eagles Ridge $159,000 194 Carousel $150,000 APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE COMMERCIALCrawfordville 2BA 1,500 sq. ft. $1500HOUSES2BR/2BA 1,044 sq. ft. $725 3BR/2BA 1,248 sq. ft. $1,100 4BR2BA 1,404 sq. ft. $975TOWN HOME3BR/2.5BA 1,440 sq. ft. $850MOBILE HOMES4BR/2BA 1,680 sq. ft. $875 3BR/2BA 1,296 sq. ft. $900 RENTALS: Wakulla Realty 850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 thewakullanews.com 5203-0904 TWN vs. Mitchell, Bridgett A. 13000225CAAXMX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13000225CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, VS. BRIDGETT A. MITCHELL A/K/A BRIDGET MITCHELL N/K/A BRIDGET STEVENS; TODD JAMES MITCHELL; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on August 5, 2014 in Civil Case No. 13000225CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff, and BRIDGETT A. MITCHELL A/K/A BRIDGET MITCHELL N/K/A BRIDGET STEVENS; TODD JAMES MITCHELL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRIDGETT A. MITCHELL A/K/A BRIDGET MITCHELL N/K/A; TODD JAMES MITCHELL, are Defendants. The clerk of the court, Brent X. Thurmond will sell to the highest bidder for cash at the Front Door of the Courthouse at 11:00 a.m. on the 25th day of September, 2014, the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH GOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 14, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 3744.28 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 0.36 FEET TO A 3 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF EMMETT WHALEY ROAD AND MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 518.69 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 250.00 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 174.24 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 65.51 FEET TO A 1 INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 691.90 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF EMMETT WHALEY ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 315.61 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT 1998 MERIT MOBILE HOME BEARING TITLE NUMBERS #75092710 AND 75092711 AND VIN: FLHMLCB118518401A AND FLHMLCB118518401B. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. ALDRIDGE/CONNORS, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff 1615 South Congress Avenue, Suite 200, Delray Beach, FL 33445 Telephone: (561) 392-6391 Facsimile: (561) 392-6965 By: /s/ HAREL AMIR, ESQ. FBN: 100894 Primary E-Mail: ServiceMail@aclawllp.com IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published August 28 & September 4, 2014. 1113-748535B 5204-0904 TWN vs. Holdeen, Theresa Ann 65-2013-CA-000362 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2013-CA-000362 Division U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. THERESA ANN HOLDEEN, FLORIDA HOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on August 12, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 21, GOLDEN GATE FOREST, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 3 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1996 EAGLE MOBILE HOME, VIN(S) GAFLS54A77626ET21 & GAFLS54B77626ET21. and commonly known as: 138 CRYSTAL LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on September 18, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 13th day of August, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Brent X. Thurmond (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Kari D. Marsland-Pettit (813) 229-0900 x Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com Published August 28 & September 4, 2014. 327603/1335759 5205-0904 TWN vs. Sapp, Rhonda T. 2013-CA-000219 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000219 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, -vs.Rhonda T. Sapp; Unknown Spouse of Rhonda T. Sapp; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000219 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Rhonda T. Sapp are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on September 18, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 33, BLOCK N, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700, (561) 998-6707 Published August 28 & September 4, 2014. 13-259781 5206-0904 TWN vs. Todd, Javelle B. 65-13-CA-000383 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-13-CA-000383 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, v. JAVELLE B. TODD A/K/A JAVELLE B. FIELDS, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAVELLE B. TODD A/K/A JAVELLE B. FIELDS and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION of 6010 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVENthat, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on July 16, 2014 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on Sept. 18, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. (EST), at WAKULLA County Courthouse: Tract No.4: Commence at a U.S. Government monument marking the Northeast corner of Lot 6 of the Hartsfield Survey of Land in Wakulla County, Florida, and run thence North 72 degrees 08 minutes 40 seconds East 1982.59 feet to the Northeast corner of the West Half of said Lot 6, thence South 17 degrees 55 minutes East along the East boundary of said West Half of said Lot 6 a distance of 2847.14 feet, thence South 72 degrees 05 minutes West 337.37 feet, thence South 17 degrees 55 minutes East 329.01 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run thence South 72 degrees 05 minutes West 188.52 feet, thence South 17 degrees 55 minutes East 567.90 feet to a point on the Northerly right of way boundary of State Road No. 30, said point being on a curve concave to the Northwest, thence Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of 2605.16 feet, through a central angle of 04 degrees 23 minutes 55 seconds, for an arc distance of 200.0 feet (chord of said arc being North 52 degrees 37 minutes 14 seconds East 199.95 feet), thence North 17 degrees 55 minutes West 501.28 feet to the Point of Beginning. TOGETHER WITH a 1998 Fleetwood, Oak Knoll, 44x28, Manufactured Home, ID#s GAFLV34A26074PK21 and GAFLV34B26074OK21 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: July 16, 2014. CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLA COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to ap5207-0904 TWN vs. Ashley, Maryvonne H. 14000117CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 14000117CAAXMX ONEWEST BANK N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY A/K/A MARVONNE HELEN DEPRES ASHLEY A/K/A MARYVONNE DEPRES ASHLEY, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION -CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHERS WHO MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF MARYVONNE H. ASHLEY A/K/A MARVONNE HELEN DEPRES ASHLEY A/K/A MARYVONNE DEPRES ASHLEY whose residence is unknown if he/she/they be living; and if he/she/they be dead, the unknown defendants who may be spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees, and all parties claiming an interest by, through, under or against the Defendants, who are not known to be dead or alive, and all parties having or claiming to have any right, title or interest in the property described in the mortgage being foreclosed herein. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 35 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and proceed South 19 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds East 785.06 feet, thence run North 70 degrees 34 minutes 40 seconds East 657.15 feet to concrete monument, thence run North 19 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds West 402.44 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence continue North 19 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds West 189.07 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 70 degrees 54 minutes 20 seconds East 231.19 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261), thence run South 19 degrees 11 minutes 35 seconds East 189.07 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 70 degrees 54 minutes 20 seconds West 230.40 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 1.00 acres, more or less. SUBJECT TO a 30.00 foot wide roadway easement along the Northerly boundary thereof. SUBJECT TO a 15.00 foot wide roadway easement along the Westerly boundary thereof. TOGETHER WITH a 30.00 foot wide roadway easement being more particularly described as follows: Commence at a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot 35 of the Harts?eld Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and proceed South 19 degrees 25 minutes 00 seconds East 785.06 feet, thence run North 70 degrees 34 minutes 40 seconds East 657.15 feet to concrete monument, thence run North 19 degrees 26 minutes 00 seconds West 591.51 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 70 degrees 54 minutes 20 seconds East 231.19 feet to a concrete monument (marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING thence run North 70 degrees 54 minutes 20 seconds East 300.04 feet, thence run South 18 degrees 58 minutes 13 seconds East 314.04 feet, thence run North 70 degrees 55 minutes 12 seconds East 381.51 feet to the Westerly right-of-way boundary of State Road #365 said point being a point on a curve concave to the Westerly, thence run Southeasterly along said Westerly right-of-way boundary and the arc of said curve having a radius of 5729.59 feet through a central angle of 00 degrees 18 minutes, 48 seconds for an arc distance of 31.33 feet the chord of said arc being South 02 degrees 19 minutes 47 seconds East 31.33 feet, thence run South 70 degrees 55 minutes 12 seconds West 402.48 feet, thence run North 18 degrees 58 minutes 13 seconds West 314.04 feet, thence run South 70 degrees 54 minutes 20 seconds West 269.92 feet, thence run North 19 degrees 11 minutes 35 seconds West 30.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH a 1993 BREN Mobile Home, Identification No. 10L23424U AND 10L23424X, Florida Title No. 65833078 and 65833079. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on counsel for Plaintiff, whose address is 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, Florida 33487 on or before Sept. 27, 2014 (30 days from Date of First Publication of this Notice) and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition filed herein. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court at Wakulla County, Florida, this 20th day of August, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK Published August 28 & September 4, 2014. 14-51465 5208-0904 TWN vs. Owen, Joshua 14000111CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 14000111CAAXMX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWABS INC., ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-10 Plaintiff vs. JOSHUHA OWEN A/K/A JOSHUA OWEN, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: JOSHUHA OWEN A/K/A JOSHUA OWEN ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 133 BROKEN BOW TRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 CHRISTINA OWEN ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 133 BROKEN BOW TRL., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned 5209-0904 TWN vs. Wilkins, Brandi Jo 2014-CA-000148 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.: 2014-CA-000148 Division: GREEN TREE SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, -vsBRANDI JO WILKINS, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO THE FOLLOWING DEFENDANTS: WILLIAM JEFFERY WILKINS 621 BOB MILLER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 WILLIAM JEFFERY WILKINS 10107 GREEN FOUNTAIN RD, TALLAHASEE, FL 32327 WILLIAM JEFFERY WILKINS 211 PARKBROOK CIRCLE, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclosure a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA county, Florida: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT X LEGAL DESCRIPTION Has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on the attorney for the Plaintiff: GIBBONS, NEUMAN, BELLO, SEGALL, ALLEN & HALLORAN, P.A. 3321 HENDERSON BLVD, TAMPA, FL 33609 EMAIL FOR THIS FILE:FORECLOSURE@GIBBLAW.COM On or before September 27, 2014, or within 30 days of the first publication of this notice of action, and file the Original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. or within 30 days of the first publication of this notice of action, and file the Original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on August 18, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, WAKULLA County 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 S Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. EXHIBIT X EXHIBIT A Begin at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of the Southwest quarter of Section 19, Township 2 South, Range 1 West Wakulla County, Florida. From said POINT of BEGINNING run South 89 degrees 30 minutes 32 seconds East along the North boundary of the Northwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of