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Wakulla news
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CONGRONS ~TO) LrM CLAW OF 2014


'1jThe Vakutta11

All-


rut.


Our 119th Year, 23rd Issue
Thursday, June 5, 2014


Published Weekly, Read Daily Three Sections

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century 75 Cents


Going the Distance


Briana Schubert sets goal to walk field at graduation


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema(_thewaku11anews.net


W hen a doctor
~told Wakulla

High School
senior Briana
Schubert to get used to
living in a wheelchair, she
had a choice let someone
else dictate her future, or
decide her own.
Thanks to supportive
family and friendly Shri-
ners, sporty pink crutch-
es, and sheer determina-
tion, Schubert will walk
the right of passage across
the football field with the
class of 2014 on gradua-
tion day.
Schubert said she and physi-
cal therapist Sheila Stephens
have practiced walking across
the field.
"It takes me six minutes to
get across the whole thing right
now," Schubert said. "I really just
want to be in step with my class-
mates. Walking with my crutches
is as close to walking and I've
ever gotten. I have these awesome
pink crutches; pink is my favorite
color, so the plan right now is to
use my crutches at graduation."
Schubert, now 18, was in a
wheelchair as a freshman at
WHS.
"I have cerebral palsy, and
my left hip was out of place,"
Schubert said. "I used to be on
my walker full time, but then it
got difficult, because it hurt really
bad. (My hip) was disintegrated
almost. My mom and I tried to
go to several different doctors,
but they kept saying that there
wasn't enough to work with on
my hip. Especially because I
have CP, no one wanted to try to
help me."
Schubert was born with spas-
tic cerebral palsy, sometimes also
termed bilateral spasticity.
"It means my muscles are tight
- tighter than they should be,"
Shubert said. "I was born early,
in January instead of March.
They don't know when I stopped
breathing, or for how long, but
the doctors know I just stopped
breathing. You know the eraser
on a pencil? I have a cyst, brain
damage, which is basically the
size of the tip of the eraser. I don't
have very good balance, and it
basically affects my muscles."
When a former doctor plainly
told Schubert she would never
know life outside of her chair, she
believed it at first.


NICOLE ZEMA
Wakulla High senior Briana Schubert, who was born with ce-
rebral palsy, has been practicing with "smart crutches" that
were developed by motocross racers, to walk the football field
with classmates at graduation June 6.


"Basically I was told to get
used to being wheelchair bound
the rest of my life, because there
was nothing else they could do,"
Schubert said. "To be honest, I
sort of surrendered to it because
I didn't know what else to do, and
I was in a lot of pain. It was hard
because I started feeling isolated,
kind of alone."
Schubert describes her mom,
Jeanette Wagner, as an advocate.
"She has always fought for
me," Schubert said. "So she said,
'Let's go get a second opinion.'
Wagner said her daughter's
hipbone was out of socket, and
it was ruining the cavity inside
of her hip, causing terrible pain.
"I kept looking for progressive
doctors, but (ours) was not that
way," Wagner said.
Fortunately the family had
developed an affiliation with the
Shriners, who wanted to help.
The Tampa Shriners, who were
incapable of offering the surgery,
referred Schubert to the St. Louis


Shriners.
"Their doctors, like a blessing,
said they can do it," Wagner said.
"So we flew up there in special
two-seat airplane. It was scary,
scary, scary."
Schubert said, "I always tell
people that St. Louis sort of re-
started my life. We went there in
January 2012, and my mom and
I were like, 'OK, this is our last
chance.'The doctors in St. Louis
decided to do a total hip replace-
ment on me in June 2012. And
they rotated my right leg. Before,
how I used to walk, my right leg
would turn in. So they made it
turn out."
The recovery process was
long, and Schubert was stuck in
a full-body cast, also known as
a spica. Schubert said she has
undergone 18 surgeries in her
life, so she was not unfamiliar
with the spica cast. The surgery
worked. Schubert reflected on
her journey.
Turn to Page 3A


Questions



raised about



insurance



contract

Pearce contends issue

is politically motivated

By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor thewakullanews.net

A thumbdrive was delivered to The
Wakulla News office this week that con-
tained information
about a health in-
surance contract
the school district
has with a local
insurance com-
pany whose offi-
cers made political
contributions to
the superintendent
and questioned
whether there was
something improp-
er.
The thumbdrive
includes docu- School Superintendent
ments that include Bobby Pearce
political contribu- __
tions to then-candidate Bobby Pearce, run-
ning for superintendent of schools, from
Rogers Gunter Vaughn Insurance president
Kevin Vaughn for $500, partner Bart Gunter
for $500, and Laraela Gunter of Tallahas-
see for $250.
Turn to Page 2A


OBITUARIES
Charlie Scarbrough
Leonard Donnell Young Sr.



INDEX
Public Notices ................................................................. Page 3A
The Opinion Page ........................................................... Page 4A
Street Beat ...................................................................... Page 5A
Church ............................................................................. Page 6A
Obituaries ....................................................................... Page 7A
Community ................................................................. Pages 8-9A
Sports ...................................................................... Page 10-11A
School ........................................................................... Page 12A
Outdoors ...................................................................... Page 13A
W ater W ays ................................................................... Page 14A
Sheriff's Report ............................................................. Page 15A
Natural Wakulla.........................Page 16A
W akulla News Extra! ........................................................ Page 1B
Taking Care of Business ................................................... Page 2B
W eek in W akulla ............................................................. Page 3B
W eekly Roundup .............................................................. Page 4B
Thinking Outside the Book...................Page 5B
Classifieds ........................................................................ Page 6B
Legal Notices ................................................................... Page 6B
Com ics ............................................................................. Page 9B
Readers Choice Ballot .................................................... Page 10B


Becky Cook is running for re-election to school board


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor thewakullanews.net

School Board mem-
ber Becky Cook an-


nounced this week that
she is running for an-
other term on the school
board.
Cook has served on
the school board since
1994, and said she is
proud of the district's
accomplishments dur-
ing her tenure.
She is being chal-
lenged in the election by
Chris Russell.
Last week, Wakul-
la was again named a
high-performing school
district, one of only 11
in the state.
"It is gratifying to
see all the hard work of
our great students and
teachers pay off in a way
that is recognized state-
wide," Cook said of the
high-performing des-
ignation. "Our parents
and community mem-
bers support the school
system and realize we
are all in this together
with the goal being our


children's success. I am
grateful to be a part of
such a high performing
district."
She is a full-time
school board member


and has volunteered in
numerous capacities
for the district from
classroom volunteer
to teaching Math Su-
perstars in elementa-


ry schools to painting
doors and pouring side-
walks. She serves as the
music minister at her
church, and has taught
music at the schools for


free, and spends two
days a week at Pre-K in
Sopchoppy and Medart.
About last year's ref-
erendum approved by
voters for a half-mill tax,
some have questioned
the timing of the special
election held in May
2013. Cook said the
school board was re-
sponding to the legisla-
ture's continued politics
with education dollars.
Cook said the school
board has been prudent
and fiscally responsible
with district tax dol-
lars. She noted that the
district is required by
law to have a 3 percent
reserve, but Wakulla
has kept a 5 percent
reserve.
She noted that Wakul-
la had been ranked No.
3 in the state in getting
the "most bang for the
buck."

Turn to Page 5A


School Board member Becky Cook with her grandchildren.




Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014


Charter committee meets ahead of public hearings


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema thewakullanews.net

The Wakulla County Charter
Review Commission passed a debt
policy and fund balance proposal,
withdrew school board proposals,
and set dates for two upcoming
public hearings. Five community
members attended the May 29 pub-
lic meeting at TCC Wakulla, which
was the record for the most public
attendance.
The proposal for the school super-
intendent to be appointed, instead
of elected, was withdrawn at the
meeting.
The school board contends that
the CRC has no authority over its
operations. A school board attor-
ney's findings stated the charter
must not address school board is-
sues because the Florida Constitu-
tion and Florida Statutes establish
school districts as a separate unit
of government in each county, and
designated the school board as its
governing body and the superinten-
dent as its managing official.
Byron Price, a former attorney
and member of the committee, also
found that the CRC has no authority
over the school board.
"The school board has their own
deal, so we'll drop that," CRC Chair-
man Chris Russell said.
Russell said it is the intention of
the commission to get an attorney's
opinion after the proposals are writ-
ten. The CRC has hired a law firm
independent of the county's law
firm, but the group is unhappy with
the lack of effort and high cost. The
CRC will organize proposals to be
reviewed altogether at the end of
the review process, which will save
money instead of paying for advice
along the way.
"If it comes to the end, and an at-
torney says, 'Hey, no, you can't do
that,' then we all accept that," Rus-
sell said. "The attorneys will have
the final word on the proposals, if
they can go forward or not. Remem-
ber this is the inaugural Charter
Review Commission, so we are in


NICOLE ZEMA
Charter Review Commission Chairman Chris Russell leads discussion
at the May 29th meeting at TCC Waklla.


essence learning as we go. There's
no evil intent here."
A proposal requiring the county to
adopt a debt policy was passed 11-3.
The proposed debt policy for Wakul-
la County Charter says the county
commission shall adopt, and adhere
to, a debt policy that regulates the
acceptance, issuance, and manage-
ment of debt. The debt policy shall
be integrated with operating and
capital budgets, and other finan-
cial policies. The county shall also
adhere to the fund balance policy.
Adherence to the fund balance and
debt policies helps ensure that debt
is issued and managed prudently
in order to maintain a sound fiscal
position and protect credit quality.
The CRC scheduled dates for two
public hearings, which will both
take place at the county commission
chambers at 6 p.m. on Thursday,
June 12 and Monday, June 23.
The CRC will present an overview
and list of proposals generated thus
far.
While the CRC will present the
overview, they will not provide in-
put. The purpose of the meeting is
to hear comments from the public,
which will allow three minutes for


each topic for new input at the be-
ginning, and public comment at the
end. Comment cards will be used,
much like the BOCC meetings.
CRC member Tim Jordan empha-
sized the importance of public input
at the hearings, especially because
the charter recommendations will
end up on the ballot at election time.
"We could change our minds,"
Jordan said.
For those who would like to view
the charter and previous meeting
minutes before the public hear-
ings, visit www.mywakulla.com/
local-governement/ charter-review.
Audio recordings of the meetings
can also be purchased at the County
Administration office.
Final votes on the charter amend-
ments will occur after the public
hearings at the CRC's June 26 pub-
lic meeting at TCC Wakulla.
County commissioners will hear
the charter review proposals on July
14 at the board meeting.
Russell provided a list of proposal
revisions discussed thus far. They
include:
Article 2.1 Non-Partisan
Elections throughout all locally
elected offices: All candidates shall


be nonpartisan in the Primary elec-
tion, settled by 50 percent + 1, the
top two candidates shall go to the
general election (unless in conflict
with Supervisor of Elections laws).
Also, there shall be five single mem-
ber districts for BOCC.
Single Member Districts for
BOCC: The proposal includes having
five districts (as it is now), however,
the voters in each district will vote
for their own BOCC representative
versus the positions being "at-large"
(voted on by the whole county).
"Some parts of the county feel
they are not adequately represented
and are overlooked by their district
representative," Russell said. "By
having the BOCC selected from
the district, they will be more ac-
countable to ensuring the interests
of their district are addressed.
However, on the flip side, the rep-
resentative may only concentrate
on their own district; running for
office county-wide is expensive and
this may allow for a greater pool of
candidates."
Article 2.3 Mandatory resi-
dency requirements: Candidates
would have to live in their district
six months before qualifying. Fur-
thermore, they would have to pro-
vide proof of this residency via a
declaration/oath stating they live
in the district, then provide three
other means of showing residency.
Article 6 Add a new subsec-
tion regarding "Special Elections/
Referendums" that reads all referen-
dums shall take place at the general
election
Article 6.1 Add language that
reads 60 percent of the electors
votes shall be required to pass char-
ter amendments and ordinances.
Article 6.2 All local officers
shall be subject to recall.
Article 7.4 Charter Review
Commission makeup in the future
New Article The BOCC shall
adopt, and adhere to, a debt policy
that regulates the acceptance, issu-
ance, and management of debt. The
BOCC shall also adhere to the fund
balance policy.


Questions raised about insurance contract


From Front Page

At the April 2 1
school board meet-
ing, the board unani-
mously approved a
contract with RGVI for


850.224.4960

www.fsucu.org


r

orOcvc



June
Card #1 Registration
Last Bike OL
Davidson, 174
Card #1 Registration
Crawfordvill,
Card #2 Hamaknockel


one year's services.
A document includ-
ed on the thumbdrive
quotes school board
member Melisa Taylor
confirming the con-
tract was not put out


, TOTAL ,5

VISION PLAN
EXAMS, LENSES, FRAMES
CONTACT LENSES
$15.74 MONTHLY
926-2200
i www.tuckerlifehealth.com
ross@tuckerlifeheaIth.com
S Ross E. Tucker, Agent
TUCKER LIFE-HEALTH INSURANCE, INC.


Habitat



for Humanity
Of Wakulla County


J Caring"W

LE POKE RUN

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9:30 a.m. until 10:30 a.m. -
ut at 10:45 Tallahassee Harley
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& grab a biscuit! Hardee's in
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for bid, and quotes her
husband, Larry Taylor,
as saying the matter
"Doesn't pass the smell
test."
Pearce denied any-
thing improper was
done, and said the issue
was a manufactured
controversy motivated
by politics and his at-
tempts to bring about
changes at Wakulla
High School.
Contacted by The
News, the Taylors were
both suprised to have
been named in the doc-
ument. Melisa Taylor
said of the no-bid con-
tract that, "As far as I
know, everything was
done correctly... Noth-
ing was done wrong."
A search of public
records emails and
other communica-
tions between Pearce,
the district's Chief Fi-
nancial Officer Randy
Beach and RGVI only
showed the men trying
to arrange times to get
together to discuss the
RGVI proposal to come
in to help advise the
district on insurance,
and especially coming
into compliance with
the Affordable Care Act,
also known as Obam-
acare.
Pearce said he had
first heard of RGVI
working with Leon
County Schools on
the issues and went to
Vaughn to see if they
could do the same thing
for Wakulla.
Vaughn said his com-
pany has worked with
Leon County Schools
for the past five years
advising them on insur-
ance issues. He said
Pearce had been a cli-
ent of his agency for 20
years or more, and said
of the campaign contri-
bution: "We certainly
support those out in
the community whose
work we feel is helping
make the community
stronger."
The contract has no
payment from Wakul-
la County Schools to
RGVI. The company
would be paid agent
fees for its dealings with
Capital Health Plan,
fees the district never


collected.
Emails from the dis-
trict show Beach sent
Pearce a health insur-
ance analysis in July
2013 that Pearce for-
warded to Vaughn. In
August, Vaughn and
Beach were emailing
back and forth to set
up an appointment to
discuss the proposal.
Vaughn wrote that "One
of the items we want to
review with you could
significantly reduce ex-
penses for the board
this year."
RGVI and Vaughn
have specialized in ACA
compliance, and even
held some workshops
for local businesses
through the Wakulla
Chamber of Commerce,
of which Vaughn is
president this year.
Based on the chain of
emails, most of the con-
tact was between Beach
and Vaughn, arranging
for district insurance
records to be reviewed
or times to meet, and
back-and-forth on the
proposed contract in
March and April.
All five school board
members voted to ap-
prove the contract in
April.
Of the November
2012 contribution from
Vaughn to his cam-
paign, Pearce said there
was no quid pro quo.
He and Vaughn are
friends, he said, adding
that Vaughn has been
his personal insurance
agent since RGVI pur-
chased Wakulla Insur-
ance several years ago.
Pearce said the con-
troversy appeared to
have been inspired by
certain current alle-
gations of impropri-
ety at the Leon School
Board where Jackie
Pons, superintendent
of schools there, over-
saw some construction
contracts being given
to local companies that
had contributed to his
election campaign. The
Leon School Board ap-
proved those construc-
tion contracts.
Pearce commented
that he was 99 per-
cent sure he knew the
source of the informa-


tion, and said it was a
purely political attempt
to discredit him. He
said that some people
were extremely upset by
him transferring Mike
Barwick as principal at
Wakulla High School,
and especially allowing
Barwick to bring in his
own transition team.
The move has miffed
some longtime teach-
ers at the school, many
of whom apparently
fear losing their jobs or
being transferred else-
where in the district.
As evidence of politi-
cal motivation in school
issues, Pearce pointed
to several proposals
being put forth by the
county's Charter Re-
view Committee (CRC),
including one to make
the superintendent's
position appointed
rather than elected.
Pearce said the dis-
cussion by the CRC
at their May 6 meet-
ing mentioned him by
name which was con-
firmed by an audio re-
cording of the meeting
- and there were dis-
cussions among CRC
members about wheth-
er Pearce should be al-
lowed to finish out his
term, comments which
Pearce said he took
personally and viewed
as politically motivated.
Pearce said he be-
lieved the ultimate goal
is to get an appointed
superintendent who
can be controlled by
three school board
members, and suggest-
ed one political party is
pushing that agenda.
The chair of the CRC
is Chris Russell, who is
a candidate for a seat
on the school board. He
said at a May 6 meeting
of the CRC that the idea
of an appointed super-
intendent was brought
to him by a couple of
people on social media.
The idea of an ap-
pointed superintendent
was brought up at the
CRC's first meeting
in April and members
asked County Attorney
Heather Encinosa if
they could go forward
with the idea, and she
told them she thought


SO.
The CRC has also
floated the idea of sin-
gle-member districts
and term limits for both
county commission-
ers and school board
members.
Pearce has sent
several legal opinions
from attorneys for the
district to Russell and
County Administrator
David Edwards con-
tending that the county
has no authority over
the school board it is a
completely autonomous
entity, operating un-
der separate articles of
the state constitution.
The opinions contend
that only the school
board not the county
government- can de-
termine matters such
as whether the school
superintendent should
be appointed or elected.
Russell told The
News last week that,
after receiving the legal
opinion, the propos-
al over an appointed
superintendent had
been withdrawn by
the CRC. On Tuesday,
after reviewing other
legal opinions on single-
member districts for
school board, Russell
sent out an email rec-
ommending the CRC
drop that proposal as
well.
Russell said the con-
cepts would have been
vetted by the CRC's
attorneys prior to send-
ing them on to county
commissioners and to
voters.
Russell has made
efforts to get the pub-
lic to attend the CRC
meetings, and praised
citizens who have taken
part in the process.
Melisa Taylor said
she was concerned that
Pearce feels some are
out to politically under-
mine him. "I agree with
at least 80 percent of
the decisions made by
Mr. Pearce and I believe
he has done some re-
ally, really good things
for the district and the
students and I sup-
port that.
"I want him to do a
fantastic job," she said.


www.thewakullanews.com




THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 3A


Going the distance: Briana Schubert sets goal to walkfield atgraduation


From Front Page

"While I've had a lot
of support, I've also had
a lot of doubt put on
me," Schubert said. "My
mom always told me
that I can do anything
you put your mind to,
but the doctor who told
me to get used to be-
ing wheelchair bound,
it like the doctor was
creating my destiny for
me. And I had a physi-
cal therapist when I was
five, who said I would
never write my name
because I couldn't form
the B with my hand,
so I basically learned
to not let anyone who
doubts you get into your
head. And if they do -
use that doubt as your
motivation. I'm going to
prove you wrong and
you don't know what
you're talking about."
Wagner considers
herself a lucky mom,
and said raising her
girls has actually been
easy, despite the chal-
lenges Schubert has
faced.
"Most important
thing is she has a great
attitude facing life chal-
lenges," Wagner said.
"Nothing's stopping
her."
Schubert's advice for
anyone facing a chal-
lenge or struggle is to
rise above the labels.


"Never let society put
a stereotype on you,"
Schubert said. "Even if
you don't have a disabil-
ity and you're just dif-
ferent in general. Never
let anyone tell you what
you're not able to do."
Schubert was vot-
ed WHS Homecoming
Queen in the fall. She
is also a member of
the medical academy at
school. Alyssa Schubert,
her twin sister, is class
salutatorian.
"I feel very lucky to
be surrounded by this
community," Schubert
said. "They all know
me. They all know my
goal. It's safe to say I
wouldn't have gotten


this far without them."
Schubert is focus-
ing on social work as a
career goal. She plans
to attend Tallahassee
Community College,
earn her AA, and then
transfer to FSU to pur-
sue a social work de-
gree. She was awarded a
Keys Committee schol-
arship for young adults
with disabilities.
"I want to focus on
helping other people
with disabilities become
good self advocates,"
Schubert said of her ca-
reer plans. "To be hon-
est, it took me a while to
become this confident. I
still have to work on it,
but I want to help, be-


ST. MARK


cause I used to feel like
I was inconveniencing
people when I need-
ed something. I didn't
feel confident enough
to stand up for what I
wanted. But I've gone
to youth leadership fo-
rums in the past, and it
teaches you to be a good
self advocate, and really
helps with self esteem.
So basically I want to
pay that forward."
Wakulla High School
paraprofessional Teresa
Douglas said she has
known Schubert since
her freshman year,
and has been working
closely with her since
autumn. Douglas said
someone recently asked


PUBIC N.TCE


PUBLIC

HEARING


THE CITY OF ST. MARKS
WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING
Community Redevelopment
Area Board
Date: June 12, 2014 at 6:55 pm
Location: 788 Port Leon Drive,
St. Marks 32355
The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9AM to 4:30
PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access
considerations should call the City Office at least 24 hours before
the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Office may be contacted
at (850) 925-6224. JUNE 5, 2014


Please


Recycle


why Schubert is both-
ering to make the long
walk across the field,
when she could take
the option to just sit
upfront.
"The point is she
wants to do it with her
classmates," Douglas
said. "Exactly like her
classmates. Don't un-
derestimate somebody,
because you're actu-
ally putting them in a
little box. She's awe-
some. She has a great
attitude. But don't think
she doesn't get mad or
get upset with herself,
because she does. But
she doesn't let it hold
her back."
In her free time,


Schubert enjoys hang-
ing out, reading and
writing, playing with
her dogs Sammy, Ella
and Sophie, and riding
her bike.
"I can pedal, but my
feet don't stay on regu-
lar pedals," Schubert
said. "So we glued a
shoe onto the pedal, and
my foot goes into the
shoe. I do it everyday
after school. But mostly
I enjoy spending time
with my mom, my sister
and my family."
Schubert said her fa-
vorite quote, by Kobi Ya-
mata, says: "She turned
her can'ts into cans,
and her dreams into
plans."


