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news ews The Wakulla The Wakulla Public Notices ..........................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ................................................Pages 4-5 Church ......................................................................Page 6 Obituaries ................................................................Page 7 Community ..........................................................Pages 8-9 Water Ways ............................................................Page 10 Street Beat .............................................................Page 11 Sheriffs Report ......................................................Page 12 Senior Citizens News ..............................................Page 14 Weekly Roundup ....................................................Page 15 Week in Wakulla ....................................................Page 16 Classi eds ..............................................................Page 17 Legal Notices .........................................................Page 17 Comics ...................................................................Page 20 Battle of the Bands photos .....................................Page 21 Natural Wakulla ......................................................Page 22INDEX OBITUARIES Luther Niles Kilgore Jr. F.H. Tommy Thomason Christmas in July One Section One Section 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailyOur 119th Year, 31st Issue Thursday, July 31, 2014Wakullas economy appears to be slowly picking up TCC pulls Cherokee Sink plansBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netWhile the real estate market in Wakulla County drags itself from the grip of the worst national economic situation since the Great Depression, local of cials are reporting small strides forward, and area realtors are seeing glimmers of hope. It will be a few more years before the county sees signi cant economic growth in the real estate market, but with an increase of permits pulled for single family dwellings and commercial construction, Building Department Director James Melvin says things are looking up. From 2010 to 2013, permits pulled for new construction of single family homes stayed the same; exactly the same at 51 permits per year. But there was a jump in the 2013/2014 scal year to 78 permits pulled. And were not finished with the year, Melvin said. But at least 12 of them, maybe more, have been with grant money to build a low income person a new house. So youre down to 66. Yeah, its an improvement, but it skews the number, because its not real money for the private sector to do investments and buy homes. Its government money. But 66 permits for new home construction is not anything to scoff at. At 66, this is still 14 better than the three previous years, he said. Commercial permitting is a better economic indicator, Melvin said. With residential construction, investors are anticipating what homebuyers might do and want in the next year or two. But commercial developers carefully plan construction based on longer term economic projections and feasibility. They ask, Is the market going to support this? especially when its a national chain, rather than somebody local who thinks its going to y, Melvin said. For commercial permits, the recessions chokehold is loosening, though the numbers arent stellar. Zero permits for out-of-the-ground construction of new commercial properties were pulled in 2010. Permit applications jumped to five in 2011, but then dropped to only one last year. Now just passed the halfway point for fiscal year 2013-14, commercial construction permits are back up to five. Recent permits include those for Zaxbys and Dollar General, and governmental permits for the Community Center and Sheriffs Annex.Turn to Page 7 By JENNY ODOMOf The Wakulla NewsLast week Tallahassee Community College withdrew plans proposing a 50-year lease within Wakulla Springs State Park that would utilize 1,850 acres at Cherokee Sink. The plan called for the restoration of the land and sink, plus 60 family camping sites, which included spaces for tents, RVs, pop-ups, and yurts. The goal was to create a land management training center within the Wakulla Environmental Institute to train park rangers. Technically we have withdrawn the request, but no way is it gone, said Bob Ballard, director of WEI. Its just on hold. Weve simply hit the pause button. In an outcry from citizens concerned about the environmental impact on the sensitive ecosystem of Wakulla Springs, Ballard said he and TCC President Jim Murdaugh, are trying to digest what the community wants. We pride ourselves in listening to the community. We want to be part of the community, said Ballard, who previously held the position of Deputy Secretary for Land and Recreation for Department of Environmental Protection. When people call it an RV campground, thats not really right, said Ballard. We are looking to make this an international destination, said Ballard. We need places for people to stay, things for people to do. When we listened to the public, what we heard that they want is to help protect the environment, and they want good quality jobs. he continued. What were going to do is to teach about the environment, and train the next generation of land managers. Heres the thing, said Ballard, I met with the director of Florida Park Service and he said you can get more done through TCC, with the opportunity to acquire grant money. He told me wed love to restore Cherokee Sink, but we dont have the funding to do that. Turn to Page 2 LYNDA KINSEYCrews working last week on a new dollar store in Crawfordville. Technically we have withdrawn the request, but no way is it gone. Its just on hold. Weve simply hit the pause button. Bob Ballard, WEI director Christmas in July e Wakulla Senior Center was packed with holiday revelers, including old Saint Nick himself, for the annual Christmas in July fundraiser, held Wednesday, July 23. See more photos on Page 14. BATTLE OF THE BANDS BATTLE OF THE BANDSSee Page 21 See Page 2 Riversink teacher studies climate change in French Alps

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From Front PageJim Stevenson, with Wakulla Springs Basin Working Group, wrote: This project would have taken 2,000 acres of the state park that has been managed by experienced park service land managers for 14 years, developed an unneeded RV campground even though two public, underutilized campgrounds are just 20 minutes away, risked contamination of Wakulla Spring from an extensive sewer system which would have negated the reason the Governor and Cabinet acquired this property which cost over $5 million to protect the caves and water flowing to the spring. Stevenson, a retired DEP senior biologist, and Ballard met prior to a public meeting regarding the plan that was held on July 17 at Woodville Public Library. We made a list of things we must have for him (Stevenson) to agree to this project, said Ballard. We had a compromise. But then I got an email right before the meeting that explained he had changed his mind. At the last second, he reneged. Stevenson confirmed that he and Ballard had met twice to create a list of compromises, but in the end he did not feel the plan was right. The more I learned about it, I determined that I could not support it, said Stevenson. Sewer lines sound great for the most part, but this would be a maze of lines, with over 100 joints, and any breaks would send raw sewage into the water that ows to the springs, he added. My bottom line is protecting the springs and protecting State Parks, he said. If its going to hurt the springs or the State Park, I wont support it. It appears that if TCC truly wants to be part of the community it will learn that not everyone follows the Chamber of Commerce arguments, particularly if those are so blatantly off base as to cause alarm, said Madeleine Carr, Friends of Wakulla Springs and local historian. I invite all citizens to inquire for themselves why certain areas are called conservation land. Wakulla County has a precious resource to protect, she said. It is its fresh water. Wakulla Springs State Park provides healthy buffers to protect our ground water. Anything that imperils that, such as a college campus built on conservation land, would be contrary to its intended use as envisioned by our legislature. We dont see people who speak out against the plan as negative, we see them as allies, said Ballard. Were on the same side. Were looking at the whole county to see what makes the most sense, he said. It is not necessarily going to happen at Cherokee Sink, but its still an option. Wouldnt it be nice if your kids could grow up and could get a good job right here, said Ballard. Our community welcomes TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, said Carr. It will be a very good addition to Wakulla County based on its initial idea to provide training to students interested in a sustainable future. Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comRiversink teacher participates in Alpine studySpecial to The NewsKatrina Roddenberry, a fth grade teacher at Riversink Elementary joined an Earthwatch research team for a sevenday expedition in the French Alps to help scientists understand how the Alpine regions inhabitants are affected by climate change. Roddenberry was a part of Earthwatchs Teach Earth USA Fellowship Program. Educator fellowships are awarded through a competitive application process, including review by the Earthwatch Review Panel, composed of past fellows from around the country. From June 22 to June 28, Roddenberry joined three other Earthwatch volunteers and a team of scientists for the Of Mountains and Marmots: Climate Change in the French Alps project. The research team was led by Dr. Aurelie Cohas of the University Claude Bernard Lyon 1. Roddenberry joined researchers in the breathtaking La Grande Sassire Nature Reserve as they monitored the marmot population theyve been working with for over 20 years. The amazing experiences I have gained from this project are extremely valuable to me as a teacher. I cannot wait to share all that I have learned and experienced with my students. It is my hope to inspire in them a greater appreciation for the natural world and the thrill of learning, said Katrina Roddenberry. The Earthwatch fellows baited traps using dandelions, observed marmots and searched for marmot pups to record their emergence date and litter size, and completed lab work by processing biological samples. Seeing the first marmot pups of the season emerge from their burrow was an exhilarating experience! said Roddenberry. After days of careful observations and waiting, we were rewarded with the most adorable pups you can imagine. The wait was well worth it! Researchers know that climate has a huge impact on the breeding and survival rates of wild animals: it can mean the difference between a species thriving or going extinct. Its critical to understand how these marmots will respond to climate change, not just because they are so important to the natural world of the French Alps, but also because Alpine regions feel the effects of climate change before many other environments. By investigating this key species, researchers hope to learn more about how all living species may respond to this major global shift. Earthwatch is an international environmental nonprofit whose mission is to engage people worldwide in scientific field research and education to promote the understanding and action necessary for a sustainable environment.TCC pulls Cherokee Sink plans PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKatrina Roddenberry, above and right, joined a week-long scienti c expedition in the French Alps to study the effects of climate change. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 3 Please Recycle PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News willprovide this Public Notice Section in our A-sectionforall Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section ofthe newspaper. POLLS OPEN 7 A.M. 7 P.M. SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 1 (Vote for One) GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR (Vote for One) GOVERNOR AND LT. GOVERNOR (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 3 (Vote for One) COUNTY COMMISSIONER DISTRICT 4 (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 1 (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 1 (Vote for One) ATTORNEY GENERAL (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 3 (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 3 (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 5 (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 5 (Vote for One) SCHOOL BOARD DISTRICT 5 (Vote for One) Verna L. S. Brock Ray Gray Yinka Abosede AdeshinaNot Yet DesignatedElizabeth Cuevas-NeunderNot Yet DesignatedRick ScottNot Yet DesignatedCharlie CristNot Yet DesignatedNan H. RichNot Yet DesignatedRebecca S. Becky Cook Chris Russell Steve Fults Jerry Moore Verna L. S. Brock Ray Gray Verna L. S. Brock Ray Gray George Sheldon Perry E. Thurston Rebecca S. Becky Cook Chris Russell Rebecca S. Becky Cook Chris Russell Jo Ann Daniels Donna Savary Jo Ann Daniels Donna Savary Jo Ann Daniels Donna Savary LENDING DISCRIMINATION WASNOTWHAT IWASEXPECTINGIfyouarequaliedforamortgage,butthelender deniestheloanbecauseyouareonmaternity leavethat'saviolationoftheFairHousingAct. Ifyoususpectyouareavictimoflending discrimination,pleasereportit.www.HUD.gov1-800-669-9777(voice)1-800-927-9275(TTY) ApublicservicemessagefromtheU.S.DepartmentofHousingandUrbanDevelopmentinpartnershipwiththe NationalFairHousingAlliance.ThefederalFairHousingActprohibitsdiscriminationbecauseofrace,color,religion, nationalorigin,sex,familystatusordisability.Formoreinformation,visit www.hud.gov/fairhousing. 2014 PRIMARY ELECTION TESTING NOTICE : Wednesday, August 13, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. Saturday, August 16, thru Saturday, August 23, 2014 from 8:00 am 6:00 p.m. Monday, August 25, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. Tuesday, August 26, 2014 at 5:00 p.m.Friday, September 5, 2014 at 1:00 p.m.www.wakullaelection.comThe Wakulla County Canvassing Board will meet in the Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections Ofce at 3115-B Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida on the following dates. All candidates, citizens and press is invited to attend.Henry F. Wells Buddy & Team Members The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Interested parties may inspect ordinance at 788 Port Leon Drive and be heard at the meeting. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224JULY 31, 2014 City of Sopchoppy Notice of Public MeetingThe City of Sopchoppy Depot Committee is holding a Public Meeting Thursday, August 14, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. The purpose of this meeting is for general planning purposes and will be held at the Sopchoppy Depot, 34 Rose Street, Sopchoppy, FLPersons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the City of Sopchoppy at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850)962-4611.JULY 31, 2104NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGA copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.comJULY 31, 2014 The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on August 18, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider:

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Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNING NR Most popular stories online: Worker rescued from Talquin Electric communication tower in Crawfordville Underwater Wakulla July 24, 2014 Sheriffs Report July 24, 2014 New veterans service officer is settling in Take a book, leave a book at the Little Free Library Wakulla schools get high rank for Bang for buck 4-year-old found drowned in family poolthewakullanews.com Candidate forum to be held for school board racesSenior Center is a godsend to WakullaSenior Center a blessed place to spend a day Follow us onThe Wakulla News will be joining with the local Republican and Democrat parties for a candidate forum prior to the primary election. The three school board races will all be decided in the primary, and the six candidates in those races have been invited to answer questions. Also, the two Republican candidates for county commission in the District 4 race, Jerry Moore and Steve Fults, have been invited to give a short statement on their positions. The event will be held on Thursday, Aug. 14 at the public library. Doors will open at 6:30 p.m. The two commission candidates are scheduled to speak at 7 p.m. The GOP county commission candidates will only make short statements they will not be taking questions. The forum with the school board candidates is scheduled to start at 7:30 p.m. The same questions will be posed to each of the six candidates, who are: DISTRICT 1 Verna Brock Ray Gray DISTRICT 3 Becky Cook Chris Russell DISTRICT 5 Jo Ann Daniels Donna Savary I will be moderator at the forum, and will be joined by representatives from the local parties. Do you have a question you would like to pose to the candidates? You can email it to me at editor@thewakullanews.net, or drop it off at The News of ce. And come out an join us on Aug. 14 to get informed about your local candidates. Early voting starts a couple of days later on Aug. 16 before election day on Aug. 26.William Snowden is editor at The Wakulla News. READERS WRITE: Editor, The News: Once upon a time I lived in a fairly large city (86,000 pop.) and the mayor of this city always made a point of stressing the importance of volunteerism. He encouraged it, he rewarded it and he respected it. He knew that no government funded program could truly succeed without the warmth and compassion of those who believed in it. And in his mind no one could better embrace these qualities than those who were willing to work out of love rather than for a paycheck? Yet even in that environment, the spirit of giving was not present in the same way as it is in Wakulla County. There is no shortage of volunteer possibilities in Wakulla including the church, Volunteer Fire