Wakulla news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins ( Crawfordville Fla )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 401960
oclc - 33429964
System ID:
UF00028313:00514


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

See Pages 6-7B newsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .................................................................Pages 8-9A Salute to Veterans....................................................Page 10-11A School......... ............................................................Pages 11-12A Sports ...........................................................................Page 14A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 15A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 16A Sharks & Chablis........ ...................................................Page 17A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 18A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 20A Senior Citizens Celebrate Life ..........................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 3B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Summer Camp ............................................................Pages 6-7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B Travel .............................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Oma L. Linzy Baxley Mary Sansbury Butera Jason Ryan Coshatt Robert Rivieccio Juanita Joan Young Its our annual PINK PA PER Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 21st Issue Thursday, May 22, 2014See Pages 10-11A Delinquent Tax Rolls in this issue Wakulla County Senior Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Citizens Celebrate Life Section B Section B By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netSchool Board member Jerry Evans formally announced this week that, after 20 years in of ce, he would not seek reelection. When I ran in 1994, my wife (Pam) was teaching, my kids were in the district, and I was very involved in a lot of school functions. Now, he said, his daughters are grown and his wife is gone after a battle with cancer. Evans said that perhaps his passion for the job had dimmed somewhat, but qualied that by saying: I still have a desire for the good of the kids, but its time for somebody with some fresh ideas to step in. The two candidates who have led for the seat are Jo Ann Daniels, retired principal from Wakulla Middle School, and Donna Savary, a teacher with her own tutoring business. Evans said he wasnt going to come out with a public endorsement of either of the candidates. I really want to see somebody with a passion and drive to continue in the excellent things that have taken place, he said. Away from the school board, Evans career has included being a music teacher and being a banker, first at Ameris and later at Centennial. He took a job as a salesman in West Palm Beach after his wifes death, while maintaining his permanent residence in Sopchoppy and attending monthly school board meetings. He recently accepted a position as fundraising director for the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Looking over his 20 years on the school board, Evans said he was proud of the fact that Wakulla has been named an Academically High-Performing District for the past six years, and has been graded an A district. He noted that Wakulla High Schools graduation rate has exceeded the state average at 88 percent, and ranks 11th in the state. He also noted that Wakulla students were above average in all 22 areas tested. In addition to the academic achievements of students, Evans said he was proud of students performance in sports, arts, and vocational programs, ranging from culinary arts and medical academy and engineering academy to the new automotive program the the upcoming welding program. These kids are complete, he said. Theyre well-rounded.Turn to Page 5AJerry Evans wont seek re-election to school boardBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netWakulla County Commissioners unanimously agreed to send a request to the state Department of Transportation to have a trafc light and crosswalk installed in front of Wakulla High School. They concurred that if safety is the biggest reason for realignment and intersection creation at U.S. Highways 319 and 98, then why not just have a traf c light and crosswalk now, instead of waiting for construction to begin in 2016. Chris Russell, who was rst to speak during the public comment time of the county commission meeting on Monday, May 19, brought the issue to the table. Russell said he had a long discussion with a DOT engineer, and they told him the new intersection and traf c light would alleviate traffic safety issues. If thats an issue now, why cant we put a red light there now? he asked. Russell said he was told if the board would send a request to DOT District Secretary Tommy Barfield, he might get behind that. He added that Sheriff Charlie Creel thought installing a traf c light, which was timed to function during school opening, release and special events, would be a good idea. It makes sense to me, Russell said. Our kids deserve it, our citizens deserve it. Commissioner Howard Kessler noted his agreement to send a letter to DOT to request an immediate traffic light does not mean his is favorable of the intersection realignment. April Williams, project manager for the DOT widening project, presented plans for the widening of US 319. She urged the public to attend an informal public alternatives meeting on Tuesday, June 17, at Crawfordville United Methodist Church beginning at 5:30 p.m., to see plans, ask questions and provide comments to DOT concerning the widening segments.Turn to Page 19ANICOLE ZEMA Commissioners request DOT install tra c light, crosswalk for safetyLight requested at WHS WILLIAM SNOWDENSchool Board Member Jerry Evans Section CTangible Personal Property ListPage 3A Business owner Mike Morgan looks at design documents at a DOT open house on the 319 alignment, held last week. See story on Page 19A. A raft of pelicans A raft of pelicans A raft of pelicansReader Val LaHart of Ochlockonee Bay shared this photo with us, taken a couple of weeks ago after all the heavy rains nally stopped, writing that the rst day of sunshine after all the rain brought a raft of 150 to 200 white pelicans oating down Ochlockonee Bay. Loa ng from a migratory ight?

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews. netThe First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee heard oral arguments in the case in which a Wakulla circuit judge found the implementation of the states net ban with mullet net rules created a legal absurdity of regulations. Wakulla fishermen led the lawsuit a couple of years ago challenging the legality of net rules that require a mesh no larger than two inches stretch, which they claim doesnt catch legal mullet but loads their nets with juvenile sh. Fishermen claimed this violated the singlepurpose of the constitutional amendment that limited net fishing the so-called net ban whih was to limit unecessary over shing and waste of marine resources. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, in an 11-page order released in October, cited contradictions between the Florida Constitution and the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and enjoined any further enforcement of the net ban amendment, the FWCs authority to enact net rules, and a series of mullet rules. As was expected, the state FWC, represented by Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau argued that the appeal court should reject Fulfords order, contending the matters have all been settled in 20 years of legal cases, and that there was no new information before the court. Tallahassee attorney Ron Mowrey, who represented the shermen, contended that Fulford did have new information the beginnings of a collaborative net study between shermen and the FWC that the agency abruptly quit when it showed that the small mesh nets catch 98 percent bycatch, not legal targeted species. The most notable event was the comments of one of the three appeal judges, T. Kent Wetherell II, about Fulford and her order. At one point, Wetherell called Fulfords order One of the worst orders Ive ever read and questioned the analysis and the lack of clear ndings of fact. Wetherell also jabbed at Fulford for going out on the water with shermen for an observation of how the nets work. Do we need to get out on a shing boat too? he asked, adding the question of whether the Supreme Court was supposed to do that as well. Mowrey answered that it was Harmless error. When asked if Mowrey had ever seen a court go outside the courtroom for something other than a static observation say, to drive by the scene of a crime or property that was part of a dispute Mowrey replied that he had, and recalled a mullet shermans trial in which the court took jurors outside for an exhibit of how nets fall off a boat. The boat was trailered in the parking lot outside the Wakulla County Courthouse and jurors walked out, watched and went back in. Wetherells comments about Fulford led to some raised eyebrows among observers, noting that it is unusual for the appeal court to make such critical remarks about a sitting judge. Wetherell also pointedly asked Mowrey if fishermen supported reversing the order because it found the net ban was unconstitutional, which went well beyond the relief shermen had sought from the trial court. Mowrey merely said that fishermen were seeking to have the net rules thrown out. Judge Bradford L. Thomas appeared to follow the logic of the shermens case, asking questions about the purpose of the two-inch rule and whether there was a legitimate purpose beyond an ease of law enforcement. Glogau contended that constituted a rational basis for the rule and was therefore within the agencys discretion. The third judge on the panel, Simone Marstiller, asked very few questions and it was dif cult to try to gauge her reasoning on the issue. The net ban amendment was approved by voters in 1994 to outlaw gill and entangling nets in state waters. It did leave shermen with two 500 square foot nets and speci cally exempted cast nets as not being gill nets. The stated purpose of the amendment was to protect marine resources from over shing and waste. But the crux of the problem right away was the issue that all nets gill. The Marine Fisheries Commission, precursor to the FWC, sought to create a bright line between gill nets and legal nets by creating a maximum mesh size of two inches stretched, and outlawing mono lament. For years, fishermen have fought the two-inch rule, rst arguing that the size is arbitrary there is no scienti c basis for the rule. After litigating that, and ultimately losing at the appeal court level under the rational basis test that is, a law or rule is presumed legal if it is rationally related to a legitimate government purpose. But fishermen using the two-inch nets claimed it caused them to violate the very purpose of the amendment, because the small mesh caught 90 percent small juvenile sh sh that werent legal to possess or sell while larger, legal sh escaped. Fulford looked at it in reverse: if all nets gill, then all nets are illegal except cast nets. And the FWC cannot create rules that make exception to the constitutional provision. The net ban amendment is clear and unambiguous, Fulford wrote. The wording that leads to this result that all nets in Florida are illegal except for a cast net is not caused by an interpretation. Its the clear and plain language of the amendment. The contradiction in the Florida Constitution is not the only issue rendered absurd in this case. It is also absurd that a net as de ned by FWC as lawful for the mullet shermen to use, cannot even be used in the manner prescribed by FWC to catch legal sh. Even FWCs own expert testi ed to that fact. So even though a court has previously determined that the method as adopted by FWC had a rational basis at the time the rule was adopted, its prescribed use is a physical impossibility. Perhaps as many as 100 fishermen from around the state were outside the Tallahassee court before oral arguments, many carrying signs. Wakulla fishermen Ronald Fred Crum, Jonas Porter, and Keith Ward who are the named plaintiffs in the original trial were outside the court. Most of the shermen were wearing their Fishing for Freedom Tshirts with Politics vs. Biology on the back, which is their claim that net rules are created and enforced for political reasons, not based on any science. Prior to the start of the case, many shermen found out they wouldnt be allowed inside the court wearing T-shirts and they had to run to stores to buy shirts with collars so they could get in the courthouse.Appeal court hears oral arguments in net case PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENGavin Tucker, 8, of Pasco County, holds up a sign outside the First District Court of Appeal that reads: The net ban was passed with lies. Wakulla sherman Jonas Porter, the rst sherman ever charged with violation of the net ban and a plaintiff in the current case, outside the appeal court before oral arguments last week. WITH SPECIAL GUESTTOM ROBERTSSopchoppyOpry.com Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information ANDTHE WAY UP BANDSOUTH BOUND BAND Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. 1 00005-400 P-0000600 $370.23 ADT SECURITY SERVICES INC PROPERTY TAX DEPARTMENT P O BOX 5006 BOCA RATON, FL 33431-0806 2 00040-000 P-0003100 $4,241.25 ANGELOS SEAFOOD RESTAURANT H/O ANGELO E PETRANDIS P O BOX 159 PANACEA, FL 32346 3 00045-025 P-0003400 $1,695.97 ATTACK ONE FIRE MANAGEMENT SERVICE 342 GUY STRICKLAND RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 4 00280-001 P-0013900 $1,849.11 DUGGAR EXCAVATING INC 963 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 5 00711-000 P-0026000 $69.73 GEE & TEE INC D/B/A LINDYS CHICKEN 2120 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 6 00851-000 P-0030000 $2,072.45 M T S DIRECTIONAL BORING INC 1336 LANSDOWNE RD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 7 00908-000 P-0031600 $235.50 OCHLOCKONEE BAY REALTY TIMOTHY R JORDAN P O BOX 556 PANACEA, FL 32346-0556 8 00915-005 P-0032000 $110.65 OUZTS TOO 7968 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 9 00990-001 P-0034700 $5,161.23 LAND OF WAKULLA INC P O BOX 1137 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 10 01120-000 P-0038600 $651.29 ROSHAN QSR INC SUBWAY OF CRAWWFORVILLE 5010 THORNTON DR SUMMERVILLE, SC 29485 11 01291-301 P-0042500 $826.58 TENNCO LEASING DBA: EDA LEASING 408 B RIVERVIEW DRIVE SHELBYVILLE, TN 37160-3843 12 01612-000 P-0049800 $204.13 ECONOMY AUTO SALVAGE LLC 572 WOODVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 13 01627-000 P-0050600 $3,960.75 SUMMITT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 313 WILLIAMS ST STE 9 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 14 01856-000 P-0064900 $3,861.19 GULF COAST ICE DIST. LLC 3919 CHAIRES CROSSR0AD ATTN: ED RICORD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 15 01862-000 P-0065500 $2,647.93 BEST VALUE TIRE & AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALTIES, LLC 2106 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 16 01865-000 P-0065800 $244.97 CYBER CENTER NILAN ROVINA INC. 5320 SANDERLING RIDGE DR LITHIA, FL 33547NOTICE OF DELINQUENT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES FOR 2013AS PROVIDED BY CHAPTER 197.016, ACTS OF 1972, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR 2013 ARE NOW DELINQUENT AND BEGINNING WITH APRIL 1, SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST OF 1-1/2% PER MONTH, PLUS THE PROPORTIONATE COST OF PUBLISHING THIS NOTICE. UNLESS THE AMOUNT SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW, WHICH INCLUDES THE COST OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND PENALTIES, ARE PAID BY THE LAST DAY OF MAY 2014, WARRANTS WILL BE ISSUED HEREON DIRECTING LEVY UPON AND SEIZURE OF THE TANGIBLE PERSONALPROPERTY OF THE TAXPAYERS.NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Meeting on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. at the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL. Purpose of Meeting: To give citizens an opportunity to become acquainted with the proposed wastewater system improvements and to comment on such items as to the economic and environmental impacts, service area, alternatives to the project and other matters of concern. This meeting will include discussion of the application process, and County action relative to approving, executing, and submitting a formal application to the USDA Rural Development for grant and local approval. Any questions may be directed to David Edwards, County Administrator, 850-926-0919. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla. comMAY 22, 2014 Notice of Public Hearing The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, June 9, 2014, beginning at 7:00 PM and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, July 14, 2014, beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Applicant: Angelo Petrandis Agent: Edwin Brown and Associates Proposal: replat lot 10 of Georges Lighthouse Pointe Marina Village Unit 2 Tax ID Number: 12-6s-02w-292-03879-C10 Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6) Existing Zoning: R-3 (Section 5-32, LDC) FEMA Flood Info: V20 zone on Panel 0485-E Parcel Size: 0.181+/acres Location: 9-J Mashes Sands Road Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing and Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.comMAY 22, 2014Concerning an Application for Final Plat By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netPlans for Sopchoppys new Downtown City Park are moving forward. The park will provide an intimate venue for music, a safe and accessible walking path, and natural playscapes for the citys younger generations. The park is currently comprised of three lots, approximately two acres, donated by the Beasley family, across to the old railroad depot. The senior citizens thrift shop, which is housed in a small trailer on the property, will be removed. The thrift shop will be relocated to the water department building. City commissioner Lara Edwards is spearheading the plans of the new park. Maurice Langston at the Senior Citizens Center is very excited to be getting the ladies out of that old dilapidated trailer, Edwards said. Wilderness Graphics in Tallahassee has designed the parks preliminary sketch. The park will feature a music pavilion in the style of a small amphitheater. A well-lit, tree-shaded walking path will also weave through the property. The focus is the music pavilion, Edwards said. It will be geared around small shows and local events, like Worm Gruntin and Fourth of July. And as big as Worm Gruntin is getting, the Christmas festival, and the Fourth of July, this park could be used for additional vendors. The walking path will be designed with safety and accessibility in mind. Since this is such a central and safe location right in the middle of Sopchoppy, it will be lit up and be made of a pervious materials for bikes, wheelchairs and scooters, Edwards said. In addition to that, there will be a lawn area. People can bring blankets and chairs. We could have movies in the park, or churches could do things here. The 10 p.m. noise ordinance will stay in effect. The nearest neighbor happens to be a musician, and Edwards said he is OK with the plans. Edwards said the new park is intended to bring some modern recreation into Sopchoppy. We are not trying to replace our existing city park, Edwards said. The existing city park is a different venue. This will be a nice, central walking park. Edwards said many of the trees under 14 inches or of poor quality will be cleared following a tree survey, but larger trees, like the shady and statuesque magnolias, will be left for people to enjoy. Any healthy trees will stay, as long as they are not on the trail or the seating area for the pavilion, Edwards said. Another modern aspect of the park will be natural playscapes for children, and freespirited adults, to enjoy. A natural playscape is defined as a space with as little man-made components as possible. Using native plants, natural grading and trees, playscapes represent a natural place. Playscapes are designed with the intent of bringing children back to nature, and have much lower injury rates then standard playgrounds. We want to work with our natural features, Edwards said. Edwards said apart from the tails and pavilion, there will be as little impact on the environment as possible. There is currently no parking lot in the plans. Guests can park on the side of the road, and use the restrooms at the old train depot. A fence might be added in the future to keep pets and children from wandering into the street. At the last meeting of the Sopchoppy City Commission, approval was granted for a topographical map and tree survey for the park. At the meeting, Edwards said she was able to get a bargain on the map and survey, costing $400. Edwards she has, and will continue, to apply for CDBG grants to fund the playscapes. Otherwise well come up with a veyear plan coming from the budget, Edwards said. Well do it a little bit at a time, and keep it relatively simple. As soon as Wilderness Graphics submits a budget proposal, construction of the music pavilion will be underway. Creation the walking path will follow. Edwards said the board is backing her completely. The reason I grabbed a hold of this, is because I want to see some improvement to downtown Sopchoppy, Edwards aid. And people who pay their taxes, and our water company customers, are seeing a bene t. Sopchoppy hasnt really had any improvements right here on Rose Street in so long. I have a four year old, and I want to leave something that will bene t him for a very long time. Edwards said the city has tried to reach the individual who owns another lot attached to the property, to expand the area. There has been no response, but the plans are moving forward anyway.Sopchoppy has plans for a downtown park WILDERNESS GRAPHICSThe new park is to be located on the property across from the railroad depot.

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comI never felt that sentimental about Mothers Day and Fathers Day as an ingrate teenager. But as Ive left my teens and 20s behind, my appreciation for my parents has grown. Im not a mom yet, but the older I get, the more perspective I have on their parenting efforts. It took me too long to fully appreciate how my parents, Robert and Debra, took steps to set me up for success. Ever since rst grade, I struggled with math. As much as I hated it, my mom made sure I was signed up for tutoring, and got extra help. My dad also spent probably hundreds of hours over the years at the dinner table with me, my math homework spread out, going over and over long division and fractions concepts my brain never absorbed. Im sure my dad would have rather been doing something more enjoyable than coaching his red-faced, teary-eyed, attentionde cit daughter in mathematical notions I made little effort to retain. But he didnt want me to fail. My mom made sure my sister and I had the little extras that are largely meaningful today braces, prom dresses, travel, extracurricular pursuits, exposure to the arts and so much more. Together they invested and saved to send me to college. They provided me with a reliable car. They took me grocery shopping on visits home. They knew education was the key to success, a vehicle was needed to gain work experience, and the ramen noodles would keep me alive long enough to hopefully make something of myself. (Im sure they had moments of doubt when I would stay out all night without calling; or when they found beer receipts from the extra cash they generously gave me when I whined about being broke.) If my parents hadnt made sacrices for me, I would not be equipped with the values to help my own future children succeed. I have their parents to thank for that too. I think about my dads grandparents making the life-altering decision to cross the ocean from Calabria, Italy, with their bevy of children, to New York in the early 1920s. Am I successful because my greatgrandparents took that risk? Or looking back even farther my mothers ancestors, the Waldensians were members of an ancient Christian movement who were persecuted for their beliefs. I come from people who died for what they believed. Is this legacy part of my success as well? Understanding the sacri ces and efforts of my folks, and their folks, has deepened my perspective on society too. One doesnt choose their parents. You just get lucky. And tragically, some do not. I know people whose parents did little to nothing to help them succeed. While many followed suit, others made it through on their own determination and drive. If their parents, and their parents parents, never made sacri ces to ensure a successful lineage, those values did not exist to continue that tradition. Can anyone be blamed? So I take the days we honor our parents more seriously now. And I hope my own kids will one day attribute their success to the sacri cial heritage of Robert and Debra.Nicole Zema is the reporter at The Wakulla News. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Mad Anthonys Signs are to help owners find pets Programs offered all summer long War Eagles playoff hopes end with 8-7 loss to Mosley Wakulla eyes $3.8M in state projects Gym open at Community Center Underwater Wakulla May 8, 2014 Spurweed and its stickers lie in waitthewakullanews.com Wetlands are irreplaceable resource anks for those who came to my help Charter review board needs your inputA grown-up perspective on my parents e orts Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.net Follow us on Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE: Editor, The News: Almost everyone knows how important our wetlands are to us. Wetlands are our nations most irreplaceable resource. They provide ood control, they help remove pollutants from our water, they protect shorelines, provide habitat for wildlife, and serve important recreational functions. Our shing industry depends very heavily on the health of our wetlands. But, even though our commissioners know the value of wetlands, four of them are ready to take away our local wetland protections and turn the control over to the Department of Environmental Protection, an agency that appears not to believe in protecting this valuable resource. DEP buffer or setback zones range from zero to 25 feet hardly enough footage to protect our water quality and provide wildlife habits. Anyone who has been in Middle or South Florida recently or read the stories about Floridas vanishing springs and polluted water can see what happens when DEP tries to protect our wetlands. It seems they simply cannot provide the oversight or the necessary enforcement, and DEPs mitigation measures still allow vast destruction of wetland habitats. When this wetlands ordinance change request rst came up in our county it was because some people wanted to be able to develop property along the coast. Now some commissioners are saying that taking away our county Wetlands Ordinance is a property rights issue and that they dont like being told what they can and cannot do with their land. We have laws and regulations in all walks of life. In most areas of the country you just cant do whatever you want to with your land. And, if you dont pay your taxes, you will nd that the property you thought was yours gets sold out from under you so is it really even your property? All private land in our county is subject to various zoning laws and setbacks. Our building and zoning codes are complex and restrictive. You cant build a simple shed without getting a building permit. You cant put mobile homes on some property. There are setbacks that say you cant build within a certain number of feet from the property line. Those are just a few of our restrictive regulations. So if the commissioners really wanted to give property rights back, then why are they not addressing some of these other laws and ordinances? Why are they focusing on taking away wetland buffers; buffers which actually add to the overall bene t for the people and the wildlife living in the county? We sometimes think we are the masters of the world and that we can change the environment to suit our perceived needs, but we should stop and think about the long-term consequences of the changes that will happen if people are allowed to destroy wildlife habitats, or allow fertilizer and other runoff to pollute our water, or allow the building of high density developments at the very edge of our wetlands and coastline. Sure, many people know that our wetlands need to be protected, but some people make mistakes, or they dont think things through, or they simply dont care about other people, wildlife, or the wetlands. Thats why we need our LOCAL Wetland Ordinance so that we have the wetland buffer footage that was deemed appropriate for our area and so that we can be sure, right here in our own county, that our wetlands and our water will be protected. Please vote YES on the ballot in November so that we KEEP our local Wetlands Ordinance. Sandy Tedder Sopchoppy There will be no changes to your solid waste collection for the Memorial Day Holiday on Monday, May 26. All services will be completed on your normal scheduled day. Waste Pro would like to thank you and wish you all a happy and safe holiday.No changes to holiday Waste Pro pickup Family appreciates supportEditor, The News: The family of Betty Drake would like to extend our sincere thank you to the Big Bend Hospice, Wakulla team for their special care, friends, neighbors and all those who gave us comfort, support, food, owers and prayers during a very dif cult dif cult time. We are blessed. The Bud Drake familyEditor, The News: I would like to express my appreciation to the paramedics and Wakulla County Commissioners who came to my assistance at the end of the April 21 Commission meeting. Unfortunately, when I got up to leave the meeting, I stumbled, whacked my head against the wall, and fell to the ground. Paramedics who happened to be in attendance at the meeting came to my assistance almost instantaneously. Moments later, the county commissioners arrived from the podium and witnessed that the paramedics had the situation well under control. I was taken by ambulance to a Tallahassee hospital where they ran a series of test and determined that the nasty-looking hickey on my head was only super cial. I was released and returned home in the wee hours of the morning. Many, many thanks to the paramedics who performed exceptionally well and to the county commissioners who arrived after the paramedics, were concerned about my wellbeing, and witnessed that everything was under control. God bless you all. Lorraine G. Lambou vwak@msn.comEditor, The News: The Wakulla County Charter Review Commission has had several meetings over the last couple of months to discuss possible revisions to the Wakulla County Charter. These proposed revisions will ultimately be placed on the General Election Ballot and voted on by the registered voters in Wakulla County. Although the meetings are open to the public, the attendance by the public has been very limited. Several key revisions to the Charter have been proposed and discussed by the CRC, including Non-Partisan Elections, Single Member Districts for BOCC Members, Residency Requirements For Elected Of cials, Budget/Reserve Policies, Term Limits, Appointment vs. Election Of School Superintendent, Future CRC Member Makeup, and Ordinance/Charter Changes Via The Petition Process. As you can denote, these items brought forth to the CRC could impact each and every citizen in Wakulla County. In turn, it would be advantageous to have more citizen input at these meetings. The charge of the CRC is not to determine if a proposed revision is right or wrong. Rather, the CRC is charged with determining if a proposal has enough support to go forth to be placed on the ballot. Suf cient support is gauged by public input, CRC discussions, and ultimately a vote by the CRC. If the proposal does have suf cient support, the CRC works to craft language that will help voters understand what is being proposed. In essence, the CRC is the conduit for the citizenry to put a proposed Charter revision on the ballot. Please consider attending an upcoming meeting of the CRC. The meetings are open to the public and citizens are provided an opportunity (and encouraged) to speak at the meetings. It is also anticipated that in the very near future, two public workshops will take place pertaining to proposed revisions. As with each CRC Meeting, these workshops will be ofcially announced by county staff including date/time/location. Please consider attending an upcoming meeting and providing input to potential revisions to YOUR County Charter. I can be reached at fcrussell92@ gmail.com, should you have any comments, questions, or concerns, pertaining to the CRC. Respectfully, Chris Russell Chairman Wakulla County Charter Review Commission

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 5A SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN pat h EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Mike Carlton drawn from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked around town:Have you or your family served in a foreign conflict?ALLEN KILLINGSWORTH ACE HARDWAREMy grandpa was in World War II and the Korean War. Three of my uncles were in Vietnam. AUBREY ARDTHE FOOD GIANTI didnt serve in the con ict, but served in the Army during the Vietnam War. RICKY BARTON CONSTRUCTION BEN WITHERSMy great grandaddy and my grandaddy both served in World War II. We also had family who served in the Civil War. My grandpa was in WWII and my father-in-law served during WWII for 4 years, he was an engineer. JEFF ALCORNCOOKGINGER HARRELLHOUSEWIFEMy great grandfather served in the Korean War for the Army. He was in the service for 20 years. Compiled by Lynda Kinsey www.cjmalphursseptic.com Your Complete Septic Service rr sTM LIC #SM0951220 to Receive $10 OFF any septic tank pumping.Mention this Ad SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW From Front PageStill, with all the success and accolades and achievements and everything as great a school district as this is, I would be foolish to think its because I was a school board member, he said. The success goes back to the districts team concept I think we have the absolute best people, employees, district staff, teachers. In this team concept, everybody who plays a role in the students day at school is important the bus drivers, teachers, administrators, lunch room staff, maintence workers. It all works to keep the district going. I have no doubt that the district will continue to be successful and continue to grow, Evans said.Jerry Evans wont seek re-election to school boardStaff ReportWakulla County will hold its annual Memorial Day Ceremony on Memorial Day, Monday, May 26, in front of the courthouse beginning at 10 a.m. This memorial ceremony is dedicated to the lasting memory and sacred honor of the brave American servicemen and servicewomen who gave their lives for our country and a special emphasis of Wakulla Countys own heroes. This years ceremony includes keynote speaker Commissioner Ralph Thomas and will highlight patriotic music, laying of the wreath, and raising of the ag. I would like to encourage everyone to remember the sacri ces of veterans who have fought for our freedom and hope each can do so by attending our ceremony on Monday, May 26th, said County Administrator David Edwards. For more information, contact Jessica Welch, Communications & Public Services Director at (850) 926-0919 ext. 706 or jwelch@mywakulla.com.Memorial Day ceremony set at courthouse

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Reinhert St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor850 745-8359Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchYour church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Why did God give us coffee? Crawfordville UMC to hold fundraiser May 31The Crawfordville United Methodist Church (CUMC) is sponsoring a festival to kick off the summer. There will be local vendors, crafts, food, games and BINGO! The festival is on May 31 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Booth spaces cost $15. Please contact Christina DeProspero at F_christina@hotmail.com or (850) 591-0082 to reserve your space now. Proceeds from the food and games goes to the 2014 CUMC Mission trip to Ecuador. Mount Trial to celebrate 12th pastoral anniversaryThe Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church will be celebrating Pastor J. Bernard Plummers 12th pastoral anniversary, starting with a pastoral banquet on Saturday, May 31, at 6 p.m. at The Wakulla Shriners Club, on Highway 319 South, followed with a close-out service, the next day, Sunday, June 1, at 11 a.m., at Mount Trial. Mount Trial is located at 1418 Sopchoppy Highway in Buckhorn. Contact Deacon Samuel Hordges (850) 321-1844), or, any other Mount Trial Church member, for tickets. Carrabelle UMC to hold Market Days in CarrabelleCarrabelle United Methodist Church and Gods Ministry for the Needy is preparing for its Market Days May Gathering on Saturday, May 31, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop till you drop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3, including your drink! Music will be provided by local talent. Remember God teaches us that we must care for orphans and widows in their distress. As He works through us and our fundraising ministry, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Bring your friends and neighbors and receive a blessing. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t.The ministry is free. Volunteers needed for prison ministryCaring, Christian volunteers are needed to go to prison on Saturday, May 31. The Bill Glass Prison Ministrys A Day of Champions will team athletes, entertainers, musicians and volunteers to share their stories and their faith with inmates at seven area correctional facilities. If you are willing to step behind the prison walls to share the gospel with men and women eager to turn their lives toward God, contact the Bill Glass Prison Ministry in Dallas at (972) 298-1101 or visit the website at BillGlass.org/tallahassee. Volunteers will receive practical information and simple evangelistic tools to guide them on their mission. Volunteer for A Day of Champions Prison Ministry on Saturday, May 31. Contest seeks spiritual poetsA $1,000 grand prize is being offered in a special religious poetry contest sponsored by the Rainbow Poets, free to everyone. The deadline for entering is June 14. To enter, send one poem only of 21 lines or less to Free Poetry Contest, PO Box 21, Talent OR 97540. Or enter on-line www.rainbowpoets. com. Be sure your name and address appears on the page with your poem. A winners list will be sent to all entrants. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERThis week I came faceto-face with a genuine dilemma. I had several meetings across town and for some reason I miscalculated and ended up with a 2 1/2 hour gap between meetings. I hate to waste time, but if I drove back to my ofce, I would simply have to return to my meeting later and with the cost of gas these days, one cannot be too cautious. I remedied the situation by stopping in a small coffee shop for cup of joe. As far as I am concerned, there is no bad time to have a cup of coffee, in spite of the price. I ordered my coffee and when the waitress brought it to me, I began to think about coffee. Why did God give us coffee? Then my mind went back to my grandfather, whose greatest gift to me was a love of coffee. Nobody loved coffee more. I remember one of his favorite quotes, You can always tell a man by the coffee he drinks. Anathema to my grandfather was the idea of instant coffee. No man, in his judgment, would ever drink anything of the kind. If a man would drink instant coffee, my grandfather perked, theres no telling what else he would do. Never trust a man who drinks instant coffee. Making coffee was an art form to my grandfather. There was a right way and a wrong way to make coffee, and he always insisted on the right way. Of course, the right way was the way he made coffee. In grandfathers kitchen was an old woodburning cook stove. On this old-fashioned stove, my grandfather brewed his famous mud broth. He never allowed my grandmother to make the brew; it was his job, which he took seriously. Once for his birthday, we all chipped in and bought him an electric coffee pot. I had never seen my grandfather so mad. When he saw what it was, he would not even take it out of the box. He had strong ideas about coffee and how it should be brewed and woe be to the person who contradicted his ideas. Grandfather always kept a fire in the old wood cook stove and on the back of the stove he kept his coffee pot, a large 2-gallon pot one of those old-fashioned percolators long since gone out of style. The coffee was always on, and no matter when you stopped in to see him, he always had fresh coffee brewing. When I say fresh, I need to explain. Actually, the coffee was only fresh on Sunday. On Saturday night, he routinely emptied the coffee pot and prepared fresh coffee for Sunday morning. He had an old coffee grinder and ground the coffee beans on Saturday night. He put some other things in the coffee, I have never gured out what. One thing I know he put in was a crushed eggshell. What it did to his coffee, I have no idea but grandfather was sure it was an important ingredient. The freshly ground coffee beans were put in, the pot filled with fresh water and set on the back of the stove to slowly perk. This coffee would last the entire week. The coffee was so strong on Sunday that if it did not wake you in the morning, you were dead. In fact, Cousin Ernie died on a Sunday afternoon, so my grandfather tells the story, and one sip of his black coffee roused him and he lived seven more years, which was unfortunate for grandfather, as he had to support him. Before going to bed each evening my grandfather took care of his coffee. He would freshly grind a few coffee beans, sprinkle it on top of the old coffee grounds and then add a newly crushed eggshell. Then he would re ll the coffee pot with water. His coffee percolated 24/7 and by Saturday it was so strong you needed a half-cup of sugar just to drink one cup. It was thick enough to use as syrup on your pancakes, but so strong, it dissolved your pancakes before you could eat them. My grandmother once tried washing the coffee pot. When my grandfather saw her, he became furious, Never wash that coffee pot, he spouted, youll ruin its character and a coffee pot needs a lot of character to make good coffee. In pondering my grandfather, I thought about my Heavenly Father and His gifts. The Bible puts it this way; Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning (James 1:17 KJV.) I really do not know why God gave us coffee, but I do know Gods character is of such a nature that it never diminishes His ability to bless me each day..The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. OUT TO PASTOR In depth home bible studies are available 3055 Crawfordville Hwy.Sun. Services 2:30