NOTICE OF AQUACULTURE LEASE
APPLICATIONS
NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to Section 253.70, Florida Stat-
utes, that the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services has
received applications from the following individuals: 1) Timothy R.
Jordan (65-AQ-1263); 2) Walter B. Dickson (65-AQ-1264); 3) Robert
Seidler (65-AQ-1265); 4) Deborah Keller and Jack W. Todd/Company
Name Oystermom, LLC (65-AQ-1266); 5) Sharon Fitzgerald (65-
AQ-1267); 6) Megan Diepietiantonio (65-AQ-1268); 7) Darrell Taylor
(65-AQ-1269); 8) John N. Taylor/Company Name Florida Native
Seafood LLC (65-AQ-1270); 9) Matthew Hodges (65-AQ-1271); 10)
Charles Painter (65-AQ-1272); 11) Karen Putch (65-AQ-1273); 12)
Deborah Logan/Company Name My-Way Seafood, Inc. (65-AQ-
1284); 13) Richard Tooke/Company Name St. Marks Seafood (65-
AQ-1340); (65-AQ-1341); 14) Philip G. Tooke/Company Name St.
Marks Seafood (65-AQ-1342); (65-AQ-1343); and 15) Keith H. Taft
(65-AQ-1344).
The lease applicants are requesting approval of sovereignty sub-
merged lands leases for the full water column for the purposes of
cultivating clams and oysters. Each proposed lease area would pre-
empt 1.50 acres, more or less, of sovereignty submerged lands, lying
northeast of Piney Island and west of Palmetto Island, in Oyster Bay,
in Wakulla County.
The sites are not located within an aquatic preserve. A map/diagram
identifying the locations and limits of the proposed activities accom-
pany this notice.
Anyone having any questions or comments regarding the proposed
leases should file them in writing with the Division of Aquaculture,
The Holland Building, Suite 217,600 South Calhoun Street, Tallahas-
see, FL, 32399-1300, on or before 5:00 p.m. on the 5th day of July,
2014.


p ant

a Billion



~es

Join The Nature
Conservancy to plant
a billion trees, one
tree at a time, in the
fight to end climate
change at
plantabillion.org

TeNature .
Conservancy i
Protecting nature Preserving ife;


NOTICE OF A FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT
The USDA, Rural Utilities Service has received an application for fi-
nancial assistance from the Wakulla County Board of County Commis-
sioners. The proposed project consists of construction of 1.2 MGD
Wastewater treatment plant located at Otter Creek Wastewater Treat-
ment Plant site located at 2146 Lawhon Mill Road, Sopchoppy, Wakulla
County, Florida.
As required by the National Environmental Policy Act and agency regu-
lations, the Rural Utilities Service prepared an Environmental Assess-
ment of the proposal that assessed the potential environmental effects
of the proposal and the effect of the proposal may have on historic
properties. The Environmental Assessment was published on March
20, 2014, for a 30-day public comment period. There were no public
comments received. Upon consideration of the applicant's proposal,
federal and state environmental regulatory and natural resource agen-
cies, and public input the agency has determined that the proposal will
not have a significant effect on the human environment and for which an
Environment Impact Statement will not be prepared. The basis of this
determination is because the construction of the proposed wastewater
treatment plant will be on existing developed lands.
Copies of the Environmental Assessment can be reviewed or obtained
at USDA Rural Development Office, 2741 Pennsylvania, Suite 5, Mar-
anna, Florida 32448; or by calling 850-526-2160 or by fax at 850-526-
2689. For further information, please contact Mary J. Gavin, Area Spe-
cialist at 850-526-2610.
A general location map of the proposal is shown below.
OITfERtCREEKWtTW[RTEJ1TFALT
WAYULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA


MAY 29, 2014


NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
The Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board
will hold a Public Hearing
on June 11, 2014 at 5:30pm
in the Commission Chambers,
29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Interested parties are invited to attend and participate.
Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla
County Board of County Commissioners Administration Office at least two (2) days prior
to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing &Voice Impaired
at 1-800-955-8771; or email atADARequest@mywakulla.com.
If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with
respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of
the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim
record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based. JUNE 5, 2014


NOTICE OF

WA KU LL AD DEI
C 0U N F PUBLIC HEARINGS

The Wakulla County
Charter Review Commission
will hold Public Hearings on
June 12, 2014 & June 23, 2014
at 6:00 p.m.
in the Commission Chambers,
29 Arran Rd.,
Crawfordville, FL 32327


PURPOSE OF MEETING:
To receive public comment on the
proposed amendments/revisions
to the Wakulla County Home Rule
Charter in accordance with
Ordinance #08-14.
To obtain a copy of the Home Rule
Charter and Proposed Amend-
ments/Revisions, please visit the
BOCC website at
www. mywaku I Ia. com/localgov-
ernement/charter review/index.
php or contact Jessica Welch
at 850-926-0919 ext. 706

If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency,
or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or
hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such
purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the pro-
ceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon
which the appeal is to be based.
Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact
the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Office
at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing &
Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.
com JUNE 5,12, 2014


(R DLBLICNOTICES


www.thewakullanews.com




Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com


The Opinion Paae


A It p


READERS WRITE:

Wetlandsprovide benefits for us all


Editor, The News:

Government has a
responsibility to pro-
mulgate rules that
benefit the entire com-
munity.
Not everyone ben-
efits from many rules
but they make our
community a better
place to live. Property
rights apply not only
to the individual land-
owner but to the com-
munity as a whole.
One example is
Wakulla County's
Code Enforcement Or-
dinance. If your neigh-
bor allows garbage,
rubbish or inoperable
vehicles to accumu-
late, is it their right to
do so since they own
the property? No, be-
cause there is an or-
dinance that prohibits
such activity in order
to protect the rights
of adjacent property
owners as well as the


community.
Similarly, destroy-
ing or filling wetlands
impacts adjacent
landowners and the
entire community.
Water takes the
path of least resis-
tance and flows to
low lying areas which
are often wetlands. If
a wetland is filled the
water must go some-
where else which is
often times the adja-
cent landowner.
If a landowner (or
developer) has the
"Right" to fill a wet-
land so that they can
make full use of their
property, that action
infringes on the rights
and property value of
adjacent landowners.
Many people wit-
nessed this first hand
when a family was
forced to use a boat
to access their home
after heavy rains as-
sociated with Tropical


Storm Debbie.
The adjacent land-
owner had brought in
fill to raise the level of
their property.
Whose property
lights are more impor-
tant? The one who has
the financial means
to displace the water
on their property or
the one who will be
the recipient of that
displaced water?
It's not just about
the property rights
of the landowner. It's
about property rights
for all who reside in
Wakulla County be-
cause of its great nat-
ural resources.
Wakulla County's
slogan is "The Natural
Place to be in Florida."
Let's keep it Natu-
ral.

Sandy Cook
Retired2888@centurylink.net


Group unfairly vilifies four commissioners


Editor, The News:

This is a plea of sorts
to the all the voters in
Wakulla who may have
fallen prey to false or
unsubstantiated argu-
ments over the past
several months.
Over a six month
period last fall and win-
ter, members of the
Wakulla Wetlands Alli-
ance were seen around
the county asking citi-
zens to sign a petition
that would allow the
repealed 2010 wetlands
ordinance to be placed
on the November ballot
as a referendum ques-
tion. For the first couple
of months, the attempt
to gain signatures was
done in a forthright
manner, but then the
strategy changed, per-
haps because the re-
sponse to the petition
was less than enthu-
siastic. During the last
several months of the
petition drive, a num-
ber of questionable ap-
proaches were taken to
fulfill the requirements
of the petition.
The wetlands alli-
ance people were seen
at the doorways of the
post office, a federal
building that is politi-
cally neutral, accosting
patrons as they left. A
county commissioner
was asked to leave the


senior center because
of an attempt to solicit
signatures from the se-
niors, thereby threat-
ening the 501(c) status
of the center. And nu-
merous attempts were
made to vilify those who
did not agree with the
wetlands people's ide-
ology.
It appeared that the
WWA was attempting
to convince citizens
that four of the com-
missioners were band-
ing together to prevent
Wakullans from voting.
These commissioners
did not deserve this
type of malignant at-
tack, especially when
the petition finally was
validated and their ap-
proval was needed to
have it placed on the
November ballot.
These commission-
ers were the ones who
stood up for the people's
right to vote in Novem-
ber while the WWA tried
to suppress the people's
right to vote. The ar-
rows were being shot at
four people elected by a
majority of Wakulla citi-
zens, yet when it came
down to the final deci-
sion, one commissioner
did not want it to go on
the ballot and four did.
Each of these four
people obviously values
the legislative process
over ideology. They have


pledged to consider the
needs of the entire com-
munity, not just the
desires of a special in-
terest group attempting
to control the future
of Wakulla through a
single issue.
Most of us have voted
for one or more of the
men who sit on our
county commission and
for the WWA to insinu-
ate that they are trying
to deprive citizens of
any of their govern-
mental rights is beyond
reason.
The commissioners
are our friends, neigh-
bors and representa-
tives. It is delusional to
think that to be opposed
to the referendum is to
be a part of a conspiracy
intended to hurt the
county they serve.
The commissioners
reasons for repealing
the wetlands ordinance
appear to be based on
economic protection
for the county and the
rights of the people to
maintain the value and
use of their own prop-
erty.
No one group should
be able to take away
citizen rights regardless
of how important they
think they and their is-
sues are.

Jan H. Colvin
Crawfordville



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thewakullanews.com


readers speak out


Crawfordville reunion was success


Editor, The News:

Our sincere thanks to The Wakulla
News for their help in sponsoring our
event and for all who helped us with
our recent Crawfordville High School
reunion.
We have received many compli-
ments on the wonderful food, the
great quartet, and the entire program.
I must confess that the "lapse in
time" at getting the food to the tables
was all my fault. I thought it would
be nice to have everyone take a seat
and be waited upon. Although no one
gripped, they would have been served
in half the time if I had let the caterer
do it his way. He has served us well
in the past and always got everyone
served in record time.
Everyone commented on the polite
and accommodating manner of our


young servers from Wakulla High
School.
Hats off to our energetic superin-
tendent, Bobby Pearce. If I were still
in the army and had just four more
men like him under my command, I
could win many battles.
May I offer our most sincere and
heartfelt thanks and may God bless
you all.


Kit Tucker
Jean Dykes
Betty Jo Green
Benita Worrell
Evelyn DiNunzio
Agnes Lord
Dural Raker
Donald Legrand Tucker
Crawfordville Reunion Committee


Don't lock wetlands into 5-0 board vote


Editor, The News:

It is shocking that the
Wakulla Wetlands Alli-
ance wants to lock the
future of our wetlands
into something as dif-
ficult to maneuver as a
5-0 commission vote or a
second referendum vote.
As one who supports


wetland protection I feel
that this is frightening.
Should there be new
technology, new scien-
tific revelations about
sustainable wetlands or
an as yet unidentified
Wakulla wetland issue,
a referendum that is dif-
ficult to rewrite, modify
or amend might limit


local response to an
important time-sensitive
concern.
I truly feel that this
referendum restricts
the county's long-range
ability to protect wet-
lands.

Linda Guyer
Crawfordville


Wetlands ordinance will increase taxes


Editor, The News:

There's a lot of hub-
bub going around about
this wetland ordinance
petition that everyone
should vote against in
November. In keeping
with the mantra of my
adolescent hero I've
been thinking all along,
"What? Me worry?" After
all I don't live in or near
a wetland.
Heck, when the pool
guy dug my 8-foot deep
pool he didn't even hit
any ground water. I
don't live on the beach
at Shell Point, Live
Oak Island, on any of
the rivers, and I don't
own property I'd like
to develop. "What? Me
Worry?"
Unfortunately I've
had to grow out of my
emotional teenage years
and face the reality that
the United States today
is a place where every
decision made by our
government, at every
level, has a monetary
effect on me. This or-
dinance makes taxable
land in the Wakulla
County unusable by its
owner.
Again, who cares


right? My land is high
and dry, no raised sep-
tic tank on my property.
But again after fur-
ther review, and using
a little foresight, what
would you do if you
owned and paid taxes
on property the local
government now says
you can't use, or even
touch for that matter? It
doesn't take a New York
lawyer to know that
lawsuits are going to
fly if this overreaching,
redundant ordinance is
allowed to stay on the
books.
Now this is where you
come in. First, you and
your tax bill will be on
the hook for these law-
suits and attorney bills
caused by this petition.
Not to mention that
those lawsuits will also
prove that the landown-
ers whose land has now
been "taken" by the gov-
ernment will no longer
be on the tax roll. At
that point we all know
what happens. The lo-
cal government will just
throw up it's hands and
say, "Oh well, now we
have less money we'll
have to cut the budget."
If you believe that I


have some wetland to
sell you.
No, your taxes will
be raised to make up
the difference in the
tax base lost due to this
land grab.
So the choice is sim-
ple, vote yes if you don't
care that you or your
friends will lose your
property rights. Vote yes
if you want your taxes
to increase, probably
significantly.
Or vote NO if you
believe that the state
laws already on the
books are sufficient to
protect our wetlands
just as they do in 65
other counties across
the state.
We're already paying
for two levels of "envi-
ronmental protection"
- federal with the En-
vironmental Protection
Agency and at the state
level with the Depart-
ment of Environmental
Protection.
We don't need further
intrusion on our prop-
erty rights by our local
government.

Larry Taylor
Larryt 1158@yahoo. com


Thanks for support offishing tournament


Editor, The News:

On behalf of myself
and the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office, I would
like to thank all of our
wonderful sponsors who
have given generously
to make the 17th An-
nual Children's Fishing
Tournament a success
this May. This year the
tournament was held on
May 17.
The children who
spend the morning fish-
ing for a variety of spe-
cies of fish obviously
have a great time spend-
ing time on the water
with their families. But
the tournament is also
about introducing our
young people to the life-
time sport of fishing.
The smiles on the
faces of the children as
they catch fish and win


their trophies and rods
and reels are priceless.
None of this would be
possible without the
generosity of the spon-
sors and the great work
of the WCSO and Parks
and Recreation Depart-
ment volunteers.
The following individ-
uals had a part in mak-
ing the event a success:
Wakulla County
Parks and Recreation,
in-kind; Wakulla County
Sheriffs Office, in-kind;
Wakulla County Sheriffs
Volunteers, in-kind; St.
Marks Refuge Associa-
tion, in-kind; Amazing
Mail Solutions, reduced
price for services; An-
gelo's Restaurant, $200;
Bernard J. Sloan, $100;
Coastal Optimist Club of
Wakulla, $100; Crum's
Mini Mall, water, ice,
bait and tackle; Florida


Light Tackle Sport Fish-
ing, $150; G and C No
Shoe Enterprises, $100;
Grist Farms, $100; Har-
rison Bail Bonds, $100;
Pepsi Cola, in-kind; Fish
Florida, rods and reels;
T -n-T Hideaway/Wilder-
ness Way, kayak trip
grand prize; Kast Net
restaurant, $100; Total
Care Dental, $100; and
Walter C. Dodson Jr.,
$25.
I would also like to
thank Moon Walkers,
Party Tents and More;
Flowers Bakery and
Mac's Meats for provid-
ing valuable assistance
in making the event
such a positive experi-
ence for our youths.
Sincerely,

Charlie Creel
Wakulla County Sheriff


Letters to the Editor
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. It's preferred that you email it to edi-
tordthewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville
FL 32326 or drop it off at The News office, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway.
Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the author's
first and last name, mailing address and telephone number for verification pur-
poses. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length
and clarity.


TO alkutla fQtW5
The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at
3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.

Editor/manager: William Snowden.........editorTthewakullanews.net

Reporter: Nicole Zema ............................................... nzemaathew akullanew s.net

Advertising: Lynda Kinsey...........lkinseyTthewakullanews.net

Advertising/reception: Denise Folh.........deniseTthewakullanews.net

Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ........... advertisingTthewakullanews.net
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo.
Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.




THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 5A


< STREET BEAT >
Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question:

A .egtaround town:/

'What is One new ingyou "would learn nght now?


GEORGE MORRIS
BENCHMARK BRECTgAS
'"Study Rerpetology,
the study ofsnakes
/ and reptiles. I am
on my way now to a
'call tj remove and
/ relocate a snake."


l O.
KEITH AUSTIN
BADC tK & "RE
'"How to use a
computer. There's so
...chyou calearue
rough a computer,
you can also use it
tQAocatvfamily' and/-
frilends."/


TERRY WRIGHT
ST.MARK81 WDE
"I wouId like to
lean the art of
ca &ning foo4"!


"Wpavingf-Therelis a
lady in Tallahassee who
tches classes The
are several different types
of weaving and I'm doing
it! There is a lady in
CrawfordvIle wlh6teach s
the cla also."


SHANNON VERNON'k
HEALTH PARENT

"To hunt with a bow.,
anarroW. I w uld
like to be a afemale

professional bow
hunt-er, and getAaid
'for it!"l


C'00 101, .


Becky Cook running

for re-election to

school board
From Front Page

"The biggest issue we have is the legislature," Cook
said. While the base student funding from the state is
a little higher, the required local effort that's local
taxes continues to go up.
She noted that the legislature's punitive attitude
toward school boards included requiring members to
vote on their own salary. Other constitutional officers'
salaries are set with a formula based on population.
Cook says she's running again because she loves
what she's doing. All three of her boys, now grown,
went to Crawfordville Elementary, Wakulla Middle
and then Wakulla High School. Now she has four
grandchildren and another on the way.
She grew up in Tallahassee and attended Godby
High School and Bill Montford, now state senator
and CEO of the Florida Association of District School
Superintendents, was her principal.
One remarkable thing about her 20 year tenure on
the school board is that she's never missed a meet-
ing even when her husband was in the hospital.
During her term, the school board has completed
more than $40 million in building and renovation
projects, including the purchase of 101 acres where
Riversink Elementary was built in 2008. The land is
expected to satisfy the needs of the district for the
next 10 to 15 years.
Cook says her task as a school board member is
to set policy and make sure employees can do their
jobs. "How can you do that unless you know what
they do?" she asks, explaining why she's taken on
volunteer tasks like varnishing gym floors and doing
yardwork at schools. "Anything I expect them to do I
should do myself," she said.
She's proud of the new vocational programs added
- auto mechanics started this year, and welding will
be added in the coming year.
The district's overall success is due to a team ap-
proach and everybody on staff, from teachers to bus
drivers and lunchroom staff to administrators is
part of the team.
We have one of the best school systems in the state,
she said. "Are we perfect? No. But we're not going to
sit on our laurels."


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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014


Church


Church Briefs


- End of school bash with
Lake Ellen Baptist

Lake Ellen Baptist Church is
hosting an end-of-school com-
munity bash for kids in Hudson
Park on June 5, from 4 p.m. to 7
p.m.
Free hot dogs and drinks will
be available in addition to games
and "bouncies."
Parents can also register kids
from 3 years old through 5th
grade for Vacation Bible School
which begins at Lake Ellen on
Sunday, June 8, and ends with
Commencement and Family Fun
Night on Friday, June 13.
Come celebrate school being
out and get registered for an ex-
citing week of free fun, food and
learning opportunities at "Agency
D3: Discover, Decide, Defend."
For more information, call
926-5265 or visit our website
at www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.
org. 4495 Crawfordville Hwy., in
Medart.

- Friendship P.B. Church
to hold revival


Pastor Darrell Johnson (pic-
tured above) from Bristol will
lead revival services at Friend-
ship Primitive Baptist Church,
165 Friendship Church Road in
Medart, from Sunday, June 8, to
Friday, June 13.
The Sunday service is at 6
p.m. Monday through Friday
services are at 7 p.m.
All are invited to come worship
with us.

- Pioneer Baptist to host
VBS on June 9-13

Pioneer Baptist Church hosts
community wide Vacation Bible


School Monday June 9 through
Friday June 13.
This year's theme is Arrow
Island Adventures. Students will
learn to choose God's way in ev-
ery area of their life while explor-
ing in a tropical island setting.
They will learn new crafts, new
songs, and new mission oppor-
tunities.
Classes are for students from
pre-kindergarten through the fifth
grade. Class times are 6 p.m.
to 9 p.m. A light dinner meal is
provided each night.
Registration begins the first
night, Monday, June 9. There is
no cost for attending VBS.
Pioneer Baptist Church is lo-
cated north of the Spring Creek
Highway and the Dr. Martin
Luther King, Jr. Memorial Road
intersection. The church address
is 486 Beechwood Drive. Please
call Vacation Bible School Direc-
tor Dottie Hall at 850-445-9618
for more information. We look
forward to seeing you each
night.

- New grief support group
forming

A new grief support group -
"Journey to Hope and Healing"
- starts June 9 at 7 p.m. at the
Crawfordville United Methodist
Church, 176 Ochlockonee St. in
Crawfordville, Florida.
For more information, please
contact 926-7209.


- Zion Hill PB. Church to
honor Elder Donaldson

Zion Hill Primitive Baptist
Church will be honoring the 14th
pastoral anniversary of Elder
Ervin Donaldson Jr. on June 22
with service at 11 a.m. with Elder
Herbert Donaldson Sr., pastor
of Mount Moriah Primitive Bap-
tist Church in Midway, a 3 p.m.
service with Elder Matthew Falk,
Popular Springs Missionary Bap-
tist Church in Wigham, Ga.
Zion Hill is located at 942
Sopchoppy Highway in Sop-
choppy. Pastor is Elder Ervin
Donaldson Jr.

Staff reports


religious views and events


OUT TO PASTOR

The war on common sense


By JAMES L. SNYDER

Listening to news
programs, particularly
the yakity-yak-my-view-
is- the- only-right-view
programs you might
come away with the idea
that there is a war on
everything.
The list goes some-
thing like this, the war
on: Women... Poverty...
Drugs... Terrorism and
on and on I could go.
You name it, there is a
war addressed.
Most of the time,
someone is for a certain
"war" because of some
political advantage it
will give them in the
public's eye. I guess you
cannot be a politician
unless you are willing
to poke somebody in
the eye!
Is it just me or have
you noticed people will
create a war on some-
thing just to get in the
limelight?
Do not let this
thought get too far, but
I think it would be a
whole lot cheaper dur-
ing election time for
politicians just to write
checks and send out to
all the voters saying,
"Here's $1,000, vote for
me." It would be a lot
cheaper in the long run
and who couldn't use
$1,000 right about now.
This war I am speak-
ing of is rather covert
and does not get any
time on the national or
cable news. Everybody
knows it is going on but
nobody wants to point it
out. That is, until now.
The greatest war go-
ing on in our society
today is the war on com-
mon sense. There, I said
it. And I stand by what
I said.
Perhaps somebody
could argue that there
has never been a time
in our history where we
had too much common
sense. That may be true,
but it seems that people
today are going out of
their way to make com-
mon sense nonsense.
I must confess that
common sense is not


as common as it once
was and perhaps never
was. I like to think that
somewhere along the
line a few good people
have entertained com-
mon sense.
There are so many
laws in our land these
days that it is impos-
sible keep up with them
all. There must be a law
somewhere particularly
in Washington, D.C.
that says any law that
makes sense has to
be immediately thrown
out. We have politicians
who would not recog-
nize common sense if
it bit them on the nose.
It would be nice if
just some time these
politicians would sim-
ply come together and
establish a law, mere-
ly one law that makes
sense. In order to make
one law that makes
sense they have to have
999 other laws that con-
fuse it to such a degree
that it no longer makes
sense.
Common sense would
tell me, for example, if I
do not have enough
money I cannot pur-
chase a certain thing.
That does not work in
Washington. Oh no. In
Washington, affording
something financially is
never part of the equa-
tion. The only thing
important in that equa-
tion is, does this make
somebody who voted
for me happy enough to
vote for me again?
It takes a lot of good
old-fashioned common
sense to take care of
money and run my
household budget in
such a way that the
Gracious Mistress of
the Parsonage is happy.
Taking care of mon-
ey and making sure
that we do not spend
money on things we
do not need is part of
the common sense that
helps me balance my
checkbook month after
month.
Common sense says
I need to balance my
checkbook.
Washington sense


says, write checks un-
til you have no more
checks to write then
order more checks.
It would be great if I
could do that with my
home budget. If I do not
have enough money one
month all I need to do is
go down into the base-
ment and print a bunch
of money to make up the
difference.
Not only is common
sense eliminated from
the financial aspects of
our country, but health
issues are also thrown
to the curb.
Common sense would
tell me I need to eat
properly.
Washington sense
says, eat what I tell you
to eat. I have seen some
of the stuff that they,
the government, wants
us to eat. The govern-
ment wants to come into
our school cafeterias
and force-feed our chil-
dren a proper diet.
In most of these
schools, I cannot speak
for all of them, the chil-
dren have the common
sense to throw it away.
Common sense says if
it does not look good or
taste good it probably
ain't good for you. (Par-
don my French.)
The Bible has a lot
to say about this. My
favorite verse of Scrip-
ture is, "Therefore to
him that knoweth to do
good, and doeth it not,
to him it is sin" (James
4:17).
I need to make com-
mon sense the standard
of my day-to-day living
based upon the com-
mon teaching of the
Word of God.

The Rev. James L.
Snyder is pastor of the
Family of God Fellow-
ship in Ocala. Call him
at (866) 552-2543 or e-
maljamessnyder2gatt.
net.


IWkla oshl*p etesd


I Crawfordville Area I


Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Crawfordville
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
"Co,,e&hopWk, U"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School.................. 10a.m.
Sunday Worship................ 11 am.
Evening Worship................. 6 p.m.
W ednesday Service .................. 7 p.m .
& Youth Service ........................ 7p.m .
Royal Rangers ........................... 7 p.m.
M issionettes .............................. 7p.m .



Coastal


SBig Bend
IHospice
yowr hometown hospice Ucensed since 1983
2889C Crawfordville Hwy
850.926.9308
bigbendhospice.org


First

Pentecostat
cburcb of crawforbviLLe

Pastor Joseph Abraham
Sun. Services 2:30
Wed. Evening Prayer 7:30
In depth home bible studies
are available

850.728.9070
3055 Crawfordville Hwy.


4 Crawfordville United
Methodist Church
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209
Ochlockonee &Arran Road "Come Grow With Us"www.crawfordville-umc.org


Sopcboppy


spirit Life Church
Sopchoppy Pentecostal
131 Rose Street. Sopchoppy FL
-Unted9629000
Schedule of Services
Methodist SUNDAY
Refreshments 930am
Church SundaySchool 10:00am
IWorship 1100am
Sunday School 9:45 a.m. Prayer 6:00pm
Worship I I a.m. WEDNESDAY
Pastor Kevin Hall Supper 6:00pm
Pioneer Club:
850-962-251 I YouthandAdultClasses 630pm
Blood Bought
Word Taught
Spirit Wrought
Sopchoppy

Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St. PastorJohn S.Duning
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. (Fro wwRhea oBbeTag ee
Worship ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...7 p.m. Your church ad here!
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses availae.,,.,
please call for details, U
962-2213


Promise Land

THRIFT STORE
Open 9-5
Closed Sun. & Wed.
Mon.----- Furniture 25%
Tues.----- Seniors 25%
Fri. & Sat.- Select Items 50%

926-3281
3299 Crawfordville Hwy.
Approx. I mile S. of County Courthouse
www promiselandministries.org


Wakulla
Station


Medart Area


St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church
Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 745-8359
Sunday Mass 10:00 am
Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm
Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs
36t9C st. .