Departments, Operation Santa, St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, Friends of Wakulla Springs, the public library, the public schools, and coaching. But no one organization demonstrates the giving heart of the volunteer better than the Wakulla Senior Center. It is truly amazing to watch the seamless melding of staff and volunteer as they work together. I feel so privileged to have been a small part of this years Christmas in July. It was an eye opener. If only everyone in the county would experience that same sense of inclusion and participation! The Senior Citizen staff, from Director Maurice Langston to Shelly Homan and the other employees, willingly embrace the help of volunteers. Perhaps this is part of the secret to the centers success in that jobs are not found for the volunteers but rather the volunteers are needed for the jobs. While the centers Angels always turn out when they are needed, the Friendraising Committee also works tirelessly to supplement the centers much stretched budget. And all of this is done for only one reason: to bene t Wakullas senior community. Christmas in July exempli es the results. Beginning months in advance the Friendraising Committee, under the dual leadership of both staff and such dedicated volunteers as Virginia Moore, Becky Black and many others, begin to plan the event. Sponsorships and donations are sought, entertainment is planned this years incredible entertainment was under the direction of Jerry Evans and tickets are sold. Wendy and Glenda at the Senior kitchen plan a menu, Carolyn Lambert lends her creative talent to the silent auction (this year 102 items), Jerilyn Cooper seeks raf e items, and every person, paid or volunteer, pitches in on the day of the event. Raising needed dollars for even a program as valued and necessary as mealson-wheels can be time consuming and stressful. However, through generous contributions by the community, hard work on the part of the Senior Citizen staff and especially through the efforts of dozens of people who believe that giving of their own time and talent is both worthwhile and rewarding the senior center and their Christmas in July event exemplify the very word Christmas. And it is fun from beginning to end. Cynthia Webster CrawfordvilleHoliday spirit displayed at Christmas in JulyEditor, The News:Thanks for the article Local Landmarks Rust in Peace last week. I remember in the late 1990s when Homer and his family members were rounding up the vehicles that had been used in the familys farming, forestry and ranching activities. Homer Harvey was proud of each vehicle and would tell the story of its use but Pat called me to say the county was telling them they had to move the cars as the scene was a distractive nuisance. We were quite outraged at such a description! Im sure Homer must have had friends to weigh-in on the matter and now the old cars may be visited almost as much as the Lighthouse! I met with Homer several times to get the stories of his life as a farmer, rancher, forester and builder he really could be called a jack of all trades! I am proud now that he, his family and cars are remembered and that Jo Ann Palmer with Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and those Whole Foods employees who stepped forward with strong arms, backs and willing hearts made such a project possible. Before closing, I would like to thank The News for printing the articles written by our friend and Wakulla County Historical Society member John Roberts, whose childhood memories include many wonderful stories of Wakulla County, its Lighthouse and the last Keepers family to live in the Lighthouse. Thanks, too, for the story of Ernest Toole, local musician who writes and sings Floridas history. The Wakulla County Historical Societys Museum, located behind the Court House has books and music pertaining to local history. Stop by to see us! Betty Green CrawfordvilleEnjoyed story on Harvey cars William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.netEditor, The News: This is in reference to the article July 17, 2014, about the Wakulla Senior Center. The lady obviously does not attend the Wakulla Senior Center. The Executive Director and his Team are the best and they go way beyond their jobs to make sure our seniors are taken care of. If this lady attended the center she would know why sometimes the seniors are taken home early such as bad storms, oors being replaced and waxed, functions going on that the dining room has to be set up for a function in the evening, maintenance problems, holiday weekend s when the seniors want to go home early to be with their families, and last but de nitely not least, fundraisers for our seniors. If a person was to ask a senior that does attend the Senior Center he or she would say that this senior center is a fun place to be. Art classes, beading, card games, dominoes, bingo, brain gym, beginners line dancing, advanced line dancing, water colors, mingling with other people 60 and above, gardening, drumming circle with Kent Hutchins, owner of Harmony Rhythm, making new friends and having a hot cooked meal every day. We have volunteers who deliver over a hundred Meals-on-Wheels every week. Most of the activities listed above are shared with the seniors in the morning between 9 a.m. and noon as lunch is served at 12. Bingo, dancing, some beading classes and art classes are also done after lunch. Seniors who ride the Wakulla Transportation vehicle go home at 1:30 p.m. We have so much fun here that people come here from Tallahassee, Carrabelle and Woodville. So guess what? The Wakulla County Senior Center does bridge the gaps created by retirement, physical changes, and death of a spouse. The Wakulla Senior Center does present stimulating activities and educational ideas all the time. Maybe you should bring your great ideas that you have to the Senior Center and enjoy what other seniors have come to enjoy every day here. Where our seniors of Wakulla County are concerned, OUR OUTSTRETCHED HAND is NOT tired and well-worn. Yes, I work at the Senior Center in Transportation. I love the seniors, my job and the people I work with. This center is such a godsend to all people of Wakulla County and Im very proud to be a part of it. Sheryl Mattison Wakulla County Transportation Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News: Having worked at the Wakulla Senior Center from 1984 to 2013, I witnessed rsthand the changes that have taken place and they are all positive. Did the writer ask a staff member what happened on the day in question? I now live in Georgia and I keep up with the activities on the Facebook page and the pictures and stories indicate a full and active center. Volunteers, suggestions and ideas are always welcome. Please dont judge what you are not daily involved in. Go and talk to the seniors who are there and ask them how they feel about the Senior Center. I believe that you will be pleasantly surprised at the positive attitudes and do follow the website and Facebook. Wakulla Senior Center is a blessed place to spend the day. Diane Lanter Blakely, Ga. Homer Harvey with his cars that are Homer Harvey with his cars that are a local landmark. a local landmark.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 5readers speak out More OpinionsBy HENRY BUDDY WELLSWakulla Elections SupervisorCan you believe it is election time once again? In fact, voters will begin casting their votes in the fastapproaching 2014 Primary election on Aug. 26. Voters can cast a ballot by mail, by voting early or going to the polls on Election Day. Absentee ballots can be requested at anytime up to six days before the election, then you will be able to pick up your ballot until the day before election day. Early voting will take place here in the Supervisor of Elections of ce at 3115-B Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville beginning Saturday, Aug. 16, through Aug. 23 from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. IT IS IMPORTANT TO GET OUT AND VOTE! The primary elections (state-wide) are not viewed as an important time to get out and cast your vote but remember that all elections are important. This primary, as well as all primaries, most likely will determine the outcome of the three local school board races. With only two candidates in each race the likelihood of one not getting 50 +1 percent is slim. Wakulla County boasts one of the highest voter-turnout rates in the state. Our primary elections often have turnout rates in the 30 percent range. In 2010 primary voter turnout was 37.8 percent while the turnout for the general election was 62.9 percent which was a good turnout, but I know we can do better in 2014. In 2012 primary we had 32.4 percent turnout and a wonderful 79 percent turnout for the general. Our team at Wakulla County Elections is aiming to push those numbers to even greater heights this year. As passionate and informed as Wakulla County residents remain on a daily basis, theres really no reason why our smallbut-mighty county cant rise to Floridas No. 1 participant in civic involvement. A well-deserved THANK YOU to all our election team members for once again serving our voters with courtesy and ef ciency in the upcoming election cycle. We could not complete an election without the great help of all our team members that work long hours while devoting to the civic duty we all have. Thank you again for your service. Thank you for taking the time to engage in the upcoming democratic process. We are counting on youTAKE THE TIME TO VOTE! Buddy Wells is Wakulla Supervisor of Elections. Editor, The News: I write this letter to encourage all registered voters, Democrats and Republicans, to turn out and vote in the primary election that happens on Aug. 26. All non-partisan school board races will be decided then, and the outcomes could have long term consequences on the taxes we all pay. If you cannot make it to the polls on election day, please request an absentee ballot from the Supervisor or Elections, or participate in the early vote scheduled for August 16-23. With the governors race being decided later, it might be easy to forget the August primary. Please dont make that mistake. Your money could well be at risk. Last year a little-advertised, low turn-out special election increased everyones property taxes. The school board, which already consumed half or more of the property taxes you pay each year, stuck its hand even deeper in your pocket to plug holes in its budget. If you kept it, pull out your property tax bill from last year or pull it up on the Tax Collectors website. The tax hike is identi ed as school voter approved. Low awareness led to low voter turn-out in that election. This let the school administration get its new tax passed by a vote of 1,083 to 1,066. Only 5.8 percent of Wakullas eligible voters approved of this bail-out package for which we are all now paying. The 17-vote margin of passage represents less than one-tenth of one percent of this countys registered voters. While it is now too late to undo the tax, we have a chance to make sure that nothing of the sort slips past us again. We can elect a school board candidate who has not been part of our tax-and-spend school administration that appears to mentor this lack of accountability before transferring the reigns of authority to the next group of hand-picked successors. Donna Savary believes that, just as every child counts, so too should every dollar count. Donna has promised that she will conduct the school boards business in the open, even when others in the administration might seek to keep things quiet. I trust that she will keep that promise. Take a look at Donnas website, www.savaryforschoolboard.com, for more information about her experience, credentials, and reasons for running. Again, this important race will be decided on Aug. 26. As for me, Donna Savary has my vote. I encourage you to support her as well. Respectfully, Greg Gibson Crawfordville Editor, The News: Dear people of Wakulla, The election season is soon upon us and there are many different candidates to choose from. They are all good people who care very deeply about Wakulla County. However, there is one person that is a cut above the rest. This person is Mrs. Jo Ann Daniels. She is currently running for the position of School Board. In my opinion she is the best person for the job. The first reason I think she is the right person for the job is because she was always there to help me as a teacher. I grew up in Wakulla County and am a product of its school system. As a child I can always remember Mrs. Daniels at school: she always had a smile on her face and was in a very good mood. She would be more than happy to help me with schoolwork. She was also there when I needed help getting along with the other children. School is never easy for any child. They have to learn the necessary skills of how to survive in this world, ot just mathematics, algebra and English, but how to get along with other people. One teacher can make all the difference in a childs succeeding. Mrs. Daniels was one of those teachers for me. I now find myself running Gulf Specimen Marine Lab which is a marine environmental education center. As the school buses arrive and the children get ready for their eld trip. I can only hope to inspire these children as Jo Ann Daniels did for me. The second reason I think Mrs. Daniels is the right person for the job is because of her work with the Sea Mobile, which is our aquariums mobile exhibit which is equipped with touch tanks, aquariums and microscopes that was built three years ago. It travels to public and private schools and over 30,000 children have gone through it in the past year alone. We educate them about marine environments ways to protect them and steps they can do to help save them. This program would not have been possible without Mrs Daniels. She worked incredibly hard to make sure that the Sea Mobile was a success, helping our biologists build lesson plans and incorporating the Florida Sunshine State Standards so they could be part of the schools curricula. She enabled our staff in understanding how the Florida schools systems worked, and thus made our program a success. With her assistance, we were able to get a grant that brought the mobile exhibit to all the Wakulla schools for free. As a grown-up I nd myself looking back at my past as a child. This wonderful teacher and educator was always there for me. I know she will be there for your children in this county school system. So make sure that your kids are getting the best education possible by voting for Jo Ann Daniels for School Board. Cypress Rudloe PanaceaEditor, The News: The Wakulla Environmental Institute will become Wakullas largest employer. They will promote Wakulla County nationally and internationally. They will hire your children and your grandchildren in years to come. But the CAVE people (Citizens Against Virtually Everything) object to almost everything TCC is trying to do. Monday night at the Board of County Commissioners meeting four of the commissioners defended the right of Wakulla citizens to use their property without additional restrictions and the taking of their property. Now, the same group of CAVE people are trying to block the Wakulla Environmental Institute plan to lease 2000 acres of land from the State Parks of Florida to use as an environmental teaching laboratory. Ladies and gentleman there is no compromise with the Wakulla Springs Alliance group. They are generally the same people who want to take your land to buffer the wetlands around a buffer that already exists. The State of Florida previously wanted a horse park on the property and relented to pressure by the springs group. Currently the Wakulla Environmental Institute compromised: 1. There will be no facility for horses. 2. The State of Florida previously wanted a 160 space RV campground. The Institute compromised for only a 60 space RV campground. 