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news The WakullaPublic Notices ....................................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Street Beat .........................................................................Page 5 Church................................................................................Page 6 Obituaries ..........................................................................Page 7 Community ...................................................................Pages 8-9 School......... .....................................................................Page 10 Sports ..............................................................................Page 11 Outdoors .........................................................................Page 12 Water Ways ......................................................................Page 13 Sheriffs Report ................................................................Page 14 Wakulla News Extra! ........................................................Page 16 Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 18 Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 19 Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 20 Classi eds ........................................................................Page 23 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 23 Comics, Puzzles .........................................................Pages 26-27 Natural Wakulla ...............................................................Page 28 INDEX OBITUARIES Eloise Barineau Virginia Marie Nichols Carter John Morgan Cruse Gloria Faye Dorsey Christmas in July One Section One Section75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 22st Issue Thursday, May 29, 2014 By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netSchool Board member Ray Gray announced this week his intent to seek reelection. Gray so far has one challenger in the race, Verna Brock. Another potential challenger, George Begley, filed but then withdrew from the race two weeks ago. One thing Gray is especially proud of is the news that this years AVID graduates have all been accepted into colleges. AVID, or Advancement Via Individual Determination, is a program started in Wakulla schools four years ago to help average students improve their academics. But Gray is also pleased with the district coming full-circle, and offering vocational programs for students. An automotive program got underway this year, a welding program is slated to start this fall. And thats in addition to vocational courses offered at Lively and available to Wakulla students who dual enroll, Gray said. For Gray, it re ects a philosophy of giving kids the skills they need as adults. Were not just educating the children, but giving them the skills to compete in the world, Gray said. And Gray stressed that he is not content for the school board to sit back on its laurels as a high-performing school district. I promise you we will always want more, always want better, he said. We require more of teachers, administrators and school board members. During the current time of so much economic need, Gray said the responsibility is there for the school system for reach out to families to help provide stability. If a childs basic needs are met if theyre fed, in a comfortable environment, and their minds not wandering because of problem at home they learn better. As of January, Gray is the director of the new One-Stop Community Center, which recently had its grand opening and is offering an expanding array of services to the community and local youth. For Gray, the new job reflects a better place after a dif cult and tumultuous past few years. He lost his longtime job as county parks director, went through a divorce, and lost considerable real estate holdings. Everything that happens in your life does have some purpose good and bad, Gray said of his experience. Turn to Page 5Ray Gray is running for another term on school boardWakulla again named highperforming school districtRemembering the fallen School Board member Ray Gray Wakulla County School District has been named an Academically High Performing District for the 2013-14 school year. This makes seven consecutive years that Wakullas public school district has met the criteria for this designation. Florida Commissioner of Education Pam Stewart announced on May 20 that Wakulla is one of only 11 out of 72 Florida public school districts to earn this recognition. The other 10 districts are Citrus, Gilchrist, Martin, Nassau, Okaloosa, St. Johns, Santa Rosa, Sarasota, Seminole, and Sumter. The 11 districts deemed Academically High Performing earned this designation by meeting three criteria: having a high point total from the 2013 Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores in Reading, Math, Science, and Writing grades 3 through 11; meeting the Class Size Amendment compliance numbers for 201314; and having a successful 2012-13 nancial audit review. This designation is not only a tribute to the teachers, administrators, staff, and parents who put our childrens education as our highest priority, it also recognizes Wakulla County School District as being scally responsible with the taxpayers dollars, said Superintendent Bobby Pearce. In 2007, the Legislature created the Academically High Performing District designation to recognize school districts that were consistently doing an outstanding job educating their students. An estimated crowd of 150 people came out to the courthouse on Memorial Day for a ceremony to remember those who lost their lives defending the United States. The crowd lled a large portion of the courthouse grounds seeking shade on a very warm morning for a somber ceremony that featured County Commissioner Ralph Thomas giving the keynote address, and patriotic and spiritual songs sung by Randy Anderson.See more on Page 21.Wakullas war dead: Army Sta Sgt. Arthur Lee Andrews, Vietnam. Navy Chief Petty O cer Matthew J. Bourgeois, Afghanistan. Army Sgt. Javier J. Garcia, Iraq. Marine Corps Lance Corporal Charles A. Hanson Jr., Iraq. Army PFC Christian J. Chandler, Afghanistan. Army Sgt. Shawn M. Farrell, Afghanistan. Army Spc. Kerry M.G. Danyluk, Afghanistan.WILLIAM SNOWDENThe VFW Color Guard salute the ag after lowering it to half-staff during the ceremony. Friday Night Lights A ride along with Wakulla County Sheriff patrols A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A ng ng g ng n ng n ng g n n ng n w w w w w w w w w it it it i it h h h h Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa W Wa Wa Wa k k k k k k k ku ku ku u k k ll l ll l a a a C C C Co Co Co o un un un n n n n u u ty ty ty t t S S he he h ri ri ff ff ff ff ff ff f f p p p p p p at at at a a ro ro ro ls ls ls s ri r i ri i ri r i d d d de e de a a a a lo lo o lo lo lo lo o o n n n n n n n n g g g g g a a a a a a a a a a a a a C C C ty ty y y ff ff f ff ff ff p p p p p p p p p a a a a a a Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa l l a a a a a a d d a a e de e d d n n n n n n n n n t t t h h h u u u ll l ll l u u un n n u u ty ty ty t h h t t t ls l l l l i i i i i f f i i i w w w w k k o o o o S S o o o o o n n n n n n n h h h k k k k k k k n n n n h h r r r r r r r n n n n n n n A A A A A A A a a Wa a Wa Wa a Wa Wa Wa p p p p p p ls a W W W W W W W W W W W W W W W a a o o S a a o o o s s o o o o o o o o o o o o w w w p p p p p p o o d d d t t t r r r g g g g g e e e e A A A A w w W W W W W W W W k k y y h r r r r r r k k he s i i i C S i ff i i W ff f g g g g ng g g Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa Wa W Wa Wa Wa Wa k k k k k k k k ku ku ku u k k ll l ll l a a a C C C Co Co C n n n n n n n ty ty ty ty t t S S h i ff ff f ff ff ff f f p p p p p p p p p at at at a a a ro r ro a a a a l lo o lo o lo o lo lo o o w w w w w w w w w Co Co o o S he he h r o ro o o ls ls ls s ri r ri i ri r r i d d de e d ng ng ng n n n n n n n n n n it it it i it h h h h h u u u u u e ri ri f f n n n n n n n n n n A A A A A A A A A A A A A A it i i i i i ff p i i d A ride along with Wakulla County Sheriff patrolsThe News Extra, Page 16 The News Extra, Page 16 The News Extra, Page 16

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By NICOLE ZEMAnzmea@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Marine Advisory Board is ready to move forward with reef enhancement projects at the St. Marks reef area and the Wakulla Big Bend reef; they just need the grants rst. But before the grant application process, reef site selection surveys and mapping must be completed. The commission will establish its own volunteer dive team, and approximately $5,000 in gas and materials needed for each site selection survey. Once the surveys are nished, and permits are obtained, the grant requests can be submitted. John Gunter, the groups chairman, has worked for the state department of agriculture for about 30 years as a shell sh biologist. He and marine council member Steve Cushman addressed the Wakulla County Board of Commissioners at the May 19 meeting. They provided a status update and priorities of the marine board. The committee has discussed at length various arti cial reefs and how we can better use them to improve tourism and economic growth through marine resources, Gunter said. Gunter said a permit has already been obtained for the St. Marks reef area. The committee is in agreement that enhancement of the St. Marks reef is a priority since it already has an open and existing permit. We dont have to apply for that. The committee would like to pursue grants, particularly through FWC, to continue to build out this permitted reef. Through research and specially-designed reef structures, it is believed we can create a habitat suitable for n sh, stone crabs, and other species associated with offshore reefal complexes. The FWC has already permitted the relocation of those species, and Gunter said the project is ready to move forward. On behalf of the marine group, Gunter asked the BOCC for their support in the pursuit of grant funding. Part of the reef enhancement process is to establish a team to conduct surveys of existing and future prospective sites. It is a process of collecting data, accessing the state of the reef and the bottom, and other considerations that require multiple trips. Establishing a local volunteer research dive team would expedite the process, instead of relying on the Organization of Arti cial Reefs, nonpro t group of marine enthusiasts and arti cial reef advocates based in Tallahassee. Gunter said a survey process for the second project the old Wakulla Big Bend reef will run concurrently with the St. Marks project. The Big Bend reef project was started, but never completed due to funding issues. The group is also considering a partnership with Taylor County. Partnerships can be a positive thing, especially when dealing with these offshore issues, Gunter said. If we could mutually bene t from a partnership, we may be able to take advantage of a broader range of resources, funds, expertise those kinds of situations. Gunter thanked Capt. Tony Murray, chairman of the Big Bend Coastal Conservancy, who attends the meetings and provides valuable information on offshore reef restoration. He has volunteered to help us kind of work through this, as hes very familiar with this process. Cushman said that Murray used to be an OAR board member, and he is the probably the most knowledgeable experts on arti cial reefs in the area. Gunter said there is a big return on reef enhancement. For every $1 spent on reef construction or restoration, $138 is recaptured in revenue. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he has absolute con dence in the Marine Advisory Board. Its to the benefit of our county to put our money out here to benefit reefs and the oyster programs the best dollar that we can spend, Moore said. We have the best group of people all marine people. Let me know what I can do to help you. I think the majority of us recognize the bene t of the reefs and oysters to Wakulla County. Id say 50 percent of our retail business is involved in seafood, oystering, shing and so forth. Cushman said he is not aware of any funds to get started on the site surveys, but the volunteer survey team is coming together. It will be between $5,000 and $6,000 per site, depending on how far offshore it is, just in fuel charges alone, and materials we need to get the surveys done, Cushman said. Ive taken it upon myself to go after that funding, I think Ive identified three sources of it so far, and were probably about 75 percent of the way of getting where we need to be. We wanted to shoot to have an ongoing reef project going back-to-back. So when the St. Marks reef is nished, wed start on Wakulla Big Bend, then Rotary (reef), and move on to the next site we choose after that. Commissioner Howard Kessler said he would like more information before adding a related item to the agenda in the future. County Administrator David Edwards said OAR originally committed to doing the reef site surveys, but then OAR had to back out, so the marine advisory group had to be formed to conduct the surveys and apply for permits and grants. He said there was never an intention to get the county so involved. There are liabilities that come with this, there are monies that come with this, Edwards said. Its a great thing, we need to move forward, but I caution you we need to do our legal things right. Commissioner Ralph Thomas said water projects will be important to the legislature next session. If an overall plan can be submitted to the statehouse, then maybe state funds could be secured if the other funding mechanisms fail. Edwards added that a five-year plan developed by the marine advisory group would be fantastic. Director of Governmental Affairs Sheree Keeler suggested a solid agenda item be developed at the June 12 meeting of the Wakulla County Marine Advisory Council, detailing costs, and examination of existing reefs and permits, to be presented to the board. Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com16-year-old in critical condition after crash Staff ReportThe Florida Highway Patrol reported that a man was critically injured in a crash on Memorial Day, Monday, May 26, after an SUV struck a tree. The wreck happened about 5:40 p.m. on U.S. Highway 98 south of Tower Road in Panacea, when a 2000 Toyota 4Runner driven by a 17-yearold from Tallahassee, traveled over to the east shoulder of the road, and the driver over-corrected, causing the vehicle to rotate as it crossed the highway and onto the west shoulder and ditch; the driver then veered to the right and the vehicle struck a tree with its left rear. The impact caused a 16-year-old passenger to be ejected from the vehicle. The ejected passenger was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital in critical condition. The other occupants were treated and released on-scene by EMS personnel.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe SUV in the ditch in Panacea after Fire-Rescue responded.Marine Advisory Committee working on artificial reef projects Special to The NewsWCSO dispatched units to a report of re in a home. Deputies arrived rst and reported all occupants out, and the house was too hot to enter. Fire-rescue crews entered quickly and were able to contain the re in one bedroom and the attic over that room. Crews responded from three volunteer stations and the one career station. Three residents of the home were in the structure when they smelled smoke. They escaped and immediately called the re department. The cause of the re is believed to have been an electrical short. While the structure was saved many of the familys belongings were ruined. The home is located on Stacey Lane in the Sopchoppy area. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA Wakulla re ghter at a blaze at a doublewide in Sopchoppy.Sopchoppy mobile home re Wakulla Berries THORNLESS BLACKBERRY FARMOPEN BY MID JUNE!$450 LB. 252 Wakulla Springs Hwy.Regular Hours: Saturday 7am-7pm, Sunday 7am-6pm, Tuesday and Thursday 7am-11am and 4pm-6:30pm Call or text for additional hours (850) 228-7942 wakullaberries@gmail.com 000HTBJ

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 3 PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netWakulla County residents have an ongoing opportunity to submit their transportation priorities to the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency as part of the regional mobility plan. An interactive workshop on Tuesday, May 20, at the county commission chambers served as a forum for citizens and of cials to meet, see maps, give input, share concerns and participate in a visual process of prioritizing which transportation projects will be prioritized for funding and implementation up to year 2040. Citizens who did not attend the workshop may still give their twocents with an interactive online quiz program. CRTPA officials urged Wakulla Countians to visit www.connections2040.metroquest.com, or visit the Facebook page: Connections2040. The mission of the CRTPA is to act as the principal forum for collective transportation policy discussions that results in the development of a long range transportation plan which creates an integrated regional multimodal transportation network that supports sustainable development patterns and promotes economic growth. Kate Widness, who works consulting ofce at CRPTA said this regional mobility plan is different from past ones because the plan includes transportation developments for four counties Gadsden, Jefferson, Leon and Wakulla. The purpose of the workshop was to identify what will work best for Wakulla County, and the capital-area region as a whole. Theyre all going to be put on the same plan, but it will be easy to separate them, Widness said. Widness said that, earlier in the day, the group met with County Commissioner Randy Merritt, County Administrator David Edwards, County Planning Director Luis Serna, ESG Public Works Directors Cleve Fleming and Sopchoppy City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. We talked with them about what they were focusing on, and things theyve heard from people they work with, neighbors and constituents. Are they more focused on road widening, or are they more focused on transit, bike lanes, or safety? Or, if people are most concerned about the environment, we want to be sure to focus on what transportation options it takes to preserve the environment. There will be a total of three workshops in each county, with another session to be scheduled in Wakulla County in a few months. Wakulla Senior Center Director Maurice Langston was huddled over a map with other community members, tracing the route where senior citizens often ride their motorized scooters. New sidewalks are a priority for him and the senior citizens he serves. He had an opportunity to express those concerns, and solutions, at the workshop. If you get on Wakulla-Arran off of 319, its subject to take you ve minutes to get to Oak Street, because theyre not going to pull off, Langston said. They paid taxes all their life, and thats their right. DOTs already funded the project to provide upgrades and sidewalks all the way down to Oak Street. I was talking about expanding it just ve hundred yards further to the senior center, so seniors could just get on the sidewalks instead of the roadway. Its must safer. Then they have access all the way to the senior center. Interactive workshop activities included a priority pyramid, where folks could rank trafc and roads; livability and safety; barriers and constraints; mobility options; economic vitality and tourism; and environmental stewardship by order of personal importance. Participants also jotted down comments that were displayed on a thought wall. There was a mapping station, where colored markers were used to trace and note areas of safety concern. The session ended with a place-making exercise, where people could rank images of ideal community design, transportation and housing.Transportation priorities discussed at CRTPA workshop Notice of Public Hearing The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled a Public Hearing regarding the following before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, July 14, 2014, beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Applicant: Farm Credit of Northwest Florida Agent: Edwin Brown and Associates Proposal: create mixed use subdivision Tax ID Number: 07-3s-01w-000-04317-007 Existing FLU Map: Rural 2 and Commercial (FLUE Policies 1.2.4 and 1.2.7) Existing Zoning: AG and C-2 (Sections 5-25 and 5-38, LDC) FEMA Flood Info: A and X zones on Panel 0250-E Parcel Size: 56.94+/acres Location: west side of Crawfordville Highway, in vicinity of 1700 Crawfordville Highway Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 9263695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com.MAY 29, 2014 MAY 29, 2014NOTICE OF A FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACTThe USDA, Rural Utilities Service has received an application for nancial assistance from the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners. The proposed project consists of construction of 1.2 MGD Wastewater treatment plant located at Otter Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant site located at 2146 Lawhon Mill Road, Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, Florida. As required by the National Environmental Policy Act and agency regulations, the Rural Utilities Service prepared an Environmental Assessment of the proposal that assessed the potential environmental effects of the proposal and the effect of the proposal may have on historic properties. The Environmental Assessment was published on March 20, 2014, for a 30-day public comment period. There were no public comments received. Upon consideration of the applicants proposal, federal and state environmental regulatory and natural resource agencies, and public input the agency has determined that the proposal will not have a signicant effect on the human environment and for which an Environment Impact Statement will not be prepared. The basis of this determination is because the construction of the proposed wastewater treatment plant will be on existing developed lands. Copies of the Environmental Assessment can be reviewed or obtained at USDA Rural Development Ofce, 2741 Pennsylvania, Suite 5, Marianna, Florida 32448; or by calling 850-526-2160 or by fax at 850-5262689. For further information, please contact Mary J. Gavin, Area Specialist at 850-526-2610. A general location map of the proposal is shown below. PROJECT INFORMATIONThe purpose of the study is to evaluate and update the 1996 Project Development & Environment (PD&E) Study to determine the preferred alternative that will improve pedestrian and bicycle connectivity, and provide public safety while Public participation is solicited special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or 220496-2-22-01 and 219747-2-22-01MEETING INFORMATION to attend an alternatives public Environmental Reevaluation Study an opportunity to review the proposed alternatives and provide FOR MORE INFORMATION Ian SatterDistrict Three Public Information Director State Road (S.R.) 61 (U.S. 319) Alternatives Public Information Meeting