PAGE 7

By ETHEL SKIPPERMay 23, 2014 will mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of the late Charlotte Harris Rosier, known to many as Mama Charlotte. Mama Charlotte was from Hyde Park, and was the daughter of Goldwire and Alberta Harris. At the age of 14 she moved to Sopchoppy, and at the age 19 was joined in holy matrimony to John E. Rosier. To this union nine children were born John Jr., Ezella, Ethel, Alberta, Callie, Joseph, Meriddie, Ruth, Mary. Proverbs 31:10 asks a very important question: Who Can Find a Virtuous Woman? For her price is far above rubies. Mama Charlotte Rosier was indeed a virtuous woman and her price was far above rubies. She had many attributes. These attributes included love, humility, faith, strength, patience, generosity, integrity, kindness, courage, and wisdom, just to name a few. She was a woman who knew she was of great worth to God. She had a special kind of heart and reached out to those in need. Mama Charlotte was an inspiration to her family, church, and community. This great woman was blessed among many. In addition to raising her own children, Mama Charlotte raised many foster children and provided food, clothes, medicine, day care, elder care, and rehabilitation and medical services to numerous others in her family and in the community. She also purchased property on which she built homes and moved trailers to accommodate the homeless. After Mama Charlottes death in 1989, the Charlotte Rosier Quality Care Home opened on March 1, 1990 in Tallahassee in her honor. The home was operated by Wendy GavinBeard, Mama Charlottes granddaughter, and her husband, Dr. Timothy Beard and provided services to moderate, minimal, and severely disabled individuals. Transportation, home training, and other related services were also provided. In February 1999, Mama Charlottes children dedicated the Charlotte Harris Rosier Memorial Outreach Center. The purpose of this center is to honor the many contributions Mama Charlotte made to the community. Prior to Mama Charlottes death, the Rosier Family came together each year during the month of February for the Annual Charlotte Harris Rosier Day. This annual celebration was held at the Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven in Sopchoppy, and included singing, praying, sharing, giving, comfort, support, encouragement, and love. After Mama Charlottes death, the Rosier family has continued the Annual Charlotte Harris Rosier Day. This annual celebration is held at various locations during the month of February and honors the legacy of both Mama Charlotte and her husband, the late John Rosier Sr. The Rosier family continues to pass on the principles and traditions of their parents to the generations that follow. The children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and foster children of the late John and Charlotte Harris Rosier continue to do all they can do to build, broaden, and sustain the Rosier family and to develop a lasting legacy. What is the legacy? L = Love, E = Educate your family which will help to nurture a brighter future, G = Give of yourself, A = Adore your family, C = Create Christ-centered worship for your family, Y = Yield to the discipline for building covenant relationships which will last beyond your lifetime. Mama Charlotte was indeed a Good Samaritan who touched the lives of many people. Her love, generosity, and personal commitment to her family will never be forgotten. Submitted by the family of Charlotte Harris Rosier.Jason Ryan Coshatt, 29, died unexpectedly on May 12, 2014 in Tallahassee. Visitation will be held Sunday, May 25, 2014 from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville. A memorial service will follow at 4 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to FSU Credit Union 2655-C, Crawfordville FL 32327 for Nathan and Jonathan Coshatt, re: Robert Coshatt. Survivors include two sons, Nathan Coshatt and Jonathan Coshatt and their sister, Chelsey Pritchard; father, Robert Coshatt (Penny); mother, Lori Zahniser (Ed); sisters, Mary Ann Ferrero, Windy Stewart (Brian) and Jessica Griner; brothers, John Coshatt, Clay Coshatt (Amber) and Shawn Coshatt; and five nieces and nephews: Cierra DelValle, Shelby DelValle, Wyatt DelValle, Alex Stewart and Clayton Coshatt. He was predeceased by numerous grandparents and a son, Jackson Rowe Coshatt. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel, Crawfordville, is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 7ARobert Rivieccio, 44, of Port Charlotte,passed away Friday, April 25, 2014. He was born March 16, 1970, in Mineola, N.Y., the son of Mario and Victoria (nee Hart) Rivieccio. Survivors include his wife of 10 years, Julie; daughters, Mia and Zoe; mother, Victoria; brothers, Mario (Maureen) and Anthony (Laura); in-laws, Charlie and Marlene Hone; sister-in-law, Jan (Mitch) House; a niece and nephew; and two goddaughters. A scholarship in his memory at Florida State University is being organized to benefit students in the Hospitality Management program. To donate, visit the website, http:// www.youcaring. com/other/robertrivieccio-scholarship-fund/172065.Oma L. Linzy Baxley, 88, of Crawfordville, died May 14, 2014 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She was born Feb. 7, 1926 in Ivan to Hayward R. and Maude (Strickland) Linzy. She was predeceased by her husbands, Curtis B. Herring in 1996 and William Baxley in 2009; and her six brothers and sisters and a grandson. Survivors include her sons, Craig (Mary) Herring of Panama City Beach, Gary (David) Herring of Tampa and John Henry (Belinda) Herring of Woodville; daughter, Joan (Charles) Herring-Smith of Crawfordville; two grandchildren; four greatgrandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. Visitation was held Thursday, May 15, 2014, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Culleys Meadowwood Funeral Home, Riggins Road Chapel, Tallahassee. Graveside funeral services were held on Friday, May 16, 2014, at 10 a.m. at Whiddon Lake Cemetery in Crawfordville. Arrangements were under the direction of Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home in Tallahassee.Juanita Joan Young, loving mother and dear friend, passed away Sunday, May 18, 2014 in Tallahassee. She was 86 years old. Mrs. Young was a devoted mother and homemaker throughout her life. One of her greatest passions was art. She enjoyed still painting with acrylics and oils, charcoal drawings and creating stained glass. Survivors include her son, Skip Young; daughter, Mary Ann Watts (Brad); son-inlaw; Charlie Krazit; brother, Bill Carter; sister-in-law, Nancy Carter; five grandsons, Trey, Justin, Brian, Andy, and Harry; one granddaughter, Brooke; and three great-grandsons, Tripp, Pepper and Tate. She was predeceased by her husband of 64 years, Lee Young; a son, Shea Young; and a daughter, Dale Krazit. Graveside services were held on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 1 p.m. at 3Y Ranch Cemetery, in Crawfordville. The family will receive friends from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. at the gravesite. In lieu of owers donations can be made to the American Stroke Association, 7272 Greenville Ave. Dallas TX 75231. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is assisting the family with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Mary Stansbury Butera, 95, passed away on May 18, 2014. Mary was born in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. on June 26, 1918, and moved to Sopchoppy in 1923 with her family. After graduating from Sopchoppy High School in 1936 as Valedictorian, she worked for S. Walter Revell, Superintendent of Schools. During World War II, Mary organized the USO in Sopchoppy and became the youngest USO president in the United States. In 1946, she married the love of her life, the late Charles (Charlie) Butera and moved to Richmond Hill, Queens and later to Levittown, N.Y., where she eventually went to work for Gilson Uniform Company as a bookkeeper. In 1984, Mary and her husband retired and returned to Sopchoppy, where she resided until her death. Mary was a beloved member of the community and was frequently involved in community activities. She was a member of the Sopchoppy Homemakers and the Wakulla County Library Board, delivered Meals on Wheels for the Wakulla Senior Center, and was a devoted member of Christ Church Anglican in Crawfordville. Mary is survived by her daughter, Brenda Carter (Jack) of Cuddebackville, N.Y.; her grandson, John Carter (Annica) of Hjo, Sweden; two granddaughters, Kristen Wolf (Mark) of Middletown, N.Y., and Jennifer DiLeo (Christopher) of Port Jervis, N.Y.; three great-grandchildren, Christofer, Jonathan, and Emelie Carter; and many, many dear friends and family members. A memorial service will be held at Christ Church Anglican in Crawfordville at a later date. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd Tallahassee FL 32308 or Christ Church Anglican, Crawfordville, 3383 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Obituaries Oma L. Linzy Baxley Mary Sansbury Butera Jason Ryan Coshatt Robert Rivieccio Juanita Joan Young Robert Rivieccio Mary Stansbury Butera Oma L. Linzey Baxley Juanita Joan Young Jason Ryan Coshatt Charlotte Rosier was a good Samaritan Buckhorn NewsSPECIAL TO THE NEWSCharlotte Rosier

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Donor provides piano to Eden Springs RehabBy Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.netThe donation of a piano to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center has lled the dining hall with beautiful music once again. A local donor, who wishes to remain anonymous, provided the center with the piano after seeing a letter to the editor requesting one in The Wakulla News. A group of four or ve local musicians gather every Wednesday evening to provide residents with familiar songs. A working piano is essential to the tradition. Mary Watson, who has volunteered to play piano and visit with residents at Eden Springs for about 12 years, said the old piano nally bit the dust. She was even bringing a keyboard since the piano was unusable. The old piano died, Watson said. It was ragged out and torn up. This is important to the elderly, and they should not be denied anything that brings them comfort and joy, and makes them feel good. Watson and the other musicians expressed deep gratitude for the anonymous donation. This person is a Good Samaritan, Watson said. Watson said regardless of rain, sleet, hail or cold, the musicians are dedicated to showing up every Wednesday night. It costs us nothing, Watson said. These are the sweetest people in the world, and this is their home. This is where they live, and we want to bring joy to them. Musicians Mike Kinsey, Berney Barwick, Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Roberts, Bill Petty, Mike and Shirley McKenzie sing and play gospel and country standards like Old Country Church, Will the Circle be Unbroken, Ill Fly Away, and Beulah Land. An anonymous donor provided a piano to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center. A group of local musicians, including pianist Mary Watson, have gathered to play for residents every Wednesday night for more than a decade. Mike Kinsey plays guitar in the background.NICOLE ZEMA Annually in the United States, 800,000 dog bites are severe enough to require medical treatment, and small children run the highest risk of being bitten. Most bites occur in the home or by a dog you may know. Even the sweetest, cuddliest dog can bite if provoked or pestered. There are three keys to bite prevention: learn to understand canine behavior, take the time to socialize and train all dogs the younger the better and teach children to respect all dogs, starting with their furry buddies at home. Children should learn to treat every dog the way they would want to be treated. That means no hitting, pulling, pinching, poking or yanking. Never allow a child to be physically abusive to a dog. This can cause the dog to lash out and it tells the child that its OK to harm another living thing. Even playful roughhousing can hurt a dog and may cause a negative reaction. An example is Dottie, our Dalmatian when my son was growing up. She was very protective and loved being outside playing with the kids, accompanying them on their walks through the woods and on occasion trying to slither onto the school bus. Her job was to protect them from snakes etc., and in general keep an eye on them. She was a great playmate however she did not tolerate having her ears or tail pulled, who does, or her space invaded when sleeping or eating. Her first line of defense was to walk away and nd another place to rest. If not left alone then, she would growl. It was my responsibility to explain that by walking away she ended the play session, and the growl means she will be upset if not left alone, and may snap or bite. Warning signs dogs give before they bite include; yawning (which is one way they try to get rid of stress), lip licking around the mouth (licking his chops which indicates stress), giving you a pleading or helpless look, showing his teeth, curling his upper lip, getting up and moving away from the person or turning his head away from someone, looking down toward the ground, showing the whites of his eyes, scratching his ears, biting his feet or licking himself. Getting up and shaking himself after someone has touched him, his tail is tucked between his legs, he looks at you out of the corner of his eyes, his ears are laid back or the hair on his back is raised are all indicators hes not happy. If hes growling, listen to what hes telling you with his body and his voice. Teach your children the correct way to approach an unfamiliar dog: First get the OK from the owner, hold out your hand, ngers closed, and palm down, slowly toward the dog. Allow the dog to approach your hand and sniff it; wait for the dogs OK. If he wants your affection, he will lower his head, perk ears, or even come closer to you. If the dogs puts his ears back, at on his head, or growls, or cowers, dont pet him; Pat the dog on the chin rather than the top of the head, or along his back. Avoid touching his belly, tail, ears, or feet. Teach your child to always be calm around dogs. High pitched squeals and shouts can make a dog nervous or overly energetic. Even if the dog doesnt bite the child, they can still harm them by jumping on them or tripping them amid all the excitement. Make a habit of teaching your child to stay relaxed and low key when around dogs. Never get close and try to pet a chained dog or dogs behind a fence as they protect their de ned space, and could be aggressive. Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog, no matter how well you know the dog! Please remember to spay/neuter your pets!Tailwagger News... By PETRA SHUFFCHAT Vice President Special to The NewsThe Sopchoppy Fourth of July Volunteer Committee is hosting a fundraiser for their annual Fourth of July Celebration at From The Heart Recording Studio in Sopchoppy, on Saturday, May 31 from noon until 8 p.m. Two years of heavy rains and ooding of the Sopchoppy River have greatly affected the gate receipts, and the committee is holding this fundraiser in order to continue to bring you the Best Fireworks and Celebration in the area. One hundred percent of the proceeds will be used for that purpose. The Committee has joined efforts to provide a full day of food and entertainment for your enjoyment. Hamburger or hotdog lunches will be available from noon to 3 p.m. and a mullet dinner beginning at 3 p.m. and continuing until 7 p.m. A day of musical entertainment begins at noon, running throughout the day until 8 p.m., at From the Heart Recording Studio. The price for a hamburger plate is $5, a hotdog plate is $4 and the mullet dinner is $8. Suggested gate donation for the musical entertainment is $5 for the whole day. Of course, you can always donate up to your hearts desire in support of the celebration. While you are here, please be sure and thank these ne musicians who have volunteered their time and craft to help with our fundraiser. May 31 Musical Lineup: Noon Hot Tamale 1 p.m. Master Chief 1:45 p.m. Rick Ott & Dillon McCall 2 p.m. Aaron Sheppard & Rick Ott 3 p.m. Dean Newman 4 p.m. Susan David 5 p.m. Hot Tamale 6 p.m. Paving Blue 7 p.m. Stone Cold Blues BandHelp fund Sopchoppy Fourth of July eventSpecial to The NewsMiss Sara Elizabeth Stewart and Mr. Thomas Lincoln Moore are pleased to announce their engagement. Sara is the daughter of Rodney and Tara Watts of Scottsburg, VA and Steve and Kristey Stewart of Rougemont, NC. Thomas is the son of Tim and Caryl Moore of Halifax, VA. The bride-elects maternal grandparents are Mike and Carol Conner of Scottsburg, VA. Her paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James Stewart of South Boston, VA, formerly of Tallahassee. The groom-elects maternal grandparents are Mr. And Mrs. E.T. Francis of South Boston, VA and the late Nancy West Francis, formally of Danville, VA. His paternal grandparents are Mrs. Mary P. Moore and the late Henry L. Moore of South Boston, VA. Sara is a recent graduate of the Danville Regional Medical Center Radiology Program. Her future plans are for a career as a Radiographer. Thomas is a 2005 graduate from Halifax County High school. He is currently employed as an Operation Dispatcher at R.O. Harrell, Inc. of South Boston, VA. The wedding will take place on June 28, 2014 in Halifax, VA. Invitations for the event have been sent. The couple will reside in South Boston, VA. Special to The NewsClasses of Crawfordville High School 1935 to 1967 have been invited to attend a nal high school reunion on May 24 at 69 Arran Road. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Reservations were required by the Tuesday, May 20 deadline. Music by Freedom Hill Gospel Quartet and door prizes and drawings will be part of the festivities. The event will be catered by Panacea Coastal Restaurant. For more information, call Jean Dykes at 926-3859 or Kit Tucker at 597-5002.Stewart-Moore to marry in Va. Final Crawfordville High School reunion Saturday

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 9A GREAT GETAWAY 000D4D5 Staff ReportYouths fished at Wakulla Countys best spots for pan sh, bass, white trout, speckled trout, redfish, Spanish mackerel, ounder, cat sh and whiting Saturday, May 17 in the 17th annual Kids Fishing Tournament. The free event wrapped with weigh-ins and awards at Woolley Park in Panacea. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce sponsors the event every year. Winners received trophies and shing poles and the grand prizewinner won two poles and two kayak rentals on the Wakulla River from T-N-T. Deputy Bruce Ashley of the WCSO said he hopes all families take advantage of the fun event. Its tness related, Ashley said. And it exposes kids to the sport of shing. This event has a good history. Ashley said that sheriffs office volunteers make the annual kids shing tournament and Christmas in the Park a possibility. Free lunch was served to participants, and exhibits and in atables were set up for the kids. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge assisted with a shing clinic last weekend, and the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department is a cosponsor with the sheriffs of ce. Submitted winners and weights are as follows: FRESH WATER Pan Fish: Donavan Whaley 1.17 Natlie Whaley 0.89 Kolbie Jones 0.69 Lydia Akins 0.64 Bass Caleb Logan 2.11 Hayden Thomas 1.48 Seth Logan 1.34 Jackson Thomas 1.30 Cat sh Lyda Akins 2.08 Trey Hicks 1.76 Jaxon Taff 1.43 Natlie Whaley 0.80 SALT WATER Flounder Kanoa Tucker 1.04 Kane Tucker 1.01 McKenna Trumbull 0.68 Red Fish Alyssa Johnson 4.61 Spanish Mackerel Strom Lawler 1.36 Jacob Sparby 1.12 Arthur Tompson 0.71 Speckled Trout Allen Willis 2.75 Kanoa Tucker 1.78 Arthur Tompson 1.62 Kane Tucker 1.44 White Trout Justin Price 0.62 Storm Lawler 0.56 Arthur Tompson 0.52 Cameron West 0.52 Whiting Parker Raulerson 0.65 Jessica Barwick 0.53 Emmalin Clark 0.48 Ethan Raker 0.24Kids win prizes in 17th WCSO shing tourneyPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPictured with David Moody of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and Peggy Bennett of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department, from top left, are: Allen Willis; Justin Price; Jacob Sparby; and Kanoa Tucker. Rotary distributes 350 oscillating fans PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Rotary Club of Wakulla bought 350 oscillating fans to distribute to those who need them throughout the community. Pictured at left, Rotarian Jo Ann Palmer Elma Lopez-Gillette at the Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. At right, Palmer and Brad Harvey with John Heys of First Baptist Church. Staff ReportAbout 30 people participated in a spearfshing contest sponsored by the Wakulla Diving Center on May 17. Spear shers and their families then gathered at the center to clean and fry their catches with the assistance and extra sh from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea. Gregg Stanton, director of the Wakulla Diving Center, said the spear shing contest is the rst of hopefully many more to come. Prizes for the biggest sh were donated from local businesses, and the center. Divers went as far as 30 miles offshore to spear sh. A representative from FWC was on-hand to ensure legality. The biggest catch was an 89.5-pound cubera snapper. Submitted results are as follows... Biggest Fish: 1stRichard Todd Langford89.5 Cubera Snapper 2ndMatt Paarlberg31.2 Amberjack 3rdMurray Baker27.3 Amberjack Aggregate: 1stDamon Jasper45.1 2ndTodd Thompson27.9 3rdJeemiah Slaymaker23.9 Specific fish were not recorded for the aggregate. Competitors were required to weigh 1 gag grouper and any 2 other legal sh excluding cobia, amberjack, sharks, and barracuda Lion sh: 1stBrian Bond3 Lion sh 2ndJosh Reynolds1 Lion sh 3rdDesmond Kieser1 Lion sh Lion sh were not weighed. Spear shing contest brings in big catches Gala to bene t childrenSpecial to the NewsJoin for a fun evening and festivities to bene t the Childrens Miracle Network. The event will be held from 7 p.m. to midnight, Saturday, June 7 at the Bistro at Wildwood, and is hosted by Walmart. The CMN Masquerade Gala continues to seek additional sponsors, and items for the silent auction. Please contact Teresa or Tracy 926.1560. Music and dancing, silent auction, hors doeuvres, and beverages. Dress code black tie/formal, mask required and available for purchase. Tickets $25 per person. Tickets must be purchased in advance and are available at Walmart, Crawfordville. Donations may be made in person at the Gala, and at Walmart, 35 Mike Stewart Drive, Crawfordville.Special to the NewsSeveral categories of tax reductions were adopted during the 2014 Legislative Session. Breaks will be applied to hurricane supplies starting May 31 and ending on June 8. During this time, the following items are: A portable self-powered light source selling for $20 or less. A portable self-powered radio, two-way radio, or weather band radio selling for $50 or less. A tarpaulin or other flexible waterproof sheeting selling for $50 or less. A self-contained rst-aid kit selling for $30 or less. A ground anchor system or tiedown kit selling for $50 or less. A gas or diesel fuel tank selling for $25 or less. A package of AA-cell, C-cell, D-cell, 6-volt, or 9-volt batteries, excluding automobile and boat batteries, selling for $30 or less. A nonelectric food storage cooler selling for $30 or less. A portable generator selling for $750 or less. Reusable ice for $10 or less.Tax breaks on hurricane supplies May 31 June 8Dont miss librarys book talkSpecial to the NewsHerb Donaldson will be speaking at Wakulla Library on his book Southern Shock Americana Thursday at 6 p.m. Guests to include Agnes Furey (Achieve Higher Ground, author Wildowers in the Median); Sheila Meehan (Tallahassee Citizens Against the Death Penalty) and others. Light refreshments will be provided. 000i9v1 UNDER NEW MANAGEMENTCattail Creek RV ParkLevy County74 sites 30 and 50 amp serviceBeautiful tree lined park, Swimming pool, ClubhouseMinutes to beach and river$30 nightly and $255 monthly352-447-3050 TILE ~ CARPET ~ WOOD ~ LAMINATE ~ VINYLKaren Richardson, Design Consultant850-491-3358www.SouthernFlooring.net Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING SETTING THE STANDARD WITH StyleBring in Photos of your Room or Patio...We can help you Create YOUR DREAM!! Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION ON A BUDGET? WE CAN RE-PURPOSE! LETS TALK!

PAGE 10

Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsShadeville Elementary held its annual Fifth Grade Brain Brawl competition on Friday, May 9. The Brain Brawl is sponsored by The Coastal Optimist Club in an effort to support and encourage our youngsters to stretch their minds and to provide an opportunity for students to shine academically. Under the direction of Shadevilles outstanding fifth grade team of teachers, Suzie McCord (chairman), Kerry Adams, Judy Paris, Rachel Harper and Debbie Marsh, the students rst battled it out in the classrooms to earn a seat on one of the two teams. Team A members included: Cole Baggett (captain), Karen Voyles, Steven Adams, and Keegan Davis. Team B members included: Peyton Bishop (captain), Jarren Harris, Daniel Chambers, and Glen Smith. Also competing in the alternate positions were: MLynn Creek and Garrett Paugh. When all was said and done, the last questions answered and points awarded the members of Team B had earned the right to wear the medallions held by blue ribbons. Team A also earned beautiful medallions held with red ribbons. Karen Voyles was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team A and Glen Smith was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team B. Glen Smith also earned the coveted medallion held by a red, white, and blue ribbon for providing the most correct answers throughout the contest. It was certainly an exciting morning watching these students show what they know in reading, math, science, social studies, geography, and current events. We are proud of each of the members of the 2014 Brain Brawl Team and will look for them to excel in the future as they continue with their educations and careers.Special to The NewsBrevard College in Brevard, North Carolina has named 2013 Wakulla High School alumnus Caleb Stephens of Crawfordville to the Deans List for the spring semester of the 2013-2014 academic year. Stephens was also named to the Brevard Deans List for the fall semester. Stephens is majoring business and organizational leadership. He was a quarterback for the Wakulla High School War Eagles, and went to state playoffs with the team. He started as a freshman quarterback for the Brevard Tornadoes, and has been awarded for highest academic achievement. Locally he is also known for a ministry he conceived, with bracelets he created and distributed that said: Do Your Best, Leave the Results to God. To be eligible for the Deans List, a student must be enrolled full-time and earn a 3.50 grade point average or higher for the semester. Brevard College (www. brevard.edu) is committed to an experiential liberal arts education that encourages personal growth and inspires artistic, intellectual, and social action.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Chamber of Commerce is offering two one time FULL scholarships for the fall Green Guide Course, funded from proceeds of our annual Low Country Boil fundraiser. Course Description: The 90-hour certi cation course, mixed with both classroom and eld trip experiences, is designed for job seekers looking for employment in a nature-based eld, entrepreneurs interested in starting a nature-based business, or those who want to learn more about the North Florida environment for personal enrichment. Course Objectives: Provide educational experiences on North Florida ecosystems Equip potential guides with the knowledge to provide environmentally and socially responsible nature-based experiences to clients Educate business owners and employees on resource sustainability Provide accurate and up-to-date information for natural resource conservation best practices Create a nature-centered network of guides and program participants When: The course start date is September 2, with an end date of November 4. The deadline for applying for the scholarship award is 4 pm Tuesday, July 15. See the application for details. If you would like to learn more about the Green Certi cation Course or to apply for the scholarship, contact Kathie Mackie (850) 9226290 or mackiek@tcc. .edu.Special to The News TutoringByCynthia. com is proud to announce that the Homeschool Classroom will be open for summer school. The Homeschool Classroom is located at 2908 W. Lakeshore Drive. The Classroom is targeted towards grades 6 -12 and supports Florida Virtual, Leon County Virtual, and K12 curricula. While in the classroom, students receive instruction in the following: Test-taking skills; Organizational skills; Behavior modification; Mentoring; and Tutoring Summer school is a great time for grade recovery, as well as advancement in preparation for the upcoming school year. There are a variety of virtual classes to choose from. The Classroom staff will assist with choosing classes, requesting transcripts and reporting credits. My sons grades dramatically improved. Im so glad we chose the Homeschool Classroom, states Nona McCall, parent of a 10th grader. The ratio of instructor to student is 1:4. Each student receives individualized attention which results in enhanced comprehension and improved grades. The Homeschool Classroom is open Monday Friday, from 7am 3pm providing supervision and instruction for Middle and High School students taking virtual school courses. Students bring their laptops and lunch. The environment is teenager-friendly and promotes learning, critical thinking, and tolerance. Visit the Facebook page at https:// www.facebook.com/TutoringByCynthia Call 850.329.7684 to enroll your student today.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla High School War Eagles Invite you to come celebrate with the Class of 2014, at its Baccalaureate on Wednesday, June 4 at 7 p.m. Gates open at 6 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Graduation is scheduled for Friday, June 6 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Gates open at 6:30 p.m. Congratulations to all Wakulla High School graduates.Special to The NewsWakulla High School (WHS) is proud to announce our Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs are achieving outstanding results again this year. WHS currently offers programs in Architecture and Construction, A/V Technology and Communication, Automotive Services, Business Management and Administration, and Hospitality and Tourism as well as two Academies, Engineering and Medical. Each area offers industry certi cation tests to their fourth-year students. While some CTE programs are currently testing others have already taken the tests for their area. The CTE programs currently testing are Automotive, Business, Engineering, and TV Pro. The Automotive students are planning on taking the Florida Automobile Dealers Association (FADA) Certi ed Technician industry certi cation exam. The automotive industry uses the certi cation for employing trusted, reliable, and skilled employees. Business students are currently taking tests involving software programs. The students are seeking certi cation in Microsoft Bundle, Adobe, FLASH, Photoshop, and Dream weaver. TV Pro students will be taking Premier Pro certication test in the coming weeks. Carpentry IV students are allowed to take the industry certi cation test issued by The National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER). This year we had 14 students, the largest number in school history, take and pass the NCCER. Our Medical Academy students also set another record. 28 students took and passed the Certi ed Nursing Assistant (CNA) test. These students also passed the First Responder course and now have certi cations in both areas, all before graduating from WHS. All Culinary Students (over 100) currently possess a certi cation in SafeStaff. Since 1997, the State of Florida has mandated that all foodservice workers be trained in food safety. The SafeStaff Foodhandler Safety Program is founded on 6 principles: Ensuring proper personal hygiene, preventing cross-contamination, controlling time and temperature when handling food, proper cleaning and sanitizing, the causes and effects of major foodborne illnesses, and ensuring proper vermin control. Students will also be taking the ServSafe certi cation. Wakulla High School is also adding Welding to CTE programs next year and we look forward to our students succeeding in this new vocational area as well continuing all the success in the other programs. Excellence in education has always been the driving force at WHS as our students continue to prove each year. Shadeville 2014 Brain Brawlers PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Wakulla High graduation events scheduledGreen Guide scholarships offered Special to The NewsCongratulations to Artigua J. Kilpatrick, who graduated with a bachelors degree in business management from St. Leo University in St. Leo, Florida on May 3. Kilpatrick is a 2010 graduate of Wakulla High School. She is the daughter of Antonio and Andrea Kilpatrick of Sopchoppy. She is the granddaughter of Flossie and Lester Denmark of Crawfordville; and Betty and James Green of Sopchoppy; and Willie and Fronia Dupree of Tallahassee. She is the goddaughter of Fred L. Harvey of Sopchoppy.St. Leo Graduate WHS to offer new career and technical programs Caleb Stephens on Deans List Homeschool Classroom open for summer