3. The Institute compromised with the number of parking spaces at Cherokee Sink and if you can believe only 30 parking spaces at Cherokee Sink swimming hole. Thousands of Wakulla children have used this sink for swimming for over a hundred years. You may as well close the sink if you only allow 30 spaces, which is exactly what the springs group would like to do? If all the facilities requested were approved it would occupy less than 20 acres out of 2000, or to be more precise less than one percent of the 2000 acres. The Wakulla Springs group will not compromise on any issue. It is always my way or the highway. When Wakulla Springs had the opportunity to join a very successful reservation system that increased reservations of the Florida State Parks from 14 million to 22 million visitors over a three year period, guess what, the springs group chose not to participate. I can imagine that sometime in the future there will be an effort to reduce the number of people who swim at the State Park along with at the same time to require all swimmers to wear DIAPERS to reduce the nitrogen the springs group says contributes to the detriment of the springs. As your commissioner I will defend Wakulla Environmental Institute, I will defend your property rights from the PhDs, the wealthy, and the radical environmentalists who are almost all from out of town, with the idea I have mine and lets keep everyone else out. Thanks for your time. Commissioner Jerry Moore District 4 Wakulla County Editor, The News: When I was growing up, Cherokee Sink was one of my favorite places to spend a summer day. The jadegreen water promised hours of fun for me, my friends and my family. It was a local paradise for kids of all ages even those who had grown up but were still young at heart. Its been years since anyones gotten to feel that. The Sink has been closed to swimmers since 2009 due to neglect, and a lack of funding to restore its beauty. Bacteria and garbage clogged the Sink unusable for swimming. Now I have children of my own and theyre the most important part of my life, and I want them to have every opportunity in the world. Swimming in the Cherokee Sink may seem small or even silly compared to other privileges, but they deserve the chance to make those memories just as I had it. Tallahassee Community College and the Wakulla Environmental Institute are doing their part to make that happen. The building of a campground at Cherokee Sink is just one part of the WEIs plan to restore the Sinks natural beauty. The Florida Park Service understands this and will ensure that TCC and the WEI act according to their regulations. This plan will bring money into the county and encourage people to come see what our parks have to offer. But to me this issue is about bringing back a part of our history that weve lost and making our area a better place for our children and the generations to come. I still remember the rush of jumping off the rocks at the edge of the spring, of swimming to the surface, of floating on my back and staring up past the towering trees into the summer sky. With our support, TCC and the WEI will make it possible for my kids all of our kids, and all of us grown-ups who still remember what it feels like to be a kid to experience that joy once more. Matthew Hodges matthodges86@yahoo.comPlease vote in the upcoming primary election Commissioner Moore on WEI proposal Concerns about WEIs plans Behind Donna Savary for school board Behind Jo Ann Daniels for school board Our kids deserve to make memories tooMORE READERS WRITE:Editor, The News: I am writing to express concern about the proposal the TCC Wakulla Environmental Institute made to sublease 2,000 acres of the Cherokee Sink area to develop a campground. While the theory of this campground sounds wonderful for the county because it would attract more eco-tourism, generate more money in the county and provide fun outdoor activities for children and families, the risks to this sensitive environment far outweigh the bene ts. Cherokee Sink is across the street from the well-known Wakulla Springs State park, which already attracts many tourists to the area. Because this area is such an important watershed it is more important that citizens of Wakulla County ght to protect and conserve this area rather than exploit it for recreation purposes. Developing this area not only threatens the animal habitats in the area but with a sink that serves as a window directly to the aquifer, it poses a threat to the underwater system that connects to Wakulla Springs and our water supply. Water pollution is a serious problem in the county as is and allowing more opportunity for pollution to enter our waters is irresponsible. It is our responsibility to ensure we do everything in our power to protect and restore our environmental surroundings. Sara Glavey Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 7 Luther Niles Kilgore Jr., 80, of Sopchoppy, went to be with the Lord on July 21, 2014, after complications from a stroke. He is survived by his loving wife of 63 years, Carolyn Kilgore. He is also survived by two daughters: Shirley Lawhon of Crawfordville, and Louise Cooper of Slocomb, Ala.; two sons: James Jimmy Kilgore of Perry, and Darrell Beaver Kilgore of Tampa; ve grandkids: Melanie Harrell, Dawn Morgan, Amy Kilgore, Ron Kilgore and Darrell Kilgore Jr.; 24 greatgrandkids and 10 great-great grandkids; and devoted family friends, Pat Harvey and Chuck and Kathy Duncan. He was predeceased by his sons, Ronnie Kilgore and Michael Niles Kilgore; a grandson, Jason S. Harrell; sons-inlaw, Aubrey Lawhon and Ernse Cooper; granddaughters, Carolyn Elizabeth Kilgore and Savanaha Brooke Harrell; parents, Luther N. Kilgore Sr. and Cora Bell Morris Kilgore; and two sisters, Jewel Alta Crum and Mable Lanell Milligan. Visitation was held Friday, July 25, 2014 from 11 a.m. to 12 noon at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held Friday, July 25, 2014 at 12 noon at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Burial followed at Lake Ellen Cemetery. David Conn and Amber Miller of Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel are assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com). F.H.Tommy Thomason passed away on July 22, 2014, in Crawfordville. He was born in Columbus, Ga., and had resided in Wakulla County since 1974. He was a member of Ivan Assembly of God Church in Crawfordville. Tommy served in the U.S. Navy from 1943 to 1945. He was a retired Plastering Contractor and also worked with Florida State University Housing Department. He was predeceased by his parents, John and Willie Ethel Thomason; his wife, Catherine Thomason; children, Francis Harrison Thomason Jr. and Theresa Ann Somerset. He is survived by his four daughters, Jan (Tommy) Brown, Cathy (Charles) Powers, Joetta (Ronald) Reeves, Cristy (Jon) Rivers; sister, Barbara Ann Meconi; 16 grandchildren and 18 great-grandchildren. Services were held at 3 p.m. at Ivan Assembly of God Church in Crawfordville on Friday, July 25, 2014. The family received friends one hour prior to the service. Burial was held at 5 p.m. at Oakland Cemetery in Tallahassee on Friday following the service. David Conn and Amber Miller of Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel are assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com).Obituaries Luther Niles Kilgore Jr. F.H. Tommy Thomason Luther N. Kilgore Jr. F.H. Tommy Thomason By TRACY RENEE LEEToday started out as many do for a funeral director working with broken families, sadly and tragically. Add to this scenario, the loss of a child, and you potentially have a volatile situation on your hands. When I decided to become a funeral director, I did not realize there might come a day I would fear for my life in my own residence, but today was that day. The point is that when life has been lost, emotions are severely heightened; hearts are lled with despair, and anger is uncontrollably prevalent. Today was not the rst time I have been nervous about my safety. It was, however, the rst day I feared mortal injury. A grieving giant stood before me, suffering inconsolable agony and mad as a bull over wording in his grandsons obituary. This man suffered his longest and most dreaded nightmare. He had the core of his soul ripped from his aching arms, and there was not a thing he could do to stop it from happening. He will yearn forever the gentle touch of his grandsons hand, the sweet fragrance of his hair and the precious kiss so gently placed on his angelic cheek. Once he is calm and potentially years from now, he will realize that he has been blessed more than others, who have suffered the loss of a child. He does not understand it now, but his blessing was his advanced knowledge that his grandson would pass away from a rare and dreadful disease. Although it is unfair that a child should suffer such a disease and that a family must witness the ravages and loss of their child, he had forewarning that his grandson would prematurely slip from his loving grasp. I would never want to change places with this grandfather. I cannot imagine the pain and anguish this heartbroken man, who lost his beloved grandson last night, along with all of their future experiences together, is suffering. My prayers go out to this family. I hope that the pain they suffer will become happy memories of this beloved child, as soon as possible. Tonight friends and family will gather to offer condolences and words of comfort, and preachers will offer words of inspiration. I know that everyone coming tonight is searching today for words of comfort to share with this poor family. I am searching myself for some way to help them through this dreadful experience. My best advice would be to allow them to mourn and recover on their own schedule. Offer to be there and support them throughout the coming months which may turn into years, as they work their way from death, back to living. Never become impatient with their sorrow, never abandon them and always provide a path of gentle reacclamation back to friendship and social acquaintance. This sorrowful grandpa, so tall in stature and powerful in voice, has been crushed by the fate of death within his family. As we experience the services honoring his beloved grandson over the next few days, I hope that I will be able to protect him from unintended offenses from others and even myself. Nevertheless, if he is overcome with anger and frustration, who wouldnt understand and give him a little latitude. I would rather be intimidated and frightened any day, than walk a mile in his heavy-laden and mournful shoes.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushin-up-daisies. blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www. QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Funeral director fears for her life BEREAVEMENT COLUMN From Front PageBut before permits are pulled for subdivisions or major development, builders have to get the ball rolling at the Planning and Zoning Department. I think theres been a slight increase, Planning and Zoning Director Luis Serna said. Were not at the bottom anymore, which is good. Its not a major increase, but its steady. Land values are where thats really re ected. Donnie Sparkman, county property appraiser, said the local economy is close to the bottom when looking at local land values. In some areas, you see two sales that go up, and three that go down, Sparkman said. But the margin between the two is close, which tells me we are getting close to where were going to be. The amount of drop is much smaller than what it was maybe two or three years ago. I think we will probably hit bottom this year. But, I dont know how long were going to stay there. Sparkman said Wakulla County really needs more than 100 new houses a year to generate an increase, and right now we are not seeing that. I think in we had 90-something-million in new construction in the county, Sparkman said of the real estate boom of the mid-2000s, before that bubble burst. Last year, we had $7 million. This year were $12 million, so weve come up $5 million. During the real estate boom, Sparkman said many spec houses were built, but investors were left holding the bag when the market crashed. Many of those homes were foreclosed. Everything got out of whack and upside down, Sparkman said. For a county of our size, we have a good number of sales. But a lot of those are short sales and foreclosures. Those have hurt construction, because you can buy a house cheaper than you can build it. Sparkman said the countys economic prognosis is most clearly re ected in the tax rolls. We might get lucky and break even this year, but I think there will be a small de cit, he said. Were talking 1 to 2 percent max. Itll come back, but I think it will be a long, slow return. A lot of things have to fall in place, and I dont think it will ever be like it was. We might ounder around for a while, but were holding our own, just not moving forward very fast. Marsha Tucker, a broker and owner of Ocholockonee Bay Realty, said there are more buyers on coastal market now, because homes and land values are low. Maybe too low, especially for lots. Acreage has been hit the worst, Tucker said. There are so many lots on market. A person can nd short sale or foreclosure cheaper than they can build, and builders cannot compete. They had to readjust their prices. Tucker said back in the heyday of Wakulla Countys real estate market, the highest that ve acres sold was for $175,000. Today a five-acre track is in the 40s, Tucker said. The acreage tracks inland have almost rolled back to 1994 prices. Tucker has been in the business almost 20 years. She said the real estate market was the most dismal in 2009 and 2010. All day long the phones didnt ring, Tucker said. It was scary. But things are starting to turn around. Other realtors also said by looking at the real estate market, it would seem that the economy is starting to bounce back. Elaine Gary, a broker at Blue Water Realty, said they are still seeing a few foreclosures and short sales, but not as many as pervious years. I think the economy is stabilizing, and there is a little bit of an uptick, Gary said. We have been busy. Were swamped right now, thank you, Jesus! Gary said the local rental market is doing especially well. Realtor Shari Edington of Shell Point Realty said the rental market is strong because financing has gotten so tough for folks. In fact, she said, there are more potential renters than rental properties. Investors are coming in because prices are so low, buying and renting them out, Edington said. Joi Hope of Big Bend Realty said as a broker for 34 years, she has certainly seen ups and downs in the market. Things are absolutely getting better, Hope said. We are seeing multiple offers again on the same house. Hadnt seen that in long time. Most of that is happening on foreclosed properties, and we have been involved in several in the last months, and that only happens when the market is starting to recover. But foreclosure property prices are still causing problems, even though realtors are seeing more offers. A house that cost $104,000 a few years ago, today Im having trouble selling that same house at the same price, because the house across the street was foreclosed on, selling for $80,000. Hope differentiated between inland and coastal property markets. I would say were picking up more buyers for the coast than last year, Hope said. She said the $150,000 to $200,000 market is, moving pretty good. A flipping market, where investors buy a home, x it up and sell it for a profit of upwards of $15,000, will be the sign of a stronger economy. But were not there yet, Hope said. Thats a fantastic market. Sandy Lott, who specializes in residential real estate, sees the market for what it is after 28 years in the business. Lott said she saw the downturn on the horizon when builders and buyers were sitting pretty in the 2000s. Im a realist, Lott said. You can tell when it gets to the higher part of market, theres one way to go and thats down. I tried to warn people. Some investors listened; some didnt, and got themselves in trouble. In 2007 you could see it coming, so I went in traded in my Navigator (Lincoln SUV), because I knew things were coming, and needed to downsize. Lott said from where she sees it, Wakulla Countys real estate market is still struggling and will continue to flounder until the economic recovery catches up. Were usually the last to feel it, Lott said. The last to see recovery. It hasnt come back like we need it to, but its a whole lot better than it was. Though, Id like to see it a little better then it is right now. Once they do something with US 319, we might see a better economy. Lott said at least investors are purchasing foreclosures throughout the calendar year, unlike most homebuyers who typically sell, buy and move in the spring and summer months. Investors are claiming 50 percent of the market right now, she said. And they will buy year around, so we enjoy them year around. Wakullas economy appears to be slowly picking up Harvest Fellowship Church850-926-4798 Carlos Sarmiento and Elliot Perez hosts from Aug. 1st & 2nd at 7:00 P.M. Aug. 3rd at 10:30 A.M.

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Special to The NewsIn front of a packed audience of thousands at the Parker Playhouse in Fort Lauderdale, 70 statewide pageant titleholders competed to become Miss Florida USA 2015. The, live two-hour television event spotlighted its evening gown, swimsuit and interview portions. FAMU senior Nicole Bowden represented Wakulla County in the pageant. Though Bowden is from Leon County, the Big Bend region has ve titles, and Miss Wakulla County USA is one of them. Bowden is majoring in pre-physical therapy, and hopes to enroll in graduate school to get a Ph.D. in physical therapy. Ultimately I hope to use physical therapy to enhance the quality of life of others, particularly children, she said. When all of the judges votes were tallied, Miss Emerald Coast Ashleigh Lollie, 23, of Grand Ridge, Fla., was the winner. First Runner Up was Miss Central Florida Kailyn Perez, Second Runner Up was Miss Capital City USA Jessica Voight. Third Runner Up was Miss Orange County USA Lacey Morgan, and Fourth Runner Up was Miss Lake Eola USA Heather Martin. The Miss Florida USA pageant featured a record number of contestants, with 70 beauty queens competing for the title. The Pageant is the of cial quali er toward the Miss USA and Miss Universe pageants. The Pageant is open to females between the ages of 18-26 and who are U.S. citizens or residents of the state of Florida for at least six months. Bowden had encouragement for young women in the area who might consider entering a pageant. I feel responsible, with all that I have been afforded to show other young women that if you work hard, you can dream big, Bowden said. Ive dreamt along time about being in this moment. Its humbling to be amongst women from across our beautiful Florida who everyday are doing wonderful things in their community and that is a story I want to tell to every young woman who has hesitated to join in this pageant. They should understand that the Miss Florida USA pageant has individuals from all walks of life with many talents among its ranks, and they too can be in the number. Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsOn June 7, 2014, ladies and guests of R. Don McLeod 2469, United Daughters of the Confederacy, donned their red and white to celebrate the end of a wonderful year and beginning of a new one. Nearly forty members and guests enjoyed a delicious seafood luncheon catered by the Coastal Restaurant of Panacea to celebrate the induction of new of cers and receive their new Chapter pin. The Chapter pin depicts historical signi cance of our area and the Chapters namesake, Judge R. Don McLeod. Judge McLeod was a Confederate veteran and served as Wakulla County judge from 1901-1928. A special feature article will be forthcoming to share the history of his famous sh or fowl court case resulting in the eventual erection of the mullet weather vane on top of the old court house. At left, the 2014-2016 of cers of R. Don McLeod 2469, Florida Division UDC, with their Chapter pin. From left: Marsha Vance, Recorder of Military Service Awards; Jean McMillan, Vice President; Carolyn Harvey, Chaplain; Mary Ann Laird, Treasurer; Arlene Vause, 2nd Vice President. Row 2: Michelle Kirby, President; Tanya Lynn, Recording Secretary; Louise Thomas, Historian; Amy Carraway, 3rd Vice President. Not pictured Mary Anne Owens, Registrar.United Daughters of the Confederacy names o cers Cotes chosen for Congress of Future Medical LeadersSpecial to The NewsAlexandra Cotes is a 17-year-old senior and band member at Wakulla High School. She dreams of being a forensic pathologist and she was chosen to go to the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Washington, DC in November. She will be listening to Nobel Peace prize winners and other medical professionals speak about the leading medical research and also tell them stories of patients. They will also be taken to see a live surgery and much more which would be a great experience for her future career. The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research elds. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal. To donate toward her trip, visit: www.gofundme.com/b48bj0, e-mail rodriguezlesly@hotmail.com, or call 850-509-1393. Cotes was nominated by Dr. Connie Mariano, the Medical Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists or by high school teachers across the country based on a students academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the eld of medicine. Students attending must have a GPA of 3.5 or better (either cumulative or current). During the three-day Congress, Cotes will join other students from across the country and hear Nobel Laureates and National Medal of Science winners talk about leading medical research; be given advice from top medical school deans on what is to be expected in medical school; witness stories told by patients who are living medical miracles; be inspired by fellow teen medical science prodigies; and learn about cutting-edge advances and the future in medicine and medical technology. Bowden represents Wakulla at Miss Florida USA pageantSPECIAL TO THE NEWS The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com 000IQ3R REGISTRATION DATES: REGISTRATION TIMES: OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: REGISTRATION DEADLINE: REGISTRATION PLACE: 1. FLAG FOOTBALL: College Division AGES 5 and Pro Division AGES 80 COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD. Age determining date is 9/1/14. EXAMPLE: A participant must turn 5 before 9/1/14 to be eligible to participate. NO EXCEPTIONSWakulla County Youth Football & Cheerleading Association2. TACKLE FOOTBALL BANTAM DIVISION AGES 6 9. A player must turn 6 by 8/23/14 in order to be eligible to participate.PEE WEE DIVISION AGES 10 12. A player must turn 10 by 8/23/14 in order to be eligible to participate.COST FOR TACKLE FOOTBALL IS $85.00 PER CHILDAge determining date is 11/15/14.A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.3. TACKLE CHEERLEADING BANTAM DIVISION AGES 6 9A player must turn 6 by 8/23/14 in order to be eligible to participate.PEE WEE DIVISION AGES 10 12A player must turn 10 by 8/23/14 in order to be eligible to participate.COST FOR TACKLE CHEERLEADING IS $85.00 PER CHILD Age determining date is 11/15/14.A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.Anyone interested in coaching any of the youth sports are encouraged to contact the ofce. All volunteer coaches are required and subjected to a criminal history background check to ensure the safety of our youth participants.SATURDAY 8/16/14 and SATURDAY 8/23/14 8:00 am TO 12:00 NOON MONDAY 8/4/14 TO FRIDAY 8/22/14, 8AM 5PMSATURDAY 8/23/14, 12:00 PM MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US 98 WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT 2014 FALL SPORTS REGISTRATION For more information contact WCPRD at 926-7227 or visit our facebook page. -Wakulla County Parks and Recreation-

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Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Every moment in life can become a teachable moment. What seems like an ordinary event can become extraordinary when viewed with a slightly different perspective. That happened this weekend while visiting the Atlantic coast. While the St. Johns Ferry was crossing the river, two jet skis and two center console boats were heading directly toward the ferry. Maybe they were too caught up in having fun or were distracted by the large casino boat beginning to leave port, but for whatever reason, they were on a collision course for the ferry. Soon ve short blasts rang out from the ferry and almost immediately the four vessels changed course. This became the teachable moment. When asking children how come the ferry captain blew the horn five times, they were stumped. A casual discussion on sound signals followed and even drew the attention of one of the ferry boat workers. For the remainder of the crossing, sound signals, side thrusters and engines were the topics. Had the captain been less vigilant or the other vessel operators been unaware of what five short blasts meant, the ending could have been much different. Sound signals are a language when out on the water and critical to saving lives. A short blast usually lasts about a second, while a prolonged blast about four to six seconds. Common sound signals include, but are not limited to the following: One short blast I intend to change course to starboard (right). Two short blasts I intend to change course to port (left). Three short blasts I am operating a stern propulsion (backing up.) Five or more short and rapid blasts Danger or doubt signal (I dont understand your intent.) One prolonged blast is a warning signal (for example, used when coming around a blind bend or leaving the dock.) Would you like to learn more about becoming a safe boater? Flotilla 12 is holding class, About Safe Boating, on August 16, from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Agricultural Extension Center Room 3. The center is located at 84 Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. For information call Chuck Hickman, 850926-9262. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net then contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources, Raye Crews, at Rayec@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at Duanet@uscgaux.net. If youre interested in a free vessel examination, send an email to our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Vessel Examinations, Steve Hults, at Steveh@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident always keep your ears open. It saves lives.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COASTGUARD While visiting the ocean oor, a visit from a speci c sh is considered by many as a subtle sign of danger. That sh is the Remora, a long slender gray striped creature with a somewhat deformed head, which includes a sucker device to permit suction attachment to another creature (including humans). I have seen Remoras as large as adult Gag Grouper, but around here they are usually smaller. Why are they a sign of danger? Its because of the company they keep. Remoras swim and even attach to large sea creatures to be available when feeding occurs such that they can share in the meal. Animals with which they cohabit include manta and sting rays, whales, sharks and people. Lets start with the people. We appear to be predators more than capable of leaving scraps of sh when we spear sh. I often see Remoras move in and take bits from my sh, usually the parts that fall off on a messy kill. We also represent food opportunities. During one summer research project off Dog Island, Remoras attacked our ear lobes trying to get the obvious loose tissue hanging below the ear. We nally posted a diver with an air driven mini spear gun to chase them away. Even with that assistance, divers climbing back aboard the boat after their work, occasionally had Remoras attached to their back. When on the sea oor and especially when spear shing, the appearance of a Remora usually means the arrival of larger creatures to follow. While on my last trip out, I was alerted to a shark in the area shortly before it came up from down current in search of my catch. I was already on the lookout, and lifted up under the protection of my partners Shark Shield with no further concern for my safety. While I am seldom happy to see a Remora show up at the party, I must admit, they are better than the unannounced arrival of unwanted predators. I now consider them the Cattle Egret of our terrestrial ecosystem. On land a white bird either stands on top or slowly walks along side cattle as they forage in the eld. Insects that are displaced by the cattle are quickly seized by the bird, thus cementing the communal relationship. In 1974 I trained on a sheries two person tow sled, a rather large pipe frame with hydroplanes out front. A decade later we built another one (after the original was lost at sea) and after a few trials, labeled it the Remora. Our students noted that no matter where the tow vessel went, the Remora followed. Indeed, Remora do follow slower vessels like sail boats, so the name stuck. While we surveyed vast stretches of the ocean oor in support of BLM projects off Cedar Keys, all manner of creatures came up and swam in unison with our sled, including Remoras. We were particularly fascinated with porpoises that would swim in unison and touch their pectoral ns on the hydroplanes, perhaps a form of communication. And yes, the Remoras would routinely attach to us observers laying prone on the sleds frame as camera and collecting bags prevented us from swatting them away. Such was the life of a diving scientist.FWC Law Enforcement weekly report www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698This report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of July 18-July 24: WAKULLA COUNTY: While working the Cherokee Sink Tract of Wakulla Springs State Park, Of cer Marlow observed two vehicles parked on the west-side boundary and tracked several sets of foot tracks to an eight-foot fence that is posted No Trespassing. The tracks continued onto the other side and down to the sink. Of cer Marlow located 14 individuals at the sink. Officers Raker, Maynard and Anderson arrived to assist and 17 warnings and six citations were issued to the group ranging from Fee Evasion, Unlawful Entry, and Alcoholic Beverage Consumption. FRANKLIN COUNTY: Of cers Allen, Marlow, Stephens, Jones, Martin, Harrison, Anderson and Nelson were on a Boating Safety detail working the Apalachicola Bay Area. There were 52 vessels and 111 users checked resulting in eight citations and 35 warnings issued. This included a BUI arrest, and Medical Emergency assistance. Of cers Marlow and Jones were working Apalachicola River and observed a vessel operating upriver that drove up into the marsh. The vessel was observed still in forward gear with the operator slumped over the steering wheel and unresponsive. The operator showed signs of impairment and field sobriety tests were completed. The operator was arrested for BUI. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday yg Thu Jul 31, 14 Fri Aug 1, 14 Sat Aug 2, 14 Sun Aug 3, 14 Mon Aug 4, 14 Tue Aug 5, 14 Wed Aug 6, 14 Date 3.6 ft. 5:24 AM 3.6 ft. 5:51 AM High 1.0 ft. 11:26 AM 1.0 ft. 12:08 PM 0.8 ft. 12:05 AM 1.2 ft. 12:45 AM 1.5 ft. 1:35 AM 1.8 ft. 2:40 AM 1.9 ft. 4:00 AM Low 3.6 ft. 5:19 PM 3.4 ft. 6:03 PM 3.6 ft. 6:21 AM 3.5 ft. 6:58 AM 3.4 ft. 7:47 AM 3.4 ft. 8:54 AM 3.5 ft. 10:17 AM High 0.6 ft. 11:33 PM 1.0 ft. 12:59 PM 1.0 ft. 2:03 PM 0.9 ft. 3:23 PM 0.6 ft. 4:46 PM 0.3 ft. 5:58 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:58 PM 2.9 ft. 8:11 PM 2.8 ft. 9:46 PM 2.9 ft. 11:21 PM High yg Thu Jul 31, 14 Fri Aug 1, 14 Sat Aug 2, 14 Sun Aug 3, 14 Mon Aug 4, 14 Tue Aug 5, 14 Wed Aug 6, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 5:16 AM 2.7 ft. 5:43 AM High 0.7 ft. 11:37 AM 0.7 ft. 12:19 PM 0.6 ft. 12:16 AM 0.8 ft. 12:56 AM 1.1 ft. 1:46 AM 1.3 ft. 2:51 AM 1.4 ft. 4:11 AM Low 2.7 ft. 5:11 PM 2.6 ft. 5:55 PM 2.7 ft. 6:13 AM 2.6 ft. 6:50 AM 2.6 ft. 7:39 AM 2.6 ft. 8:46 AM 2.6 ft. 10:09 AM High 0.4 ft. 11:44 PM 0.7 ft. 1:10 PM 0.7 ft. 2:14 PM 0.6 ft. 3:34 PM 0.4 ft. 4:57 PM 0.2 ft. 6:09 PM Low 2.4 ft. 6:50 PM 2.2 ft. 8:03 PM 2.1 ft. 9:38 PM 2.2 ft. 11:13 PM High yg Thu Jul 31, 14 Fri Aug 1, 14 Sat Aug 2, 14 Sun Aug 3, 14 Mon Aug 4, 14 Tue Aug 5, 14 Wed Au g 6, 14 Date 3.4 ft. 6:00 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:30 PM 0.5 ft. 12:37 AM 0.8 ft. 1:09 AM 1.0 ft. 1:49 AM 1.3 ft. 2:39 AM 1.6 ft. 3:44 AM 1.8 ft. 5:04 AM Low 3.4 ft. 5:55 PM 3.4 ft. 6:27 AM 3.3 ft. 6:57 AM 3.3 ft. 7:34 AM 3.2 ft. 8:23 AM 3.2 ft. 9:30 AM 3.3 ft. 10:53 AM High 0.9 ft. 1:12 PM 0.9 ft. 2:03 PM 0.9 ft. 3:07 PM 0.8 ft. 4:27 PM 0.5 ft. 5:50 PM 0.2 ft. 7:02 PM Low 3.2 ft. 6:39 PM 2.9 ft. 7:34 PM 2.7 ft. 8:47 PM 2.6 ft. 10:22 PM 2.7 ft. 11:57 PM High yg Thu Jul 31, 14 Fri Aug 1, 14 Sat Aug 2, 14 Sun Aug 3, 14 Mon Aug 4, 14 Tue Aug 5, 14 Wed Aug 6, 14 Date 2.8 ft. 5:08 AM 2.8 ft. 5:35 AM 2.8 ft. 6:05 AM High 0.9 ft. 11:05 AM 0.9 ft. 11:47 AM 1.0 ft. 12:38 PM 1.1 ft. 12:24 AM 1.5 ft. 1:14 AM 1.7 ft. 2:19 AM 1.9 ft. 3:39 AM Low 2.8 ft. 5:03 PM 2.7 ft. 5:47 PM 2.5 ft. 6:42 PM 2.7 ft. 6:42 AM 2.7 ft. 7:31 AM 2.7 ft. 8:38 AM 2.8 ft. 10:01 AM High 0.6 ft. 11:12 PM 0.8 ft. 11:44 PM 0.9 ft. 1:42 PM 0.8 ft. 3:02 PM 0.6 ft. 4:25 PM 0.3 ft. 5:37 PM Low 2.3 ft. 7:55 PM 2.2 ft. 9:30 PM 2.2 ft. 11:05 PM High yg Thu Jul 31, 14 Fri Aug 1, 14 Sat Aug 2, 14 Sun Aug 3, 14 Mon Aug 4, 14 Tue Aug 5, 14 Wed Aug 6, 14 Date 3.7 ft. 5:21 AM 3.7 ft. 5:48 AM High 1.0 ft. 11:23 AM 1.0 ft. 12:05 PM 0.9 ft. 12:02 AM 1.2 ft. 12:42 AM 1.6 ft. 1:32 AM 1.9 ft. 2:37 AM 2.1 ft. 3:57 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:16 PM 3.5 ft. 6:00 PM 3.6 ft. 6:18 AM 3.6 ft. 6:55 AM 3.5 ft. 7:44 AM 3.5 ft. 8:51 AM 3.6 ft. 10:14 AM High 0.6 ft. 11:30 PM 1.1 ft. 12:56 PM 1.0 ft. 2:00 PM 0.9 ft. 3:20 PM 0.7 ft. 4:43 PM 0.3 ft. 5:55 PM Low 3.2 ft. 6:55 PM 2.9 ft. 8:08 PM 2.8 ft. 9:43 PM 2.9 ft. 11:18 PM High yg Thu Jul 31, 14 Fri Aug 1, 14 Sat Aug 2, 14 Sun Aug 3, 14 Mon Aug 4, 14 Tue Aug 5, 14 Wed Aug 6, 14 Date 2.9 ft. 5:32 AM 3.0 ft. 5:56 AM 3.0 ft. 6:24 AM 3.1 ft. 6:57 AM 3.2 ft. 9:20 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:59 AM 1.0 ft. 11:48 AM 0.9 ft. 12:49 PM 0.7 ft. 2:05 PM 1.4 ft. 12:10 AM 1.7 ft. 12:52 AM 0.1 ft. 5:43 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:17 PM 2.3 ft. 6:18 PM 2.1 ft. 7:34 PM 2.0 ft. 9:14 PM 3.1 ft. 7:36 AM 3.2 ft. 8:24 AM High 0.8 ft. 10:36 PM 1.0 ft. 11:03 PM 1.2 ft. 11:35 PM 0.6 ft. 3:28 PM 0.3 ft. 4:41 PM Low 2.1 ft. 11:23 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJuly 31 Aug. 6First Aug. 5 Full Aug. 10 Last Aug. 17 New Aug. 254:45 am-6:45 am 5:06 pm-7:06 pm 10:59 am-11:59 am 11:07 pm-12:07 am 5:28 am-7:28 am 5:50 pm-7:50 pm 11:52 am-12:52 pm 11:42 pm-12:42 am 6:12 am-8:12 am 6:35 pm-8:35 pm 12:46 pm-1:46 pm --:-----:-6:59 am-8:59 am 7:23 pm-9:23 pm 12:18 am-1:18 am 1:42 pm-2:42 pm 7:48 am-9:48 am 8:14 pm-10:14 pm 12:59 am-1:59 am 2:40 pm-3:40 pm 8:41 am-10:41 am 9:09 pm-11:09 pm 1:44 am-2:44 am 3:39 pm-4:39 pm 9:37 am-11:37 am 10:06 pm-12:06 am 2:35 am-3:35 am 4:38 pm-5:38 pm Average Average Average Average Average Average Average6:55 am 8:31 pm 10:59 am 11:08 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:56 am 8:30 pm 11:52 am 11:43 pm 6:56 am 8:29 pm 12:47 pm --:-6:57 am 8:29 pm 1:43 pm 12:20 am 6:57 am 8:28 pm 2:41 pm 1:00 am 6:58 am 8:27 pm 3:40 pm 1:45 am 6:59 am 8:26 pm 4:39 pm 2:36 am26% 33% 39% 45% 52% 59% 66%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 11 < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked at the Community Centers Battle of the Bands:What is the best concert youve ever attended?GORDON PAPI MCCLEARYFLYING PAPISThe best one was the Aerosmith concert. My wife is a longtime fan and I surprised her with tickets. That was in the s. LARRY ELVIS STRICKLANDRETIREDI saw the Eagles! I went to the concert in Tallahassee. It was around the late s or early s. RONNIE BONESMUSICIANAt the Suwannee River Jam! There was an old funk master. He had a star guitar and star glasses. He was one of those old school musicians. This one today! It was awesome with all local and very talented musicians. TIM RECKSSHIELDS MARINA MANAGERSARA DAWCOMMUNITY SPECIALISTThe best concert I have ever been to was YES! It was around 1985 in Austin, Texas. CompiledbyLyndaKinsey Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days ys 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Daily Specials!Includes Chips and DrinkCuban SandwichCuban Ham & Pork, topped with Swiss cheese, dill pickle, yellow mustard on a Cuban Roll Includes Chips and Drink$895 926-3500 SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATINpath EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Pirates Landing Free Appetizer of your choise Ouzts Too Grilled Shrimp w/rice dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Merphis Ellis drawn from Pirates Landing in St. Marks Specializing in Local Seafood Gator & Full Bar785 Port Leon Drive, St Marks RACE DAY SUNDAY: 850 925-64487968 Coastal Hwy. 98 Newport Historic Bridge WED.HOME COOKED MEALS THURS.PICKIN & GRINNINOUZTSTOO.COMFOOD BEVERAGEENTERTAINMENT$4 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER LUNCH PARTNER F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWithAnyOrder Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDERHOTOR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHESSALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of IDNO.: KML951045 BIN: 005947 GRP: 6226KVB PCN: CLAIMCR CLIP & USEthis coupon for SAVINGS OFUPTO75% OFF Reader DiscountShow this coupon to your pharmacist at checkout. Show this coupon to your pharmacist at checkout. the full price of any FDA-approved prescription.For a FREEPermanent Discount CardCall Toll-Free:1-888-636-8633 Online at:UniScriptCard.com/ROP THIS IS NOT INSURANCE READY TO USE SELL&INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.comLube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW

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Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Friday, July 18, Deputy Adam Pendris responded to a complaint about two intoxicated females in a restroom at Macks Meats. Sgt. Ryan Muse arrived at the scene and discovered the females with a glass pipe containing crack cocaine residue. A crack rock was discovered on one of the females. Stephanie Michelle Exline, 41, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of crack cocaine and possession of drug paraphernalia. Patricia Dawn Morgan, 37, of Sopchoppy was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia. Exline was also issued a traffic citation for driving while license suspended or revoked. The drugs and paraphernalia were turned into the Property and Evidence Division and the vehicle used by the subjects was towed from the scene. During the booking process, Exline was allegedly found to have more drug paraphernalia on her. She was also charged with introduction of contraband into a correctional facility and another count of possession of drug paraphernalia. Deputy Ross Hasty, Detention Deputy Scott Delbeato and Lt. Julie Martin also investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office this week: THURSDAY, JULY 17 Jordan Bird of Crawfordville reported the loss of a wallet. The wallet was used to make a purchase at Wal-Mart when it was lost. The wallet and contents are valued at $24. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Stalena Teague of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported that two of her vehicle tires were cut overnight. Damage was estimated at $31. Persons of interest were identi ed. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Molly T. Jones of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A Crawfordville business allegedly completed an automotive repair for the victim when the victim discovered that the repair work was not completed and the work created damage to the vehicle. The mechanic quoted the cost as more than twice the original payment. The vehicle was taken to another mechanic who uncovered the damage. The investigation was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. A16-year-old female reported a grand theft at Wal-Mart. The victim was in Wal-Mart when she left her cell phone in the restroom. She returned to the scene after discovering the phone was missing and it was already gone. The sleeve and screen saver were recovered in the trash can. The phone is valued at $350. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. FRIDAY, JULY 18 Ralph Rumph of Albany, Ga. reported a residential burglary. The victims wallet was stolen from his Panacea home. The wallet and contents are valued at $554. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Detention Deputy John Metcalf reported collecting lost items while picking up trash with WCSO work camp workers on Coastal Highway at the Wakulla County Airport. Credit cards, a weapons card and other items were recovered. The owner of the missing property was identi ed in Crestview. Deputy Gibby Gibson was unable to locate the victim and the property was turned over to the Property and Evidence Division. Sierra Moss of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wallet. The victim left the wallet in a cart at Wal-Mart and returned to find the wallet missing. The victim was gone five minutes. The value of the wallet and contents is $43. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Jason Lee ONeal, 32, of Crawfordville was stopped for speeding at 60 mph in a 45 mph zone on Spring Creek Highway. During the traf c stop it was determined that he did not have a valid driver license and ONeal had five previous convictions for driving with a suspended license. He was charged with driving while license suspended or revokedhabitual offender. The vehicle was turned over to a friend and ONeal was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough and Deputy Roy Gunnarsson investigated. SATURDAY, JULY 19 Lisa Strickland of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported vandalism to five vehicles on her property. Profanity was keyed into the vehicle paint and written in permanent marker. A tire was also damaged. The total damage is estimated at $4,000. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough and Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Antonia Carrin of Tallahassee reported a vehicle theft in Crawfordville. The victim received a telephone call from the Tallahassee Police Department about her vehicle being found wrecked in Tallahassee. A suspect was identi ed. The victim decided not to pursue criminal charges. Lt. Mike Kemp and Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Rando Leon of Crawfordville reported nding a bicycle near his home. The bike is valued at $100, but the owner is unknown. The bicycle was transported to the WCSO Impound Yard. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Lawanda Jackson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered but it appears that entry was unsuccessful. Damage was estimated at $50. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Michelle Peart of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Both of the family vehicles were entered. A firearm, valued at $350, was removed from one of the vehicles. The second vehicle contained change and a gift card with a total value of $65. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. A concerned citizen from Crawfordville reported a 74-yearold Connecticut man outside her home. The elderly man was able to give Deputy Jeff Yarbrough his rst name but was unable to give his full name and a reason for being at the Crawfordville home. The man thought he was at his home in the East Hartford, Conn., area. The man was taken to the Sheriffs Of ce and Lt. Jimmy Sessor was able to locate a telephone number of a relative inside the elderly mans car. Sheriff Service Officer Wes Coleman stayed with the man at all times until the relative arrived from Sarasota and picked him up. The victim had been reported missing from Sarasota on July 18. A 77-year-old Crawfordville man was injured when he was working on his vehicle. The emergency brake released and the vehicle rolled over his leg and arm. Wakulla EMS transported the victim to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment of his injuries. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. Kevin Martinez of Crawfordville reported the theft of a Wal-Mart gift card. The gift card was mailed to an old address and Wal-Mart reported the card had already been used. A suspect was identi ed. The card was valued at $40. Deputy Mike Zimba and Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Tina Marie Heuring, 43, of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c stop when she was observed failing to stop at an intersection stop sign. The driver did not possess a valid driver license. She was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge. An open container was discovered in the vehicle at the time of the traffic stop. She was also issued traf c citations for failing to stop at a stop sign and open container. Deputy Adam Pendris and Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. SUNDAY, JULY 20 Daniel Fore of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as a friends vehicle was damaged on his property. The vehicle windshield was smashed. Damage is estimated at $300. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Kyle Downer of Crawfordville reported the theft of his wallet. The wallet and contents are valued at $160. It may have been lost when the victim was at a Tallahassee nightclub. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. MONDAY, JULY 21 Vito Knowles of Crawfordville reported a single vehicle traf c accident in St. Marks. The victim ran off Port Leon Drive into a drainage culvert. Wildlife ran in front of the vehicle, according to the victim. There were no injuries. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. TUESDAY, JULY 22 Tina Miller of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim was unable to access her business due to something obstructing the inside of the lock. Damage to the lock was estimated at $100 as Deputy Ashley McAlister observed something wedged inside the lock. Detective Randy Phillips investigated a complaint of a counterfeit bill at WalMart. The counterfeit bill was a $100 note and was turned in by Loss Prevention. The counterfeit bill was seized as evidence. Randy Tucker of Crawfordville reported the theft of a boat trailer tag. The tag is valued at $45. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Detective Rachel Wheeler arrested Michael Lance Skinner, 22, of Crawfordville for failing to register a social media account and associated email account as required through the FDLE Sex Offender data base. Sex offenders are required to register any Internet or cyber communication accounts with the local sheriffs office or to FDLE prior to using the accounts.WEDNESDAY, JULY 23 Christy Davis of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief. Someone tampered with an air conditioning unit and created $400 worth of damage. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Jamie Faircloth of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Three unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The charges totaled $120. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,266 calls for service during the past week. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 13A (PLEASE PRINT) Business name: ______________________________________________ Business contact: _____________________________________________ Business address: _____________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ Business phone number ( ) ___________________________________ Email and/or web address (if available): ___________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________ The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Invites you to Nominate your Favorite Business. 2014 Wakulla Area A Big THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!Your name ( ): ____________Your phone number: ( ) ( ) ____ Your email address: ( ) _____________________________________ DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION IS AUGUST 12, 2014 PRESENTED BY: CANDIDATE FORUMThursday, Aug. 14 at the Wakulla Public LibraryDoors open at 6:30 P.M. Brought to you byThe Wakulla newsRepublican Candidates at 7 P.M.the Wakulla Republican Party & the Wakulla Democratic PartySchool Board Candidate Forum 7:30 P.M.Short Statements by Steve Fults and Jerry Moore District 1 Verna L. S. Brock, Ray Gray District 3 Rebecca S. Becky Cook, Chris Russell District 5 Jo Ann Daniels, Donna SavarySubmit your questions to editor@thewakullanews.net

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director In the 1920s, John Ringling was one of the worlds richest men. In a mere short six years, he acquired tens of thousands of acres in Floridas growing cities (Key West, Sarasota Bay) and lived in a Venetian-styled mansion which he built for he and his wife in Sarasota. On the grounds of his estate a museum was built which housed Old World master paintings, including several large canvases by Rubens, and other European treasures. Now I wrote that he was one of the richest men in the world in the 1920s. But what happened in 1929 that was the game-changer for Ringling and others like him? The Great Depression. He didnt see or dream of the Depression coming. The Sarasota area developed little after the Depression and reverted back to its agricultural leanings. Ringling tried to perk up the city by moving his circus to Sarasota during the winter months. Ringling like all the row crop farmers struggled to make ends meet. Ringling died at age 70 in nancial ruin. The only thing he had left with monetary value at the end of his life was his art. The Big Top was left as a museum and his massive collections were left to the Great State of Florida. The Ringling estate remains today one of the psychological anchors of Sarasota. It houses a small circus and circus museum. Only models created by a volunteer reveal what the grand circus was really like in its heyday! On any given day, the Ringling complex is filled with senior citizens, grandparents with grandchildren in tow. However, its more than a tourist attraction. It has become a near-perfect intergenerational bridge in a community where the retired transplants are often separated from their families at home. So why does the Ringling complex attract so many senior citizens? The big top has become a window! And the senior can gander and wander with a child holding their hand and travel back to the time when someone was holding their hand as they marveled at the ying trapeze, the elephants and the acrobats! Its a trip into their own youth! Think about it, it was a borderless, multimedia, exotic, erotic, strange and dangerous entertainment that existed before television, phones and an era when the internet was not even pondered. Sure, you can see all these things on the web now by a click of the mouse attached (or not) to your computer. But what about the visuals grandma saw, what about the smells grandpa picked up from the air inside. There are no elephant dung sweepers on the web. Whats the point, Langston? Im glad you asked. The circus museum allows older Floridians the chance to ll in their lives, to describe the characters they once were before they were retired, before they were grandmas and grandpas. Its a place where this older generation can lift a cane and point to a picture of the famous family aerialist, the great Wallendas, the 20th Centurys most famous aerialists. Deep down inside them, each one wanted to be a Wallenda! How many of them tied ropes to trees, took a young sapling as a balancing beam and tried to walk that grass rope without success. I bet they all did. I bet the ones at the senior center in Wakulla County tried it at least once in their lives. The Wallenda family exempli es active aging. In 1970 (the year I graduated Wakulla High), Karl Wallenda, age 65 (four years older than me now,) walked 750 feet on a high wire across Tallulah Gorge to promote tourism in Georgia. Eight years later, at age 73, he made a daring walk in Puerto Rico, but fell to his death due to a faulty cable connection in the wires rigging. While the seniors dont walk on a tight wire here, the health care act, doctors visits, follow ups to specialist, and nutrition and emotional well-being puts them on an invisible tight wire every day of their lives. We at the center are in charge of rigging their cable and we are careful as we interact with our seniors to make sure every cable clamp is tight, the wire is taunt, and their lives are triumphant. As Hollie Corbitt, the volunteer coordinator of the Ringling Museum, said, We at the center could not open our doors if it were not for our volunteers. There are a lot of seniors at the center each week, on some days as many as 150 seated in chairs. Come by and meet them! Maurice Langston is executive director of the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeIts Christmas in July!The story behind the Ringling Museum Senior Center Angels lined up along the wall preparing to serve guests Christmas dinner. The last call for silent auction leads to a crush in the hallway as everyone checks their bids. Detective Bruce Ashley serves some tea to Peggy Mackin. Kevin Vaughn of Roger Gunter Vaughn and Shirley Howard of Centennial Bank. Mary Wallace of Cook Insurance poses with silent auction items.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN $19900SPECIAL OF THE WEEKPR50021 HIGH WHEEL PUSH MOWER Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 15By BRANDON LARRABEEThe News Service Of FloridaTALLAHASSEE, July 25 The justice system tends to move very slowly, and this week it seemed to be struggling to keep up with politics. A circuit judge in Leon County pondered whether to try to redraw a flawed congressional redistricting plan with an election looming. Another judge in Monroe County grappled with his own decision that same-sex marriages should be allowed in Florida --keeping that ruling on hold even as the newest Republican member of the states congressional delegation supported allowing gay couples to wed. Other things moved more quickly. The state announced that a hurricane tax that has cost Floridians almost $3 billion in recent years will end 18 months ahead of schedule. And Libertarian Adrian Wyllie, now included in the Quinnipiac University Poll that occasionally checks in on the Florida governors race, showed that guring out who will win the states top of ce in November could be more complicated than originally thought. STATUS QUO Even Leon County Circuit Judge Terry Lewis expected that his decision striking down congressional districts approved by state lawmakers in 2012 would be appealed. Now that the Legislature is willing to go along with Lewis opinion at least for now a new question has emerged about whether the state can use the current map in the November elections. Attorneys for the state say yes. Their argument: It would be too complicated to try to redraw the map in time for the general election, much less the August primaries, in which some members of the armed forces stationed overseas have already voted. The fundamental problem is we could have a new map tomorrow, and we still dont have time to make it for this election, because people have already returned their ballots and voted, Raoul Cantero, a former state Supreme Court justice representing the Senate in the case, told Lewis at a hearing Thursday. But the voting-rights groups and voters who successfully challenged the map in court had a different spin on things: The map violates the antigerrymandering standards approved by voters in 2010, meaning it cant be used. The other side has an amazing tolerance for the fact that 18,800,000 Floridians are facing an election with an unconstitutional map, said David King, a lawyer for the organizations. They dont seem to care very much about that. For now, Lewis looks cautious in considering the challengers most-radical ideas, including pushing back the date of the November elections or holding a separate, special election early next year under a new map. I have to tell you, Im extremely skeptical that I can do what the plaintiffs want me to do, Lewis said near the conclusion of an almost threehour hearing. Lewis said he would try to issue a ruling by the end of next week. SLOWING DOWN THE MOVE TO MARRIAGE One case the state is appealing: Monroe County Circuit Judge Luis