V. Sanurda of Pevenmonth
Confessions 10:30- 11:30 and 3:00 4:00
Adoration Mass 10:00 am

avaiabl. 85509763


CKShurh
LWEY's



DISCOVER DECIDE DEFEND Jt -3

Grab your ID and head on over to Agency D3'f
Come join us as we investigate the iruth about Jesus! Ages 3
through 5th grade will tour the sites of Vacation Bible
School, starting Sunday, June 81, at 6 p.m. and going through
Friday, June 13'b. In this one-week adventure you will drive
home answers through Bible stories, crafts, motivating music
and games. For more information call the Church office at
926-5265,


r Big Bend
Hospice
your hometown hospice, cened since 1983
2889C Crawfordville Hwy
850.926.9308
bigbendhospice.org


Trinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School1926-5557


www.thewakullanews.com




www.thewakullanews.com


Obituaries


Charlie Scarbrough
Leonard Donnell Young Sr.


Charlie Scarbrough

Brother Charlie
Scarbrough, 81, of
Valdosta, Ga., died
Saturday, May 31,
2014 at Langdale
Hospice House in
Valdosta.
He was born in Tal-
lahassee on March
11, 1933, to the late
Sam and Trudie
Green Scarbrough
and grew up in Sop-
choppy. He was the
owner and operator
of Southern Elec-
tric from 1959-1987.
Brother Scarbrough
was a member of
Crossroads Bap-
tist Church where
served as the Senior
Adult Minister. He
had pastored Morven
Baptist Church and
conducted church


services for the resi-
dents of Langdale
Place. He also served
as chaplain for Hal-
cyon Hospice and
South Georgia Medi-
cal Center.
Survivors include
his daughter and
son-in-law, Cheryl
and David Cole, and
two granddaughters,
Logan Cole and Ellie
Cole, all of Valdosta;
two brothers-in-law
and sisters-in-law,
Eugene and Kathi
Gunter of Milled-
geville, Ga., and
Lamar and Diane
Gunter of Charlotte,
N.C.; nephews, Mace
Gunter, Clay Gunter,
Ben Gunter, Kendall
Gunter; nieces, Tova
Gunter, Becky Pitt-
man, Juli Sinski and
Kari Cochran.


Leonard Donnell Young Sr.

Leonard Donnell Young Sr.,
78, died on Sunday, June 1,
2014 in Valdosta, Ga.
He was born in Spring Creek
and was a member of Panacea
Full Gospel Church.
Visitation was held on Wednes-
day, June 4, 2014 from 5 p.m.
to 7 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home,
Harvey-Young Chapel in Craw-
fordville. Funeral services will
be Thursday, June 5, 2014 at
1 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home,
Harvey-Young Chapel in Craw-
fordville. Burial will follow at
Friendship Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, donations
may be made to Pruitt Health-
care Crestwood, Alzheimer's


He was prede-
ceased by his wife,
Virginia Gunter
Scarbrough; and an
infant son.
Funeral services
were held on Wednes-
day, June 4, 2014, at
2 p.m. at Crossroads
Baptist Church with
Dr. Ken Alford of-
ficiating. Burial will
follow in McLane
Riverview Memorial
Gardens. The fam-
ily received friends
on Tuesday, June 3,
from 6 to 8 p.m. at
the funeral home.
Condolences to
the family may be
conveyed online at
www. mclanecares.
com. Carson McLane
Funeral Home was in
charge of arrange-
ments.


Unit, 415 Pendleton Place, Val-
dosta GA 31602 or United Hos-
pice of Valdosta, 407 Cowart
Ave., Valdosta GA 31602.
Survivors include a son, Wil-
liam Young of Medart; daugh-
ter, Patricia White (Danny) of
Tallahassee; a sister, Mary Ann
Whaley (Herman) of East Pal-
atka; 11 grandchildren and 24
great-grandchildren.
He was predeceased by his
wife of 55 years, Glendell Young;
two sons, Lamar Young and Don-
nell Young.
Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel in Crawfordville
is assisting the family with ar-
rangements (850-926-3333 or
bevisfh.com).


Library News...


By SCOTT JOYNER
Library Director

BOOK
EXTRAVAGANZA
SATURDAY

Join us this Satur-
day for our June Book
Extravaganza from 9
a.m. until noon in our
Main Meeting Room.
As always there will be
thousands of books,
audio and video for
your browsing plea-
sure.
We will be joined
by other community
groups as well as a
local representative
from Melaleuca who
will explain how buy-
ing products from
their product line can
raise funds for the
Friends of the Library.
Find some great beach
reads, flicks to watch,
and great audio to
listen to on those long
summer drives. Re-
member, all funds
raised go directly to-


ward the Friends of
the Library and help
pay for our Summer
Program among other
needed WCPL expens-
es.

SUMMER READING
BOOKS AT WCPL

With the nearing
end of the school year,
we are beginning to
stock up on copies
of the summer read-
ing books requested
by Wakulla County
Schools for all of the
great students in the
county.
Some are already
on hand with more
coming in daily. We
are doing things a
little differently this
year with allowing only
two of the Summer
Reading Books to be
checked out per card
at a time, and only for
two weeks.
This hopefully will
allow us to work our
way through the hold
lists quicker than in
the past and allow
more students access
to these materials.
Don't wait until
school is about to start
in August, please al-
low your child to read
the Summer Books
they want early so
they don't miss out on
this year's great titles.


Please contact us with
any questions.

WCPL SUMMER
PROGRAM
BROCHURES

Keep an eye out this
week as we've passed
out our annual bro-
chures about all the
great programs well be
providing the children
of Wakulla County this
summer. This year's
theme is, Fizz, Boom,
Read, and will have
a science focus. We
also have many great
performers which will
be coming to see us
for the first time, as
well as visits from the
Challenger Learning
Center, Tallahassee
Museum of Natural
Science (Jr. Museum),
as well as bringing
back our Cinemani-
acs program for teens
where they will work
on a short film over the
summer to be shown
at the end. All of the
fun this summer is free
to the public thanks to
the continued support
of the Friends of the
Library who sponsor
our Summer Program
each year. Sign up will
be next Thursday eve-
ning from 6 to 8 p.m.
and next Friday from
10 a.m. to noon.



First Baptist Church
CRAWFORD VILLE
SUNDAY SERVICES
8:30 am Contemporary Worship
9:45 am Sunday School
11:00 am Traditional Worship
5 pm Discipleship Training
6 pm Evening Service
WEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES
6:30 pm
RA's & GA's for elementary
7 pm
Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study
3086 Crawfordville Highway
(One block south of Courthouse)
850-926-7896
www.crawfordvillefbc.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 7A

BUCKHORN NEWS



Salvation is available to


every person


By ETHEL SKIPPER

Salvation is available
to every person, but it
should be noted that the
benefits are not just in
the future.
Salvation brings great
benefit to believers in
the present, as children
of God made righteous
in Him and gifted with
the Holy Spirit.
Salvation encom-
passes so mcuh more
than rescue from the
power of death, and
separation from God.
The Christian enjoys
numerous benefits of
salvation. Therefore if
any man be in Christ,
he is a new creature -
old things are passed


away, behold all things
are become new.
There are many ben-
efits of being a joint
heir with Jesus. A life of
salvation is the life God
intended for us, saved,
delivered from dark-
ness, healed, preserved
through His word, and
made whole physically,
mentally and spiritually.

Children's Day is
celebrated the second
Sunday in June. Some
churches will let the
children play a special
part in the regular ser-
vice. Spiritual dance,
sing, quote scripture,
give thanks. We invite
you to fellowship with
us on our Children's
Day service.
Macedonia Church
welcomes you on Sun-
day to their Children's
Day gar rally. It is an
annual program where
each child with a gar
will receive a gift. The
children will take part in
the church service.
On Friday, June 13,
Skipper Temple Church
will have a service on
the Seven Churches


- Revelation 2,3, chap-
ters. There will be seven
speakers. Everyone is
welcome.
On Sunday, June 15,
Skipper Temple Church
will come together and
give God the praise as
we worship our seventh
year here on Surf Road.
Skipper Temple is lo-
cated at 159 Surf Road
in Sopchoppy.

Happy birthday
greets to the following
people in June: Troy
Rosier, Joshua Man-
ning, Tommie Webster,
Daisy M. Donaldson,
Gwen Green, Willie
Skipper Jr., Pastor Ethel
M. Skipper, Lachrians
Skipper, and Lattreal
Skipper.
Happy belated birth-
day to Elder Greg Rosier
from your church fam-
ily.

Let us continue to
remember the sick and
shut-in, those in the
jails, hospitals, the
homeless, and all the
families that have lost
a loved one. Let us pray
for each other.


Medart Assembly seeks donations


for student fine arts trip


By MATTHEW RAY
Youth Pastor

Back in April, we took
about 15 students to
compete in a District
Fine Arts event hosted
by the Assembly of God.
Ten of the 15 progressed
and were invited to com-
pete at the National lev-
el. During the week of
July 28 through Aug. 1
we are taking these 10
students to compete
in a National Fine Arts
Competition in Colum-
bus, Ohio.
We are competing in
various Categories such
as: Vocal Solos, Photog-
raphy, 2D Art, Songwrit-
ing, Solo Drama pre-
sentations, and Group
Drama presentations.
The purpose of Fine
Arts, is to help students
Discover, Develop, and


Contest seeks

spiritual poets
A $1,000 grand prize
is being offered in a spe-
cial religious poetry con-
test sponsored by the
Rainbow Poets, free to
everyone. The deadline
for entering is June 14.
To enter, send one
poem only of 21 lines or
less to Free Poetry Con-
test, PO Box 21, Talent
OR 97540. Or enter on-
line www.rainbowpoets.
com.
Be sure your name
and address appears on
the page with your poem.
A winner's list will be
sent to all entrants.











STRONG

& JONES

Funeral Home, Inc.
551 West Carolina St.
Tallahassee, FL 32301

Gracious,

Dignified Service


"7ESH.


224-2139
Day or Night
Pre-Arrangements
Silver Shield
Notary


DARRELL L. LAWRENCE
LINN ANN GRIFFIN
J. GRIFFIN
Licensed Funeral Directors


Deploy their ministry
gifts and talents in ser-
vice to God's Kingdom
and in service to others.
We focus on integrity
and character develop-
ment.
We teach our stu-
dents not to build a
name for themselves but
to serve others in com-
passion and care.
The trip costs about
$600 per person. Which
puts us at a $12,000
budget including
adult chaperones. We've
raised about $2,500 to


this point and will be do-
ing various fundraising
within the community to
earn funds.
We are asking for do-
nations from anyone
willing to help support
us in this endeavor.
If anyone desires to
help monetarily, please
send all offerings to:
Medart Assembly
NFAF Trip fund, c/o
Matt Ray, Youth Pastor,
P.O. Box 190, Crawford-
ville FL 32326.


In Loving Memory
of

Richard Wayne

Nicholson

Sept. 15, 1949 June 4, 2013

If love could have saved you,
you would have
lived forever.


Book sale is Saturday


KAREN

=

E=









..=




ANY Times best-selling author
Karen Kingsbury LIVE
M-F 3 to 5 p.m. on 94.1 FM

Listen online at Wave94.com
WAKU 94.1 FM 926-8000




Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014




Community


Iris Garden Club sending students



to environmental conference


PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
The Iris Garden Club will send local teenagers Emmylou Chason and Rafel Fortier to attend a
four-day environmental conference based at Wakulla Springs State Park in July.


by LYNN ARTZ
Special to The News

The Iris Garden Club will send
two local teenagers to attend a
4-day environmental conference
based at Wakulla Springs State
Park in July. Emmylou Chason
and Rafel Fortier will attend the
annual conference known as
SEEK (Save the Earth's Environ-
ment through Knowledge). The
Iris Garden Club will pay their
conference expenses including
lodging, meals, and activities.
The SEEK Conference is
sponsored by the Florida Fed-


eration of Garden Clubs for high
school students entering grades
10- 12. The conference focuses
on today's critical environmen-
tal issues and attracts students
from across Florida. Conference
activities include field trips,
workshops, and information on
careers in environmental sci-
ence and conservation. Students
swim, hike, and canoe, too!
Emmylou Chason is 15 and a
10th grader. She lives on a farm
and takes care of a menagerie of
farm animals. Her family was
named Wakulla County's farm
family of the year this past year.


Emmylou worked as a volunteer
at the Green Living Expo.
Rafel Fortier is 15 and has
been homeschooled since third
grade. He enjoys film and has
created and posted several
films on YouTube. Rafel plays
percussion in the Wakulla
High School Band and the
Tallahassee Youth Orchestra's
Symphony. He plans to study
filmmaking and music in col-
lege. Rafel also enjoys nature,
photography, and soccer. One
day, he hopes to day travel
around the world and experi-
ence different cultures.


www.thewakullanews.com


happenings in our community


ST. MARKS STONE CRAB FESTIVAL



Vendor



applications



available

By MICKEY CANTNER
Special to The News

Fall will be here before we know it, and interested
arts and crafts vendors are encouraged to send in their
registrations now due to so many vendors expected this
year at the popular October 25 event. "With more than
100 vendors at last year's successful festival, vendor
spaces are limited," said St. Marks Stone Crab Festival
Vendor Chair Mickey Cantner.
The theme for the golf cart parade this year is "Pi-
rates of the Caribbean!" Please call Zoe Mansfield at
524-6182 about joining the parade. We are encourag-
ing everyone to wear their pirate garb and join the fun.
San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park will have
some special speakers and activities in conjunction
with the festival this year.
More than 12,000 visitors attended last year's fes-
tival to enjoy music, shopping and of course, stone
crabs. Space was enlarged last year and is expected to
only grow more for the event. This year, as was done
last year, additional space will be opened for shopping,
including the main street of St. Marks, Port Leon and
Riverside Drive. The October 25 festival runs from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. Portions of the profits goes to the St.
Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership, the St. Marks
Volunteer Fire Department and other local organiza-
tions. The festival is a 501.c3 Non Profit Corporation.
Please check out our website at www.stmarksstone-
crabfest.com to view photos from last year's event.
Interested vendors should contact Mickey Cantner
at (850) 567-0157 or email info@stmarksstonecrabfest.
com or you can now download an application from
the above website.
For general festival information, please contact
Glenda Pruitt at (850) 925-1053. Sponsors are wel-
come to contact Charlene or Billy Bishop at 850-933-
1718


Special to the News


St. Marks Wildlife
Refuge has announced
that Saturday, June 7
is National Trails Day.
In celebration of this
date, a hike will be led
along a section of the
Florida National Scenic
Trail to the Cathedral
of the Palms and Shep-


herd Springs. Hikers
will meet at the check
station on the Wakulla
Beach Road at 8:30 am
and be back by noon.
(The Wakulla Beach
Road runs south of US-
98, 1.3 miles west of
the Wakulla River, and
the check station is 1
mile south on this dirt
road.) Total walking


distance will be about
2 miles. Appropriate
shoes (mud tolerant
and not open-toed) are
required. Bug spray
and drinking water are
strongly recommend-
ed. Group size is lim-
ited to 20, so register
and get further details
by calling the Refuge
(850/925-6121).


Gala to benefit children


Special to the News

The community is wel-
come to an evening of fes-
tivities to benefit the Chil-
dren's Miracle Network.
The event will be held from
7 p.m. to midnight, Satur-
day, June 7 at the Bistro at
Wildwood, and is hosted by
Walmart. The CMN Masquerade
Gala continues to seek additional
sponsors, and items for the silent
auction. Please contact Teresa or
Tracy 926.1560.


Enjoy music and danc-
ing, silent auction, hors
d'oeuvres, and beverag-
es. Dress code black
tie/formal, mask re-
quired and available
for purchase. Tickets
$25 per person. Tick-
ets must be purchased
in advance and are avail-
able at Walmart, Craw-
fordville. Donations may be
made in person at the Gala, and
P at Walmart, 35 Mike Stewart
Drive, Crawfordville.


Ongoing announcements:


-The NEW WEBSITE for the Wakulla
One Stop Community Center is open.
Visit www.wakullaonestopcommunity-
center.com to find resources and events
offered by the center.

PINOCHLE PLAYERS everywhere,
save this date as we are going to have
fun. On Sunday, Oct. 12, we would like
you to join with pinochle players from
across Wakulla County for the first ever
Open Pinochle Classic. You may have
been playing forever or for only a week


but you are invited to come and be a
part of this great event. For additional
information, call Edgar at 926-8748 or
Cyndi at 926-9254.

The Wakulla County Health De-
partment has removed the no swim ad-
visory for MASHES SANDS BEACH; the
beach is now safe to swim. If you have
any questions, contact the Wakulla
County Health Department at 850-926-
0401 or visit the beach website at www.
wakullahealthdept.com.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 9A


Leadership Day at Medart Elementary


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

Medart Elementary School's Leadership Day was
a showcase of students' hospitality and leadership
skills on May 30.
The morning began with students welcoming com-
munity leaders, business owners and citizens at the
front door, and walking them to the library for registra-
tion where coffee and donuts were served.
Students presented the leadership theme called
the 7 Habits to the group of more than 60 adults. The
seven habits were: Be proactive; begin with the end in
mind; put first things first; think win-win; seek first to
understand, and then be understood; synergize (you
get more done together than when you work alone);
and sharpen the saw (live a balanced life).
MES fourth-grader Cameron Nichols sang Katy
Perry's motivational song, "Firework," and students
performed a skit of the Three Little Pigs. Fifth-grader
Molly Jones asked, "When you hear leader, what do
you think? After learning the seven habits, it changed
the way I thought about leadership."
Children sang modern pop songs that were rewrit-
ten to include the principals of leadership, and the
seven habits.
Adults were divided into groups for school tours
following the presentation. Students who led the tours
were responsible for keeping classroom visits running
on schedule, and did so successfully without supervi-
sion. Throughout the morning, students in hallways
and classrooms shook hands with guests and said,
"Welcome to Medart," and Thank you for coming."

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Group 2 was first led to Ms. Davis' third grade class,
where students presented five book characters who
embodied the seven habits. Guests viewed caterpillars
in the butterfly garden outside Ms. Corrigan's kinder-
garten class, and were shown individual projects by
the kindergarten students. Guests were also taken to
beautiful murals that depicted aspects of the seven
habits. Older students explained the year's learning
service projects, which included a Valentine's trip to
Eden Springs, letters and care packages for soldiers,
fundraisers for the Florida Wild Mammal Association
and Wakulla County Senior Services, campus beau-
tification, a Veteran's Day program, volunteerism at
the Wakulla County Animal Shelter, canned food drive,
Civil Rights projects and Pink Out Day.
Back in the library, student leadership teams ex-
plained the activities of their respect clubs, including
the Breakfast Club, Butterfly Garden Leaders, Green
Team, Greeter Leaders, Welcome Wagoneers, Media
Club, Patriotism Leaders, Safety Patrol, School Beau-
tification Leaders, Student Council and Technology
Leaders. Other students discussed what they learned
about lifestyles for youth in third world countries.
Students took time to show guests their leadership
notebooks, and more.







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visitor Sara Daw. 3) Tour leaders take the visi-
tors through the campus garden. 4) Third-grad-
er Sam Sanders is dressed as Captain Under-
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book character. 5) McKenzie Anderson, first
grade, reads one of the seven habits to guests.
6) Kindergartners Connor Crawford and Jayden
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Page 1OA THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014


Sports


sports news and team views


Wakulla athletes sign scholarships




Amber Bryant to play softball for Edward Waters College


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema(_thewakullanews.net

Wakulla High School senior Amber
Bryant signed a softball scholarship
to play for Edward Waters College in
Jacksonville at the War Eagle Caf6 on
May 27.
WHS Softball Coach Tom Graham
said he was proud of Bryant's opportu-
nity to move on and do what she loves
to do play softball. Graham said as
an outfielder, she was dedicated to the
team, and worked hard every day.
"Her work ethic just super," Graham
said. "It's great for me as a couch to see
a lot of my girls move on to the next
level. It's always been a real kick for me
to see my kids go on, do things at the
next level, and plus get their academics
and get themselves ready for life. I want
to congratulate Amber today."
Edward Waters College Softball
Coach Stanley Cromartie said the col-
lege's softball program is on the rise.
The college is part of the Gulf Coast
Athletic Conference, and Cromartie


said the softball team finished second
place at the championship.
"We congratulate her," Cromartie
said. "She's going to come, and she's
going to play and compete."
Bryant was all smiles as she was
surrounded by family and teammates
at the signing.


"I'm feeling pretty good," Bryant said.
"I'm really excited to play for them."
Bryant said she has been on the
softball field since age 12. She said
just being a teammate has been the
highlight of her Lady War Eagles softball
career. She will play second base for the
EWC Tigers.


"I'm really excited about going off to
college," Bryant said. "But I'm nervous
at the same time."
Bryant plans on majoring in biol-
ogy, an academic track that will lead
to physical therapy school.
Phillip Bryant, Amber's dad, said
he plans on catching some games in
Jacksonville, which is about two and a
half hours away.
"I am very proud," Phillip said. "To
see her make it to this level, I couldn't
be any prouder. She has worked hard,
and I know she loves the sport. She
never gave up, and it will pay off for her
in the long run. She's getting to where
she wants to be."
Kelly Farhat, Amber's mother, was
overwhelmed with happy tears at the
signing. She credited her daughter's
success to God's hand.
"I'm extremely proud, I can't put into
words how proud I am," Farhat said.
"To see her take it to the next level...
it's been her dream to play college ball.
This is a blessing from God, what He's
done for her."


Shelby Harrell signs softball scholarship for Alabama Southern


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzemaithewakullanews.net

Wakulla High School
senior Shelby Harrell
is headed to Alabama
Southern Community
College in Monroeville,
Ala., to play softball
for the Eagles in the
fall. She signed the
scholarship papers at
the War Eagle Caf6 on
May 28.
The team is part
of the Alabama Com-
munity College Con-
ference, and finished
third in the South Di-
vision.
WHS Softball Coach
Tom Graham said Har-
rell is her own person.
He said when things
got intense at practice,
Harrell was the player
who could put things
in perspective for the
team.
"She could always
bring a smile," Graham
said. "The other thing
is what she brought
as a teammate and
as a player. She was
out there every day
working her butt off.
On the defensive side,
it was just unbeliev-
able. We had her at


third base and short-
stop. Anything we've
asked of her, she did.
I know she's going to
take her best to Ala-
bama Southern. It's so
great to see our players
moving on to the next
level. I congratulate
Shelby for all she's
done at Wakulla, and
all she will do at Ala-
bama Southern."
Harrell's father,
Sheriffs Sgt. Danny
Harrell, said he has
been dragging his kids
around to ball games
since they were in dia-
pers.
"She grew up on the
ball field," Harrell said.
"I'm excited she's


going to do well, and
she's going to have a
good time."
Sgt. Harrell said
Shelby has achieved
academically as well,
with a high grade point
average and is already
certified as a nursing
assistant. He antici-
pates her college ca-
reer going smoothly,
"as long as she doesn't
go boy crazy," Sgt. Har-
rell joked.
Harrell's soon-to-be
step mother, Heath-
er Williams, said she
plans on checking in
on her some weekends
at college.
Harrell's mother Su-
zanne said she was


so excited that her
daughter was taking
her talents to the col-
lege level.
"Her first word was
ball," Suzanne said.
"I'm so proud of her.
I'm overjoyed."
Harrell said she was
excited about starting
the next chapter of
her life.
"I'm ready to do


this," she said. "They
have the perfect cam-
pus, it's small, and I'm
ready to go."
Harrell said he plans
on majoring in nurs-
ing, and will decide on
a nursing specializa-
tion in the future.
WHS Athletic Direc-
tor Mike Smith said in
the five years he has
worked at the school,


the number of female
athletes signing college
sports scholarships
has increased.
"I think that's a
great thing for Wakul-
la," Smith said. "It tells
people that we have
(a strong) program for
female sports."
Smith relayed a
message from Coach
Brooke Powell at Ala-
bama Southern, who
couldn't attend the
signing because of an
emergency.
"She wants to say
how excited she is that
Shelby is going to come
play for them in Mon-
roeville," Smith said.
"I've been there. It's a
pretty nice little school.
Coach Powell said that
since Shelby is coming
from Wakulla, they
can expect good things
from her."


WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION DEPARTMENT
2014 SUMMER PROGRAMS SESSION I
June 9, 2014 through July 3, 2014
All Programs will be held at the Wakulla County Community Center Gymnasium
located at 318 Shadeville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327.
Interested participants may register at the Wakulla County Recreation Department Office, 79 Recreation
Drive, Crawfordville, or at the Community Center Gymnasium the starting day of the clinic.
Please call 926-7227 for further questions.
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday
4:00 PM to Quick Start Youth Volleyball Youth Indoor T.B.A.
5:30 PM Tennis Camp Soccer Camp
6:OOPM to Youth Softball Open Gym for T.B.A. Open Gym for
7:30 PM Camp Volleyball Basketball
Quick Start Tennis Camp (For Beginners ONLY) INFO: QuickStartTennis format is a
SESSION 1: Mon: AGES: TIMES: COST: new way for kids to learn and play
the game. The court size, racquet
June 9, June 16, 6 to 12 4:00 PM to $30.00 for entire z size, balls, and net are adjusted to
June 23, June 30 5:30 PM Summer Session 1 help in learning the game.
Youth Softball Camp INFO: Softball instruction at the
SESSION 1: Mon: AGES: TIMES: COST:new Community Center will con-
sist of fun ways to improve your
June 9, June 16, 7 to 14 all 6:00 PM to $30.00 for entire softball skills.
June 23, June 30 skill levels 7:30 PM Summer Session 1
Youth Volleyball Camp INFO: This volleyball camp will chal-
lenge players to learn about team
SESSION 1: Tues: AGES: TIMES: COST: volleyball and skills. Participants will
be grouped and instructed based on
June 10, June 17, 6 to 15 4:00 PM to $30.00 for entire ability. Players need to provide their
June 24, July 1 5:30 PM Summer Session 1 own knee pads.