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Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Andrew Wilson, facing death penalty for double murder, admits to killing at pre-trial hearing Lovebugs and yellow flies are the seasons flying pests A look at the Senior Centers Meal on Wheels Dozens turn out for workshop on 319 realignment Underwater Wakulla May 15, 2014 Programs offered all summer long Memorial Day ceremony set at courthouse Sopchoppy has plans for a downtown parkthewakullanews.com Insidious, incremental governmentWhy are candidates signs pink and purple? anks for sports examinations A tale of two Crums Follow us on Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE: CorrectionsEditor, The News: Well, here it comes! The Wakulla Board of County Commissioners will vote to approve the Airport Master Plan (AMP) during its June 2 meeting. Several commissioners have publicly stated they would only approve the minimums yet they are about to approve a document that includes far more than the minimums. Airport Manager Steve Fults, in his own recording of a neighborhood meeting on March 24, 2012, stated that we all must seek the absolute minimums as confirmed in his email of March 26, 2012 to County Administrator David Edwards and others. His recording was posted on YouTube. Fults recording also includes a statement by a pilot that light aircraft are 6,000 pounds or less, by de nition. We in the neighborhood agreed to work with Tarpine to get what it needed to comply with Florida Department of Transportation standards. That harmonious relationship quickly deteriorated by the insidiousness of Steve Fults to take with one hand what is being offered, while using the other hand to pickpocket for more. An Airport Committee existed that was stacked with nothing but Tarpiners and its advocates. Seeing the bias, the Board terminated the multi-person committee only to result in the airport manager becoming a one-man committee providing input to the consulting engineer, KimleyHorn. Kimley-Horn was complicit in producing a very biased document in the form of an AMP that was sent to DOT earlier this year for its review. It includes all kinds of bells and whistles and blatantly alters a reference to the 1963 deed granting the land for the airport by rede ning light aircraft as being 12,500 pounds or less. We in the neighborhood complained to FDOT that a document, paid-for by taxpayers and submitted to government should have an inherent presumption of objectivity. The master plan, as submitted, undermines public trust due to its bias and predetermined outcome. DOT responded on March 10 stating the obvious: a y-in community airport. The primary user is of this airport is Tarpine y-in community. The letter also states there is no demand for additional airports in the area. Most importantly is the comment the only projects the Department will provide funding for are those that assist the airport in meeting airport licensing standards. DOT confirmed in an email on April 11, the only thing needed for the airport to meet airport licensing standards is widening to 250 feet; the airport as deeded is 200 feet wide. We in the surrounding neighborhoods have pleaded for only the minimums to be included in the AMP. Yet, much more is being sought in the AMP that would result in a transformation of the airport into something grandiose while transforming some of the most highly preferred (and valued) waterfront property into property that will eventually become wasted. The Board will approve the gussiedup AMP with a quick qualifying statement that THIS Board is only seeking funding for what is required to meet the minimums in its width. Then this board can say to us in the surrounding neighborhoods that they only approved the minimums while saying to the Tarpiners that they approved the AMP. So, the airport will be widened with an approved Airport Master Plan on the shelf; with a shelf-life of 20 years. Other Boards in subsequent years will be composed of other individuals and the tempting will be great to seek more and more in grants. It is the insidious incremental manner in which many operate and has been demonstrated far too often in Wakulla County. However, there is this little thing called the Bert Harris Act which provides compensation to property owners for loss in value due to a series of actions by government. DOT is simply the funding source for projects that are to be approved and implemented by Wakulla County, hence it will be Wakulla County that will be the defendant. It is in that direction THIS board is taking us. However, they know the burden of proof will be on us and it will be other boards in subsequent years that will approve seeking of grant funds for other components of the AMP. THIS board will always hold-up their hands and say, Wait, we only approved the minimums! while craftily paving the way for more than the minimums to be effected. Our home is on a lot as part of a subdivision platted in 1963 (by my wifes grandfather) within a month of deeding of the land for airport. Our home was built in 1979. Tarpine was platted in 1981. Tarpine attached itself to the airstrip (a public facility) and has all but made the airstrip its own, as de ned by DOT. Only three of the waterfront homes that will be directly affected by the airport were built after platting of Tarpine. PLUS most of the homes permitted and built in Tarpine were done so while the airport was out-of-compliance! Thank you for indulging. I am disappointed that we will lose the quiet enjoyment we purchased and will have to remain on watch for the time to le suit. All of this could be avoided by this Board if it were to reject the AMP as written and issue a directive that it will only approve the component for meeting the requirement for 250 of width. Please, lets keep this out of the courts, it will be too costly and unpleasant for all of us. L. James Parham Ochlockonee BayEditor, The News: Some friends and I were discussing The Wakulla News story last week about Chris Russell, the School Board Candidate from District 3, and his being on top of the traf c safety issue which will confront Wakulla High while the new intersection is under construction. All of us agreed that he is exactly the kind of person we would like standing up for the children of Wakulla. But then one of my friends said something like, Hey what is the story behind his purple and pink campaign colors anyway? We each had our take. Someone thought that he might have let his daughters choose the colors while another thought it was in support of breast cancer and yet another thought it was a clever way to make people investigate gender identity since Chris is a neutral name. The bottom line is, none of us knew for sure and would like to know the story behind the story. Can The Wakulla News solve this mystery? Cyndi Webster Crawfordville Editor reply: It seems to be a combination: Chris Russell said the pink is in support of breast cancer awareness, and he let his daughters pick the color scheme.Editor, The News: Imagine my surprise when I learned that the small community of Panacea has two individuals with the exact same name. No, I am no talking about a common name like Barwick, Posey or Metcalf. I am speaking about a name that is endemic to the area, a name that can stand alone like Prince, Sting or Elvis. I am talking Crum. A name we all know to be synonymous with shing, crabbing, complaining about net size, and most anything else associated with government and taxes. Yes, you guessed it, Ronald Fred Crum. But its true there are two different people living in Panacea by the name of Ronald Fred Crum. First of all, what are the chances of this occurring and, secondly, what are the odds they seem to represent two opposing points of view. It would be like having two Jack Rudloes one an avid environmentalist and the other a wetlands developer. We all know the Ronald Fred Crum who represents the shermens association and its relentless fight against government regulation over the net ban. We have seen the articles about him ghting government and favoring the tea partys demands for smaller government and fewer taxes. But now we have some other Ronald Fred Crum who is advocating that more government be created by incorporating Panacea into a municipality! This of course means more government and more regulation, all paid for increases in our taxes. Finding this new Crum is similiar to some of the amazing discoveries we have made in space, like gravity and anti-gravity, white dwarfs and black holes. Its as if we now have regular Crum and an Anti-Crum. What a coincidence we have right here in Panacea. I own two houses in Panacea and dont feel the need for incorporation. Im told its to get grants. Most require matching funds where is that going to come from? I pay enough taxes. Theres police, re department, ambulance, garbage pickup. What else do I need? Why should I pay more taxes for another level of government? Cameron McMurry Panacea In last weeks edition, in the stories on Vietnam veterans, the pro le of Jimmie Smith talked about the invasion of Laos. The writer should have referred instead to an incursion into Laos. In last weeks edition, in the story Sopchoppy has plans for a downtown park, the wrong illustration was used. The city is going with the park plan that does not include a parking area. Anyone interested in park board membership may contact Sopchoppy City Hall. We regret the errors. Editor, The News: On Saturday, May 19, Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Physician Partners Wakulla volunteered their site, staff and medical supplies while providing free sports physicals. This great event is held each year serving students from Riversprings Middle School, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School. A total of 127 students were served. The goal of this event is to insure that every middle and high school student in Wakulla County has the opportunity to participate in sports or summer camps by removing economic barriers such as lack a family doctor, health insurance or the ability to pay. This initiative began with the vision of Lynn Artz and the Wakulla Health Care Task Force, and over the past seven years almost 1,000 physicals have been performed at no cost to families. After this year, Lynn is passing the leadership torch, but will continue support in other ways. Her ongoing dedication to collaborating with healthcare providers is deeply appreciated. Providing the sports physicals is truly was a community effort, and heartfelt thanks go out to all who worked to make it a success. Special recognition and appreciation are due to Susan Register and Lynn Artz for coordinating the medical services, staff and facilities which included set up and clean up! Dr. Andrea Plagge, Dr. Matthew Standridge, Dr. David Keene, and Valerie Russell, ARNP devoted their Saturday morning to provide all of the medical examinations, bringing two local medical practices together as a team. Many thanks! Students from the Wakulla High School Medical Academy staffed the stations for height, weight, pulse, blood pressure, temperature, hearing and vision. Looking very professional in their red scrubs and earning Bright Futures Scholarship volunteer hours were Katherine Ferguson, Sloan Russell, Silesia Green, Zachary McAlpin, Carson Strickland, Marina Petrandis, Aliya Callaghan and Jeanna Prisco. Wakulla County Sheriffs Department volunteers Mitch Hampton and Ken Malphurs assisted with parking and traf c ow. Coaches James Vernon, Tony Yeomans and Bill Peck assisted volunteers Mary Fort, Sally Watson, Jim Hilyer, Samantha Key, Leigh Key and Kaitlin Lammert with check-in, patient flow, copying and ling forms. Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Physican Partners Wakulla staff, Julie Neet, Sandra DeGennaro, Lois Cook, Lori Strickland and Mary Ellis assisted the clinicians, and provided support with record keeping, copying and public relations. The generosity of all volunteers who gave of a beautiful Saturday morning is truly appreciated and inspiring. Your dedication makes a difference in the lives of students. Thank you. Tanya English Executive Director of Exceptional Student Education/Student Services Wakulla County School Board

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 5 SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days ys 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Marguerite Burton drawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked around town:What are your summer vacation plans ?MISSY LYNCHTALK O THE TOWN DELIIll be working during the summer and Ill spend spare time in the Wakulla River enjoying the cool water and the sun! DAVID SPEARSCOASTAL PORTABLEPanama City. Well be taking the kids to Shipwreck Island, well stay for a week and get in a whole lot of shing. JUANITA CANTRELL RETIRED, SECOND CHANCE SCHOOLIm going to have surgery and and will be in a cast for 6-8 weeks. Kind of messes up my summer. But Im usually a beach bum! I really want to get down to the Keys this summer; shing, getting lobster, bully netting at Marathon Key! ROCKY ROCCORETIREDZACHARY STINSONDR. KEENS OFFICE & VECTORDont have any ... I live in paradise already! Compiled by Lynda Kinsey www.cjmalphursseptic.com Your Complete Septic Service rr sTM LIC #SM0951220 to Receive $10 OFF any septic tank pumping.Mention this Ad SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW Ray Gray is running for another term on the school boardFrom Front PageGray recognizes that a lot of the challenges hes faced are the same that many Wakulla families have faced in the past few years. He repeats the old adage, What doesnt kill you makes you stronger. Its true, he says, and adds that hes in a better place for having Been through the re. Gray is a proud father: one of his children has just graduated from law school, another is in technical school, another is at the University of Florida, and his youngest is at home and attends Wakulla High School. Gray expresses a pride in being part of a school system that has achieved so much, and that continues to rank in the top tier of schools throughout the state. But he also expresses a pride in a community that has supported the schools. After the recent awards day ceremony he was proud to see how much in local money was being awarded to seniors for scholarships. Im very proud to serve a community that believes it takes a village to raise a child thousands of dollars in scholarship money, and its all being given by this small community. Thats what makes us a family, and thats what makes Wakulla strong, he said. Im very proud to be representing something that helps the most important asset you have, he said. Gray beams as he anticipates the class of graduating seniors who will soon walk across the stage to take their diplomas. In a week, well see these kids walk across the stage, and as happy as these kids say they are, it wont be until theyre our age and they realize how important these years were, and the in uence of these friends on the rest of their life. Gray apologizes in advance to citizens for polluting our beautiful county with political signs, but vowed he would pick his signs up right after the election.

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Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor850 745-8359Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchYour church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Just dont call me on Monday Crawfordville UMC to hold fundraiser May 31The Crawfordville United Methodist Church (CUMC) is sponsoring a festival to kick off the summer. There will be local vendors, crafts, food, games and BINGO! The festival is on May 31 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Booth spaces cost $15. Please contact Christina DeProspero at F_christina@hotmail.com or (850) 591-0082 to reserve your space now. Proceeds from the food and games goes to the 2014 CUMC Mission trip to Ecuador. Mount Trial to celebrate 12th pastoral anniversaryThe Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church will be celebrating Pastor J. Bernard Plummers 12th pastoral anniversary, starting with a pastoral banquet on Saturday, May 31, at 6 p.m. at The Wakulla Shriners Club, on Highway 319 South, followed with a close-out service, the next day, Sunday, June 1, at 11 a.m., at Mount Trial. Mount Trial is located at 1418 Sopchoppy Highway in Buckhorn. Contact Deacon Samuel Hordges (850) 321-1844), or, any other Mount Trial Church member, for tickets. Carrabelle UMC to hold Market Days in CarrabelleCarrabelle United Methodist Church and Gods Ministry for the Needy is preparing for its Market Days May Gathering on Saturday, May 31, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop till you drop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3, including your drink! Music will be provided by local talent. Remember God teaches us that we must care for orphans and widows in their distress. As He works through us and our fundraising ministry, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Bring your friends and neighbors and receive a blessing. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t.The ministry is free. Volunteers needed for prison ministryCaring, Christian volunteers are needed to go to prison on Saturday, May 31. The Bill Glass Prison Ministrys A Day of Champions will team athletes, entertainers, musicians and volunteers to share their stories and their faith with inmates at seven area correctional facilities. If you are willing to step behind the prison walls to share the gospel with men and women eager to turn their lives toward God, contact the Bill Glass Prison Ministry in Dallas at (972) 298-1101 or visit the website at BillGlass.org/tallahassee. Volunteers will receive practical information and simple evangelistic tools to guide them on their mission. Volunteer for A Day of Champions Prison Ministry on Saturday, May 31. Contest seeks spiritual poetsA $1,000 grand prize is being offered in a special religious poetry contest sponsored by the Rainbow Poets, free to everyone. The deadline for entering is June 14. To enter, send one poem only of 21 lines or less to Free Poetry Contest, PO Box 21, Talent OR 97540. Or enter on-line www.rainbowpoets. com. Be sure your name and address appears on the page with your poem. A winners list will be sent to all entrants. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERThose who know me would agree that I am cool, calm, and collected, although not in that order. It takes quite a bit to razzle me and get me out of sync with my inner harmony. No matter what happens, I can always nd something to amuse me and to laugh it off. I am just that kind of guy. I must confess that, while that is mostly true, I did have an incident this past week that threw all of that out of the window. That is what I get for leaving my window down! The week started out as normal. Mondays are usually my down day. After a full weekend of preparation and ministry, I need one day to really chill out and get my wits re-collected. On Mondays, I do not wish to do anything or see anybody or go anywhere. My motto for Monday is simply, just dont call me! I have one rule for Monday and that is it is impossible to oversleep. Whenever I wake up on Monday is when I get up. If ever the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage set the alarm clock for Monday morning, she will have to deal with a grouchy old geezer with an unpleasant attitude. I am sorry, that is the way life is. On this particular Monday when I finally awakened, the rst thing I noticed was that my wife had already left the house. Out in the kitchen the coffee had been brewed and waiting for my consumption. There was a nice bowl of oatmeal ready just for me. Life cannot get any better than that! I only wish there were more Mondays in the week. I think when the Beatles sang that song, Eight Days a Week, they were referring to two Mondays. I xed my coffee, got my oatmeal ready and proceeded into the living room where I could set in my easy chair and watch a little bit of television for as long as I could stay awake. Nothing is quite as nice as a Monday with nothing to do and nobody to bother you while you are doing it. I got situated and took a nice sip of delicious coffee and then proceeded to turn on the TV. That is when my Monday exploded. I could not turn the TV on; something was wrong with the service. I distinctly remember one occasion when my wife had to face such a situation and she would call the TV service. She would speak to some people there and in a few moments (after some rather angry screeching) the problem was solved. So I decided to do the same thing, minus the screeching. One of my problems is that I can remember the day when you talked to a live person. Someone actually living and breathing and living in your own country. How was I to know that the service technicians were somewhere in the hills of India? After punching 2,743 numbers on my phone, I nally got somebody. Actually, it was not really somebody; it was a recording telling me that I was 47th in line waiting for the technician. According to my calculation, it would take me 29 Mondays to get to talk to a live, breathing technician. By the time I was connected to a live technician, I had completely lost my cool and was close to not being collected. One of the problems I faced was trying to explain to this technician what my problem was. The next problem was to understand what he was saying to me. I believe if you are going to service American people, you need to speak good old fashioned American without some accent that makes you sound like you are from Mars. Each minute on the phone with this technician caused me to lose more of my cool until I was absolutely hot under the collar. He knew almost as much about my problem as some stray cat in the backyard. Finally, I had enough and thought the best part of valor on my part would it be to bid him adios before I said some things that I would later regret. After I hung up and cooled down a little bit I thought of something. Why dont I just unplug the whole mess and then restart everything. It worked and I did not have to say it with some strange accent. In my devotions that morning, I read from Psalms 33:4 where David says, For the word of the LORD is right; and all his works are done in truth. Sometimes the best course of action is to do it yourself. Not being a do-it-yourself guru, it does not come naturally to me. If you blame someone else for your problems, you are pointing the nger in the wrong direction..The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTOR In depth home bible studies are available 3055 Crawfordville Hwy.Sun. Services 2:30