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 13Aeducation news from local schools School Rotary names Interact ScholarsWILLIAM SNOWDENThe Rotary Club of Wakulla presented scholarship checks last week to ve students for their involvement with Interact, the youth version of Rotary. With the students are Brad Harvey, treasurer of Rotary and Interact liasion, Missy Rudd, Interact sponsor, and Richard Russell, Rotary president. The ve students who received scholarships were Tamara Arnold for $1,000, Emily Rudd for $500, Colby King for $250, and Rachel Rudd for $250. Charles Moss, who received $250, was not present because of testing. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netAssistant Superintendent for Instruction Beth ODonnell will retire in July, it was announced at this weeks school board meeting. The longtime educator, who has been a teacher and assistant principal before joining the district staff, will continue for a period as a consultant. Superintendent Bobby Pearce said at the school board meeting on Monday, May 19, that ODonnells job duties will be divided up under a new plan: Beth Mims, who is currently Chief Academic Of cer, will take over K-12 instruction, and current Sopchoppy Second Chance Principal Dod Walker will move to the district as Director of Adult, Athletic and Dropout Prevention Progams. Its been previously announced that current Wakulla High School Principal Mike Crouch will take the job as head of the Second Chance School and Wakulla Middle School Principal Mike Barwick will go to the high school. Pearce praised ODonnell for her work, especially her work with the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program, which has focused on helping middle-of-the-road students become more focused on school, offering such things as study tips, visits to colleges, and volunteer opportunities. The program has proven so successful that other students have sought to join AVID. Im going to miss her involvement in AVID, and working with her everyday, Pearce said. In other matters: The school board approved a low bid of $544,648 for campus-wide renovations at Wakulla Middle School. Randy Bristol, facilities manager for the district, noted that most of the improvements include replacing doors and hardware. One topic of conversation was that the gym oors have been found to contain mercury and may require some hazardous materials work to remove and replace, which would substantially increase the costs. Bristol said he initially priced the work at around $50,000, but the mercury took the costs up over $122,000. He said he is working to nd a cheaper alternative. Pearce said that the renovations are needed because Wakulla Middle, built in 1980, needs improvements to match the facilities at the newer Riversprings Middle School. A 5th grade student was expelled for possesing a knife on campus. The knife was discovered in the students backpack by a teacher, according to the sheriffs of ce. The 9-inch long knife contained a 5-inch blade. The student was expelled for the remainder of this year and will be attend to attend Sopchoppy Second Chance next year and transfer to Wakulla Middle School if there are no other problems. Missy Rudd, president of the Wakulla Classroom Teachers Association, the local teachers union, announced during citizens to be heard that the Florida Education Association, the statewide teachers union, had endorsed Democrat Charlie Crist for governor. At the school board meeting last month, there were a couple of controversial items discussed, including a new tobacco-free policy that would prohibit tobacco product on campus. The tobacco-free policy ultimately passed, with school board members Becky Cook, Jerry Evans and Ray Gray voting for it. But school board members Greg Thomas and Melisa Taylor voted against the policy, expressing concerns about unintended consequences. Thomas began his comments saying he deeply disliked tobacco but was concerned about a part of the policy that called for possible termination after a fth violation by an employee. Prior violations are to be dealt with by offering the employee help with tobacco cessation classes. It is an addictive drug, and a legal one at that, Thomas said, questioning whether dismissal might open the district up to lawsuits. Taylor agreed, saying she knows of an excellent teacher who smokes. One of the best teachers I know, if taken of the classroom beause of something that had nothing to do with her job performance I dont support that. Gray said he supported the policy, noting that Wakulla was one of only seven districts without it. Cook said she would be willing to discuss whatever changes might be needed to the policy, but we need somewhere to start, she said in voting for it. There was also a split vote at that same meeting over the districts cyberbullying policy, with Taylor casting a lone dissenting vote in that. Taylor rst commented that she didnt want students or employees to be bullied, but had heartburn over what is de ned as bullying. I worry, seriously, that it doesnt matter where the alleged bullying takes place, that it would amount to the schools stepping into peoples personal homes. Its become common for schools to punish online bullying by students that occurs in social media such as Facebook and Twitter because of its impact on school conduct.Beth ODonnell, longtime educator, will retire Special to The NewsSuperintendent Robert Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the endurance and dedication given to the children of Wakulla County and the loyalty displayed on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities Sally Watson serves. Watson, May Employee of the Month, has been an administrative secretary in the ESE and Student Service Department for more than a decade. Prior to that time she served as the secretary in the district Personnel Department. Watson came to the school district after years of secretarial experience with the Wakulla County Probation Department and the Florida Department of Labor. Watson said, There is never a dull moment working with the school district. Beyond being challenged, the job is ful lling as I am always learning something new. Most of all, I love working with my wonderful fellow employees. Watson and her husband moved to Wakulla County after researching the schools. Originally from Ravenna, Ohio where she graduated and attended vocational school, they relocated to be closer to her husbands family. She shares, Working for the Wakulla County School Board has been a blessing for me. Executive Director Tanya English notes, Sallys knowledge of program procedures spanning exceptional student education and student services makes her a vital part of the team, as does her heart for students. This sentiment is echoed by her co-workers, as she was selected by district staff to receive the Awesome Award last month. Participation in Special Olympic district events is another love of Sallys. She always lends a hand with score keeping and enjoys encouraging the students during their events. She has been an avid supporter of the Legacy Caf and assisted with the ordering of supplies securing a successfully launched set up. Sallys participation in education extends beyond the school district. She participates in classes as both a student and teacher in the arts of knitting, spinning and weaving. She and husband John spend many weekends at events across the south serving as interpreters of the 19th century life by demonstrating black-smith skills and textile talents. When not traveling and demonstrating and working for the school district, Watson is active at The Pioneer Baptist Church where she is presently serving as a Sunday school teacher. She is an organizing member of the Wakulla Pearls Fiber Club and a member of the Florida Blacksmith Association. Sally Watson is schools employee of the month Diving, other new courses offered in fallWAKULLA ENVIRONMENTAL INSTITUTESpecial to The NewsStudents interested in studying professional diving and environmental studies can sign up for courses through Wakulla Environmental Institute. New courses offered by the institute include Natural Resources Conservation and Management (3 credits), Environmental Sampling and Analysis I (3 credits), and Environmental Regulation and Compliance (3 credits). New programs include Environmental Science Technology, A.S., and Water Quality Technician Certi cate. The professional diving course also earns 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ability to swim. This is a multidisciplinary course to expose students to the environment (physiology and medicine), the living occupants that live within (biology), and the tools (technology) available to successfully work in this aquatic world. Students will become familiar with and dive surface-supplied air, open circuit air and Nitrox scuba and closed circuit re-breather. Class time is 1 to 6 p.m., Tuesdays. The instructor is Gregg Stanton. This class is held at FAMU. For more information, visit www.tcc. .edu and search for Wakulla Environmental Institute, call 9226290, or e-mail mackiek@tcc. .edu. By MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAAfter more than a decade of trying, students watched as lawmakers passed a bill granting in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants who have attended Florida secondary schools for at least three years. Gov. Rick Scott has promised to sign the measure. It took a lot of courage to do what they did, said House Speaker Will Weatherford, a Wesley Chapel Republican whose support powered the bill to passage. Theyre the face of what we were trying to articulate. Wearing orange mortarboards and brandishing their high-school diplomas, the students repeated their stories of hard work and good grades, their dreams of higher education colliding with the cost of out-of-state tuition. When HB 851 stalled in the Senate, they held a sit-in outside Senate President Don Gaetzs of ce, calling on him to allow a oor vote. He did. Lawmakers also passed a bill allowing Jose Godinez-Samperio, an undocumented immigrant with a law degree, to be admitted to The Florida Bar. Scott signed the measure on Monday.In-state tuition granted to some undocumented Florida students FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Sally Watson

PAGE 12

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports By PAUL HOOVER WHS Track CoachThe 2014 track season is now in the books and there were many things that contributed to making this one of the most successful seasons yet at Wakulla High School. CORION KNIGHT, KEITH GAVIN DOMINATE HIGH JUMP High jumpers Corion Knight and Keith Gavin started the year ranked at the top of Class 2A and dominated the local high jump scene all season long. One or the other won every local competition they entered and had great performances in two of the states largest and most competitive meets of the year the FSU and Florida Relays. At FSU Knight tied Gavins school record of 6 and placed second, based on the number of misses. At the Florida Relays, Knight was third and Gavin fth. They then proceeded to place rst and second at the District, Region and, nally, the State Meet, with Knight capturing the State Title. Both also excelled in the long jump this year, culminating with Knight, the ying brick, placing seventh at the State Meet. The WHS team, of Knight and Gavin, placed sixth overall at the State Meet. Gavin is just a sophomore, so will return next year for another outstanding season. MADISON HARRIS RANKS IN 800M Senior Madison Harris continued her tremendous run in the 800 meters, ranking as high as fth in the nation at one point in the season. Included in her wins were victories at the FSU and Florida Relays, the Big Bend Championships and a fourth consecutive District title. She ended the season with runner-up nishes at the Regional and State Meets. She was also an integral part of the success of the girls 4x400 and 4x800 relay teams, both of whom quali ed for the Regional Meet and the 4x800 quali ed for the the State Meet for the second straight year. Harris ended up posting the second fastest 800 meter time of the year in the State. GIRLS 4x800 RELAY The girls 4x800 relays performance at the State Meet was another season highlight.The team, minus Harris, the teams fastest runner, still ran the second fastest relay time in school history, 9:59.75, placing seventh and earning the schools rst ever relay podium nish. The nal State team of consisted of Marty Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Haleigh Martin, Lydia Wiedeman and alternates Madison Harris and Connie Lewis. Other highlights of the season included the emergence of some young and talented track athletes. Freshman Adrianna Mitchell became the brightest spot among the sprint athletes, with outstanding season performances in all the sprint events and the long jump. At the Chiles Freshman/Sophomore Championship meet she won the 100, 200 and 400 meters, as well as the long jump. She also jumped over 17 feet in the long jump. Freshman Haleigh Martin became one of the teams best and most consistent middle distance runners, becoming the District Champion in the 1600 meters and an integral part of the 4x400 and 4x800 meter relay teams. At the State Meet, she ran an outstanding 2:22 leg on the 4x800 relay team. Kayla Webbe also won the District 3200 meters and Shelby Alsup placed fth in the shotput and Ashley Carr placed fth in the discus for outstanding performances. For the boys, freshman Bryce Cole became, argueably the best middle distance runner on the squad. His performances culminated in a District 1600 meter title, a third place nish in the 800 meters and a spot on the 4x800 meter relay team at Regionals. Albert Smythe, battling asthma problems all season long, still had an outstanding season and emerged, surprisingly, as a real factor in the 800 meters. Both Smythe and Cole, along with J.P. Piotrowski and Alan Pearson, comprised the 4x800 relay team that placed fth at the Regional Meet, missing qualifying for the State Meet by only 1 1/2 seconds. This year, graduation will signi cantly impact the team, with the loss of such outstanding athletes as Madison Harris, Corion Knight, Margaret Wiedeman and Kayla Webbe, but this season also saw the emergence of some additional top young and returning talent, that should help form a good base for next years team. In addition to those noted above, these include Mikala Gavin (sprints/long jump), Connie Lewis (middle distance), Lydia Wiedeman (800 meters), Sean Hill (400 & 800 meters) and middle distance runners Evan Guarino, Travis Parks, Riley Welch, Mitchell Atkinson and William Thomas and the boys 4x800 meter relay team that should return all of its members. 2014 will go down as one of the best years ever for the WHS track teams due to the hard work and dedication of a lot of athletes. They have set the bar for the teams to come and will serve as the standard by which subsequent teams will be judged. 2014 SCHOOL RECORDS Girls: 800 meters: Madison Harris 2:13.33 400 meters: Madison Harris 57.87 Indoor Mile: Haleigh Martin 6:08.52 Shotput: Shelby Alsup 30.5 Discus: Ashley Carr 92 4x400 relay: 4:13.15 (Lydia Wiedeman, Sarah Thigpen, Adrianna Mitchell, Madison Harris) 4x200 relay: 1:55.26 (Adrianna Mitchell, Dazaha Jackson, Mikala Gavin, Shanise Johnson) 4x1600 relay: 24:00.18 (Margaret Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Connie Lewis, Madison Harris) Boys: High Jump: Corion Knight & Keith Gavin tie school record with jumps of 6 Long Jump: Corion Knight 23.25 400 meters: Sean Hill :51.90 800 meters: Bryce Cole 2:03.47 Indoor Mile: Bryce Cole 5:02.22 110 meter hurdles: Patrick Harvey :16.91 4x800 relay: 8:30.47 (J.P. Piotrowski, Alan Pearson, Bryce Cole, Albert Smythe) End of Year Track Cookout ScheduledThe annual end-ofthe-year awards cookout will be held at Wakulla Springs on May 31, starting at noon. All track athletes should plan on attending and must bring their uniforms to turn in, if they havent already done so. The unifoms should be turned in to Coach Amos no later than May 21. Everyone should also check with their respective coach to nd out what they should bring. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles will be playing their annual Blue & Red game this Friday night at 7 p.m. on Reynolds Field at JD Jones Stadium. Both JV & Varsity will be participating. The boys have been working hard getting ready for their spring game vs. Trinity Catholic from Ocala on May 30, and are ready to show off this years War Eagles. The spring game will also be held here in Wakulla. The Blue & Red Game is also a big fundraiser for the gridiron club. The boys have been selling tickets for a fried chicken dinner beginning at 6 p.m. Tickets may be purchased in advance by contacting any player or grid iron member. A limited number of dinners may be available after all ticket holders have been served. The admission is $10 for the dinner and the game, or $3 admission to the game only. Come out and support your War Eagles.Jake Walker, a 2013 WHS graduate and standout pitcher in the War Eagle baseball program, nished his rst year of college with the same work ethic and determination he was known for at Wakulla High. The Daytona State pitcher completed his rst season with a 2.25 ERA in limited action. He also earned the title of Baseball Scholar Athlete of the Year at DSC with a 4.0 grade point average. He plans to return to Daytona in the fall and compete for a starting position in the weekly rotation. A past St. Marks Powder scholarship recipient, Jake plans to complete his studies at Daytona next year and then pursue a degree in business at a four-year university.FOOTBALL TRACK BASEBALLTRACKBlue & Red game is FridayA look back at a record-setting seasonWalker nishes year at DaytonaLinton excels at FSU track SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakullas 4x800 relay team nished seventh in the state and was Wakullas rst-ever relay podium nish. The team consisted of Marty Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Haleigh Martin, Lydia Wiedeman and alternates Madison Harris and Connie Lewis. Former top WHS runner Stanley Linton, a late addition to the FSU Track Team, is making his presence felt at the collegiate level. In the rst 5K track race of his college career he placed first at the Seminole Invitational on April 11, in a new PR (personal record) of 14:56.02. He followed that up with an outstanding debut 10,000 meter run at the Virginia Challenge Meet in Charlottesville, Va. on Saturday, May 10, placing fourth in another PR time of 30:41.60. Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Have something on your mind?Send it to William Snowden, Editoreditor@thewakullanews.net Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 13

What a beautiful weekend we just had. Cool mornings, very little wind and not too hot in the afternoon. Next Monday will be Memorial Day and most folks will have a three-day weekend. Theres going to be a lot of boats on the water so be careful and watch out for other people. Im sure many of them dont know the rules of the water or what the green and red markers mean. The water temperature is up around 76 and still pretty dirty. The farther east you go the clearer it seems to get. Someone said around Keaton Beach its crystal clear. Scallop season is a little over a month away and with all the rain we have had I would really be surprised if there were any scallops around St. Marks. I do remember one year though that the water was awfully dirty but we still had scallops so lets keep our ngers crossed. Capt. Luke Frasier was back on the job at AMS and he was looking good. He said he hadnt been out shing in quite a while and, hopefully, Capt. David Fife and I will be able to get him on the water in the coming weeks. If the county gets the money from the state that it hopes to get, they will be putting in several kayak launch sites. Any more you see about as many kayaks on cars and trucks as you do boats being hauled down the road and the tournament they just had for the Wakulla seniors had 93 kayaks entered. They are relatively inexpensive, easy to haul and launch and it doesnt matter how low the tides are you can launch and get where normal boats cant get. If youre quiet the sh wont even know youre there. Capt. David Fife has been catching quite a few reds around the Oyster Bay area using live minnows. Dr. Jim ONeil from Tallahassee went Saturday and they had 10 nice trout and several reds. They were using live shrimp and shed east of Live Oak Island for the trout and mum was the word on the reds. Mark and Louise Prance from Shell Point shed Saturday and caught two nice reds three trout and four flounder. They were using pin sh and shiner tails. Mike Pearson from Tifton said they went east of St. Marks and caught quite a few trout using grubs and the Ewings from Shell Point shed the same area with live shrimp and caught sh until they ran out of bait. I took three high school buddies from the Atlanta area out on Sunday and they went home with six ounder, seven trout and three Spanish. I spent too much time looking for reds which again I couldnt nd. Thats what they wanted to catch but they just didnt bite for me. It was a beautiful day and we laughed a lot and reminisced about the good old days. We had a great time but it just went by too fast. The Warriors and Quiet Waters soldiers are here and I hope they catch a bunch of sh and have a great time in Wakulla County. Capt. David Fife and I took three of the rst warriors to come to Wakulla County and we had a great time fishing with those guys. Remember to know your limits. If you are on the water or on the road this weekend be careful. Good luck and good shing! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 15ABy MARJ LAWRecently, I wrote about chicken kick shooting. This is what I prefer, and a lot of other people do as well. Chicken kick refers to shooting a gun with less recoil to the action. So, OK, I like less recoil. Im a chicken when it comes to a gun that kicks a lot. Im not fond of kick at all. When you have little recoil, the gun does not jump in your hand as it will with more recoil. This is important if you ever have to get of another round rapidly. This way, your sight picture will stay in place from the rst to the second shot. When you are learning to shoot, its important to have little recoil. Recoil tends to make you inch. When you inch, your eyes squeeze shut and your hands holding the gun jerk. Naturally, you cant hit the target well with your eyes shut and your hands jerking the gun wide. Not only will you miss your target, youll set up a bad habit of flinching every time you shoot. You dont want to begin shooting with a bad habit. You want to begin with success! Back to the issue of recoil. Since you have your gun already, lets discuss how you can lessen recoil. In my umble opinion, certain guns have more kick, and also certain bullets have more kick. The first refers to the way the gun is made, how tight its springs are set, whether its high or low caliber and other considerations. When it comes to the bullets, you have choices that will affect recoil. Target loads and wadcutters have less powder in them, so they come out of the gun with less kick and less velocity. All wadcutters are target loads, but not all target loads are wadcutters. Confusing? Wadcutters are bullets that have at projectiles. The projectile part is even with the end of the casing. If you only saw the casing, youd think there was no bullet inside, but when you look, youll see theres a at something inside. Target loads, however, can be wadcutters, semi-wadcutters or round nose bullets. The round nose can be typically lead, but they can be clad in a shiny metal. Both wadcutters and target loads have a lower velocity than hunting or defensive loads. Wadcutters make fat, round, perfect holes in targets. They are easy to see when youre practicing. Semi-wadcutters have a rounded noses that are lopped-off and flat looking, so they appear to be normal bullets where someone chopped part of the tip off. A match grade bullet can be either a wadcutter, semi wadcutter or round-nose bullet, but it has an exacting and consistent amount of powder and weight which increases accuracy of shooting. Match grade rounds are target loads, and they are of high quality consistency because the weight of the bullet and the amount of powder is tightly controlled. Youll pay for the level of quality! One of my gal friends at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce range told me she was going to get rid of her .38 revolver because the kick hurt her hands. She tried a wadcutter and decided to keep the .38. Now, I wouldnt want to be politically incorrect or anything like that, but as a generalization, I think women like these wadcutters, semi-wadcutters and match grade bullets because they reduce the kick from shooting. Men, however, like them because they want the accuracy to beat the competition at matches; not because of the kick. Ahem.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.outdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Using wadcutter bullets result in less kickWater gets clearer the further east you head HOME ON THE RANGE From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL $1,49999SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 28 10HP REAR ENGINE RIDER From FWC NewsThe recreational red snapper season in Gulf state waters opens Saturday, May 24, and will remain open through July 14, a total of 52 days, closing July 15. This season was set at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) meeting in April. Opening the season the Saturday before Memorial Day will provide recreational red snapper fishing opportunities through an important holiday weekend, helping attract more visitors and bringing economic bene ts to our coastal communities. The federal season will be 9 days, starting June 1 and remaining open through June 9, closing June 10. Florida state waters in the Gulf are from shore to 9 nautical miles. Federal waters extend from where state waters end, out to about 200 nautical miles. The daily bag limit for red snapper will remain 2 per person in Gulf state and federal waters. The minimum size limit is 16 inches total length. There is a zero daily bag and possession limit for captain and crew of for-hire vessels. Recreational anglers targeting reef sh such as red snapper in Gulf state and federal waters are required to use dehooking devices and non-offset, non-stainless steel circle hooks when shing with natural bait. These devices are designed to help increase the likelihood a sh will survive if it is released. Venting tools are no longer required when targeting reef sh. This requirement was removed to allow shermen the freedom to use the methods or tools of their choosing when releasing reef sh. To learn more about recreational red snapper shing in the Gulf of Mexico, visit MyFWC. com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Snapper. Gulf red snapper season opens May 24 in state waters

PAGE 14

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com The following article is a press release provided by the National Safe Boating Council: Boating safety advocates remind boaters to Wear It! during National Safe Boating Week, May 17-23 Life jacket wear is an effective and simple lifesaving strategy for safe recreational boating Boating safety advocates across the U.S. and Canada are teaming up to promote safe and responsible boating, including consistent life jacket wear each and every time boaters are on the water, during National Safe Boating Week, held from May 17-23, 2014. National Safe Boating Week is the official launch of the 2014 North American Safe Boating Campaign. This yearlong campaign promotes safe and responsible boating and the value of voluntary life jacket wear by recreational boaters through the national theme, Wear It! Every day I hear about the grim consequences of not wearing a life jacket while boating, said Rachel Johnson, executive director of the National Safe Boating Council, the lead organization for the Wear It! campaign. You can still have fun on the water while choosing to always wear a life jacket and boating responsibly. U.S. Coast Guard statistics show that drowning was the reported cause of death in almost three-fourths of recreational boating fatalities in 2012, and that 85 percent of those who drowned were not wearing life jackets. Thats why boating safety advocates continue to push for increased and consistent life jacket wear on the water. Accidents on the water happen much too fast to reach and put on a stowed life jacket, said John Johnson, chief executive of cer of the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators. Its important that everyone consistently wears a life jacket while on the water and always boats responsibly. Todays life jackets are comfortable, stylish and easy to wear. In fact, they dont even have to be jackets anymore. Old-fashioned, bulky orange life jackets have been replaced with innovative options, such as in atable life jackets, allowing mobility and exibility for activities like boating, fishing, paddling or hunting, and are much cooler in the warmer weather. This year during National Safe Boating Week and throughout the year, the campaign will highlight stories of real boaters whose lives were saved by wearing a life jacket. In addition, the campaign will remind boaters of the importance of boating safely, including consistent life jacket wear, boating sober, knowing navigational rules and having a proper lookout. The North American Safe Boating Campaign unites the efforts of a wide variety of boating safety advocates, including the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, Canadian Safe Boating Council and many members of the National Safe Boating Council. The campaign is produced under a grant from the Sports Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund, administered by the U.S. Coast Guard. Partners hold local events, teach classes, offer on-water training, distribute educational materials and perform free vessel safety checks, among other activities. Be sure to follow the campaign on Twitter at twitter.com/boatingcampaign and like us at facebook.com/SafeBoatCampaign. Share your boating story at SafeBoatingCampaign. com. The National Safe Boating Council (NSBC) is the foremost coalition for the advancement and promotion of safer boating through education, outreach and training. The NSBC accomplishes this mission by promoting outreach and research initiatives that support boating education and safety awareness; improving the professional development of boating safety educators through training; and developing and recognizing outstanding boating safety programs. Visit SafeBoatingCampaign.com for campaign materials and additional safe boating resources. We will be holding a Free Vessel Examination Ramp Day Saturday, May 24, at the fort in St. Marks. If you are not able to attend, our members are available to assist area boaters with complimentary Vessel Examinations, and scheduling Boat Safety Courses. Contact our staff ofcer for vessel exams at fso-ve@uscaux.net and our public education of cer at fso-pe@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says Safe boating is no accident. Wear it!!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD The spear shing tournament. Divers have a long tradition harvesting sh and other marine life for food and sport. Breath-hold diving (snorkeling) began the sport centuries ago. All marine collections in the Bahamas is currently limited to breath-hold diving. In Florida, limitations are placed on scuba diving collections underwater, principally forbidding the spearing of selected species such as spiny lobsters and a few recreational sh species, and the use of rebreathers to spear sh within state waters (in the Gulf out 9 miles). Everyone (line and spear shing) must follow the established shing rules for Florida (out 9 miles) and Federal waters beyond 9 miles out in the Gulf. The unfortunate truth about line shing is that every sh brought to the surface can be injured during the ascent. Many, if not most, never make it back to the bottom alive, making catch and release practices somewhat limited. Undersized catches that must be released become prey to other predators attracted to the boat. Spear shing, as opposed to hook-and-line shing, is far more selective. The spear sherman selects the sh of choice and takes his prey, leaving undersized sh to grow up. They do learn about spear shermen and thus become more dif cult to catch when they do reach legal sizes. There is a bit of a con ict between the two groups, but they usually each respect the others rights to a shing site. Line shing is often accompanied by chumming the waters with bait. Sharks are attracted to the blood at places shared with divers, like K Tower, making diving less desirable. Many divers linesh rst to nd sh before expending the energy to get into the water. Many non-divers sh using lines while divers hunt for the big boys below. To my knowledge, we just held the rst Wakulla County based spear shing tournament, at least in recent history. Dive shops in Tallahassee have sponsored tournaments in the past. Folks asked us to step in and sponsor a local tournament when another shop went out of business. We have no experience doing a tournament, but Travis Kersting took it on anyway. The theme was an aggregate tournament with an effort to learn more about the Lion sh off our coastline. Any three of the largest sh were weighed in at one time, of course the largest sh, and the most/largest Lion sh. We then asked everyone to donate sh to the sh fry, including the Lion sh they were delicious! The largest sh was a Cubberra Snapper at 89 pounds! The largest Lion sh was over a foot. The weather cooperated! The seas were a bit rougher than expected but, by all accounts, everyone did a great job and had a great time. We had 30 registrations with 90 folks (lots of kids) attending the sh fry after the check in on last Saturday. We set up over $5,000 in prizes, spent the evening with an abundance of music and sh stories. I was asked to make this an annual event, with volunteers to help guide the next one. Yes, we learned a lot! Next year there will be fun things for the kids to do (not just eat fresh sh), better advertising, live music, more tents and more tables. Thank you to all the volunteers this year. Hey, we had to start somewhere!Red tide detected in south Florida Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 12:47 AM 3.2 ft. 1:41 AM 3.3 ft. 2:27 AM 3.3 ft. 3:08 AM High 0.7 ft. 3:04 AM 1.0 ft. 4:11 AM 1.2 ft. 5:14 AM 1.3 ft. 6:09 AM 1.4 ft. 6:56 AM 1.4 ft. 7:38 AM 1.4 ft. 8:16 AM Low 3.2 ft. 9:44 AM 3.3 ft. 10:45 AM 3.5 ft. 11:38 AM 3.7 ft. 12:24 PM 3.9 ft. 1:05 PM 3.9 ft. 1:42 PM 4.0 ft. 2:17 PM High 1.3 ft. 3:58 PM 0.9 ft. 5:23 PM 0.4 ft. 6:28 PM 0.1 ft. 7:20 PM -0.2 ft. 8:06 PM -0.3 ft. 8:47 PM -0.4 ft. 9:25 PM Low 2.8 ft. 10:06 PM 2.9 ft. 11:39 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.3 ft. 12:39 AM 2.4 ft. 1:33 AM 2.4 ft. 2:19 AM 2.5 ft. 3:00 AM High 0.5 ft. 3:15 AM 0.7 ft. 4:22 AM 0.9 ft. 5:25 AM 0.9 ft. 6:20 AM 1.0 ft. 7:07 AM 1.0 ft. 7:49 AM 1.0 ft. 8:27 AM Low 2.4 ft. 9:36 AM 2.5 ft. 10:37 AM 2.6 ft. 11:30 AM 2.8 ft. 12:16 PM 2.9 ft. 12:57 PM 3.0 ft. 1:34 PM 3.0 ft. 2:09 PM High 0.9 ft. 4:09 PM 0.6 ft. 5:34 PM 0.3 ft. 6:39 PM 0.0 ft. 7:31 PM -0.1 ft. 8:17 PM -0.3 ft. 8:58 PM -0.3 ft. 9:36 PM Low 2.1 ft. 9:58 PM 2.1 ft. 11:31 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:15 AM 2.8 ft. 1:23 AM 2.9 ft. 2:17 AM 3.0 ft. 3:03 AM 3.1 ft. 3:44 AM High 0.6 ft. 4:08 AM 0.9 ft. 5:15 AM 1.1 ft. 6:18 AM 1.2 ft. 7:13 AM 1.2 ft. 8:00 AM 1.3 ft. 8:42 AM 1.3 ft. 9:20 AM Low 2.9 ft. 10:20 AM 3.1 ft. 11:21 AM 3.3 ft. 12:14 PM 3.4 ft. 1:00 PM 3.6 ft. 1:41 PM 3.7 ft. 2:18 PM 3.7 ft. 2:53 PM High 1.2 ft. 5:02 PM 0.8 ft. 6:27 PM 0.4 ft. 7:32 PM 0.1 ft. 8:24 PM -0.2 ft. 9:10 PM -0.3 ft. 9:51 PM -0.3 ft. 10:29 PM Low 2.6 ft. 10:42 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.3 ft. 12:31 AM 2.5 ft. 1:25 AM 2.5 ft. 2:11 AM 2.6 ft. 2:52 AM High 0.7 ft. 2:43 AM 1.0 ft. 3:50 AM 1.2 ft. 4:53 AM 1.3 ft. 5:48 AM 1.3 ft. 6:35 AM 1.4 ft. 7:17 AM 1.4 ft. 7:55 AM Low 2.5 ft. 9:28 AM 2.6 ft. 10:29 AM 2.7 ft. 11:22 AM 2.9 ft. 12:08 PM 3.0 ft. 12:49 PM 3.1 ft. 1:26 PM 3.1 ft. 2:01 PM High 1.3 ft. 3:37 PM 0.9 ft. 5:02 PM 0.4 ft. 6:07 PM 0.1 ft. 6:59 PM -0.2 ft. 7:45 PM -0.3 ft. 8:26 PM -0.4 ft. 9:04 PM Low 2.2 ft. 9:50 PM 2.2 ft. 11:23 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed May 28, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 12:44 AM 3.2 ft. 1:38 AM 3.3 ft. 2:24 AM 3.4 ft. 3:05 AM High 0.8 ft. 3:01 AM 1.1 ft. 4:08 AM 1.3 ft. 5:11 AM 1.4 ft. 6:06 AM 1.5 ft. 6:53 AM 1.5 ft. 7:35 AM 1.5 ft. 8:13 AM Low 3.2 ft. 9:41 AM 3.4 ft. 10:42 AM 3.6 ft. 11:35 AM 3.8 ft. 12:21 PM 3.9 ft. 1:02 PM 4.0 ft. 1:39 PM 4.1 ft. 2:14 PM High 1.4 ft. 3:55 PM 0.9 ft. 5:20 PM 0.5 ft. 6:25 PM 0.1 ft. 7:17 PM -0.2 ft. 8:03 PM -0.4 ft. 8:44 PM -0.4 ft. 9:22 PM Low 2.8 ft. 10:03 PM 2.9 ft. 11:36 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.1 ft. 1:30 AM 2.3 ft. 2:40 AM 2.4 ft. 3:35 AM 2.5 ft. 4:20 AM High 0.5 ft. 2:39 AM 0.8 ft. 3:38 AM 1.1 ft. 4:34 AM 1.3 ft. 5:26 AM 1.5 ft. 6:13 AM 1.6 ft. 6:55 AM 1.7 ft. 7:34 AM Low 2.5 ft. 9:59 AM 2.6 ft. 10:32 AM 2.6 ft. 11:03 AM 2.7 ft. 11:33 AM 2.8 ft. 12:03 PM 2.8 ft. 12:34 PM 2.9 ft. 1:07 PM High 0.9 ft. 3:57 PM 0.6 ft. 5:03 PM 0.2 ft. 5:59 PM -0.0 ft. 6:48 PM -0.2 ft. 7:33 PM -0.3 ft. 8:14 PM -0.3 ft. 8:52 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:56 PM 2.0 ft. 11:54 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 22 May 28First June 5 Full June 13 Last June 19 New May 288:33 am-10:33 am 8:58 pm-10:58 pm 2:29 am-3:29 am 2:40 pm-3:40 pm 9:23 am-11:23 am 9:48 pm-11:48 pm 3:09 am-4:09 am 3:41 pm-4:41 pm 10:13 am-12:13 pm 10:38 pm-12:38 am 3:48 am-4:48 am 4:41 pm-5:41 pm 11:03 am-1:03 pm 11:28 pm-1:28 am 4:27 am-5:27 am 5:41 pm-6:41 pm 11:53 am-1:53 pm --:-----:-5:08 am-6:08 am 6:40 pm-7:40 pm 12:18 am-2:18 am 12:44 pm-2:44 pm 5:51 am-6:51 am 7:37 pm-8:37 pm 1:09 am-3:09 am 1:35 pm-3:35 pm 6:37 am-7:37 am 8:32 pm-9:32 pm Average Average Average Average Better Better Best6:39 am 8:28 pm 2:31 am 2:41 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:39 am 8:28 pm 3:10 am 3:42 pm 6:38 am 8:29 pm 3:49 am 4:43 pm 6:38 am 8:30 pm 4:28 am 5:42 pm 6:38 am 8:30 pm 5:09 am 6:41 pm 6:37 am 8:31 pm 5:52 am 7:38 pm 6:37 am 8:31 pm 6:38 am 8:33 pm45% 38% 30% 23% 17% 10% 3%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Biggest Fish: 1stRichard Todd Langford 2ndMatt Paarlberg 3rdMurray Baker Aggregate: 1stDamon Jasper 2ndTodd Thompson 3rdJeemiah Slaymaker Lion sh: 1stBrian Bond 2ndJosh Reynolds 3rdDesmond KieserFrom FWC NewsKarenia brevis, the Florida red tide organism, was detected in background concentrations in four water samples collected this week alongshore and inshore of Pinellas, Hillsborough, and Sarasota counties. Additional samples collected throughout Florida this week did not contain K. brevis. Tables and maps of sample results are available on our Web site: (http://myfwc.com/research/redtide/events/ status/statewide/). The website also provides links to additional information related to the topic of Florida red tide including satellite imagery, experimental red tide forecasts, shellsh harvesting areas, the FWC Fish Kill Hotline, the Florida Poison Information Center (to report human health effects related to exposure to red tide), and other wildlife related hotlines: (http:// myfwc.com/research/ redtide/events/status/ contact/). To learn more about various organisms that have been known to cause algal blooms in Florida waters, see our flickr page at (http:// www.flickr.com/photos/myfwc) and click on Harmful Algal Bloom Species. The FWRI HAB group in conjunction with Mote Marine Laboratory now have a facebook page. Please come like our page and learn interesting facts concerning red tide and other harmful algal blooms in Florida at http://facebook.com/ FLHABs Information, including maps and reports with additional details, is available on our website, (http://myfwc.com/research/redtide/events/ status/statewide/).