section 19 (as monumented) a distance of 331.72 feet to a re-r od (marked #4261), THENCE run South 00 degrees 36 minutes 33 seconds West 669.88 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the South boundary of the Northwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 19, THENCE run North 89 degrees 13 minutes 26 seconds West along said Southerly boundary (as monumented) a distance of 333.75 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the Westerly boundary of the Northwest quarter of the Northwest quarter of the Southwest quarter of said Section 19, THENCE RUN North 00 degrees 47 minutes 00 seconds East along said Westerly boundary (as monumented) a distance of 668.23 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 5.11 acres, or more or less. Published August 28 & September 4, 2014. FC-14320 5210-0911 TWN vs. Fricchione, Lisa 65-2012-CA-000270 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No. 65-2012-CA-000270 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. FRICCHIONE, LISA, et. al, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000270 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, and, FRICCHIONE, LISA, et. al., are Defendants, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, the FRONT DOOR of the Courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 25 day of September, 2014, the following described property: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEG24 50 ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 32, A DISTANCE OF 171.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POB, CONTINUE NORTH 01DEG 24 50 EAST, 509.01 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 83 DEG 34 53WEST, 625.58 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEG 10 11 WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE, 100.00 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHTHAVING A RADIUS OF 180.0 FEET; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CURVE FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 90.09 FEET (CHORD SOUTH 14 DEG 30 28 WEST, 89.15 FEET); THENCE RUN SOUTH 58 DEG 08 52 EAST, 743.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT. TOGETHER WITH: MOBILE HOME ID #GAFLH05A13899CH AND #GAFLH05B13899CH. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 131 SUMMERWIND CIRCLE EAST, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. DATED this 23 day of May, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk **IMPORTANT** If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at Shelia Sims, Chief Deputy Court Administrator, Office of Court Administration at the M.C. Blanchard Judicial Building, 5th Floor, Pensacola, FL 32502, 850-595-4400, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published September 4 & 11, 2014. 26675.0073 named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: LOT 5 & 6, BLOCK 13 OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: 133 BROKEN BOW TRL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff`s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by September 27, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 11th day of July, 2014. Clerk of the Court, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Published August 28 & September 4, 2014. CA 14-01375 pear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published August 28 and September 4, 2014. 66897 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 2BR/1BA. $800 Rent, $800 Sec. Dep. 3BR/2BA Mobile Home, $800 Sec. Dep. $750 Rent 3BR/2BA, $750. Mo., $800. Deposit. No Smoking/No Pets. 3BR 2B home, partially furnished $1200 Deposit/ $1200 Mo. No Smoking/No Pets Available September 15, 2014 Long-Term & Vacation RentalsCheck out our Alligator Point Beach Rentals at www.obreatly.comLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2619 Surf Rd. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 54 Cardinal Lane Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyEED TO RET YOUR HOUE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 9B 5185-0911 TWN vs. Revell, George N. Estate 2014-CA-165 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-165 LAWRENCE B. MOORE, JR., LISA A. REVELL, T.L. STRICKLAND, and ALICE MARIE REVELL, Plaintiffs, vs. ESTATE OF GEORGE N. REVELL, ESTATE OF NELL M. REVELL, ROY N. REVELL, JAMES M. REVELL, GEORGE P. REVELL, BRENDA F. LASSITER, LISA M. WALKER, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF GEORGE N. REVELL, AND KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF NELL M. REVELL, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ESTATE OF GEORGE N. REVELL, ESTATE OF NELL M. REVELL, ROY N. REVELL, JAMES M. REVELL, GEORGE P. REVELL, BRENDA F. LASSITER, LISA M. WALKER, KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF GEORGE N. REVELL, AND KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS OF NELL M. REVELL YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action seeking determination of beneficiaries, declaratory relief and partition of real property encumbering thr ee (3) parcels of real property located in Wakulla County, Florida as described in Exhibit A and Exhibit B attached hereto has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to the action on Frances Casey Lowe and Jaken E. Roane, Plaintiffs attorneys, whose address is 1983 Centre Pointe Boulevard, Suite 200, Tallahassee, Florida 32308-7823, on or before a date not less than 30 days after the first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately after service; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. Dated: August 6, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A PARCEL 1 BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION TWELVE (12), TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST AND RUN EAST, ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID SECTION 12 THE DISTANCE OF 845, THENCE RUN NORTH 176 FEET, THENCE RUN IN A WESTERLY DIRECTION AT AN ANGLE SO THAT THE DISTANCE TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE COMMUNITY ROAD LEADING SOUTH FROM THE TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY DOWN THE EAST SIDE OF THE SOPCHOPPY RIVER WILL BE 845 FEET, TO THE EASTERN BOUNDARY LOINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID ROAD, THENCE RUN IN SOUTH-WESTERLY DIRECTION ALONG THE EASTERN BOUNDARY LINE OF RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID COMMUNITY ROAD, THE DISTANCE OF 353 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, LESS