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 7John Johnny Morgan Cruse, 60, of Sopchoppy, died on Wednesday, May 21, 2014. He was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. Survivors include his mother, Mary Virginia Cruse of Irvington, Ala.; sons, John Rhuben Cruse of Tallahassee and Blake (Candace) Anderson of Lamont; daughter, Cissy Cruse of Tallahassee; brothers, Donnie (Nicole) Cruse of Louisiana and Kevin Cruse of Tennessee; a sister, Kitt (Pete) Griggs of Sopchoppy; and two grandchildren. He was predeceased by his father, Joseph Morgan Cruse. A celebration of his life will be held at a later date. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home of Lake City, 386-752-5212. Please sign the online guestbook at http://www.forbesfuneralhome.net. Eloise Barineau, 94, died on May 25, 2014. Survivors include her sister, Anita Fletcher; two sisters-in-law, Rhona Mae Layfield and Wanda Humphrey; her son, Gorden, and daughter-in-law, Jacki Barineau; and her adopted grandson, Jacob Mattice. She was born in Georgia and lived in Tallahassee. Services will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursday, May 29, 2014 at Beggs Funeral Homes, 3322 Apalachee Parkway in Tallahassee. Family will receive friends from noon until 1 p.m. prior to services. A private burial will be held at White Primitive Baptist Church Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Lighthouse Childrens Home, 7771 Mahan Dr., Tallahassee FL 32317, or Leon County Humane Society, 413 Timberlane Road, Tallahassee FL 32312 Beggs Funeral Home, Apalachee Parkway Chapel, is in charge of the arrangements (850942-2929, beggsfuneralhomes.com).Gloria Faye Dorsey, 80, of Tallahassee, died on May 20, 2014 in Medart. A daughter of the late Clarence A. Ladd Sr. and the late Mae Barton Ladd, she was born April 11, 1934 in Newport. Survivors include her brothers, Larry Ladd and C.A. Junior Ladd; sister, Frances Ladd; her daughter Kitty (Lee) Crowson; and a grandson. She was predeceased by her parents; her husband, John H. Dorsey; a brother, George Ladd; and a sister, Elizabeth Beaty. The funeral was held at 11 a.m. on Thursday, May 22, 2014 at Abbey Funeral Home, with interment in Tallahassee Memory Gardens. The family received friends from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., prior to the service. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice.Virginia Marie Nichols Carter, 52, of Panacea, died on Saturday, May 24, 2014. She was a lifelong resident of Panacea. Survivors include her husband, Daniel Carter of Panacea; sons, John Douglas (Crystal) Dixon of Bainbridge, Ga., and James Michael (Alicia) Carter of Texas; daughters, Sarah Louise (Andrew) Dale of Virginia, Ashley Renee Methvin of Daytona Beach, Lindsey Nicole Carter of Gainesville, Rebecca Jean Carter of Texas, Emily Marie Carter of Panacea, and Brianna Nicole SmithCarter of Panacea; foster daughters, Katelyn, Amanda, Daisy, and Brandy, all of Sopchoppy; father, Clark Nichols of Otter Creek; brother, Jim (Tina) Nichols of Panacea; sisters, Diane (Robert) Burke and Frances (John) Trumbell, both of Panacea, and Kathy Moss of Bainbridge, Ga.; six grandchildren and numerous other family members. She was predeceased by her mother, Betty Louise Crum Shouest; and brother, Roger O. Nichols. Funeral services were held at 11 a.m. on Tuesday, May 27, 2014 at the Panacea Full Gospel Assembly in Panacea, with Pastor BB Barwick and Elder Bruce Taylor of ciating. Interment followed at Panacea Cemetery. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday, May 26, 2014 at the church. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home of Lake City. Please sign the online guestbook at http://www. forbesfuneralhome.net.Obituaries Eloise Barineau Virginia Marie Nichols Carter John Morgan Cruse Gloria Faye Dorsey Virginia Marie Nichols Carter Eloise Barineau Juanita Joan Young john Morgan CruseBy TRACY RENEE LEEAccording to the Los Angeles Times, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-V) recently added prolonged (complicated) grief disorder as an of cial psychiatric diagnosis, giving people who suffer from debilitating grief a name for the disorder. What does this mean for the poor soul suffering this excruciating disorder? It means that they can now identify their disorder by name, and seek out medical and psychiatric assistance for recovery. In the past, survivors suffering debilitating grief were basically on their own to find a remedy and recover from their disorder. The work place is not obligated to accommodate grief recovery, only bereavement leave. It has been my experience that the work place has generally accepted two to three days as an appropriate time for bereavement leave. This slight recognition ignores the emotional affects of loss, and does not allow additional time to recover from the deep emotional and psychological trauma that comes with such a catistrophic experience. If you break your limb and your doctor casts it, there is physical evidence that something is wrong. Your doctor might also send a note to your employer requiring that you receive a prescribed time of light duty or time off completely. In these cases, there is no question that your work is going to accommodate your needs during this time. If your spouse or child suffers an accident severe enough to take his or her life, your employer may give you two to three days off work for funeral services. Unfortunately, they expect you back; bright eyed and bushy tailed as soon as the gravedigger covers up your loved one with earth. Fulfilling the customary ritual within our society, your coworkers and company of employment may send words and owers of condolences for the services. The problem comes into play, when they fail to realize that although your loved one lost his or her life, you have lost your loved one. The wound to your soul, although invisible, is greater and more signi cant than any physical wound you will ever suffer. It appears that if your wounds are without outward marks of trauma, they are unrecognized as noteworthy. Perhaps with this new designation from the DSM, recognition is on the cusp of change. As a funeral practitioner, I have seen a signi cant number of my clients lose their jobs because they could not bring themselves to return to work after only three days of bereavement leave. These clients suffered signi cant losses of either their spouse or their child. Losses one would naturally expect would take more than three days from which to recover. The Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA) established in 1993, provides for up to 12 weeks unpaid leave per year for employees to address serious health conditions, care for a newborn or adopted child, recovery from illness, or care for a sick family member. It fails to recognize even one day for recovery from familial loss. Familial loss in icts a severe wound to ones soul. The psychological effects of such trauma can be devastating, and if left untreated or unresolved, may progress into a debilitating illness. The ensuing illness may manifest itself in mental and/or physical ailments. At this juncture, the FMLA may become applicable, as the survivor potentially quali es for leave under personal serious illness. Isnt it sad, however, that survivors suffer grief to such a serious level, when it could have been treated early on, possibly preventing other illnesses from manifesting themselves. Even with treatment to these new illnesses, the underlying cause remains unaddressed and may, therefore, continue to cause poor and degenerating health. During the Victorian Era, families wore black for one full year after the loss of a signi cant loved one. In so doing, they were notifying others that they were in a state of grief, that they would be functioning at a lower than anticipated level of competency, that they might be inexplicably melancholy and that they might require kindness and consideration during their daily activities and responsibilities. The Victorians automatically allowed considerations for the bereaved, yet in modern society, we barely recognize it as signi cant. Perhaps the identi cation of Prolonged Grief Disorder by the DSM will bring new awareness, research, recognition and treatment for those who suffer the catistrophic effects of complicated grief..Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http:// pushin-up-daisies. blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @ PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome. com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Grief designated as a disorder BEREAVEMENT COLUMN Special to The NewsMyrtle Hoffman is the new community outreach coordinator for Big Bend Hospice in Wakulla and Franklin counties. Myrtle is a native and resident of both Woodville (Leon) and Wakulla County, and joins BBH after working 10 years with Florida Telecommunications Relay, managing 16 counties as the program director at the Center for Independent Living in Gainesville. Myrtles role will entail cultivating relationships with local residents on behalf of the organization, promoting the services that BBH provides, and participating in various community engagements as a representative of Big Bend Hospice. When asked about joining Big Bend Hospice, Myrtle said, Big Bend Hospice thrives on helping individuals and their families in their most critical time of need. Im honored to work in Wakulla and Franklin counties to help educate the community about the service that Big Bend Hospice provides.Lake Ellen Baptist Church is hosting an end-of-school community bash for kids in Hudson Park on June 5, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Free hot dogs and drinks will be available in addition to games and bouncies. Parents can also register kids from 3 years old through 5th grade for Vacation Bible School which begins at Lake Ellen on Sunday, June 8, and ends with Commencement and Family Fun Night on Friday, June 13. Come celebrate school being out and get registered for an exciting week of free fun, food and learning opportunities at Agency D3: Discover, Decide, Defend. For more information, call 926-5265 or visit our website at www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org. 4495 Crawfordville Hwy., in Medart.Free end-of-school community bash set at Lake EllenNew community outreach coordinator at Big Bend Hospice Myrtle Hoffman Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityPhoto special to The NewsDon Schmidt talks with Mays Leroy Gray, who gave a presentation of the history of the GF&A Railroad.Special to The NewsThe Historical Societys nal program for the season featured Mr. Mays Leroy Gray presenting the Georgia, Florida & Alabama Railroad (GF&A). The purpose of the Carrabelle Tallahassee Georgia (CT&G) Road was to connect the Coast with Georgia. Construction began in Carrabelle and moved toward Sopchoppy where the rst Depot was built in 1891. Crossing the river was an obstacle that delayed progress until a bridge could be nanced and built. There were thriving communities around the depots for Lanark, Sopchoppy, Arran, Tallahassee and ag stops for McIntire, Hilliard, Helen, and Spring Hill. The Arran Depot was three miles west of the courthouse in Crawfordville. Grays dramatization of the whistle and conductors call for all aboard was followed by a multi-media presentation of sights and sounds along the journey from Tallahassee to Carrabelle when trains ran on time. Many girls from Wakulla County went to Tallahassee to work and boarded there at the Ira Sutton House. Some weekends they rode the train to Lanark to attend dances at the hotel. Mr. Gray finished his presentation train music and pictures with a little Caboose jig. A remarkable event happened near Spring Hill in October 1926 when the train could not stop before hitting a new automobile stalled on its track. Though twisted and rusted, the iron frame of the Overland sedan remains today where it was pulled away from the track and left long ago. Mr. Gray said that it is a memorial to three who tragically perished in the rst accident of its kind. Ira Sutton was the only survivor. Transportation changed after WWII and by 1948 the Carrabelle Tallahassee railroad was abandoned. A previous Historical Society Looking Back program included an artifact which depicted the railroad track through Arran. A map by the late Clayton Taff whose handwritten note indicates drawn from memory no scale identi es sites of commerce, residences, churches, and the school. Betty Green carefully planned each program for the 2014 Season to highlight communities that are now gone but should not be forgotten. We have a rich history to be proud of and it should be remembered. The people should be remembered. Mrs. Greens comments are always followed by write it down and write names on the back of those pictures. Mr. Gray, Mrs. Green, and Cal Jamison are charter members of the Historical Society. Mr. Gray was the second Historical Society president and he completed the corporate paperwork in 1992. The WCHS Programs resume after summer and are presented on the second Tuesday in September, November, and January through May. Each program is recorded and DVDs are available through the Gift Shop for $10. Betty and Ernest Newberry, Sr., of Wakulla Station, celebrated their 65th wedding anniversary May 10, 2014. They were married in Corinth, Mississippi. They have three children: Ernie, Jr. and wife Cathy of Wakulla Station, Debbie and husband Steve Flora of Trinity, Fla. and Joy and husband Joe Maltese of LaGrange, Ga. They have six grandchildren and two great grandchildren. Their children took them out to eat on their anniversary. The following day a cookout was held in Wakulla Station for the extended family. The family is blessed to have such an example of a committed relationship. The couple is active in their Wakulla Station Methodist Church and has watched their youngest great grandchild full time for the past two and a half years! Special to The NewsMiss Sara Elizabeth Stewart and Mr. Thomas Lincoln Moore are pleased to announce their engagement. Sara is the daughter of Rodney and Tara Watts of Scottsburg, VA and Steve and Kristey Stewart of Rougemont, NC, formerly of Tallahassee. Thomas is the son of Tim and Caryl Moore of Halifax, VA. The bride-elects maternal grandparents are Mike and Carol Conner of Scottsburg, VA. Her paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James Stewart of South Boston, VA. The groomelects maternal grandparents are Mr. And Mrs. E.T. Francis of South Boston, VA and the late Nancy West Francis, formally of Danville, VA. His paternal grandparents are Mrs. Mary P. Moore and the late Henry L. Moore of South Boston, VA. Sara is a recent graduate of the Danville Regional Medical Center Radiology Program. Her future plans are for a career as a Radiographer. Thomas is a 2005 graduate from Halifax County High school. He is currently employed as an Operation Dispatcher at R.O. Harrell, Inc. of South Boston, VA. The wedding will take place on June 28, 2014 in Halifax, VA. Invitations for the event have been sent. The couple will reside in South Boston, VA. Stewart-Moore to marry in Va.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce is participating in the Click It Or Ticket Campaign which began May 19 and concludes on June 2. The WCSO urges everyone to buckle their seatbelts as law enforcement cracks down on motorists who fail to use their seatbelts. As we kick-off the busy summer driving season, it is critical that everyone buckles up every time they go out, day and nightno excuses, said Sheriff Charlie Creel. Our deputies are prepared to ticket anyone who is not wearing their seatbelt, including drivers that have neglected to properly buckle their children. According to the U.S. Department of Transportations National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 52 percent of the 21,253 passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2011 were not wearing their seatbelts at the time of the crash. And unbelted fatalities are more prevalent at night than during the daytime. According to NHTSA, 62 percent of the 10,135 passenger vehicle occupants killed in 2011 during the overnight hours of 6 p.m. to 5:59 a.m. were not wearing their seatbelts at the time of the crash. Seatbelts save thousands of lives every year, but far too many motorists are still not buckling up, especially at night when the risk of getting in a crash is even greater, said Sheriff Creel. We want to make this the safest summer possible. Buckling up is not optional; its the difference between life and death in a crash. Thats why were out enforcing the law. Click It Or Ticket, every time, day or night. WCSO DUI CHECKPOINT PLANNED The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce will conduct a DUI checkpoint and saturation patrols on Saturday, June 7 between the hours of 10 p.m. and 12 a.m. The two hour checkpoint will be conducted in the area of the 2600 block of U.S. Highway 319 near Winn-Dixie in Crawfordville. Deputies will not only be checking for impaired drivers but also for drivers who violate driver license and registration laws and who have inoperable vehicle safety equipment. Deputies will be making sure motorists are complying with seatbelt laws. The DUI saturation patrols and DUI checkpoints are funded by a Florida Department of Transportation (DOT) grant.Wakulla drivers: click it, or ticket U.S. n sd a rtth Remembering GF&A Railroad WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY Newberrys celebrate 65 years together Special to The News Teens across Florida are celebrating the end of the school year, high school graduations and the carefree summer months. But the Florida Teen Safe Driving Coalition warns parents not to stop monitoring their teens driving habits. Memorial Day marks the start of the 100 deadliest days on the roads for teens. From Memorial Day to Labor Day in 2012, 59 people were killed in Florida in crashes involving teen drivers, according to National Safety Council estimates based on data from the National Highway Traf c Safety Administration. More than 1,000 people nationwide were killed in teen-related crashes during the same period. Car crashes are the leading cause of death for teens in the U.S. When it comes to safety, parents shouldnt take the summer off, said Danielle Branciforte, leader of the Florida Teen Safe Driving Coalition. Too many of these preventable crashes happen during months that should be fun and carefree. Making sure teens still driving safely avoiding distractions such as passengers and cell phones, and coming home earlier instead of staying out late will help ensure this time of the year is all it should be.100 deadliest days for teen drivers Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50 TILE ~ CARPET ~ WOOD ~ LAMINATE ~ VINYLKaren Richardson, Design Consultant850-491-3358www.SouthernFlooring.net Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING SETTING THE STANDARD WITH StyleBring in Photos of your Room or Patio...We can help you Create YOUR DREAM!! Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION ON A BUDGET? WE CAN RE-PURPOSE! LETS TALK!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 9Special to The NewsTom Roberts and The Way Up Band will join South Bound in a special Memorial Day show, Saturday, May 31 begining at 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. Patriotic songs will be performed by some of this areas best musicians and singers in tribute to those who have given their lives for our freedom. Tickets are $12 and available for purchase at the door or may be reserved by calling 962-3711. The ticket of ce and Opry Caf open at 5:30 p.m. on show date. For more information on this show and those scheduled, go to sopchoppyopry.com. Special to The NewsIf you are having an issue with Social Security, Medicare, Veterans Affairs bene ts, immigration, the IRS or any federal agency, a member of Senator Rubios staff will be available to meet with you. Please plan to attend to meet your local staff and nd out the services Senator Rubios Of ce offers his constituents. THURSDAY, MAY 29 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. at Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Highway. 2 p.m. 3 p.m. at St. Marks City Hall, 788 Port Leon Drive. For more information, call the Capital Regional Of ce at (850) 599-9100.Special to The NewsWakulla Democratic Executive Committee Chair Rachel Sutz Pienta announced today that a full weekend of campaign education will be held May 31 and June 1 at the TCC Capitol Center in partnership with local sponsors and the national Democracy for America program. I am very happy to announce that Tallahassee was chosen to be the 2014 site for this national campaign academy, she said. With the generous support of local co-sponsors including the Leon County DEC, ReThink Energy Florida, Minority Outreach Solutions, the Wakulla County DEC, Commissioner Andrew Gillum, Curtis Richardson, and Brian Lee, Big Bend residents will have the opportunity to participate in two days of intensive training with national campaign educators. Spots for the academy are still available. For more information, visit the event website at www.democracyforamerica.com/trainings/160campaign-academy-in-tallahasseeor call 802-651-3200 x217. By LYNN ARTZ Special to The NewsThe Iris Garden Club honored its founder Kate Brimberry at Wakulla Springs State Park on Tuesday, May 20. Dozens of people who knew Brimberry showed up wearing decorative hats to enjoy a shared-dish luncheon and a presentation about Mrs. Annie Kate Smith Brimberry (1911-2005) by historian Madeleine Carr. Carr, who knew Brimberry, described her life, her home on Ochlockonee Bay, and the Indian shell midden on Kates property. Brimberry obtained a university degree, attended law school, and worked as an accountant before moving to Wakulla County. In addition to founding the Iris Garden Club in 1977, Brimberry was active in the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs. She founded Sopchoppy Homemakers Association and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. Brimberry was among the first to promote Coastal Cleanup, taking part annually at Mashes Sands beach. Brimberry also was one of the rst women in the county to appear before the Board of County Commissioners to advocate for environmental issues. You were elected to take care of our environment, she would tell them. After Carrs talk, others shared their own reminiscences of Kate Brimberry. Norma Kirby modeled Kates gardening hat and a oral pleated skirt that belonged to Brimberry. Kirby also brought a proclamation and photo of Brimberry that are on display at the Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. Painting by Fran MathisThe Tallahassee Watercolor Society hosted the 26th Tri-State Juried Water Media exhibit May 16 at the FSU Museum of Fine Arts. Two paintings by Wakulla Countys Fran Mathis were selected for the exhibit. Her watercolor, Ladies in Red, was awarded an honorable mention prize.Check out the Way-Up Band at Sopchoppy Opry May 31 Iris Garden Club honors founder Kate BrimberryPhoto by Angret Piasecki Above, Norma Kirby, who modeled Brimberrys hat and skirt, is pictured at the event. Inset photo, Kate Brimberry. Mathis nabs honorable mention Rubio sta to meet with locals Wakulla Democratic Committee to co-sponsor campaign education Good mowing practices Good mowing practicesBy ELEANOR DIETRICHPanhandle Wild ower AllianceLast week, I drove from Sopchoppy to Tallahassee on CR 375 (Smith Creek Rd) and saw terri c wild owers along it. I started seeing lots of parrot pitcher plants around Sanborn Cemetery Road and northward with many north of Roberts Landing Road. I stopped at Mack Lake Road and took photos of parrot pitcher plants, dewthread sundews, and many other gorgeous wild owers. CR 375 is part of the Big Bend Scenic Byway and is maintained by Wakulla County Public Works. ESG administrators and mowing staff are committed to preserving roadside wild owers and mow only a safety strip along county roads during the spring, summer, and fall when wild owers are blooming and setting seed. They mow the full rightof-way during the winter to cut down woody plants. They may mow the full ROW in mid-summer if needed. Wakulla County is extremely fortunate to have less frequent mowing of roadside swales and back slopes on its county roads as well as its statemaintained roads. This will allow roadside wild owers in Wakulla County to increase in number and put on showy displays for the enjoyment of residents and tourists. The following are tax reductions adopted during the legislative session. The tax breaks are in effect, they have been signed by the Governor. The motor vehicle fee reductions will go into effect on Sept. 1. A permanent sales tax exemption for child restraint systems, booster seats for use in motor vehicles, and bicycle helmets marketed for use by youth. A permanent sales tax exemption for therapeutic pet foods available through a licensed veterinarian. A permanent sales tax exemption for college meal plans. A three-year sales tax exemption for cement mixing drums. An Expansion of the amount of credits available under the New Markets Tax Credit program. A reduction of the sales tax rate on electricity purchases and creates an additional gross receipts tax on electricity purchases that are subject to sales tax. Delays the repeal of the Community Contributions Tax Credit program for one year and increases the credits available for affordable housing. Amends the statutory de nition of prepaid calling arrangement to provide that certain prepaid mobile communications services are subject to state and local sales taxes instead of state and local communications services taxes. Revises the calculation of the premium tax imposed on bail bond premiums so that the tax rate is applied only to the amount of the premium received by the insurance company, excluding amounts retained by the bail bondsman.Various tax breaks approved Happy 41st Anniversary!Tom and Jackie CloreWe love you! www.coastalgems.com33 Years of Experience!850566-9293 Est. 2000Carol Ann Williams, Licensed Real Estate Broker/Owner 33 Years Experience FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922

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Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsLake Ellen Baptist Church is hosting an end-of-school community bash for kids in Hudson Park on June 5, from 4 to 7 p.m. Free hot dogs and drinks will be available in addition to games and bouncies. Parents can also register kids from 3 years through 5th grade for Vacation Bible School which begins at LEBC on Sunday, June 8 and ends with Commencement and Family Fun Night on Friday, June 13. Come celebrate school being out and get registered for an exciting week of free fun, food and learning opportunities at Agency D3: Discover, Decide, Defend. For more information, call 926-5265 or visit our website at www.lakeellenbaptistchurch.org. 4495 Crawfordville Hwy., MedartPhoto submitted by Betty Green The nal Crawfordville High School reunion was held on Saturday in Wakulla County. Members of classes 1935 to 1967 were invited. Pictured are Kit Tucker, on the left, who was chairperson of the Reunion Committee and his brother, Don, a committee member who led the pledge of allegiance. Notice: Wakulla High School parking gates will open at 5:30 p.m., and stadium gates will open for seating at 6:30 p.m., before the Class of 2014 War Eagles graduation at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office hosted a Five Stand Sporting Clay Competition Saturday, May 24 to raise money for the Wakulla High School NJROTC and Project Graduation which will be held Thursday, June 5 at Wakulla Springs State Park. The event raised $760 for the youth of Wakulla County. The event was sponsored by St. Marks Powder and prizes were provided by Rons Guns and Hunting Supplies, NoShoe Firearms and Accessories and Joe Page of Deer Track Blades, LLC. There were a number of outstanding shooters competing but Randy Barnes hit 23 of 25 clay birds to win the 20 gauge shotgun from Rons Guns. Ray Geyer placed second hitting 22 targets to win a bone handle hunting knife from Joe Page. Marshall Driver placed third by hitting 21 of 25 targets. He won a $50 gift certificate from NoShoe Firearms. Wakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel presented the winners with their awards. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce is seeking youths to take part in the WCSO Explorer Program and two Teen Driving Challenge programs planned for June and July. To participate in the Explorer Program you must be at least 14 years old. To participate in the Teen Driving Challenge you must possess a Learners Permit or Driver License. The WCSO Explorer Academy will be held June 9 through June 12. The academy will be held from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. each day with transportation and lunch provided. On June 9, the participants will be in the WCSO Emergency Operations Center (EOC) Conference Room. The other days the youths will be at the WCSO Range. Explorers will learn about law enforcement training and policies. Anyone interested in becoming an Explorer is asked to contact your school resource of cer. The Teen Driver Challenge will be offered June 26 and June 27 at the EOC Conference Room the rst day and at the high school the second. Classroom learning and practical exercises will be offered. The July program will be offered July 17 at the EOC and July 18 at WHS. The program will be offered from 9 a.m. until 3 p.m. with lunch provided. To become part of the Teen Driver Challenge please contact your school resource of cer. WCSO deputies will be conducting the programs.Sign ups open for WCSO summer programs By MIKE SMITHWHS Athletic DirectorTwo Wakulla High School senior athletes were awarded for academic achievement last week: Corion Knight 3.42 GPA. Three-sport Varsity Letter Winner, football, basketball, track. Basketball WHS Game changer of the year award. Track District Champ Long Jump, District High Jump 2nd place. Regional 2nd place in Long Jump and High Jump. State Champion in High Jump, 7th Long Jump. Voted Big Bend Field Athlete of the Year. Knight is signing with Barton College in North Carolina for track. Madison Harris 4.0 GPA. Cross Country District Champ, Regional 2nd place, State 9th place, 1st team All Big Bend and area Runner of the year. Track 800m District Champ, Regional 2nd place, State 2nd place. Girls soccer Team MVP. Harris signed a scholarship with Florida State for track. NICOLE ZEMAAthletes Corion Knight and Madison Harris have been recognized for their academic achievements.Knight, Harris are academic achievers Tourney raises funds for Wakulla High studentsPhoto special to The NewsMarshall Driver, Sheriff Charlie Creel, Randy Barnes and Ray Geyer. Free End-of-School Bash is June 5 Back-to-school tax holiday scheduled in AugustSpecial to The NewsTax exemption for purchasing back to school items has been scheduled for three days, August 1 through August 3. Mark your calendars to get a break on schoolrelated purchases. During this time the following items are exempt: Clothing, footwear, wallets, and bags that cost $100 or less. School supplies that cost $15 or less per item. The first $750 of the sales price for personal computers and related accessories purchased for noncommercial home or personal use, including tablets, laptops, monitors, input devices, and nonrecreational software. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 11sports news and team views SportsSpecial to The NewsWakullas Lucas Briggs and Jordan Trussell led Tallahassees ASG Premier U15 team to the Finals of the Nike Championship Cup Soccer Tournament played in Sanford, Apopka, Kissimmee, Winter Garden and Clermont on May 16-18. The Nike Championship hosted 441 teams and provided recruiting opportunities to college coaches as well as the Olympic Developmental Team coaches. The ASG U15 Boys opened the tournament against the Jacksonville Creeks Kraze with a 2-2 tie with forward Jordan Trussell scoring both goals with assists from mid elder Lucas Briggs. The 15s then shut out the Jacksonville Fury Boys Premier team 2-0 with Trussel again scoring both goals with assists from Briggs. The pressure was on the boys Sunday morning as they needed to win the seminal game against the Arlington Futbol Adrenaline team by at least 2 goals to advance to the championship game. Jordan Trussel stepped up again and scored two goals, one unassisted and the other with an assist from Briggs. Teammate Tony Adams also scored 2 goals, one unassisted and the other with an assist from Briggs, bringing the team the needed 4-2 win and advancing the team to the nals. The 15s fought hard in the nals with Adams again scoring off an assist from Briggs, but it was not enough and the team lost to the IPSA INTERNATIONAL PRO team 2-1. Jordan and Lucas play for the ASG Premier Club, directed by Coach Andy Warner. Briggs also plays varsity soccer and baseball for Maclay School, and Trussell plays varsity soccer for Wakulla High School. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachWhen the State Track Meet was over on May 2, it looked like Wakulla High School senior Madison Harris had run her last high school race and was ready to move on to take her talents to FSU in the fall. However, there was a little un nished business still looming in the background. Harris held every WHS girls school record from 200 meters through 5000 meters, except for the 3200 meter run, a race she had never run in competition. It had been planned for her to run the event early in the track season, get the record and then concentrate on the 800 meters but a nagging injury prevented that from happening. It was decided that her best and only shot at getting record would be at the Golden South Meet in Orlando on May 24. That only gave her about three weeks to prepare for the longer distance, but her injury seemed to be better and the decision was made to take the chance and enter the meet to see if she could add the 3200 meters to her list of school records. So, on Saturday afternoon she found herself checking in at the Golden South Meet and preparing to run her rst ever 3200 meter run in brutally hot conditions. By the 6:45 p.m. start, the weather had moderated a little and she was on the for her last high school race in the Classic Division 3200 meter run. Although she didnt have a qualifying time, the meet directors placed her in the Classic Division based on the times she had run at other distances this past year. At the gun, the top seeded runner, Autumn Bartlett from University High in Orlando, shot into the lead with Harris and the rest of the runners in pursuit. Harris was leading the chase pack and the others all seemed content to sit on her shoulder and let her lead. That is the way it stayed through ve of the eight laps in the race. Then all but one runner fell off the pace, leaving those two to battle it out for second place while Bartlett steadily built on her lead. With 800 meters to go, her lead had extended to 16 seconds, around 100 meters! Harris started to open a small gap on the third place runner and that gap continued to grow on the penultimate lap and Bartletts lead shrank slightly to 13 seconds. By then it appeared the race was all but over. However, anyone who has ever seen Harris race, knew that that may not be the case. At the bell lap, Harris accelerated like she was in a 400 meter race and she started eating into the lead with every stride. By the 200 meter mark, Bartletts lead was down to about 10 seconds, which still seemed to be a safe distance. At about 125 meters, Bartlett looked over her shoulder and realized Harris was coming and accelerated toward the finish, but Harris wasnt done just yet. Now in full sprint mode, she kept closing with each stride, but she ran out of track. Bartlett nished the race in 11:34.95 with Harris about two strides back, nishing less than a second later in 11:35.73. Harris had run the last 400 meters 12 seconds faster than the leading runner, shattered the existing WHS record, held by Life College runner Cora Atkinson, by 40 seconds and ran a State Elite Time in the process. The race was a tting end to the high school career of the best girls track athlete to ever run for the War Eagles. She ran one of her patented race efforts, closing faster than anyone should be able to, and getting the nal school record that had eluded her. It was a tting end to an incredible high school career.TRACK COOKOUT REMINDERThe Track cookout and awards ceremony will be this Saturday, May 31, at Wakulla Springs, starting at noon. Athletes should contact their respective coaches to nd out what to bring. TRACKOne more race, one more record for HarrisKEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENQuarterback Feleipe Franks drops back to pass in the Blue & Red game. Wakulla fans packed the stands for the scrimmage.FOOTBALLWar Eagles QB Franks looks strong in Blue & Red gameBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWar Eagle quarterback showed in last weeks intersquad scrimmage, the Blue & Red game, that not only does he have a strong arm, but he appears to have added some speed as well he tore off a 90-yard touchdown run in the game. Two Florida State coaches at the game may have taken notice. The only thing missing was Franks sure-handed brother, receiver Jordan Franks, on the other end of some long bombs. Jordan Franks has signed with the University of Central Florida. The Blue & Red team dominated in a 24-7 scrimmage. The game started with a 10-minute drive by the Blue & Red team, featuring runs by Demarcus Lindsey and passes to Ethan Davis, and culminated in a 25-yard eld goal by Feleipe Franks. On the blues next drive, Antonio Morris tore off a 35-yard run for a TD. Franks added his run on the next drive. Bucky McGlammery played well as the white team quarterback, and had strong runs from Monterrious Loggins and Derek Allen. The spring game is Friday night, May 30, at home against Trinity Catholic. Wakullas elite soccer players make nals in the Nike Championship CupLucas Briggs saves a goal. FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Family Coastal Restaurant All You Can Eat SeafoodCome Join us for our Grand Opening! May 31st all day from 11am to 7pmAUCE Sefood Specials$199 Appetizers* 850 962-2920*Limit 1 per person per table