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 17A By Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.netThe Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea celebrated its 50th birthday and fth annual Sharks and Chablis bene t on May 18. Cypress Rudloe, executive director of the lab, said the event continues to grow every year. About 300 attendees strolled the grounds, sipped beverages, enjoyed live music, checked out wildlife displays, and perused the labs numerous exhibits featuring sea turtles, fiddler crabs, nurse sharks, starfish and much more. The smell of blooming honeysuckle permeated the air. Were very happy with the turnout, Cypress said. Overall everyone seemed to have a good time. Funds raised through the bene t will help build a new tank for a goliath grouper. Cypress said an 8,000-gallon tank and construction of a surrounding deck will cost approximately $15,000 by time the project is done. The Seineyard Seafood Restaurant donated food and labor for the event. Guests seemed to enjoy the fried sh and shrimp, with sides of cheese grits, fresh coleslaw and hush puppies. Cypress said the 300 guests were served quickly and ef ciently. True to the events name, participants enjoyed a selection of wines and beers to suit every taste. Jack Rudloe, the labs founder, said the response from the community to support the efforts of the marine lab is heartwarming. Rudloe said he was just a kid when he and Colin Phipps started the operation in 1964. Rudloe said imparting a message about conservation and environmental protection to children, which is the labs mission, will be the key to undoing harm caused by policies that hurt the environment. We want to wake up and say, That was just a bad dream, Rudloe said. And build an economy based around the wonderful things that we have the shing, the bird watching. We have to move beyond the idea that we have to ll in and destroy land. Sharks and Chablis says that we as a society are ready to move beyond the old type of thinking that has been so destructive and blinding. Rudloe said volunteers, interns, and an association with the Florida State University biology department move the GSMLs mission forward. FSU biological sciences professor Janie Wulff, PhD, said the partnership with the lab is an incredible asset to the university. What an over-the-top astounding resource this is, Wulff said. Wulff said as an invertebrate zoology professor at Yale, students looked forward to specimen shipments from the mythical place, Panacea. I never imagined I would be able to drive to Gulf Specimen, Wulff said. Jack and his people have very generously allowed me to root about in the tanks and carry things back with me for my courses. The name the goliath grouper campaign is ongoing, with a name being chosen on July 4. Cypress said people can still suggest names through the Facebook page, and donate $3 for a name. & Sharks Sharks Chablis Chablis5th annual 5th annualPHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAMore photos online at thewakullanews.com

PAGE 16

Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Monday, May 12, Riversprings Middle School Principal Michele Baggett reported a student selling marijuana on school grounds. A small amount of marijuana was recovered from a male student who purchased the marijuana from another student. The $5 used to purchase the pot was seized from one of the juveniles and a small amount of marijuana was seized from the other student. The two students will receive discipline from the school system and they will also receive juvenile civil citations for possession of 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Nick Boutwell investigated. In other activity reported this week by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce: THURSDAY, MAY 8 Melissa Paul of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of $56 from inside the unsecured vehicle. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Melissa Brown of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was in the process of moving from the residence when she observed some of her property along the side of the road. Several other items were in the back yard burning. Damaged property was valued at an estimated $800. Damage was also done to vehicle tires and the vehicles paint job. The criminal mischief damage was estimated at $3,000. Suspects have been identied. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Anthony Lariscy of Panacea reported a theft at Coastal Corner in Ochlockonee Bay. A suspect came into the store and stole beer without paying for it. The beer is valued at $16 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Three females were observed leaving the store without paying for merchandise. The total value of the unpaid merchandise was $84. Allison Freeman, 19, of Crawfordville, Nancy Sharlie Grantham, 22, of Tallahassee and Samantha Dawna Grantham, 23, of Tallahassee were all charged with retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Susan Lorraine Potwin, 55, of Crawfordville was involved in a scooter accident on U.S. Highway 319 near Carraway Cutoff. Potwin did not have a valid driver license. Potwin was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge. Potwin was also issued a citation for possession of an open container. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks and Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. FRIDAY, MAY 9 Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. John David Corathers, 27, of Crawfordville left the store without paying for $132 worth of merchandise including a video game controller, baby diapers, shoes, peanut butter, baby formula, childrens bowls and childrens clothing. Deputy Stephen Simmons observed the suspect on Allen Harvey Road. The stolen items were returned to the store and the suspect was given a notice to appear in court for retail theft. He was also issued a criminal citation for driving while his license was suspended or revoked second or subsequent conviction. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Holly Harrell of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized $85 charge on her bank account. Deputy Ross Hasty and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Marvin Libby of Titanium Motors in Crawfordville reported a grand theft of auto parts. The victim purchased a vehicle for parts from a suspect. It was determined after the sale that the vehicle was stolen from Samuel Logan of Ochlockonee Bay. A suspect has been identi ed. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. SATURDAY, MAY 10 David Williams of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported $1,220 worth of property being stolen including electronic games, a DVD player, movies, childrens toys, shoes and toys. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Amanda Rhodes of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The contents of the victims purse were stolen. The stolen property is valued at $205. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Betty Willis of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim determined that many of the missing items were not of any value. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. James Moore of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone went through the victims truck and stole his wallet. The vehicle was left unsecured and a bank card was taken with the wallet. The stolen property was valued at $15. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Charles Heether of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A gym bag and two custom made knives were stolen from the unsecured vehicle. The property is valued at $610. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. John Newell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A rearm was stolen from a vehicle. It is valued at $250. A second vehicle burglary resulted in the theft of business cards which were recovered. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Sarah Grindle Rollins of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Two vehicles on the victims property were entered but nothing was reported missing. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Catherine Criswell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left her purse in the vehicle and her wallet was stolen. The wallet and contents were valued at $310. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Michelle McKenzie of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. Someone entered the victims vehicle and stole an iPod cord and U.S. currency valued at $20. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Monica Pitts of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A purse was stolen from the inside of her unsecured vehicle. It is valued at $15. A search of the area discovered the purse and contents thrown into a wooded area. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Sgt. Ryan Muse conducted a traf c stop due to an expired sticker on the vehicle tag. Jonathan Flinkman, 46, of Crawfordville did not possess a valid driver license. Flinkman was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked habitual offender. He also had an outstanding warrant for unpaid nancial obligations. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Steve Stange of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone stole cordless headphones and U.S. currency valued at $106. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty and Detective Cole Wells investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Store staff observed Kris Bellamy Holt, 35, of Marietta, Ga. fail to scan some items in the self checkout line and attempt to leave the store. The value of the stolen items was $161 and included food and kitchen items. Holt was issued a notice to appear in court for petit theft and also given a trespass warning. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. A citizen came into the Medart Kangaroo and turned in a wallet that was found on U.S. Highway 98. The property was owned by Emily Oliver of Cairo, Ga. The value of the wallet and contents was $189. Detectives are still working to contact the owner. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. SUNDAY, MAY 11 Florida Highway Patrol Trooper John Tallman arrested Alice Marie Causseaux, 34, of Tallahassee for DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of drug paraphernalia and providing a false name to law enforcement. Deputy Stephen Simmons reportedly observed Causseauxs vehicle leave the roadway multiple times and the driver was unable to maintain a single lane in a safe manner. The suspect allegedly gave Trooper Tallman a false name. Causseaux also had an active contempt of court writ for nancial obligations out of Wakulla. During the search of the vehicle drug paraphernalia and marijuana shake was discovered. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough also investigated. William Roddenberry of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief. Two suspects, who have been identi ed, vandalized a residence he owns. Extensive damage was observed throughout the home and the value of the damage was estimated at $20,000. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Amber Michele Paulette, 26, of Crawfordville was arrested for counterfeiting of license plates, attached tag not assigned, driving while license is suspended or revoked second or subsequent conviction, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Ross Hasty were on patrol on Crawfordville Highway when they observed a vehicle without a tag. Paulette stopped at a fast food restaurant and the deputies conducted their investigation. They determined that the suspect had a suspended license. A strong odor of marijuana was emitting from the vehicle and the suspect. A marijuana pipe was recovered inside the vehicle along with a bag of marijuana. The suspect also admitted to the vehicle tag being a fake. During the search of the vehicle white powder was found in a capsule that tested positive for amphetamines. The marijuana weighed 2.5 grams. Sgt. Ryan Muse also investigated. Orlando Hero of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from the Crawfordville Shell Station. The bike is valued at $200 and was used to go to work. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. MONDAY, MAY 12 Thomas C. Revell of Crawfordville reported a business burglary at the Panacea Area Water System. A golf cart was stolen from the water systems fenced-in water tower in Ochlockonee Bay. The fencing was cut and the cart, valued at $5,000, was missing. Damage to the fence was estimated at $100. The golf cart was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Tiffany Ann Hudson, 25, of Crawfordville was arrested for trespass after warning at Wal-Mart. The subject was observed by Wal-Mart staff at the customer service desk attempting to obtain a refund for products without a receipt. Store staff had knowledge of the active trespass warning and contacted Deputy Anthony Paul. Deputy Gibby Gibson also investigated. Rebecca Humphries of Carrabelle reported the theft of her purse from Winn-Dixie. The victim left her purse in a cart in the parking lot. A white four door sedan was observed with a subject getting out of the vehicle and taking the purse from the cart before leaving the scene. The purse was later recovered in a bush at Walgreens. Prescription medications and cash, valued at $623, were stolen. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. TUESDAY, MAY 13 Joanna Johnson of Tallahassee reported discovering a marijuana plant at her Crawfordville of ce. The immature plant was found in a ower bed and was seized for destruction. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Timothy Peterson of Crawfordville reported the theft of prescription medications. The medications were removed from the victims backpack while he was at work. The medications are valued at $30. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Rebecca Conrad of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered two unauthorized credit card accounts that were opened. The investigation was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. A clerk at Mashes Sands BP in Ochlockonee Bay reported a retail theft. Mark L. Dunsmore, 26, of Crawfordville was observed drinking a bottle of milk and hiding the empty bottle. Deputy Vicki Mitchell attempted to issue a notice to appear in court but when Dunsmore failed to give an exact address he was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The milk was valued at $1.99. WEDNESDAY, MAY 14 Cesar Plata of Murphy Oil Company in Crawfordville reported the theft of gasoline. A male driver pumped $20 worth of gas and left without paying for the fuel. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Lanette Gibson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a trailer tag. The tag is valued at $40 and it was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Animal Control Officer Mark Carter investigated an animal complaint involving two abused dogs. The first dog was suffering from malnutrition and had been ghting with a kennel mate. A second dog was discovered in a cage with no food or water. The animals were taken to a veterinarian for treatment and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. A suspect has been identied. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Germaine Lee of Norfolk, Va. reported leaving her wallet at a peanut stand on U.S. Highway 98. Sgt. Ryan Muse asked Deputy Ross Hasty to check all the peanut stands on Coastal Highway east of Medart. Deputy Hasty spoke to John Robinson of Crawfordville who recovered the victims wallet. The wallet was held for family members to retrieve at the WCSO. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,134 calls for service during the past week including 18 vehicle burglaries; 100 citizen contacts; 12 disturbances; 24 E-911 calls; 64 investigations; 41 medical emergencies; 129 traf c stops; 14 reckless vehicles; and 21 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 www.coastalgems.com33 Years of Experience!850566-9293 Est. 2000Carol Ann Williams, Licensed Real Estate Broker/Owner 33 Years Experience Dawn ReedRealtor, GRI 850-294-3468 ofce 745-8046 www.FloridaBigBendRealty.com Joi HopeBroker 850-210-7300211 Beaty Taff Rd. $299,9003/2 home on canal with a dock so easy access to the Gulf Call us today for more information! Florida Big B end Realty14 Medallion Lane Crawfordville FL 32327 (next to Gulf Coast Lumber)DawnJReed@yahoo.com Joi@JoisHouses.comFull Service Real Estate Company including Property Management Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

PAGE 17

By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netDozens of Wakulla County citizens attended an open house hosted by the Florida Department of Transportation regarding road realignment and improvements on May 15. Display panels were erected at the fellowship hall of Medart Assembly of God, showing maps and plans to realign the intersection of U.S. Highway 319 and U.S. 98 and continuing to north of Alaska Way. Attendees were be able to preview maps and documents, ask questions of DOT employees, and provide comments concerning the project. Ian Satter, DOTs public information director, said he is always glad when a large number of people turn out at meetings and information sessions. Public comment is important, Satter said. This is going to affect people who live here, so we want their opinion. A stack of public comment cards accumulated in a basket at the event. Satter said the cards are scanned, read, and become part of the data packet for the project. He said 90 percent of the planning process is complete, and 100 percent of the plans are due in July. The public input meeting was a requirement to reach 100 percent of provided plans. There will be no more public information meetings scheduled before construction begins. Satter said the old section of Crawfordville Highway will remain in place, and will intersect with the new alignment. Drivers will not be able to make a left turn from Highway 98 going north on the old roadway. It will be a while before construction on the intersection will begin, with right of way acquisition on the intersection not scheduled until 2016. Luis Serna, Director of Wakulla County Planning and Development, said there have been problems with the intersection in the past. A lot of high school students drive across the road or park at the convenience store where its not safe to walk across, Serna said. There has been concern for quite some time on that. The intersection is also intended to make it easier and safer for traf c to turn left from Crawfordville Highway, onto Highway 98, since a traf c light will be installed. Mike Morgan, owner of Mikes Paint and Body shop, was concerned that the intersection alignment would affect his business. Maps showed the right-of-way, depicted with a red line, running right through the middle of his shop. Morgan said he was frustrated that he was not informed of the plans ahead of time. Others at the event voiced concerns that the intersection would slow traf c and increase congestion in front of the high school. Another aspect of the controversy is political, in that Jerry Moore, a county commissioner running for reelection, sold property to DOT at the proposed intersection. His political opponents are seeking to use the sale against him. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 19ABy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netAndrew Michael Wilson and his attorneys admitted in a pre-trial hearing last week that he is responsible for a double-murder in 2011, but without conceding that it was rst degree murder. At a pre-trial hearing on Thursday, May 15, Wilsons defense attorney, Steve Allan Been, told the court: We want you to be aware the defense is not going to dispute, and will af rmatively be conceding that he is the person who committed these violent acts... We will be conceding that he is guilty of some form of murder. Assistant State Attorney Eddie Evans, a prosecutor in the case, said the admission raised some questions in his mind, such as if the murders were committed during the commission of a felony, then the crime is rst-degree felony murder. One of the charges Wilson faces is burglary of occupied dwelling while armed, which is a felony. Wakulla Circuit Judge Charles Dodson, who will preside over the trial, said at the hearing that he understood the defense strategy: The defense will require the state to prove the evidence that Wilson committed the murders without necessarily contesting the evidence, but not conceding or stipulating to it. It appears the defense will be focused on the penalty phase of the trial, when the state presents its case on why jurors should recommend the court impose the death penalty, and the defense presents its case on mitigating factors for why the defendant should not be sentenced to death. It would be up to Judge Dodson to sentence Wilson, though he is supposed to give great weight to the jurys recommendation. Wilson, now 27, faces two counts of rst-degree murder for killing John McKenzie, 62, and Patrick Pittman, 24, in a home in Wakulla Station on March 30, 2011. Wilson is also charged with the attempted murder his former girlfriend, Gabrielle McKenzie, who was 19 at the time of the attack, now 22. John McKenzie was Gabrielle McKenzies father, and Pittman was her boyfriend. According to reports at the time, Gabrielle McKenzie and her 1-year-old son by Wilson were staying at her fathers house. She already had a domestic violence injunction against Wilson, who allegedly broke into the house during the night and attacked the family. Pittman reportedly called 911 to summon help before he died. Gabrielle McKenzies neck was slashed and she had been stabbed, but the deputy responding to the scene was able to stablize her. She reportedly spoke Wilsons name as the person who attacked her. McKenzie attended the hearing with a victim advocate, but had no public comment. The trial is scheduled to get underway beginning with jury selection on June 16. Twelve jurors and two alternates will be selected from a pool of 200 potential jurors. Presuming Wilson is found guilty of rst-degree murder, the penalty phase would get underway starting June 23. Wilson was wearing chains and an orange prison jumpsuit at the hearing. After the murders were discovered, an alert went out to law enforcement agencies to be on the lookout for Wilson, who was located in south Georgia after he crashed his truck in a deputys yard. He was later extradited back to Florida to face the murder charges.Andrew Wilson, facing death penalty for double murder, admits to killing at pre-trial hearingFrom Front PageWe need to widen 319 and improve mobility and traffic congestion, especially here through Crawfordville, Williams said. She said that the widening might impact churches and businesses, which is why public feedback is so important. We need to know what the town wants, Williams said. The wildcard here is public input. Traf c engineering and environmental analysis is ongoing. Final conceptual plans will be ready later this fall, based on the input that comes out of the public hearing. Commissioner Ralph Thomas and Commissioner Chair Richard Harden both said public input is crucial to the widening project. Its impossible to do something like this without impacting someone, Thomas said. Someone is going to be displaced. Kessler acknowledged that Williams is not the project manager for the intersection realignment (also known as Segment 1, under project management of Sandra Lamb), and asked to see the traffic safety studies, because he has yet to review them. Williams said Lamb is working through public response from the open house regarding road realignment and improvements on May 15, to return a response to the board. I dont think the department was anticipating that kind of pushback, Williams said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the intersection realignment is pretty much a done deal. It was studied by the DOT, in multiple fashions, with professionals doing that with credibility in what they do, Moore said. Thats what they have chosen with all the criteria they could nd. They already made that decision for you. In other matters: Keith Lawhon of the Wakulla County Health Department announced the official start of mosquito control season. Lawhon said citizens can request mosquito spray or larvicide at 926-0410 or visit www.wakullahealthdept.com. Citizens who wish not to be sprayed may also submit a request. Sprays are limited to two per residence, unless the need for an increase is verified. Lawhon said many factors determine spray times, conditions must be right, so it is not possible to schedule spray times. Susan Willis presented a proclamation to name May 2014 as Mental Illness Awareness Month. She said one in four adults live with mental illness, and less than half receive treatment. She hoped to raise awareness about the availability of local mental health services, like NAMI Wakulla. County Administrator David Edwards asked for board confirmation to appoint Cody Solburg as director of parks and facilities. The board approved the appointment. Edwards said Solburg will be a great asset to the county. Moore said he will make a future agenda item, possibly in the next budget year, to ask the board to waive building fees for the construction of Heritage Village an undertaking of the Wakulla County Historical Society. Moore said he will assess of the fees. He said Heritage Village will be a 10-to-1 return on the investment for the interest it will generate.Light requested at WHS MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Andrew Wilson Dozens turn out for workshop on 319 realignment Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners wants to remind citizens that the FY 2013/14 Solid Waste and Fire Hardship Applications are due by June 1. The Hardship Assistance Program assists residential property owners who meet the eligibility criteria, with the nancial burden imposed by the Solid Waste and Fire Services Assessments. In order to qualify for assistance, the applicant must complete an application and le with the County Administrators Of ce by June 1. Its important to note that citizens must apply for this assistance on an annual basis. To learn more about the eligibility criteria for the Hardship Assistance Application and to obtain the application, please visit the County website (www.mywakulla. com) or contact Patty Taylor at (850) 9260919 ext. 701.Deadline nears for application for solid waste, re hardship

PAGE 18

There is a long running joke which identi es the mosquito as the State Bird of Florida. No doubt this attempt at humor was conceived by some competing states tourist development agency which desired to distract potential visitors from their own shortcomings, like snow 10 months of the year. It is possible this is the same group of conspirators who initiated the rumor claiming the University of Florida released the Lovebug, Plecia nearctica. It is true Florida has ying bugs and some are a nuisance. Actually, Lovebugs originated in Central America, but migrated north. By 1949 they had reached Escambia County and today are found in every Florida county. Embellishing the finish of automobile and trucks is this insects specialty. They have a justi able reputation for etching vehicle paint at the point of impact, but it is a combination of factors at work. Their body fluids are slightly acidic and capable of damaging the nish slowly. Bacterial action on the Lovebugs residue increases the acidity if they remain on the vehicle for several days. These creatures have an unfortunate attraction to compounds in diesel and gasoline exhaust fumes. Hot engines and vehicle vibrations may also contribute to the demise of many unlucky pairs. Post-appearance chemical control of Lovebugs is pointless. Adult males live for two to three days or a bit longer and females may live for a week, if they avoid roadways. April through May is the largest population emergence of Lovebugs in spring, but this species has been collected in Florida every month of the year except November. The females lay approximately 350 gray, irregularly-shaped eggs in or on the soil surface under partially decayed vegetable matter which is used for food and shelter. Slate-gray larvae are often found in groups where moisture under the decaying vegetation is constantly present, but not excessive. One of the positive byproducts of the heavy rains and standing waters currently being experienced in Wakulla County is many of the larvae will drown. Unfortunately, standing water does encourage other problems. Not as well know, but just as infamous is the Yellow Fly. This Horse Fly and Deer Fly relative is a tenacious pest with a vicious and painful bite. As with many other biting or stinging insects, it is the female Yellow Fly which bites. She uses knife-like mandibles to access the blood of her victims, and is not particular about the source. The spring hatch is currently underway in Wakulla County which created a sudden population eruption, but Yellow Flies will be active all summer. They are active during the daylight hours in shade or full sun. Females deposit egg masses on plants, rocks, sticks or other similar objects usually over water or other favorable larval habitat. Eggs are deposited throughout the life cycle of the female. After ve to 12 days, the eggs hatch and the young larvae drop into the water or mud where they feed on organic debris or prey on other small aquatic organisms.Upon hatching, the larvae burrow into mud or moist earth and begin feeding. No matter the year, there will be ying insect pests. Still, it is better than 10 months of snow. To learn more about Wakulla Countys ying insects, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension website at http:// wakulla.ifas.ufl.edu or call 850-926-3931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 9263931. Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comWhile Lovebugs, above, are a nuisance to drivers, they spend most of their days among the owers and foliage in Wakulla County. Yellow Flies, like the one above, are a notorious, and sometimes painful pest in Wakulla County. Lovebugs and yellow ies are the seasons ying pests Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Free Checkingwith Interest... 1.50 %APY**Account opening subject to approval. Certain restrictions apply. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) accurate as of 07/24/13. Rate t iers are as follows: 1.50% APY applies to balances of $.01 $10,000 and 0.10% APY applies to balances over $10,000 as long as qualications are met each monthly qualication cycle. 0.05% APY applies to all balances if qualications are not met. All balances will earn 1.50% APY to 0.10% APY as long as quali cations are met. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce earnings. No minimum balance required. No monthly service charge. Available to personal accounts only. Federally insured by NCUA. You Deserve Better Banking 6 MO. FORCHOOSE AS YOUR NEWS SOURCE FOR EVERYTHING LOCAL AND SAVE!!! JUST $ 12 Promo Code: SPECIAL Expires: 05-31-14Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:www.TheWakullaNews.com1-877-401-6408 Please accept my new 6 Month subscription at the price of $12* Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $20.14. Local delivery area only.The Wakulla newsSign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the ofce. Name ______________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________State ___Zip ________________ Phone# ( ) _______Cell Phone# ( ) ________E-mail _______________________ Credit Card _________-_________-_________-_________ Exp. _______3119-A Crawfordville Hwy.