ONE ACRE OF LAND LYING IMMEDIATELY IN THE SOUTHWEST CORNER SAID SECTION TWELVE, TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, RANGE THREE WEST, CONVEYED TO HARDY REVELL BY MARY CRUM BY DEED DATED NOVEMBER 8, 1937, AND RECORDED ON PAGE 210 OF DEED BOOK 32 OF THE PUBLIC IS RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CONTAINING 5 ACRES MORE OR LESS. PARCEL 2 BEGINNING AT AN IRON PIPE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF HARDY REVELLS YARD RUNNING SOUTH ONE HUNDRED (100) FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE EAST FIVE HUNDRED NINTY FEET (590) TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE NORTH ONE HUNDRED FEET (100) TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE WEST FIVE HUNDRED NINTY FEET (590) TO PLACE OF BEGINNING, ALL BEING IN SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, RANGE THREE WEST, CONTAINING 1.33 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. PARCEL 3 THE NORTH WEST QUARTER (NW 1/4) OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER (NW 1/4) AND ALL OF THAT PART OF THE NORTH ONE HALF OF THE NORTH EAST QUARTER OF THE NORTH WEST QUARTER (N 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF NW 1/4) LYING WEST OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF THE GEORGIA, FLORIDA AND ALABAMA R. WY IN SECTION THIRTEEN (SEC.13) TOWNSHIP FIVE SOUTH, OF RANGE THREE WEST (TSS, R3W) CONTAINING IN ALL FORTY THREE AND ONE HALF (43 AND 1/2) ACRES MORE OR LESS, ALSO NORTH WEST (NW) QUARTER (1/4) OF SW 1/4 OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, CONTAINING 43.50 ACRES MORE OR LESS. EXHIBIT B 5.02 ACRES PARCEL #1 Commence at a nail and cap marking the Northwest corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida also being the Southwest corner of Section 12, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 26 minutes 08 seconds West 19.79 feet to an iron pipe said point lying on the Easterly maintained right of way of Park Avenue, said point also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said maintained right of way run along the Southerly boundary line of said Section 12 and the Northerly boundary line of said Section 13, South 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds East 590.00 feet to a re-bar; thence run South 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds East 5202-0904 TWN vs. Johnson, Mable 2013-CA-000211 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2013-CA-000211 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MABLE JOHNSON; WAILON JOHNSON A/K/A WAILON R. JOHNSON A/K/A WAILON ROCKWELL JOHNSON; JAMIE JOHNSON A/K/A JAMIE MICHELLE BANKS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE; WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 5, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2013-CA-000211, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and MABEL JOHNSON; JAMIE JOHNSON A/K/A JAMIE MICHELLE BANKS; WAILON JOHNSON A/K/A WAILON R. JOHNSON; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Clerk Conference Room in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 a.m., on the 11 day of September, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A FOR LEGAL DESCRIPTION a/k/ 319 LOST CREEK LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327. DATED this 5th day of June, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Heller & Zion, LLP, 1428 Brickell Avenue, Suite 700, Miami, FL 33131 Telephone: (305) 373-8001, Facsimile: (305) 373-8030 EXHIBIT A Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the point of beginning. From said point of beginning, run thence South 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds West along the south boundary of said Northeast Quarter of Northeast Quarter 444.87 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds West 718.76 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 444.87 feet to the East boundary of said Northeast Quarter of Northeast Quarter, thence run South 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds East along said boundary 718.76 feet to the point of beginning. (Tract No. 6) SUBJECT, HOWEVER, to the following described roadway easement: Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of the Northeast Quarter of the Northeast Quarter of Section 26, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, said point being the point of beginning of herein described. From said point of beginning, run thence North 17 degrees 07 minutes 42 seconds West 104.40 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds West 588.93 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds West 414.87 feet, thence North 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds West 30.0 feet, thence North 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East 444.87 feet to the East boundary of said Northeast Quarter of Northeast Quarter, thence South 00 degrees 25 minutes 45 seconds East along said boundary 718.76 feet to the point of beginning. Together with that certain 2007 Homes of Merit Mobile Home serial no. FLHMLC30793A/B Published August 28 & September 4, 2014. 11826.2971 235.13 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said Southerly and said Northerly boundary lines run North 00 degrees 12 minutes 52 seconds East 176.00 feet; thence run North 77 degrees 46 minutes 59 seconds West 849.00 feet to a point lying on the Easterly maintained right of way of said Park Avenue; thence run South 00 degrees 38 minutes 46 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right of way for a distance of 353.25 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 5.02 acres more or less. 1.35 ACRES PARCEL #2 Commence at a nail and cap marking the Northwest corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida also being the Southwest corner of Section 12, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 26 minutes 08 seconds West 19.79 feet to an iron pipe said point lying on the Easterly maintained right of way of Park Avenue, said point also being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said POINT OF BEGINNING and said maintained right of way run along the Southerly boundary line of said Section 12, and the Northerly boundary line of said Section 13, South 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds East 590.00 feet to a re-bar; thence leaving said Southerly and said Northerly boundary lines run South 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds West 100.00 feet to a re-bar; thence run North 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds West 590.00 feet to a re-bar; thence run North 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds East 100.