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Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARJ LAWAnd they left without a trace. Lock, stock and barrel, said a cowboy in an old movie. Today, weve heard that phrase many times. Lock, stock and barrel. But what does it mean? I looked up the phrase in Brewers Dictionary of Phrase & Fable. According to Brewer, lock, stock and barrel means: the whole of anything; in entirety. The lock, stock and barrel of the gun make a complete old-time rearm. Back in the late 1600s and the 1700s, guns were made in three parts: the lock, the stock and the barrel. And back in those old days, you could purchase these parts at different places, and then assemble your gun. The lock is the mechanism that houses the hammer and usually includes the trigger in an old black powder or percussion cap gun. You could find your locks at a locksmith or a watchmaker. The stock is the wooden part that holds the gun together. It cradles the barrel and is attached to the lock mechanism. Carpenters usually made the stocks. If you didnt have a lot of money, you might have made the stock yourself! Machinists or blacksmiths made barrels. Then again, in those old days, you either found someone to t these parts together, which were not standardized, or you took your chances and gured out how to do it yourself. Later, though, places like the Lancaster School in Pennsylvania built and taught people how to put together ri es. So today, when you hear your spouse demand that the children pick up their rooms lock, stock and barrel, youll know what that means. And, by the tone of voice, your kids will gure it out too.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.outdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Learning about the phrase Lock, stock and barrel HOME ON THE RANGE CHAINSAW $34900 SPECIAL OF THE WEEKMS250 Identi cation on a black powder gun of a lock, a stock and a barrel.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFrom DEP NewsSea turtle nesting has begun in Florida and will continue through the end of October. On May 8, a loggerhead sea turtle nest was discovered at the Guana Tolomato Matanzas National Estuarine Research Reserve beach. The nest was spotted by the reserves sea turtle patrol, a volunteer-based effort for monitoring and evaluating sea turtle nests. In April, these volunteers began monitoring and evaluating this seasons nests on the reserves beach, seven days a week. Floridas shallow bays and estuaries provide important habitats for threatened and endangered sea turtles. The Sunshine State accounts for 90 percent of sea turtle nests in the continental United States and ve of the worlds seven beach-nesting species of sea turtles, including the loggerhead, green turtle, leatherback, hawksbill and the rarest and most endangered sea turtle the Kemps ridley. Sea turtles are part of Floridas unique and dynamic natural environment, said Kevin Claridge, director of DEPs Florida Coastal Of ce. They are a vibrant part of what makes this state so special. We know people love turtles and every beach-goer can help increase their survival rate during nesting and hatching season. Residents are most likely to encounter the loggerhead sea turtle, named for its prominently featured block-like head. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission report that the contiguous beaches from Brevard to Palm Beach counties are the most important loggerhead nesting sites in the Western Hemisphere. These beaches typically see 15,000 nesting loggerheads in a year. Overall, Florida can expect 40,000 to 60,000 sea turtle nests by seasons end. Adult female sea turtles can come from as far as the West Coast of Africa to breed and nest on Florida beaches. A typical female may lay 85-120 ping-pong sized eggs in one sitting and repeat this process up to eight times in one nesting season. Once deposited, incubation lasts for approximately two months. To minimize disturbance to nesting sea turtles, residents and visitors are advised to heed the following tips: Use sea turtle friendly lighting. Use low-power and low-frequency lighting angled downward to the ground. Residents and establishments close to the beach should pay special attention to cover xtures as much as possible and keep them off when not needed; Refrain from re and reworks; Keep the beach clear. Do not litter or leave behind beach equipment. Demolish sandcastles and ll in holes. Consider cleaning up litter spotted around you; Respect zones around nests and on the dunes. Keep back to avoid accidentally stepping on eggs; DO NOT disturb females while they nest. Feel free to observe from a safe distance without making excessive noise; Report sightings to 1-800-404FWCC. Workers and volunteers can mark off the area to help prevent inadvertent damage; and If you spot a stranded or trapped female turtle call the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission at 1-800-404-FWCC.From FWC NewsThis report represents some events the FWC handled over the past week, May 1622. However, it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. LIBERTY COUNTY: On Saturday night, Lt. Parker observed two vehicles parked in the northern section of the Apalachicola Forest. The occupants were using lights as they walked in several locations in the wooded area. A closer check revealed the subjects were trying to catch their dogs. The individuals, one being from Liberty County and the other one from Calhoun County, were cited for running deer with dogs during closed season. On Thursday night, Of cers Mims and Henderson taught a boating safety class to students and their parents at the Tolar School near Bristol. There were approximately 80 students and parents in attendance. SANTA ROSA COUNTY: Officer Hutchinson and Investigator Hughes were checking a sherman at Carpenters Park when Of cer Hutchinson observed a bag containing cannabis under the console. Upon further inspection, more cannabis was located, in addition to several prescription pills including what appeared to be oxycodone and amphetamine. Officer Hutchinson issued the man a notice to appear for possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis. The pills will be sent to FDLE for identi cation. Of cer Hutchinson and Investigator Hughes were checking fishermen at the Simpson River Fishing Pier when they observed a subject quickly hide something upon seeing the of cers. After speaking to him, they discovered that he had hidden a cannabis joint. He was also in possession of alcoholic beverages and was not yet 21. The subjects companion admitted to giving him the beer. The of cers issued the one subject a notice to appear for possession of not more than 20 grams of cannabis and possession of alcoholic beverages by a person under the age of 21 and the other subject a notice to appear for giving alcoholic beverages to a person under 21. Officer Barnard and Lt. Hahr were just leaving the boat ramp at Smiths Fish Camp when a boat returned to the ramp. The of cers conducted a boating safety inspection and observed indicators of impairment from the operator. The man performed very poorly on eld sobriety tasks and was arrested for BUI. The mans girlfriend was present and her car was parked at the boat ramp. The of cers noticed a glass drug pipe lying in the center console of the vehicle. The woman admitted that she had smoked cannabis from the pipe earlier. The woman was issued a notice to appear for possession of drug paraphernalia. The man submitted to a breath test, but due to the damage at the Escambia County Jail, he had to be taken to Gulf Breeze Police Department for the test. Approximately 2.5 hours after the stop, the man provided a breath sample of .100 BAC. Additionally, a bag of crushed pills were located in the boat. They appeared to be Xanax, but positive identi cation was not possible. The pills will be sent to FDLE for analysis. Officer Clark received information that an individual had been keeping over the bag limit of red drum near Galvez Landing. Officer Clark observed an individual that fit the description given returning to Galvez Landing. The subject was in possession of two legal red drum. Upon questioning the individual, he admitted having some additional sh in a cooler in the back of truck. There were four additional red drum in the cooler, one of which was undersized. Of cer Clark issued the subject a notice to appear for the violations. Of cers Manning and Hoomes received information about a picture of speared goliath grouper being posted on Facebook. Officers Hoomes and Manning were able to track down two individuals involved in spearing the fish. After interviewing the subjects the fish was retrieved from a nearby dumpster. A warrant was obtained for the violation.Florida sea turtle nesting season is here Marine reptiles use Sunshine State to start new lifeFWC Law Enforcement report