Garcias ruling that gay couples should be allowed to marry in Florida. But same-sex couples in the Keys cant get married quite yet. Siding with Attorney General Pam Bondi and courts in other states, Garcia on Monday refused to lift a stay on his ruling. The automatic stay was prompted by Bondis appeal, filed almost immediately after Garcia issued his initial ruling that the states ban on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional. Lawyers for Aaron Huntsman and William Lee Jones, two Key West bartenders who sued Monroe County Clerk of Court Amy Heavilin for refusing to grant them a marriage license, asked Garcia to order Heavilin to start issuing marriage licenses because the state has little chance of winning its appeal. But Bondis lawyers asked Garcia to maintain the status quo as other courts have done throughout the country. Both sides anticipate that the U.S. Supreme Court will ultimately decide the fate of same-sex marriage bans. Meanwhile, newly minted Republican Congressman David Jolly was on the defensive after being quoted supporting Garcias ruling to allow gay marriage. On Wednesday night, Jolly issued a 1,509-word long statement explaining how, Jolly said, hes never changed his position on same-sex marriage. As a Christian, Jolly said he personally supports traditional marriage between a man and a woman. But as a matter of constitutional principle, I believe in a form of limited government that protects personal liberty, and therefore I believe all individuals, all couples should be allowed to determine the sanctity of their marriage by their own faith or their own beliefs of marriage, Jolly wrote. HURRICANE TAX SEASON ENDING Instead of a court-ordered delay, insurance policyholders in Florida will get a quick resolution with regard to an extra charge on propertyinsurance and auto-insurance policies to cover claims paid for the 2004 and 2005 hurricane seasons. The Office of Insurance Regulation formally issued orders Tuesday for insurance companies to move up by 18 months the end of a 1.3 percent emergency assessment for the state-run Florida Hurricane Catastrophe Fund, which provides backup coverage to insurers. The levy will now end Jan. 1. The assessment has hit policyholders for $2.9 billion, which has gone to reimburse insurance companies for claims from the eight hurricanes that hit Florida in 2004 and 2005, the last time a hurricane made landfall in Florida. Its been nine years since (Hurricane) Wilma, said Sam Miller, executive vice president of the Florida Insurance Council. If anything, the assessment helps us remember how devastating these storms may be. The orders make official a decision Gov. Rick Scott and the Cabinet made last month to end the assessment, Amy Bogner, a spokeswoman for the Office of Insurance Regulation, said in an email. Scott has tried to turn lowering the cost of living in Florida into a campaign weapon, also calling this week for the state to make permanent the temporary lifting of a sales tax on the purchase of manufacturing machinery. The governor pushed a three-year cut through the Legislature in 2013, but wants the charge gone forever. FLORIDIANS WANT A CEASEFIRE? But the race between Scott and his Republican predecessor turned Democratic challenger, former Gov. Charlie Crist, is already moving even more steadily toward a media war. Scott has spent millions to define Crist (and soften his own image), and Crist hit back this week with his second ad, going directly after Scott on education. The new television ad points out the state currently spends less per student in public schools than it did during the best budget year of Crists administration and has seen a reduction in the number of Bright Futures scholarships awarded to Florida students. When I was governor, we brought both parties together to open the doors of opportunity, not close them, Crist says in the ad. Sen. John Thrasher, a St. Augustine Republican who also chairs Scotts re-election bid, instead highlighted Crists decision to cut school spending amid a recession at the end of the former governors term. Rick Scott has cleaned up his predecessors mess, funding schools $370 more per student in state funds than Crists last budget, Thrasher said. Charlie Crists fuzzy math wont fool Floridians. The back-and-forth came despite a warning from Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac poll, that Libertarian candidate Wyllie was pulling 9 percent in the governors race, in part because of the drumbeat of attacks that has for months de ned the race between Scott and Crist. That is almost certainly a re ection of some unhappiness in the electorate with the tone of the campaign, Brown told reporters. Theres an old maxim in politics, which is you cant throw mud without getting some on yourself. And that seems to be whats happening to Mr. Crist and Mr. Scott. STORY OF THE WEEK: The Legislature and voting-rights organizations squabbled over whether to wait until after the November elections to redraw the states congressional districts after they were found unconstitutional. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: The decline in my net worth is forcing me to make economies. Im afraid I will have to cancel some newspaper subscriptions. Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, who is worth $26 million despite reporting a $140,000 drop in his fortune in 2013. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Different speeds for justice, politics WHITES WINESBeaujolais: greatest secret in wineBy DAVID WHITEOne hundred years ago, the Wine Society, a wine club in London, offered its members a Beaujolais from the appellation of Moulin Vent for $29 per case. It offered cases of Burgundy from the appellations of Beaune and Pommard for around $36 each. Today, a case of wine from Domaine Diochon, a top producer in Moulin Vent, costs around $250. And its one of the most expensive wines in the region. In Burgundy, however, most Pommard and Beaune on offer from the Wine Society go for well over $1,000 per case. So whereas consumers seeking compelling reds from Burgundy instead of Beaujolais once paid a premium of about 25 percent, todays consumers can expect to pay a premium of 400 percent or more. Burgundy is quite different from Beaujolais, of course. But serious wines from both regions effortlessly combine vibrant acidity with depth and complexity. And wines from both regions can age for decades. Thats why todays price differential doesnt make any sense. Had those 1914 prices tracked inflation, that case of Moulin Vent would retail for $690. Without any question, the top wines of Beaujolais represent the greatest value in the wine world. Consider the wines of Domaine Diochon. Since its launch in 1935, the winery has rejected the temptation to churn out industrialized, oak-soaked wines designed for mass appeal. The focus, instead, is on authenticity. Bernard Diochon, who succeeded his father in 1967 and only recently handed off the winemaking responsibilities, insists on traditional methods and a light touch he wants the character of his vineyard, where many plantings are over 100 years old, to come through. As Diochons importer, Kermit Lynch, has written, [the wine] is juicily delicious yet there is a majesty to it. It is full-blown and full-bodied, yet it has a lush, supple, swallowable texture. No hard edges. No astringency. No heat its hard to imagine a world without wine like this. Diochon isnt the only producer in Beaujolais who belongs in any conversation about the pantheon of great wines. From the village of Morgon, Jean Foillard, Marcel Lapierre, JeanPaul Thvenet, and Guy Breton deserve similar praise. Known as the gang of four a moniker given to them by Kermit Lynch these producers have held onto Beaujolais ancient practices of viticulture and vini cation and today make rustic, mineraldriven wines with sappy fruit and tremendous intensity. In the appellation of Cte de Brouilly, Chteau Thivin has been producing exceptional wines for over a century. In Fleurie, fthgeneration winegrower Cdric Chignard is safeguarding his familys minimalist approach and producing distinctive, delicious wines. The list goes on. Across Beaujolais, an increasing number of producers are enhancing the reputation of the region by keeping yields low, rigorously sorting their grapes, avoiding manipulation in the cellar, and making real wine. Producers like Daniel Bouland, JeanPaul Brun, Louis-Claude Desvignes, Jean-Louis Dutraive, and Julien Sunier are also worth seeking out. Top wines from Beaujolais can easily be found for under $25 per bottle. If youre scratching your head, then youre probably thinking of Beaujolais Nouveau, the easy drinking, fruity wine that oods ashore every November. Once just a local beverage to celebrate Beaujolais new harvest, Georges Duboeuf introduced the wine to the U.S. marketplace three decades ago and it became incredibly popular. Quality plummeted and Beaujolais gained a reputation for massproduced, gimmicky plonk, hurting the reputation of everyone in the region. In 1914, when the Wine Society put Moulin Vent on offer, oenophiles everywhere knew that Beaujolais could produce some of the worlds most complex, aromatic, and lively wines. The region still produces gorgeous wines in the world, but theyre mostly ignored. Its no wonder why Michael Madrigale, one of the nations top sommeliers, recently told Eric Asimov of the New York Times that Beaujolais is the greatest secret in wine. Hes right. So before word gets out, stock up.. David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, July 31 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 5249103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the 8 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, 3292 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m. Friday, August 1 Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, self-defense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042. Saturday, August 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, August 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. Monday, August 4 VFW POST 4538 monthly meeting at the post the SECOND MONDAY of each month. Dinner at 6 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. for post and auxiliary members only. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by the Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, August 5 C.O.R.E. Challenging Obstacles Require Effort FREE Fitness for the whole family. Tuesday 5-6 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Contact 850745-6045 or CORE at 850-224-1177. Tys US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, self-defense, tactics and techniques. Free two introduction classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For more information please contact the Community Center at 850745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, meets from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. Wednesday, August 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.FRIDAY, AUG. 1 GWEN GRAHAM, DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATE for the Second Congressional district, will be joined by her father, former Sen. Bob Graham, for a FREE COOK OUT at the Crawfordville Womans Club from 6 to 8 p.m. The entire community is welcome. SATURDAY, AUG. 2 NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National Button Society) will meet at the central location of Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. Wakulla, Franklin, Okaloosa, Leon, and guests welcome. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson 926-7812, President Don/Barbara Lanier 729-7594, email bardon56@aol.com, Linda Wood 850-899-0025, or a local email: skpsky2000@ comcast.net. A short interesting presentation about fancy glass/unique buttons will be given at this meeting. MONDAY, AUG. 4 WAKULLA SPEAKS is a chance for the community to come together and discuss things we normally shy away from. This rst discussion is a partnering of the Wakulla County Christian Coalition, and the Southern Shock Initiative, titled Seeing Wakulla County School System through the eyes of Wakullas Black Community. At 6:30 P.M. AT THE WAKULLA LIBRARY. Candidates and school board members are welcomed to be members of the audience. But its the parents, students, teachers, and administrators who are black Americans who will participate on the panel and be given a chance to address their concerns. Others wishing to make a brief 2 minute statement concerning their child attending a Wakulla school (or addressing the system in general), are free to contact us at wakullaspeaks@gmail.com. TUESDAY, AUG. 5 ONE STOP CHILDBIRTH EDUCATION classes will be held for ve classes Aug. 5, Aug. 12, Aug. 19, Aug. 26 and Sept. 2 from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042. WEDNESDAY, AUG. 6 THE DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB of Wakulla County will hold its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. at Lindys Chicken, 2120 Crawfordville Hwy., in Crawfordville. All Democrats are invited and welcome to attend. We look forward to seeing old friends as well as meeting many new ones. With the 2014 election cycle in full swing, we have plenty of items to discuss and hope you will join us. Contact President Diane Wilson at 984-4768. THURSDAY, AUG. 7 THE 4TH ANNUAL WAKULLA COUNTY COALITION for Youth Town Hall meeting will be held at the One Stop Community Center from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. will be the Coalitions August Meeting and will be held at the One Stop Community Center on THURSDAY AUGUST 7, 2014 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. All Coalition members can hopefully attend.Upcoming Events SATURDAY, AUG. 9 WAKULLA COUNTY LONGSPURS of the NATIONAL WILD TURKEY FEDERATION will host its annual HUNTING HERITAGE BANQUET at the Wildwood Country Club. Doors will open at 5 p.m. Pre-sale ticket prices are $55 single, $100 for double, $275 sponsor, $25 Jake, $1,000 Platinum Sponsor, and $650 for Boss Gobbler table. Contact Joe Morgan at 850-445-3364, Beth Spratt 352-514-3085, or Jessica Kassees 850-688-3465. GENERATION NOW MINISTRIES PRESENTS FRESH: the fourth annual BACK TO SCHOOL event at the Community Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. School supplies will be distributed. Enjoy prize drawings, live entertainment, fashion show, kid zone, baseball clinic and more. Saturday, Aug. 23 WORKABLE SPRINGSHEDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, a free program by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park. Share the wonders of the park and the surrounding springshed. The event will be held at 6:30 p.m. at Community Center, Shadeville Road, Crawfordville Government MeetingsMonday, Aug. 4The WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION meets at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. A county BUDGET WORKSHOP will be held at 4 p.m., before the regular meeting. Monday, Aug. 11 The SOPCHOPPY CITY COMISSION meets at Sopchoppy City Hall at 6:30 p.m. The WAKULLA PLANNING COMMISSION meets at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Aug. 12 The TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL meets at the Welcome Center at 8:30 a.m.Thursday, Aug. 14The CITY OF SOPCHOPPY DEPOT COMMITTEE is holding a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the Sopchoppy Depot, 34 Rose Street, Sopchoppy. Emailyourcommunityeventstonzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Wakulla Speaks at the public library at 6:30 p.m.County Commission meets at 6 p.m. One Stop Childbirth Education classes begin at community center at 6:30 p.m. Challenger Learning for a program on rockets and matter at the library at 7 p.m. MondayMondayTuesdayThursday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akulla July 31 Aug. 6THE WAIT IS OVER!The Wakulla County Public Library has a new Director! Her name is Rebecca Robyn Hurst and she comes to us from the Thomas University Library, in Thomasville, Georgia, where she was a librarian. Ms. Hurst begins her work at the Wakulla County Public Library on Tuesday, July 29. We are all very excited to welcome her to the library.CHALLENGER LEARNING CENTER PROGRAMOn Tuesday, July 22, the children of Book Bunch and Book Nook created a cloud in the Childrens Room of the library with the help of Harry Hawbecker, physicist with the Challenger Learning Center. Children and parents alike were enthralled! Mr. Hawbecker returns Thursday, July 31, at 7 p.m. to demonstrate rockets and the properties of matter. His planned demonstrations include levitating a beach ball, creating different colored re tornadoes, a space shuttle heat shield, a foam rocket launch, and a thermoelectric generator. Join us for this exciting program that will appeal to the whole family. READING PROGRAMS AT COMMUNITY CENTERThe library-sponsored After School Reading Programs at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center continue through the summer for school age children. Programs are held at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays and are geared to speci c grade levels. The rst Tuesday of the month is for kindergarten through second grade. The second Tuesday is for third through fth grade. The third Tuesday is for middle school children. Be sure to stop by and join the fun. No registration is necessary.SUMMER READING BOOKS AT WCPLOur copies of the Summer Reading Books requested by Wakulla County Schools for all the students are consistently checking out. Many are also available to be checked out as eBooks from our website. The Summer Reading Books check out for only 2 weeks and only 2 at a time per card. The hold lists are long, but the 2 week check-out period allows us to work through the lists quicker than in the past. If you have Summer Reading Books checked out, please return them promptly to allow other students a chance to read them. If you place a hold on a Summer Reading Book and are noti ed that the book is available for you, please pick it up promptly. If you no longer need the book, please let us know so that we can give it to the next person on the hold list. Everyone deserves a chance to read these great books.Library News...