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.35 acres more or less. 41.70 ACRES PARCEL #3 Begin at the Northwest corner of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida also being the Southwest corner of Section 12, Township 5 South, Range 3 West Wakulla County, Florida, said point lying in the approximate centerline of Park Avenue, said point being the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence leaving said Point of Beginning run along the West boundary line of said Section 13 South 00 degrees 15 minutes 50 seconds West 1324.64 feet; to the Northwest corner of property described in Official Records Book 487, Page 485 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said west boundary line of said Section 13; thence run along the North boundary line of said property described in Official Records Book 487, Page 485 as follows South 89 degrees 44 minutes 08 seconds East 14.96 feet; thence North 88 degrees 49 minutes 28 seconds East 285.15 feet to a point marking the Northeast corner of said property described in Official Records Book 487, Page 485, said point also marking the Northwest corner of property described in Official Records Book 779, page 58 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence run along the North boundary line of said property described in Official Records Book 779, Page 58 North 88 degrees 50 minutes 53 seconds East 500.39 feet to the Northeast corner of said property described in Official Records Book 779, Page 58 said point also marking the Northwest corner of property described in Official Records Book 692, Page 350 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence run along the North boundary line of said property described in Official Records Book 692, Page 350 North 88 degrees 52 minutes 04 seconds East 528.69 feet to a point marking the intersection of said Northerly boundary line with the Easterly boundary line of the Northwest 1/4, of the Northwest 1/4, of Section 13, Township 5 South, Range 3 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run along said Easterly boundary line North 00 degrees 13 minutes 19 seconds East 630.89 feet to a point marking the Southwest corner of the North 1/2, of the Northeast 1/4, of the Northwest 1/4, of said Section 13; thence leaving said Easterly boundary line run along the South boundary line of the North 1/2 of the Northeast 1/4, of the Northwest 1/4 of said Section 13 South 89 degrees 54 minutes 11 seconds East 145.42 feet to a point marking the intersection of said Southerly boundary line with the Westerly right of way line of the Georgia, Florida & Alabama Rail Road (abandoned); thence leaving said South boundary line run along said Westerly right of way line as follows North 10 degrees 34 minutes 39 seconds East 123.37 feet; thence North 10 degrees 49 minutes 10 seconds East 548.11 feet to a point marking the intersection of said Westerly right of way line with the North boundary line of said Section 13 thence leaving said Westerly right of way line, run along said Northerly boundary line as follows North 89 degrees 35 minutes 10 seconds West 751.32 feet; thence North 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds West 235.13 feet; thence leaving said Northerly boundary line run South 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds West 100.00 feet; thence North 89 degrees 49 minutes 52 seconds West 590.00 feet; thence North 00 degrees 10 minutes 08 seconds East 100.00 feet to a point lying on the Northerly boundary of said Section 13; thence run along said Northerly boundary line North 89 degrees 26 minutes 08 seconds West 19.79 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 41.70 acres more or less. SUBJECT TO THE MAINTAINED RIGHT OF WAY OF PARK AVENUE LYING OVER AND ACROSS A WESTERLY PORTION OF THE ABOVED DESCRIBED PROPERTY. Published August 21, 28, Sept. 4 & 11, 2014. 16546855 5213-0911 TWN Kimberl, David Andrew 2014-CP-72 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2014-CP-72 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID ANDREW KIMBERL Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of DAVID ANDREW KIMBERL, deceased, whose date of death was January 16, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 773.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is September 4, 2014. Personal Representative: By: /s/ Donald Eugene Dempsey, Jr. c/o Daniel W. Dobbins, Esq. 1330 Thomasville Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Attorney for Personal Representative: By: /s/ Daniel W. Dobbins, Florida Bar # 0263176 Daniel W. Dobbins, P.A. 1330 Thomasville Road Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Phone: (850)222-1910 Fax: (850) 254-7238 Email: dobbins@nettally.com Published September 4 & 11, 2014 5214-0911 TWN 9/19 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, September 19th, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouses containing personal property of: Samuel Brinson Michael Zanco Before the sale date of September 19th, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. Publish: Sept. 4&11, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5193-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 034 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR OR DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 168 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 03-5S-02W-000-02488-000 Description of property: 3-5S-2W P-15-M-40A .08 OF ACRE IN SE 1/4 OF SEC 3 OR 23 P 311 OR 912 P 840 DC OR 913 P 260 ORDER OR 913 P 262 ORDER Name in which assessed RONNETTE CRUSE Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5194-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 035 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1245 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-060-000-10077-003 Description of property: A PRCL IN HS LOT 60 BEING .50 ACRES M/L DESC IN OR 600 P 605 Name in which assessed ARTHUR & SHELBY W JEFFERSON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5195-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 036 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1368 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-077-014-10389-001 Description of property: GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 