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 13 Thank you to Jack West for submitting the following article and pictures. As mentioned last week, National Safe Boating Week was held May 17-23. The event week, held annually the week before Memorial Day weekend, aims at improving boater behavior through education, awareness and training. This years areas of emphasis included life jackets, signaling devices, marine-band radios, oat plans, vessel safety checks, boating safety courses, and boating under the inuence. In conjunction with National Safe Boating Week and the Memorial Day holiday weekend, Flotilla 12 performed vessel safety checks May 24 at the St. Marks Boat Ramp adjacent to the San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park. Six members of the otilla provided free checks to recreational boaters hitting the water, many for the rst time this year. Twenty vessels were checked with 17 receiving the sticker indicating they had all of the required equipment and paperwork aboard at the time of the check. Some of the things the vessel safety checks look for include the vessels registration, personal otation devices, and signal ares among other things. The vessels registration must be in it anytime the vessel is on the water. There must be a PFD readily available, and in the proper size, for each person on the vessel. There must be unexpired signal ares on the vessel even if there are older expired ares also present. Having the sticker on your vessel doesnt guarantee you wont be stopped by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission or the Coast Guard, but it does help decrease the probability that youll be stopped if youre not doing anything reckless. All vessel operators were encouraged to have a copy of both the State of Florida and the federal boating regulations aboard their vessels. Much like driving a vehicle on land, ignorance of the law is no excuse when operating a vessel on the water. Flotilla 12 focuses on vessel safety checks each of the three major holiday weekends that occur during the summer. Just like they did this past weekend, our members will be at the St. Marks Boat Ramp on the Fourth of July weekend as well as the Labor Day weekend. If youre interested in a free vessel examination, send an email to our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Vessel Examinations at fso-ve@ uscgaux.net If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net then contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident Being prepared is your best defense! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Talk underwater? Communications underwater is fundamentally the same as in air, with the obvious difference that the density of water is 800 times greater than air. We are so used to talking while standing as our primary form of communicating on land that swimming prone while breathing from a regulator inserted in the mouth seems awkward. Sound travels four times faster underwater than in air. Cousteaus Silent World is also far from silent, providing amble distractions to interfere with a discussion anyway. How do we cope? First, you must get the ATTENTION of our intended recipient or the effort is useless. Many a surprised sh has wondered what the diver is trying to say to his unsuspecting buddy. And why would your buddies spend much time looking at you? They are here to see the reef and share the adventure. We nd touch is the easiest way to get someones attention. You could rap on your tank using a rock or knife, but the sound is not easily directional. We evolved to locate sound in air. In water we would need to move our ears four times further apart to echolocate a sound. The density of the water results in such sounds travelling a great distance and sounds loud. Whales can use low frequency sounds to communicate for thousands of miles. Some divers have attached a power in ator driven whistle on their BC to attract attention. Just remember, all you need to attract is your buddy, and not the local cruising shark or whale. Once you have their attention, a common LANGUAGE is best, to deliver a clear message. Underwater sign language is available in books and is generally understood, but local dialects are common. We might all agree that a hand motion across the neck signi es out of air, but in Jamaica it means dangerous marine life in the area. Some have adopted the American Deaf Mute sign language, where each letter is spelled out. I used this method when I lived underwater. It takes time to master, is slower spelling out words, and can be humorous if your spelling is poor. Of course you can write on a slate. Write big letters that are easily seen. There is an underwater Etch-asketch device exactly like the childs toy that works well but is bulky. Several years ago we used an underwater scroll, rolled up in a device secured to ones arm. I could be tted with any number of options from just blank paper to sh identi cation lists for sh survey. My favorite is a small notebook, carried in a pouch, with pages of underwater paper that I can ip through at will. Beware what you write to your buddy. I once had a group of early divers with me on a checkout dive in the Florida Keys. I found a Snook under a ledge, not something you might usually see on the reef. I lacked the ability to write or sign what I saw so I got everyone together and began writing on the sand. I did get them to recognize the letter S before they bolted for the boat, and got out. The third requirement for underwater communications is a REPEAT of the signal. The purpose is to assure the giver that the buddy knows that there is a shark over there. Put the open hand up and move it forward (shark), two ngers point to your eyes (look), then point in the direction of the incoming creature. Command signs require immediate action, such as I need air. The correct response is to push a regulator mouth piece toward the requesting diver, NOT pulling your hand across your neck again. Rebreather divers just talk! Our large ambient pressure hoses vibrate like a speaker permitting close contact communications. And that is when you realize the inability to talk underwater is one of the reasons diving is so delightful. Enjoy the Silent World with all of its sounds (but missing the chatter of words) and economize your signs to just what is essential. Oh, and laughing is allowed, but expect your mask to ood. By the way, we need a new hand sign for LIONFISH. Any ideas? Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday y Thu May 29, 14 Fri May 30, 14 Sat May 31, 14 Sun Jun 1, 14 Mon Jun 2, 14 Tue Jun 3, 14 Wed Jun 4, 14 Date 3.3 ft. 3:45 AM 3.3 ft. 4:21 AM 3.3 ft. 4:56 AM 3.2 ft. 5:32 AM 3.1 ft. 6:09 AM High 1.4 ft. 8:52 AM 1.4 ft. 9:28 AM 1.4 ft. 10:04 AM 1.4 ft. 10:41 AM 1.5 ft. 11:23 AM 0.3 ft. 12:12 AM 0.6 ft. 12:49 AM Low 4.0 ft. 2:50 PM 3.9 ft. 3:22 PM 3.8 ft. 3:54 PM 3.7 ft. 4:27 PM 3.5 ft. 5:03 PM 3.1 ft. 6:49 AM 3.0 ft. 7:35 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:01 PM -0.2 ft. 10:35 PM -0.1 ft. 11:07 PM 0.1 ft. 11:39 PM 1.6 ft. 12:11 PM 1.6 ft. 1:10 PM Low 3.3 ft. 5:45 PM 3.0 ft. 6:37 PM High y Thu May 29, 14 Fri May 30, 14 Sat May 31, 14 Sun Jun 1, 14 Mon Jun 2, 14 Tue Jun 3, 14 Wed Jun 4, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 3:37 AM 2.5 ft. 4:13 AM 2.4 ft. 4:48 AM 2.4 ft. 5:24 AM 2.4 ft. 6:01 AM High 1.0 ft. 9:03 AM 1.0 ft. 9:39 AM 1.0 ft. 10:15 AM 1.1 ft. 10:52 AM 1.1 ft. 11:34 AM 0.3 ft. 12:23 AM 0.4 ft. 1:00 AM Low 3.0 ft. 2:42 PM 3.0 ft. 3:14 PM 2.9 ft. 3:46 PM 2.8 ft. 4:19 PM 2.6 ft. 4:55 PM 2.3 ft. 6:41 AM 2.3 ft. 7:27 AM High -0.2 ft. 10:12 PM -0.2 ft. 10:46 PM -0.0 ft. 11:18 PM 0.1 ft. 11:50 PM 1.1 ft. 12:22 PM 1.2 ft. 1:21 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:37 PM 2.2 ft. 6:29 PM High y Thu May 29, 14 Fri May 30, 14 Sat May 31, 14 Sun Jun 1, 14 Mon Jun 2, 14 Tue Jun 3, 14 Wed Jun 4, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 4:21 AM 3.1 ft. 4:57 AM 3.0 ft. 5:32 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:56 AM 1.3 ft. 10:32 AM 1.3 ft. 11:08 AM -0.1 ft. 12:11 AM 0.1 ft. 12:43 AM 0.3 ft. 1:16 AM 0.5 ft. 1:53 AM Low 3.7 ft. 3:26 PM 3.7 ft. 3:58 PM 3.6 ft. 4:30 PM 3.0 ft. 6:08 AM 2.9 ft. 6:45 AM 2.9 ft. 7:25 AM 2.8 ft. 8:11 AM High -0.3 ft. 11:05 PM -0.2 ft. 11:39 PM 1.3 ft. 11:45 AM 1.4 ft. 12:27 PM 1.4 ft. 1:15 PM 1.5 ft. 2:14 PM Low 3.5 ft. 5:03 PM 3.3 ft. 5:39 PM 3.0 ft. 6:21 PM 2.8 ft. 7:13 PM High y Thu May 29, 14 Fri May 30, 14 Sat May 31, 14 Sun Jun 1, 14 Mon Jun 2, 14 Tue Jun 3, 14 Wed Jun 4, 14 Date 2.6 ft. 3:29 AM 2.6 ft. 4:05 AM 2.5 ft. 4:40 AM 2.5 ft. 5:16 AM 2.4 ft. 5:53 AM 2.4 ft. 6:33 AM High 1.4 ft. 8:31 AM 1.4 ft. 9:07 AM 1.4 ft. 9:43 AM 1.4 ft. 10:20 AM 1.5 ft. 11:02 AM 1.5 ft. 11:50 AM 0.6 ft. 12:28 AM Low 3.1 ft. 2:34 PM 3.1 ft. 3:06 PM 3.0 ft. 3:38 PM 2.9 ft. 4:11 PM 2.7 ft. 4:47 PM 2.5 ft. 5:29 PM 2.3 ft. 7:19 AM High -0.3 ft. 9:40 PM -0.2 ft. 10:14 PM -0.1 ft. 10:46 PM 0.1 ft. 11:18 PM 0.3 ft. 11:51 PM 1.6 ft. 12:49 PM Low 2.3 ft. 6:21 PM High y Thu May 29, 14 Fri May 30, 14 Sat May 31, 14 Sun Jun 1, 14 Mon Jun 2, 14 Tue Jun 3, 14 Wed Jun 4, 14 Date 3.4 ft. 3:42 AM 3.4 ft. 4:18 AM 3.3 ft. 4:53 AM 3.3 ft. 5:29 AM 3.2 ft. 6:06 AM High 1.5 ft. 8:49 AM 1.5 ft. 9:25 AM 1.5 ft. 10:01 AM 1.6 ft. 10:38 AM 1.6 ft. 11:20 AM 0.4 ft. 12:09 AM 0.6 ft. 12:46 AM Low 4.1 ft. 2:47 PM 4.0 ft. 3:19 PM 3.9 ft. 3:51 PM 3.8 ft. 4:24 PM 3.6 ft. 5:00 PM 3.1 ft. 6:46 AM 3.1 ft. 7:32 AM High -0.4 ft. 9:58 PM -0.2 ft. 10:32 PM -0.1 ft. 11:04 PM 0.1 ft. 11:36 PM 1.7 ft. 12:08 PM 1.8 ft. 1:07 PM Low 3.3 ft. 5:42 PM 3.0 ft. 6:34 PM High y Thu May 29, 14 Fri May 30, 14 Sat May 31, 14 Sun Jun 1, 14 Mon Jun 2, 14 Tue Jun 3, 14 Wed Jun 4, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 4:57 AM 2.5 ft. 5:30 AM 2.5 ft. 6:01 AM 2.5 ft. 6:30 AM 2.5 ft. 7:01 AM 2.5 ft. 7:32 AM High 1.7 ft. 8:12 AM 1.7 ft. 8:50 AM 1.6 ft. 9:32 AM 1.6 ft. 10:19 AM 1.5 ft. 11:13 AM 1.4 ft. 12:16 PM 0.3 ft. 12:04 AM Low 2.9 ft. 1:42 PM 2.8 ft. 2:20 PM 2.8 ft. 3:02 PM 2.7 ft. 3:47 PM 2.5 ft. 4:37 PM 2.3 ft. 5:33 PM 2.6 ft. 8:04 AM High -0.3 ft. 9:26 PM -0.2 ft. 9:58 PM -0.1 ft. 10:29 PM 0.0 ft. 10:59 PM 0.2 ft. 11:30 PM 1.3 ft. 1:29 PM Low 2.1 ft. 6:41 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 29 June 4First June 5 Full June 13 Last June 19 New June 272:00 am-4:00 am 2:25 pm-4:25 pm 7:25 am-8:25 am 9:24 pm-10:24 pm 2:50 am-4:50 am 3:15 pm-5:15 pm 8:15 am-9:15 am 10:12 pm-11:12 pm 3:40 am-5:40 am 4:04 pm-6:04 pm 9:06 am-10:06 am 10:56 pm-11:56 pm 4:27 am-6:27 am 4:51 pm-6:51 pm 9:58 am-l0:58 am 11:37 pm-12:37 am 5:13 am-7:13 am 5:36 pm-7:36 pm 10:51 am-11:51 am -:--:5:58 arn-7:58 am 6:20 pm-8:20 pm 12:15 am-l:15 am 11:43 am-12:43 pm 6:42 am-8:42 am 7:03 pm-9:0J pm 12:50 am-1:5O am 12:35 pm-1:35 pm Best Better Good Average Avernqe Avernge Average6:37 am 8:32 pm 7:26 am 9:25 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:36 am 8:32 pm 8:16 am 10:13 pm 6:36 am 8:33 pm 9:07 am 10:58 pm 6:36 am 8:33 pm 9:59 am 11:38 pm 6:36 am 8:34 pm 10:52 am --:-6:36 am 8:34 pm 11:44 am 12:16 am 6:35 am 8:35 pm 12:36 pm 12:51 am3% 10% 16% 22% 28% 34% 40%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Raye Crews and Phil Hill conducting a VE, above, and Steve Hults reviewing information with a boat owner, right.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Friday, May 16, Shane Ebright of Crawfordville reported the theft of groceries. The victim met a friend who offered to drive him home from the store in exchange for gasoline. The suspect went to Murphy Oil for gasoline as the victim went into Wal-Mart. When the victim returned the suspect was gone. The groceries and personal property left in the suspects vehicle is valued at $175. Sgt. Lorne Whaley made contact with the suspect who refused to return the stolen items. An arrest warrant has been requested for the suspect. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: WEDNESDAY, MAY 14 Michele Barwick of Panacea reported the theft of a rearm. The weapon was taken from her home. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Edith Williams of Tallahassee reported a vehicle theft. The victim left her vehicle at Binkys Everything Automotive when it was stolen. A suspect has been identi ed. The vehicle was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Adam Pendris and Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. THURSDAY, MAY 15 Kim Gilly of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A purse was stolen from the vehicle. The purse and contents are valued at $200. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Brandy Whited of Sopchoppy reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of $95 from inside her unsecured vehicle. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Kristina Clemons of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the loss of $30 from her unsecured vehicle. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Amy Parker of Crawfordville reported two vehicle burglaries. Lottery tickets and a ashlight, valued at $35, were reported missing from two vehicles at her home. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Maria Cooper of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The vehicle was left unsecured and was ransacked but nothing was reported missing. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. Roger Waters of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A rearm and a chainsaw were stolen from the vehicle. The vehicle was left unsecured. The stolen property is valued at $605. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Charles Smith of Sopchoppy reported the burglary of a structure. Antique furniture was stolen following a forced entry. The furniture was valued at $950 and damage to the building was estimated at $415. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Krystal Shephard of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims personal information to file a Workers Compensation claim. The claim was led in Miami and the victim is employed in Crawfordville. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. Ronnie Arnitage of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost $32 from inside his unlocked vehicle. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. James Miller of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Someone in Miami ordered a new credit card using the victims personal information. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated a two vehicle traf c crash at the Livestock Pavilion. There were no injuries and minor damage to the vehicles along with a broken car window. Thomas Bentley of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim discovered a nail in one of his vehicle tires. Damage was estimated at $86. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. John Metcalf of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Coins, jewelry and a knife were stolen. They are valued at $226. A forced entry was observed and damage was estimated at $20. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. FRIDAY, MAY 16 Deputy Mike Crum investigated a two vehicle traffic crash on Wakulla Springs Road. There were no injuries. Linda Rhodes of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim observed damage to a window screen and window frame. Damage was estimated at $105. Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Two computers were reported stolen after staff observed a suspect cut the security wire. The suspect was observed on store security video and Deputy Matt Helms spoke to the suspect at his home. The computers were observed in the home in plain view. The laptops were found damaged and stripped of parts. Dwayne Anthony Creery, 42, of Crawfordville was charged with grand theft. The stolen property was valued at $1,121. Creery was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deborah McCaffrey of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A juvenile created $190 worth of damage to the bushes in her yard. The juvenile was going to be charged with criminal mischief until the victim declined to press charges. He was released to the custody of his parents. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. George Ellis Schipper III, 26, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks performed a traf c stop when the suspect vehicle was unable to maintain a single lane. The driver said he was attempting to miss wildlife in the roadway. It was determined the subjects license was suspended for failure to appear on two trafc summonses in Leon County. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. SATURDAY, MAY 17 Mary Paulic of Crawfordville reported the theft of a pressure washer from her carport. The washer is valued at $300. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. Megan Cooper of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on her bank card for satellite television services in the amount of $99. Deputy Ashley McAlister and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated a case of a 76-year-old Santa Clarita, CA woman collapsing inside the Stop and Save on Spring Creek Highway. Wakulla EMS transported her to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital where she was pronounced deceased. Hospital staff deemed the death natural and the investigation was closed. Detective Randy Phillips and Wakulla EMS also investigated. Winn-Dixie Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Store staff observed a female subject pay for a few items in the self checkout line and leave the store without paying for the rest of her food. Sgt. Ryan Muse located the suspect vehicle in Crawfordville. The subject said it was a misunderstanding and returned to the store and paid for the merchandise. A trespass warning was issued against the subject for the store. Sgt. Lorne Whaley investigated. SUNDAY, MAY 18 Deputy Ward Kromer was investigating a Crawfordville complaint when he observed drug paraphernalia, burnt marijuana cigarettes and white powder residue in plain view inside a home. The items are believed to belong to a subject who was arrested on unrelated charges. Without being able to prove ownership, the items were seized for destruction and turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Matt Hedges were investigating a welfare call when they observed illegal narcotics inside a vehicle at the investigation scene. Crack cocaine was recovered from a plastic bag inside a suspect vehicle. Shawn Versailes Brown, 41, of Apalachicola was arrested for possession of 2.1 grams of crack cocaine. Brown was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. His vehicle was seized. Sgt. Lorne Whaley, Deputy Matt Helms and CSI Rae Eddens investigated. Sherry Hall of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of medications from her home. The missing property is valued at $500. Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Christina Dodson of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary and criminal mischief. The victim entered her vehicle and discovered burn marks on her roof liner. Damage was estimated at $150. The victim also reported the loss of $120 from her vehicle. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Timothy Barr of Crawfordville reported the theft of a firearm from his home. The rearm is valued at $359. Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. Melissa Webster of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The vehicle was taken from the victims yard and a suspect has been identi ed. The vehicle was entered in the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy David Pienta and Deputy Richard Moon investigated. MONDAY, MAY 19 Bryan Lalonde of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Two unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank card. A total of $90 was made through Wal-Mart online. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Matthew Howell of the county road department located a cellular telephone at the intersection of Dogwood Drive and Ochlockonee Street. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough was unable to locate an owner. The phone was turned into the Property and Evidence Division. Carol Canellas of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victims credit card had $549 worth of unauthorized charges from Xbox. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. Leah Poppell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of a drum set and currency valued at $360. It is unclear if the theft occurred in Wakulla or Leon counties. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. Donna Chatham of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of a bicycle from her home. The bike was taken from the victims front porch. A scooter was recovered in a ditch nearby and was turned over to the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. The bike was recovered May 20 while Deputy Pendris was investigating another theft in the Medart area. TUESDAY, MAY 20 Demond Vantez Fields, 38, of Tallahassee was arrested on drug charges following a trafc stop. Deputy Stephen Simmons observed an expired vehicle tag and stopped Fields. Deputy Simmons observed a half consumed open beer container on the seat. The deputy was granted permission to search the vehicle and he observed a bag of marijuana and cocaine. The marijuana weighed 1.5 grams. Fields was charged with possession of cocaine, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. A verbal warning was issued for the expired tag and open container. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Kenny Godbolt of Riversprings Middle School reported the theft of a trailer ball from a county vehicle. The ball is valued at $30. Deputy Nick Boutwell investigated. George Davis of Baconton, Ga. reported the theft of a propeller from his boat motor in Crawfordville. The prop is valued at $200. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. John Whitfield of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim lost a dirt bike from his garage. While investigating the theft of the dirt bike, Deputy Adam Pendris was made aware of a bicycle in a ditch across the street from the victims home. Deputy Pendris discovered that it was the same bike that was reported stolen on May 19. The bike was returned to the owner. The dirt bike is valued at $1,000. It was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Sgt. Danny Harrell also investigated. Michael Hollett of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed 18 fraudulent charges on his bank account. The charges totaled $1,335 through Turbo Tax. Deputy Mike Zimba and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. John C. Burnett of Tallahassee and Debra A. Finch of Crawfordville were involved in a two vehicle traf c crash at the intersection of Navajo Trail and Apache Road in Crawfordville. There were no injuries and minor damage to the vehicles. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. WEDNESDAY, MAY 21 Marion Reynolds of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A fuel tank was stolen from the victims boat. The tank and fuel inside is valued at $120. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Lisa Varnum of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered four unauthorized charges on her bank card that were created at restaurants in Hammond, Ind. The charges are valued at $117. Two other charges were attempted in Texas and Ohio but they did not process. Sgt. Ray Johnson and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Dave Sheffield of Tallahassee reported a construction dumpster trailer re on Old Bethel Road in Crawfordville. The trailer was fully engulfed when Deputy Vicki Mitchell arrived on scene. The Wakulla Fire Department put out the re which included some burning brush nearby. The cause of the re has not been determined but it does not appear to be suspicious. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,272 calls for service during the past week.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 A 15-year-old Apalachicola male juvenile wanted for escaping custody while on a transport to the juvenile detention center in Tallahassee on May 19 was arrested in Apalachicola on May 20, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office assisted the Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce in attempting to locate the juvenile who was reported missing by Franklin County at 5:38 p.m. The search for the juvenile included the Wakulla County Correctional Institution K-9 Unit, Franklin County Correctional Institution K-9 Unit, Florida Highway Patrol (FHP), Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC), WCSO and Franklin County Sheriffs Of ce. Law Enforcement of cers continued the search until 11:10 p.m. before calling it off for the night. There were helicopters in the area at the time of the search but they were not part of the law enforcement operation. On May 20, Franklin County Sheriffs Office deputies arrested the escaped teenager at his home. The juvenile was being transported to juvenile detention by a Franklin County deputy when he asked to use the restroom at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. The juvenile escaped from custody at that time by running from the deputy. The juvenile was transported back to the Wakulla County Jail where he was booked on the escape charge. He was released back to the custody of the Franklin Sheriffs Of ce. The juvenile is facing charges of burglary, dealing in stolen property and grand theft in Franklin County. Deputy Will Hudson, Lt. Brent Sanders, Sgt. Ryan Muse, Deputy Gibby Gibson, Captain Chris Savary and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated from the WCSO.Juvenile captured after escape

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 15Special to The News The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has released 2013 index crime statistics for Wakulla County and the county has experienced a 17.9 percent drop in index crimes from 2012 to 2013. Index crimes include murder, forcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny and motor vehicle theft. FDLE also released a crime comparison of all 67 counties and Wakulla County ranked eighth best in the state for reduction of crime rate from 2012 to 2013 making the county one of the safest in Florida. The crime statistics create a crime rate percentage per 100,000 residents to allow a comparison of all 67 counties. Wakulla County did not have any murders in 2012 or in 2013. The number of forcible sex offenses declined from 31 in 2012 to 17 in 2013 or a 45.2 percent decrease. All of the sex offenses were down as forcible rapes dropped from 14 to 10 and forcible fondling dropped from 17 to seven. There were no cases of forcible sodomy in 2012 or 2013. Robberies remained the same as there were four reported in 2012 and four reported in 2013. Aggravated assaults dropped by one as 57 were reported in 2012 and 56 were reported in 2013. Burglaries dropped sharply as 149 were reported in 2012 and 102 were reported in 2013 or a 31.5 percent drop. Larceny cases dropped from 513 in 2012 to 435 in 2013 or a 15.2 percent drop. The largest number of larceny cases was reported from motor vehicles. In 2013, 104 larceny cases stemmed from motor vehicle thefts. The second largest number came from buildings at 72 cases. Larceny cases went down in every type of incident except motor vehicle theft cases. Building larcenies went down 33.3 percent. The only area where Wakulla County saw an index crime increase was in motor vehicle thefts. There were 22 motor vehicle thefts in 2012 and 23 in 2013 or a 4.5 percent increase. There were 776 index crimes reported in 2012 and 637 in 2013. Of the 637 crimes reported 77 were violent and 560 were nonviolent. In 2013, violent crime dropped 16.3 percent and non-violent crime dropped 18.1 percent. FDLE also included a 0.3 percent increase in Wakulla population from 2012 to 2013 or 30,771 to 30,869 residents. A review of domestic violence offenses showed a 15 percent decrease from 2012 to 2013 as 80 cases were reported in 2012 and 68 were reported in 2013. FDLE lists $238,674 worth of stolen property being recovered by the WCSO out of a total of $734,778 worth of property stolen. Three out of the last ve years Wakulla County has seen a reduction in the total number of index crimes, but 2013 was the lowest number of crimes reported with 637. In the previous four years at least 765 index crimes were reported. In domestic violence cases, the 68 cases included 20 that were cohabitants to the offender, 12 were children of the offender, 11 were spouses of offenders, nine were parents, eight were other family members, ve were siblings, and three were listed as other. In vehicle recovery cases nine were stolen locally and recovered locally while eight were stolen locally and recovered by another jurisdiction. In 2013, the WCSO arrested 49 juveniles with 15 arrested for index crimes and 34 arrests for other offenses. Of the 49 juveniles, 31 were males and 18 were females. The WCSO also arrested 709 adults in 2013 with 152 index crime arrests and 557 for other offenses. Of the adult total, 524 were male and 185 were female. Sheriff Charlie Creel said the reasons behind the improvements include a better line of communication between the various divisions within the agency. He also credited the success to keeping a closer eye on county hot spots when they are identi ed for a particular incident and increasing patrols in that area. Saturation patrols have been used to ght motorists who are impaired and underage drinking incidents. He also added that the WCSO has closely examined the agency resources and analyzed the best methods to deploy the resources. The sheriffs office held public meetings in 2013 to raise awareness among residents related to criminal activity in speci c areas of the county as well as forming a partnership with the school district to address anti-bullying measures. While not considered by the FDLE as an index crime, Sheriff Creel said Wakulla County recorded 236 driving while license suspended or revoked arrests in 2013. Many of the individuals who have been stopped for DWLSR do not possess vehicle insurance which puts the burden on the insured public when an uninsured motorist gets into a traf c crash. Wakulla Countys crime rate percentage improved from 2012 to 2013 as it became 18.2 percent less likely for residents to become victims of crimes. The ranking placed Wakulla County behind only Bradford, Calhoun, Franklin, Gilchrist, Indian River, Lafayette and Levy counties for lowering crime rates. The State of Florida recorded a 3.8 percent decline in index crimes when comparing 2012 with 2013. The state also had a 4.7 percent reduction in its crime rate. Wakulla County cleared 33 percent of its cases in 2013. The state average was 26 percent. Today we have more good news for families, Gov. Rick Scott said. Even while Floridas population grows, the total number of crimes continues to drop, which is a testament to our brave men and women who serve in our communities each and every day. Florida is now at a 43-year crime low. Our lower crime rate means that not only are our families and communities safer, but Florida is in a better position to create more opportunities for Floridians. This drop in crime shows everyone that Florida really is the best place to raise a family. Making Florida a safe place to live, work, and raise a family is my main goal, said Attorney General Pam Bondi, and thanks to the hard work of our superior law enforcement officers and prosecutors, we have the lowest crime rate in 43 years. I am grateful to all of the public servants who work tirelessly to make our communities safer. Their work has made a tremendous difference, as evidenced by a crime rate that has dropped for the past three consecutive years. It is noteworthy, that while our population continues to increase, overall crime continues to decrease, said Florida Department of Law Enforcement Commissioner Gerald Bailey. My thanks to Floridas dedicated law enforcement professionals for making this a better place to live.Crime rate falls, Wakulla ranks as one of safest countiesFDLE crime statistics show Wakulla down 17.9 percent in violent and non-violent crimeBy DANIELLE PETERSONSpecial to The NewsIn memory of both Julie and Jerry Davis. Take a moment and ask yourself: What is NAMI Wakulla? Why should I contact NAMI Wakulla? When should I contact NAMI Wakulla? How important is NAMI Wakulla to our community? Before you answer, let me share with you a very tragic story about dear friends and neighbors of mine, Jerry and Julie Davis. When my family moved to Wakulla County we immediately met all of our neighbors with the exception of the couple that lived across the street. Finally the day came when we met Jerry and Julie. An older couple, been married 40-plus years, Jerry was a retired Pan Am pilot, Julie a homemaker, with two grown sons. Jerry liked to take his boat out and sh occasionally but had to stay close to home because Julie suffered from a mental illness and could not be left alone for long periods of time. As time passed, we became good friends. It was dif cult to have a close relationship with Julie due to the struggles she faced day to day. Jerry con ded in us and shared that Julie had become a victim to mental illness/schizophrenia during her 2nd pregnancy, which got worse as time passed. This disease made their lives very dif cult. The boys had no recollection of a normal mother. Their memories consisted of coming home from school and nding her overdosed, slashed wrists, house in disarray from a tantrum with herself. During this time, it was taboo to discuss mental illness. The disease was typically treated with heavy drugs, shock treatments and most of the time institutionalization. Julie did take medicine, had shock therapy and experienced numerous hospital stays but NEVER institutionalized. Every day was different with Julie. When Julies medication was taken properly, she was a different person. We were able to share many good days, lots of smiles, and lots of laughs. Jerrys life revolved around taking care of Julie, trying to keep her smiling, protecting her when needed (she loved to walk their dogs in the neighborhood, but would sometimes forget how to get back home and he would watch for her and would go meet her making her think he was joining her on her walk.) Jerry would take her out to appointments, shopping, lunch, senior center, church, etc. Jerry was her husband and caregiver. As time progressed, Julies bad days became more frequent than the good days. She never hesitated to call the sheriffs ofce when she thought something was wrong, and unfortunately the sheriffs of ce was also called many times on her as well. She would see someone in the neighborhood and overstay her welcome, the neighbor would call Jerry and he would go and try to get her to come home. There were some times he would be successful and other times she would become belligerent and the sheriffs of ce would be called. They would come and help settle her down or in some cases would speak to her and she would volunteer to be Baker Acted. Julie, at times, made serious accusations on deputies and others stating these individuals made inappropriate acts toward her. She had trespass warnings placed against her from several organizations like churches, doctors offices, etc., here in Wakulla County because of her aggressive/unstable behavior. I never could understand why some of the places she would visit and attend regularly would not take the time and assist her with the proper direction or help instead of placing trespass warnings against her making it more difcult for her and Jerry to cope. Jerrys shing buddies eventually quit calling or coming by, actually most everyone stopped coming by. Then, December 14, 2004, arrived. Jerry went to the sheriffs of ce and reported that upon his return from running an errand in Tallahassee, Julie was not home and he could not nd her. She had left before and made her way to the bus station and traveled to a relatives home in north Georgia, but this time was different, her belongings were still at home. At this time, our family had moved to another area of Wakulla County but we stayed in touch with Jerry. This day he called us and we began looking for her and passed out missing persons yers. The sheriffs of ce had many questions for Jerry, which concerned us. We too spoke numerous times with the sheriffs of ce, sharing our opinion that Jerry had nothing to do with Julies disappearance. At one point during the search I was asked why did I so strongly believe that Jerry didnt have anything to do with Julies disappearance? Because he loved her too much to have done anything wrong to her, I replied. I had asked Jerry in times past why he never chose to put Julie into a hospital or institution, his reply was always the same: She wasnt always like this, if you could have only met her before she became ill. I married her for better or worse, sickness and in health, not lock her up and forget about her. I told Jerry and many others often that he should be commended for the true love he had for her. That tragic day came, Julie was having a very bad day, she became aggressive and violent towards him and things started spiraling out of control and became too much for him and instead of walking away again, Jerry snapped. He strangled her during their altercation, panic set in and then he chose to lay by her side until the next day when he took her and drove to the Florida-Alabama line and left her there. Jerry came home, led a missing persons report, went through the motions of searching, and then the emotional burden and guilt of what he had done became too much for him. Julie died Dec. 11, 2004 at their home. Jerry was arrested for her death. Jerry died March 12, 2014, while serving a 21-year sentence at Lawtey Correctional. All the what ifs have crossed my mind many times. What if, the churches, senior center, doctors of ces and others had taken a different approach? What if there had been services within the county to educate this family? What if I had taken a different approach with our friendship getting Jerry and Julie help and support/education for their sons? I recently had the opportunity to be a celebrity horseowner for the NAMI Wakulla Triple Crown Derby and I learned about NAMI and their services and programs offered here in Wakulla County. They offer support and education programs for not only the person with the mental illness but their families as well, which are all FREE. Not to mention their public programs each month, free to all, educating the community on mental illness. NAMI Connection is one of their support programs for an individual diagnosed with a mental illness, helping them cope and live successful lives. Family-to-Family, another program where family members or caretakers can come and learn how to cope and live productive lives with their loved one who suffers from a mental illness. NAMI also offers a NAMI Basics program for parents who have children who could have a mental illness, not yet diagnosed, or a behavioral issue, learn to cope through education and support for their family to live the best life possible. Theres also the NAMI Basics for Professionals where teachers, guidance counselors, school personnel and others working with young people, can learn about mental illness and practical insights to help students/young people empower themselves and overcome new challenges. In closing, we as a community need to come together and try not to let anyone fall thru the cracks. We cant be afraid to speak about mental illness. We have to make sure individuals who suffer from a mental illness, their families, friends and co-workers know there are resources out there and available to them. Remember mental illness is not something WE choose, it chooses us and it is a disease! Please educate yourself now, dont wait until another tragedy occurs.May is mental health awareness monthA friend and neighbors tragic story of what ifs