PAGE 19

Lt. j.g. Phil Canter U.S. Navy Helicopter pilot Was in Vietnam in 1968-69, when he was 20-21. Cantner was a helicopter pilot ying Hueys for the Navy along the coast defending waterways. He spent a lot of his time ying on the Cambodian border and in Cambodia, working the small rivers that fed into the Mekong River. The helicopters always ew in pairs with a lead ship and a trail. He recalled there was triple canopy jungle in the area that gave bad guys a place to hide, though if the helicopters could be seen from the ground if they were ying high enough. Occasionally, there would be green tracers come up from the jungle, and the idea was to drop altitude to treetop height so that the helicopters were no longer easily seen and nose over where the re seemed to be coming from and do a pop up maneuver and open up with mini guns and rockets. That was one way to make people be quiet, he said, though he added that the pilots never knew if theyd hit anything or if the enemy was just hiding. The Mekong Delta is generally a at region with the exception of the Black Virgin Mountain, and Cantner recalled the Viet Cong had a series of caves in the mountain from which they would shoot at helicopters. That would stir up some hostility right quick, Cantner said. The trick was to get a rocket right into the mouth of the cave, he said, adding that again the pilots relied on a pop-up manuever to get in range and that, one the chopper red, you had to break off and y for your life. He also remembered the dif culty of trying to get enough lift to take off from a ight deck, and he recalled that some ended up in the Mekong River if they didnt pull it off. The Hueys the Navy had came from the Army, Cantner said, and were overhauled and repainted. Flying the underpowered helicopters was probably more dangerous than getting shot at, Cantner said. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com memorial day salute to local vietnam veteransDonnie Sparkman U.S. Army 199 Light Infantry Brigade From April 1969 to April 1970. He turned 21 five days after he arrived in Vietnam. He went in as a PFC and came out a sergeant E-5. For the rst three or four months, Sparkman served in the area southwest of Saigon, an area largely made up of rice paddies. Later, he served in an north of Saigon, near the II Corps-III Corps tactical zone, which he described as being more into the woods, with rubber plantations. I didnt like it at the time, he said of his experience. Now, I dont regret it... It teaches you to grow up in a hurry. It also gave him a perspective and helped him when his three sons served in Iraq, he said. One memory he shared was of trying to cook a duck they had caught, but the re wasnt hot enough so the duck meat was raw. After eating out of a can, anything tastes good, he said. He also recalled going back to base camp one time and running into fellow Sopchoppy native Thurman Roddenberry there. He chuckled remembering that, saying you travel halfway around the world and run into somebody else from Wakulla County. Sparkman remembered never being so cold as during monsoon season the heavy rains would soak everything. It would be 60 degrees and my teeth would be chattering, he remembered. The most frustrating thing was never knowing who was the enemy. During the day, theyd be your best friend, and theyd be shooting at you at night, he said. Coming back from that unpopular war, he said, You were looked down on... People were very disrespecful and all that we were just doing our job. He admitted feeling somewhat jealous of the reaction veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq have gotten, with public embracing and revering soldiers today. He recalled that, years ago, even the older veterans of World War II and Korea at VFWx werent especially welcoming to Vietnam vets. Perhaps it was just a reflection of the wars unpopularity, he said. Editors Note: The idea for these stories was prompted by a realization that most of our World War II veterans are gone and a lot of the Vietnam veterans are getting older. I had originally envisioned a page with shorter, questionaire-type interviews with several more veterans. But the veterans I talked to were so interesting and what I wrote got longer. I hope to continue the series with more interviews for the Fourth of July and Veterans Day papers, and perhaps adding some veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. Thanks to these veterans for being generous with their time and sitting down and talking with me. Stories by WILLIAM SNOWDEN Lt. Col. Thomas Case and Staff Sgt. Mike Long at Hudson Park. Lining up along the highway at Hudson Park as the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce leads the procession. Jimmie Smith U.S. Army 1st Cavalry. He went in a PFC and came out a Spec 4. 1969-70. He was 18 years old. He recalled serving during the invasion of Laos when he was attached to the Army Rangers. A couple of miles in, they a camp with caches of AK-47s and areas set up as classrooms with chalkboards as big as billboards. We went in and blew them up, he said. The best part of the experience was the camraderie with the guys in his platoon, Smith said. You had their back, they had yours. No matter who they were or what color... We all bleed red... But it hurt when you lose somebody. He said nowadays he understands that the Vietnamese were ghting for their country and admits a respect for his enemy they fought against overwhelming odds, he said. Everybody was just doing their job, he said. During most of his tour, he was assigned to do recon, and they were supposed to observe the enemy and report back on their strength and types of weapons for later engagement. He recalled a couple of experiences, including an officer change of command ceremony. The of cers inside the of cers club were eating steak and having mixed drinks while enlisted men outside had hot dogs and 3.2 beer. One disgruntled soldier red a gas round into the group of of cers, which filled the club with smoke and forced all the of cers unhappily outside. Smiths whole company was punished with double guard duty because they wouldnt tell who did it. He recalled another experience of being on an ambush patrol in area with rubber plantations and that a new gunnery sergeant, who had just transferred in from Germany and didnt have combat experience, got nervous after sensing movement in the woods and called in an artillery strike but gave the wrong coordinates. He called it in on us, Smith said. Nobody was hurt, and the sergeant was transferred out. Smith remembered the day he was discharged at Fort Dix, N.J., running across the parade eld trying to make it to a flight home. He was stopped by a drill instructor with some brand new recruits and asked why he was running. Going home? the DI asked. Let me give you a piece of advice change into your civilian clothes. Smith did, and when his plane landed at home in Michigan, there were protestors at the airport, but he had taken the DIs advice and changed into his civilian clothes and so nothing was said to him. Still, he said, he felt like a pariah in society because of his service. People asked when I came back, Where have you been? Havent seen you in a while. I made up stories about where Id been. I was ashamed. Youre forced to go and youre a bad guy, he said. He said when he sees soldiers today returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, he thanks them for their service, and says he has a lot of respect for them because they arent drafted, they volunteer. Its like volunteering to get in a car crash, he said. Of his own service, Smith re ected that, I feel better for it for some reason. I have no fear of death why worry about it? And he said hed like to go back to Vietnam as a tourist. Id like to go back, just to visit, he said. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 11A Dusty Cook U.S. Navy, E-5Served aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany. He was discharged in 1973. The Oriskany was decommissioned in 1976 and was ultimately was sunk in May 2006 off the coast of Pensacola to become the largest vessel ever sunk to create an arti cal reef. Photos submitted by his wife, Becky Cook. Patriot Guard guide the van with the soldiers past Hudson Park. Well-wishers sign posterboard cards for the soldiers. They were supposed to just drive past Hudson Park on Saturday afternoon as well-wishers waved ags and welcomed them to Wakulla County. But the two soldiers arrived early, and so organizers with Warriors and Quiet Waters brought them to Hudson Park where they mingled with the crowd and shook hands. Lt. Col. Thomas Case and Staff Sgt. Mike Long, both U.S. Army, are two visitors to Wakulla County to do some shing over the next week. Steve Fults, one of theorganizers of the event, said the early arrival was an happy accident Long at Hudson Park. Soldiers visiting from Warriors and Quiet Waters given warm welcomethat worked out well the 100 or so people who turned out were happy for the opportunity to meet and greet the soldiers. The Warriors and Quiet Waters Southern Chapter provides traumatically injured U.S. service men and women from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars a high quality restorative program, utilizing the therapeutic experience of shing on the Gulf of Mexico. Serving those who served for usTCC IS A MILITARY FRIENDLY SCHOOL Happy Memorial Day Buddy Wells

PAGE 20

Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director The Big Bend Kayak Tournament was once again a success for anglers and senior citizens. The weekend of May 2 and 3, brought in the 2nd Annual Big Bend Kayak Classic fishing tournament. Wakulla County and the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center team welcomed local and outof-town anglers from all over the southeastern United States to the cool, clear, waters of our bays, beaches and estuaries. So what do kayaking anglers and senior citizens have in common? They both love the meals on wheels program at the senior center. The anglers enjoy giving back to the generation of people that gave them so much beauty and the overall Wakulla way of life. Many seniors were on hand and stepped up to the microphone at 3Y Ranch and genuinely and sincerely thanked the anglers for contributing to their quality of life. The anglers gave the seniors their undivided attention and a healthy round of applause after each thank you had been offered to them. How did this get started? A group of kayak anglers named the Forgotten Coast Kayak Anglers started the trend locally, conducting a professional tournament mainly among friends and acquaintances who love the sport of kayak shing. The fellow who started the paddles to moving lives right here in Crawfordville, Jeff Suber a big man with an equally as big heart conducted the tournament each year and brought a check for thousands of dollars to the senior center each year. When Jeff retired, the center took on the event with a promise from Jeff and other kayak angling professionals to conduct the actual tournament. At the event, the senior center team, board of directors and friend-raising committee stepped up to the plate, literally, and served food at the Captains Meeting on Friday night and a low country boil was prepared by Scott Homan and devoured by the anglers on Saturday night after a long, enjoyable and sunny day on the water. The anglers always enjoy the low country boil as it has been a tradition at the kayak tournament for the last eight years. Professional kayak anglers like Rob Baker, Mike McNamara, Gregg Blakney and Liam Callaghan were on hand to oversee that the tournament maintained professional standards yet afforded all round family fun. The sponsors came through from all over the region to support Meals-on-Wheels and to keep the services to senior citizens a oat! While the Friday night rains came in, it did not dampen the spirits of the 92 anglers who assembled for a Captains Meeting under the arena at the ranch. Food and drinks were plenteous and the anglers left that night after some great food, fun and fellowship ready to sh at 6:45 a.m. Saturday morning. The weather cleared and a great day was had by all anglers. Redfish, trout and largemouth bass were caught in abundance in and around the area of Wakulla County. The tournament is a catch, photo, and release tournament so no sh were killed or harmed during the event. Saturday evening brought the anglers back to the arena where multiple prizes were given away for their attendance! Kayaks were donated as rst place prizes for all categories, including a youth division. Cash and other prizes were given to anglers for second and third place prizes. The anglers left the event and promised to return for the 3rd Annual Big Bend Kayak Classic which will be held the first Friday and Saturday of May each year. Hobie always comes through as the headline sponsor and donates a high-end Kayak for the grand slam division winner (longest red sh/trout combo). Maurice Langston, the director of the center said, Its wonderful to see local and regional support caring for the greatest generation of senior citizens in Wakulla County. Our sponsors take their efforts personally and they know they are taking care of the generation of people who took care of them and are feeding those who have fed them and have made this county the great county that it is today. National sporting good chains gave of their resources however, most resources for the event came from local help and loving hearts. Not one sponsor said no to supporting Meals-on-Wheels, according to Langston. Many cuts in federal and state programs have taken their toll on senior citizens and while many counties are having to step back on services, Wakulla County is kicking up its services to senior citizens. A big thank you to our sponsors and a great thank you goes out to all of Wakulla County. We live in the most blessed and best county in the region; second to none, said Langston. Now, let me set the stage as a kayak angler in the Big Bend. It could be possible that my vision of Big Bend kayak shers is biased, but I see our peers as a spectacular diverse group of folks that love to sh. Add to the mix a true sense of charity, and the warm feeling of the tournament will be overwhelming. Do not get me wrong, this is a shing tournament, and the competition was erce, as this tournament attracted the best kayak anglers from several states. If you are worthy to compete with the best of the best, this is the place to bring your Agame. If competition seems to not be your thing, then you could come as you are and learn from the best. Some folks won big money and prizes, and everyone else won by being part of the kayak shing community. The tournament was a two day event, with a captains meeting on Friday night, and shing on Saturday. Both events were full of awesome food, raf e prizes, and buzzing with kayak shing friendship. Kayak fishing tournament was successful fundraiser By SHERYL SMYTHEOf the Senior CenterThe Senior Center Team is always looking for ways to raise money for all the programs and services offered at the Senior Center. One of the fundraisers is the Big Bend Classic Kayak Tournament for The Meals on Wheels Program. The Kayak tournament was held this year at 3Y Ranch on May 2 and 3 and it was a shing and nancial success. Since this fundraiser directly impacted the Meals on Wheels program we thought we would give a sneak peek into the program. Meals on Wheels is a program offered at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center for individuals age 60 and older and who are homebound. Frozen meals along with other consumable items such as milk and bread are delivered to clients each week to assist in meeting the clients nutritional needs. In the public eye, Meals on Wheels is just that. But in reality, there are more aspects to this program. Our clients bene t in so many other ways one cannot imagine and are often in more need than the average person could even imagine. Every client has a story and every story is different. When our dedicated volunteers or team members deliver to their clients they are able to get behind the scenes and become familiar with every individual situation. Some clients have more needs than just meals and through this program we are able to identify them. Some of the needs range from socializing, home repairs, to getting the mail or having yard work done, etc. Through our volunteers and outreach in the community we try to accomplish helping them with the speci c problem. In addition to this service, we also offer supplemental food for their pets (specifically cats and dogs) to ensure that the client does not have to share their meals with their companions. When a client owns a pet they often feed their little companions part of their meals due to lack of finance or simply by not being able to go to the store and purchase pet food. We help with this need by sending donated pet food to them. Meals on Wheels is such a wonderful program for our community and the clients that need the service. Please, next time you see the Senior Center advertising about a fundraiser come out and support the people in need. We want to say a special thanks to County Commissioners Jerry Moore and Richard Harden for their constant kind donations of their raises to the Senior Citizens Center. Moore brings food to raffle to the seniors once a month and Harden brings a check. A look at the Senior Centers Meal on Wheels PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMaurice Langston, above, shows off a craw sh at the senior centers low country boil at 3Y Ranch for its kayak shing tournament. At right, a kettle of cooked craw sh. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms IN-SHORE FISHING IS HOT AND SO IS THE WEATHER HOOK UP YOUR BOAT See us for All your boating supplies! MAY. 24IN STATE WATERSOPENS As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926

PAGE 21

Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 12345 6789 10111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 2526 272829 303132 33 34 3536 3738 3940 41 4243 44 4546 4748 49 5051 52 5354 55 565758 59 606162 636465 6667 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 Across 1 In the midst of 6 High tennis shots 10 Copy a baseball player, at times (ick!) 14 Brown shade 15 Freshly 16 Song 17 Patriot who went on a "Midnight Ride" 19 Time ___ half 20 Matthew and John: abbr. 21 Toothbrush part 23 One of the Kardashians 24 Enemies 25 Some astrological signs 27 Dog food brand 30 Possesses 33 Day-___ paint 34 Rough 37 Last drink of the evening 41 Toy that spins 42 Person who never throws anything away 44 First aid ___ 45 Very thin 47 Singer Easton 49 Kind of bread 50 Director Craven 52 ___ and crafts 53 Be in charge of a movie 56 Burn 59 Yoko ___ 60 Whaler's weapon 63 Cat's place 66 Easy victory 68 Caribbean island owned by the U.S. 70 Tiny bit 71 "What ___ is new?" 72 Running on ___ (almost out of fuel) 73 Wintertime fun 74 Tennis match parts 75 Grand banquet Down 1 Scary snakes 2 Beef or turkey, e.g. 3 Masterwork 4 Zero, in soccer 5 Gorgeous Greta 6 Sparing no expense 7 Dollar bills 8 Ernie's pal, on "Sesame Street" 9 Just fine and dandy 10 Train stop: abbr. 11 Musician with a mohawk, maybe 12 Country whose capital is New Delhi 13 Cowboys, Broncos, Seahawks, etc. 18 Before, in poems 22 Between seventh and ninth 24 In favor of 26 Three-letter sandwich 27 Hits the stage 28 "Check it out!" 29 One way for a kid to earn money 31 Foot joint 32 Gentleman 35 Politician's words 36 Devour 38 Fuel 39 "___ Misbehavin'" 40 School orgs. 43 Crow's sound 46 Soap ingredient 48 One of two on your head 51 Makes a goal 53 College dwellings 54 One way to saute 55 Scotch and masking 57 Burning 58 Have ___ day 61 Law 62 Irritating person 63 ___ beans 64 Four in a deck of cards 65 Blog item 67 Baseball great Williams 69 Wish you hadn't Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 1 23 3456 2758 3 148 69 5234 6 739 4917 782 2009 HometownContent 517 9862 4 3 983412576 624375189 396 147852 842659317 175823964 261 738495 459261738 738594621 AMONG LOBS SPIT SEPIA ANEW TUNE PAULREVERE ANDA STS BRISTLE KIM FOES LIBRAS ALPO HAS GLO COARSE NIGHTCAP TOP PACKRAT KIT SKELETAL SHEENA RYE WES ARTS DIRECT CHAR ONO HARPOON LAP ROUT PUERTORICO MITE ELSE FUMES SLED SETS FEAST Second Harvest food distribution held Saturday at the Senior Center By William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.netAn estimated 250 cars were lined up around the block at the senior center on Saturday, May 17, for the free food distribution from Second Harvest. Richard English, executive director of Second Harvest of the Big Bend, was at the distribution and estimated some 20,000 pounds of food was brought and distributed to families. The food included frozen chicken, fresh tomatoes and squash, canned goods, juice, peanut butter, bottled water and bread and buns. English said Second Harvest is trying to nd local businesses interested in sponsoring distributions. He noted the Saturday distribution was costing a lot of money for the two trucks that delivered the food with fuel costs and overtime for the drivers. Second Harvest operates on donations from the community, English said, adding: The hardest thing is covering our costs. English said he has seen an increase in local need since the reduction in benefits for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, SNAP, or food stamps as its more commonly known. Were out there in the community trying to distribute as much food as we can, English said. Wakulla Senior Center staff and volunteers were joined by several area church organizations in distributing the food.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

PAGE 22

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 3BClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m.Friday, May 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Saturday, May 24 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, May 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for ve classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Monday, May 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, May 27 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.Wednesday, May 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Upcoming Events Wednesday, May 21 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOl will hold its nal SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL meeting from 3 to 5 pm in the WHS library. Anyone interested is invited to attend. Thursday, May 22 A BOOK EVENT featuring Southern Shock Americana: The Life and Execution of John Mills, Jr. by local author HERB DONALDSON will be at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla Public Library. Donaldson will discuss his book and community. Guests are Agnes Furey (Achieve Higher Ground, author Wild owers in the Median); Sheila Meehan (Tallahassee Citizens Against the Death Penalty) and others. The NOAA HURRICANE HUNTERS are coming to Tallahassee at the Tallahassee Regional Airport and does include tours of the aircraft as well as many other exhibits on hurricane preparedness, response, and recovery. The event begins at 9:30 a.m. and continues until around 5 p.m. This is an excellent opportunity for residents in North Florida, South Georgia, and Southeast Alabama to learn about the hurricane hunters and ways that your residents can prepare for the coming hurricane season. Friday, May 23 A SUMMERTIME BLOOD DRIVE will be from noon to 6 p.m. at Walmart in Crawfordville. Donors will receive a $10 WALMART GIFT CARD, and a coupon for $5 off two entrees at Outback Steakhouse. Donate blood twice before August 31 and receive a free lunch courtesy of Outback, and be entered to win outback for a year. Donors are encouraged to make an appointment online at www.oneblooddonor.org, and use sponsor code #G1915. Monday, May 26 Wakulla County announces the ANNUAL MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY at 10 a.m. in front of the courthouse. This Memorial is dedicated to the lasting memory and sacred honor of the brave American servicemen and servicewomen who gave their lives for our Country and a special emphasis of Wakulla Countys own heroes. This years ceremony includes keynote speaker Commissioner Ralph Thomas and will highlight patriotic music, laying of the wreath, and raising of the ag. All are welcome to attend to honor those who served. Saturday, May 31 THE SOPCHOPPY OPRY and South Bound Band welcomes Tom & Janie Roberts with the Way Up Band in a special MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE SHOW, 1 to 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. The show will include a variety of patriotic music performed by some of the best singers and musicians in this area. Tickets are $12. Call 962-3711 for information or log onto sopchoppyopry.com. Wednesday, June 4 The Class of 2014, WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL War Eagles invite you to come celebrate with them at BACCALAUREATE at 7 p.m. (Gates Open at 6 pm) at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Friday, June 6 Class of 2014, WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL War Eagles GRADUATION will beat 7:30 p.m. (Gates Open at 6:30 p.m.) at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Thursday, June 12 WAKULLA PREGNANCY CENTER is partnering with the Community Foundation of North Florida on MATCH DAY 2014 on JUNE 12 ONLY. The Foundation will match your donations to us dollar-for-dollar up to $5,000 on gifts made ONLY THROUGH THEIR WEBSITE. Simply go to www.Findlearngive.org and make a gift by credit card using the Donate Now Match Day button between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to be eligible for the Match Day grants and incentive prizes. Select Wakulla Pregnancy Center as your chosen charity. The earlier in the day the better as there is a maximum dollar amount available to be awarded. For details of the rules go to http:// ndlearngive.guidestar.org/ or follow this link.Saturday, June 14 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1994 20-year reunion will be held at Wakulla Springs Lodge from 6 to 10 p.m. Reunion Ticket are $40 and includes admission to event at Wakulla Springs Lodge, heavy hors odourves, entertainment, and door prizes. Wakulla Springs Lodge will be providing a cash bar on the terrace. Online payments are preferred, the website to make your online payment and RSVP is www.WHSWarEagles1994. myevent.com. Payments can also be mailed to the following address. Attention: Ashley Savary, Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Make Checks payable to WHS Class of 1994. For more information e-mail Hunter Versiga Tucker at htucker32327@yahoo.com. Government MeetingsWednesday, May 21 The WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMITTEE is holding a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, to review and make recommendations to the BOCC on matters related to historical, cultural and architectural resources. The WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a Public Meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn and Suite 3292 Coastal Hwy. Monday, June 2 The WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. to give citizens an opportunity to become acquainted with the proposed WASTEWATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS and to comment on such items as to the economic and environmental impacts, service area, alternatives to the project and other matters of concern. Tuesday, June 3 The Wakulla County Tourist Development Council will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn and Suites 3292 Coastal Hwy.Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Wakulla Library Book/Author EventCrawfordville 6 p.m. NOAA Hurricane Hunters Tallahassee Airport 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m.Crawfordville High School Reunion Reservation required All Day Memorial Day Ceremony Courthouse Lawn 10 a.m.ThursdayThursdaySaturdayMonday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla May 21 June 14 Friday Night Movie Our rescheduled Friday Night Movie for May 23 is the multi Academy Award nominated film, Philomena. This PG-13 (language, some sexual references, and thematic elements) rated lm stars Oscar winner Judi Dench and Steve Coogan and is based on the New York Times bestseller The Lost Child of Philomena Lee. This true story was nominated for Best Picture, Actress, Original Score, and Screenplay at the 2014 Academy Awards and is sure to touch your heart and mind. Doors open at 6:45 for the 7 p.m. show. Author Herb Donaldson Herb Donaldson will be speaking for the second time at WCPL on his book Southern Shock Americana Thursday at 6 p.m. in our Main Meeting Room. Guests to include Agnes Furey (Achieve Higher Ground, author Wildflowers in the Median); Sheila Meehan (Tallahassee Citizens Against the Death Penalty) and others. Please join us for another discussion on this profound and controversial work about the death penalty, Wakulla County, and the impact of tragedy on two families. Copies will be available to purchase and light refreshments will be provided. Summer Reading Books With the nearing end of the school year, we are beginning to stock up on copies of the summer reading books requested by Wakulla County Schools for all of the great students in the county. Some are already on hand with more coming in daily. We are doing things a little different this year with allowing only 2 of the Summer Reading Books to be checked out per card at a time and only for two weeks. This hopefully will allow us to work our way through the hold lists quicker than in the past and allow more students access to these materials. Dont wait until school is about to start in August, please allow your child to read the Summer Books they want early so they dont miss out on this years great titles. Summer Program Brochures Keep an eye out next week as we plan to pass out our annual brochures about all the great programs well be providing the children of Wakulla County this summer at the local schools. This years theme is, Fizz, Boom, Read, and will have a science focus. We also have many great performers which will be coming to see us for the rst time, as well as visits from the Challenger Learning Center, Tallahassee Museum of Natural Science (Jr. Museum), as well as bringing back our Cinemaniacs program for teens where they will work on a short lm over the summer to be shown at the end. All of the fun this summer is free thanks to the continued support of the Friends of the Library. Check with you children next week as they bring home the brochures with information on all the fun (and learning) going on here this summer!Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary Director

PAGE 23

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 16 The dual roles of the governors office during an election year were on full display this week. On the one hand, Gov. Rick Scott was signing and at least preparing to veto some of the bills approved in this springs legislative session --including accidentally signing one bill before it had been sent to him. New restrictions on education standards, the last half of a sizable tax cut and a bill paving the way for undocumented immigrants to practice law in Florida all met with Scotts approval. Whatever Scotts motive for signing them, several of the bills served political ends. At the same time, the governor said a bill that would increase how fast motorists could drive on state highways wasnt his speed. Meanwhile, blind trusts like the one Scott has used to handle his assets during his time in office came under fire from advocacy groups who object that, while the mechanism might shield knowledge about investments from elected officials, it also keeps their financial interests secret from the public. And the fundraising machine continued to churn for Scott, his rivals and dozens of other candidates and causes across the board, as the November elections loomed. SIGNING BILLS, WHEREVER THEY ARE The closest intersection between the governors campaign and his official duties was the signing Monday of the final portion of his $500 million reduction in taxes and fees, something already transitioning from the cornerstone of Scotts legislative agenda to the centerpiece of his campaign for reelection. The bill we signed today is $121 million right back into Florida citizens hands, Scott said during a Monday news conference. Scott last month had already signed a larger part of the tax and fee cuts, rolling back vehicle registration fees, that was expected to save motorists on average savings of $20 to $25 per vehicle. Lawmakers approved the most recent tax-cut package (HB 5601) called the patchwork of awesomeness by House Finance & Tax Chairman Ritch Workman, R-Melbourne on the final day of the legislative session, saying it would save Floridians about $105 million. But Scott put the number Monday at $121 million, and his office also repeated that figure in a news release. The savings include sales-tax holidays on hurricane gear, school supplies and energy-efficient appliances. It reduces or gets rid of taxes on college meal plans, therapeutic pet food, car seats and bicycle helmets for kids. Scott also autographed a set of bills aimed at calming down activists worried about the states version of the Common Core education standards. The governor was so eager to get the proposals into law, his office announced that he had authorized a bill that he was technically unable to sign. The brief mix-up began when the governors office announced that Scott had signed bills meant to push back on federal intrusion. The bills included measures that would give parents more opportunities to challenge their school boards choice of textbooks; remove the words Common Core from state law while leaving unchanged the states modified version of the benchmarks; and ban the collection of students biometric and other personal information by school districts. There was just one hitch the Legislature had not yet sent Scott the education privacy bill, meaning that he could not sign it. After the announcement, Scotts office asked the Legislature to send the bill to him. Lawmakers complied, and Scott inked it along with another measure giving school districts one year to transition to a new state test. Scott approved several other proposals this week, including a bill that would allow admission to The Florida Bar for a Mexicanborn law school graduate who was brought to the country at age 9 by his parents and became an undocumented immigrant. But the governor announced he would slam the brakes on an effort to increase speeds on state highways by vetoing a bill that would have allowed the Florida Department of Transportation to consider hiking maximum speed limits by 5 mph. Im going to stand with law enforcement and I want everybody to stay safe, Scott said less than a week after a Florida Highway Patrol trooper made an impassioned plea for him to veto the bill at a fellow troopers funeral. DO TRUSTS BLIND THE PUBLIC? Open-government advocates didnt attack any of the bills that Scott signed into law this week, but they did take aim at a 2013 law that allows elected officials to put financial assets in blind trusts that do not offer detailed public disclosure of the holdings. Jim Apthorp, former chief of staff to the late Gov. Reubin Askew, filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the law. The suit has the backing of the First Amendment Foundation, the League of Women Voters and half a dozen media organizations that will file friend-of-thecourt briefs, including the Associated Press, The Miami Herald and The Florida Times-Union. Apthorp and the attorney in the case, Talbot Sandy DAlemberte, said the use of blind trusts circumvents the full disclosure of public officials holdings required by the Sunshine Amendment, which Askew spearheaded and Florida voters overwhelmingly passed in 1976. Apthorps petition asks the high court to prohibit Secretary of State Ken Detzner from accepting the qualifying papers of any candidate who has placed finances in a blind trust. Senate President Don Gaetz and House Speaker Will Weatherford released a joint statement Wednesday defending the law, which was known as Senate Bill 2 and followed a 2010 grand jury recommendation about the use of blind trusts and a 2012 recommendation from the Commission on Ethics and suggested that the lawsuit was politically motivated. For the plaintiff to suddenly come forward with his objections four years after the grand jury report, two years after the ethics commissions recommendations and one year after Senate Bill 2 was enacted raises the suspicion that this is not a serious or sincere constitutional challenge but a cynically timed political ploy designed and timed to affect the outcome of this years elections, the statement said. Although Apthorp and DAlemberte are Democrats, as was Askew, they said the lawsuit doesnt target Scott, a Republican. Gov. Scott did everything that the ethics commission and the Legislature asked him to do, Apthorp said. So I dont think hes done anything wrong here. The problem is that the statute under which he received advice is not constitutional. Scotts campaign manager Melissa Sellers on Thursday sent a letter to Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner, making clear the governor would comply with disclosing his individual investments if blind trusts are barred. If the courts believe the trust should be dissolved, all assets will be disclosed in accordance with the law for qualifying, Sellers wrote. STORY OF THE WEEK: Open-government advocates filed suit against a law allowing elected officials to put their assets in blind trusts, saying the mechanisms kept the public from knowing about the officials financial holdings. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: There wont be fields of marijuana growing in Florida. It will be grown under roof, in controlled environments, inside, for obvious security reasons. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, speaking about the potential impact of the impending legalization of low-THC marijuana, in a videotaped interview with the South Florida Sun Sentinel editorial board. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Two sides of the governors of ce WHITES WINESEmbracing the unknown at restaurantsBy DAVID WHITERepresenting real people who make real wine has always been very important to me, explained Danny Fisher, the general manager and beverage director of Ripple, a wine-focused restaurant in Washington, D.C. When youre drinking wine -or any kind of beverage, really -you want to know that someone has put time and effort into it. It shouldnt be mass produced, toyed with, or manipulated. Fisher and I were chatting about the wisdom or foolishness of loading up a restaurant wine list with smallproduction, unfamiliar offerings. Sure, Americans have fallen for wine. We surpassed France as the worlds largest wine-consuming nation in 2010 and have been drinking more each year. But consumers still feel most comfortable with major grapes like Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Sauvignon Blanc. And most stick with easily recognized brands, like Duckhorn, Kendall-Jackson, and Chateau Ste. Michelle. In restaurants and wine bars across the country, however, a growing number of courageous sommeliers are eschewing these obvious choices and gently guiding patrons outside their comfort zones. These efforts are having an impact. Thanks in no small part to people like Fisher, Americans are beginning to embrace the unknown. Consider Ripples bythe-glass list. Its home to 40 different wines, including an unusual blend of Vermentino and Grenache Blanc from maverick California vintner Steve Edmunds; an orange wine from Channing Daughters on Long Island; and a Teroldego from superstar Italian winemaker Elisabetta Foradori. From the beginning, one of our biggest things was that we wanted people to be able to taste different wines -and thats why we have so many by the glass, Fisher explained. Its so our customers can explore what different wines taste like with foods. You can do half glasses if you want; its all about tasting and seeing what you like and maybe discovering something new. The focus on food is echoed by David McCarus, the proprietor of a boutique wine distribution agency in South Carolina. While the general manager and beverage director of FIG, an award-winning restaurant in Charleston, he focused on the interaction of wine with food and the role wine should play at the table. And he saw how eager consumers were to learn. When McCarus moved to Charleston from San Francisco in 2012, he wasnt sure he would nd a receptive clientele. I didnt know if there was an appetite in town, he explained. But I had a strong enough belief that people would understand the wine program if it made the food taste better. Consumers might not know what theyre looking for. They might not really know what they want. But if the wine and food can combine into this organic dance and it makes sense while its happening people will be comfortable. And people will come back. McCarus saw his patrons come back again and again. A successful wine program satis es virtually every customer, of course, so McCarus made sure to always have something for everyone, even if it was obscure and didnt match the exact request. My point was always, Why dont we try this? he continued. So If someone comes in and asks for a glass of Pinot Grigio, we can say, No, we dont have a glass of Pinot Grigio, but we have this beautiful Erbaluce from Piedmont made by this great producer and its really delicious and it will be really good with your sh. What McCarus and Fisher have done isnt unique. Nationwide, more and more sommeliers are showcasing small-production, interesting wines and providing opportunities for people to try things that arent available at the local supermarket. Theyre acting as educators, eager to share their palates and preferences with their customers. The wine world is vast. And thanks to this work, Americans are beginning to make all sorts of discoveries. David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

PAGE 24

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 5B Accompanied Acted Along Angle Arabs Barns Basin Beast Birds Books Cheek Choirs Crystals Damage Dream Feels Given Horses Illustrations Immense Irons Items Jigsaws Meats Naming Nosey Novel Organ Perch Pianos Queens Reeds Rightly Rivers Search Sicker Sleek Smooth Snails Stationery Status Storage Studio Suits Tiles Tribe Trouble Vapor Views The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