Youth Indoor Soccer Camp_ __
SESSION 1: Wed: AGES: TIMES: COST:


June11,June18, 6to15 6:00PM to
June 25, July 2 7:30 PM
Adult Open Gym Volleyball
SESSION 1: Tues: AGES: TIMES:
June 10, June 17, 16 and up 6:00PM to
June 24, July 1 8:00 PM
INFO: Open gym for pickup volleyball games.
Adult Open Gym Basketball
SESSION 1: Thurs: AGES: TIMES:
June 12, June 19, 16 and up 6:00PM to
June 26, July 3 8:00 PM
INFO: Open gym for pickup basketball games.


$30.00 for entire
Summer Session 1

COST:
$3.00 entry fee



COST:@
$3.00 entry fee


- INFO: This indoor soccer camp
will teach participants the skills
they need to excel and improve in
soccer. This camp will also intro-
duce the sport of INDOOR SOCCER
versus regular soccer to partici-
pants. Participants must wear shin
guards and rubber sole tennis
shoes. NO CLEATS ALLOWED.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Due to the
game situations and specifica-
tions of indoor soccer, spectators
will not be allowed in the gymna-
sium during game and scrimmage
play, please plan accordingly.
For questions or more
information call
926-7227 or visit
www.AyWakulla.com


Ihomas University welcomes


Amy Walker to soccer team


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema(_thewakullanews.net

Amy Walker's athletic and academic
pursuits has her following her soccer
career to Thomas University in Thom-
asville, Ga. in the fall.
The Lady War Eagles center-forward
signed the four-year partial scholar-
ship in April, surrounded by family,
coaches and teammates.
Walker said she was also offered a
scholarship at Randolph Macon Col-
lege in Ashland, Va., but chose Thomas
University's offer instead. She said her
family is relieved that she is not travel-
ing too far from home.
"It's a gorgeous campus, I love it,"
Walker said. "The team is really close,
so they were welcoming. I'm looking
forward to being on my own, and play-
ing with a new team," she said.
Walker said the Lady War Eagles
have been very supportive.
"My teammates are pretty excited,"
Walker said. "I know a bunch of them
want to come see me play next year."
Coach Nick Reed said he looks for-
ward to seeing Walker excel.
"Over that past four years Amy has


been able to persevere through many
on-and-off the field issues in her life
that have molded and shaped her into
the person she is today," Reed said.
"We couldn't be more excited to see all
the extra effort that Amy has put in,
which has translated into receiving a
scholarship to play soccer at the next
level."
Walker said she has played soccer
since she was 6 or 7. Her dad, Joe
Walker, coached her team at the rec
park when she was little.
"I've been involved since day one,"
Joe said. "Amy got old enough, and
said, 'Daddy I don't want you to have
to coach me anymore."
Joe retired from soccer coaching,
but his support of his daughter never
is as strong as ever.
"I'm so proud of her," Joe said. "I'm
proud of her academic accomplish-
ments too. She's had straight As
the past two years. She's been a true
blessing. I'm so glad she's able to keep
going with it."
Walker said she plans on majoring
in biology with a pre-med focus, and
hopes to have a career in physical
therapy after college.


www.thewakullanews.com




www.thewakullanews.com




Sports


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014 Page 11A



sports news and team views


PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Quarterback Feleipe Franks drops back to pass early in the game against Trinity Catholic.


Diving for a loose ball.


Catch and run.


A War Eagle defender puts a lick on a Trinity Celtic.


Top photo: War Eagle runner busts through a hole.
Bottom photo: Wakulla High School Cheerleaders keep cool in tank
tops at the game.


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor thewakullanews.net

The Wakulla War Eagles had
an exciting spring game against
the Trinity Catholic Celtics last
week that ended with Wakulla on
the short end of a 28-26 score.
Head Coach Scott Klees said
he and his coaching staff were
pleased with the game.
"We dressed out 79 kids and
79 kids got to play," he said.
He said he and his coaching
staff were pleased with where the


team's at. "We just need to have
a great summer, work really had
and continue to build on what
we've got."
The War Eagles went up 7-0
on a 45-yard long bomb from
quarterback Feleipe Franks to
Keith Gavin in the first quarter.
The Celtics quickly bounced
back and scored on some defen-
sive miscues to give up four big
plays. The War Eagles were down
28-7 when Franks was sacked
and injured.
Bucky Mcglammery came in


as backup and played very well.
In the fourth quarter, the War
Eagles young guys played with
great heart and were within sec-
onds of tying the game.
Klees said he told his coaches,
even before the game, that spring
training had been successful.
"We built depth," he said.
In last week's intersquad
game, Monterious Loggins suf-
fered a broken leg, but is ex-
pected to return in August. In
the spring game, Antonio Morris
suffered a concussion.


Wakulla softball camp offered in June


Special to The News

Wakulla Softball Camp will kick off at the Wakulla
High Softball Field June 23 June 25, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Lunch will be provided and all campers will get
a T-shirt and other prizes throughout the three
days. Camp fee is $100. The camp is hosted by
Sally Wheeler, WHS 2002 graduate, teacher/coach at
WHS (four years); Briana Holley, WHS 2008 gradu-
ate, teacher/coach at WHS (two years); and Alena
Crawford, WHS 2000 graduate, teacher/head coach
at WMS (four years). The coaches performed at the
college level as well.
All three coaches played at Wakulla High and have
combined for three Final Four appearances and seven
District Championships as players. Now all three
have returned to Wakulla High and are teaching and
coaching. The whole idea of putting on this camp is
to continue helping softball in Wakulla County grow
and prosper. There is a legacy of success in this pro-


gram and we hope to continue that by molding and
helping players improve their skills at a young age.
For more information contact Coach Wheeler at
Sally.Wheelergwcsb.us. There is also information
on our school website softball page: http://wakulla.
whs.schooldesk.net/Athletics/ Softball


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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014


education news from local schools


Summer feeding



sites announced

Special to The News

The Wakulla County School Board will be partici-
pating in the Summer Food Service Program during
the months of June, July and August.
Nutritionally balanced meals will be provided to
all children regardless of race, color, sex, disabil-
ity, age, or national origin during summer vaca-
tion when school breakfasts and lunches are not
available. All children 18 years old and younger
are eligible for meals at no charge and there will
be no discrimination, as outlined in the UDSA
Non- discrimination Statement, in the course of
the meal service. The programs are only approved
for geographical areas of need where 50 percent or
more of the children qualify for free and reduced
price meals during the school year.
Summer feeding sites that are located at schools
provide meals to all children in the immediate vicin-
ity in addition to those enrolled in summer school.
The following school sites will be participating in
the Summer Food Service Program:
WAKULLA EDUCATION CENTER located at
87 Andrew Hargrett Sr., Rd. Meals will be served
beginning Monday, June 9, and ending Tuesday,
August 5. The site will offer meals Monday through
Thursday when it is open. The site will be closed
on Thursday, July 3. Breakfast will be served from
8:30-9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30
a.m. 12:15 p.m.
MEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL located at
2558 Coastal Highway. Meals will be served be-
ginning Monday, June 9, and ending Thursday,
July 17. The site will offer meals Monday through
Thursday when it is open. The site will be closed
Thursday, July 3. Breakfast will be served from
8:30-9:15 a.m. Lunch will be served from 11:30
a.m. 12:15 p.m.
WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL located at 3237
Coastal Highway. Meals will be served beginning
Monday, June 16, and ending Thursday, July 24.
The site will offer lunch Monday through Thursday
when it is open. The site will be closed on Thursday,
July 3. Lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m. 12:15
p.m. Breakfast will not be served.


PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Top photo: Crawfordville Elementary School Brain Brawl competitors. Left photo: Team A Red
Ribbon Winners. Right photo: Team B Blue Ribbon Winners.


Crawfordville students show


their smarts at Brain Brawl


Special to The News

An exciting Brain Brawl com-
petition was held at Crawfordville
Elementary School on Friday,
May 30. The teams competed in a
hard fought contest in which tie-
breaker questions were needed
to determine the highest scorers.
Team answered the most ques-
tions correctly to win the blue
ribbons. Team B participants
were Captain Jackson Osteen,
Kristen Walker, Michael Wallace,
Caleb Tillman and Rachel Free-
man. Kristen Walker was the
highest scorer on Team B. Team
A won the 2nd place red ribbons.
The Team A participants were


Captain Aden Barksdale, Ma-
rina Harvey, Caleb Joiner, Keira
Cushard, and Dalton Gowdy. A
tie-breaker round between Ca-
leb Joiner and Marina Harvey
was needed because they both
answered the same number of
questions during the rounds.
Marina then became the high-
est overall scorer for Team A.
The next tie-breaker round was
between Marina and Kristen
Walker to determine who would
receive the most points. Kristen
then won the ribbon for being
the highest overall scorer for the
competition.
The Brain Brawl Competitions
are sponsored by the Coastal


Optimist Club. The moderator
was Jo Ann Daniels. The time
keeper was Mike Carter and the
Score Keeper was Tom Vlasak.
Daniels stated that this was the
most exciting elementary Brain
Brawl because the students were
answering so many questions
correctly. This was the first time
this year that tie-breakers were
needed. The fifth grade teachers
who helped with the competition
were Alisa Adkison, Renee, Kelly,
Debi Morgan, Brandi Panzarino
and Trishia Strickland. The Op-
timist Club would like to thank
Principal Angie Walker, the stu-
dents, teachers and parents who
attended and helped.


5K race to benefit


tri-county students


Special to The News


Tallahassee Community
College will serve as the start-
ing point for a 5k walk/run
on Saturday, June 7, to raise
funds for low-income stu-
dents in Gadsden, Leon and
Wakulla counties. Registra-
tion begins locally at the TCC
Workforce Development build-
ing at 7:30 a.m., Saturday,
and the race is scheduled to
start at 8 a.m.
The first three winners of
each age group and the top
team will receive Take Stock
in Children medallions. Ad-
ditionally, gift certificates in
the amount of $20 will be dis-
tributed from Sonny's BBQ,
Academy Sports, Wal-Mart


and other local sponsors.
The TSIC program raises
scholarship monies and pro-
vides weekly mentorships for
students in middle and high
school who would otherwise
not be able to attend college
due to low family income. The
group targets primarily first-
generation college students.
Individuals who wish to
support the TSIC Strides
for Education event, but are
unable to attend, may con-
tribute by visitinghttp: / /give.
takestockinchildren.org and
choosing "Gadsden, Leon,
Wakulla" for the location of
the event.
For information, contact
Wanda Lewis at (850) 201-
8312.


Saulter is COAST teacher of the year


By ALYSSA HIGGINS
Principal

COAST Charter School's
Teacher of the Year for the
2013-2014 school year is Mrs.
Christine Saulter. If I had to
describe this teacher in three
words, they would be dedicat-
ed, creative and hard working.
These three traits permeate all
areas of Christine's life, not just
her teaching. She is an example
of how to be a kind and com-
passionate person to all of us
and has the type of work ethic
we should all strive to emulate.
Mrs. Saulter is an asset to
COAST Charter School. She
serves as a mentor to her peers,
sharing new educational dis-
coveries and collaborating with
them about various instruc-
tional and behavioral strate-
gies. Mrs. Saulter infuses tech-
nology into
her class-
room daily
and strives
to engage
her students
while chal-
lenging them
and pushing


them to new
academic
heights.
Mrs. Sault-
er is always at
school, stay-
ing late most
days, and
attending all
school func-
tions to give
110 percent
to her stu-
dents and our
school. With
all the chaos
that comes


from being an integral part of a
small school, where everyone is
often required to wear multiple
hats and endure regular plan
upsets and changes, Christine
is always positive and willing to
do whatever is asked of her to
the best of her ability and with
a smile. She does all of this
even though she has a hus-
band and two young children,
Tyler and Anna, at home as
well. It is a fine line to find bal-
ance between home and school,
yet she seems to have achieved
it masterfully.
One of her peers says:
"Mrs. Saulter always has
a way of lightening the mood
when I am struggling with
students or projects. I can al-
ways come to her and feel like I
can get back to it with a better
perspective and attitude. She
is always working and looking
for better ways to teach and to


be efficient. Mrs. Saulter does
a great job sharing resources
that she thinks will be benefi-
cial to other teachers. We often
leave school well after everyone
else has gone and I am sure
that she put in more 'after
hours' here that I do, which
always amazes me because she
has her own children at home.
I know of her great concern for
her students and she tries to
find ways for each of them to
be successful. I am grateful
that she asks to borrow things
from me so that I can pay her
back for taking away much of
her after school time."
We are honored to know
Mrs. Saulter and proud to call
her a member of our outstand-
ing faculty. It is without res-
ervation that she is the 2013-
2014 COAST Charter School
Teacher of the Year!


First youth theatre workshop to begin


Signups are open for Palaver Tree's
Summerburn Young Adult Theatre
Workshop for ages 13-20. Cost is $75
for the 7-day program. All students
must dedicate themselves to the 7 days
of the Workshop and also show an
interest in the performing arts, or the
development of artistic performance.


Workshop One: 12-4 p.m. June 10,
11, 12 and June 17, 18, 19, 20. (Time
for the 20th may be changed due to
public performance.) For more infor-
mation contact the Wakulla One Stop
Community Center at 850-745-6042.
Workshop two will be July 8-18 from
12-4 p.m.


ciwp T4 A-

Ci F0AW*


DISCOVERl
~ the













o~tvo Weekend
1FLOAWA is Only a
C&hN FandlY Couple of

Fu !!! Hours Away!

Get the family outdoors to enjoy bikingfishing,
camping, kayaking, horseback riding, hiking trails
and enjoy the fresh local seafood.

Visit Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, St. Marks Federal Wildlife
Refuge and Lighthouse and Wakulla Springs State Park.
WWW.VISITWAKULLA.COM


www.thewakullanews.com




THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014 Page 13A


Outdoors


outdoor sports and fishing reports


The fishing is really good right now


Here it is the first
of June and it seems
like we were just
talking about how
we couldn't wait till
spring.
Fishing is really
good right now, the
water is clearing up
around Shell Point
and the water tem-
perature is around 81
degrees.
It's one month un-
til scallop season and
the question on a lot
of peoples mind is will
there be any scallops
at St. Marks? All of
our heavy rains that
typically drop the sa-
linity level were early
in the year so maybe
we will have them this
year.
Only time will tell.
Richard Gardner
fished out of Shell
Point last week and
limited on trout fish-
ing around the old


stake line. He used
both live shrimp
and the gulp. One
of my neighbors
and a friend went
down around Gray
Mare and limited out
on trout using live
shrimp. Mike Pear-
son and Tom Riddle
from Tifton took some
of Mike's customers
offshore and they lim-
ited on amberjack,
caught quite a few
grouper and had a
big king. Bob Palmer
from Shell Point went
out Sunday and came
back with some grou-
per, big Spanish and
a cobia. Bob is Cap-
tain of a big tugboat
on the Mississippi
River when he not
fishing at Shell Point.
One of my neighbors
said they had been
catching some nice
reds around Smith
Island fishing top-


From The Dock

BY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


water baits early in
the morning before
the sun got up too
high. He was using a
gold spoon last week
and caught and re-
leased a 37 inch red.
Captain David Fife
put down his fishing
rods for a week and
picked up this golf
clubs and headed for
Myrtle Beach. He did
a lot of fishing around
Oyster Bay before he
left and caught some
reds but not many.
Dr. Jim O'Neil fished
Saturday and caught
quite a few flounder
Spanish and trout.
He used live shrimp


and Gulp.
Fishing around the
Aucilla and Econfina
continue to be good.
I heard there were
some big reds be-
ing caught around
the rocks at Alligator
Point and the bars at
Bald Point. There are
also lots of sheeps-
head around the bars.
My niece and her
family camped at Fort
De Soto State Park in
St. Pete this weekend
and caught a lot of
trout. On her first cast
she caught a 22 inch
trout using shrimp.
She called me and
said, "We fished just


like you do at Shell
Point and we were the
only people catching
anything where we
were fishing."
About a month ago
I got a call from a
woman saying they
would be renting a
house at Live Oak
Island. Her husband
was 68 and had nev-
er been fishing. She
didn't say how old
she was but she had
never been either.
They were living in
Roswell, Ga., but
were from England.
It was one of those
mornings when it
couldn't have been
any better. Tide was
moving good and the
fish were biting. They
both caught their lim-
it of trout and I will
say she caught the
most.
After about two
hours he looked at


me and said he didn't
know why he hadn't
done this before. He
also said it was the
most fun either of
them had in a very
long time.
That's one of the
things that makes
this job so much fun.
They plan on com-
ing back in August
and I told them not to
expect the same.
Last week I took
Bobby Jones and
his son Mark. Bobby
spent 30 years out
of the country doing
missionary work. We
fished three days and
limited on trout each
day and caught some
reds but most were
small. Still can't find
the reds.
Remember to know
your limits and be
careful out there.
Good luck and good
fishing!


HOME ON THE RANGE


Old phrases often involve artillery or guns


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS


Full cock, left, and half cock, right. The phrase "going off half-cocked" implies a lack of preparation.


By MARJ LAW


When I was shoot-
ing an old black pow-
der gun at the Wakul-
la County Sheriff's
Office range the other
day, a man stopped
me and asked if I
knew the meaning
of the phrase "going
off half-cocked." He


had read the article
in The Wakulla News
about "lock, stock,
and barrel" and he
was trying to figure
out how much I really
knew about old guns.
Really.
So, when I get
home, I ask my liv-
ing encyclopedia of
gun-related knowl-
edge, Joe, what is so
important about the
half-cocked position.
He brings out a
Kentucky percussion
pistol. He places a
percussion cap on the
nipple and thumbs
the hammer back into
the half-cocked posi-
tion.
"Pull the trigger,"
he instructs.
So I take the gun


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and pull the trigger.
Nothing happens.
The half-cocked
position in old per-
cussion guns cannot
fire (unless there is a
defect in the gun). Not
being able to shoot
in this position is a
safety feature.
You can have a ball
and powder in the
barrel, and the fir-
ing cap on the nip-
ple, and your gun
is almost ready to
shoot. However, it
can't shoot because
when half-cocked, the
gun is kept in check.
You have to move the
hammer to the full-
cocked position for
the gun to go off.
To go off at half-
cock, according to


Brewer's Dictionary
of Phrase & Fable,
means to fail as a
result of doing some-
thing prematurely or
without proper prepa-
ration.
Many of our old
phrases have to do
with artillery or guns.
A cannon on an old
war ship was placed
on rollers. In order to
load, you had to roll
the cannon back from
the gunport so the
ball could be placed
down the muzzle.
Cannons were held in
position on the ship
by ropes or chains.
They had to be held in
place because of the
force exerted when
the gun was fired.
If anything hap-


10f4tg


D I SON'


pened to those ropes
or chains, the can-
non on its rollers
could become loose
on the ship's rolling
deck. Danger! Dan-
ger!
A person who goes
off like "a loose can-
non" is, according to
The Phrase Finder in
phrases.org.uk, "an
unpredictable per-
son or thing liable
to cause damage if
not kept in check by
others."
Lewis Grizzard ti-
tled one of his books,
"My Daddy was a Pis-
tol, and I'm the Son
of a Gun."
I'd heard the
phrase "son of a gun"
before I ever read ol'
Lewis.
But where did that
phrase originate?
In the 1700s, and
perhaps before, wom-
en were allowed on
naval ships. Again,


according to Brewer,
"The son of a gun
was one born in the
ship, often near the
midship gun, behind
a canvas screen. If
paternity was uncer-
tain, the child was
entered in the log as
"son of a gun."
The man at the
range was waiting
for his answer about
going off half-cocked.
Well, since I wasn't
prepared to give him
a response, and also,
since I wasn't under
the gun, I said, "I'll
get back to you.
"Wouldn't want to
shoot from the hip.
After all, you're in
front of me."

Marj Law is the
former director of
Keep Wakulla County
Beautiful who has be-
come an avid shooter
in retirement.


W SSEVC

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www.thewakullanews.com




Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 www.thewakullanews.oom


W~lc4 WAtws


a peek into life on and under the water


____________________ F_ Local writers share their experiences


To end the focus on
National Safe Boat-
ing week, the following
are some recreation-
al safe boating facts
from the U.S. Coast
Guard's 2012 Recre-
ational Boating Safety
Statistics, the latest of-
ficial record of reported
recreational boating
accidents.
The full report is
available online at:
www. USCGBoating.
org/ statistics/ acci-
dent statistics.aspx.
In 2012 Florida
ranked as the No. 1
state in both fatalities
and injuries for boat-
ers.
Drowning was re-
ported as the cause of
death in almost three-
fourths of all fatalities.
Approximately 85
percent of those who
drowned were not
wearing life jackets.
In 2012, the Coast
Guard counted 4,515
accidents that involved
651 deaths, 3,000 inju-
ries and approximately
$38 million dollars of
damage to property as
a result of recreational
boating accidents.
Approximately 14
percent of deaths oc-
curred on boats where
the operator had re-
ceived boating safety
instruction.
Operator inatten-
tion, operator inexpe-
rience, improper look-
out, machinery failure
and excessive speed
are the top five primary
contributing factors in
accidents.
Alcohol use is the
leading contributing
factor in fatal boating
accidents; it was listed


as the leading factor
in 17 percent of the
deaths.
Twenty-four chil-
dren under age 13 lost
their lives while boat-
ing in 2012. Forty-two
percent of the children
who died in 2012 did so
from drowning.
The most common
types of vessels in-
volved in reported ac-
cidents were open mo-
torboats (47 percent),
personal watercraft (19
percent) and cabin mo-
torboats (15 percent).
The National Safe
Boating Council pro-
vides the following tips
on choosing the right
life jacket.
Today's life jackets
come in a variety of
shapes, sizes, colors
and materials. No mat-
ter which life jacket
you choose, be sure
it's right for YOU, your
planned activities and
the water conditions
you expect to encoun-
ter.

TRY IT ON

Check the manufac-
turer's ratings for your
size and weight.
Make sure the life
jacket is properly
zipped or buckled.


Raise your arms
straight up over your
head while wearing
your life jacket and ask
a friend to grasp the
tops of the arm open-
ings, gently pulling up.
If there is excess
room above the open-
ings and the life jacket
rides up over your chin
or face, it does NOT
fit properly. A snug fit
in these areas signals
a properly fitting life
jacket.

FIT FACTS

It is extremely im-
portant that you choose
a properly fitting life
jacket.
Life jackets that are
too big will cause the
flotation device to push
up around your face,
which could be dan-
gerous.
Life jackets that are
too small will not be
able to keep your body
afloat.

IMPORTANT
REMINDERS

Make sure your life
jacket is U.S. Coast
Guard approved.
Double check that
your life jacket is ap-
propriate for your fa-


*tBoating Emergencies

Coast Guard Station
Panam a City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetow n .......................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12).............(850) 942-7500
or ............................................................................ (850) 284-1166


FWC Law Enforcement report


From FWC News


This report repre-
sents some events the
FWC handled over the
past week, May 23- May
29, however, it does
not include all actions
taken by the Division of
Law Enforcement.

WAKULLA COUNTY:
Officers Anderson and
Harrison received a
complaint about an
impaired boat opera-
tor at the St. Marks
Boat Ramp. The offi-


cers located the vessel
and observed the vessel
operating erratically
and also observed the
operator fall down in
the boat several times.
The officers conduct-
ed a vessel stop and
tried to communicate
with the operator which
was very difficult due to
his slurred speech. The
individual could not
stand and appeared to
be severely intoxicated.
The operator was un-
able to complete sev-
eral field sobriety tasks.


The operator was even-
tually arrested for BUI
and transported to the
Wakulla County Jail.

FRANKLIN COUN-
TY: FWC officers,
Florida Highway Patrol
troopers, and Franklin
County Sheriff's depu-
ties participated in a
public safety opera-
tional detail coinciding
with the 2014 'White
Trash Bash' held on the
Memorial Day holiday
weekend at Dog Island
and Alligator Point. The


detail was designed to
protect safety and en-
force BUI and DUI laws.
During the detail, 69
vessels were boarded
with 504 users being
checked. The citations
and warnings issued
included 17 boating
safety warnings, 21
resource warnings, 8
uniform boating cita-
tions for boating safety
violations, 1 arrest for
operating a vessel while
impaired, 23 uniform
traffic citations, and 23
traffic warnings.