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Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThe Wakulla news EXTRA! Friday Night LightsWBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.nethile the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce has a visible presence in the county, much of their behind the scenes work goes overlooked. A ride-along on the evening of May 23 gave insight into what uniformed personnel encounter and accomplish on a typical Friday night. 4:45 p.m. Sgt. Danny Harrell arrives before his shift. Information is passed on from the day shift. Deputy zones are articulated. 5 p.m. Harrell gets into his truck and starts his 12-hour shift. We basically ride around, take calls or initiate calls, depending on whats going on, he says. The rst contact of the day is with a citizen who lost her pet, and called the sheriffs of ce with questions. Dispatchers passed her number onto Sgt. Harrell. She asks if posting lost-pet yers is legal. Harrell gives her the go-ahead to post lost pet signage. You never know what youre going to come across, Harrell said. You have the good and the bad out and about. Its a fun job. You see the best of people, and the worst of people. Its never the same thing. 5:51 p.m. A citizen calls to complain that her ex has not arrived to pick up their children for weekend visitation. Harrell says the sheriffs of ce cannot make her ex ful ll his visitation rights. He advised the caller to document the incident. If it continues, go to court and get the visitation modi ed, Harrell says. Dispatchers receive many calls pertaining to children. Harrell says he has taken several calls from exasperated guardians whose childrens behavior is out of control. He said a rm and authoritative talking-to usually sets the kids straight. 5:58 p.m. Harrell responds to a call involving theft at a residence. The investigation is ongoing, so details cannot be shared. Harrell says he likes working the 12-hour shift. If you dont like getting up early, and if your family can work with you and they dont mind, that helps, Harrell said. 7:24 p.m. Harrell rides to Jenny Lynn Road to assist Deputy Mike Zimba with a call involving illegal dumping. A property owner complains that someone had cut trees and then dumped the trunks on her property. Harrell speaks to the neighbor, who the complainant identi ed as a possible suspect. The neighbor says he had also noticed the logs dumped there, but did not do it. Harrell tells the complainant that he will personally return to cut and remove the logs, and use them for rewood in the future. The night is young, but every person sheriffs of ce employees encountered have been treatedwith dignity and respect no matter the signi cance of their complaint. Everyone has different personalities, Harrell says. Youve just got to learn how to deal with them. 7:44 p.m. Dispatchers direct Harrell to a residence in the Eagles Ridge neighborhood, where a childs bicycle was stolen. Harrell gets information from the family. Even though the bike is gone, the family is smiling and excited as they tell Harrell about holiday weekend plans on their boat. 8:04 p.m. A call is made warning of children walking around the Ridgeway neighborhood with BB guns. Harrell arrives and speaks to children outside. They say who was carrying a BB guns, and that child steps forward. I told the kid to put the BB guns away, and not to use them without adult supervision, Harrell says. Harrell is good with children. He has two kids himself a son in the Army and a daughter who is poised to graduate from Wakulla High School next week, with a softball scholarship and CNA license. His ance has two younger children as well, so communicating with kids comes naturally to him. 8:15 p.m. Another deputy responds to a call of a suspicious vehicle. Its amazing how many people pay attention to whats going on around them, Harrell says. You get some paranoid callers, but a lot of calls lead to arrests or good information. 8:23 p.m. A speeder passes Sgt. Harrell on Martin Luther King Memorial Road. Harrell pursues the vehicle, which turns off on a dirt road. By the time Harrell slows, turns and nds the road, the vehicle is gone. A drive through the neighborhood is unproductive. 8:45 p.m. It is getting dark on Spring Creek Highway. A car passes without headlights on. Harrell pulls the vehicle over and gives the driver a warning. I had no idea, the driver says. 8:53 p.m. Harrell pulls parallel to the gate at Shadeville Elementary School, ips on his speed detector, and takes time to write reports. As a WCSO sergeant, Harrell acts as a shift supervisor, available to eld questions from the public and deputies on shift. He also grades deputy reports and asks for clari cations. A lot of writing and editing is involved in a typical shift. Harrell has worked for the WCSO for 12 years. Previously he worked at the Leon County Jail for seven years. I grew up in Tallahassee, but this is a slower pace, Harrell says. You can get around without pulling your hair out. 9:01 p.m. A vehicle speeds by, going 56 mph in a 45 mph zone on Spring Creek Highway, and Harrell pulls them over. Neither the driver nor passenger has a driver license. Deputy Mike Zimba responds and tickets them at 9:10 p.m. The car is seen abandoned in the spot later in the evening, as the occupants found a ride home. 9:20 p.m. Dispatchers warn of a vehicle, with ames coming from the undercarriage, headed up U.S. Highway 319. The drivers seem unaware of the re. Harrell searches for the vehicle, but never sees it. Other units respond. 9:23 p.m. So many medical calls are pouring in, that there are not enough emergency medical service units to respond. Harrells computer is lit up with red medical calls, and dispatchers say they dont have enough ambulances to reach everyone. EMS is slammed for more than two hours. 9:28 p.m. Harrell responds to a call at Melody Lane, where a young man said he is arguing with his girlfriend, who refuses to leave. He said she is on-foot in the neighborhood. The girlfriend is gone when Harrell arrives, but he does make contact with the boyfriend, who was standing shirtless, phone in hand, on the front porch. He is animated and hyper, and said his girlfriend, who is pregnant, had taken drugs that evening. Insects are thick in the air. Anyone standing outside can be seen swatting and batting at winged pests. 10:37 p.m. Harrell gives a broken-headlight warning to a car heading northbound on US 319. 11:15 p.m. Harrell rides out to Mashes Sands. Young people are assembling with blankets and snacks to watch the meteor shower. Harrell says everything looks under control. Midnight Shell Point Beach is also a meteor-viewing spot for young people. It is dark and the stars are bright. Harrell looks around, and determines that everything is ne. 1:05 a.m. Harrell meets up with Lt. Jimmy Sessor, who is monitoring traf c on US 319. They chat for a while about retirement, and Harrells upcoming wedding and 50th birthday. 1:20 a.m. A car heading southbound on US 319 swerves over the yellow line, and Sessor follows. The car is pulled over at Angies Marine Supply on Coastal Highway 98. Harrell arrives to assist. The young people inside say they are going shing. While suspicious, there is no probable cause to search the vehicle. Turn to Page 17PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAPhotos, from top, Sgt. Danny Harrell returns to the patrol unit after issuing a warning for no headlights. Harrell performs a background check on a suspect; Deputy Will Hudson makes a call in the background. Harrell and Deputy Mike Zimba assist a citizen who called about illegal dumping on her property. Harrell talks to a driver and passenger who were speeding and do not have licenses. Report writing and grading is a big part of working patrols.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 17By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netJanis David does not want to hear people say they are too old or fat to belly dance. Excuse me, David said. Im in my late 50s and I am certainly not thin. David has developed a belly-dancing program for women over 50, and a DVD, called Ageless Belly Dancing with Janis David, Dance with Qi. Qi, or Qi Gong, is a traditional Chinese practice of aligning body, breath, and mind for health, meditation, and martial arts training. David made Qi part of her Ageless Belly Dancing program an artistic expression to improve posture, balance, muscles, joint exibility, endurance, circulation; and to reduce stress. Beyond the physical and spiritual aspects of Ageless Belly Dancing, David said part of her goal is to help women feel good about themselves. So many women over 50 arent valued the way they should be, David said. Thats why I made a DVD. Its my goal to empower women over 50 to continue to feel attractive, spice up their marriage, whatever they want to do. Its called ageless because I believe everyone can belly dance. I want women of all ages, shapes and sizes to realize their beauty. Thats what belly dancing has done for me. David created, produced and edited the DVD, which she describes as the ultimate business card. Original music was created speci cally for the DVD, except the performance song. Though belly dancing has a history stretching back more than 5,000 years, David is known as a modern belly dancer. Belly dancing is cross cultural and takes many different forms, with styles including Egyptian, Arabic, Turkish, Turkish fusion, tribal, Ghawazee and more. David has been dancing since age three, belly dancing for 35 years, and has been teaching in the area for 10 years. I started with all the typical stuff tap, ballet, jazz, acrobatics, David said. She participated in modern dance in high school. I just kept dancing and learning. When David eventually enrolled in a belly dancing class, her teacher was an inspiration. She had thick, black eyeliner and long, black hair, David said. I said, Oh my gosh, I like this on the best! While David has taught belly dancing in centers around Tallahassee, Crawfordville and Woodville, she now teaches out of her home in Crawfordville. One highlight of her career so far was teaching a group 10-to-12-year-old girls belly dancing moves they could perform on a balance beam for a church circus. Each girl has featured move, David said. Snake arms, gure eight it was hilarious fun. They loved it! David also shares the art of belly dancing at parties, bridal showers and dance classes. Of course its hard to pay the bills with belly dancing. David works as a rental property manager, is an independent cosmetics distributor and software developer. David said she is convinced that more women, and men too, should experience the use of their body through dance. I think everybody should dance, David said. Its a healthy thing. Those interested in learning more about belly dancing may call Janis David at 2512192 or Janis@dancewithqi. com. From Previous Page 2 a.m. Harrell checks in at dispatch. Even though it is a holiday weekend, things have quieted down. Dispatchers discuss a previous call from a grandmother, who is raising her 22-year-old daughters ve children. The grandmother claimed her daughter, who is not supposed to have contact, came over and stole the childrens clothing. Harrell said he would deal with the situation at the start of his shift the next afternoon. 2:20 to 4 a.m. Harrell rides the roads and checks bar parking lots, monitoring speed and watching for drunk drivers. The night is quiet. The only movement is from brown bunnies zig-zagging across the dark streets. Harrell said the house is always quiet when he gets home. He usually xes himself dinner tonight a frozen pot pie does a few chores and sleeps. His ance and the kids are planning a beach trip for Saturday, and he says hell consider prepping treats for a picnic that will be enjoyed without him. The 12-hour workday will start over again that evening, with uniformed patrol cranking up as the citizens of Wakulla County are winding down. Friday night lights: A ride along with the WCSO Beauty embraced through belly dancingPhotos special to The NewsJanis David has developed a belly-dancing program for women over 50, and a DVD, called Ageless Belly Dancing with Janis David, Dance with Qi. PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAPhotos, from top, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce uniformed patrol question passengers in a vehicle pulled over on U.S. Highway 98. Harrell checks in at dispatch around 2 a.m. when things get quiet. Red medical calls light up Harrells computer monitor as calls start pouring in. There were more calls than available ambulances at one point on Friday night. 6 MO. FORCHOOSE AS YOUR NEWS SOURCE FOR EVERYTHING LOCAL AND SAVE!!! JUST $ 12 Promo Code: SPECIAL Expires: 05-31-14Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:www.TheWakullaNews.com1-877-401-6408 Please accept my new 6 month subscription at the price of $12* Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $20.14. Local delivery area only.The Wakulla newsSign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the ofce. 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Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m.Friday, May 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Saturday, May 31 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, June 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for ve classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Monday, June 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, June 3 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.Wednesday, June 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Upcoming Events Thursday, May 29 If you are having an issue with Social Security, Medicare, Veterans Affairs bene ts, immigration, the IRS or any federal agency, a member of SENATOR MARCO RUBIOS staff will be available to meet with you. Please plan to attend to meet your local staff and nd out the services Senator Rubios Ofce offers his constituents. 11 a.m. 12:30 p.m. at Tallahassee Community College Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Highway. And 2 p.m. 3 p.m. at St. Marks City Hall, 788 Port Leon Drive. For more information, call the Capital Regional Of ce at (850) 599-9100. Saturday, May 31 THE SOPCHOPPY OPRY and South Bound Band welcomes Tom & Janie Roberts with the Way Up Band in a special MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE SHOW, 1 to 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. The show will include a variety of patriotic music performed by some of the best singers and musicians in this area. Tickets are $12. Call 962-3711 for information or log onto sopchoppyopry.com. Wednesday, June 4 The Class of 2014, WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL War Eagles invite you to come celebrate with them at BACCALAUREATE at 7 p.m. (Gates Open at 6 pm) at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Friday, June 6 Class of 2014, WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL War Eagles GRADUATION will beat 7:30 p.m. (Gates Open at 6:30 p.m.) at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. The high school parking gates will open at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, June 7 NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National Button Society) will meet at the central location of Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. Wakulla, Franklin, Okaloosa and guests welcome. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson 926-7812, President Don/Barbara Lanier 729-7594, email bardon56@aol.com, Linda Wood 850-899-0025, or a local email: skpsky2000@comcast.net. A short interesting presentation about unique buttons is given at each meeting. Monday, June 9 A SUMMERTIME BLOOD DRIVE at Crawfordville Walmart will be from noon to 6 p.m. All donors will receive a $10 WALMART GIFT CARD, a $5 coupon off of two entrees from Outback Steakhouse, and a wellness checkup including blood pressure, iron count and cholesterol screening. Walkons welcome. Or make an appointment online at www.oneblooddonor.org and use sponsor code #G1915. Donate blood twice between May 1 and August 31 and you will receive a free lunch offer courtesy of Outback Steakhouse and be entered to win Outback for a Year Photo ID required. 1.800.68.BLOOD Thursday, June 12 WAKULLA PREGNANCY CENTER is partnering with the Community Foundation of North Florida on MATCH DAY 2014 on JUNE 12 ONLY. The Foundation will match your donations to us dollar-for-dollar up to $5,000 on gifts made ONLY THROUGH THEIR WEBSITE. Simply go to www.Findlearngive.org and make a gift by credit card using the Donate Now Match Day button between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to be eligible for the Match Day grants and incentive prizes. Select Wakulla Pregnancy Center as your chosen charity. The earlier in the day the better as there is a maximum dollar amount available to be awarded. For details of the rules go to http:// ndlearngive.guidestar.org/ or follow this link. Friday, June 13 Going Places will present OUTDOOR MOVIE NIGHT at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center beginning at 8:30 p.m. Bring the whole family, with blankets and chairs, to see INDIANA JONES AND THE RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK. The community center is located at 318 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville.Saturday, June 14 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1994 20-year reunion will be held at Wakulla Springs Lodge from 6 to 10 p.m. Reunion Ticket are $40 and includes admission to event at Wakulla Springs Lodge, heavy hors doeuvres, entertainment, and door prizes. Wakulla Springs Lodge will be providing a cash bar on the terrace. Online payments are preferred, the website to make your online payment and RSVP is www.WHSWarEagles1994.myevent.com. Payments can also be mailed to the following address. Attention: Ashley Savary, Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Make Checks payable to WHS Class of 1994. For more information e-mail Hunter Versiga Tucker at htucker32327@yahoo.com.Friday, June 27 ROOT 319 CUTS & COLOR is collecting CARE PACKAGES to send to troops overseas. The DEADLINE IS JUNE 27. Items in care packages can include toiletries and travelsize personal grooming products for men and women, nonperishable food items, games and miscellaneous items like batteries, pens, insect repellent wipes, socks and paper.Saturday, June 28 The BIG BEND MODEL RAILROAD ASSOCIATION model railroad show and sale will be from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the North Florida Fairgrounds buildings no. 2 and 4. Parking is free. Admission is $6 for ages 13 and up. For more information visit the website: www.bbmra.org, or call John Sullenberger at 544-1870. Government MeetingsThursday, May 29 The Wakulla County CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION will hold a PUBLIC MEETING at 6 p.m., at the TCC Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Hwy. (North Entrance of Centennial Bank). Monday, June 2 The WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. to give citizens an opportunity to become acquainted with the proposed WASTEWATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS and to comment on such items as to the economic and environmental impacts, service area, alternatives to the project and other matters of concern. Tuesday, June 3 The Wakulla County TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn and Suites 3292 Coastal Hwy. Tuesday, June 17 A public meeting with FDOT on the US 319 plans is scheduled at 5:30 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Included are some of the conceptual plans. All local businesses are encouraged to attend this meeting. Your input is vital for con-Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Meet and talk with Marco Rubios staffTCC Wakulla 11-12:30 St. Marks: 2-3 p.m. Sopchoppy Opry Tribute Show Historic Auditorium 1 7 p.m.Sopchoppy 4th July Fundraiser Downtown Sopchoppy Noon 8 p.m. Wakulla High Baccalaureate Stadium 7 p.m.ThursdaySaturdaySaturdayWednesday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla May 29 June 28Other announcements... The USS MOUNT MCKINLEY ASSOCIATION will holds its 26th annual reunion in Colorado Springs, Co., September 17 through 21. Veterans and associate members from all military branches what served on the Amphibious Force Flagship, USS Mount McKinley AGC/LCC-7, and associate members from the Flagship Alliance group that served on one of the other AGCs during their years of commissioned service, are welcome to join. Contact Dwight L. Janzen, secretary, at djanzen4@msn.com, or 509-534-3649 on evenings and weekends. PARENTS OF ESTRANGED CHILDREN is forming a peer support group in Tallahassee. If you have been estranged by your adult children, and believe it would help to have the support and comfort of a group, and share concerns with parents like you, call 850-224-4055 or e-mail mikebwinn@gmail. com. Depending on the location, and number of concerned members, the group will be forming and meeting at convenient locations around Tallahassee. If you have been worried and concerned over your adult child who has frozen you out of his or her life, for whatever reason, please contact us. Sharing with others who are in a similar position may help. Its OK to cry in this group! Special to The NewsThe Sopchoppy Fourth of July Volunteer Committee is hosting a fundraiser for their annual Fourth of July Celebration at From The Heart Recording Studio in Sopchoppy, on Saturday, May 31 from noon until 8 p.m. One hundred percent of the proceeds will be used for that purpose. The Committee has joined efforts to provide a full day of food and entertainment for your enjoyment. Hamburger or hotdog lunches will be available from noon to 3 p.m. and a mullet dinner beginning at 3 p.m. and continuing until 7 p.m. A day of musical entertainment begins at noon, running throughout the day until 8 p.m., at From the Heart Recording Studio. The price for a hamburger plate is $5, a hotdog plate is $4 and the mullet dinner is $8. Suggested gate donation for the musical entertainment is $5 for the whole day. Of course, you can always donate up to your hearts desire in support of the celebration.Reminder: Fourth of July fundraiser