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Lowest Rates in the Area A/C Compressors and Evaporator A/C Leak check Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSUREDA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC MungesTree ServiceMichael Mongeon850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 B&T MARINE850566-786385042 1-SAIL2923 Shadeville hwy.Trailers Engines Boat Repair ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEPIT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 850528-2371 or 850926-7461 Call for All of Your Lawn Care Needs!FREE SMOOTH MOVESIMPLIFY YOUR MOVE, I CAN HELP!Professional Home & Ofce Organization Service also offered850-597-3196Please Call for Free Estimates ORGANIZING & PACKING SERVICE Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Specialty Cuts F lat TopsCuts F eather Locks Low Lights Low L i g g h h t t s s 850 926-602027 AZALEA DR. Behind CVS & Bealls, Crawfordville F acial WaxingsColor Highlights Perms FREEESTIMATESWorry Free with A to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414 Todays New Ads CrawfordvilleSaturday Only Aug 2nd 8am to noon antiques, Princess Diana Doll, JFK collectibles, 2 tables, race car collection, picture frames & pictures, antique FP mantel, household items, junior clothes & more! Warehouse next to Myrajeans HANDYMANLocal project, basic repairs, painting, door/windows, drywall, basic plumbing, etc. Job approx. 120 hours. Attention to detail a must. References are required. 614-578-6322 2 year old male olde English Bulldog Missing Havey Mill Road Area Last seen July 15th He is dark brown brindle and white Please contact Carol Broome 850-510-3907 with any information He has health issues and needs to be found. Wakulla Senior Citizens Center Before / After School Program have openings availablefor the upcoming school year, 2014-2015. The Schools with openings are Riversink and Crawfordville Elementary. If you have a passion for children and want to make a difference in their lives you can apply at the Wakulla Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 or call Debbie at 850-926-7145 ext. 222. Averitt ExpressNew Pay increase for Reginal Drivers 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post -Training Pay increase for Students! (Depending on Domicile) Get Home EVER Y Week + Excellent Benefits CDL-ARequired 888-362-8608 Apply @ A verittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans & indivdiuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. EXPERIENCED OTR FLATBED DRIVERSEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843) 266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE HANDYMANLocal project, basic repairs, painting, door/windows, drywall, basic plumbing, etc. Job approx. 120 hours. Attention to detail a must. References are required. 614-578-6322 AIRLINE CAREERS Begin Here -Get FAAapproved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICALBILLING, ACCOUNTING ASST, CUSTOMER SERVICE, NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 CRAWFORDVILLEFriday Aug. 1st through Thursday 7th 8am to 5pmMOVING ESTATE SALESomething for Everyone COME SEE! 103 Turkey Run Road CrawfordvilleSaturday Only Aug 2nd 8am to noon antiques, Princess Diana Doll, JFK collectibles, 2 tables, race car collection, picture frames & pictures, antique FP mantel, household items, junior clothes & more! Warehouse next to Myrajeans ATTENTION: VIAGRAand CIALIS USERS!Acheaper alternative to high drugstore prices! 50 Pill Special $99. FREE Shipping! 100% Guaranteed. CALLNOW: 1-800-943-8953 DirectTV 2 Year Savings Event! Over 140 channels only $29.99 a month. Only DirectTV gives you 2 YEARS of savings and a FREE Genie upgrade! Call 1-800-481-2137 DISH TV RETAILERStarting $19.99/ mo. (for 12 mos.) Find Out How to SA VE Up to 50% Ask About SAME DA Y INST ALLA TION!! CALL1-800-605-0984 Safe Step Walk-In Tub Alert for Seniors.Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step-In. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 1-800-605-6035 for $750 Off. KILLFLEAS ON CONTACT... on dogs and cats with DD-33 flea mist. Lasts longer. Pleasant Odor. Contains NO Fipronil! ASHLEYFEED & HARDWARE (850-421-7703) www happyjackinc.com Crawfordville90 Nelson St *Avail. 8/1* 3/2 all new flooring, fans & blinds, $850 mo. 1st, last, $850 ea. 850-567-3989 CRAWFORVILLE 2/2 Secluded Area, Lawnho Mill road, no pets $750. mo, $450. Sec. 850-926 9017 850-524-9804 PANACEASweet Small Cottage with Fishing Dock on Canal Large yard to park boat, Pet with deposit Must have clean background check with references. $600. month CALL LISA (850) 510-2647 Mountains of NCNew custom built 1,232 sf unfurnished log cabin on 1.59 ac. $74,900. Covered front & back porches with private setting, EZ access. 866-738-5522 5158-0731 TWN 8/17 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction, for towing and storage, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at: 3325 Crawfordville Hwy., at 9:00 a.m. on the following vehicle(s): Sale Date: 8/17/2014 2007 Kawasaki M/C Vin # JKABNRA107DA19797 Published July 31, 2014. 5162-0731 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida Statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Siefe J. Awad JR 1367 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Jonathan N. Christian 21 Crested Eagle Dr., Crawfordville, FL 32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 Published July 31, 2014. APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE MOBILE HOMESSWMH 2/2 $625 mo.HOUSES2/1.5 $675 mo.4/3 $1,450 mo.3/2 1,100 mo. TOWN HOMES3/2.5 $825 mo. 2/2 $750 mo.COMMERCIALTallahassee 700 sq. ft. $700 mo. Crawfordville 1,500 sq. ft. $1,500 mo. RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. 0 0EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Maintenance Worker Corrections Certied Recreation Department 36 TUSCANY TRACE, CRAWFORDVILLENew Construction! Pafford Construction is offering 1600 sq ft, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, Garden Homes with custom features throughout for only $174,900. Real wood oors, granite counter tops, beautiful trim package, soaring stepped-up tray ceilings, in a great location at a great price. Call David at 519-7944 for more information or come by on Saturday to see this gorgeous home! Dir: From Bloxham Cutoff, south on Hwy. 319, Right on Ivan Church Road (Walmart trafc light), First Left after stop sign on Tuscany Trace. Home on left. dhoover2@hotmail.com COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. (850) 926 ~ (850) 926 fax 520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL OPEN HOUSE EVERY SATURDAY 1-3

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Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com5140-0807 TWN vs. Allen, Robert 14 CA 110 Amended Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 14 CA 110 EDWARD E. BRIMNER and KATRINA W. BRIMNER, Plaintiff, vs. ROBERT ALLEN, et al. Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ROBERT ALLEN, if alive, and if dead, unknown spouse, heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, assigns, and all other parties claiming by through, under or against him; YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a Complaint for Tax Deed Quiet Title on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCING AT NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 101 HARTSFIELD SURVEY, ON SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 92 HARTSFIELD SURVEY, THEN RUNNING WESTWARD ALONG SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 92, 30 CHAINS AND 8 LINKS AS POINT OF BEGINNING, THEN RUNNING NORTHWARD 5 CHAINS, WESTWARD 5 CHAINS, SOUTHWARD 5 CHAINS, EASTWARD ALONG SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF LOT 92, 5 CHAINS TO POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you and others, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on ANDREW J. POWER, ESQUIRE, SMITH, THOMPSON, SHAW, MINACCI & COLON, P.A., Plaintiffs attorneys, 3520 Thomasville Road, 4th Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 32309-3469, no more than thirty (30) days from the first publication date of this notice of action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorneys or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED this 27 day June, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Published July 17, 24, 31 and August 7, 2014. 5148-0731 TWN vs. Dekle, Russell 65-2011-CA-000297-CAAX-MX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000297-CAAX-MX CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. RUSSELL DEKLE; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOTS 67 AND 68, BLOCK 24, WAKULLA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 oclock, A.M. on August 14, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 9 day of July, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Phone: 913-915-8660 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published July 24 & 31, 2014. 152826-T seg2 5149-0731 TWN vs. Withers, Ben 2014 CA 49 Notice of Foreclosure sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2014 CA 49 CENTENNIAL BANK, an Arkansas banking corporation Plaintiff, v. BEN WITHERS a/k/a BEN WITHERS, JR. a/k/a ROBERT BEN WITHERS, JR., LISA ANN WITHERS f/k/a LISA CLARK a/k/a LISA ANN CLARK, AUTO-OWNERS INSURANCE COMPANY, and RING POWER CORPORATION, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on August 21, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Property COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREE, 02 MINUTE, 23 SECONDS WEST 660.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 339.27 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #6475), MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 443.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 517.93 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREE 08 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 399.55 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 516.76 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH 30 FOOT ACCESS AND UTILITY EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 660.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 339.27 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #6475), NORTH 01 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 443.67 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 517.93 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 84 DE5150-0731 TWN vs. Langley, Jr., Jerry T. 65-2012-CA-000120 Notice of Rescheduled Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000120 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JERRY T. LANGLEY, JR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated July 2, 2014 and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000120 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and JERRY T LANGLEY, JR.; JERRY T LANGLEY, SR; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JERRY T. LANGLEY, SR. N/K/A MARGARET LANGLEY; SUSAN DIANE LANGLEY; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 7th day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB WHICH IS THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NORTHWEST 1/4) OF LOT NUMBER 35, HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES EAST FOR 1,978.47 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST FOR 905.2 FEET TO AN IRON PIN ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 365, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 365 FOR 568.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTHERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY FOR 75.06 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST FOR 348.6 FEET, TO A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF STEVE REVELL AND LOUISE M. REVELL PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES EAST FOR 70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 50 SECONDS FOR 312.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LYING IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER (NORTHWEST 1/4) OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY LOT NO. 35, COUNTY OF WAKULLA, STATE OF FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2005 CAVALIER MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN: BL05GA0212948A AND BL05GA0212948B. A/K/A 1628 SPRING CREEK HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2606 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on July 3, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published July 24 & 31, 2014. F 12004113 5159-0807 TWN vs. Moss, David Leslie 2013-CA-000041 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000041 Envision Credit Union Plaintiff, -vs.David Leslie Moss a/k/a David L. Moss and Christine E. Lewis; Unknown Spouse of David Leslie Moss a/k/a David L. Moss; Unknown Spouse of Christine E. Lewis; Clerk of Court of Wakulla County, Florida; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties 5160-0807 TWN vs. Odom, Donna R. 65-2011-CA-000181 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000181 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. DONNA R. ODOM A/K/A DONNA RAE ODOM A/K/A DONNA ODOM A/K/A DONNA PITTMAN A/K/A DONNA RAE PITTMAN A/K/A DONNA RAE PORCH, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 17, 2014 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000181 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and DONNA R. ODOM A/K/A DONNA RAE ODOM A/K/A DONNA ODOM A/K/A DONNA PITTMAN A/K/A DONNA RAE PITTMAN A/K/A DONNA RAE PORCH; ASHOK MANOCHA; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of August, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: PARCEL 1: LOT 13, BLOCK D, OF AN UNRECORDED PLAT, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 3 OF THE HARTS FIELD RIVER SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 1434.40 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN 66.0 ACRE TRACT KNOWN AS THE W. F. GAVIN TRACT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 3 OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY 1841.50 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY, RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 310.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE THENCE SOUTH 54 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 140.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 01 MINUTE 02 SECONDS EAST 210.99 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG A PROPOSED WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 130.0 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 57 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 242.62 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 3 OF THE HARTS FIELD RIVER SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 1434.40 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN 66.0 ACRE TRACT KNOWN AS THE W. F. GAVIN TRACT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 3 OF THE HARTS FIELD RIVER SURVEY 1841.50 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 450.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 57 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 13, BLOCK D OF MYSTERIOUS WATERS A DISTANCE OF 210.99 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 29.16 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 49 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 208.55 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. PARCEL 2: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 3 OF THE HARTS FIELD RIVER SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 3 A DISTANCE OF 1434.40 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN 66.0 ACRE TRACT KNOWN AS THE W. F. GAVIN TRACT, THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 3 OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY 1841.50 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 54 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 155.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE SOUTH 54 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 155.0 FEET, THENCE NORTH 57 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 242.62 FEET TO A POINT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 60.0 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE NORTH 41 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG A PROPOSED WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 77.43 FEET TO A POINT ON A 100.0 FOOT CUL-DE-SAC (THE CENTER OF SAID CUL-DE-SAC BEING LOCATED NORTH 04 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 50.0 FEET), THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CUL-DE-SAC WITH A RADIUS OF 50.0 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 83 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 23 SECONDS, FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 73.0 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 53 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 66.69 FEET), THENCE SOUTH 58 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 264.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 42 EGRET NORTH, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on June 18, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Published July 31 & August 7, 2014. F 11015480 5161-0807 TWN vs. Carraway, Marilyn J. 2014 CA 000100 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 2014 CA 000100 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, acting through the United States Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, f/k/a Farmers Home Administration, a/k/a Rural Housing Service, Plaintiff, vs. MARILYN J. CARRAWAY, et al., Defendants, NOTICE OF ACTION STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF WAKULLA TO: FIRST AMERICAN INVESTMENT COMPANY, LLC, N/K/A FIRST AMERICAN RECOVERY SERVICES, LLC, a New York limited liability company, whose whereabouts are unknown; and whose officers, directors, general managers, cashiers, resident agents, and business agents are unknown. YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage regarding the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: Lots 57 and 58, Block WAKULLA GARDENS, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: FREDERICK J. MURPHY, JR., Esquire, Attorney for Plaintiff, Boswell & Dunlap LLP, 245 South Central Avenue, Post Office Drawer 30, Bartow, FL 33831, E-Service: fjmefiling@bosdun.com, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice of Action, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. DATED on this 17 day of July, 2014. REQUESTS FOR ACCOMMODATIONS BY PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Circuit Court 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 (SEAL) BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Published July 31 & August 7, 2014. may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to order rescheduling foreclosure sale or Final Judgment, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000041 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Envision Credit Union, Plaintiff and David Leslie Moss a/k/a David L. Moss and Christine E. Lewis are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on August 21, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT NO. 7, QUARRY SPRINGS, UNRECORDED COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 4, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 4 A DISTANCE OF 1321.36 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THEN RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 369.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 313.21 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 693.62 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT; THEN RUN WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 313.22 FEET, THEN RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 697.12, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AND SUBJECT TO A 60 FOOT INGRESS, EGRESS, DRAINAGE AND UTILITY EASEMENT. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700, (561) 998-6707 Published July 31 & August 7, 2014. 12-251577 GREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 498.64 FEET TO AN IRON ROD LYING IN THE APPROXIMATE CENTERLINE OF TUCKER SPRINGS ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 27 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 25 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE CENTERLINE 35.51 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 84 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 515.56 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 30.07 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the undersigned attorney at least seven (7) working days or immediately upon receiving this notification.. If you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 9th day of June, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court [SEAL OF THE COURT] By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Plaintiffs Address: Keith L. Bell Jr., Esq. Clark, Partington, Hart, Larry, Bond & Stackhouse 105 E. College Ave., Suite 600, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Published July 24 & 31, 2014. 