PAGE 25

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comEXPLORATION STATIONThree Camps Designed to Explore The academic/artistic based camps hosted at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center that focus on aspects of culture/history, science based, economy, finance, politics, and a host of other topics as students take part in camps designed to foster creativity while using real world skills and collaboration with other students. Camp dates are TBA but each camp will be one week Monday through Friday 8 am to 11 a.m. $75 per week. Please, contact Catherine Harris Small at Ms.Catherapy@gmail.com or 850-274-6810 to reserve your spot and make payments. Ambassadors Camp designed for students to use creativity and communication skills to create their own country and collaborate with other campers in trading, managing, and developing ways for their own country to survive a host of circumstances both positive and negative that will occur with their country as the World Summit approaches. Countries and campers must work together to survive. Inventors Camp designed for campers to invent their own items. They will be creating blueprints, designing and developing their plans, and creating prototypes artistically of their inventions to share in a Mock Scientific Convention where other inventors will be critiquing and discussing their inventions while they market their promising items to a welcoming public. Entrepreneurs Camp designed for students to use creativity and communication to design their own food business restaurant or food developer. These new business owners must go through the hoops of developing their own marketing process, products, using finances, and finally present their business propositions to an excited market of stockholders who would love to invest in an original business. These campers must work together to make a business and a profit.SCOUTINGCub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Eagle Scouts. Ages 1st GradeAge 20. To learn more contact David Damon 850-251-4166.PROVIDENCE CHRISTIAN ACADEMYSummer School Private Tutoring. Courses as needed. English, Algebra, remedial reading. Call for further information. 850-926-2456, 710 Shadeville Hwy, Crawfordville.CAMP INDIAN SPRINGSTraditional Over Night Camp Ages 7 to 16 year old. Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! Note: Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www.campindiansprings.comWAKEBOARDINGVictory Wakeboarding Instruction will feature Wakeboarding, wakeskating, wakesurfing, skiing, tubing & Birthday Parties. Half day or full day lessons available. www. Victorywakeboard.comFLORIDA SHERIFFS YOUTH RANCHESTwo Locations The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches has two locations which provide a positive camping experience for many of Floridas deserving children. The purpose of these camps is to provide a wholesome atmosphere and positive camping experience for boys and girls. At the Youth Camp/Barberville and Caruth CampInglis/Yankeetown, boys and girls experience many different therapeutic camping activities. Canoeing, archery, swimming, and many other recreational activities allow them the opportunity to build basic teamwork and peer communication skills. Additionally, they can spend the week enjoying the beautiful, tranquil outdoor environment. Ages 10-15, 5 & 6 Day Sessions. Contact: Cori Welbes, Director Camping Services, Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. Office Caruth Camp (352) 447-2259 x 3607 Office Youth Camp (386) 749-9999 x 3916 Cell (386) 688-4337 Caruth Camp is located at 14770 SE Highway 19 in Inglis, Florida, which is about 20 minutes north of Crystal River, in Levy County. Youth Camp is located at 1170 Youth Camp Lane in Barberville, Florida, which is about 30 minutes west of Ormond Beach, in Volusia County. ITS FREE! The only cost is your time in completing the application; getting it notarized, signed by the Sheriff in your county, filling out the physical, and postage to mail it back.4H CAMP CHERRY LAKEJune 23-27, 2014 Accepting Campers, Counselors In Training and Counselors. Traditional Rustic Cabin Camping Experience at Camp Cherry Lake in Madison. Leave Monday at 8a.m. and return Friday at noon. Ages 8 to 13, Campers $230, Counselors in Training $230, Counselors $180. $50 non-refundable deposit due before Thursday June, 19 at Registration. For More Information Contact: Les Harrison Phone: 850-926-3931 Email: harrisog@ufl.edu. FREE Summer Youth Camo Sheriffs Youth Ranch.HAPPY TIMESOffering Full or Part time Childcare and Before & After School Programs. Summer Childcare includes a wide variety of field trips and adventures for your children. We enjoy skating, museums, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally owned and operated by Linda Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Weekly and Daily rates available. 850-926-5226KNOWLEDGE TREE ACADEMYFull Day Summer Camp, Ages K-5th Grade, $135 per week. USDA Breakfast, Lunch & Snack. Weekly Field Trips 850-926-5557BUSY BEE LEARNING CENTERChildCare 6 weeks to 8 years of age. Before & After School for Riversink and WEK. FREE VPK and Warp around care, School Readiness Provider. Discounts offered for Multi-Child, Military, Civil Service, Teacher Discount. For more information contact 850-745-6053 or busybeelearning32327@ yahoo.com.GAMERZ PARADISEVideo Games, Pool Tournaments, Ping Pong Tournaments, Foosball and more! Kinect, X-Box Live, PS3, WII & WII-Fit. All in A/C and Supervised Environment. Contact: 850-926-9100 Open All Summer Long.WERE ALL SO PRECIOUS Offering Full or Part time Childcare Infants thru 5 years old. Before & After School Programs Pre-k thru 5th Grade. Summer Camps Daily Field Trips and more! 850-745-8234DREAMS DAY CARE CENTER850-926-0200SAVARY ACADEMYWe are pleased to be able to offer students the opportunity to earn credits while they are out of school for the summer! Savary Academy will be open on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.to enable the students to work solely on one or two subjects for credit recovery, earn credit in AP areas or participate in classes such as Drivers Education. Students do not need to be enrolled in Savary Academy during the traditional school year to participate for the summer! If you are interested, contact us today space is limited! Enrollment deadline is June 4.THE LEARNING CURVEIntro to Kindergarten ABCs & 123s. Intro to next grade level of elementary. Intro to 3rd grade Common Core Math. For students scoring below grade level in Reading gr 3, 6, 7, 8, or 10. Designed to help students meet graduation requirements if they have not passed FCAT Algebra 1 Summer EOC Retakes; Kindergarten Ready; Jump Start!; 3rd grade math camp; FCAT remediation; the ACT replace high school FCAT reading; Algebra 1 bootcamp; Home school portfolio evaluation; Financial literacy for high school students; College assignment proofreading; One-on-one tutoring all summer; Learn to Excel! Call Melisa Taylor & register today! 850-926-2179 www.thelearningcurvetutoring.com TYS US TAI KARATE SCHOOLCome join for Mixed Martial Arts, Realistic Women Self-Defense, Tactics & Techniques for Women and more! FREE 2 Introduction Classes, $40 per month, and Family Rates! Tiny Dragons 3-5 years Old. Kids 6-12 years Old. Teens & Adults. For more information please contact the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140.C.O.R.E. Challenging Obstacles Require Effort FREE Fitness Fun for the WHOLE FAMILY! Tuesday 5-6 pm at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Contact 850-224-1177 or 850-745-6045EARLY LEARNING COALITION OF THE BIG BEND REGION The Voluntary PreKindergarten program (VPK) helps children prepare for success in school and it is FREE! Will your child be 4 years old by September 1st? Does your child reside in Florida? Need Help? Call us at 1-866-973-9030 or email vpk@ elcbigbend.org Single Point of Entry Need Help? Call us at 1 866 973 9030 or email vpk@elc bigbend.org. The Voluntary PreKindergarten program (VPK) helps children prepare for success in school and it is FREE! Will your child be 4 years old by September 1st? Does your child reside in Florida? Register online at www.elcbig bend.org Make Your Summer AWESOME!1/2 or FULL Day Lessons AvailableSkiing Wakeboarding Tubing Birthday Parties VictoryWakeboard.com Programs offered all summer long:

PAGE 26

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 7BPrograms offered month-by-month: May FREE SPORTS AND CAMP PHYSICALS for Middle & High School students at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Wakulla Center, May 17 9 a.m. to noon. High School Football Players at 9 a.m. Riversprings and Wakulla Middle School Students at 10 a.m. Wakulla High School Students at 11 a.m. If Student arrive at a time not designated for their school, they will be worked in after students from the school are served. Families with siblings at two school may choose the most convenient time and bring both students. For more information call your school Athletic Directors. The WAKULLA CHILDRENS FISHING TOURNAMENT will be May 17 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Wooley Park, and is open to boys and girls ages 3-15. The tournament is free to all children with lunch provided. Children can also enjoy games, rides and exhibits. Trophies will be awarded after weigh-in from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Children may fish from a boat, or another legal fishing site, including Mashes Sands Pier, Otter Lake and Woolley Park. For more information, contact David Moody at 925-6121, or Bruce Ashley at 745-7162.June PALAVER TREES SUMMERBURN 2014 YOUNG ADULT THEATRE WORKSHOP for age range 13-20 years. Cost: TBA. Requirements: All students must dedicate themselves to the 7 days of the Workshop. Students must also show an interest in the performing arts, or the development of artistic performance. Workshop One: June 10-20. Times: 12-4 p.m. June 10, 11, 12 (Tues. Wed. Thurs.) June 17, 18, 19, 20* (Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri.) (*Time for the 20th may be changed due to public performance.) For more information contact the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 850-745-6042. FLORIDA FORESIGHT BOAT BUILDING SUMMER CAMP: Learn to build your own boat. Male and female young adults: Ages 12 16. TWO 6 Day Sesions: June 9 June 14 June 16June 21 Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday morning to launch with parents and choose who takes home the boat. Bring your own lunch and snacks. Water & Gatorade provided. $125 per student. Big Bend Maritime Center at Woolley Park. Contact Roger Pinholster 850728-2121 or e-mail RPinholster@gmail.com. CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Over Night Camp Ages 7 to 16 year old Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! June 9 June 13 June 16 June 20 June 23 June 27 June 30 July 4 $200 per child per session. Note: Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www. campindiansprings.com WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY PROGRAMS and Reading Programs offered throughout the summer. FUN DAYS Registration: 6/12 5:00-8:00, 6/13 10:00-Noon Enrichment Programs begin Tuesday 6/17 Each Tuesday: Book Bunch (preschoolers) 10:30 Childrens Room; Book Nook 3rd-5th grades 10:30 Main Meeting Room. Each Wednesday: Book Babies (infants) 10:30 Childrens Room; Book Blas K-2nd grades 10:30 Main Meeting Room; Cinemaniacs Teen Film Program 12:00 Main Meeting Room. PERFORMERS (all performances at 7:00) All Ages. For more information call 850-926-7415. Performers are as follows: Anna Moo Song Writer of Childrens Entertainer/ Performer 6/19 Windell Campbell Incorporates the Art of Puppetry with the art of storytelling 6/26July PALAVER TREES SUMMERBURN 2014 YOUNG ADULT THEATRE WORKSHOP for ages 13-20 years. Cost: TBA. Requirements: All students must dedicate themselves to the 7 days of the Workshop. Students must also show an interest in the performing arts, or the development of artistic performance. Workshop Two: July 8-18 Time: 12-4 p.m. July 8, 9, 10 (Tues. Wed. Thurs.) July 15, 16, 17, 18* (Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri.) (*Time for the 18th may be changed due to public performance.) For more information contact the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 850-745-6042.WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY PROGRAMS PERFORMERS (all performances at 7:00): Michael White High Energy interactive program for students $ Adults 7/10 Balloon Man Dewayne Reynolds 7/17 Curious Moon Puppets 7/24 Challenger Learning Center 7/31 All Ages. For more information call 850-9267415. CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Over Night Camp, Ages 7 to 16. Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! July 7 July 11 July 14 July 18 July 21 July 25 July 28 August 1 $200. per child per session Note: Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www. campindiansprings.comAugustWAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY PROGRAMS: End of Summer Ice Cream Party 8/6 2:00 3rd annual talent show 8/7 7:00 Teen Film Night 8/8 7:00 For more information call 850-926-7415CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Over Night Camp for Ages 7 to 16. Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! August 4 August 8 Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www.campindiansprings.com PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY DAVID DAMON Big Bend Maritime Center B B i i g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g B B e e e n n n d d d d d d d M a a r r r i t t t m m m e e e e e C C C e e e e n n n t t t t t t e g g g g g g g g g g g g g g n n a a e e n n B B B B B B B B B B B B B B e e e B B e B B e e B B B d M M M M M M M M t t t t t m m t m t i m m m t t C C C C C C e e e e C e e C e e e e e C C e e e e r r r r e e BOAT BUILDING SUMMER CAMPWOOLLEY PARK PANACEALEARN TO BUILD YOUR OWN BOAT!Young Adults Boys and Girls Ages 12 to 16 Work Together in Small CrewsTWO 6 Day SessionsJune 9 June 14 June 16 June 21Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.Saturday Morning to Launch with Parents & choose who takes home the boat.$125 a week per student Contact Roger Pinholster850728-2121rpinholster@gmail.com Bring your own lunch and snacks. Water and Gatorade provided. SUMMER CHILDCAREIncludes a wide variety of field trips and adventure during the summer for your children We enjoy skating, museums, movies, bowling and so much more. Call today for our very affordable pricing. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available.HAPPY TIMEInstructional Child Care CenterEstablished 1983HAPPY TIMELocally Owned and Operated By Linda Wicker since 1983Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs 926-5226

PAGE 27

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.com FREE ESTIMATESWorry Free with A to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEP IT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f l l l f f d d Call Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and InsuredTree Trimming Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Facial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsColor PermsFeather LocksHighlights Cuts Low Lights STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN Full Service Hai g ai ice Ha e g g g g 850 926-6020 Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES RenegadesVAPE SHOPof The GulfTRY VAPING for FREEVisit our RELAXING ROOM to TRY UNLIMITED FLAVORS... for FREE!Owned & Operated by Casey Hodges & son Chris Hodges, formerly of Bayside Seafood Restaurant PanaceaBring in this ad for $1 OFF 10 ml or $3 OFF 30 ml E-Juice 850 3010 B Crawfordville Hwy., Downtown Crawfordville THE MOST NATURAL WAY TO LOSE WEIGHTFinally there is an all-natural, healthy solution to help you lose weight. The synergistic effect of Plexus Slim and Accelerator taken together can help you lose more weight faster than you ever thought possible. Experience great results and keep the weight off. People around the country are experiencing amazing results and you can too!Call Rhonda Sapp today at 850-544-2110http://rhondasapp.myplexusproducts.com Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Randall Pest Management 850 570-7085850570-7085 850 570-7084850570-7084 CLIP and SAVE$200 OFFADULT HAIRCUTS prices @ $12.95 CLIP and SAVE$1000 OFFMinzani Hair Relaxers prices @ $65.00 CLIP and SAVE$500 OFFMATRIX PERMS prices start at $34.95 haircut/style not includedCLIP and SAVE$1000 OFFFOIL HI & LO LITES prices start at $59.95CLIP and SAVE$300 OFFSingle Process HAIRCOLOR prices start at $34.95No appointment Necessary One coupon per VisitShear ExpressionsFamily Hair Salon where families and budget meet850-984-3100 Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLE, FLSaturday May 24, 7:00am to 3:00pm at 36 Covington Circle Antiques -lamps,dressers,mirrors,ta bles & misc items. Also girls twin bed & dresser, clothes, couch, kingsize bedframe toys,lots of items. or call 850-321-2703. New Refrigerator, Frigridaire, side by side Cost New $800-$1,000 Asking $400. (850) 926-7473 Todays New Ads GANOEGalvanized Trailer with 4 stroke Outboard motor, $1,500. (850) 926-7473 MEDART AREA3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking.References required. $650mo., $400/Security no inside pets (352) 493-2232 Todays New Ads CRA WFORDVILLE 2BR/1BA CozyCottage on large wooded lot. 1266 MLK Memorial Blvd. West of Spring Creek Hwy. Close to Crawfordville area schools. CH/A, diswasher, laundry room with W/D. Seperatestorage shed/garage. $700/mo, security dep, pet deposit, and references required. 850 926 7439 or 850 294 8654 ONE ACRE, qtr cleared, qtr woodedwith septic, & light pool, city water. Mobile home and shed on property that must be moved. $12,000 ** Negotiable ** (850)519-4830 5072-0612 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution issued in the County Court of Leon County, Florida, on the 22nd day of February, 2013, in the cause wherein FSU Credit Union, was Plaintiff, and Tanesia Thomas was Defendant, being Case Number 2011SC003321 in said Court; Court, I, Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff of Wakulla County, Florida, have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of Tanesia Thomas in and to the following described Personal Property to-wit: 1. 2005 GMC, White in Color, FL Tag/2381IR, Vin/1GKES63M252334452 Further, on the 24th day of June, 2014 at the hour of 10:00 A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office located at 15 Oak Street, Crawfordville, Florida, I will offer for sale all the said right, title and interest in the afore said Personal Property at Public Auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution. /s/ Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff Wakulla County, Florida By: Lt. Steve Willis, Deputy Sheriff STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF WAKULLA Sworn to and subscribed before me this 13 day of May, 2014 by Sheriff Charlie W. Creel and Lt. Steve Willis who are personally known or has produced _________ as Identification. /s/ Amy Lamarche Notary Public (Seal) Published May 22, 29, June 5 & 12, 2014. 5079-0529 TWN vs. Edwards, Donald W. 14000030CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 14000030CAAXMX Capital One, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Donald W. Edwards; Suzanne S. Edwards; Colin Dunbar; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION -CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: Colin Dunbar Last Known Address: 4095 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3,381.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 160.4 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 40.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 33 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A 2 INCH IRON PIPE ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 17 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 278.63 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST ALONG A FENCE LINE 117.4 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 10 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID FENCE LINE 78.3 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF FRANCES SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES EAST ALONG SAID Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 WANTED! School Bus Drivers

PAGE 28

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 9B CJIS GROUP Inc.,a Market Research firm, has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government doc-uments, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20K to $24K based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 11 paid holidays, monthly leave accrual, Health, Dental, Suppl. Ins, and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com CJIS GROUP LLC.,Crawfordville, FL, has an open position for an Office Administrator. The position requires a mature individual with work experience in HR administration and general office management. Responsibilities will include human resources, recruiting, benefits, employee supervision, facilities and office management, administrative duties, and support with special projects. Salary commensurate with experience, benefits include 11 holidays, monthly leave accrual, health, dental and 401(K). Please E-mail Resume to: David Heinemann, CEO, CJIS GROUP at dheinemann@ cjisgroup.com. DRIVERS 25 DriverTrainees Needed NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises. Earn $750 per week! No experience needed Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 877-741-9260 www .fixjet s.com New Refrigerator, Frigridaire, side by side Cost New $800-$1,000 Asking $400. (850) 926-7473 CRAWFORDVILLE, FLSaturday May 24, 7:00am to 3:00pm at 36 Covington Circle Antiques -lamps,dressers,mirrors,ta bles & misc items. Also girls twin bed & dresser, clothes, couch, kingsize bedframe toys,lots of items. or call 850-321-2703. CRAWFORDVILLE ESTATE SALE Friday 23rd & Saturday 24th 9am 2758 Spring Creek Hwy CrawfordvilleFriday & Saturday 8am-5pm ESTATE SALE 466 River Plantation Road Chinese porcelain, oriental rugs, TVs, primitive hooked rugs, antiques, 50s collectibles, mahogany tables, lamps, bistro set, china cabinet, wing chairs, bar stools, tools, books, rain barrel waterford crystal and china. MUCH MORE (850) 745-8494 $ $ Absolute Bargain New Qn Pillow-top Mattress $150. (850) 745-4960 CRAWFORDVILLE4/2, DW MH, on 1 Acres, Nice & Well Maintained 1,900 sf, $900. mo. 144 Leslie Circle Available for Sale (850)443-3300 MEDART AREA3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking. References required. $650mo., $400/Security no inside pets (352) 493-2232 LAKEFRONT Mobile Home on 300 foot lot along Lake Ellen Dr at boat ramp. 14 ft wide, 2 Br/1Ba, Screen porch, CHA, kitchen equiped $80,000 (850) 576-2695 CRA WFORDVILLE 2BR/1BA CozyCottage on large wooded lot. 1266 MLK Memorial Blvd. West of Spring Creek Hwy. Close to Crawfordville area schools. CH/A, diswasher, laundry room with W/D. Seperatestorage shed/garage. $700/mo, security dep, pet deposit, and references required. 850 926 7439 or 850 294 8654 CRAWFORDVILLENewly Remodeled 3Bedroom/2Bath; W/D Hook-up, $850. month plus Dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLELooking for individual to share my 3 bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage home. $400 + half utilities (elec + cable) (850) 509-3456 25 Shadow Oaks Circle 3 bedroom 2 bath home in safe and quiet neighborhood. 1486 sf, on .5 acre lot. 159,900 ONE ACRE, qtr cleared, qtr woodedwith septic, & light pool, city water. Mobile home and shed on property that must be moved. $12,000 ** Negotiable ** (850)519-4830 Bank Owned Auction-160+/1 Acres Divided of Higher Elevation Pasture & Timber Land with Beautiful Views for Miles in Clyde, NC, Haywood County. Saturday, May 31st at 11am. Auction At Haywood County Fairgrounds, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. ir onhorse auction.com 800-997-2248. NCAL3936 GANOEGalvanized Trailer with 4 stroke Outboard motor, $1,500. (850) 926-7473 Sheas Family Child Care has openings for children ages one to five yrs old for the Summer and the 2014-15 School year. Contact Betty Shea 850-933-2747. Church Pianist and Pastors Assistant seeking church to serve P/T. Retired husband & wife team, very exp. & Inter-denominational salary & mileage reqd (850) 878-3850 SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY 590.28 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY 60.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE HANCOCK PROPERTY 150 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 31 MINUTES WEST 227.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF A CANAL, THENCE RUN NORTH 25 DEGREES 20 MINUTES WEST 275.5 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH IRON PIPE AT THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF EDWARD JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREE 47 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 238 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID JONES PROPERTY 118 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 40.4 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF JAKE RAULERSON PROPERTY 99.8 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 25 DEGREES 10 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID RAULERSON PROPERTY AND 70 FEET TO A POINT IN A CANAL, THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 45 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID CANAL 88.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 55 DEGREES 57 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID CANAL 24.85 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 51 MINUTES WEST 47.8 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS, IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT A PERPETUAL EASEMENT FOR THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED ROADWAY, TO WIT: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT THE DISTANCE OF 3,381.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 160.4 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 40.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 33 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A 2 INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 60.3 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 97.7 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 65 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST 59.6 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF JAKE RAULERSON PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID RAULERSON PROPERTY 99.8 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF EDWARD JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 23.2 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 82 DEGREES 42 MINUTES WEST 42.3 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 46.35 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 65 DEGREES 50 MINUTES WEST 55 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES WEST 100.65 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY 15.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Yashmin Chen-Alexis, Esquire, Brock & Scott, PLLC., the Plaintifs attorney, whose address is 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, on or before June 20, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on May 13, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. 13-F 04995 5076-0529 TWN vs. The Sights and Sounds Co. of Wakulla, Inc. 13-38-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-38-CA CRE VENTURE 2011-1, LLC a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. 5078-0529 TWN vs. Langford, Mary L. heirs 2014 CA 000005 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2014 CA 000005 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARY L. LANGFORD, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARY L. LANGFORD LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: Lot 34, Block M of Aqua De Vida, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 12, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Monica D. Shepard, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 13th day of May, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. B&H# 337855 THE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA, INC., a Florida corporation, NORMAN D. SHEPPARD an individual, MILDRED C. SHEPPARD, an individual, AMERICAN EXPRESS BANK a federal savings bank, and FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION, in its capacity as receiver for WAKULLA BANK, UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 2, and UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 3 Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered on March 5, 2014, in that certain cause pending in the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein THE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA, INC., a Florida corporation, NORMAN D. SHEPPARD, an individual, MILDRED C. SHEPPARD, an individual, AMERICAN EXPRESS BANK, a federal savings bank, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION, in its capacity as receiver for WAKULLA BANK, CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC and SEAVENTURES USA, INC. d/b/a Down Under Dive Center, are the Defendants, in Civil Action Case No.: 2013-38-CA, I, Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the aforesaid Court, will at 11:00 a.m., on June 12, 2014, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property, situate and being in Wakulla County, Florida to-wit: REAL PROPERTY: COMMENCE at a nail & cap marking the Northeast corner of Lot 76, THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; thence run South 72 49 47 West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 76, a distance of 1047.37 feet to the Westerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. 369; thence run South 18 37 47 West along said right-of-way boundary, a distance of 277.95 feet to a concrete monument and the POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE continue South 18 37 47 West along said right-of-way boundary, a distance of 129.84 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run North 71 19 32 West, a distance of 182.87 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run South 73 12 37 West, a distance of 101.31 feet to a nail & cap; THENCE run North 16 56 53 West, a distance of 135.52 feet to a re-rod on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of the Wakulla-Arran Road; THENCE run North 73 24 48 East along said right-of-way boundary, a distance of 200.10 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run South 16 50 03 East, a distance of 135.40 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run North 73 04 22 East, a distance of 125.67 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER with all right, title and interest of, in and to any streets and roads abutting the above described premises. LESS AND EXCEPT COMMENCE at the Northeast corner of Lot 76 of THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; thence run South 72 49 47 West a distance of 1047.37 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 319; thence run along said right of way South 18 37 47 West a distance of 407.79 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said right of way run North 71 19 32 West, a distance of 182.87 feet to a concrete monument and the POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 73 12 37 West, a distance of 101.31 feet to a nail and cap; THENCE run North 16 56 53 West, a distance of 135.52 feet to a rod and cap lying on the Southerly right of way of Wakulla/Arran Road; THENCE run along said right of way North 73 24 48 East, a distance of 170.67 feet; THENCE leaving said right of way run South 16 01 55 West, a distance of 84.66 feet; THENCE run South 04 43 39 East, a distance of 55.23 feet; THENCE run South 33 05 49 West, a distance of 15.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established except as herein before set forth, in accordance with Fla.Stat. 45.031. The highest bidder for purposes of this Notice of Sale, is defined as the party who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property and who completes the sale in a timely fashion, as hereinafter set out. The one who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property shall be permitted to complete the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the balance of such bid, over and above the deposit, by 4:30 p.m. on the day of sale. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: March 5, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By /s/ Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe Street, Rm. 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4430, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 22 & 29, 2014. 2719652:1 5075-0529 TWN vs. Tucker, Kimberly D. 10-00199 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS2 /2 $750. mo., $750 Deposit 3/2, $925. mo., $925 Deposit 2/2, $850. mo., $850 Deposit 3/2, $950. mo., $950 Deposit 3/2, $750. mo., $800 Deposit Stunning 4 bedroom, 3 bath home in the desirable Sweetwater Ridge Subdivision. Living room has stone replace with gorgeous entertainment center. Eat in kitchen with all upgraded appliances. Elegant dining room with wood oors and trey ceiling. Sunroom/family room with loads of windows overlooking sparkling in ground pool. Spacious master suite with beautiful master bath. 2 large bedrooms upstairs with cozy 31 x 13 bonus room with replace over garage. 35 x 45 Morton building w 3 bays, electricity, and concrete oor. Separate workshop/garage insulated and has air conditioner. 5 acres, professionally landscaped and fenced with long driveway and lots of parking. Please call owner for appointment or more information. (850) 545-2312. Virtual tour can be seen on Youtube, just type in address. Asking $425,000. Owner will work with licensed Realtors. FOR SALE BY OWNER 107 SWEETWATER CIRCLE, CRAWFORDVILLE Specializing in new home constructionCongratulations JANE ROBINSONTOP PRODUCERAPRIL 2014 COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 850 545-4294jrobinsoncoastwise@embarqmail.com Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has 46 Savannah Forrest 636 Coastal Hwy. 98 B5 Marina Village 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 7 Big White Oak Lane Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyEED TO RET YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE4 Br 1 Ba Hs $750 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $875 mo.3 Br 1 1/2 Ba Hs, $900 mo. 3 Br 2 1/2 Ba Twnhs, $900 mo. 3 Br. 2 Ba Hs, $850 mo. 1500 sq ft $1500 mo. Crawfordville 700 sq ft $700 mo. Tallahassee RENTALS: COMMERCIAL Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

PAGE 29

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.com 5061-0522 TWN Vs. Falk, Jennifer L. Estate 2014-81-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-81-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. THE ESTATE OF JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE; WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED : YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the real property located at 480 Lonnie Raker Lane, Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida being more particularly described as follows: Begin at a concrete monument marking the intersection of the Northeasterly right of way of State Road Number 267 with the South Boundary of Section 32, Township 2 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence run East along the South boundary of Section 32 for a distance of 476.00 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly maintained right of way of Lonnie Raker Road; thence run along said maintained right of way South 00 degrees 46 minutes 39 seconds East 291.73 feet to a rod and cap lying on the intersection of said maintained right of way and the Northeasterly right of way of State Road Number 267 also being a point of curve to the right having a radius of 2814.93; thence run Northwesterly along said right of way of 478.88 feet with a central angle of 09 degrees 44 minutes 50 seconds, chord of said arc being North 59 degrees 25 minutes 31 seconds West 478.30 feet to a concrete monument; thence continue along said right of way North 54 degrees 36 minutes 59 seconds West 83.60 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within 30 days of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: May 5, 2014.BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court(SEAL) BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 15 & 22, 2014. 13267304 5062-0522 TWN vs. Morris, Charles Wayne 652013CA000252CAAXMX Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652013CA000252CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES WAYNE MORRIS; DEBRA ELAINE MORRIS A/K/A DEBRA MORRIS, ET AL. Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 652013CA000252CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC (hereafter Plaintiff ), is Plaintiff and and CHARLES WAYNE MORRIS; DEBRA ELAINE MORRIS A/K/A DEBRA MORRIS; THE GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE I PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCITION, INC., are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT DOOR of the Courthouse; 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, at 11:00 a.m., on the 19th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 58, BLOCK A OF GARDENS OF SARALAN, PHASE I, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 77-78 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Dated this 5 day of May, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk Van Ness Law Firm, PLC 1239 E. Newport Center Drive Suite #110, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442 Phone: (954) 571-2031 Fax: (954) 571-2033, Pleadings@vanlawfl.com Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. May 15 & 22, 2014. NS2659-13/cl 5063-0515 TWN vs. Victoriana-Powell, April M. 65-2013-CA-000011 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000011 Division: FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. APRIL M. VICTORIANA-POWELL; ET AL. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated April 7, 2014, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2013-CA-000011, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and APRIL M. VICTORIANA-POWELL; SAMUEL B. POWELL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMUEL B. POWELL; GIBBES MILLER CONSTRUCTION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendant(s). BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Court, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. in front lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 29th day of May, 2014 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 19 AND THE WEST HALF OF LOT 20, BLOCK 11 OF GRIENERS ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on May 5, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff:Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd, Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 15 & 22, 2014. 3524ST-40814 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 28, 2014. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT: DANNY DAVIS, COURT TECHNOLOGY OFFICE, OFFICE OF COURT ADMINISTRATION, 301 S MONROE ST, RM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, AT LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711. By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of Court, Wakulla County (COURT SEAL) MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C., Attorney for the Plaintiff 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 644-8704; Fax: (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com May 15 & 22, 2014 11-11959 5065-0522 TWN vs. Yates, Jason D. 65-2013-CA-000203 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000203 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. JASON D. YATES; SHAWN E. YATES; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 11, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 15, OF ELLENWOOD, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 10 AND 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on June 12, 2014 at 11:00 A.M. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dated this 11th day of March, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716 PHONE 727-536-4911 FAX 727-539-1094 EFILING@DCZAHM.COM IF YOU HAVE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDSANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. May 15 & 22, 2014. 888131142 5066-0522 TWN vs. Parker, Gregory E. 10000304CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10000304CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. GREGORY E. PARKER, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of foreclosure dated January 24, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10000304CA of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is Plaintiff, and GREGORY E. PARKER, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 12 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 13, Block R, Hudson Heights, Unit 4, addition to Crawfordville, Florida, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 38, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: April 23, 2014 Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Tel: 954-462-7000 Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Lindsay R. Dunn Phelan Hallinan, PLC Linda R. Dunn, Esq., Florida Bar No. 55740 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303. 850-577-4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 15 & 22, 2014 PH # 14192 5067-0522 TWN vs. Harper, Marylynn M. 2013-CA-000352 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000352 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee Corporation, P.O. Box 9800 Maryville, TN 37802 Plaintiff, v. MARYLYNN M. HARPER, HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1196 SOPCHOPPY HIGHWAY, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO C.K. GREEN BY JOHN C. HODGE BY DEED DATED NOVEMBER 29, 1941 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 10 OF DEED BOOK 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT OF LAND THE DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT OF LAND THE DISTANCE OF 300 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 (OLD STATE ROAD NO. 10), THENCE RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID U.S. #319 THE DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TRACT OF LAND, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT OF LAND 300 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW1/4 OF SW1/4) OF SECTION FOUR (4), TOWNSHIP FIVE (5) SOUTH, RANGE TWO (2) WEST. COMMONLY KNOWN AS 1196 SOPCHOPPY HIGHWAY, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358. at public sale on June 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 CLERK OF COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 15 & 22, 2014. 5068-0522 TWN Vs. Lancaster, Stephen 09000496CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09000496CAAXMX 5071-0522 TWN vs. Pope, Daniel N. 65-2012-CA-000088 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2012-CA-000088 PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL N. POPE AKA DANIEL POPE, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIEL N. POPE AKA DANIEL POPE, JESSICA POPE, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JESSICA POPE, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, THENANT #1 AND TENANT #2 Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 5, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000088 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Corporation, is the Plaintiff and Daniel N. Pope aka Daniel Pope and Jessica Pope, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 5th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 44 AND 45, BLOCK 10, WAKULLA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 3 PAWNEE TRL CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327-2877 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 5 day of May, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile E-Serve: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 May 15 & 22, 2014. 001338F01 5073-0529 TWN vs. Smith, William Earl 13-282-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-282-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA 39828, Plaintiff, v. WILLIAM EARL SMITH A/K/A WILLIAM E. SMITH II, SHERRY SMITH A/K/A SHERRY LEE SMITH, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM EARL SMITH A/K/A WILLIAM E. SMITH II, and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHERRY SMITH A/K/A SHERRY LEE SMITH, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: TRACT 4 COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, 1660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11391.20 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 210.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 10.65 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST 327.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 161.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES WEST 325.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 151.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11391.20 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 210.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST 155.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 15.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES WEST 155.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 210.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, AND THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 15.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1992 GMC TRUCK WITH VIN #1GTGK24N3NE554606 Commonly known as: 4735 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on June 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. 5074-0529 TWN vs. Lastowski, Steven P. 2014-CA-000007 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-000007 CENTENNIAL BANK an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN P. LASTOWSKI, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2 Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Lot 3, Block B of A REPLAT OF LOTS 16 THRU 36 OF SNUG HARBOR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 117, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 19th day of June, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 6th day of May, 2014. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. 5064-0522 TWN vs. Martin, Frances E. 65-2012-CA-000026 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000026 Division #: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES E. MARTIN ET. AL.; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 23, 2013, in the above-styled cause, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 A.M. on June 5, 2014, the following described property: LOT 6, BLOCK C HIGHWOODS PLACE, PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 66 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 1999 PALM TITLE #77489861 & 77489858 AND ID #PH164090A AND PH 164090B. Property Address: 40 RIDGEWAY COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 10-00199 DIVISION: U.S. BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY D. TUCKER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 22, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10-00199 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank, N.A.,, is the Plaintiff and Kimberly D. Tucker, Todd W. Tucker, Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lendingtree Loans, a California Corporation, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 12th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 37, BLOCK A, OF MAGNOLIA RIDGE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 55 THROUGH 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 204 MAGNOLIA RIDGE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 23rd day of April, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 May 22 & 29, 2014. 10-38222 LOANCARE, A DIVISION OF FNF SERVICING, INC. PLAINTIFF, VS. STEPHAN LANCASTER, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on June 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for the following described property: Lot 10, Replat of Lake Ellen Shores, Phase I, as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 8 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with a 1995 MERI MOBILE HOME VIN #FLHML2F56012287A AND FLHML2F56012287B, TITLE NOS, 69495209 AND 69492510 and VIN#FLHML2F56012287C, TITLE NO. 69495211. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: February 12, 2014 [COURT SEAL] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of the Court Gladstone Law Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 15 & 22, 2014. 08-000194 5077-0522 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EMILE JUSTIN MEYER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 981 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 09-6S-01W-000-04864-003 Description of property: 9-6S-1W P-1-3-M-60-1 LYING IN SEC 9-6S-1W OR 77 P624 Name in which assessed _SYCAMORE CREEK INC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on June 4, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: May 18, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Published May 22, 2014. Tax Deed Notices 5069-0522 TWN 5/30 sale PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Seminole Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid May 30, 2014 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. May 15 & 22, 2014. May 30, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, of the contents of MiniWarehouse containing personal property of: ANGELA FORD ED UNDERWOOD Before the sale date of Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices

PAGE 30

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 11B 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is a sheet of printed stamps called? 2. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Canadas Northwest Territories? 3. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a baby bat called? 4. MUSIC: How many holes does the musical instrument called a recorder have? 5. LANGUAGE: What is a lazaretto? 6. ARCHITECTURE: What is adobe made of? 7. MYTHOLOGY: Who was the Greek god of medicine? 8. DISCOVERIES: Who is credited with discovering the air brake? 9. BIRTHSTONES: What is Februarys traditional birthstone? 10. MATH: What is the Arabic equivalent of the Roman numeral CMXC? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. A pane 2. Yellowknife 3. A pup 4. Seven in the front and a thumbhole in the back 5. A place to quarantine people with infectious disease, such as leprosy 6. The building material is made of dried earth and straw. 7. Asclepius 8. George Westinghouse 9. Amethyst 10. 990 Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

PAGE 31

Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsWhats in a name? This one, devised by travel agents in the 1950s, describes the road between Wurzburg and Fussen, Germany. An apt description given youll get to explore storybook German villages full of multi-story plaster and timber houses crafted to fairytale perfection on what was once a trade route. The crown jewel of them all is Rotenberg ob der Tauber. This 13th century medieval walled city is lled with narrow lanes and alleys, half-timbered houses and clock towers that chime on the hour. A fully intact city wall, 1.5 miles long, is still lined by battlements and circled by stairs and walkways; perfect for exploring. At its peak in the 15th century the city was home to around 6,000 residents, at a time when Germanys major cities had not even been settled. The city was constructed at a time when security was paramount. Gates were closed nightly to prevent attack. Perched high above the valley floor the charming fountains served an added purpose. Cisterns located under the fountains would continue to provide fresh water even in the event of a prolonged siege. Today the number of visitors dwarfs the number of residents.Annually around 2.5 million tourists include a day trip here on their itinerary, but a fractional number spend the night. With so much charm, just go ahead and plan to stay. Every pastry shop window is full of softball shaped desserts. Constructed of shortcrust, which is similar to a piecrust. The baker splashes it with plum schnapps and winds it around the handle of a spoon to form its shape. They are covered by chocolate, confectioners sugar, or nuts and sometimes lled with marzipan, this treat has been served here for over 400 years. With a name like schneeball, you simply have to sample one Climb to the top of the town hall tower located in the citys center market square. For only 1 Euro, plus the challenge of ascending the 241 steps, you are rewarded with a birds eye view of the city. The citys most famous site is the church of St Jacob. Home to a relic that purports to contain some of Jesus blood, it has drawn many pilgrims. Today the citys churches are mostly Lutheran, although they were built before the time of Martin Luther. A city policy that the church will be the denomination of the city council, brought the changes, and in its time those that did not change their religion, simply lost all their property. Not to be missed is the Medieval Crime and Punishment Museum. A glimpse at some of these diabolical horrors will leave you glad youre a 21st century visitor. Include a visit to the Katie Wolhlfahrt Christmas shop. Stroll through rooms chocked full of different style ornaments, trees and themes. Explore the Christmas Museum, with old Christmas cards, advent calendars, and ornaments, even mini Christmas trees sent to World War II soldiers. Encompassing a huge display, the throng of tourists makes even moving in this winter wonderland challenging, but worthwhile. Like many German cities, almost 40 percent of the city was destroyed during World War II. Partially rebuilt with private donations from all over the world after the war, it is once again historically accurate. Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www.luxurycruise-travel. com.Follow Germanys Romantic Road to Rotenberg PHOTOS BY LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL Storybook buildings in Rotenberg, above, and a gate to the city, below. Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 21, Noon Publication Date: June 5 Remember This Years Graduate Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by The Wakulla News CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2014Sponsor Line ........$25 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available LUNCH PARTNER FREE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER



PAGE 1

See Pages 6-7B newsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .................................................................Pages 8-9A Salute to Veterans....................................................Page 10-11A School......... ............................................................Pages 11-12A Sports ...........................................................................Page 14A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 15A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 16A Sharks & Chablis........ ...................................................Page 17A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 18A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 20A Senior Citizens Celebrate Life ..........................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 3B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Summer Camp ............................................................Pages 6-7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B Travel .............................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Oma L. Linzy Baxley Mary Sansbury Butera Jason Ryan Coshatt Robert Rivieccio Juanita Joan Young Its our annual PINK PAPER Three Sections Three Sections75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 21st Issue Thursday, May 22, 2014See Pages 10-11A Delinquent Tax Rolls in this issue Wakulla County Senior Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Citizens Celebrate Life Section B Section B By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netSchool Board member Jerry Evans formally announced this week that, after 20 years in of ce, he would not seek reelection. When I ran in 1994, my wife (Pam) was teaching, my kids were in the district, and I was very involved in a lot of school functions. Now, he said, his daughters are grown and his wife is gone after a battle with cancer. Evans said that perhaps his passion for the job had dimmed somewhat, but qualied that by saying: I still have a desire for the good of the kids, but its time for somebody with some fresh ideas to step in. The two candidates who have led for the seat are Jo Ann Daniels, retired principal from Wakulla Middle School, and Donna Savary, a teacher with her own tutoring business. Evans said he wasnt going to come out with a public endorsement of either of the candidates. I really want to see somebody with a passion and drive to continue in the excellent things that have taken place, he said. Away from the school board, Evans career has included being a music teacher and being a banker, first at Ameris and later at Centennial. He took a job as a salesman in West Palm Beach after his wifes death, while maintaining his permanent residence in Sopchoppy and attending monthly school board meetings. He recently accepted a position as fundraising director for the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Looking over his 20 years on the school board, Evans said he was proud of the fact that Wakulla has been named an Academically High-Performing District for the past six years, and has been graded an A district. He noted that Wakulla High Schools graduation rate has exceeded the state average at 88 percent, and ranks 11th in the state. He also noted that Wakulla students were above average in all 22 areas tested. In addition to the academic achievements of students, Evans said he was proud of students performance in sports, arts, and vocational programs, ranging from culinary arts and medical academy and engineering academy to the new automotive program the the upcoming welding program. These kids are complete, he said. Theyre well-rounded.Turn to Page 5AJerry Evans wont seek re-election to school boardBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netWakulla County Commissioners unanimously agreed to send a request to the state Department of Transportation to have a trafc light and crosswalk installed in front of Wakulla High School. They concurred that if safety is the biggest reason for realignment and intersection creation at U.S. Highways 319 and 98, then why not just have a traf c light and crosswalk now, instead of waiting for construction to begin in 2016. Chris Russell, who was rst to speak during the public comment time of the county commission meeting on Monday, May 19, brought the issue to the table. Russell said he had a long discussion with a DOT engineer, and they told him the new intersection and traf c light would alleviate traffic safety issues. If thats an issue now, why cant we put a red light there now? he asked. Russell said he was told if the board would send a request to DOT District Secretary Tommy Barfield, he might get behind that. He added that Sheriff Charlie Creel thought installing a traf c light, which was timed to function during school opening, release and special events, would be a good idea. It makes sense to me, Russell said. Our kids deserve it, our citizens deserve it. Commissioner Howard Kessler noted his agreement to send a letter to DOT to request an immediate traffic light does not mean his is favorable of the intersection realignment. April Williams, project manager for the DOT widening project, presented plans for the widening of US 319. She urged the public to attend an informal public alternatives meeting on Tuesday, June 17, at Crawfordville United Methodist Church beginning at 5:30 p.m., to see plans, ask questions and provide comments to DOT concerning the widening segments.Turn to Page 19ANICOLE ZEMA Commissioners request DOT install tra c light, crosswalk for safetyLight requested at WHS WILLIAM SNOWDENSchool Board Member Jerry Evans Section CTangible Personal Property ListPage 3A Business owner Mike Morgan looks at design documents at a DOT open house on the 319 alignment, held last week. See story on Page 19A. A raft of pelicans A raft of pelicans A raft of pelicansReader Val LaHart of Ochlockonee Bay shared this photo with us, taken a couple of weeks ago after all the heavy rains nally stopped, writing that the rst day of sunshine after all the rain brought a raft of 150 to 200 white pelicans oating down Ochlockonee Bay. Loa ng from a migratory ight?

PAGE 2

Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews. netThe First District Court of Appeal in Tallahassee heard oral arguments in the case in which a Wakulla circuit judge found the implementation of the states net ban with mullet net rules created a legal absurdity of regulations. Wakulla fishermen led the lawsuit a couple of years ago challenging the legality of net rules that require a mesh no larger than two inches stretch, which they claim doesnt catch legal mullet but loads their nets with juvenile sh. Fishermen claimed this violated the singlepurpose of the constitutional amendment that limited net fishing the so-called net ban whih was to limit unecessary over shing and waste of marine resources. Circuit Judge Jackie Fulford, in an 11-page order released in October, cited contradictions between the Florida Constitution and the Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and enjoined any further enforcement of the net ban amendment, the FWCs authority to enact net rules, and a series of mullet rules. As was expected, the state FWC, represented by Assistant Attorney General Jonathan Glogau argued that the appeal court should reject Fulfords order, contending the matters have all been settled in 20 years of legal cases, and that there was no new information before the court. Tallahassee attorney Ron Mowrey, who represented the shermen, contended that Fulford did have new information the beginnings of a collaborative net study between shermen and the FWC that the agency abruptly quit when it showed that the small mesh nets catch 98 percent bycatch, not legal targeted species. The most notable event was the comments of one of the three appeal judges, T. Kent Wetherell II, about Fulford and her order. At one point, Wetherell called Fulfords order One of the worst orders Ive ever read and questioned the analysis and the lack of clear ndings of fact. Wetherell also jabbed at Fulford for going out on the water with shermen for an observation of how the nets work. Do we need to get out on a shing boat too? he asked, adding the question of whether the Supreme Court was supposed to do that as well. Mowrey answered that it was Harmless error. When asked if Mowrey had ever seen a court go outside the courtroom for something other than a static observation say, to drive by the scene of a crime or property that was part of a dispute Mowrey replied that he had, and recalled a mullet shermans trial in which the court took jurors outside for an exhibit of how nets fall off a boat. The boat was trailered in the parking lot outside the Wakulla County Courthouse and jurors walked out, watched and went back in. Wetherells comments about Fulford led to some raised eyebrows among observers, noting that it is unusual for the appeal court to make such critical remarks about a sitting judge. Wetherell also pointedly asked Mowrey if fishermen supported reversing the order because it found the net ban was unconstitutional, which went well beyond the relief shermen had sought from the trial court. Mowrey merely said that fishermen were seeking to have the net rules thrown out. Judge Bradford L. Thomas appeared to follow the logic of the shermens case, asking questions about the purpose of the two-inch rule and whether there was a legitimate purpose beyond an ease of law enforcement. Glogau contended that constituted a rational basis for the rule and was therefore within the agencys discretion. The third judge on the panel, Simone Marstiller, asked very few questions and it was dif cult to try to gauge her reasoning on the issue. The net ban amendment was approved by voters in 1994 to outlaw gill and entangling nets in state waters. It did leave shermen with two 500 square foot nets and speci cally exempted cast nets as not being gill nets. The stated purpose of the amendment was to protect marine resources from over shing and waste. But the crux of the problem right away was the issue that all nets gill. The Marine Fisheries Commission, precursor to the FWC, sought to create a bright line between gill nets and legal nets by creating a maximum mesh size of two inches stretched, and outlawing mono lament. For years, fishermen have fought the two-inch rule, rst arguing that the size is arbitrary there is no scienti c basis for the rule. After litigating that, and ultimately losing at the appeal court level under the rational basis test that is, a law or rule is presumed legal if it is rationally related to a legitimate government purpose. But fishermen using the two-inch nets claimed it caused them to violate the very purpose of the amendment, because the small mesh caught 90 percent small juvenile sh sh that werent legal to possess or sell while larger, legal sh escaped. Fulford looked at it in reverse: if all nets gill, then all nets are illegal except cast nets. And the FWC cannot create rules that make exception to the constitutional provision. The net ban amendment is clear and unambiguous, Fulford wrote. The wording that leads to this result that all nets in Florida are illegal except for a cast net is not caused by an interpretation. Its the clear and plain language of the amendment. The contradiction in the Florida Constitution is not the only issue rendered absurd in this case. It is also absurd that a net as de ned by FWC as lawful for the mullet shermen to use, cannot even be used in the manner prescribed by FWC to catch legal sh. Even FWCs own expert testi ed to that fact. So even though a court has previously determined that the method as adopted by FWC had a rational basis at the time the rule was adopted, its prescribed use is a physical impossibility. Perhaps as many as 100 fishermen from around the state were outside the Tallahassee court before oral arguments, many carrying signs. Wakulla fishermen Ronald Fred Crum, Jonas Porter, and Keith Ward who are the named plaintiffs in the original trial were outside the court. Most of the shermen were wearing their Fishing for Freedom Tshirts with Politics vs. Biology on the back, which is their claim that net rules are created and enforced for political reasons, not based on any science. Prior to the start of the case, many shermen found out they wouldnt be allowed inside the court wearing T-shirts and they had to run to stores to buy shirts with collars so they could get in the courthouse.Appeal court hears oral arguments in net case PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENGavin Tucker, 8, of Pasco County, holds up a sign outside the First District Court of Appeal that reads: The net ban was passed with lies. Wakulla sherman Jonas Porter, the rst sherman ever charged with violation of the net ban and a plaintiff in the current case, outside the appeal court before oral arguments last week. WITH SPECIAL GUESTTOM ROBERTSSopchoppyOpry.com Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information ANDTHE WAY UP BANDSOUTH BOUND BAND Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. 1 00005-400 P-0000600 $370.23 ADT SECURITY SERVICES INC PROPERTY TAX DEPARTMENT P O BOX 5006 BOCA RATON, FL 33431-0806 2 00040-000 P-0003100 $4,241.25 ANGELOS SEAFOOD RESTAURANT H/O ANGELO E PETRANDIS P O BOX 159 PANACEA, FL 32346 3 00045-025 P-0003400 $1,695.97 ATTACK ONE FIRE MANAGEMENT SERVICE 342 GUY STRICKLAND RD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 4 00280-001 P-0013900 $1,849.11 DUGGAR EXCAVATING INC 963 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 5 00711-000 P-0026000 $69.73 GEE & TEE INC D/B/A LINDYS CHICKEN 2120 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 6 00851-000 P-0030000 $2,072.45 M T S DIRECTIONAL BORING INC 1336 LANSDOWNE RD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 7 00908-000 P-0031600 $235.50 OCHLOCKONEE BAY REALTY TIMOTHY R JORDAN P O BOX 556 PANACEA, FL 32346-0556 8 00915-005 P-0032000 $110.65 OUZTS TOO 7968 COASTAL HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 9 00990-001 P-0034700 $5,161.23 LAND OF WAKULLA INC P O BOX 1137 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 10 01120-000 P-0038600 $651.29 ROSHAN QSR INC SUBWAY OF CRAWWFORVILLE 5010 THORNTON DR SUMMERVILLE, SC 29485 11 01291-301 P-0042500 $826.58 TENNCO LEASING DBA: EDA LEASING 408 B RIVERVIEW DRIVE SHELBYVILLE, TN 37160-3843 12 01612-000 P-0049800 $204.13 ECONOMY AUTO SALVAGE LLC 572 WOODVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 13 01627-000 P-0050600 $3,960.75 SUMMITT OUTDOOR ADVERTISING 313 WILLIAMS ST STE 9 TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 14 01856-000 P-0064900 $3,861.19 GULF COAST ICE DIST. LLC 3919 CHAIRES CROSSR0AD ATTN: ED RICORD TALLAHASSEE, FL 32317 15 01862-000 P-0065500 $2,647.93 BEST VALUE TIRE & AUTOMOTIVE SPECIALTIES, LLC 2106 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 16 01865-000 P-0065800 $244.97 CYBER CENTER NILAN ROVINA INC. 5320 SANDERLING RIDGE DR LITHIA, FL 33547NOTICE OF DELINQUENT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES FOR 2013AS PROVIDED BY CHAPTER 197.016, ACTS OF 1972, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY TAXES ASSESSED FOR 2013 ARE NOW DELINQUENT AND BEGINNING WITH APRIL 1, SUCH TAXES ARE DRAWING INTEREST OF 1-1/2% PER MONTH, PLUS THE PROPORTIONATE COST OF PUBLISHING THIS NOTICE. UNLESS THE AMOUNT SET OPPOSITE EACH NAME BELOW, WHICH INCLUDES THE COST OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND PENALTIES, ARE PAID BY THE LAST DAY OF MAY 2014, WARRANTS WILL BE ISSUED HEREON DIRECTING LEVY UPON AND SEIZURE OF THE TANGIBLE PERSONALPROPERTY OF THE TAXPAYERS.NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Meeting on Monday, June 2, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. at the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL. Purpose of Meeting: To give citizens an opportunity to become acquainted with the proposed wastewater system improvements and to comment on such items as to the economic and environmental impacts, service area, alternatives to the project and other matters of concern. This meeting will include discussion of the application process, and County action relative to approving, executing, and submitting a formal application to the USDA Rural Development for grant and local approval. Any questions may be directed to David Edwards, County Administrator, 850-926-0919. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla. comMAY 22, 2014 Notice of Public Hearing The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, June 9, 2014, beginning at 7:00 PM and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, July 14, 2014, beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. Applicant: Angelo Petrandis Agent: Edwin Brown and Associates Proposal: replat lot 10 of Georges Lighthouse Pointe Marina Village Unit 2 Tax ID Number: 12-6s-02w-292-03879-C10 Existing FLU Map: Urban 2 (FLUE Policy 1.2.6) Existing Zoning: R-3 (Section 5-32, LDC) FEMA Flood Info: V20 zone on Panel 0485-E Parcel Size: 0.181+/acres Location: 9-J Mashes Sands Road Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing and Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.comMAY 22, 2014Concerning an Application for Final Plat By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netPlans for Sopchoppys new Downtown City Park are moving forward. The park will provide an intimate venue for music, a safe and accessible walking path, and natural playscapes for the citys younger generations. The park is currently comprised of three lots, approximately two acres, donated by the Beasley family, across to the old railroad depot. The senior citizens thrift shop, which is housed in a small trailer on the property, will be removed. The thrift shop will be relocated to the water department building. City commissioner Lara Edwards is spearheading the plans of the new park. Maurice Langston at the Senior Citizens Center is very excited to be getting the ladies out of that old dilapidated trailer, Edwards said. Wilderness Graphics in Tallahassee has designed the parks preliminary sketch. The park will feature a music pavilion in the style of a small amphitheater. A well-lit, tree-shaded walking path will also weave through the property. The focus is the music pavilion, Edwards said. It will be geared around small shows and local events, like Worm Gruntin and Fourth of July. And as big as Worm Gruntin is getting, the Christmas festival, and the Fourth of July, this park could be used for additional vendors. The walking path will be designed with safety and accessibility in mind. Since this is such a central and safe location right in the middle of Sopchoppy, it will be lit up and be made of a pervious materials for bikes, wheelchairs and scooters, Edwards said. In addition to that, there will be a lawn area. People can bring blankets and chairs. We could have movies in the park, or churches could do things here. The 10 p.m. noise ordinance will stay in effect. The nearest neighbor happens to be a musician, and Edwards said he is OK with the plans. Edwards said the new park is intended to bring some modern recreation into Sopchoppy. We are not trying to replace our existing city park, Edwards said. The existing city park is a different venue. This will be a nice, central walking park. Edwards said many of the trees under 14 inches or of poor quality will be cleared following a tree survey, but larger trees, like the shady and statuesque magnolias, will be left for people to enjoy. Any healthy trees will stay, as long as they are not on the trail or the seating area for the pavilion, Edwards said. Another modern aspect of the park will be natural playscapes for children, and freespirited adults, to enjoy. A natural playscape is defined as a space with as little man-made components as possible. Using native plants, natural grading and trees, playscapes represent a natural place. Playscapes are designed with the intent of bringing children back to nature, and have much lower injury rates then standard playgrounds. We want to work with our natural features, Edwards said. Edwards said apart from the tails and pavilion, there will be as little impact on the environment as possible. There is currently no parking lot in the plans. Guests can park on the side of the road, and use the restrooms at the old train depot. A fence might be added in the future to keep pets and children from wandering into the street. At the last meeting of the Sopchoppy City Commission, approval was granted for a topographical map and tree survey for the park. At the meeting, Edwards said she was able to get a bargain on the map and survey, costing $400. Edwards she has, and will continue, to apply for CDBG grants to fund the playscapes. Otherwise well come up with a veyear plan coming from the budget, Edwards said. Well do it a little bit at a time, and keep it relatively simple. As soon as Wilderness Graphics submits a budget proposal, construction of the music pavilion will be underway. Creation the walking path will follow. Edwards said the board is backing her completely. The reason I grabbed a hold of this, is because I want to see some improvement to downtown Sopchoppy, Edwards aid. And people who pay their taxes, and our water company customers, are seeing a bene t. Sopchoppy hasnt really had any improvements right here on Rose Street in so long. I have a four year old, and I want to leave something that will bene t him for a very long time. Edwards said the city has tried to reach the individual who owns another lot attached to the property, to expand the area. There has been no response, but the plans are moving forward anyway.Sopchoppy has plans for a downtown park WILDERNESS GRAPHICSThe new park is to be located on the property across from the railroad depot.

PAGE 4

Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comI never felt that sentimental about Mothers Day and Fathers Day as an ingrate teenager. But as Ive left my teens and 20s behind, my appreciation for my parents has grown. Im not a mom yet, but the older I get, the more perspective I have on their parenting efforts. It took me too long to fully appreciate how my parents, Robert and Debra, took steps to set me up for success. Ever since rst grade, I struggled with math. As much as I hated it, my mom made sure I was signed up for tutoring, and got extra help. My dad also spent probably hundreds of hours over the years at the dinner table with me, my math homework spread out, going over and over long division and fractions concepts my brain never absorbed. Im sure my dad would have rather been doing something more enjoyable than coaching his red-faced, teary-eyed, attentionde cit daughter in mathematical notions I made little effort to retain. But he didnt want me to fail. My mom made sure my sister and I had the little extras that are largely meaningful today braces, prom dresses, travel, extracurricular pursuits, exposure to the arts and so much more. Together they invested and saved to send me to college. They provided me with a reliable car. They took me grocery shopping on visits home. They knew education was the key to success, a vehicle was needed to gain work experience, and the ramen noodles would keep me alive long enough to hopefully make something of myself. (Im sure they had moments of doubt when I would stay out all night without calling; or when they found beer receipts from the extra cash they generously gave me when I whined about being broke.) If my parents hadnt made sacrices for me, I would not be equipped with the values to help my own future children succeed. I have their parents to thank for that too. I think about my dads grandparents making the life-altering decision to cross the ocean from Calabria, Italy, with their bevy of children, to New York in the early 1920s. Am I successful because my greatgrandparents took that risk? Or looking back even farther my mothers ancestors, the Waldensians were members of an ancient Christian movement who were persecuted for their beliefs. I come from people who died for what they believed. Is this legacy part of my success as well? Understanding the sacri ces and efforts of my folks, and their folks, has deepened my perspective on society too. One doesnt choose their parents. You just get lucky. And tragically, some do not. I know people whose parents did little to nothing to help them succeed. While many followed suit, others made it through on their own determination and drive. If their parents, and their parents parents, never made sacri ces to ensure a successful lineage, those values did not exist to continue that tradition. Can anyone be blamed? So I take the days we honor our parents more seriously now. And I hope my own kids will one day attribute their success to the sacri cial heritage of Robert and Debra.Nicole Zema is the reporter at The Wakulla News. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Mad Anthonys Signs are to help owners find pets Programs offered all summer long War Eagles playoff hopes end with 8-7 loss to Mosley Wakulla eyes $3.8M in state projects Gym open at Community Center Underwater Wakulla May 8, 2014 Spurweed and its stickers lie in waitthewakullanews.com Wetlands are irreplaceable resource anks for those who came to my help Charter review board needs your inputA grown-up perspective on my parents e orts Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.net Follow us on Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE: Editor, The News: Almost everyone knows how important our wetlands are to us. Wetlands are our nations most irreplaceable resource. They provide ood control, they help remove pollutants from our water, they protect shorelines, provide habitat for wildlife, and serve important recreational functions. Our shing industry depends very heavily on the health of our wetlands. But, even though our commissioners know the value of wetlands, four of them are ready to take away our local wetland protections and turn the control over to the Department of Environmental Protection, an agency that appears not to believe in protecting this valuable resource. DEP buffer or setback zones range from zero to 25 feet hardly enough footage to protect our water quality and provide wildlife habits. Anyone who has been in Middle or South Florida recently or read the stories about Floridas vanishing springs and polluted water can see what happens when DEP tries to protect our wetlands. It seems they simply cannot provide the oversight or the necessary enforcement, and DEPs mitigation measures still allow vast destruction of wetland habitats. When this wetlands ordinance change request rst came up in our county it was because some people wanted to be able to develop property along the coast. Now some commissioners are saying that taking away our county Wetlands Ordinance is a property rights issue and that they dont like being told what they can and cannot do with their land. We have laws and regulations in all walks of life. In most areas of the country you just cant do whatever you want to with your land. And, if you dont pay your taxes, you will nd that the property you thought was yours gets sold out from under you so is it really even your property? All private land in our county is subject to various zoning laws and setbacks. Our building and zoning codes are complex and restrictive. You cant build a simple shed without getting a building permit. You cant put mobile homes on some property. There are setbacks that say you cant build within a certain number of feet from the property line. Those are just a few of our restrictive regulations. So if the commissioners really wanted to give property rights back, then why are they not addressing some of these other laws and ordinances? Why are they focusing on taking away wetland buffers; buffers which actually add to the overall bene t for the people and the wildlife living in the county? We sometimes think we are the masters of the world and that we can change the environment to suit our perceived needs, but we should stop and think about the long-term consequences of the changes that will happen if people are allowed to destroy wildlife habitats, or allow fertilizer and other runoff to pollute our water, or allow the building of high density developments at the very edge of our wetlands and coastline. Sure, many people know that our wetlands need to be protected, but some people make mistakes, or they dont think things through, or they simply dont care about other people, wildlife, or the wetlands. Thats why we need our LOCAL Wetland Ordinance so that we have the wetland buffer footage that was deemed appropriate for our area and so that we can be sure, right here in our own county, that our wetlands and our water will be protected. Please vote YES on the ballot in November so that we KEEP our local Wetlands Ordinance. Sandy Tedder Sopchoppy There will be no changes to your solid waste collection for the Memorial Day Holiday on Monday, May 26. All services will be completed on your normal scheduled day. Waste Pro would like to thank you and wish you all a happy and safe holiday.No changes to holiday Waste Pro pickup Family appreciates supportEditor, The News: The family of Betty Drake would like to extend our sincere thank you to the Big Bend Hospice, Wakulla team for their special care, friends, neighbors and all those who gave us comfort, support, food, owers and prayers during a very dif cult dif cult time. We are blessed. The Bud Drake familyEditor, The News: I would like to express my appreciation to the paramedics and Wakulla County Commissioners who came to my assistance at the end of the April 21 Commission meeting. Unfortunately, when I got up to leave the meeting, I stumbled, whacked my head against the wall, and fell to the ground. Paramedics who happened to be in attendance at the meeting came to my assistance almost instantaneously. Moments later, the county commissioners arrived from the podium and witnessed that the paramedics had the situation well under control. I was taken by ambulance to a Tallahassee hospital where they ran a series of test and determined that the nasty-looking hickey on my head was only super cial. I was released and returned home in the wee hours of the morning. Many, many thanks to the paramedics who performed exceptionally well and to the county commissioners who arrived after the paramedics, were concerned about my wellbeing, and witnessed that everything was under control. God bless you all. Lorraine G. Lambou vwak@msn.comEditor, The News: The Wakulla County Charter Review Commission has had several meetings over the last couple of months to discuss possible revisions to the Wakulla County Charter. These proposed revisions will ultimately be placed on the General Election Ballot and voted on by the registered voters in Wakulla County. Although the meetings are open to the public, the attendance by the public has been very limited. Several key revisions to the Charter have been proposed and discussed by the CRC, including Non-Partisan Elections, Single Member Districts for BOCC Members, Residency Requirements For Elected Of cials, Budget/Reserve Policies, Term Limits, Appointment vs. Election Of School Superintendent, Future CRC Member Makeup, and Ordinance/Charter Changes Via The Petition Process. As you can denote, these items brought forth to the CRC could impact each and every citizen in Wakulla County. In turn, it would be advantageous to have more citizen input at these meetings. The charge of the CRC is not to determine if a proposed revision is right or wrong. Rather, the CRC is charged with determining if a proposal has enough support to go forth to be placed on the ballot. Suf cient support is gauged by public input, CRC discussions, and ultimately a vote by the CRC. If the proposal does have suf cient support, the CRC works to craft language that will help voters understand what is being proposed. In essence, the CRC is the conduit for the citizenry to put a proposed Charter revision on the ballot. Please consider attending an upcoming meeting of the CRC. The meetings are open to the public and citizens are provided an opportunity (and encouraged) to speak at the meetings. It is also anticipated that in the very near future, two public workshops will take place pertaining to proposed revisions. As with each CRC Meeting, these workshops will be ofcially announced by county staff including date/time/location. Please consider attending an upcoming meeting and providing input to potential revisions to YOUR County Charter. I can be reached at fcrussell92@ gmail.com, should you have any comments, questions, or concerns, pertaining to the CRC. Respectfully, Chris Russell Chairman Wakulla County Charter Review Commission