Ul


uydenater

By Joerg Hess 3) Vakiid 1w


vorite water activities.
Take the time to en-
sure a proper fit. A life
jacket that is too large
or too small can cause
different situational
problems.
Life jackets meant
for adults do not work
for children. If you are
boating with children,
make sure they are
wearing properly fitted,
child-sized life jackets.
Do not buy a life
jacket for your child to
"grow into."
On recreational
boats underway, chil-
dren under 13 years
old must wear a Coast
Guard approved life
jacket unless they are
below decks or in an
enclosed cabin.
Some state laws vary
- check with your local
Marine Law Enforce-
ment Authorities.
This information
along with much more
is discussed during our
safe boating classes as
well as vessel exams.
Our members are
available to assist area
boaters with compli-
mentary Vessel Exami-
nations, and schedul-
ing Boat Safety Cours-
es.
Contact our staff of-
ficer for vessel exams
at fso-ve@uscaux.net
and our public educa-
tion officer at fso-pe@
uscgaux.net.
Flotilla 12 will hold
their monthly meeting
Saturday, June 7, at
the Crawfordville Fire
Station. The meting will
begin at 9:30 am.
As Sherrie says -
Safe boating is no ac-
cident. Wear it!


Wakulla Financial Center

2190 Crawfordville Highway

224-4960, ext. 1254 I www.fsucu.org


Sun rise/set Moon ise/set
6:35 am 1:28 pm
8:35 pm 1:25 am
Brightness- 46%

Sun rise/set Moon ise/set
6:35 am 2:21 pm
8:36 pm11:59.am
Brightness- 53%

Sun rise/set Moon ise/set
6:35 am 3:15 pm
8:36 pm1 2:33 am
Brightness- 59

Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
6:35 am 4:12 pm
8:37 pm1 3:08 am
Brightness- 65/o

Sun rise/set Moon ise/set
6:35 am 5:10pm
8:37 pm 3:47 am
Brihtnes-72%

Sun rise/set Moon ise/set
6:35 am 6:11 pm
8:38 pm1 4:29 am
Brightness- 79o

Sun rise/set Moon ise/set
6:35 am 7:14 pm
8:38 pm 5:16 am
Brightness- 86%


I


4
First
June 5


Full Last
June 13 June 19


New
June 27


St. Marks River Entrance
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.8 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.7 ft.
Jun 5,14 1:33 AM 8:27 AM 2:24 PM 7:50 PM
Fri 1.1 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.6 ft.
Jun 6, 14 2:26 AM 9:25 AM 3:47 PM 9:30 PM
Sat 1.3 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.6 ft.
Jun 7, 14 3:28 AM 10:22 AM 5:03 PM 11:06 PM
Sun 1.4 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.7 ft.
Jun 8, 14 4:32 AM 11:12 AM 6:04 PM
Mon 2.8 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.3 ft.
Jun 914 12:18 AM 5:32 AM 11:55 AM 6:54PM
lue 3.1 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.1lft.
Jun 10,14 1:16AM 6:24 AM 12:36 PM 7:40 PM
ed 3.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.5ft.
Jun 11,14 2:06AM 7:11 AM 1:15 PM 8:24PM I
Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.6 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.0 ft.
Jun 5,14 1:44 AM 8:19 AM 2:35 PM 7:42 PM
Fri 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.0 ft. 1.9 ft.
Jun 6, 14 2:37 AM 9:17 AM 3:58 PM 9:22 PM
Sat 0.9 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.0 ft.
Jun 7, 14 3:39 AM 10:14 AM 5:14 PM 10:58 PM
Sun 1.0 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.5ft.
Jun 8,14 4:43 AM 11:04 AM 6:15PM
Mon 2.1 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.2 ft.
Jun 9,14 12:10 AM 5:43 AM 11:47 AM 7:05 PM
rue 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
Jun 10, 14 1:08 AM 6:35 AM 12:28 PM 7:51 PM
Ned 2.5 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.3 ft.
un 11, 14 1:58 AM 7:22 AM 1:07 PM 8:35PM I


If CW e AI Fortides at the following points add to
oastW e lm anac Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide
Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min.
June 5 June 11 Apalachicola 1 Hr,53Min. 2Hrs., 38Min.
Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min.
id hatsby LowerAnchorage 1Hr, 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3Min.
Zihua Software, LLC West Pass 1 Hr, 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.
O~f~i~1,1 ichotarsbeowrAcorg H,3Lm.2Hs. m


City of St. Marks
Date High Low High Low High
rhu 0.8 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.5 ft.
Jun 5, 14 2:37 AM 9:03 AM 3:28 PM 8:26 PM
Fri 1.0 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.4 ft.
Jun 6,14 3:30AM 10:01 AM 4:51 PM 10:06 PM
Sat 1.2 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.Oft. 2.5 ft.
Jun 7, 14 4:32 AM 10:58 AM 6:07 PM 11:42 PM
Sun 1.3 ft. 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft.
Jun 8, 14 5:36 AM 11:48 AM 7:08 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.2 ft.
Jun 9,14 12:54 AM 6:36 AM 12:31 PM 7:58 PM
rue 2.9 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.1 ft.
Jun 10, 14 1:52AM 7:28AM 1:12 PM 8:44 PM
ed 3.1 ft. 1.4 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.4 ft.
Pun 1114 2:42AM 8:15AM 1:51 PM 9:28 PM I
St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.1ft.
Jun5,14 1:12AM 8:11 AM 2:03 PM 7:34 PM
Fri 1.1ft. 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.Oft.
Jun 6, 14 2:05 AM 9:09 AM 3:26 PM 9:14 PM
Sat 1.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 1.1ft. 2.lft.
Jun 7,14 3:07 AM 10:06 AM 4:42 PM 10:50 PM
Sun 1.4 ft. 2.5ft. 0.7 ft
Jun 8,14 4:11 AM 10:56 AM 5:43 PM
Mon 2.2 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.3 ft.
Jun9, 14 12:02AM 5:11AM 11:39AM 6:33PM
lue 2.4 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.1ft.
Jun 10,14 1:00AM 6:03AM 12:20 PM 7:19PM
ed 2.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.5 ft.
lun11,14 1:50AM 6:50AM 12:59PM 8:03PM


Shell Point, Spring Creek
Date High Low High Low High


0.9 ft. 13.0 ft.
1 A O AA


1.7 ft. 2.8 ft.
.1 PN 7.A7 47PM


Fhu
I,,,, 5 14


Mvapr i llm fflirlm
7:24NI924 Ni 1:25 NiI2:25
746pm-946pmI 1:27 2271pm
Avmge

Major Iimes III M ill~ie
8:29 Pi-1:9ph :0 PM32
vera ge 8
............................................


ri 1.2 ft. 3.1 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.6 ft. Majorrimes Minorrimes
Jun 6, 14 2:23 AM 9:22 AM 3:44 PM 9:27 PM 82=-102 In 231NI33n
Bat 1.4 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.7 ft. 9:14-1:4p 1 315pn14m1pinl
un 7,14 3:25 AM 10:19 AM 5:00 PM 11:03 PM
'un 1.6 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.8 ft. Alrge
un 8, 14 4:29 AM 11:09 AM 6:01 PM
on 2.9 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.3 ft.
un 9,14 12:15 AM 5:29 AM 11:52 AM 6:51 PM Majoriimes Minor~imes
Fue 3.1 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.1 ft. 9:37n-l3Ni 3:07N4O7N
Jun 10, 14 1:13 AM 6:21 AM 12:33 PM 7:37 PM 1 lO:0pm-12 Oli 411pm-11pm
Ned 3.4ft. 1.7 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.5ft. Average
un11 ,14 203AM 708AM 112PM 8:21PM


Dog Island West End
Date High Low High Low High
Fhu 0.5ft. 2.6 ft. 1.0ft. 1.9 ft.
un 5,14 12:42 AM 8:37 AM 2:43 PM 8:04 PM
-ri 0.7 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.8 ft. 1.8 ft.
un 6,14 1:25 AM 9:10AM 3:51 PM 9:44 PM
Sat 1.Oft. 2.7 ft. 0.5ft. 1.8 ft.
un 7,14 2:14 AM 9:42 AM 4:49 PM 11:30 PM
Sun 1.2 ft. 2.8 ft. 0.3 ft.
un 8,14 3:11 AM 10:15 AM 5:39 PM
Mon 2.Oft. 1.4 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.Oft.
un9,14 1:05AM 4:13AM 10:49AM 6:25PM
Fue 2.2 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.2 ft.
un10,14 2:20AM 5:13AM 11:25AM 7:08PM
Ned 2.4 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.4 ft.
un11,14 3:18AM 6:09AM 12:04PM 7:50PM


MajrTi-mes MinorTme




MajrTi-mes Minor~ie
11:18-I:185pi !8mII528ml
11.45 pm-:45 l 6:10 pm pm
God

Mar Times IIrI is
'-:r- ---- 1 5m I-:5mNi
12:13 pnl-2:13 phi7:13_ pm]3
Bete


Force of nature.

I moved to Florida, many years ago, pursuing a
dream of developing new technologies, all while fol-
lowing my passion of cave diving. Humble beginnings
consisted of simple and reliable open-circuit dive
technology.
More and more often I find myself mentioning "the
old times, when we didn't have -."
Today, knowledge and technology has evolved much
further, alongside the infrastructure making training
and service easily accessible. In order to undertake a
dive that, a few years back would have been considered
record breaking, all you need now is mostly money,
unfortunately. It is tempting to go on a rant about
vocal chest-pounding wannabes who became instant
experts by purchasing the latest greatest. Nature,
however, is impervious to such self-grandeur, and the
lack of this basic understanding more often than not
means money spent without achieving the increased
performance.
To use an analogy, you can spend thousands of
dollars on a bicycle, but don't be surprised if you still
have to hit the pedals yourself.
A week ago we experienced nature as the great
equalizer. Gregg Stanton and I only rarely have a
chance to go fun diving together, without obligations
to students or prot6g6es. Last Wednesday was one of
those rare occasions, greatly cherished, when we re-
turned to our old training cave, Jackson Blue, in Mari-
anna. Some of our equipment needed a shakedown
dive, meaning an easy dive to test its performance and
identify possible improvements. The goal was to get
submerged, which for us usually means reaching the
"stop light" at 2,100 feet into the cave, where literally
an old stop light has been placed on a rock. So we
were not deterred by local reports of greatly increased
water flow at the site. Others have aborted their dives
due to the high current making progress impossible,
despite expensive underwater scooters pulling the
diver. We did not bring any fancy dive gear beyond our
rebreathers, our standard of choice.
Visible on the surface of the cave was the broil
of uprising water, usually close to shore, now much
further away, providing an indication of the increase
in magnitude of flow. Water levels were also about one
foot higher, again an indication of much more water
being pushed through the system.
Entering the cave required pull and glide, a tech-
nique of carefully placed handholds to pull yourself
along, rather than just swimming. This reminded me
of the conditions encountered 15 years ago in Jackson
Blue, something Gregg and myself were very much
used to. Since then, the flow had gradually subsided
over time, only to now be restored to its original level
almost overnight for reasons yet to be determined.
Following the cave, most passages are large enough
for a two-lane highway. On a few occasions however
the cave narrows, increasing the flow, slowing our
progress almost to a halt. I felt more like a mountain
climber going vertically up rather than floating along
horizontally, using arms to pull and legs to push.
Mainstream technology cannot assist in this situation.
What is required is the skill of streamlining and using
the local terrain to hide behind as much as possible,
as well as sheer determination. The flow was such
that using a scooter would have resulted in moving
backwards rather than forward, and looking sideways
pushed the mask off the face. On a few occasions the
cave leads straight down. Negative buoyancy would
normally allow the descend now however we had to
climb downwards against the flow!
We can usually reach the stop light in 45 minutes,
60 with students. It took us over 90 minutes, with
a welcomed rest stop at the end. Although this may
sound exhausting, but we were exhilarated, and
even laughed. The way out of the cave was a simple
rollercoaster ride in the current, the main concern
not hitting the cave, otherwise free to just relax and
ponder the revelation of technology not determining
the application, yet again.
Needless to say, we had the cave to ourselves.


I I


FSU.




THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014 Page 15A


Law Enforcement and Courts


reports


Sheriff's Report


On Thursday, May 22,
a Wakulla High School
teacher reported smell-
ing marijuana in the
classroom. A 16-year-
old juvenile was found to
be in possession of less
than 20 grams of mari-
juana along with five
prescription pills. The
marijuana weighed 2.8
grams and the pills were
placed into evidence.
The male student was
issued a juvenile civil
citation. Deputy Scott
Rojas investigated.
In other activity re-
ported by the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office
this week:

THURSDAY, MAY 22

Frederick Matus-
chak of Crawfordville
reported a criminal mis-
chief. His fence line was
damaged by a vehicle
which broke a fence
post. Damage was es-
timated at $10. Deputy
Matt Helms investigat-
ed.
Shellen Scott of

Panacea reported a
grass fire in Panacea.
A brush fire was ob-
served burning near the
victim's shed. The fire
was suspicious in na-
ture but did not damage
any structures. Deputy
Ashley McAlister and
Detective Derek Lawhon
investigated.
Kathleen Newton of
Sopchoppy reported a
structure fire. A faulty
air conditioning unit
caused fire to break out
in a room. Three females
and a baby escaped the
home without incident.
No foul play was detect-
ed. The American Red
Cross was notified to as-
sist the family members
as the residence was a
total loss. Damage was
estimated at $60,000.
Deputy Ward Kromer,
Sgt. Lorne Whaley and
the Wakulla Fire Depart-
ment investigated.

FRIDAY, MAY 23

0 Paul English of
Crawfordville reported a
vehicle theft. The victim
was attempting to sell a
motorcycle to a man he
did not know. The man
asked to take the mo-
torcycle for a test drive
but failed to return with
the bike. The bike is val-
ued at $1,500 and was
entered into the NCIC/
FCIC data base as sto-
len. A suspect has been
identified. Deputy Vicki
Mitchell investigated.
Jude Burk of Craw-
fordville and a 17-year-
old juvenile were in-
volved in a traffic crash
at U.S. Highway 98 and
Jack Crum Road. There
were no injuries and
minor damage. Deputy
Gibby Gibson investi-
gated.
Lindsey Case of
Crawfordville reported
the theft of firearms
from her home. Three
firearms and cash, val-
ued at $3,500, were
reported missing. A sus-
pect has been identi-
fled. The firearms were
entered into the NCIC/
FCIC data base. Deputy
Will Hudson investi-
gated.
Dana Wilson of
Crawfordville reported
the theft of a bicycle.
The bike was taken from
the victim's home and
is valued at $189. Sgt.
Danny Harrell investi-
gated.

SATURDAY, MAY 24


0 Sara Ewing of
Crawfordville reported
a structure fire to a
Santa-Emma Lane home
in Crawfordville. Deputy


Mike Zimba and Deputy
David Pienta responded
to the scene and ob-
served an air condition-
ing unit on fire. The
deputies used water and
fire extinguishers to put
out the fire. Wakulla
Firefighters arrived on
scene and finished put-
ting out the fire to the
window unit. Renters
at the residence got out
of the home although
one resident was taken
to the hospital for treat-
ment of smoke inhala-
tion. The cause of the
fire was determined to
be faulty wiring. Dam-
age was estimated at
$5,000. The Red Cross
was summoned to the
scene to assist the fam-
ily. Deputy Richard
Moon also investigated.
Sgt. Ryan Muse as-
sisted FWC Officer Casey
Anderson with an ap-
parent intoxicated boat-
er at the St. Marks Boat
Ramp area. A 55-year-
old Crawfordville man
was arrested for Boat-
ing Under the Influence
(BUI) and transported to
the Wakulla County Jail.

SUNDAY, MAY 25

Deputy Adam Pen-
dris conducted a traf-
fic stop on Shadeville
Highway after observ-
ing a vehicle swerving
over the shoulder. The
vehicle tag information
came back from dis-
patch as stolen out of
Tallahassee. During the
arrest process, Antwon
Davontrez Griffin, 19, of
Tallahassee gave Deputy
Pendris a false name.
He did not possess a
driver license and had
active warrants out of
Leon County. Griffin
was arrested for driving
while license suspended
or revoked, resisting an
officer by a disguised
person, possession of
stolen property and an
out of county warrant.
Leon County agreed to
extradite. Deputy Mike
Zimba, FHP Trooper
Tallman and Lt. Julie
Martin investigated.
0 Deputy Stephen
Simmons conducted a
traffic stop for faulty
equipment. Christian
Robert Payne, 20, of
Crawfordville admitted
that he had drug para-
phernalia in his vehicle.
The items were seized
and the driver was is-
sued a notice to appear
in court for possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Deputy Ross Hasty also
investigated.
Theresa Mills of
Crawfordville reported
a vehicle burglary. The
victim's purse was sto-
len from her unsecured
vehicle. The purse and
the contents are valued
at $835. Deputy Ross
Hasty investigated.
WCSO deputies re-
sponded to a 2 p.m.
structure fire in Och-
lockonee Bay. Emer-
gency personnel arrived
on scene to observe a
Wilderness Way home
on pilings completely
engulfed in flames. A
small area of the woods
on the north side of the
residence was on fire
as well.
There was nobody
at home at the time of
the fire and investiga-
tors determined that the
home was owned by Wil-
liam and Lea Manifold of
Tallahassee. The home
was rented by Michael
Carter at the time of the
fire but Carter did not
respond to the scene


until being notified by
law enforcement.
The home and con-
tents were a total loss.
The home is valued


at $250,000. The state
Fire Marshal was called
to the scene to deter-
mine the cause of the
fire which remains un-
determined. However,
it does not appear to
be suspicious. Lt. Mike
Kemp, Deputy Gibby
Gibson, Detective Rich-
ard Moon and CSI Rae
Eddens investigated.
There were no injuries.
Wakulla Firefighters
also responded to the
blaze.
Alan Saylor of Lex-
ington, Ky. reported the
theft of a backpack while
fishing off Mashes Sands
Road. The backpack was
left unattended when
it was stolen and con-
tained $2,195 worth
of property. Lt. Brent
Sanders investigated.
Reginald Feagin of
Cotton, Ga. reported a
vehicle burglary. The
victim's wallet was sto-
len from his vehicle while
in Panacea. The vehicle
was left unsecured. The
stolen property is val-
ued at $50. The victim
contacted the WCSO on
May 26 to inform law en-
forcement that two of his
bank cards were used to
create fraudulent charg-
es. The charges totaled
$650. Deputy Adam
Pendris investigated.
Deputy Mike Zimba
was en route to assist
another deputy with a
complaint when he ob-
served Eldon Theodore
Hicks Jr., 32, of Panacea
walking on a Crawford-
ville road. Deputy Zimba
knew Hicks had active
arrest warrants. Hicks
attempted to convince
the deputy that he was
someone else. Hicks was
arrested for the out-
standing warrants and
for resisting an officer
by a disguised person.
Lt. Brent Sanders also
investigated.

MONDAY, MAY 26

Quinton Owens of
Yulee reported the theft
of his wallet while visit-
ing relatives in Craw-
fordville. The wallet and
contents are valued at
$105. Sgt. Lorne Whaley
investigated.
Travis Walker of
Crawfordville reported
the loss of a firearm. The
victim rented a vehicle
and returned the vehicle
only to forget leaving
his firearm inside it.
The firearm is valued
at $200. Deputy Ward
Kromer investigated.

TUESDAY, MAY 27

Leland Bell of Craw-
fordville reported the
theft of his wallet. The
victim went swimming
in the Wakulla River
and returned to discover
that his wallet had been
removed from his shoe.
Deputy Anthony Paul
investigated.
Geoffrey Grove of
Crawfordville reported a
fraud. The victim's bank
informed him that a new
account was opened in
his name. Someone de-
posited $1,000 in the ac-
count and made numer-
ous withdrawals from
the account. Deputy
Alan Middlebrooks and
Detective Randy Phillips
investigated.
Charles McShane of
Sopchoppy reported a
structure fire. A mobile
home on the property
was engulfed in flames
and Wakulla Firefight-
ers came to the scene to
fight the blaze. The fire


originated at a window
air conditioning unit.
The fire was not sus-
picious. The loss was
estimated at $25,000.
Deputy Alan Middle-


Arrest made in vehicle burglaries


Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office depu
ties arrested a 19-year-
old Crawfordville man
in connection with a
series of vehicle bur-
glaries on Maria Del
Carmen Lane in Craw-
fordville May 31, ac-
cording to Sheriff Char-
lie Creel.
Elisha Jerime Tilley
faces four counts of
burglary, two counts of
grand theft, one count
of petit theft, one count
of battery, one count of
robbery without a fire-
arm and one count of
larceny in connection
with cases investigated
May 29 and May 30.
One victim reported
the theft of tools, ra-
dios, medications and
U.S. currency, valued
at $1,000. Damage to
the inside of his vehicle
was valued at $200.
The second victim
reported her unsecured
vehicle was rummaged

brooks investigated.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 28

Katherine Gray of
Crawfordville reported
a vehicle burglary. The
victim's purse was sto-
len from her vehicle
while at the beach in
Ochlockonee Bay. Two
fraudulent charges were
observed on her bank
cards totaling $263 at
Wal-Mart and a gas
station in Tallahassee.
Deputy Nick Boutwell
investigated.
0 Michael Bray of
Crawfordville reported
a vehicle burglary. A ve-
hicle key and cigarettes
were reported stolen af-
ter someone ransacked
the vehicle. The sto-
len items are valued
at $355. Deputy Gibby
Gibson and Sgt. Ryan
Muse investigated.
Deputy Gibby Gib-
son investigated a stolen
vessel left unattended
on Forest Road 369 and
Forest Road 309. The
vessel was missing a
motor. The boat was
processed at the scene
and taken to the WCSO
Impound Yard. Stephen
Wilson of Tallahassee
reported the vessel sto-
len from Entrepot Bou-
levard in Tallahassee.
Leon County Sheriff's
Office deputies were no-
tified and will be work-
ing the case. The vessel
was turned over to the
victim. Lt. Mike Kemp
also investigated.
David Mitchell of
Sopchoppy reported
a fraud. The victim's
bank card was illegally
used at Wal-Mart and a
charge of $104 was cre-
ated. Sgt. Ryan Muse
and Detective Randy
Phillips investigated.
Lorra L. Shepherd of
Crawfordville and Jean
M. Crawford of Craw-
fordville were involved
in a minor traffic crash
at 2481 Crawfordville
Highway in Crawford-
ville. There were no inju-
ries and minor damage
to both vehicles. Deputy
Gibby Gibson investi-
gated.
Beatrice Motsinger
of Panacea reported a
fraud. The victim re-
ceived a past due letter
from a loan that she did
not secure. A suspect
has been identified. The
fraud was created over
$255. Sgt. Ray Johnson
and Detective Randy
Phillips investigated.
Deputy Stephen
Simmons conducted a
traffic stop in Crawford-


ville due to an expired
tag. Deputy Simmons
determined that Justin


through but nothing
was taken except ciga-
rettes and a lighter
which were stolen from
her enclosed patio. A
third victim report-
ed the theft of head-
phones, a dirt bike and
a skateboard valued at
$500.
Tilley was also
charged with taking
medications from a
friend's home and
striking his friend mul-
tiple times in the face


Keith Drasher, 24, of
Crawfordville did not
have a valid driver li-
cense. He was arrested
for driving while license
is suspended or re-
voked. Drug parapher-
nalia was found on the
suspect and he was also
charged with possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Sgt. Ryan Muse also
investigated.
Sgt. Ryan Muse in-
vestigated a case of ani-
mal neglect after Animal
Control Officer Mark
Carter contacted him
about two dogs needing
medical treatment. The
dogs had matted hair,
long unclipped nails and
mange.
The dog owner was
required to address the
animal issues within
five days. The dog owner
was contacted in North
Carolina while on vaca-
tion and she had not
addressed the animal
issues. The case is be-
ing turned over to the
Criminal Investigations
Division for possible
neglect charges.
Dolores Moody of
Panacea reported a
grand theft. The victim
reported the loss of an
iPad while she was at
Wal-Mart. The prop-
erty is valued at $600.
Deputy Adam Pendris
investigated.


and head when she
attempted to retrieve
the medications from
him. Tilley is also a
suspect in the theft of
an energy drink and
cigarette lighter from
the Wakulla Station
Kangaroo. On May 29,
the clerk reported a
male suspect leaving
the store without pay-
ing for the products.
The suspect returned
to the Kangaroo three
more times during the
evening in an attempt
to acquire items before
law enforcement was
called to the scene. The
retail theft case is still
pending.
Tilley was arrested
without incident at a
Crawfordville residence
near the vehicle bur-
glaries. He was trans-
ported to the Wakulla
County Jail where he
remains pending a
bond hearing on Tues-
day, June 3.

Marisa Davidson of
Crawfordville reported
locating a bicycle in a
wooded area near her
home. The bike had
not been reported sto-
len. It is valued at $150
and was turned into the
Property and Evidence
Division. Deputy Adam
Pendris investigated.

THURSDAY, MAY 29

Danny Colvin of
Crawfordville reported
a vehicle fire on Don-
aldson-Williams Road in
Crawfordville. Wakulla
Firefighters put out the
blaze which is believed
to be caused by a me-
chanical issue. Dam-
age to the truck and
contents is estimated at
$11,300. Deputy Adam
Pendris and Detective
Cole Wells investigated.