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 19By DARA KAMTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 23 Secrecy was the overarching theme this week. An appeals court agreed to let a GOP consultant keep his redistricting-related documents hush-hush. In the closely tied lawsuit over the once-a-decade redistricting process, House staffers provided a peek into secret discussions between legislative aides and Republican operatives while the new maps were being drawn. And a months-long whisper campaign about GOP powerhouse John Thrasher taking the helm of his alma mater nally emerged from the shadows, virtually turning off the lights for other candidates. REDISTRICTING REDUX In a blow to a coalition of voting-rights organizations ghting the states congressional map, an appeals court ruled Thursday that GOP consultant Pat Bainters documents can remain sealed. Bainter contends that divulging 538 pages of documents from his Gainesvillebased consulting rm, Data Targeting, Inc., could reveal trade secrets and endanger his rms First Amendment rights. The information has been at the center of a long-running dispute between the consultants and the votingrights organizations and voters challenging the map. The lawsuit argues the congressional districts violate the antigerrymandering Fair District amendments approved by voters in 2010. The documents may remain secret, but the trial in that case, which kicked off Monday, pulled back the curtain on meetings between GOP consultants and legislative staffers and, for Capitol watchers, exposed some juicy tidbits about the dysfunctional relationship between former House Speaker Dean Cannon and former Senate President Mike Haridopolos. On Thursday, Alex Kelly a former House staffer who led the chambers efforts to draw the map contradicted current House Speaker Will Weatherfords testimony earlier this week that Weatherford did not know about a 2010 meeting between legislative staffers and Republican operatives. The meeting has become a focal point for the maps critics, as they try to build a case that party operatives improperly in uenced the nal shape of congressional boundaries. Under the Fair District amendments, lawmakers are barred from drawing lines that are meant to help or hurt political parties or candidates. Kelly said Weatherford, RWesley Chapel, knew about the get-together and approved of Kellys attendance. I cant say I remember his exact words, but I was blessed to go to the meeting, Kelly said. Earlier this week, Weatherford, who was chairman of the redistricting committee, had testi ed that Kelly did not ask for his permission and didnt need it, because committee staff worked for then-speaker Cannon. (Kelly) had not cleared it with me, Weatherford said. I didnt know he was going. I didnt know about the meeting. The trial began Monday with hours of grilling of GOP consultant Marc Reichelderfer, who repeatedly denied that he provided speci c feedback to Cannon and Kirk Pepper, one of the speakers top aides, on how to craft new districts that would help Republicans. Reichelderfer said he didnt speci cally recall what came of an email conversation with Pepper about a congressional map that Pepper gave him through an online program known as Dropbox. Actually, the Webster seat is a bit messed up, Reichelderfer wrote in the email conversation, referring to the Central Florida district of Republican Congressman Dan Webster. Performance or geography, Pepper responded. Pepper testified that the exchange was a sarcastic one. He also admitted that he erred by secretly feeding redistricting plans to Reichelderfer in 2012 but denied that the arrangement tainted the redrawing of the states congressional districts. According to computer records and testimony, Pepper in some cases provided Reichelderfer with copies of the plans being crafted by House mapmakers weeks before they became public. In hindsight, I wouldnt have done that again, Pepper said under questioning from David King, a lawyer for those challenging the map. But it was intended to help a friend who was cut out of a process that determines how he makes his living. Pepper, who now works for Cannon as a lobbyist, said he gave Reichelderfer the maps without the then-speakers approval. Cannon, who is expected to testify next week, was upset when he found out about the transfer months later from media reports, Pepper said. I think he said that was stupid, Pepper said. FAT LADY HASNT SUNG YET, BUT Rumor once had it that Scott would pick Thrasher, a former Republican Party of Florida chairman and veteran lawmaker, to fill a vacancy in the lieutenant governors of ce. That didnt pan out. But ever since former Florida State University president Eric Barron announced in February that he was ditching his Tallahassee digs for the same job at Penn State University, Thrashers name has been at the top of the list of possible replacements. This week, speculation about Thrashers interest in the post ended when FSUs search committee took a pause so it could interview the St. Augustine Republican for the position. On Monday, DAlemberte, a Democrat who was the president of the university from 1994 to 2003, sent a letter nominating Thrasher. During my time as president of the university, John repeatedly was the legislator who understood the need to support higher education and he always took a direct interest in the issues that related to FSU, DAlemberte wrote. But for John Thrasher, there would be no medical school here at Florida State University. On Wednesday, search consultant Bill Funk told committee members that the irregular step of putting the search on hold was necessary because the long-shadow of Thrasher, who received undergrad and law degrees from FSU, had intimidated other quali ed candidates. Were not endorsing John for the role, said Funk, founder and president of Dallasbased consulting rm R. William Funk & Associates. But we are saying that John is casting a long-shadow. Its limiting our opportunity to put together the kind of pool that this committee and that this university deserves. The universitys Board of Trustees will get an up or down recommendation from the committee some time after the Thrasher interview, which is set for June 11. The boards chairman Allan Bense, a former House speaker, said Wednesday that the process isnt a done deal. The decision to interview Thrasher quickly drew opposition from students and faculty. Several claimed Thrasher has hijacked the process by covertly maneuvering for the post. Search committee members had said in February the selection would weigh more on academic credentials than political connections. Jennifer Prof tt, president of the FSU chapter of the United Faculty of Florida, expected the process would lean toward Thrasher, but said the action Wednesday was more blatant than she anticipated. I think this meeting effectively shut down anyone who would have applied, Prof tt said. STORY OF THE WEEK: A Leon County circuit judge heard testimony in a trial about whether the Legislature violated constitutional requirements when drawing congressional districts in 2012. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Florida TaxWatch has once again shown that it is possible to be absent all year long from any engagement in the budget process, do no research into the merits of any appropriation, utter not one word of testimony on any proposal or alternative and still convince well-meaning people to donate hundreds of thousands of dollars to keep a well-paid staff employed to absolutely no positive effect other than to get mentioned in one news cycle. Senate President Don Gaetz, after Florida TaxWatch recommended that Gov. Rick Scott veto about $121 million from the new state budget.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Out of the shadows and into the light HOME COUNTRYKnife-sharpening is the latest idea to spur tourism -Janet By SLIM RANDLESDelberts at it again. You know Delbert McLain, our local chamber of commerce? Hes the guy who wants to bring lots of people here so the place isnt quite as nice as it is now. Well, ol Delbert zipped into the Mule Barn truck stop the other day, plopped down at the empty Round Table, and motioned for those of us at the philosophy counter to join him. We did. Boys, he said, when we were seated and sipping, I want to bounce an idea off you and see how it goes. He almost whispered, Two words knife sharpening! Sure, said Dud, pulling a diamond steel from a holster on his belt. Ill sharpen it for you, Delbert. No, I dont mean I need a knife sharpened, he said, I mean a knife-sharpening contest. Actually, a knife-sharpening fiesta! His face beamed, he spread his arms, his hands palms up toward Heaven as the sheer Divine magnitude of the idea settled in. Doc reached for another sugar packet. Just think of it, guys, Delbert said, A veritable bevy of blade bevellers descending on our community, spending money in our restaurants, buying the latest in knife gear from the hardware store, lling the rooms at the motel. He looked around. Steves coffee made him cough. Doc chuckled into his hand. Dud put his diamond steel away. Sounds like a sharp idea to me, Del, said Doc. I like the way you came right to the point. An edgy proposition, Dud said, but one that whets the appetite. Steve recovered from his coughing t. You could hold it out in the pasture and call it Hone on the Range. Delbert ignored the groaning and smiled. Thats it, boys. Think on it. Lets come up with some good angles. And Doc said, I hear 10 to 15 degrees is best for a really sharp blade. Cracker packets ew. Brought to you by Saddle Up: A Cowboy Guide to Writing. Have a look. http:// nmsantos.com/ Books/Saddle/Saddle. html. The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 20 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Apply Astronomer Atlas Bears Bible Bombs Catches Cheap Choir Class Crush Cuddle Dusty Elbows Encyclopedias Ended Essay Fifteen Flute Fossil Happy Heats Hunted Knees Lodge Lower Media Oldest Organ Panel Policy Punch Purse Readily Reward Rolls Roots Runner Sacks Scene Sheep Shelf Shoes Snaps Splash Spread Stage Surgery Swims Swiss Tissues Touch Wasted Works Worry The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 21by NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netThe in uence 4-H had on Eric Westbrook has come full circle, as he has returned to Wakulla County to serve as the local 4-H program assistant through the extension of ce. Westbrook is settling into his new position, where he is organizing plans to build upon Wakulla Countys 4-H program. The 2004 Wakulla High School graduates career path has led from the University of Kentucky, where Westbrook graduated in 2008 with a degree in community communications and leadership development from the College of Agriculture; to the Florida Department of Agricultures metrology lab in Tallahassee, where he worked setting standards of mass and volume for the state of Florida for the past four years. Westbrook still wanted to return to his eld of study, so when the 4-H program assistant job became available, Westbrook jumped at it. I always entertained the idea of working in extension, so this was a good opportunity for me and a way to do that, and way to get back into the county and community I grew up in, Westbrook said. He said soon, Wakulla 4-H will announce summer day camps for the year. Westbrook is also working with community clubs to finish the year up and get a running start for next year. Thats been my primary focus right now, Westbrook said. -Hs main goal is to provide educational opportunities on a long-term basis. The best way to do that is community clubs. I hope to get more youth involved in the district and state level of 4-H. I would really like to increase our participation numbers, get a lot of volunteers and resources here, so the youth have access to them. Volunteer leader training and volunteer leader recruitment are also big priorities. Without volunteers, this cant happen, Westbrook said. Its way too much for one person to do. I hope to offer a lot of support and a lot of educational resources for my volunteers to use in their specialty areas. Westbrook said in addition to traditional 4-H programs, there are many programs that people are not aware of, like robotics clubs. We have opportunities that go in a lot of different directions, Westbrook said. Of course programs like sewing and animal clubs are ongoing. Westbook added that he would like to see Junior Master Gardeners get going again. Wakulla County Extension Director Les Harrison has lots of confidence in Westbrook. Im sure hell be doing an absolutely splendid job, Harrison said. Were looking forward to seeing all the wonderful things he will do to build the program. Westbrook attained Eagle Scout status locally from Troop 5. In addition to years of 4-H activities, Westbrook used to lifeguard at Wakulla Springs, and has had success as a horse master, completing the fourth level of advancement in horsemanship. He attended the University of Kentucky with Thoroughbred Scholar scholarship. He still works as a horse trainer in the area, and previously reported for a horseracing newspaper, The Special, which has been discontinued. Westbrook attributes his success to his roots. -H and Eagle Scouting were directly responsible for whatever success I have had so far, he said. Im really excited for this position, and to help the community. I want to keep everything going strong, and as 4-H says to make the best better. To nd out more about volunteer opportunities or community clubs, call Eric Westbrook at 926-3931, or e-mail ewestbrook@u .edu. Westbrook is new 4-H program assistantNICOLE ZEMAEric Westbrook has returned to his hometown to serve as the local 4-H program assistant through the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. He is focused on the mission of 4-H to make the best better. Memorial Day at the Wakulla County CourthouseThe courthouse grounds were packed with people on Memorial Day, who searched for shade. The brief ceremony included County Commission Chairman Richard Harden reading off the names of Wakullas fallen soldiers. Commissioner Ralph Thomas spoke on the signi cance of the holiday, and opened with a quote from Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf: It doesnt take a hero to order men into battle. It takes a hero to be one of those men who goes into battle. The VFW Color Guard raised the ag and then lowered it to half staff. Later, they placed the memorial wreath. At the end of the program, Commission Chair Richard Harden spoke of former county veterans of cer J.D. Johnson, who organized the Memorial Day and Veterans Day programs for years, but is gravely ill. After the ceremony, the crowd milled about on the grounds and ate a ag-shaped cake. William Snowden A large crowd attended the Memorial Day ceremony at the Wakulla County Courthouse, above. Glenda McCarthy shares with former sheriff David Harvey a plaque she found on her property. Sheriff Charlie Creel and Congressional Candidate Gwen Graham.School board member Becky Cook and Judge Jill Walker.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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Gordon McLeary recently opened Flying Papi catering, which is located at di erent areas around the county. The catering truck o ers a variety of foods and drinks, but specializes in hot dogs, including a Chicago dog, and also has Bradleys sausage dogs. Page 22 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy MARGARET R. MCDOWELL, ChFC, AIFArbor OutlookWho is gonna make it? Well nd outin the long run. The Long Run by Glenn Frey, Don Henley and Bob Seger Please allow me to introduce you to David and Rose, who have been married for 42 years. Like many young couples, David and Rose began their married lives with virtually no assets. Throughout their marriage, though, they lived on 80% of their combined salaries. The other 20 percent was invested, saved and tithed. As young adults, the couple used part of their savings as a down payment and bought the least expensive home in a nice neighborhood. Each month, they paid extra toward principal and eventually paid off the mortgage in 20 years. They still make their residence there. David earned over $100,000 annually only in the latter part of his career and Roses pay grade never reached that level. The couple raised three children, took an annual family vacation, and paid for braces for two kids. All three children attended college, but they all worked during school. David drove an older, dependable car, a mid-size sedan and the odometer eventually passed 300,000 miles. While he kept his auto spotless, it was surrounded in his office parking lot by more attractive, newer models, and his af nity for his older car became a subject of mirth for his coworkers. David, who wore a coat and tie to work, always bought his suits on sale. Rose and David also bought needed household items on sale throughout their marriage. Whats the point? The couple now enjoys an investment account with a value of well over a million dollars. And they have no debt. When Rose retired, David asked her if she wanted anything special to celebrate that milestone. Rose asked for a trip to Ireland. The couple spent four weeks touring Europe, returned exhausted but ful lled, then resumed their relatively frugal lifestyle. Its a happy habit they cant seem to break. Im still a coupon clipper at heart, says Rose. I cant stand wastefulness. David bought a new BMW convertible recently, but only takes it out on weekends. Rose says he really prefers driving his old, dependable sedan, the one with 300,000 miles. The couple are the prototypical millionaires next door, and while they are completely ctional, their story rings true. In fact, you may recognize parts or all of your own lifestyle and history in this ctional portrayal. You would never recognize them as millionaires while waiting in line at Wal-Mart, where they did much of their shopping. Rose and David never attempted to emulate the lifestyles of those whose wealth seemed more obvious. The importance of saving and investing wisely can only be evaluated over time. Its not fancy, but it still works. This column should not be considered personalized investment advice and provides no assurance that any speci c strategy or investment will be suitable or pro table for an investor. Margaret R. McDowell, ChFC, AIF, a syndicated economic columnist, is the founder of Arbor Wealth Management, LLC, (850-608-6121, www.arborwealth.net), a Fee-Only Registered Investment Advisory Firm located near Destin. Forty-two years of living within your meansSpecial to The NewsOur Sights and Sounds Radio Shack franchise recently underwent a complete remodeling: We updated our products and the entire look and feel of our newly modernized store. We offer many pre-paid cell phone services and phones. We have had many customers come in asking about the possibility of our Radio Shack closing based on recent corporate news. Our reply is that the closings are based on Radio Shack corporate locations that are not doing so well in todays economy, something that does not apply to our Radio Shack franchise. Sights and Sounds and Radio Shack have been around in Wakulla County since 1983 in fact this year will be our 31th year. Our integrated business has come complete circle, so to speak, regarding the electronics business and Radio Shack. We have kept the small town feel while integrating big business products and resources. That transformation took a leap ahead in 1991, when we became a franchisee with Radio Shack. Our business moved several times throughout the years, resting nally in current location at 2000 Crawfordville Highway since 2010. We offer our own computer virus removal and repair department and full service car audio sales and installation. We also offer and install DirecTV. Our Sights and Sounds division designs and installs home theatre, security alarms and all integrated home products from low to high voltage. We are going to continue to serve Wakulla County and the surrounding counties. Having a small business in a small town, we get to know our customers by name and understand their wants and needs and it is such a pleasure to help our customers and we would like to thank all of them for their many years of loyalty to our store.BUSINESSSpecial to The NewsAfter several years of stagnation, people are once again moving to the Sunshine State, according to the new State of the Cities report issued by the Florida League of Cities Center for Municipal Research and Innovation. Many of Floridas metropolitan areas are now showing steady growth, at an average rate of 3 percent. Florida boasts some of the best cities in the nation and it should come as no surprise that our state has rebounded so effectively after the dif culties of recent economic challenges, said Florida League of Cities President P.C. Wu. With this increased growth comes an increased responsibility to focus on evaluating and improving the services our cities provide. Florida is already a leader in ef cient and effective municipal services, with more than half of all Florida cities offering parks, water services and police and fire services for their citizens. In addition, some cities are beginning to add newer services such as employee health clinics and charter schools. These are among the ndings of the State of the Cities report based on statewide data from the Florida League of Cities 2013 CityStats Survey. The report focuses on trends and key issues related to municipal governments in Florida. With 90 percent of Florida municipalities responding, the State of the Cities report provides a comprehensive look at the current status of Floridas cities in such areas as employment and economy, public safety, services and utilities, and budgets. The report notes that as of last year, Floridas population of more than 19 million people is evenly divided between those who live in cities, towns or villages and those who live in unincorporated areas. The populations of these cities vary greatly, from more than 800,000 residents in Jacksonville to fewer than 10 in Weeki Wachee. Some of the major trends highlighted in the State of the Cities report include: Florida has 270 local police agencies and 22,506 sworn local police of cers, producing a rate of 122 sworn local police of cers per 100,000 residents. Volunteer re ghters are utilized in 44 percent of Florida cities with populations of fewer than 5,000. Trends in budget and economic development and employment rates indicate that cities are rebounding from the economic recession. In an effort to increase economic development, almost 60 percent of Florida municipalities offer economic development incentives to encourage business growth. The four largest population increases in metropolitan areas were recorded by Miami (+13,341), Jacksonville (+10,955), Tampa (+9,241) and Orlando (+8,437). The full State of the Cities report and results of the 2013 CityStats Survey are available online at http:// www.floridaleagueofcities.com/Assets/ Files/StateoftheCities2013FINAL.pdf. Founded in 1922, the Florida League of Cities is the united voice for Floridas municipal governments. For more information, visit www. floridaleagueofcities. com. Sights and Sounds remodels store After economic downturn, Florida cities returning to steady growth, report showsFlorida League of Cities releases State of the Cities reportSpecial to The NewsBeing young and inexperienced can be intimidating for stayat-home entrepreneurs, but it doesnt mean youre making mistakes, says veteran businesswoman Renae Christine. Fresh out of college at 23, she thought shed done something wrong when the wholesaler for her stationery company assigned her a personal representative. In reality I was doing so much business with them that they wanted to ensure my satisfaction, says Christine, a serial entrepreneur who has created dozens of successful home-based businesses for herself and others. She shares practical how-to advice in her new book, Home Business Startup Bible, (http://richmombusiness.com/). She was the busy mother of a 2-year-old and shed just returned home to the mess left in the wake of lastminute packing when the rep showed up, she says. I was mortified when he walked into my home/business and he was shocked, but the experience marked my rst success as an of cial business, she says. It was actually the beginning of a great relationship. Though it turned out well, Christine says her rst years in business would have been much happier if she hadnt had to deal with her own painful feelings of selfdoubt, embarrassment, guilt, etc. The good news is no stay-at-home entrepreneur needs to feel that way, she says. She offers these tips for maintaining professionalism in business without sacri cing or feeling guilty about family. Dont apologize for your kids. We need to stop apologizing for our kids squawks and energy while were on the phone or in meetings. Kids are kids and to them, Mommy is Mommy and their home is their home 24/7. If anything, we can all learn from our children and lighten up during business chats. Dont pick up the phone when youre not ready. I used to think I had to say yes to everyone, including the telephone whenever it rang. Dont answer the phone if youre not ready to speak; if its important, the caller will leave a message. Consider an online chat system for your website; I use a free one via craftysyntax.com. Add a disclosure message to your callanswering service. My disclosure indicates the quickest way to reach me, which is chat or email. Email is quickly becoming everyones preferred method of communication anyway, and this way, we all have a digital trail that will help us stay organized. Say no and dont apologize for it. You can say no to lots of things, like PTA meetings and extra bake sales for your kids school. When you say yes to those things, you are saying no to your business. You have to think of your new business as if you are your own boss. Would you ask your boss for a day off so you can sell cupcakes? Probably not. Pick a neutral location. If you need to have business meetings in person, I suggest choosing a neutral place like a coffee shop. Dont allow them to come to your home and, if you can avoid it, dont go to their of ce. If youre negotiating, this can give them a homeeld advantage. Just say it. I continue to attend trade shows. When I tell companies that I work from home, they might give me an indifferent attitude and hastily move on to chat up a brickand-mortar owner. I simply take my business elsewhere; I know the value of my business, and so will another vendor. Renae Christine is the owner of by Renae Christine, a company that has launched several successful businesses and has helped launch dozens more for others. A journalist, shes known for her popular YouTube videos (search Rich Mom Business channel), which use humor and pragmatism to advise others who want to launch home-based businesses. She recently published Home Business Startup Bible, (www.richmombusiness.com), a comprehensive how-to guide. Christine is also the founder of the Rich Mom Business University and has come into popular demand as a speaker.Six tips for balancing business and family Flying Papi opens