5156-0821 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 032 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 885 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-035-008-07364-000 Description of property: WAKULLA GARDENS BLOCK 16 LOT 17 OR 2 P 222 OR 565 P 555 Name in which assessed PONSIT REALTY INC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on September 10, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 24, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published July 31, August 7, 14 & 21, 2014. 5157-0821 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 033 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1523 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-11116-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK K LOT 4 DB 58 P 189 Name in which assessed MRS M K DAVIDSON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on September 10, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 24, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published July 31, August 7, 14 & 21, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 850926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS Beautiful 3BR/2BA, two-story log cabin on 5 acres. Master bedroom downstairs. Includes storage shed. $1300 security deposit, $1300 monthly rent. No smoking, pets okay with approval. Available August 1, 2014. 3BR/2BA Mobile Home, $800 Sec. Dep. $750 Rent 2BR/2BA 1,496 Sq. Ft., No Smoking/No Pets, $800 Security Deposit $800 Rent 4 BR/2BA Home in Crawfordville $1,300 Security Deposit $1,300 Rent Available Aug. 1 Long-Term & Vacation RentalsCheck out our Alligator Point Beach Rentals at www.obreatly.comLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!Bayside Villas Surf Rd. Beautiful Bay-front condo on Ochlockonee Bay, 3BR/2.5BA, 28 Endeavour Drive 46 Savannah Forrest 636 Coastal Hwy. 98 119 Duane St. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEEDTORENTYOUROUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346850-984-0001obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 19 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5151-0821 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 025 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1500 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10993-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK F LOT 8 DB 59 P 314 OR 196 P 444 OR 197 P 821-822 OR 422 P 591 Name in which assessed MAGNOLIA GARDENS DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LLC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on September 10, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 23, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published July 31, August 7, 14 & 21, 2014. 5152-0821 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 027 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: 5153-0821 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 029 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1386 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-077-014-10505-027 Description of property: GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 13 LOT 3 & W 1/2 OF 2 DB 31 P 405 & OR 50 P 277 OR 104 P 337 OR 179 P 187 OR 196 P 153 Name in which assessed R.E.M. DEVELOPERS, LLC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on September 10, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 24, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published July 31, August 7, 14 & 21, 2014. 5154-0821 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 030 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1484 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10943-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK D LOT 45 DB 58 P 93 OR 103 P 528 Name in which assessed EMIL J & SYLVIA RUTZ Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on September 10, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. 5155-0821 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 031 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that SAMMIE D or DONNA G SIMMONS the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1439 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-078-013-10777-000 Description of property: MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOT 54 DB 59 P 18 Name in which assessed HERSCHELL VICTORY Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on September 10, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 24, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published July 31, August 7, 14 & 21, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Certificate # 1349 Date of Issuance May 30, 2007 Parcel # 00-00-076-000-10265-021 Description of property: LOT 76 HS P-14-21-M-20C LYING IN SE 1/4 OF LOT 76 HS PARCEL 100 X 158 OR 84 P 270 & OR 89 P 37 OR 136 P 598 OR 219 P 626 Name in which assessed ROBERT TIMMONS JR Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on September 10, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: June 24, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published July 31, August 7, 14 & 21, 2014. Dated: June 24, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published July 31, August 7, 14 & 21, 2014. Brain Teaser 12345 678910 111213 14 15 16 171819 20 21 22 23 24 252627 2829 30313233 34 35 36 37 38 394041 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 4950 515253 545556 5758 596061 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 Across 1 The Mamas & the ___ 6 Posed a question 11 Egg ___ (December drink) 14 Fast Amtrak train 15 Willing to believe anything 16 Night before a big day 17 Dr. Seuss book 20 "A mouse!" 21 Stories 22 Harnesses the wind 23 Actress Winslet of "Titanic" 24 Kitty or puppy 25 Store event 28 Kind of poem 30 "Woe is me!" 34 Theater items 36 Extreme dislike 38 Every last bit 39 Dr. Seuss book 42 "First of all..." 43 More than months 44 Resort lake that's also a Chevy SUV 45 Grandma 47 Soap ingredient 48 Slithering creature 49 Delivery company 51 "The ___ Show" 54 Instrument for Billy Joel 57 Number of Olympic medals in each event 59 Ending for real or surreal 62 Dr. Seuss book 65 "Sands of ___ Jima" 66 Stands against a wall 67 Attempts 68 Young fellow 69 Cheese with holes in it 70 Transmits Down 1 Chapter part 2 Land measurement 3 Quick look 4 Ginger ___ 5 Mrs. Claus's man 6 It may be 90 degrees 7 Herb that sounds wise 8 Smooch 9 Actress Longoria 10 Tightly-packed 11 Soda brand 12 Racetrack shape 13 Valuable rocks 18 Consume 19 Facts 23 Held onto 24 ___ Plus (shampoo brand) 25 Watch through binoculars, for example 26 Stadium 27 Sultry Sophia 28 Earth tone 29 Impersonates 31 Wood shop tool 32 Permit 33 Scary driving weather 35 Sneaky 36 Remain 37 Pecan or cashew 40 Long fish 41 Hit the bell 46 Dad's sister, to his daughter 50 Places to swim 51 Blades in a field 52 "___ the ramparts..." 53 Homes for robins 54 TV's Dr. ___ 55 Des Moines' state 56 Baseball nickname 57 Cuisine that uses peanuts 58 Egg layers 59 Victorious cry 60 Structure to store tools in 61 Tree growth 63 ___ Hampshire 64 "What ___ you doing?"Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 4 4516 78 9 412 4371 965 2 47 3671 7538 2009 HometownContent 519 7263 4 8 843951276 627843159 736 418925 452397861 198265437 261 584793 384679512 975132684 PAPAS ASKED NOG ACELA NAIVE EVE GREENEGGSANDHAM EEK TALES SAILS KATE PET SALE ODE ALAS PROPS SCORN ALL YERTLETHETURTLE ONE YEARS TAHOE NANA LYE NEWT UPS GONG PIANO THREE ISM HORTONHEARSAWHO IWO LEANS TRIES LAD SWISS SENDS These organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.Accomplishments Acre Addresses Aims Alarm Archer Array Asia Assure Away Beer Bite Boil Buds Cane Card Chief Cigar Cone Cuts Dares Days Earn Ends Evident Healed Herd Hose Insect Kind Know Maps Match Nest Oils Owls Peas Pipes Plural Pour Rage Rainy Rang Rear Recover Remember Rich Ripen Scored Seals Seam Slice Sour Spear Sweeps Task Toad Toes Torn Travels True Twins Uses Whip Winds Wine Yeah

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Page 20 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com 1. MOVIES: Who starred in the 1957 film An Affair to Remember? 2. FOOD & DRINK: Osso bucco is traditionally made with what type of meat? 3. GEOGRAPHY: On which continent is the nation of Djibouti located? 4. GAMES: In Monopoly, what is the name of the square that represents the water utility? 5. ANATOMY: What is a more common name for the umbilicus? 6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: A big band dance called the Lindy Hop came to be associated with which early 20th-century celebrity? 7. RELIGION: According to the Old Testament, Noahs Ark landed on what mountain range? 8. ENTERTAINMENT: Who created the catchphrase Bam! on his television show? 9. GOVERNMENT: How long is a U.S. senators term of office? 10. SCIENCE: What are endorphins? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Cary Grant and Deborah Kerr 2. Veal 3. Africa 4. Water Works 5. Navel or belly button 6. Charles Lindbergh, who was the first to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean 7. The Mountains of Ararat 8. TV chef Emeril Lagasse 9 Six years 10. Chemicals produced in the body that reduce perception of pain ARIES (March 21 to April 19) Dealing with a dif cult person can be the kind of challenge you Aries Lambs love. Or it could be an energy-draining exercise in futility. Be certain your goals are worth your efforts. TAURUS (April 20 to May 20) The Divine Bovine might be seeing red at having your crisis-resolution efforts overlooked. But others know the truth, and they can be expected to step forward when the time comes. GEMINI (May 21 to June 20) You should be well on your way to nally making that important decision. Having the support of loved ones will help when crunch time comes. Keep a positive attitude. CANCER (June 21 to July 22) Feeling uneasy about a move might not mean youre having a case of Cancerian wavering. It could be your inner sense is warning you to reassess your situation before taking action. LEO (July 23 to August 22) Your pride could get in the way of admitting you might have erred. Best to fess up now before a small mistake turns into a big misunderstanding. Make the weekend a special family time. VIRGO (August 23 to September 22) Trying to please someone with a less-thanglowing opinion of something you value could be a waste of time. If you like it, stay with it. The weeks end brings an answer to an old mystery. LIBRA (September 23 to October 22) There might be time to make a change. But be honest with yourself: Is it what you really want, or one you feel pressured into making? Your answer should determine your next move. SCORPIO (October 23 to November 21) Change is dominant, but so is caution: Proceed carefully, checking each step along the way to avoid encountering any unwelcome surprises that might be lurking along your path. SAGITTARIUS (November 22 to December 21) It could be a mistake to rely on someone to keep his or her promise without checking out previous performances. What you learn now could save you from a painful lesson later. CAPRICORN (December 22 to January 19) Taking a strong stand on an issue you feel is too important to ignore could inspire others to follow suit. The weekend is a good time to socialize with old friends and make new ones. AQUARIUS (January 20 to February 18) Your sensitive nature gives you an insight into the problems of someone close to you. Your offer of support could be just what this person needs to start turning his or her life around. PISCES (February 19 to March 20) Financial matters continue to need even more careful analysis than usual. Use caution with investment possibilities. A personal relationship might take an unexpected turn by the weeks end. BORN THIS WEEK: You appreciate the wonders of the world and enjoy sharing your delight with others. 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 Page 21By JENNY ODOMSpecial to the NewsChelsea Dix-Kessler is on her way home, and shes bringing her ddle. Dix-Kessler, a 2011 WHS grad, is a sophomore at Eastern Tennessee State University in Johnson City where she is majoring in Bluegrass, Old Time and Country Music studies. She comes from a musical family and has performed since a young age. Her mother ran Posh Java in Sopchoppy where local musicians used to play. Around the age of 14, she played some gigs with well-known singer songwriter Trafton Harvey of Crawfordville. She says Harvey was the person who stressed to her the importance of learning to play by ear. Dix-Kessler was only 16 and a junior in high school when she joined Coon Bottom Creek, a local bluegrass group, as their ddle player. Initially, she was not interested in playing bluegrass music, but one night, and at the insistence of her mother, Debbie Dix, her idea about the genre changed. One night Coon Bottom Creek was playing at the Frog and the Hummingbird (which is now closed), she says. My mom made me go listen, and the very rst song they did was an acapella version of Dancing with the Angels. Ive been hooked ever since. The members of Coon Bottom Creek heard Dix-Kessler was a ddle player and her to sit in with them at a practice. They played Wagon Wheel and it just so happened that Id been recently learning the fiddle break for that song. She played with Coon Bottom Creek for four years, and went on a European tour with them, traveling to Germany, Austria and Switzerland. These days, an older Dix-Kessler is one half of Well Worn Soles, a bluegrass duo that she put together with ETSU classmate Emerson Wells-Barrett, a senior. Raised in a musical family, just like DixKessler, he writes music and plays the acoustic guitar, mandolin, bass, dobro and piano. We met my first semester at school when we were placed in a band together, Dix-Kessler explains. At this school you audition and then are placed in a band with other musicians. We started out as friends, and now were dating and recording music together, she says. Currently the pair is recording a full length CD in Austin, Texas, where Wells-Barrett grew up. Wells-Barrett wrote all but one of the songs on the album. Dix-Kessler and Wells-Barrett will return to ETSU in the fall, but until then, theyll be playing gigs in August around Wakulla, Leon and Franklin counties.BATTLE OF THE BANDSAn all-day concert is held as a fundraiser for the One Stop Community Center called Battle of the Bands, a fundraiser for the One Stop Community Center was held Saturday, July 26, and was headlined by Jordan Miller & Friends, left. Other acts included the bluegrass music of Coon Bottom Creek, below, and some stirring gospel music. Proud papa Jared Miller smiles as he watches his son perform., bottom right, and Sarah Daw and Cheryl Creel, bottom left.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN LYNDA KINSEYMore photos online at thewakullanews.com Well Worn SolesSopchoppy ddler Chelsea Dix-Kessler hoofs it home for series of performancesWell Worn Soles shows ursday, Aug. 7, 7 p.m., Tropical Traders, Ochlockonee Bay, free. Friday, Aug. 8, 5 p.m., Bowery Station, Apalachicola, and Saturday, Aug. 9, 1 p.m., Bowery Station, Apalachicola, both shows are free. Aug. 14, 8 p.m., Backwoods Bistro, Tallahassee, free. Aug. 15, 7 p.m., Rio Carrabelle, Carrabelle, $10. BYOB. August 16, 7 p.m., Tropical Traders, Ochlockonee Bay, free.Well Worn Soles is made up of Chelsea Dix-Kessler, a Wakulla High School graduate, and Emerson Wells-Barrett of Austin, Texas. For School Board District 5DID YOU KNOWTHE SCHOOL BOARD IS ELECTED IN AUGUST Its Bi-Partisan. Early voting starts August 11th. The Primary is August 26th! I Would Greatly Appreciate Your Vote!NOT NOVEMBER! Paid for by Jo Ann Daniels, Nonpartisan, for School Board District 5 As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Live Well. Choose Well. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2013. Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage are HMO plans with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage depends on contract renewal. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_DP 610 CMS Accepted 12252013 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQA August 8 August 22 September 12 September 26 and at 5:30 p.m. on August 14 September 11 October 9 October 10 October 24

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Page 22 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 31, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFew experiences in life are as comforting as having a companion who answers needs and is there to serve without being summoned. The relationship benefits both parties, each providing something needed and each receiving enough through their service to engender continuation of the mutual af liation. In many cases this reciprocal arrangement is a lifelong relationship. The individuals are never far apart and it is an exception to see one without the other close by. This interdependent commitment occasionally works with people, but the complications of life often interfere with the single mindedness required to fulfill the promise. Fortunately for Wakulla Countys horse and cattle owners, there is bond between livestock and cattle egrets which is a textbook example of a win-win relationship. Cattle egrets (Bubulcus ibis) are a white bird with red to orange tinged feathers on their back, breast and the top of the heads. They are a common sight locally in fields and pastures, especially if livestock are present. Large adults can be about two feet in height with a wingspan of about three feet. Usually silent, they can utter a guttural call which is usually associated with breeding season. This bird is a relatively recent arrival in Florida. It is believed to have migrated to Brazil from sub-Saharan Africa in the 1930s. Like many exotic species which have landed in South America, it adapted well to conditions there and moved north to expand its range. Cattle egrets crossed into Florida in the early 1950s and now reside here year around. While technically an exotic species, they are not considered an invasive exotic. Cattle egrets do compete with other wading birds for nesting sites, but the greatest concern to this population is habitat loss. The cattle egrets closest avian relatives are herons. There are recorded incidents of cattle egrets occasionally cross-breeding with herons. While they will search for food by wading in shallow waters, the cattle egret is more likely to be viewed on wide open expanses of land. If horses, sheep, goats or cattle are present it is almost a guarantee these insect-eating birds will be in action next to the group. They quickly establish a symbiotic relationship with the livestock. Somehow these birds communicate their intentions are to consume any and all of the flies and ticks which prey upon the local grazing herds. The cattle egrets serenely stroll through the grass in and around the stock, all the while plucking bugs with their long pointed bills. Occasionally, cattle egrets can be seen standing on the back of horses and cattle grooming the thankful creature. Cattle ranchers and hay producers watch for swarming flocks of cattle egrets in the late summer. These ravenous birds have the acute eyesight to spot armyworm infestations hidden in hay elds and pasture. Hundreds of birds will circle and dive at their prospective targets in a fashion reminiscent of the most gluttonous feeding frenzy imaginable. The soft bodied worms are easy picking, and farmers and ranchers appreciate the effort at removing a dreaded pest. It may not be expressed in words, but it is likely most livestock consider the cattle egret a good companion. Farmers and ranchers certainly appreciate the egrets work. To learn more about cattle egrets in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at (850) 926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Cattle egrets are often seen around horses grazing. The horses accept the egrets close proximity, likely knowing they are eating irritating insects.Cattle egrets, livestock have interdependence Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS These courses are offered through TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, in conjunction with the Division of Natural SciencesNatural Resources Conservation and ManagementOnline | Aug. 25 Dec. 12 Learn about ecology, conservation and management of natural resourcesEnvironmental Regulation and ComplianceOnline | Aug. 25 Dec. 12 Learn about environmental law, re gulations and compliance issuesEnvironmental Sampling and Analysis IIn-class/Online | Aug. 25 Dec. 12 Learn about Florida Department of Environmental Protection standard procedures for collection of surface water, groundwater, potable water systems and sedimentIntroduction to Professional DivingTues, 1-6 p.m. | Aug. 25 Dec, 12 | Rattler Aquatic Center Earn certifications in SCUBA and NITROX breathing gasesGreen Guide Certification ProgramTues/Thurs, 6-9 p.m. | Sept. 2 Nov. 4 | Wakulla Center Learn about natural history and wildlife of the Big Bend; employmentand enrichment-focused (includes weekend field trips)FALL 2014 ENVIRONMENTAL COURSESEnvironmental Regulation and Compliance (EVR1858)This fully-online course will provide an in-depth look at legal issues and regulations affecting the environment. 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