The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received
1,320 calls for service
during the past week
including 14 business
and residential alarms;
12 assists to other agen-
cies; 54 investigations;
13 suspicious people;
28 suspicious vehicles;
11 thefts; 36 traffic en-
forcements; 206 traffic
stops; and 12 reckless
vehicles.


Est. 200


850566-9293 Carol Ann Williams,
Licensed Real Estate
www. coastalgems.com Broker/Owner
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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014


Insects are busy establishing themselves in new sites


By Les Harrison


"Thus out of small be-
ginnings greater things
have been produced." So
said William Bradford,
five-time governor of the
Plymouth Colony in Mas-
sachusetts's early days.
Bradford was one of
the pilgrim leaders who
guided his followers out
of the Netherlands and to
a primitive New England
wilderness. They clawed
their way past harsh
winters, inhospitable
natives, and the threat
of potential French and
Spanish attack.
With Bradford at
the forefront, the colo-
ny weathered the hard
times to become a stable
and prosperous settle-
ment. His charges had
been deposited at the
right location and were
able to successfully use
all the resources avail-
able.
While Wakulla County
in June is a much friend-
lier environment than a
wintery New England,
native insects are now
busy establishing them-
selves in new and unpop-
ulated sites around the
area. They persistently
leave fresh, and hungry,
colonists in rarely no-
ticed locations.
Eggs are deposited in
isolated and concealed


spots. Once the drop-off
occurs the parent leaves
for parts unknown, just
like the Mayflower after
visiting Plymouth Rock.
The small, isolated
eggs are left to the whims
of fate, defended only
by luck and the cam-
ouflage skills of a de-
parted mother. Other
insects, reptiles, and
birds search incessantly
for these quick meals
available with little effort.
The early summer in-
cubation period is usu-
ally quick, lasting only a
few days. Hatching into
a new world only compli-
cates the challenges for
insects with no model to
follow and left with only
instincts to direct their
survival attempt.
The new insects usu-
ally arrive in quick suc-
cession, but disperse as
fast as they can walk
or crawl away from the
hatch site. This first
stage sometimes is the
nymph phase in certain
insects such as lady-
bugs.
The nymph phase re-
quires massive energy
intake to support rapid
growth and develop-
ment. The search for
food begins almost as
quickly as they break out
of the egg.


In the instar, or adolescent phase,


The most common
food is plant material,
usually leaves and ten-
der stems. Some nymph
stage insects are picky
eaters and will dine on
a limited selection of
plants, while others will
eat almost anything
green.
This plant munch-
ing is usually noticed
if it involves someone's
landscape plants or turf
grass. While many adult
insects are considered
desirable, their nymph
stage is considered a
pest.


As with adolescence
in children, this problem
phase passes relatively
quickly. These insects
emerge as adults after a
respite as a pupa.
Other insects, such
as grasshoppers, develop
a hard exterior coat-
ing called an exoskel-
eton soon after hatch-
ing. Their development
stages are referred to as
instars and some insects
may go through as many
as five instars.
Eating all the time,
exoskeletons are out-
grown and shed by the


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FTMOMz~


PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
of lady bugs, left, and stink bugs.


insect. Some sheds are
deposited whole and are
easily identified, with
others flaking off as rare-
ly recognized remains of
a particular species.
Many times these too
are first noticed when
foliage and turf goes
missing from a yard. As
they pass through the
advancing instar stages
these insects are easier
to identify and target..
Insect growth rates
outstrip any other ani-
mal on earth. From small
beginnings, these Wakul-
la County natives can


Shrimp
Crickets
* Wormls


be hundreds of times
larger in a few months
and produce even greater
numbers as the summer
passes.
To learn more about
the expanding insect
populations in Wakulla
County, contact the UF/
IFAS Wakulla County
Extension Office at 850-
926-3931.

Les Harrison is the
Wakulla County Exten-
sion Director. He can be
reached by email at har-
risog(dytfl.edu or at (850)
926-3931.


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Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014


Chamber News


Page 2B


Having their day in court Weekin Wakulla


Weekly Roundup

Page 4B


Page 3B


oun 4-22


Tbtrakutta UHtu EXTRA!





Revised airport plans adopted


Board adopts plan with minimum standards to keep license


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema thewakullanews.net

Commissioners
passed a motion to adopt
updated revisions of the
Wakulla County Air-
port Master Plan at the
Wakulla County Board
of Commissioners board
meeting on Monday,
June 2. A plan has to be
adopted in order to keep
the airport license.
Instead of adopting
the original master plan,
commissioners will
adopt a minimum plan,
with three parts of the
project left off- hangars
and maintenance facil-
ity, a flight office, and
paving of the runway.
At a December 2013
meeting, commission-
ers voted unanimously
to approve the Airport
Master Plan and the
public/private option
for the airport. Following
that meeting, the state
Department of Trans-
portation provided the
county with suggestions
and comments related
to the master plan. The
suggestions and com-
ments have been incor-
porated into the master
plan document, and
Wakulla County has ad-
opted approval of these
changes.
"This revisions are
based upon FDOT's
comments," County


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
An aerial view of the Wakulla Airport.


Administrator David
Edwards said. "We took
out the paving portion
of it, which was in the
original airport master
plan submitted in De-
cember."
Retained as part of
the airport plan were a
vegetative buffer and a
fuel farm.
"At least this will let
us move ahead with the
minimum needed to per-
mit the airport and keep
it open," Commissioner
Randy Merritt said.
Community members
had a lot to say on the
issue.
Airport manager
Steve Fults said he be-
lieved the airport is a big
economic driver in the
area, and has tremen-
dous potential.


"Airports are the fu-
ture for transportation,
that's the bottom line,"
Fults said. "We have an
underdeveloped, under-
utilized diamond in the
rough in our county air-
port. To hamstring this
and say that we're not
going to have a viable,
general aviation airport
that can flourish, is not
looking forward it's not
prudent."
Fults distributed a
DOT document that
showed the annual air-
ports economic impact
to be $113,000.
"I can certiainly ap-
preciate the half-dozen
or so objectors that are
extremely vocal about
opposing this. But I
think this process has
been done absolutely


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8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week, October 1 February 14
8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30
www.capitalhealth.com/medicare


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An Independent Li-n ofth, BlCros and iue Shild As ation

Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans
in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to
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Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2013-2014."
Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage are
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properly with Kimley-
Horn (design consulting
firm) and the county. We
have bent over back-
wards two or three times
to accomodate those
folks. Do we stop our
progress in our county
and the prosperity for
our future?"
Citizen Richard Shep-
herd said he supports
the airport master plan
with revisions, to pacify
the opposition.
"I request the board to
approve this, so we don't
have any more tragedies
like we had with the
helicopter crash and
everything else."
In Feburary, two men
were killed and a wom-
an was injured when
a helicopter clipped a
tree limb, crashed and
landed on its top.
Several citizens
echoed the proponents,
while others objected.
Jim Parham of Surf


Road said opponents
came together with air-
port advocates to help
them get the minimum
standards.
"Fine," Parham said.
"That would preserve
the level of use, and level
of intensity. DOT said all
they would fund is the
minimums. If you pass
this master plan with all
the bells and whistles
in there, we as property
owners on Surf Road are
bound by law to disclose
that you can have all of
these things happening
next door to you. That
has already impeded the
sale of one property."
Citizen Walt Dixon
asked the board to adopt
the original master plan,
so the board would not
have to revisit the issue
in a few years.
Citizen Dana Peck
said she enjoys flying a
Piper Cherokee herself,
but said the original


airport master plan is
filed with inaccurate,
contradictory and mis-
leading statements.
"Nobody objected to
this airport before it
started growing huge,"
Peck said. "The thought
of someone saying they
want to be stewards
of the land and keep a
master plan that would
pave a floodplain, that
would pave over wet-
lands, that would have
airplanes flying over
the heads of people that
weigh 12,500 pounds,
that's ridiculous in this
setting. There is no posi-
tive in this for people
living along Surf Road.
Increased flights means
increased danger for
people living on the end
of this runway. Keep
it the way it is. Some
people can be a little bit
happy, and some people
can be a little bit sad."
Commissioner Ralph
Thomas said outlining
the plan's minimum
standards was the best
approach to getting the
license pinned down.
"Things can always
change in the future,"
Thomas said. "But I
think the motion is con-
sistent with the feed-
back we received. I don't
love the airport, I don't
hate the airport. I just
want to make sure we
aren't spending a lot
of local money on it.
I think this (motion)
allows it to move for-
ward, and keeps it alive
and keeps the licensing
in place. Anything can
be revisited down the
road."
Commissioner Jerry
Moore said people he
has spoken with in the
county "do not want to
pay a dime" for what is
perceived as a private
airport.
"However y'all vote
on your compromise,
I will decide against
that," Moore said. "The
people of Tarpine have
a very good airport. And
they are the people who
should pay for the air-
port."
The motion to adopt
the amended Airport
Master Plan passed 4-1
with Moore voting no.


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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014 thewakullanews.com


a-


The Chamber held a ribbon cutting for new
member Flying Papi May 9. Flying Papi Wakulla
is a mobile food truck specializing in their famous
hot dogs and Bradley's sausage.
The food truck is available for breakfast, lunch
and special occasions. Like them on Facebook to
see where they are located each week. Flying Papi
updates their schedule on Facebook frequently.
Since 1893, the hot dog has been a part of
American culture. From the World's Fair, to city
sidewalks, to baseball games and family barbe-
cues, the hot dog is an American tradition. Variety
and catering to the budget and tastes of custom-
ers are flying Papi's two main goals.
Flying Papi offers an affordable meal to fit any-
one's budget. They offer a 100 percent all-beef
hot dog with all the typical condiments (mustard,
relish, onions, and ketchup).
Other unique offerings include:
Chicago style dog- Mustard, relish, chopped
onions, tomato slices, peppers, pickle spear, and
a dash of celery salt.
The Wakulla Dog All American Grilled Beef
Hot Dog (FREE toppings).
The Chow Dog- Home-style Southern Relish
with chopped sweet onion.
The Papi Dog Sauerkraut with spicy Mustard
New York Style Dog Savory sauteed onions in
a "special" Sauce!
The Chili Dog- Homestyle savory chili (cheese
optional; coming soon)
The Southern Slaw Dog Southern-style cole
slaw and savory chili (coming soon).
The Flying Joe Dog- Sloppy joe beef and topped
with shoestring potato sticks.
We will also offer other alternatives such as
grilled cheese, hamburgers and sandwiches. Cole
slaw, potato salad and much more!
Flying Papi is available for promotions, parties,
fundraisers, catering, and special events. (850)
321-7975.


Stan West of Riverside Cafe, second from left, and Ed Gardner, third from right, jointly
hosted a Chamber networking event at Riverside Cafe in St. Marks.



Ed Gardner, Riverside



host networking event


By PETRA SHUFF
Of the Chamber

It was a beautiful
evening, right on the
water at Riverside Caf6
in St. Marks, Thurs-
day May 15. This was
the Chamber's second
quarter After-hours
mixer hosted by Dr.
Ed Gardner, 0. D. and
his staff, and Riverside
Caf6.
City Manager Zoe
Mansfield is always
happy to show off her
community and greet-
ed guests as they ar-
rived. Petra gave ev-
eryone a ticket for the
exciting door prizes,
which were donated by
Walmart.
Dr. Gardner and his
staff set up a table
with eyeglass cleaner,


information on their
services and to make
sure everyone glasses
were clean and shiny.
Chamber members
mingled in the outside
area of the restaurant,
enjoying the unusu-
ally cool evening and
snacking on the deli-
cious variety of foods
prepared by Stan West
and his staff at Riv-
erside. There were
homemade fish and
crab dips, hot wings
and an assortment of
crackers, chips and
other dips.
When Molly began
drawing for door priz-
es, there were a lot of
happy cheers when
so many people went
home with a prize; FSU
baseball tickets, Sub-
way sandwiches, Riv-


erside Caf6 tee-shirts,
a blender won by Co-
lin Irons and an out-
standing electric crock
pot trio won by Lesley
Cushman, and many
more.
Thank you to Dr.
Gardner and staff and
Riverside Caf6 for host-
ing the event. We all
enjoyed a chance to
connect to other cham-
ber members and an
evening of good food
and friendship.
Dr. Gardner's Of-
fice is located with the
Crawfordville WalMart
and is a full-service eye
care facility. They are
open from 9 a.m. to 7
p.m. Monday through
Friday and Saturday
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.,
closed Sundays. They
offer competitive pric-


ing and walk-ins are
welcome.
You should contact
Mali Rowe for any ques-
tions about scheduling
an appointment with
Dr. Gardner, insurance
or other information on
their services.
In addition to Dr.
Gardner and Mali,
the staff includes Tim
Babcock, Joe Red-
ding, Karen Stelling,
all available and eager
to assist you with your
eye care needs. They
can be reached at 926-
6206.
Riverside Caf6 is a
popular restaurant on
the St. Marks River,
and you can always
count on friendly staff
dishing up great food,
and enjoy live music on
the weekends.


Chamber lunch held at Legacy Cafe


By PETRA SHUFF
Of the Chamber

Our monthly net-
working luncheon was
held at the Legacy Caf6,
serving a wonderful
salad bar with delicious
chicken and taco salad,
and a baked potato to
load with various top-
pings, and homemade
cheesecake and Ger-
man chocolate cake. It
was a wonderful oppor-
tunity for the students,
introduced by Teresa
Hernandez, to show off
their learned skills.
The cafe is housed
in the cafeteria of the
former Crawfordville
Elementary School, and
serves as a training
ground for students
with disabilities to de-
velop skills in culinary
arts, hygiene, social
communication, main-
tenance and the busi-
ness of running a res-
taurant through hands
on participation.
Students plan the
menu, shop for the food
and supplies, prepare
and serve the food, col-
lect money, and per-
form the maintenance
duties (laundry, dish-
washing and cleaning).
Participating stu-
dents come from the
Wakulla High School
Exceptional Student
Education Program and
the Program for Adults
with Disabilities. In
2013, the students ex-
panded the business to
include a boutique, of-
fering the sale of hand-
crafted items.
The Legacy Caf6 and
Boutique is open every
Tuesday and Thursday


WILLIAM SNOWDEN
Mary Wallace and Legacy workers draw names.


when school is in ses-
sion to school district
employees and commu-
nity members between
11 a.m. and noon for
lunch. Pre-orders must
be received in order to
avoid waste.
Proceeds from the
boutique and caf6 sup-
port the programs and
surplus funds are paid
to the student workers
to teach fiscal respon-
sibility and indepen-
dence.
For more information
contact Vicki Strick-
land, employment spe-
cialist, by email at vicki.
stricklandjwcsb.us or
Tanya English, execu-
tive director of Excep-
tional Student Educa-
tion at tanya.english@
wcsb.us or 926-0065
ext. 252.
Mary Wallace
thought it would be
great for the students to
be part of the drawing
and let them take turns,
and Brenda Posey's
name was drawn for the
$43 cash prize. Mary
announced our May


new members, Flying
Papi and The Garden
Center by Gatortrax,
and introduced her
guest Debbie Rascati
with Bass Underwrit-
ers. Tara Kieser invited
two guests, Jeremy An-
derson of Halpern and
Anderson, PA, and his
wife Crystal Anderson
with Reel Life.
Jo Ann Palmer in-
troduced Janie John-
son, co-owner of Bruce
Johnson Construction,
and Warden Jimmy
Coker introduced his
Assistant Warden of
Operations Cindy Swi-
er. Chrys Goodwyne
introduced Sharon
Council Tyler, new
CEO of the American
Red Cross Capital Area
Chapter.
Lisa Wetherton, Fi-
nancial Associate with
Thrivent Financial was
the Spotlight Business
presenter at our lunch.
Thrivent Financial is a
financial services orga-
nization that is a faith
based and membership
owned organization


that enjoys the highest
industry ratings (A++
by A. M. Best) and is
ranked 325 on the For-
tune 500.
Thrivent Financial is
filed as a brotherhood
organization, which
enables Thrivent to
distribute money that
would have otherwise
been paid in taxes.
Last year, Thrivent and
members gave $182.7
million dollars to indi-
viduals in need, con-
gregations and other
nonprofits.
Lisa would welcome
an opportunity to learn
more about you and see
how Thrivent can help
you with your goals.
Her phone number is
(404) 643-8272 and her
email address is lisa.
wetherton@thrivent.
com. You can learn
more about Thrivent at
www.whythrivent.com.
Our next spotlight
will shine on Jessi-
ca Revell and Lorra
Phillips of Shepard
Accounting and Tax
Services at our June
luncheon, scheduled at
Wakulla Springs Lodge.
As always we want
to thank our raffle item
contributors: CHAT of
Wakulla, Petra Shuff,
Cook Insurance,
Friends of Wakulla
State Springs Park,
Bass Underwriters,
Chris Phillips/Red Hills
Broadcasting, Deirdre
Farrington, Shepard
Accounting, and The
Wakulla News.
Our June luncheon
will be held at Wakulla
Springs Lodge, Wednes-
day, June 25.


RIBBON CUTTINGS:


Flying Papi


LYNDA KINSEY

The Garden Center by

Gatortrax

On May 16 there was a great turnout for the
Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce ribbon
cutting event for the grand opening of The Garden
Center by Gatortrax in Crawfordville.
The Garden Center had previously opened for
business on March 26 with a "soft opening" to give
a preview of what the business would be offering.
Since then, the garden center has received an over-
whelming amount of support and well wishes from
the community.
When asked about the response of the new shop,
owner Rodney True said, "I couldn't be any happier
with the amount of response we have received about
the new store. Our customers are so very happy
that we have opened a store with the garden and
outdoor products as a specialty store."
The idea of The Garden Center by Gatortrax
has been a plan for us for a couple of years, said
True, who is also the owner of Gatortrax Services, a
landscape maintenance company in Crawfordville.
"The two businesses complement each other. The
landscape company uses the products that the store
sells, and the store helps our retail customers by
offering our knowledge and expertise in landscape
maintenance for their own projects."
My family is the reason we could do this my
fiance Shannon, my mom Geri, and kids Bree and
Zach all gave a lot of time to get the store open,
heck, even our Fat Cat helped out some, True said.
The 3,000 square foot showroom is air condi-
tioned and open all year round with a complete
line of organic and non-organic gardening supplies,
pottery and talavera, fountains, in-house made
concrete statuary, plus a huge gift and home d6cor
section with something for everyone.
The Garden Center by Gatortrax is located be-
hind 3Y equipment at 16 McCallister Road. Open
seven days, weekdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sat-
urdays 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sundays noon to 3
p.m. Phone (850) 545-2901. Gatortrax Services is
open weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Phone (850)
545-6760.


p wm"




THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 3B


Upcoming Events

Wednesday, June 4

The Class of 2014, Wakulla High School War Eagles in-
vite you to come celebrate with them at BACCALAUREATE
at 7 p.m. (Gates Open at 6 p.m.) at J.D. Jones Stadium at
Jerry Reynolds Field.

Thursday, June 6

Lake Ellen Baptist Church is hosting an END-OF-
SCHOOL COMMUNITY BASH for kids in Hudson Park from 4
to 7 p.m. Free hot dogs and drinks will be available in addition
to games and "bouncies." Parents can also register kids from
3 years through 5th grade for Vacation Bible School which
begins at LEBC on Sunday, June 8 and ends with Com-
mencement and Family Fun Night on Friday, June 13.

Friday, June 6

Class of 2014, Wakulla High School War Eagles GRAD-
UATION will beat 7:30 p.m. (Gates Open at 6:30 p.m.) at J.D.
Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. The high school park-
ing gates will open at 5:30 p.m.

Saturday, June 7

NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National
Button Society) will meet at the central location of Sunset
Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. Wakulla, Franklin, Oka-
loosa and guests welcome. For more information, call Sherrie
Alverson 926-7812, President Don/Barbara Lanier 729-7594,
email bardon56@aol.com, Linda Wood 850-899-0025, or a
local email: skpsky2000@comcast.net. A short interesting
presentation about unique buttons is given at each meeting.

A MASQUERADE GALAto benefit the Children's Miracle
Network will be from 7 p.m. to midnight at the Bistro at Wild-
wood, and is hosted by Walmart. Dress code black tie/for-
mal, mask required and available for purchase. Tickets $25
per person. Tickets must be purchased in advance and are
available at Walmart, Crawfordville. Please contact Teresa or


Tracy 926.1560.

St. Marks Wildlife Refuge is hosting NATIONAL TRAILS
DAY. In celebration of this date, a hike will be led along a
section of the Florida National Scenic Trail to the Cathedral
of the Palms and Shepherd Springs. Hikers will meet at the
check station on the Wakulla Beach Road at 8:30 a.m. and be
back by noon. (The Wakulla Beach Road runs south of US-
98, 1.3 miles west of the Wakulla River, and the check station
is 1 mile south on this dirt road.) Total walking distance will
be about 2 miles. Appropriate shoes (mud tolerant and not
open-toed) are required. Bug spray and drinking water are
recommended. Group size is limited to 20, so register and
get further details by calling the Refuge 925-6121.

Monday, June 9

A new Grief Support group "Journey to Hope and Heal-
ing" starts at 7 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist
Church, 176 Ochlockonee Street, Crawfordville, Florida. For
more information, please contact 926-7209.

A SUMMERTIME BLOOD DRIVE at Crawfordville
Walmart will be from noon to 6 p.m. All donors will receive
a $10 WALMART GIFT CARD, A$5 COUPON off of two en-
trees from Outback Steakhouse, and a wellness checkup in-
cluding blood pressure, iron count and cholesterol screening.
Walk-ons welcome. Or make an appointment online at www.
oneblooddonor.org and use sponsor code #G1915. Donate
blood twice between May 1 and August 31 and you will re-
ceive a free lunch offer courtesy of Outback Steakhouse and
be entered to win "Outback for a Year" Photo ID required.
1.800.68.BLOOD.

EXPLORATION STATION CAMP AMBASSADORS June
9 13 Camp designed for students to use creativity and
communication skills to create their own country and collabo-
rate with other campers in trading, managing, and developing
ways for their own country to survive a host of circumstances
both positive and negative that will occur with their country
as the "World Summit" approaches. Countries and camp-
ers must work together to survive. Monday through Friday
8 am to 11 a.m. $75 per week. Please, contact Catherine
Harris Small at 850-274-6810 or Wakulla One Stop Commu-
nity Center at 850-745-6042 to reserve your spot. Camp is
hosted at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 318
Shadeville Road.

Tuesday, June 10

Young Adult Theatre Workshop. Workshop is for ages
13-20 years. Cost: $75. Requirements: All students must
dedicate themselves to the 7 days of the Workshop. Students
must also show an interest in the performing arts, or the de-
velopment of artistic performance. 12-4 p.m. June 10, 11, 12
and June 17, 18, 19, 20. For more information contact the
Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 850-745-6042.

Thursday, June 12

One Stop CPR/AED CHOKING ASSISTANCE CLASS
will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) at The


Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville
Highway. Register for class at 745-6042.

WAKULLA PREGNANCY CENTER is partnering with
the Community Foundation of North Florida on Match Day
2014 on June 12 only. The Foundation will match your dona-
tions to us dollar-for-dollar up to $5,000 on gifts made ONLY
THROUGH THEIR WEBSITE. Simply go to www.Findlearn-
give.org and make a gift by credit card using the "Donate Now
Match Day" button between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to be eligible
for the Match Day grants and incentive prizes. Select Wakulla
Pregnancy Center as your chosen charity. The earlier in the
day the better as there is a maximum dollar amount available
to be awarded. For details of the rules go to http://findlearn-
give.guidestar.org/ or follow this link.

Friday, June 13

GOING PLACES will present OUTDOOR MOVIE
NIGHT at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center begin-
ning at 8:30 p.m. Bring the whole family, with blankets and
chairs, to see Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark.
The community center is located at 318 Shadeville Road in
Crawfordville.

Saturday, June 14

WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1994 20-YEAR
REUNION will be held at Wakulla Springs Lodge from 6 to 10
p.m. Reunion Ticket are $40 and includes admission to event
at Wakulla Springs Lodge, heavy hors d'oeuvres, entertain-
ment, and door prizes. Wakulla Springs Lodge will be provid-
ing a cash bar on the terrace. Online payments are preferred,
the website to make your online payment and RSVP is www.
WHSWarEagles1994.myevent.com. Payments can also be
mailed to the following address. Attention: Ashley Savary,
Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville, FL 32326.
Make Checks payable to WHS Class of 1994. For more in-
formation e-mail Hunter Versiga Tucker at htucker32327@
yahoo.com.

*ACAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will meet at9 a.m. at
Myra Jean's Restaurant in Crawfordville. Topic for discussion
will be dietitian recommendations.

Friday, June 27

Root 319 Cuts & Color is collecting CARE PACKAGES to
send to troops overseas. The DEADLINE is June 27. Items in
care packages can include toiletries and travel-size personal
grooming products for men and women, non-perishable food
items, games and miscellaneous items like batteries, pens,
insect repellent wipes, socks and paper.