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 23 FREE ESTIMATESWorry Free with A to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f l l l f f d d Call Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and InsuredTree Trimming Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Facial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsColor PermsFeather LocksHighlights Cuts Low Lights STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN F u ll Se r v i c e Ha i g a i i c e Ha e g g g g 850 926-6020 Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES THE MOST NATURAL WAY TO LOSE WEIGHTFinally there is an all-natural, healthy solution to help you lose weight. The synergistic effect of Plexus Slim and Accelerator taken together can help you lose more weight faster than you ever thought possible. Experience great results and keep the weight off. 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Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government doc-uments, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20K to $24K based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 11 paid holidays, monthly leave accrual, Health, Dental, Suppl. Ins, and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com CJIS GROUP LLC.,Crawfordville, FL, has an open position for an Office Administrator. The position requires a mature individual with work experience in HR administration and general office management. Responsibilities will include human resources, recruiting, benefits, employee supervision, facilities and office management, administrative duties, and support with special projects. Salary commensurate with experience, benefits include 11 holidays, monthly leave accrual, health, dental and 401(K). Please E-mail Resume to: David Heinemann, CEO, CJIS GROUP at dheinemann@ cjisgroup.com. Averitt Express New Pay increase for Reginal Drivers! 40 to 46 CPM + Fuel Bonus! Also, Post -Training Pay increase for Students! (Depending on Domocile) Get Home EVERYWeek + Excellent Benefits CDL-ARequired 888-362-8608 Apply at A verittCareers.com Equal Opportunity Employer Females, minorities, protected veterans and indivdiuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply. Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE 5072-0612 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution issued in the County Court of Leon County, Florida on the 22nd day of February, 2013, in the cause wherein FSU Credit Union, was Plaintiff, and Tanesia Thomas was Defendant, being Case Number 2011SC003321 in said Court; Court, I, Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff of Wakulla County, Florida have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of Tanesia Thomas in and to the following described Personal Property to-wit: 1. 2005 GMC, White in Color, FL Tag/2381IR, Vin/1GKES63M252334452 Further, on the 24th day of June, 2014 at the hour of 10:00 A.M or as soon thereafter as possible at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office located at 15 Oak Street, Crawfordville, Florida, I will offer for sale all the said right, title and interest in the afore said Personal Property at Public Auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution. /s/ Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff Wakulla County, Florida By: Lt. Steve Willis, Deputy Sheriff STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF WAKULLA Sworn to and subscribed before me this 13 day of May, 2014 by Sheriff Charlie W. Creel and Lt. Steve Willis who are personally known or has produced _________ as Identification. /s/ Amy Lamarche Notary Public (Seal) Published May 22, 29, June 5 & 12, 2014. 5083-0529 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida Statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Dillan D. Grimes 48 Gopher Scuffle Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 May 29, 2014 5084-0529 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida Statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Mickel R. Osborne 5086-0605 TWN vs. Strickland, Mamie J 2011CA000369 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2011CA000369 ONEWEST BANK, F.S.B, Plaintiff, vs. MAMIE J STRICKLAND, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 22, 2014, and entered in 2011CA000369 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, F.S.B is the Plaintiff and SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; JIM NICHOLS A/K/A JIM H. NICHOLS LEGAL/GUARDIAN-POWER OF ATTORNEY; UNKNOWN TENANT; MAMIE J STRICKLAND AKA MAMIE JEANETTE STRICKLAND AKA MAMIE JEANETTE SMITH are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, 32327, at 11:00 AM, on June 12, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 1 1/2 INCH DIAMETER IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1293.78 FEET ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SOUTHEAST QUARTER TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7017) FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE ALONG SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARY NORTH 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 309.74 FEET TO A UNITED STATES FOREST SERVICE CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF PLOT 164 OF THE OLD HILLIARDVILLE SUBDIVISION AND THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARY OF A PORTION OF THE APALACHICOLA Experienced Team, Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402 Experienced Team, Solo, Recent Grad & Student Drivers needed for dedicated run in your area! Ask about our sign-on bonus and guaranteed hometime! Call 866-414-3402 TRAIN FROM HOME MEDICALBILLING, ACCOUNTING ASST, CUSTOMER SERVICE, NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED. HS/GED NEEDED TO APPLY. Sullivan and Cogliano Training Centers. 1-800-451-0709 CRAWFORDVILLESaturday May 31, 9am-3pm MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE Lots of Nice Things 104 Covington Circle $ $ Absolute Bargain New Qn Pillow-top Mattress $150. (850) 745-4960 CRAWFORDVILLE4/2, DW MH, on 1 Acres, Nice & Well Maintained 1,900 sf, $900. mo. 144 Leslie Circle Available for Sale (850)443-3300 MEDART AREA3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking. References required. $650mo., $400/Security no inside pets (352) 493-2232 CRAWFORDVILLENewly Remodeled 3Bedroom/2Bath; W/D Hook-up, $850. month plus Dep. (850) 228-0422 25 Shadow Oaks Circle 3 bedroom 2 bath home in safe and quiet neighborhood. 1486 sf, on .5 acre lot. 159,900 ONE ACRE, qtr cleared, qtr woodedwith septic, & light pool, city water. Mobile home and shed on property that must be moved. $12,000 ** Negotiable ** (850)519-4830 Western NC New cabin on 2.51ac. w/2bdr, loft, large deck, covered porch, fpl, minutes from the lake $139,900. Call 828-286-1666 AUCTION Waterfront Home Lake Eufaula, 217 Cypress Cove Drive, Eufaula, Al, 5 Bedroom-4 Bath, Executive, Great views. June 10, 1:00pm. Details, pictures GT Auctions.com 205.326.0833 Granger, Thagard & Assoc, Inc. Jack F Granger, #873 Sheas Family Child Care has openings for children ages one to five yrs old for the Summer and the 2014-15 School year. Contact Betty Shea 850-933-2747. SUMMER SCHOOL: Take virtual classes at the Homeschool Classroom, located at 2908 W. Lakeshore Drive in Tallahassee. Open Monday -Friday, 7am 3pm for your 6th -12th grade student. Go to TutoringByCynthia.com for details or call (850)329-7684 TODAY! 414 Bob Miller Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 May 29, 2014 APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE4 Br 1 Ba Hs $750 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $875 mo.3 Br 1 1/2 Ba Hs, $900 mo. 3 Br 2 1/2 Ba Twnhs, $900 mo. 3 Br. 2 Ba Hs, $850 mo. 1500 sq ft $1500 mo. Crawfordville 700 sq ft $700 mo. Tallahassee RENTALS: COMMERCIAL Wakulla Realty 850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. WANTED! School Bus Drivers Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 The Wakulla news

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Page 24 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEP IT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES RenegadesVAPE SHOPof The GulfTRY VAPING for FREEVisit our RELAXING ROOM to TRY UNLIMITED FLAVORS... for FREE!Owned & Operated by Casey Hodges & son Chris Hodges, formerly of Bayside Seafood Restaurant PanaceaBring in this ad for $1 OFF 10 ml or $3 OFF 30 ml E-Juice 850 3010 B Crawfordville Hwy., Downtown Crawfordville Randall Pest Management 850570-7085850570-7085850570-7084850570-7084 CLIP and SAVE$200 OFFADULT HAIRCUTS prices @ $12.95 CLIP and SAVE$1000 OFFMinzani Hair Relaxers prices @ $65.00 CLIP and SAVE$500 OFFMATRIX PERMS prices start at $34.95 haircut/style not includedCLIP and SAVE$1000 OFFFOIL HI & LO LITES prices start at $59.95CLIP and SAVE$300 OFFSingle Process HAIRCOLOR prices start at $34.95No appointment Necessary One coupon per VisitShear ExpressionsFamily Hair Salon where families and budget meet850-984-3100 NATIONAL FOREST; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHERN BOUNDARY LINE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 397.15 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7017); THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERN BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 313.78 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP (LB 7017); THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 397.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.Dated this 22 day of April, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court(SEAL) By: Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 May 29 and June 5, 2014. 13-22816 5079-0529 TWN vs. Edwards, Donald W. 14000030CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 14000030CAAXMX Capital One, N.A., 5080-0605 TWN vs. Wiles, Mary Jo L. & Mark A. 65-2013-CA-000356 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2013-CA-000356 Division NAVY FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Plaintiff, vs. MARY JO L. WILES, MARK A. WILES A/K/A MARK WILES AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on May 14, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOTS 4, 10, 11 AND 12, BLOCK OF PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 125 DICKSON BAY RD, PANACEA, FL 32346 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on June 19, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16th day of May, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Kari D. Marsland-Pettit, (813)229-0900, x1509/1359 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800, ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com May 29 & June 5, 2014 110650/1342057 5081-0605 TWN vs. Register, Laura R. 65-2013-CA-000372 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2013-CA-000372 Division MIDFIRST BANK Plaintiff, vs. LAURA R. REGISTER A/K/A LAURA RAE COOK REGISTER, MARTIN JACOBS, FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION, CITIBANK, N.A., HAROLD D. REGISTER, JR., AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE 5082-0605 TWN vs. Nelson, Craig 65-2013-CA-000032 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000032 DIVISION: US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST INC., MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WF1, Plaintiff, vs. CRAIG NELSON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 5, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000032 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which US Bank National Association, as Trustee for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc., Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-WF1, is the Plaintiff and Craig Nelson, Tenant #1, Tenant #2, The Unknown Spouse of Craig Nelson, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 12th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: TRACT 75, BLOCK C, SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 163 PERSIMMON RD SOPCHOPPY FL 32358-0714 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 19th day of May, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743, Facsimile: (813)221-9171, servelaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 May 29 & June 5, 2014. 013665F01 5085-0605 TWN vs. Williams, Roy A. 14000088CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION Case No. 14000088CAAXMX FIRST AMERICAN MORTGAGE TRUST, Plaintiff, v. ROY A. WILLIAMS et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Roy A. Williams & Brandi Williams P.O. Box 1804, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: Description of Mortgaged and Personal Property See Exhibit A has been filed against you in the Wakulla County Circuit Court in the matter of First American Mortgage Trust v. Roy A. Williams, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to it, on Plaintiffs attorney, whose name and address is J. Andrew Baldwin, THE SOLOMON LAW GROUP, P.A., 1881 West Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, Florida 33606, and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court, on or before 30 days after first publication; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief prayed for in the complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court at Wakulla County, Florida on this 19 day of May, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Court Wakulla County, Florida (Circuit Court Seal) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk J. Andrew Baldwin Florida Bar No. 671347 THE SOLOMON LAW GROUP, P.A. 1881 West Kennedy Boulevard, Tampa, FL 33606-1606 (813) 225-1818 (Tel) Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are an individual with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding or other court service, program, or activity, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4430, as far in advance as possible, but preferably at least seven (7) days before your scheduled court appearance or other court activity; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Exhibit A TRACT 38, RAKIRK RANCHETTES, (UNRECORDED) COMMENCING AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF LOT NO. 43, HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (MARKED BY AND OLD IRON PIN); THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST, 1606.51 FEET TO AN IRON PIN USED ON PREVIOUS SURVEYS; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST, 814.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF TRACT HEREIN DESCRIBED; FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST, 400.05 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF WAY OF PALOMINO ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF PALOMINO ROAD, 200.0 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST, 400.11 FEET TO CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST, 200.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SITUATE IN THE WEST HALF OF LOT NO. 43, HARTSFIELD SURVEY, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING OTHERWISE DESCRIBED AS TRACT NO. 38 OF AN UNRECORDED PLAT OF RAKIRK RANCHETTES. TOGETHER WITH A 1999 OAKWOOD DOUBLWIDE MOBILE HOME VIN #S 0W66614A & 0W66614B, TITLE #S 76420987 & 76420988 The address of which is 79 Palomino Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 May 29 & June 5, 2014. 11901.22144.44 Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on May 14, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 5, BLOCK A, AMELIA WOOD, AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION SAID LOT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS: COMMENCE AT THE SOTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NUMBER 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 408.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.0 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. and commonly known as: 303 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on June 19, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16th day of May, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Kari D. Marsland-Pettit, (813)229-0900, x1509/1359 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800, ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com May 29 & June 5, 2014 086150/1342382 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS2 /2 $750. mo., $750 Deposit 3/2, $925. mo., $925 Deposit 2/2, $850. mo., $850 Deposit 3/2, $950. mo., $950 Deposit 3/2, $750. mo., $800 Deposit Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., mo. No smoking, No pets.46 Savannah Forrest pets. 636 Coastal Hwy. 98 pets. No smoking 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. No smoking, No pets. 7 Big White Oak Lane Ochlockonee BayRealty Wakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEED TO RENT YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 25 Plaintiff, vs. Donald W. Edwards; Suzanne S. Edwards; Colin Dunbar; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION -CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: Colin Dunbar Last Known Address: 4095 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3,381.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 160.4 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 40.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 33 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A 2 INCH IRON PIPE ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 17 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 278.63 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST ALONG A FENCE LINE 117.4 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 10 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID FENCE LINE 78.3 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF FRANCES SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES EAST ALONG SAID SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY 590.28 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY 60.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE HANCOCK PROPERTY 150 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 31 MINUTES WEST 227.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF A CANAL, THENCE RUN NORTH 25 DEGREES 20 MINUTES WEST 275.5 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH IRON PIPE AT THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF EDWARD JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREE 47 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 238 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID JONES PROPERTY 118 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 40.4 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF JAKE RAULERSON PROPERTY 99.8 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 25 DEGREES 10 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID RAULERSON PROPERTY AND 70 FEET TO A POINT IN A CANAL, THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 45 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID CANAL 88.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 55 DEGREES 57 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID CANAL 24.85 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 51 MINUTES WEST 47.8 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS, IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT A PERPETUAL EASEMENT FOR THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED ROADWAY, TO WIT: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT THE DISTANCE OF 3,381.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 160.4 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 40.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 33 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A 2 INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 60.3 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 97.7 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 65 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST 59.6 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF JAKE RAULERSON PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID RAULERSON PROPERTY 99.8 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF EDWARD JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 23.2 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 82 DEGREES 42 MINUTES WEST 42.3 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 46.35 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 65 DEGREES 50 MINUTES WEST 55 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES WEST 100.65 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY 15.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Yashmin Chen-Alexis, Esquire, Brock & Scott, PLLC., the Plaintifs attorney, whose address is 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, on or before June 20, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on May 13, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. 13-F 04995 5078-0529 TWN vs. Langford, Mary L. heirs 2014 CA 000005 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2014 CA 000005 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARY L. LANGFORD, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, 5075-0529 TWN vs. Tucker, Kimberly D. 10-00199 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 10-00199 DIVISION: U.S. BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY D. TUCKER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 22, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10-00199 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank, N.A.,, is the Plaintiff and Kimberly D. Tucker, Todd W. Tucker, Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lendingtree Loans, a California Corporation, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 12th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 37, BLOCK A, OF MAGNOLIA RIDGE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 55 THROUGH 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 204 MAGNOLIA RIDGE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 23rd day of April, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 May 22 & 29, 2014. 10-38222 5074-0529 TWN vs. Lastowski, Steven P. 2014-CA-000007 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-000007 CENTENNIAL BANK an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN P. LASTOWSKI, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2 5073-0529 TWN vs. Smith, William Earl 13-282-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-282-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA 39828, Plaintiff, v. WILLIAM EARL SMITH A/K/A WILLIAM E. SMITH II, SHERRY SMITH A/K/A SHERRY LEE SMITH, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM EARL SMITH A/K/A WILLIAM E. SMITH II, and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHERRY SMITH A/K/A SHERRY LEE SMITH, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: TRACT 4 COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, 1660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11391.20 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 210.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 10.65 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST 327.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 161.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES WEST 325.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 151.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11391.20 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 210.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST 155.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 15.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES WEST 155.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 210.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, AND THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 15.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1992 GMC TRUCK WITH VIN #1GTGK24N3NE554606 Commonly known as: 4735 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on June 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Lot 3, Block B of A REPLAT OF LOTS 16 THRU 36 OF SNUG HARBOR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 117, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 19th day of June, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 6th day of May, 2014. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARY L. LANGFORD LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: Lot 34, Block M of Aqua De Vida, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 12, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Monica D. Shepard, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 13th day of May, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. B&H# 337855 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. The Wakulla News

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Page 26 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1234 567 89101112 1314 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 252627 2829 30313233 34 35 36 37 38 3940 41 42 43 44 45 46 4748 49 5051 52 5354 5556 5758 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 Across 1 Jack and ___ 5 Phone download 8 Ginger ___ (cookies) 13 "Goodbye," in Spanish 15 Road stuff 16 Cute little creature from Australia 17 Do a dishwashing job 18 Undivided 19 "___ its course" 20 Ready for bed 23 James Bond creator ___ Fleming 24 Infield cover 25 Bugs Bunny catchphrase 30 Person from Mecca, usually 34 No longer working: abbr. 35 "Understood" 36 "Rolling in the Deep" singer 37 Every last bit 38 Criticize 41 Rank below general: abbr. 42 Park ___ (Monopoly property) 44 The E in Q.E.D. 45 "You've Got Mail" company 46 Sammy with 609 home runs 47 Delights 50 Plant's "foot" 52 ___ no. 53 "Step right up!" 59 Like some diet foods 60 Paddle's cousin 61 Director Welles 63 Old saying 64 Card game with a colorful deck 65 Joe of "Goodfellas" 66 Printer powder 67 Danson or Williams 68 Fall Down 1 Jelly container 2 "That's cool!" 3 Supermarket hassle 4 Went ballistic 5 Lots and lots 6 Feeling of guilt 7 "___, change-o!" (Magician's phrase) 8 Person who goes downhill in a hurry? 9 Reporter's book 10 Org. for seniors 11 "Hamlet" or "Romeo and Juliet" 12 ___ Francisco 14 Keep for later 21 Occupied 22 Fond du ___, Wisconsin 25 Alternatives to sandwiches 26 "Greetings!" 27 Book of maps 28 Kitty or puppy 29 Bo who scored a "10" 31 Summary 32 Throw for ___ (surprise) 33 Stomach 36 #1 hit of 1958 39 "___ you trying to tell me..." 40 Broken bone healers 43 Utter ruin 47 Mafia 48 Enjoyed a restaurant 49 Batman's butler 51 Playful water creature 53 Extinct bird 54 The end ___ era 55 Archenemy 56 Longtime Yankees nickname 57 Cold War country 58 Crazy 59 ___ King Cole 62 Bite playfully Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 123 4 5 367 84 4 3125 73 19768 46 984 14257 2009 HometownContent 967 1283 4 5 314569782 285734691 498 312576 726845913 531976428 853 491267 679283154 142657839 JILL APP SNAPS ADIOS TAR KOALA RINSE ONE ITRAN GETTINGSLEEPY IAN TARP WHATSUPDOC ARAB RET ISEE ADELE ALL DETRACT COL PLACE ERAT AOL SOSA MAKESHAPPY ROOT TEL DONTBEBASHFUL NOFAT OAR ORSON ADAGE UNO PESCI TONER TED DROP

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 Page 27 1. MOVIES: What animated movie was promoted as the greatest fairy tale never told? 2. BIBLE: What is the fifth book of the Pentateuch in the Old Testament? 3. ART: Where is Leonardo Da Vincis masterpiece The Last Supper displayed? 4. ANATOMY: What causes a hiccup? 5. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Who was the shortest U.S. president? 6. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel The Russia House? 7. MUSIC: What 1960s rock star lit his guitar on fire while performing? 8. GEOGRAPHY: Where is Stonehenge located? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: When was the Lincoln Memorial dedicated? 10. SCIENCE: What is kinetic energy? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Shrek 2. Deuteronomy 3. The Santa Maria delle Grazie convent in Milan 4. Involuntary contraction of the diaphragm 5. James Madison at 5 feet, 4 inches 6. John Le Carr 7. Jimi Hendrix 8. England 9. 1922 10. Energy of movement Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 28 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 29, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBeing a late bloomer has its advantages. The anonymity almost guarantees the late bloomer will be passed over and left in peace, if not isolation, with the agrant excesses of others are the center of attention. Of course this may have a negative effect on the ego of human late bloomers. Some have been known to develop an abrasive or prickly personality. Opuntia humifusa, commonly known as the Eastern Prickly Pear or Indian Fig has no such ego problems. Late May and early June is the prime blooming period for this Wakulla County native. Prickly pear is a true cactus which are native only to the western hemisphere. This plant family varies greatly in height depending upon which of the more than 200 members is represented. The leaves of prickly pear cactus are inconspicuous in appearance, but its plate-like sections of the stem are often misidentified as leaves. These sections are may reach a length up to six inches. Stem sections remain green as they age and are covered with sharp three inch-long spines or quills. The larger spines are quite capable of inicting painful wounds. There are also tiny spines, known as glochids, which are located in the areoles, those small light to dark colored bumps on the pear shaped stem sections. These can cause a lot of irritation if they pierce clothing or attach to the skin surface. The flowers of this plant are produced in large numbers and create a striking contrast to their earth-colored surroundings. The plant will bloom over a period of several weeks, but individual owers only last one day. The cup-shaped owers appear on the outermost plate like stem sections and may reach three inches in width. The color most commonly encountered is yellow, but orange and red variations are occasionally encountered. Bright red to purple berries develop from the owers, appearing in mid to late summer at the plants maturity. These plants are wellsuited to hot, dry conditions and will tolerate summer droughts. For best growth it requires a sunny, welldrained site and is tolerant of sandy, alkaline soils which are common in Wakulla County. Prickly pear will only tolerate wet conditions for a very short period of time before root rot becomes a problem. While prickly pear does produce seed, the conditions for germination are very specific. Most propagation is accomplished by plant fragmentation. The plate-like sections need only have slight contact with moist sand to obtain rooting. This reproduction process turns prickly pear from a curiosity to a problem for landscape managers, cattlemen and hay producers. Mowing is a frequent means of weed control and stimulating grass growth. But mowing prickly pears detaches and scatters the pads which quickly root. Although prickly pear will not form dense canopies or overwhelm desirable forage grasses, its rapid spread causes problems. The impact on grazing has severe potential because of its barbed quills. Once the quills penetrate they are difcult to remove and may cause infection. This cactus is eaten by gopher tortoises, but has no pests or diseases of great concern. The anonymity of this late bloomer works in its favor. To learn more about prickly pear and Wakulla Countys other native cacti, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension website at http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu or call 850-926-3931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931. Prickly pear blooming in Wakulla County.Prickly pear is a late bloomer in Wakulla Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms IN-SHORE FISHING IS HOT AND SO IS THE WEATHER HOOK UP YOUR BOAT See us for All your boating supplies! MAY. 24IN STATE WATERSOPENS NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 Expert physicians.Quality care. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalGroup.comRobert Frable, DOSpecializing in: Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Group accepts Capital Health Plan and most all other insurance carriers.850 9266363 Aida Torres, ARNP Flu and pneumonia vaccination