1 LOT 1 LESS ST RD R/W DB 31 P 405 & OR 50 P 277 OR 50 P 277 & OR 104 P 337 OR 179 P 187 OR 196 P 153 Name in which assessed R. E. M. Developers LLC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5196-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 037 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1440 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10779-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOT 56 DB 58 P 381 Name in which assessed Lawson & Bernice Woodham Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5197-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 038 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1443 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10786-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOT 64 DB 59 P 52 OR 594 P 103 OR 627 P 840 Name in which assessed Carlos Alberto Giraldo Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5198-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 039 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that CL YDE K CAR TER SR & DELORISS FOR T (WROS) the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1512 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-11077-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK J LOT 17 DB 59 P 81 Name in which assessed Howard E Martin Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. 5199-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 040 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PPF HOLDINGS III L TD the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in 5200-0918 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 041 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that DA VID OR TINA SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 8 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 18-3S-04W-000-00152-008 Description of property: 18-3S-4W P-8-8-M-8 A PARCEL 70 X 100 FT IN SEC 18 OR 71 P 292 & OR 87 P 357 OR 175 P543 Name in which assessed Janie D Davie & Howell Toney Williams Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2090 Date of Issuance May 30, 2012 Parcel # 00-00-073-112-10189-016 Description of property: AMELIAWOOD SUBD BLOCK C LOT 13 OR 52 P 43 & OR 54 P 888 OR 687 P 802 ORDER Name in which assessed Lisa Sanders Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on October 8, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: July 29, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published August 28, September 4, 11 and 18, 2014. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 83, PART IV Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, September 19, 2014 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self-Storage Unit containing Household items of: Starlette Taylor Raker and Scott and Dawn Miller Before the sale date of September 19, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327.September 4, 11, 2014 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. 00 9 HometownContent 1 2 3 4516 7418 2 95 9834 457 6 194 1236 871 Solutions 2009 HometownContent 591 2684 3 7 834579216 276341598 762 834951 918725364 345916782 657 192843 129483675 483657129 FEARS STOIC HEM ALLOT CANDO ODE DOLLYPARTON LIT EPEE INTO VOLTS DEN PETS DENY FIR RENEWED SOPUP AGENT OLE THOR TREAT JOSE OIL SHIED JADED POLICED MOM YARN STAB APB MIAMI POOR IDOL OWN MOLLYCODDLE LON PROVE LEEKS DNA SEWED DADAS 12345 678910 111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2223 24 25 26 27 28 2930 313233 3435 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 4748 495051 5253 54 55 56 5758 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Across 1 Worries 6 Unemotional 11 Work on pants 14 Set aside 15 Go-getters attitude 16 Kind of poem 17 to 5 singer 19 Ignited 20 Olympics sword 21 ___ the Woods 22 Electrical units 24 Lions home 25 Animals at home 26 Say it didnt happen 27 Douglas ___ (kind of tree) 28 Got more issues 31 Absorb, like gravy 34 FBI employee 36 Bravo! 37 Norse god 38 Trick or ___! 39 No way, ___! 40 Word after sesame 41 Turned (away from) 42 Having seen it all 43 Kept a sharp eye on 45 Dads lady 46 Knitters need 47 Random guess 49 Important message to cops 52 The Golden Girls city 54 ___ thing! 55 American ___ 56 A League of Their ___ 57 Spoil 60 Actor Chaney 61 Show to be true 62 Soup vegetables 63 Genetic material 64 Used a needle 65 Papas Down 1 Became less loud 2 Run away to marry 3 Director Woody 4 Part in a movie 5 Pigs home 6 Hard to nd 7 Pastries with fruit 8 Im ___ you! 9 Wedding words 10 Home to nuns 11 Movie capital 12 Make changes to an article 13 New York baseball team 18 Dock 23 Number after zero 25 Dot on dice 26 Fender-bender result 27 Cats cover 28 Enjoy a book 29 What ___ can I say? 30 Act 31 Octagonal road sign 32 Daytons state 33 Optimistic person 34 Hot and dry 35 Wowzers! 38 Next 39 Jelly cousin 41 Pinches pennies 42 Occupation 44 ___ the Walrus 45 Painter Chagall 47 Work, as a crossword 48 Played (around with) 49 Did some math 50 ___ dots 51 God ___ America 52 Bad sign on bread 53 Victors shout 54 Farmers item 55 Concept 58 Valuable rock 59 ___ King ColeBrain Teaser

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 thewakullanews.com 1. COMICS: What was the name of Calvins neighborhood friend and classmate in Calvin & Hobbes? 2. LANGUAGE: What does draconian mean? 3. GEOGRAPHY: On what continent does the Atacama desert lie? 4. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What famous 19th-century author and humorist had only an elementary-school education? 5. ADVERTISING SLOGANS: What product is the snack that smiles back? 6. LITERATURE: What Southern author often wrote novels set in the fictional Yoknapatawpha County? 7. MUSIC: What was the name of Buddy Hollys band? 8. FOOD & DRINK: What vegetable is used in making sauerkraut? 9. TELEVISION: What was Marge Simpsons maiden name on the sitcom The Simpsons? 10. HISTORY: In what U.S. city was the Republican National Convention held in 1968? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Susie 2. Extremely harsh or cruel 3. South America 4. Mark Twain 5. Goldfish 6. William Faulkner 7. The Crickets 8. Cabbage 9. Bouvier 10. Miami Beach, Fla. ARIES (March 21 to April 19) It might not be wise to pursue goals involving others, unless you can stop impulsively rejecting new ideas. Either open your mind or wait until next week, when this ornery mood passes. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) Its a good time for the Bovine to be creative and practical for yourself and your surroundings. Shop wisely, not impulsively, and keep your Bulls eye focused on quality, not quantity. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You should feel more confident about moving ahead with plans that had to be delayed by an unexpected turn of events. Also, family matters might need more time than rst anticipated. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Be considerate of others as you move into a new area in your professional life. Take time to meet people and discuss mutual goals. The more you get to know each other, the better. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Creating a fuss could get your ideas noticed quickly. But it would be best to present your case, and then wait for a reaction to follow in due course, rather than try to force it to happen. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Unkept promises might cause plans to go awry this week. You can either grumble about people letting you down or nd a way to make the best of it and move on. The choice is yours. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) Putting off making a commitment early in the week could be a good move. Best to act when you know youre making an informed decision. Expect more facts to emerge by the weeks end. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) A recent act of kindness on your part could take on special meaning this week. Also, look for signs of upcoming changes in both your personal and professional relationships. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) Many of the tougher communication barriers between you and others in the workplace or at home could begin breaking down this week. Expect some surprises to emerge. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Your tough love attitude toward someone you care for could be misunderstood. Try to be less judgmental and show more consideration in the way you relate to that person. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) An unexpected workplace challenge could be daunting. But take what you know (and you know more than you realize) and apply it to the problem, and you should see positive results. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Recent relationship changes for both single and paired Pisces continue to in uence much of your week. Keep your focus on developing the positive aspects as you move along. BORN THIS WEEK: You set your goals with assurance and in uence others to follow suit. You would be an excellent philosopher and teacher. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 Page 11B Enjoy a great meal and pick up a copy of The Wakulla news at one of these partner locations:Special to The NewsJo Ann Daniels sponsored a co-ed adult softball team this summer at the rec park consisting mostly of local school teachers and administrators and law enforcement of cers. Jessica Wells was the manager and they received their trophy for winning the 2014 Summer Championship Adult CoEd Softball League. Their team name is Signal Three, which means in cop radio shorthand HIT AND RUN! How clever. Of course they couldnt go wrong with players like Jessica Wells, who received a silver medal for the USA during the Olympics in China and played Division 1 softball for FSU and UGA. Michele Yeomans (just got married) who played college ball for Troy State, as well as Sara Lovestrand, Nicole Klees and Mandy Butler who also played college ball. We had a lot of fun this summer playing softball, said Wells. We enjoyed fraternizing with the other teams. Its a great way to spend summer evenings, polishing our skills, and working toward physical tness. It was especially fun to watch Jo Ann Daniels cheer with excitement at our games when she joined us in the dugout. Shes a great sport! Jo Ann Daniels sponsored team that won championshipPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netCream, sugar, ice, salt and the secret ingredient physical science resulted in a tasty handmade concoction and frozen ngers on Aug. 4. Twenty-two local children participated in an ice cream social at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce as part of the 21st Century Youth Program. Before Extension Agent Shelley Swenson demonstrated ice-cream creation technique, 4-H Program Assistant Eric Westbrook explained how the science works. Westbrook said an agitation technique will turn the liquid into ice cream when a sealed bag of cream and sugar is shaken inside of a larger bag filled with ice and salt. He incorporated a metrology lesson the scienti c study of measurement as the children measured ingredients on their own, and then explained how the salt lowers the freezing point of water. Swenson worked with children on proper table settings, using real plates and glasses, to limit paper products ending up in land lls. She also instructed program participants on etiquette that included table manners and politely seating the ladies. Westbrook said the summer-long 21st Century Youth program has included gardening, insect identi cation, geology, geography, culinary science, microbiology and much more. PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAPhotos clockwise, from top left: Bryce Estep, 10, displays the nal product cold ice cream. Peyton Forbes, 11, Jasmine Davis, 11, and Comnicia West, 9, shake the bags of ice, containing cream and sugar. Leslie Slay, 10, digs into the ice cream she made. Kamari Whitaker, 10, cools off with the cold bag of salted ice and cream on his head.Science meets fun at summer ice cream social Working Waterfronts in Apalachicola, next stop WakullaSpecial to The News The Wakulla Working Waterfronts exhibit was on display during the months of July and August at the Apalachicola Center for History, Culture & Art. A celebration of workers in the maritime industry, and a last chance to view the photo exhibit in Apalachicola, was Aug. 23. Guests enjoyed live music, fresh seafood, drinks and dancing. The homecoming of the exhibit will be Thursday, Sept. 4 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center,1493 Coastal Highway 98, Panacea. The event is free and open to the public.PHOTOS BY LYNDA KINSEY Special to The News Hands are needed to pitch in for 2014 Coastal Cleanup beginning at 9 a.m. on Sept. 20 at Woolley Park headquarters or your chosen site. At 11:30 a.m., meet at Woolley Park in Panacea for lunch and prize giveaways. Site Locations: St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Lighthouse Road; Shell Point at the Pavilion Bottoms Road at the boat launch; Mashes Sands at the park area; St. Marks San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park at the gate. We encourage groups of ve or more to pre-register by sending an email to helpkwcb@gmail.com. All volunteers may either select a site location and go directly there on Saturday morning, or go to Woolley Park in Panacea to be assigned a site. All volunteers are provided trash bags and directions to areas to be cleaned. For more information call KWCB at (850) 745-7111, email us at helpkwcb@gmail.com, visit our website: www. kwcb.org and follow us on FACEBOOK at keepwakullacountybeautiful.Coastal Cleanup Sept. 20 LUNCH PARTNER F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER

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By LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsOne of the oldest cities in Germany, and currently the 4th largest, Cologne, has been drawing visitors since 50 A.D., when it was of cially founded. As your cruise ship docks Cologne Cathedral, a UNESCO world heritage site, is already visible soaring above the city skyline. From ruins uncovered after World War II, there is evidence of a Christian church in this location as early as the 4th century. The plans were drawn, and the foundation laid for the current cathedral in1248. Six hundred years later it was completed. Built in sections so that the cathedral could be used, by 1560 about 90% of the total planned building had a roof, including temporary roofs over the nave and transept. In 1842, with growing romantic enthusiasm for the middle ages coupled with the financial support of the Prussian Court after a gap of almost 300 years construction resumed on the transept portion of the cathedral. Completed by 1880, for four years it had the distinction of being the worlds tallest building. Inside the cathedral, enshrined in an elaborately carved ornamental gold tomb are the purported remains of the Three Wise Men, The centerpiece of this amazing cathedral, the relics were given to the Archbishop of Cologne in 1164 by the Holy Roman Emperor Fredrick Barbarossa. Built in both the Gothic and neo gothic styles, this gem attracts over 20,000 visitors a year. Free to visit, summer hours are from 6am until 10pm. A separate admission applies for the treasury, full of golden icons from the churches history, and the tower, with its birds eye view of the city. Guided tours are available 10am to 2:30 Monday through Saturday in English for 7 euro. http://www. colognecathedral.net/ History-of-CologneCathedral.html Outside the cathedral, melodies ring out from street performers and various characters, some spray-painted head to toe, others in authentic period costumes, beckon you over to take photos with them, for a fee. During the war more than 72 percent of the city was destroyed, reducing the historic section to rubble. Rebuilt in the original style, a stroll along the cobblestone streets, through the old town, reveals many charming multihued buildings. Most were constructed with storage spaces above and the lower oors were devoted to shops. Today many of the buildings have been converted into pubs, restaurants and shops. Numbers prominently displayed on the buildings face indicate the year of construction and not the address. Addresses historically featured images of the owners occupation, rather than numbers. Today you can still see a whale prominently displayed, on the side of the building where a whaler once lived. Famous for Koelnischwasser, or eau de Cologne, fragrance has been produced here since 1709. Used liberally by Napoleon, in a time when bathing was uncommon, you can take home a bottle as a souvenir Primarily a modern city, Cologne has a long and storied past. The Cologne Cathedral, while struck 14 times during Allied bombing, was one of the one of few buildings left standing after World War II. And was completely reconstructed by 1965. Perfect for a short stop on a relaxing river cruise, enjoy the modern vibe of this historic marvel.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www. luxurycruise-travel. com. Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 4, 2014 thewakullanews.comExplore Cologne as you sail through history PHOTOS BY LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL 000IWYWwww.chronicleonline.com/divanight Sponsored by AAA Western Wear Alpaca Magic Arbonne Baiter Body Transformations Citrus County Jazzercise Citrus Pest Management Color Me Wicked Complete Family Connollys Connors Gifts Crystal Auto Dental Cosmetic Dr Santa Cruz Eclectic Ends Salon Everyones Massage Florida Department of Health Citrus County Frame Design The Garden Shed Gardner Audiology Georgieos Hair Designs Gold Rush Heart of the Garden HPH Hospice Inverness Yoga It Works Wraps Jafra Cosmetics John Meyers Locks/ Mamas Juice Plus Karma La Te Da Boutique Complete Family Dentistry and Implant Dentistry M Hair Studio and the Spa at M Mez Mer Eyes Mosaic Tile Oragami Owl Rock Solid Creations Rodan & Field Skin Care Silipada Tracy Specialty Gems Suncoast Dermatology & Skin Surgery Center Suncoast Plumbing & Electric Susan Reynolds The Honey Hole The New Image Med Spa Thirty One by Valorie Timberlane Chiropractic Todd F Sisto MD FACS Towne and Country All Waverley Florist Whalen Jewelers Wine Shop Zebra Candles Zen Zone Will Construction Zibye Weight 50+ Vendors 000IXDP Saturday, October 4, 2014 VIP Preview 5-6pm Event 6-9pm *Limited Availability. Taxes not included. *For tickets only go to the Chronicle site listed below.Vip $55 advance only$149 General Admission $25 advance $30 at the door Get Your Tickets Now!Call 800-632-6262to reserve your room www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com A weekend to get away, have fun and be treated like a Diva!Shop Til You Drop Cocktails Hors doeuvres Massage Jewelry Clothing Cosmetics & More! Over $3500 in Door Prizes 9301 Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL 1 Night Stay & 2 General Admission Diva Tickets ( 850 ) 926-GOLF ( 4653 )Opening Soon! GOLF COURSE FAMILY MEMBERSHIP PKG. $300 Annually Includes FAMILY MEMBERSHIP PKG. $300 Annually Includes A A M M L Y Y M A A A M M M I L L L Y Y M A A A M M M I L Y Y M I L Y F A F A F F A A F F A A A A M M M M L M M I I I I L L L L L Y Y L Y Y M M SOCIAL SOCIAL GOLF MEMBERSHIPS* JOIN NOW for BEST RATES Individual $1,200 Annually GOLF MEMBERSHIPS* JOIN NOW for BEST RATES Individual $1,200 Annually