Saturday, June 28

The BIG BEND MODEL RAILROAD ASSOCIATION
model railroad show and sale will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at
the North Florida Fairgrounds buildings no. 2 and 4. Parking
is free. Admission is $6 for ages 13 and up. For more infor-
mation visit the website: www.bbmra.org, or call John Sul-
lenberger at 544-1870.
Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net


Wakulla High School
Baccalaureate
J.D. Jones Stadium

7 p.m.

Wednesday


Government Meetings
Monday, June 9
PLANNING COMMISSION meeting will begin at 7 p.m. in
the Commission Chambers located at 29 Arran Road.
SOPCHOPPY CITY COUNCIL meetings are held the second
Monday of each month, 6:30 p.m., City Hall Commission Cham-
bers, 105 Municipal Avenue.
Wednesday, June 11
The Vakulla County CODE ENFORCEMENT BOARD will
hold a public hearing at 5:30pm In the Commission Chambers,
29Arran Rd., Crawfordville.
Thursday, June 12
The Wakulla County CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION
will hold its first PUBLIC HEARING at 6 p.m. at County Com-
mission Chambers. The second public hearing will be June 23
at6 p.m.
The TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a pub-
lic meeting, 8:30 a.m., Wakulla County Adminisration Office.
The Wakulla COUNTY MARINE ADVISORY COMMIT-
TEE will hold a public meeting at 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County
Administration Building
Monday, June 16
The Vakulla County BOARD OF COMMISIONERS will
have its regular meeting at Commission Chambers at 6 p.m.
Tuesday, June 17
A PUBLIC MEETING WITH FDOT on the US 319 plans is
scheduled for at 5:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist
Church. Included are some of the conceptual plans for stretches
in Crawfordville. All local businesses are encouraged to attend
this meeting. Your input is vital for continued FDOT planning.

-Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings

Thursday, June 6
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey's Steam
Room in Panacea.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each
second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office,
2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and
friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.
Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be
held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County
One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for
class at 745-6042.
WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center
from 2 to 4 p.m.
Friday, June 6
Ty's US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, realistic
women self-defense, tactics and techniques for women and more!
Free two introduction Classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For
more information please contact the Wakulla One Stop Community
Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlock-
onee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.


WHS Class of 2014
Graduation

J.D. Jones Stadium

7:30 p.m.

Friday


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at
54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more infor-
mation.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the senior
center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30
a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill
levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.
Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two
classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The
Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville High-
way. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Saturday, June 7
LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday
from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817
South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, educa-
tion and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune
diseases.
ALCOHOLICSANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission
by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853
for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organ-
ic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Down-
town Sopchoppy under the giant oak.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND
ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is lo-
cated at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.

Sunday, June 8
-ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at
54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for
five classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30
p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Cen-
ter, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Monday, June 9
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call
545-1853.
YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior
Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath.
RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer's Project of Wakulla
at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship
Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There


is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call
Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.

Tuesday, June 10
C.O.R.E. "Challenging Obstacles Require Effort" FREE Fitness
for the whole family. Tuesday 5-6 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Com-
munity Center Contact 850-745-6045 or CORE at 850-224-1177.
Ty's US TAI KARATE SCHOOL for mixed martial arts, realistic
women self-defense, tactics and techniques for women and more!
Free two introduction Classes, $40 per month, and family rates. For
more information please contact the Wakulla One Stop Community
Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140.
VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post
on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30
p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information,
call 545-1853.
BOOK BUNCH meets in the children's room at the public library
at 10:30 a.m.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI
Wakulla office.
CRAWFORDVILLE LION'S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant.
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more informa-
tion at 984-5277.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in
the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office.

Wednesday, June 11
-ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30
p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information,
call 545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call
545-1853.
-ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC
on Surf Road at noon.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more informa-
tion.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30
a.m.
KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. For information, call 491-1684.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.
BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at
the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to
create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.
KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library.
Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.
MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road.
Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play.
SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m.
until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy com-
panionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs
Office Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.


Week

in


www.thewakullanews.com




Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014

WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)


thewakullanews.com


By JIM SAUNDERS
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE, May 30
- Gov. Rick Scott is off cam-
paigning. Lawmakers are back
home.
But don't let the calm in the
Capitol fool you. The real action
this week took place in the legal
system, from a courtroom in
downtown Tallahassee to the
U.S. Supreme Court.
Republican operatives spent
time in Leon County circuit
court trying to downplay their
roles in drawing new congres-
sional districts in 2012. Mean-
while, the U.S. Supreme Court
rejected a key part of Florida's
system of determining whether
Death Row inmates should be
shielded from execution be-
came of intellectual disabilities.
And just for good measure,
Scott called for the Agency for
Health Care Administration to
launch a legal fight with the
federal Department of Veterans
Affairs about state inspectors'
failed attempts to check out VA
hospitals.

MYSTERY MAPS

Republican legislative lead-
ers have been fond of describ-
ing the 2012 redistricting
process as the most open and
transparent in state history.
Maybe that's true, but you
couldn't tell it from testimony
that continued this week be-
fore Leon Circuit Judge Terry
Lewis.
GOP operatives and former
House Speaker Dean Cannon
took the stand in a lawsuit al-
leging that the Legislature did
not follow constitutional anti-
gerrymandering requirements
when drawing new congres-
sional districts. Spilling out of
the testimony were accounts of
behind-the-scenes discussions
between Republican Party
strategists and legislative aides
and puzzling questions about
how maps were submitted to
the Legislature.
Attorneys for the plaintiffs,
including voting-rights groups
and seven voters, are trying to
show that Republican insid-
ers crafted the congressional


Having

districts to help elect GOP can-
didates. If proven, that could
violate the 2010 "Fair Districts"
constitutional amendments,
which were supposed to rein
in the redistricting process
that has been used in the past
to protect incumbents and the
party in power.
During testimony Wednes-
day, Cannon acknowledged
being angry when he learned
that top aide Kirk Pepper, at
one point in the process, gave
copies of the Legislature's
maps to GOP consultant Marc
Reichelderfer.
"I yelled at him and told
him that was stupid," Cannon
told David King, a lawyer rep-
resenting the plaintiffs. "I said
that was really dumb. And he
apologized, and he agreed that
it was."
But maybe the most-puz-
zling issue of the week focused
on a map that was purportedly
submitted to the Legislature by
former Florida State University
student Alex Posada. The map
included several districts iden-
tical to those drawn by Repub-
lican Party staff member Frank
Terraferma. Lawmakers have
publicly praised the "Posada"
map as a footprint for their
congressional plan.
One problem: Posada said
under oath in a deposition that
he did not draw the map and
did not submit it to the Legisla-
ture, according to an attorney
for the plaintiffs in the case.
The email address on an ac-
count used to submit the map
was one Posada "had never
seen, never used, never autho-
rized anybody to use to submit
those maps under his name,"
said attorney Vince Falcone,
who took the deposition.

DEATH PENALTY DEFEAT

For more than 35 years,
Freddie Lee Hall has faced the
possibility of execution for his
role in the 1978 murder of a
pregnant woman abducted
outside a Leesburg grocery
store. But questions have
long focused on whether Hall
is intellectually disabled or
in old-school terms, mentally
retarded and whether that


their day in court


should prevent him from being
put to death.
The U.S. Supreme Court
this week gave Hall at least a
temporary reprieve. Justices,
in a 5-4 decision, ruled that
Florida's use of a "rigid" IQ
score of 70 in determining
whether inmates should be
shielded from execution "cre-
ates an unacceptable risk
that persons with intellectual
disability will be executed, and
thus is unconstitutional."
Hall's attorneys submitted
evidence in state courts that he
had an IQ of 71, though that
number has been disputed by
prosecutors.
Writing for the majority,
Justice Anthony Kennedy said
using the 70 IQ score as a
cutoff prevents courts from
considering other types of po-
tentially important evidence in
determining whether a person
is intellectually disabled. That
evidence can include such
issues as social adaptation,
medical history, behavioral
records, school reports and
family circumstances.
"Intellectual disability is
a condition, not a number,"
wrote Kennedy, who was joined
in the majority by justices
Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen
Breyer, Sonia Sotomayor and
Elena Kagan. "Courts must
recognize, as does the medi-
cal community, that the IQ
test is imprecise. This is not
to say that an IQ test score is
unhelpful. It is of considerable
significance, as the medical
community recognizes. But in
using these scores to assess a
defendant's eligibility for the
death penalty, a state must af-
ford these test scores the same
studied skepticism that those
who design and use the tests
do, and understand that an IQ
test score represents a range
rather than a fixed number. A
state that ignores the inherent
imprecision of these tests risks
executing a person who suffers
from intellectual disability."
But Justice Samuel Alito,
writing in dissent, referred to
a 2002 ruling in which the Su-
preme Court said that execut-
ing people with intellectual dis-
abilities was unconstitutional.


He said that case, known as
Atkins v. Virginia, relied on
states to determine how best to
identify defendants with intel-
lectual disabilities. Alito also
took issue with parts of the ma-
jority opinion about looking at
a person's adaptive behavior in
making such determinations.
"No consensus exists among
states or medical practitioners
about what facts are most criti-
cal in analyzing that factor, and
its measurement relies largely
on subjective judgments,"
wrote Alito, who was joined in
the minority by Chief Justice
John Roberts and justices
Antonin Scalia and Clarence
Thomas. "Florida's approach
avoids the disparities that re-
liance on such a factor tends
to produce. It thus promotes
consistency in the applica-
tion of the death penalty and
confidence that it is not being
administered haphazardly."
The decision sends Hall's
case back to Florida courts for
further consideration. Hall,
now 68, is being held at Union
Correctional Institution for the
murder of Karol Hurst, who
was 21 years old and preg-
nant when she was abducted
by Hall and another man.
Hurst, whose body was found
in a wooded area of Sumter
County, was beaten, shot and
sexually assaulted, according
to court records.

SCOTT TAKES AIM AT VA

With Florida home to a
huge population of veterans
and active-duty military, Scott
has jumped on the well-docu-
mented problems at Veterans
Administration hospitals.
And this week, he took
another step when he called
on the state Agency for Health
Care Administration to sue the
U.S. Department of Veterans
Affairs. The goal is for AHCA
inspectors to gain access to
VA hospitals so they can de-
termine if the health needs of
veterans are being met.
State inspectors have tried
for more than a month to get
into the hospitals to review al-
legations of problems such as
inappropriate scheduling and


treatment. The VA has turned
them away, basically saying
the state has no authority to
inspect federal facilities.
While it's unclear whether
the state will have any success
legally, the issue, at a mini-
mum, has added to the politi-
cal squabbling between Scott
and Democratic gubernatorial
candidate Charlie Crist.
"It's unfortunate that Rick
Scott may be attempting to
inject politics (through calling
for a lawsuit against the VA)
into a tragic situation," Crist
spokesman Kevin Cate said
Wednesday
The Republican Party of
Florida, meanwhile, has ar-
gued that Crist is the one
"exploiting" the VA issue, not-
ing that the former governor
included a link to his political
campaign and a fundraising
page when tweeting a message
that Veterans Affairs Secretary
Eric Shinseki should resign.
Shinseki, in fact, did resign
Friday, though there was no
indication the move had any-
thing to do with Crist or Scott.

STORY OF THE WEEK:
Leon County Circuit Judge
Terry Lewis continued hear-
ing testimony in a legal battle
about whether Republican
legislative leaders violated con-
stitutional requirements when
drawing congressional districts
in 2012.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
"The First District has, by
preventing consideration of
these documents during trial,
jeopardized the stability and
integrity of our governmental
structure and authorized those
who interact with the Florida
Legislature on a critical mat-
ter such as redistricting to
operate under a veil of secrecy.
This outcome should be most
disconcerting to any supporter
of our democratic form of gov-
ernment." --- Florida Supreme
Court Justice R. Fred Lewis,
as the court overturned a 1st
District Court of Appeal deci-
sion that would have prevented
the use of a Republican consul-
tant's records in the congres-
sional redistricting case.


Sharing Hometown Recipes, Cooking Tips and Coupons


Top off Your Favorite Cake with This Creamy Frosting


"This
goes on
beautifully!"


Sherry Symmonds
Hamilton, MS
(Pop. 6,284)


Y ou'll never grab a can of icing again once you try
Sherry Symmonds creamy, smooth Yummy Vanilla
Buttercream Frosting recipe! We loved the flavor of this
icing and it will perfectly top of any cake. This recipe
makes more than enough to cover a regular cake, but we
suggest doubling the recipe. It's that good!
See step-by-step photos of Sherry's recipe plus thousands
more from home cooks nationwide at:
www.justapinch.com/buttercream
You'll also find a meal planner, coupons and chances to
win! Enjoy and remember, use "just a pinch"...

-9re


Bi ummy vanilla
IButtercream Frostingk -- "


(-


What You Need
1/2 c shortening
1/2 c unsalted butter,
room temperature
2 tsp meringue powder
2 tsp vanilla extract
1 tsp butter flavor extract
3 c powdered sugar
2 tbsp water

Directions
In a large bowl mix
shortening and butter at
high speed until smooth
and fluffy (about 3-4
minutes).


Reduce mixer speed to
low and add meringue
powder and extracts.
Increase speed and blend
for another minute.
Reduce mixer speed to
low again and begin to
add powdered sugar, one
cup at a time. Scrape
down sides with a spatula
to ensure all powdered
sugar is blended.
Once all the powdered
sugar has been added,
check the consistency.
You should be able


to easily frost a cake
without worrying that
you are going to tear
the cake or cause it to
crumble.
If it is too stiff, add
water (a little bit at a
time) and blend.
Your end result should
be fluffy, smooth and
more than enough to
frost a 9-inch round layer
cake or a 9x13 cake.


WHITE'S WINES

Virginia (wines) rising


By DAVID WHITE

"I don't understand
why the D.C. public
doesn't realize its So-
noma and Napa is just a
day's drive. It's an easy,
straight shot out of the
city, and there are incred-
ible wines," exclaimed
Sebastian Zutant, the co-
owner of The Red Hen, a
popular restaurant in the
nation's capital known
for its serious yet quirky
wine list.
Zutant has been man-
aging beverage programs
at some of Washington,
D.C.'s top restaurants for
more than a decade. And
in recent years, he has
become a big proponent
of Virginia wines.
Many critics share
Zutant's newfound re-
spect for the state. After
a recent visit to the Old
Dominion, celebrated
British wine authority
Jancis Robinson sug-
gested that Rutger de
Vink of RdV Vineyards
has "a good chance of
putting the state on the
world wine map."
De Vink's name is al-
most always mentioned
alongside Jim Law of
Linden Vineyards and
Luca Paschina of Barbo-
ursville Vineyards, two
key figures in Virginia's
wine industry. Bottles
from these producers
would convert just about
anyone who doubts the
state's potential.
But many consumers
continue to give short
shrift to Virginia, even
if they're in driving dis-
tance of its best wineries.
Indeed, when Zutant
shows off wines from pro-
ducers like RdV, Linden,
and Barboursville, he'll
often hide the labels.
"At my restaurant, I
try to change perspec-
tives," he explained. "It's
never about bringing over


a bottle of wine from Vir-
ginia; it's always about
hearing what my cus-
tomers like. Then I'l open
a bottle from Virginia,
have them taste it, and
explain where it's from.
That's the only way I can
do it."
In mid-May, I visited
Linden with Zutant to
chat with de Vink, Law,
and Paschina about the
future of Virginia wine.
While the industry has
experienced remarkable
growth over the past de-
cade, the number of win-
eries has increased from
78 to over 250 the three
winemakers admitted
there's still great skepti-
cism in the marketplace.
But they're optimistic.
"I'm not in a hurry,"
replied Paschina, when
Zutant expressed his
frustration. "We'll get
there. Every year, the
knowledge of Virginia
wine increases. It's up to
us as producers to create
an experience for people."
De Vink agreed. One
experience he's fond of
is a brown-bag tasting,
where hell pit his wines
against similar blends
from better-known re-
gions.
"We're making world-
class wines that com-
pete with the top wines
around the world," De
Vink said. "If you don't
think so, let's put them
in brown bags. Unless
someone like Robert
Parker says -- '95 points!'
-- everyone will be suspi-
cious of Virginia. That's
hard. But it's getting
better."
Zutant isn't the only
restaurateur starting to
pay attention to Virgin-
ia. On marketing trips
across the country, Pas-
china has found a grow-
ing thirst for his wines.
"We have to identify
spots with intelligent


wine buyers ones who
aren't prejudiced or lazy,"
he explained.
"It's easy to buy fa-
mous wines, put them
on the list, and jack up
the prices," Paschina
continued. "Those are the
restaurants I don't want
to be in. Barboursville is
at a fantastic restaurant
in Brooklyn -- and I've
had people come visit
the winery after tasting
the wine there. Some
of our best buyers, his-
torically, have come after
hearing about us from
restaurants in New York,
Washington, Richmond,
and Charlotte."
Jim Law has also seen
a huge uptick in res-
taurant interest. "The
differences I've seen are
phenomenal, especially
in the last five years,"
he said.
Thanks to the D.C.
region's large population,
many Virginia wineries
can afford to ignore qual-
ity and instead focus on
weddings and weekend
tourists. So it takes a
moral interest in quality
to produce world-class
wine. This commitment
ties De Vink, Law, and
Paschina and a hand-
ful of other vintners to-
gether.
For several years now,
De Vink has been called
"a top winegrower in Vir-
ginia." But at one recent
event, he was introduced
as "one of the best wine-
growers in the country."
So long as descriptions
like that keep coming,
Zutant should soon be
able to stop hiding wine
labels..

David White is the
founder and editor of
Terroirist.com. His col-
umns are housed at Pal-
ate Press: The Online
Wine Magazine.


Submitted by: Sherry Symmonds, Hamilton, MS (Pop. 6,284)
www.justapinch.com/buttercream
Brought to you by American Hometown Media




THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 5B


Thinkln.


Basis

Blowing

Boots

Breathe

Bumps

Butterflies

Circumference

Curved

Dating


Eaten Lasted Result


Entertainment

Fifth

Flaming

Flaps

Guide

Healed

Ideals

Invest


Leave

Loaded

Magnet

Manage

Marsh

Meets

Models

Month

Nicer

Ocean

Plate

Really

Responsibility


Savage

Shape

Shone

Smiled

Solar

Solve

Stamps

Stared

Striped

Tempo

T-shirt

Uneasy

Unions


MO

B A

D D

T U

S M

H T

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S H

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S Y N E S

NCED L


Even Exchange by Donna Pettman
Each numbered row contains two clues and two 6-letter answers. The two answers differ from each other
by only one letter, which has already been inserted. For example, if you exchange the A from MASTER
for an 1, you get MISTER. Do not change the order of the letters.


1. Food morsel
2. Tub user
3. Steed
4. Singing group
5. Might
6. Bazaar
7. Canoe oar
8. Kelly or lime
9. Weeping tree
10. Criminal


A

0


P Skedaddle
Irritate
T Pitcher's hill
Rocker, e.g.
Mockery
T Pointer
Equestrian chair
N From Athens
Flounder
K Sing like Bing Crosby


M


0


D


A -


N


(D 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


CAN YOU TRUST YOUR EYES? There are at least six differ-
ences in drawing details between top and bottom panels. How
quickly can you find them? Check answers with those below.
pwrn, s O "9 "ee p s! s "S'uissgu sJnd
", "tu-eajp s! 6n "6UISSlU S! pJeo Z "JQ-JaoIS S a8 lsQOUejP("


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The following organiza-
tions are proud to support
Wakulla County Education
through sponsoring the
Newspaper in Education
Program.


by Hal Kaufman
ORANGE AID! Place two tables a short distance apart. Place an orange
under a wide-mouthedjar (mouth down) on one of the tables. Now, how
is it possible to move the orange
1 2 3 4 to the other table without using
. I the jar as a scop, or by touching
C A IT C H it with yourhand? V
ALAKAZAM! Move the jar
[ A I [ [ [ I around rapidly so that the o,.
2 A ange whirls aroundinside, and
3 T trnsportitovertothe otherlable.
4 C SUM GUESS! Dan's teacher offered a prize to the first child
who could get the correct sum for alof the numbersI through
5 H 10. Take a guess. Time: 30 seconds.


DOT'S DOTI What can you draw to complete this graduation
scene? To find out, add connecting lines from dot to dot


SNVI A ,A NVS
SHVN V SVN:IHV
SOVH m O HSVM
DSIV V SIAHV
SIuVd 0 1HOlSVd
S1Va 09 SOV10
sdnos D SnOdS
NOOdS S SdOONS
OIDVO V 3OVOuV
SMO7la D SMOM3
H3174 7 71II
3fIHV d 3nfoVud
JIElZSUV
SP!AtsOIZZfld


SCHOOL'S OUTI School is out and guess who's jumping forjo
Apply colors by number, 1- Red. 2--Li blue. 3-Yellow. 4-4
brown. 5--Flesh tones. 6--Lt green. 7-Dk. brown. 8-Dk. gree
SPELLBINDER
SCORE 10 points for using all the
letters in the word below to form
two complete words:
BEDCOVER
THEN score 2 points each for all
words oft our letters or more
found among the letters-
Try to score at least 50 points.
"PO 'qJQA :esAOs4 Glq!iod


Kids' Maze




Li u ,

02014 Kng Faue Synd, Inc.


WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOLS

comme)-o SCCSSWakulla County Coalition for Youth


gby Helene
Puzzle4KidHovanec
WORD FUN
Study the two words on each line to find the ONE letter in the left
column that is NOT in the word in the right column. Write the extra
letter on the blank space. Then read DOWN to answer this riddle:
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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014


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5072-0612 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SHERIFF'S SALE
NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution issued in the County
Court of Leon County, Florida, on the 22nd day of February, 2013, in the cause
wherein FSU Credit Union, was Plaintiff, and Tanesia Thomas was Defendant, being
Case Number 201 1SC003321 in said Court; Court, I, Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff of
Wakulla County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of Tanesia
Thomas in and to the following described Personal Property to-wit:

1. 2005 GMC, White in Color, FL Tag/23811R, Vin/1GKES63M252334452

Further, on the 24th day of June, 2014, at the hour of 10:00A.M. or as soon thereafter
as possible at the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office located at 15 Oak Street, Craw-
fordville, Florida, I will offer for sale all the said right, title and interest in the afore said
Personal Property at Public Auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior
liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH
IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and
the satisfaction of the above- described execution.
/s/Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff Wakulla County, Florida
By: Lt. Steve Willis, Deputy Sheriff
STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF WAKULLA
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 13 day of May, 2014 by Sheriff Charlie W.
Creel and Lt. Steve Willis who are personally known or has produced as
Identification.
/s/ Amy Lamarche
Notary Public (Seal)
Published May 22, 29, June 5 & 12, 2014.


5090-0605 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE
Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida Statutes, notice is given to the following
person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter:
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 7B


30 Hackney Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327
Abbi N. Bolick
179 Pixie Circle, Crawfordville, FL 32327

The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not
be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this
published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elec-
tions and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For fur-
ther information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850)
926-7575.
Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections
P. 0. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326
Published June 5, 2014.


5089-0612 TWN
vs. Farmer, Claudette L. 2012-000353-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 2012-000353-CA

BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.,
PLAINTIFF,
VS.
CLAUDETTE L FARMER, ET AL.
DEFENDANT(S).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated
May 23, 2014, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla,
Florida, on June 26, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for the following described property:

LOTS 14, 15 AND 16, BLOCK 1, WAKULLA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 39, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale.
Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein.

DATED: May 23, 2014

(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of the Court

Gladstone Law Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff
1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe
Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appear-
ance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the sched-
uled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

Published: June 5 & 12, 2014. 13-003289


5088-0612 TWN
vs. Evans Ill, William Henderson 65-2013-CA-000110 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000110

FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM HENDERSON EVANS, Ill, WALTER R PARDUE, UNKNOWN TENANT IN
POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF
WILLIAM HENDERSON EVANS, Ill, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WALTER R. PARDUE,
Defendants
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure
filed February 3, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 65-2013-CA-000110 of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Flor-
ida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front
door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville,
FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 3 day of July, 2014
at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final
Judgment, to wit:

LOT 10, BLOCK "A", LAKE ELLEN TERRACE SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 1, PAGE 49 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days
after the sale.

Dated this 4th day of February, 2014.


(SEAL)


CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
As Clerk of the Court

BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk


MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF
110 SE 6TH STREET, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301, (407) 674-1850
MRSERVICE @MCCALLARAYMER.COM

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)
577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Talla-
hassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to ap-
pear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.

The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be
reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at
1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County
Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 3230 1. In all other coun-
ties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office and ask for the
ADA Coordinator. The Clerk's number is included on each county page.

Published: June 5 & 12, 2014. 12-06176-1


5087-0612 TWN
vs. Tucker, Timothy 65-2013-CA-000284 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT CIVIL COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 65-2013-CA-000284 Division

CENLAR FSB
Plaintiff,
vs.
TIMOTHY TUCKER, ANGELA TUCKER, AMERIS BANK, CARMEN ROCIO HOMEOWNERS
ASSOCIATION, INC., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on May 1,2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:

LOT 14, CARMEN ROCIO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN
PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.

and commonly known as: 130 CARMEN ROCIO LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327; includ-
ing the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the
highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County
Courthouse, on June 26, 2014 at 11am.

Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

Dated this 19th day of May, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court Brent X. Thurmond
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

Lauren A. Ross (813) 229-0900 x 1556 Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureService kasslaw.com

Published: June 5 & 12, 2014. 327470/1217426


5085-0605 TWN
vs. Williams, Roy A. 14000088CAAXMX Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
Case No. 14000088CAAXMX


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FIRST AMERICAN MORTGAGE TRUST,
Plaintiff,
V.
ROY A. WILLIAMS, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION

TO: Roy A. Williams & Brandi Williams
P.O. Box 1804, Crawfordville, Florida 32326

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the follow-
ing property in Wakulla County, Florida:

Description of Mortgaged and Personal Property
See Exhibit "A"

has been filed against you in the Wakulla County Circuit Court in the matter of First
American Mortgage Trust v. Roy A. Williams, and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any to it, on Plaintiffs' attorney, whose name and address is
J. Andrew Baldwin, THE SOLOMON LAW GROUP, P.A., 1881 West Kennedy Boulevard,
Tampa, Florida 33606, and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court,
on or before 30 days after first publication; otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed for in the complaint.

WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court at Wakulla County, Florida on this 19
day of May, 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Court
Wakulla County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk

J. Andrew Baldwin Florida Bar No. 671347
THE SOLOMON LAW GROUP, P.A.
1881 West Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33606-1606 (813) 225-1818 (Tel)
Attorneys for Plaintiff

If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to
participate in a court proceeding or other court service, program, or actvity, you are
entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Su-
san Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301,
850.577.4430, as far in advance as possible, but preferably at least seven (7) days
before your scheduled court appearance or other court actvity; if you are hearing or
voice impaired, call 711.

Exhibit "A"

TRACT 38, RAKIRK RANCHEITES, (UNRECORDED)

COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF LOT NO. 43,
HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (MARKED BY AND OLD
IRON PIN); THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, 1606.51
FEET TO AN IRON PIN USED ON PREVIOUS SURVEYS; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 04
MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST, 814.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT
OF BEGINNING OF TRACT HEREIN DESCRIBED; FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN
SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 400.05 FEET TO A CONCRETE MON-
UMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF WAY OF PALOMINO ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DE-
GREES 05 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF PALOMINO
ROAD, 200.0 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST, 400.11 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN
SOUTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, 200.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING, AND BEING SITUATE IN THE WEST HALF OF LOT NO. 43, HARTSFIELD SURVEY,
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING OTHERWISE DESCRIBED AS TRACT NO. 38 OF
AN UNRECORDED PLAT OF RAKIRK RANCHETTES.

TOGETHER WITH A 1999 OAKWOOD DOUBLWIDE MOBILE HOME VIN #'S 0W66614A &
0W66614B, TITLE #'S 76420987 & 76420988

The address of which is 79 Palomino Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327

May 29 & June 5, 2014. 11901.22144.44



5086-0605 TWN
vs. Strickland, Mamie J 2011CA000369 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 2011CA000369

ONEWEST BANK, F.S.B,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MAMIE J STRICKLAND, et.al.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April
22, 2014, and entered in 2011CA000369 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial
Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, F.S.B is the Plain-
iff and SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT JIM NICHOLS A/K/A JIM
H. NICHOLS LEGAL/GUARDIAN-POWER OF ATTORNEY UNKNOWN TENANT MAMIE J
STRICKLAND AKA MAMIE JEANETTE STRICKLAND AKA MAMIE JEANETTE SMITH are the
Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla
County Courthouse, Crawfordville, 32327, at 11:00 AM, on June 12, 2014, the follow-
ing described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

COMMENCE AT A 1 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER
OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST,
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 00 SECONDS
EAST 1293.78 FEET ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER TO
AN IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7017) FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT
OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY NORTH 00 DEGREES 35
MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 309.74 FEET TO A UNITED STATES FOREST SERVICE CONCRETE
MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF PLOT 164 OF THE OLD HILLIARDVILLE
SUBDIVISION AND THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF A PORTION OF THE APALACHICOLA
NATIONAL FOREST; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE SOUTH 89
DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 397.15 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (LB
7017); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERN BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 35 MIN-
UTES 00 SECONDS WEST 313.78 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7017); THENCE RUN
SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 397.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGIN-
NING.

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

Dated this 22 day of April, 2014.
Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court
(SEAL)
By: Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk

IMPORTANT
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe
Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before
the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.

Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff
6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487
Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902

May 29 and June 5, 2014. 13- 22816


5082-0605 TWN
vs. Nelson, Craig 65-2013-CA-000032 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000032 DIVISION:

US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC., MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WF1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CRAIG NELSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
April 5, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000032 of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which US Bank National
Association, as Trustee for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc., Mortgage
Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-WF1, is the Plaintiff and Craig Nelson, Tenant
#1, Tenant #2, The Unknown Spouse of Craig Nelson, are defendants, the Wakulla
County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash
in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 12th
day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judg-
ment of Foreclosure:

TRACT 75, BLOCK 'C, SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 163 PERSIMMON RD SOPCHOPPY FL 32358-0714


Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Us Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.

Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 19th day of May, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law
P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623
(813)221-4743, Facsimile: (813)221-9171, servelaw&albertellilaw.com

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.

May 29 & June5, 2014. 013665F01



5081-0605 TWN
vs. Register, Laura R. 65-2013-CA-000372 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 65-2013-CA-000372 Division

MIDFIRST BANK
Plaintiff,
vs.
LAURA R. REGISTER A/K/A LAURA RAE COOK REGISTER, MARTIN JACOBS, FLORIDA
COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, CITIBANK, N.A., HAROLD D. REGISTER, JR., AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on May 14, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:

LOT S, BLOCK "A", AMELIA WOOD, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION SAID LOT BEING
MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT THE SOTHWEST CORNER OF LOT
NUMBER 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND
RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH
BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF
A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS
WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYA DISTANCE OF 408.91 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE
NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF
WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.0 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY
BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN
THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT
OF BEGINNING.

and commonly known as: 303 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327; including the
building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Court-
house, on June 19, 2014 atl11am.

Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

Dated this 16th day of May, 2014.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

Kari D. Marsland-Pettit, (813)229-0900, x1509/1359
Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800, ForeclosureService kasslaw.com
May 29 & June 5, 2014 086150/1342382


5080-0605 TWN
vs. Wiles, Mary Jo L. & Mark A. 65-2013-CA-000356 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 65-2013-CA-000356 Division

NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARY JO L. WILES, MARK A. WILES A/K/A MARK WILES AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE

Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on May 14, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:

LOTS 4, 10, 11 AND 12, BLOCK "34" OF PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVI-
SION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGES, OF THE PUB-
LIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.

and commonly known as: 12S DICKSON BAY RD, PANACEA, FL 32346; including the
building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Court-
house, on June 19, 2014 atl11am.

Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

Dated this 16th day of May, 2014.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

Kari D. Marsland-Pettit, (813)229-0900, x1509/1359
Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800, ForeclosureService kasslaw.com
May 29 & June 5, 2014 110650/1342057





Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014








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14 Black and white
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15 Australian birds
16 Coral island
17 Aquarium swimmer
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21 Throw trash on the
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23 out a living
24 Cracker type
26 Actress Bancroft or
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28 Donkey's sound
29 Nose, eyes, etc.
31 Self-importance
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37 mignon
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60 Country whose capital
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67 Songs for one person
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29 Bills with Lincoln on
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33 Sign on a store
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36 Wine store choice
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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014 Page 9B

King Crossword


ACROSS
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comb com-
partment
5 In earlier
times
8 Pleads
12 Neighbor-
hood
13 Sister
14 Chills and
fever
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group
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19 Strapped
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legend
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26 Aromatic
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Page lOB THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5,2014 thewakullanews.com


T1e/


yw Cfwic&!


the Readers' Choice Contest




is underway!




Iakutta Utetu






is asking you... our readers




to participate in identifying




Wakulla County's MOST POPULAR




local businesses for 2014!





Tell us your favorites by filling out the official



ENTRY BALLOT below. Your name will then be



registered in a random drawing for $100 in Cash.*


fo(


b ge- er'ThdI








W lIN 200 S





001, Submit your completed entry form and be entered ,
WAin the drawing to win $100 in Cash*


Readers' Choice Categories:

Use the area beside each category to list your favorite business.
Please complete 15 or more choices, write clearly and legibly,
to make your nominations count.


Animal Care:
Pet Care/Sitting
Pet Grooming
Pet Supplies
Vetenarian

Automotive:
Auto Engine Repair
Auto Body Shops
Used Car Dealer

Financial Services:
Bank
Credit Union
Mortgage Company

Food and Beverage
Liquor Store
Grocery
Ice Cream/Snacks
Bakery

Health and Fitness
Gym
Massage Therapist
Chiropractor
Fitness Instructor/Trainer

Homes and Land
Builder
Real Estate Company
Title Company
Surveyor
Lawn Care/Landscaping
Nursery/Garden Center
Flooring
Plumbing
Electrician
A/C-Heating
Painter
Tree Service
Pool Care
Home Cleaning Service


Miscellaneous:
Childcare
Clothing and Gifts
Storage Centers
Dance Studio
Photographer
Hotel
Hardware
Local News Source


Personal Services:
Barber Shop
Hair Salon
Nail Care


Professional Services:
Accountant
Attorney
Doctor
Dentist
Insurance Provider



Recreation:
Marina
Fishing Charter
Bait & Tackle
Boat &
Motor Repair
Canoe/Kayak Rental
Scuba


Restaurant:
Atmosphere
Breakfast
Lunch
Dinner
Service
Entertainment


Mail your official entry form and completed ballot to:

1 Iakuula ReW


c/o Readers' Choice Contest

P. 0. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326

OR drop it off at 'akl[a Idt36 office:

3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville.


Name


Address


City-


State


Phone


Email


Age


Are you a current subscriber to0 T I iakula ta 5U? Yes -_..No

Official Rules
*Entries must be handwritten on official entry ballot from T u aiIle u .
Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies,
illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted.
*At least 15 of the choices must be filled out. *Only one entry per person.
*Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided and will not be eligible for the $100 prize.
*All ballots must be received by T1e WakuUafQeW5 by 4:00 p.m. on July 3, 2014. Send entire
ballot to "Fe Wakula_ e, Readers' Choice Contest", P. 0. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326
or bring it to our office at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.)
*Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of Tbeakullaebui.
*All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional
compensation. Announcement of the winner will appear in the "Readers' Choice"
special section to be published in the August 7, 2014 edition of Tb e uajIle u .
*Employees of TbFeakullaei, and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for
residents of states where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older.
*All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.

THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT

& ENTRY FORM.

Please complete and return to

bakula lt u by 4:00 p.m. July 3, 2014.


III


Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 5, 2014


thewakullanews.com













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Graduation


Class of 2014 has strong character

~ PrincipalMike Crouch says these students 'respect others and each other'


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

Principal Mike Crouch said strong character
defines the Wakulla High School War Eagles
graduating class of 2014.
As the 250 high school seniors walk the field
on June 6, Crouch said he is proud of the legacy
they are leaving behind for the next class.
"They finish what they start," Crouch said. "I
think overall as a class they're going really far,
whether they stay here in the county or if they
are matriculating off. They respect other people,
and they respect each other, which I think is most
important."
Crouch said the year was punctuated with stu-
dent success academically and athletically.
A high-achieving Brain Bowl team and
AVID students showcased the school's
smarts this year. Boys and girls ath-
letic teams overachieved locally and in
statewide competitions. Athletes and
academics, backed by a bevy of schol-
arships, will be taking their talents
to the next level in the fall at various
colleges and universities. The school
band racked up superiors at state for
the first time in school history. Crouch
added the thespians did well at state.


And the WHS ROTC, one of the smallest schools at
the state meet, finished highest they ever have for
personnel inspection. Crouch said all 28 students who
took the CNA test passed.
"It's on and on with these things," Crouch said. "It's
because we have good kids, a good community, good
parents and great teachers."
After eight years of leading the school as principal,
Crouch is moving on to a new challenge as principal
at the Sopchoppy Education Center Second Chance
School.
Crouch said he feels good about embracing the new
opportunity.
"It's been a good eight years here," Crouch said.
"It's been nice to leave the house and look forward
to coming to school."
Crouch added that he was the victim of a groovy
senior prank.
"They put a disco ball and confetti in my office,
had disco music playing, and were sitting in my chair
when I walked in," Crouch said. "Probably because
they think that's my era. But I'm actually older than
disco, so they missed it on that one."
As Crouch said goodbye to students boarding buses
on the seniors' last day, he reflected on why Wakulla
High School is a special place.
"I love the feel of this school," Crouch said. "The
kids are friendly, the teachers are friendly... That's
what I think is an indicator that a school is successful."


Congratulations, graduates

Goforth and make usproud


On behalf of the Wakulla County School
Board and all faculty and staff members, I
would like to congratulate our graduating
Senior Class of 2014.
Your journey through the Wakulla County
School System is almost complete. It is our
hope that the education you have received
will serve you well as you move on to the
next phase of your lives.
We also hope that you have made many
fond memories as you traveled from elemen-
tary school all the way to your final days at
Wakulla High School.
As you move forward, we challenge you
to make a difference each of you in your
own unique way and to remember the les-
sons taught to you by your parents, grand-


parents, family members, teachers
and friends.
You truly are our hope for the
future
So, go forth and make us proud.
And remember to always be true to
the red, white and blue.

Go War Eagles!

Bobby Pearce

Superintendent of
Wakulla County Schools


Inside

Honor Court ..................... Page 4


Honors and Awards ..... Page 6


War Eagle Walk ............ Page 24


Prom 2014 ...................... Page 26


Senior Picnic .................. Page 28

A special thanks to Hunter
Tucker for her support and as-
sistance with the graduation
section.


Thursday, June 5, 2014


THE WAKULLA NEWS Pagye 3G





Pate 4G-THE WAKULLA NEWS Graduation Thursday. June 5. 2014


1\


4


K
V


NICOLE ZEMA
Wakulla High School 2014 Senior Honor Court members, in no particular order, are: Ian Matthew Burse, Cary Grace Mathers, Savanah Ashley Hamilton, Aleyda Kristen
Plagge, Daniel Lee McCullers, Christopher Stephen Paris, David Reid Damon, Margaret A.Wiedeman, Brook Lynn Roddenberry, Tamia Olivia Potter, Arien Danielle Hart,
Sammie Elizabeth Inlow, Madison Jane Harris, Aaron Thomas Smith, Emily Ann Westmark, Marlee Marina Kelle, Allison Taylor Metcalf, Melissa Danielle Gentry.


Dedicated to your dreams.
At Capital City Bank, we believe dedication to your dreams will take you as far as you wish to go.
We are proud to support all graduating seniors in Wakulla County. Congratulations!


2592 Crawfordville Hwy. 1850.92667ccbg corn CBank City

More than your bank. Your banker.


We aRe

SO PROUD

OF YOU!


Pagye 4G-THE WAKULLA NEWS


Graduation


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Thursday, June 5. 2014




Thursday, June 5, 2014


Graduation


THE WAKULLA NEWS Page 5G


Congratulations Class of2oI4












































PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMA
At left, Wakulla Men's Association Scholarship winners are Christian Daniel Veaudr and Malik Kenneth Hutchinson. At right, The-
atre Arts Students of the Year are Melissa Gentry and Emily Westmark; Technical Theatre Student of the Year is Emily Davis.


Scholarship Awards
& Recipients
KEYS Scholarship Cindi
Goodson
WHS Scholar Athletes Madi-
son Harris & Corion Tyrell Knight
American Legion / Boys State
2-2 Landon Glover
STEM Scholars of Distinction
- Ian Burse, Melissa Gentry, Minh
Hoang, Malik Hutchinson, Kyla Kerce,
Doran McFalls, Alyssa Schubert,
David Sloan, Aaron Smith, Annalise
Torres, Margaret Wiedeman & Chi-
one Young
Wakulla County Sunshine
State Scholar of the Year '13 Emily
Westmark
Wakulla County Sunshine State
Scholar of the Year '14 William


Atkinson
TCC-Board of Trustees Chris-
ten Brown, Ian Burse, & Brook Rod-
denberry
TCC Follett Book Scholarship -
Emily Rudd
TCC Jenkins Scholarship Em-
ily Rudd
TCC John M. Russi Scholarship-
Emily Rudd
TCC Brandon King Memorial
Scholarship Ian Burse
TCC District Scholarship Josh
Conway
TSMUN Scholarship David
Damon
IMUN Scholarship Melissa
Gentry
Keiser University Dean's Schol-
arship Krista Payne
Keiser University Culinary Arts


Scholarship Krista Payne
St. Marks Powder Technical
Scholarship Madison Harris
St. Marks Powder Non-Technical
Scholarship Maurice Dennis
Rotary Club of Wakulla Academ-
ic Scholarships Tamara Arnold Em-
ily Rudd, Colbi King, Charles Moss,
Rachel Woofter
Wakulla County Recreation
Board Scholarship Taylor Vaughn
Crawfordville Women's Club
Scholarship Kyler Woodward
4-H Enrichment Council Schol-
arships Savanah Hamilton & Tiana
Leigh Haskett
Crawfordville Elementary
School Scholarship Kelli White
Riversprings Middle School
Scholarship Charles Moss
Grady F. McKenzie Scholarship


- Tabitha Danielle Williams
McKenzie Vocational Scholar-
ship Sara Marie Mathis
McKenzie Endowed Scholarship
- Felicia Michelle Green
Guy Harold Hudson Scholarship
- Regina Kay Kestel
WCABA Headstart Scholarships
- Allison Carr, Shelby Jean Dykes,
Arien Hart, Jessica Scarborough, Amy
Walker, Megan Wright, Shannon
Wood, Rachel Anniston Woofter
WCABA Scholarships Ethan
Lamar Byrd, Amber N. Donley, Joshua
Aaron France, Brianna Paige Gubala,
Erika Shaw-nea Jackson, Charles
Edward Moss, Joshua Taylor Small,
Justin McCarthy Small, Savannah
Leigh Strickland & Kyler Woodward
WCABA Endowed Scholarship
- Emily Collins Davis


Henry Vause Vocational Scholar-
ships Colbi Kathryn King, James
Myrle French, Samuel Andrew Mess-
er, Edward A. Rudd
Pee Wee Vause Annual Scholar-
ship Kelli Ann White
Elsie Schulte Scholarship -
Maxamillion Alexander Hollett
Townsend Vocational Scholar-
ship Shelby Jean Dykes
Anita Townsend Nursing Schol-
arship Alisha Faith Kent
Bonner Vocational Scholarship
- Jessica Maria Wise
Brann Vocational Scholarship -
Maurice Keivon Dennis
Veasman Endowed Scholarship
- Bryan Nelson Nichols
Koelliker Endowed Scholarship
- Jessica Michelle Waltman
Baggett/Hernandez/Kane An-
nual Scholarship Shelby Suzanne
Harrell
Paul Dubay Memorial Scholar-
ship James Joshua Douin
Frank Snyder Memorial Schol-
arship Brenna Kimberly McGuire
Keiser Memorial Scholarship -
Corion Tyrell Knight
Gilbert Memorial Scholarship
- Nicole Ellen Buchanan
Alexander-Pearce Memorial
Scholarship Jacey Alisse Todd
A.L. Porter Memorial Scholar-
ship Kaleb Anthony Atkins
Roger Stokley Memorial Schol-
arship Taylor Nichole Vaughan
Optimist Club Annual Scholar-
ship Tiana Leigh Haskett
Optimist Club Endowed Schol-
arship Doran Blake McFalls
Wakulla Men's Association An-
nual Scholarship Christian Daniel
Veaudry
Wakulla Men's Association
Scholarship Malik Kenneth
Hutchinson
Wakulla County Realtors As-
sociation Annual Scholarship Kyla
Renea Kerce




Graduation


At top left, honor court members and Daniel Lee McCullers, Christopher Stephen Paris and David Reid Damon. Top middle, the Don White Memorial Scholarship recipient is
Diwata Shantel Thomas. Top right, the Crawfordville Elementary School Scholarship went to Kelli White. Bottom left, the TV Production Award went to Ian Burse, who held
instructor Marc Bowerman's photo while a humorous poem was read. Bottom right, AVID scholarship and award winners, in no particular order, were Savanah Hamilton,
Kelli White, Sheldon Johnson, Tiana Leigh Haskett, Tamara Arnold and Colbi Kathryn King.


Crawfordville Lions Club An-
nual Scholarship Maidson Jane
Harris
Wakulla Cattlemen Scholar-
ship Holli Jean Lucas
Wakulla County Elected Of-
ficials Scholarship Tamara Chris-
tina Arnold
Wildwood Men's Golf As-
sociation Scholarship Zachary
Ray Nordlof
Distler Golf Scholarship -
Rachel Anniston Woofter
Don White Memorial Schol-
arship Diwata Shantel Thomas
Wakulla "Arts" Coalition
Scholarships Theatre Arts: Em-
ily Davis (These are Dramatis
Personae Matching Scholarships,
Troupe 5036) Visual Arts: Ethan
Byrd & Kayla Webbe


WHS AVID Academic Scholar-
ship Savanah Hamilton
WHS AVID Student of the Year
Scholarship Kelli White
WHS AVID Ambassador
Award Sheldon Johnson
WHS AVID Adversity Award
- Tiana Leigh Haskett
WHS AVID Most Improved
Scholarship Tamara Arnold
WHS AVID Volunteer of the
Year Colbi Kathryn King


School Awards

WHS Special Area Awards
Outstanding Achievement in
Spanish 4 Alyssa Schubert
Outstanding Achievement in
Art Jod'e Yates & Chuling Chen


Outstanding Achievement in
AP Art History Tamia Potter
Theatre Arts Student of the
Year Melissa Gentry & Emily
Westmark
Technical Theatre Student of
the Year Emily Davis

WHS Vocational Awards
Auto-Tech Darren Rohe
Carpentry Sam Messer
Digital Design Kayla Webbe
Culinary Operations Alex
Hester
Web Design Christopher
Daniel Allen
TV Production Ian Burse
Medical Academy Regina
Kestel


WHS English Awards
AP Language and Composition
- Ashley Carr
English IV Honors Maxamil-
lian Hollett

WHS Math Awards
Precalculus Rebekah Fielder
AP Statistics Mitchell At-
kinson
AP Calculus Annalise Torres

WHS Science Awards
Chemistry Honors Rebekah
Fielder
AP Environmental Science -
Heather Alvarez

WHS Social Science
Awards
AP US History Holli Capps


AP Economics Aaron Smith
AP American Government -
Melissa Gentry
AP Psychology Heather
Alvarez

WHS Special Awards
Student of the Year Dillon
Howard
Senior Reading Award Sonya
Stafford
Academic Team Landon
Glover
Perfect Attendance Awards -
David Damon & Chione Young
Principal's Award Madison
Harris
Salutatorian Alyssa Laura
Schubert
Valedictorian Annalise
Nicole Torres


Thursday, June 5, 2014


THE WAKULLA NEWS Page 7GI














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Charlene & Billy Bish
850-933-1718


Colleen Skippe
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Dan Hayes & Rex Holmes
Coastal Trailer & Hitch ngratulations Senior
850-984-0728 4i l City of St. Marks


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TCC is an Equal Opportunity/Equal Access campus. Visit www.tcc.fl.edu for full statement.


Thursday, June 5, 2014


on THE WAKULLA NEWS Page 15G








6.1dmi Euaraie Program ___

A~ 9~






The TCC2FSU program offers guaranteed
admission into Florida State University if you
stay on track and meet all transfer requirements
as you complete your Associate in Arts degree at
Tallahassee Community College. You will have a
special orientation and advising opportunities with
both TCC and FSU advisors to keep you on track to
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Page 16G-THE WAKULLA NEWS Graduation


Congratulations


to the Graduating


Seniors of 2014


Panhandle Area Educational Consortium
Member School Districts


Calhoun
Ralph Yoder
Superintendent
Franklin
Nina Marks
Superintendent
FAMU D.R.S.
Dr. Patricia Hodge
Director
Gadsden
Reginald James
Superintendent
Gulf
Jim Norton
Superintendent


Patrick McDaniel


Holmes
Eddie Dixon
Superintendent
Jackson
Steve Benton
Superintendent
Jefferson
Al Cooksey
Superintendent
Liberty
Tony Anderson
Superintendent


Safety and Positive

Thinking Lead

to Success


Executive Director Facilities and Safety Specialist


PAEC


Madison
Doug Brown
Superintendent
Taylor
Paul Dyal
Superintendent
Wakulla
Robert Pearce
Superintendent
Walton
Carlene Anderson
Superintendent
Washington
Joe Taylor
Superintendent


Brian Goddin


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Graduation THE WAKULLA NEWS Page 17G


Thursday, June 5, 2014 Thursday, June 5, 2014