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 5A SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Mike Carlton drawn from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Asked around town:Have you or your family served in a foreign conflict?ALLEN KILLINGSWORTH ACE HARDWAREMy grandpa was in World War II and the Korean War. Three of my uncles were in Vietnam. AUBREY ARDTHE FOOD GIANTI didnt serve in the con ict, but served in the Army during the Vietnam War. RICKY BARTON CONSTRUCTION BEN WITHERSMy great grandaddy and my grandaddy both served in World War II. We also had family who served in the Civil War. My grandpa was in WWII and my father-in-law served during WWII for 4 years, he was an engineer. JEFF ALCORNCOOKGINGER HARRELLHOUSEWIFEMy great grandfather served in the Korean War for the Army. He was in the service for 20 years. Compiled by Lynda Kinsey www.cjmalphursseptic.com Your Complete Septic Service rr sTM LIC #SM0951220 to Receive $10 OFF any septic tank pumping.Mention this Ad SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW From Front PageStill, with all the success and accolades and achievements and everything as great a school district as this is, I would be foolish to think its because I was a school board member, he said. The success goes back to the districts team concept I think we have the absolute best people, employees, district staff, teachers. In this team concept, everybody who plays a role in the students day at school is important the bus drivers, teachers, administrators, lunch room staff, maintence workers. It all works to keep the district going. I have no doubt that the district will continue to be successful and continue to grow, Evans said.Jerry Evans wont seek re-election to school boardStaff ReportWakulla County will hold its annual Memorial Day Ceremony on Memorial Day, Monday, May 26, in front of the courthouse beginning at 10 a.m. This memorial ceremony is dedicated to the lasting memory and sacred honor of the brave American servicemen and servicewomen who gave their lives for our country and a special emphasis of Wakulla Countys own heroes. This years ceremony includes keynote speaker Commissioner Ralph Thomas and will highlight patriotic music, laying of the wreath, and raising of the ag. I would like to encourage everyone to remember the sacri ces of veterans who have fought for our freedom and hope each can do so by attending our ceremony on Monday, May 26th, said County Administrator David Edwards. For more information, contact Jessica Welch, Communications & Public Services Director at (850) 926-0919 ext. 706 or jwelch@mywakulla.com.Memorial Day ceremony set at courthouse

PAGE 6

Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Reinhert St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor850 745-8359Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchYour church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Why did God give us coffee? Crawfordville UMC to hold fundraiser May 31The Crawfordville United Methodist Church (CUMC) is sponsoring a festival to kick off the summer. There will be local vendors, crafts, food, games and BINGO! The festival is on May 31 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Booth spaces cost $15. Please contact Christina DeProspero at F_christina@hotmail.com or (850) 591-0082 to reserve your space now. Proceeds from the food and games goes to the 2014 CUMC Mission trip to Ecuador. Mount Trial to celebrate 12th pastoral anniversaryThe Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church will be celebrating Pastor J. Bernard Plummers 12th pastoral anniversary, starting with a pastoral banquet on Saturday, May 31, at 6 p.m. at The Wakulla Shriners Club, on Highway 319 South, followed with a close-out service, the next day, Sunday, June 1, at 11 a.m., at Mount Trial. Mount Trial is located at 1418 Sopchoppy Highway in Buckhorn. Contact Deacon Samuel Hordges (850) 321-1844), or, any other Mount Trial Church member, for tickets. Carrabelle UMC to hold Market Days in CarrabelleCarrabelle United Methodist Church and Gods Ministry for the Needy is preparing for its Market Days May Gathering on Saturday, May 31, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Curley Messer Pavilion on Tallahassee Street next to the re station in Carrabelle. Shop till you drop for local crafts, baked goods and rummage items. Then eat hot dogs with all the xings for $3, including your drink! Music will be provided by local talent. Remember God teaches us that we must care for orphans and widows in their distress. As He works through us and our fundraising ministry, our mission is to better serve the needy in our community. Bring your friends and neighbors and receive a blessing. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t.The ministry is free. Volunteers needed for prison ministryCaring, Christian volunteers are needed to go to prison on Saturday, May 31. The Bill Glass Prison Ministrys A Day of Champions will team athletes, entertainers, musicians and volunteers to share their stories and their faith with inmates at seven area correctional facilities. If you are willing to step behind the prison walls to share the gospel with men and women eager to turn their lives toward God, contact the Bill Glass Prison Ministry in Dallas at (972) 298-1101 or visit the website at BillGlass.org/tallahassee. Volunteers will receive practical information and simple evangelistic tools to guide them on their mission. Volunteer for A Day of Champions Prison Ministry on Saturday, May 31. Contest seeks spiritual poetsA $1,000 grand prize is being offered in a special religious poetry contest sponsored by the Rainbow Poets, free to everyone. The deadline for entering is June 14. To enter, send one poem only of 21 lines or less to Free Poetry Contest, PO Box 21, Talent OR 97540. Or enter on-line www.rainbowpoets. com. Be sure your name and address appears on the page with your poem. A winners list will be sent to all entrants. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERThis week I came faceto-face with a genuine dilemma. I had several meetings across town and for some reason I miscalculated and ended up with a 2 1/2 hour gap between meetings. I hate to waste time, but if I drove back to my ofce, I would simply have to return to my meeting later and with the cost of gas these days, one cannot be too cautious. I remedied the situation by stopping in a small coffee shop for cup of joe. As far as I am concerned, there is no bad time to have a cup of coffee, in spite of the price. I ordered my coffee and when the waitress brought it to me, I began to think about coffee. Why did God give us coffee? Then my mind went back to my grandfather, whose greatest gift to me was a love of coffee. Nobody loved coffee more. I remember one of his favorite quotes, You can always tell a man by the coffee he drinks. Anathema to my grandfather was the idea of instant coffee. No man, in his judgment, would ever drink anything of the kind. If a man would drink instant coffee, my grandfather perked, theres no telling what else he would do. Never trust a man who drinks instant coffee. Making coffee was an art form to my grandfather. There was a right way and a wrong way to make coffee, and he always insisted on the right way. Of course, the right way was the way he made coffee. In grandfathers kitchen was an old woodburning cook stove. On this old-fashioned stove, my grandfather brewed his famous mud broth. He never allowed my grandmother to make the brew; it was his job, which he took seriously. Once for his birthday, we all chipped in and bought him an electric coffee pot. I had never seen my grandfather so mad. When he saw what it was, he would not even take it out of the box. He had strong ideas about coffee and how it should be brewed and woe be to the person who contradicted his ideas. Grandfather always kept a fire in the old wood cook stove and on the back of the stove he kept his coffee pot, a large 2-gallon pot one of those old-fashioned percolators long since gone out of style. The coffee was always on, and no matter when you stopped in to see him, he always had fresh coffee brewing. When I say fresh, I need to explain. Actually, the coffee was only fresh on Sunday. On Saturday night, he routinely emptied the coffee pot and prepared fresh coffee for Sunday morning. He had an old coffee grinder and ground the coffee beans on Saturday night. He put some other things in the coffee, I have never gured out what. One thing I know he put in was a crushed eggshell. What it did to his coffee, I have no idea but grandfather was sure it was an important ingredient. The freshly ground coffee beans were put in, the pot filled with fresh water and set on the back of the stove to slowly perk. This coffee would last the entire week. The coffee was so strong on Sunday that if it did not wake you in the morning, you were dead. In fact, Cousin Ernie died on a Sunday afternoon, so my grandfather tells the story, and one sip of his black coffee roused him and he lived seven more years, which was unfortunate for grandfather, as he had to support him. Before going to bed each evening my grandfather took care of his coffee. He would freshly grind a few coffee beans, sprinkle it on top of the old coffee grounds and then add a newly crushed eggshell. Then he would re ll the coffee pot with water. His coffee percolated 24/7 and by Saturday it was so strong you needed a half-cup of sugar just to drink one cup. It was thick enough to use as syrup on your pancakes, but so strong, it dissolved your pancakes before you could eat them. My grandmother once tried washing the coffee pot. When my grandfather saw her, he became furious, Never wash that coffee pot, he spouted, youll ruin its character and a coffee pot needs a lot of character to make good coffee. In pondering my grandfather, I thought about my Heavenly Father and His gifts. The Bible puts it this way; Every good gift and every perfect gift is from above, and cometh down from the Father of lights, with whom is no variableness, neither shadow of turning (James 1:17 KJV.) I really do not know why God gave us coffee, but I do know Gods character is of such a nature that it never diminishes His ability to bless me each day..The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att. net. OUT TO PASTOR In depth home bible studies are available 3055 Crawfordville Hwy.Sun. Services 2:30

PAGE 7

By ETHEL SKIPPERMay 23, 2014 will mark the 100th anniversary of the birth of the late Charlotte Harris Rosier, known to many as Mama Charlotte. Mama Charlotte was from Hyde Park, and was the daughter of Goldwire and Alberta Harris. At the age of 14 she moved to Sopchoppy, and at the age 19 was joined in holy matrimony to John E. Rosier. To this union nine children were born John Jr., Ezella, Ethel, Alberta, Callie, Joseph, Meriddie, Ruth, Mary. Proverbs 31:10 asks a very important question: Who Can Find a Virtuous Woman? For her price is far above rubies. Mama Charlotte Rosier was indeed a virtuous woman and her price was far above rubies. She had many attributes. These attributes included love, humility, faith, strength, patience, generosity, integrity, kindness, courage, and wisdom, just to name a few. She was a woman who knew she was of great worth to God. She had a special kind of heart and reached out to those in need. Mama Charlotte was an inspiration to her family, church, and community. This great woman was blessed among many. In addition to raising her own children, Mama Charlotte raised many foster children and provided food, clothes, medicine, day care, elder care, and rehabilitation and medical services to numerous others in her family and in the community. She also purchased property on which she built homes and moved trailers to accommodate the homeless. After Mama Charlottes death in 1989, the Charlotte Rosier Quality Care Home opened on March 1, 1990 in Tallahassee in her honor. The home was operated by Wendy GavinBeard, Mama Charlottes granddaughter, and her husband, Dr. Timothy Beard and provided services to moderate, minimal, and severely disabled individuals. Transportation, home training, and other related services were also provided. In February 1999, Mama Charlottes children dedicated the Charlotte Harris Rosier Memorial Outreach Center. The purpose of this center is to honor the many contributions Mama Charlotte made to the community. Prior to Mama Charlottes death, the Rosier Family came together each year during the month of February for the Annual Charlotte Harris Rosier Day. This annual celebration was held at the Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven in Sopchoppy, and included singing, praying, sharing, giving, comfort, support, encouragement, and love. After Mama Charlottes death, the Rosier family has continued the Annual Charlotte Harris Rosier Day. This annual celebration is held at various locations during the month of February and honors the legacy of both Mama Charlotte and her husband, the late John Rosier Sr. The Rosier family continues to pass on the principles and traditions of their parents to the generations that follow. The children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren and foster children of the late John and Charlotte Harris Rosier continue to do all they can do to build, broaden, and sustain the Rosier family and to develop a lasting legacy. What is the legacy? L = Love, E = Educate your family which will help to nurture a brighter future, G = Give of yourself, A = Adore your family, C = Create Christ-centered worship for your family, Y = Yield to the discipline for building covenant relationships which will last beyond your lifetime. Mama Charlotte was indeed a Good Samaritan who touched the lives of many people. Her love, generosity, and personal commitment to her family will never be forgotten. Submitted by the family of Charlotte Harris Rosier.Jason Ryan Coshatt, 29, died unexpectedly on May 12, 2014 in Tallahassee. Visitation will be held Sunday, May 25, 2014 from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville. A memorial service will follow at 4 p.m. at the funeral home. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to FSU Credit Union 2655-C, Crawfordville FL 32327 for Nathan and Jonathan Coshatt, re: Robert Coshatt. Survivors include two sons, Nathan Coshatt and Jonathan Coshatt and their sister, Chelsey Pritchard; father, Robert Coshatt (Penny); mother, Lori Zahniser (Ed); sisters, Mary Ann Ferrero, Windy Stewart (Brian) and Jessica Griner; brothers, John Coshatt, Clay Coshatt (Amber) and Shawn Coshatt; and five nieces and nephews: Cierra DelValle, Shelby DelValle, Wyatt DelValle, Alex Stewart and Clayton Coshatt. He was predeceased by numerous grandparents and a son, Jackson Rowe Coshatt. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel, Crawfordville, is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 7ARobert Rivieccio, 44, of Port Charlotte,passed away Friday, April 25, 2014. He was born March 16, 1970, in Mineola, N.Y., the son of Mario and Victoria (nee Hart) Rivieccio. Survivors include his wife of 10 years, Julie; daughters, Mia and Zoe; mother, Victoria; brothers, Mario (Maureen) and Anthony (Laura); in-laws, Charlie and Marlene Hone; sister-in-law, Jan (Mitch) House; a niece and nephew; and two goddaughters. A scholarship in his memory at Florida State University is being organized to benefit students in the Hospitality Management program. To donate, visit the website, http:// www.youcaring. com/other/robertrivieccio-scholarship-fund/172065.Oma L. Linzy Baxley, 88, of Crawfordville, died May 14, 2014 at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. She was born Feb. 7, 1926 in Ivan to Hayward R. and Maude (Strickland) Linzy. She was predeceased by her husbands, Curtis B. Herring in 1996 and William Baxley in 2009; and her six brothers and sisters and a grandson. Survivors include her sons, Craig (Mary) Herring of Panama City Beach, Gary (David) Herring of Tampa and John Henry (Belinda) Herring of Woodville; daughter, Joan (Charles) Herring-Smith of Crawfordville; two grandchildren; four greatgrandchildren; and numerous nieces and nephews. Visitation was held Thursday, May 15, 2014, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Culleys Meadowwood Funeral Home, Riggins Road Chapel, Tallahassee. Graveside funeral services were held on Friday, May 16, 2014, at 10 a.m. at Whiddon Lake Cemetery in Crawfordville. Arrangements were under the direction of Culleys MeadowWood Funeral Home in Tallahassee.Juanita Joan Young, loving mother and dear friend, passed away Sunday, May 18, 2014 in Tallahassee. She was 86 years old. Mrs. Young was a devoted mother and homemaker throughout her life. One of her greatest passions was art. She enjoyed still painting with acrylics and oils, charcoal drawings and creating stained glass. Survivors include her son, Skip Young; daughter, Mary Ann Watts (Brad); son-inlaw; Charlie Krazit; brother, Bill Carter; sister-in-law, Nancy Carter; five grandsons, Trey, Justin, Brian, Andy, and Harry; one granddaughter, Brooke; and three great-grandsons, Tripp, Pepper and Tate. She was predeceased by her husband of 64 years, Lee Young; a son, Shea Young; and a daughter, Dale Krazit. Graveside services were held on Wednesday, May 21, 2014 at 1 p.m. at 3Y Ranch Cemetery, in Crawfordville. The family will receive friends from 12:30 p.m. to 1 p.m. at the gravesite. In lieu of owers donations can be made to the American Stroke Association, 7272 Greenville Ave. Dallas TX 75231. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is assisting the family with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Mary Stansbury Butera, 95, passed away on May 18, 2014. Mary was born in Poughkeepsie, N.Y. on June 26, 1918, and moved to Sopchoppy in 1923 with her family. After graduating from Sopchoppy High School in 1936 as Valedictorian, she worked for S. Walter Revell, Superintendent of Schools. During World War II, Mary organized the USO in Sopchoppy and became the youngest USO president in the United States. In 1946, she married the love of her life, the late Charles (Charlie) Butera and moved to Richmond Hill, Queens and later to Levittown, N.Y., where she eventually went to work for Gilson Uniform Company as a bookkeeper. In 1984, Mary and her husband retired and returned to Sopchoppy, where she resided until her death. Mary was a beloved member of the community and was frequently involved in community activities. She was a member of the Sopchoppy Homemakers and the Wakulla County Library Board, delivered Meals on Wheels for the Wakulla Senior Center, and was a devoted member of Christ Church Anglican in Crawfordville. Mary is survived by her daughter, Brenda Carter (Jack) of Cuddebackville, N.Y.; her grandson, John Carter (Annica) of Hjo, Sweden; two granddaughters, Kristen Wolf (Mark) of Middletown, N.Y., and Jennifer DiLeo (Christopher) of Port Jervis, N.Y.; three great-grandchildren, Christofer, Jonathan, and Emelie Carter; and many, many dear friends and family members. A memorial service will be held at Christ Church Anglican in Crawfordville at a later date. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd Tallahassee FL 32308 or Christ Church Anglican, Crawfordville, 3383 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Obituaries Oma L. Linzy Baxley Mary Sansbury Butera Jason Ryan Coshatt Robert Rivieccio Juanita Joan Young Robert Rivieccio Mary Stansbury Butera Oma L. Linzey Baxley Juanita Joan Young Jason Ryan Coshatt Charlotte Rosier was a good Samaritan Buckhorn NewsSPECIAL TO THE NEWSCharlotte Rosier

PAGE 8

Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Donor provides piano to Eden Springs RehabBy Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.netThe donation of a piano to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center has lled the dining hall with beautiful music once again. A local donor, who wishes to remain anonymous, provided the center with the piano after seeing a letter to the editor requesting one in The Wakulla News. A group of four or ve local musicians gather every Wednesday evening to provide residents with familiar songs. A working piano is essential to the tradition. Mary Watson, who has volunteered to play piano and visit with residents at Eden Springs for about 12 years, said the old piano nally bit the dust. She was even bringing a keyboard since the piano was unusable. The old piano died, Watson said. It was ragged out and torn up. This is important to the elderly, and they should not be denied anything that brings them comfort and joy, and makes them feel good. Watson and the other musicians expressed deep gratitude for the anonymous donation. This person is a Good Samaritan, Watson said. Watson said regardless of rain, sleet, hail or cold, the musicians are dedicated to showing up every Wednesday night. It costs us nothing, Watson said. These are the sweetest people in the world, and this is their home. This is where they live, and we want to bring joy to them. Musicians Mike Kinsey, Berney Barwick, Mr. and Mrs. Tommy Roberts, Bill Petty, Mike and Shirley McKenzie sing and play gospel and country standards like Old Country Church, Will the Circle be Unbroken, Ill Fly Away, and Beulah Land. An anonymous donor provided a piano to Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center. A group of local musicians, including pianist Mary Watson, have gathered to play for residents every Wednesday night for more than a decade. Mike Kinsey plays guitar in the background.NICOLE ZEMA Annually in the United States, 800,000 dog bites are severe enough to require medical treatment, and small children run the highest risk of being bitten. Most bites occur in the home or by a dog you may know. Even the sweetest, cuddliest dog can bite if provoked or pestered. There are three keys to bite prevention: learn to understand canine behavior, take the time to socialize and train all dogs the younger the better and teach children to respect all dogs, starting with their furry buddies at home. Children should learn to treat every dog the way they would want to be treated. That means no hitting, pulling, pinching, poking or yanking. Never allow a child to be physically abusive to a dog. This can cause the dog to lash out and it tells the child that its OK to harm another living thing. Even playful roughhousing can hurt a dog and may cause a negative reaction. An example is Dottie, our Dalmatian when my son was growing up. She was very protective and loved being outside playing with the kids, accompanying them on their walks through the woods and on occasion trying to slither onto the school bus. Her job was to protect them from snakes etc., and in general keep an eye on them. She was a great playmate however she did not tolerate having her ears or tail pulled, who does, or her space invaded when sleeping or eating. Her first line of defense was to walk away and nd another place to rest. If not left alone then, she would growl. It was my responsibility to explain that by walking away she ended the play session, and the growl means she will be upset if not left alone, and may snap or bite. Warning signs dogs give before they bite include; yawning (which is one way they try to get rid of stress), lip licking around the mouth (licking his chops which indicates stress), giving you a pleading or helpless look, showing his teeth, curling his upper lip, getting up and moving away from the person or turning his head away from someone, looking down toward the ground, showing the whites of his eyes, scratching his ears, biting his feet or licking himself. Getting up and shaking himself after someone has touched him, his tail is tucked between his legs, he looks at you out of the corner of his eyes, his ears are laid back or the hair on his back is raised are all indicators hes not happy. If hes growling, listen to what hes telling you with his body and his voice. Teach your children the correct way to approach an unfamiliar dog: First get the OK from the owner, hold out your hand, ngers closed, and palm down, slowly toward the dog. Allow the dog to approach your hand and sniff it; wait for the dogs OK. If he wants your affection, he will lower his head, perk ears, or even come closer to you. If the dogs puts his ears back, at on his head, or growls, or cowers, dont pet him; Pat the dog on the chin rather than the top of the head, or along his back. Avoid touching his belly, tail, ears, or feet. Teach your child to always be calm around dogs. High pitched squeals and shouts can make a dog nervous or overly energetic. Even if the dog doesnt bite the child, they can still harm them by jumping on them or tripping them amid all the excitement. Make a habit of teaching your child to stay relaxed and low key when around dogs. Never get close and try to pet a chained dog or dogs behind a fence as they protect their de ned space, and could be aggressive. Never leave a baby or small child alone with a dog, no matter how well you know the dog! Please remember to spay/neuter your pets!Tailwagger News... By PETRA SHUFFCHAT Vice President Special to The NewsThe Sopchoppy Fourth of July Volunteer Committee is hosting a fundraiser for their annual Fourth of July Celebration at From The Heart Recording Studio in Sopchoppy, on Saturday, May 31 from noon until 8 p.m. Two years of heavy rains and ooding of the Sopchoppy River have greatly affected the gate receipts, and the committee is holding this fundraiser in order to continue to bring you the Best Fireworks and Celebration in the area. One hundred percent of the proceeds will be used for that purpose. The Committee has joined efforts to provide a full day of food and entertainment for your enjoyment. Hamburger or hotdog lunches will be available from noon to 3 p.m. and a mullet dinner beginning at 3 p.m. and continuing until 7 p.m. A day of musical entertainment begins at noon, running throughout the day until 8 p.m., at From the Heart Recording Studio. The price for a hamburger plate is $5, a hotdog plate is $4 and the mullet dinner is $8. Suggested gate donation for the musical entertainment is $5 for the whole day. Of course, you can always donate up to your hearts desire in support of the celebration. While you are here, please be sure and thank these ne musicians who have volunteered their time and craft to help with our fundraiser. May 31 Musical Lineup: Noon Hot Tamale 1 p.m. Master Chief 1:45 p.m. Rick Ott & Dillon McCall 2 p.m. Aaron Sheppard & Rick Ott 3 p.m. Dean Newman 4 p.m. Susan David 5 p.m. Hot Tamale 6 p.m. Paving Blue 7 p.m. Stone Cold Blues BandHelp fund Sopchoppy Fourth of July eventSpecial to The NewsMiss Sara Elizabeth Stewart and Mr. Thomas Lincoln Moore are pleased to announce their engagement. Sara is the daughter of Rodney and Tara Watts of Scottsburg, VA and Steve and Kristey Stewart of Rougemont, NC. Thomas is the son of Tim and Caryl Moore of Halifax, VA. The bride-elects maternal grandparents are Mike and Carol Conner of Scottsburg, VA. Her paternal grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. James Stewart of South Boston, VA, formerly of Tallahassee. The groom-elects maternal grandparents are Mr. And Mrs. E.T. Francis of South Boston, VA and the late Nancy West Francis, formally of Danville, VA. His paternal grandparents are Mrs. Mary P. Moore and the late Henry L. Moore of South Boston, VA. Sara is a recent graduate of the Danville Regional Medical Center Radiology Program. Her future plans are for a career as a Radiographer. Thomas is a 2005 graduate from Halifax County High school. He is currently employed as an Operation Dispatcher at R.O. Harrell, Inc. of South Boston, VA. The wedding will take place on June 28, 2014 in Halifax, VA. Invitations for the event have been sent. The couple will reside in South Boston, VA. Special to The NewsClasses of Crawfordville High School 1935 to 1967 have been invited to attend a nal high school reunion on May 24 at 69 Arran Road. Registration begins at 10 a.m. Reservations were required by the Tuesday, May 20 deadline. Music by Freedom Hill Gospel Quartet and door prizes and drawings will be part of the festivities. The event will be catered by Panacea Coastal Restaurant. For more information, call Jean Dykes at 926-3859 or Kit Tucker at 597-5002.Stewart-Moore to marry in Va. Final Crawfordville High School reunion Saturday

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 9A GREAT GETAWAY 000D4D5 Staff ReportYouths fished at Wakulla Countys best spots for pan sh, bass, white trout, speckled trout, redfish, Spanish mackerel, ounder, cat sh and whiting Saturday, May 17 in the 17th annual Kids Fishing Tournament. The free event wrapped with weigh-ins and awards at Woolley Park in Panacea. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce sponsors the event every year. Winners received trophies and shing poles and the grand prizewinner won two poles and two kayak rentals on the Wakulla River from T-N-T. Deputy Bruce Ashley of the WCSO said he hopes all families take advantage of the fun event. Its tness related, Ashley said. And it exposes kids to the sport of shing. This event has a good history. Ashley said that sheriffs office volunteers make the annual kids shing tournament and Christmas in the Park a possibility. Free lunch was served to participants, and exhibits and in atables were set up for the kids. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge assisted with a shing clinic last weekend, and the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department is a cosponsor with the sheriffs of ce. Submitted winners and weights are as follows: FRESH WATER Pan Fish: Donavan Whaley 1.17 Natlie Whaley 0.89 Kolbie Jones 0.69 Lydia Akins 0.64 Bass Caleb Logan 2.11 Hayden Thomas 1.48 Seth Logan 1.34 Jackson Thomas 1.30 Cat sh Lyda Akins 2.08 Trey Hicks 1.76 Jaxon Taff 1.43 Natlie Whaley 0.80 SALT WATER Flounder Kanoa Tucker 1.04 Kane Tucker 1.01 McKenna Trumbull 0.68 Red Fish Alyssa Johnson 4.61 Spanish Mackerel Strom Lawler 1.36 Jacob Sparby 1.12 Arthur Tompson 0.71 Speckled Trout Allen Willis 2.75 Kanoa Tucker 1.78 Arthur Tompson 1.62 Kane Tucker 1.44 White Trout Justin Price 0.62 Storm Lawler 0.56 Arthur Tompson 0.52 Cameron West 0.52 Whiting Parker Raulerson 0.65 Jessica Barwick 0.53 Emmalin Clark 0.48 Ethan Raker 0.24Kids win prizes in 17th WCSO shing tourneyPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPictured with David Moody of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and Peggy Bennett of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department, from top left, are: Allen Willis; Justin Price; Jacob Sparby; and Kanoa Tucker. Rotary distributes 350 oscillating fans PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Rotary Club of Wakulla bought 350 oscillating fans to distribute to those who need them throughout the community. Pictured at left, Rotarian Jo Ann Palmer Elma Lopez-Gillette at the Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church. At right, Palmer and Brad Harvey with John Heys of First Baptist Church. Staff ReportAbout 30 people participated in a spearfshing contest sponsored by the Wakulla Diving Center on May 17. Spear shers and their families then gathered at the center to clean and fry their catches with the assistance and extra sh from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea. Gregg Stanton, director of the Wakulla Diving Center, said the spear shing contest is the rst of hopefully many more to come. Prizes for the biggest sh were donated from local businesses, and the center. Divers went as far as 30 miles offshore to spear sh. A representative from FWC was on-hand to ensure legality. The biggest catch was an 89.5-pound cubera snapper. Submitted results are as follows... Biggest Fish: 1stRichard Todd Langford89.5 Cubera Snapper 2ndMatt Paarlberg31.2 Amberjack 3rdMurray Baker27.3 Amberjack Aggregate: 1stDamon Jasper45.1 2ndTodd Thompson27.9 3rdJeemiah Slaymaker23.9 Specific fish were not recorded for the aggregate. Competitors were required to weigh 1 gag grouper and any 2 other legal sh excluding cobia, amberjack, sharks, and barracuda Lion sh: 1stBrian Bond3 Lion sh 2ndJosh Reynolds1 Lion sh 3rdDesmond Kieser1 Lion sh Lion sh were not weighed. Spear shing contest brings in big catches Gala to bene t childrenSpecial to the NewsJoin for a fun evening and festivities to bene t the Childrens Miracle Network. The event will be held from 7 p.m. to midnight, Saturday, June 7 at the Bistro at Wildwood, and is hosted by Walmart. The CMN Masquerade Gala continues to seek additional sponsors, and items for the silent auction. Please contact Teresa or Tracy 926.1560. Music and dancing, silent auction, hors doeuvres, and beverages. Dress code black tie/formal, mask required and available for purchase. Tickets $25 per person. Tickets must be purchased in advance and are available at Walmart, Crawfordville. Donations may be made in person at the Gala, and at Walmart, 35 Mike Stewart Drive, Crawfordville.Special to the NewsSeveral categories of tax reductions were adopted during the 2014 Legislative Session. Breaks will be applied to hurricane supplies starting May 31 and ending on June 8. During this time, the following items are: A portable self-powered light source selling for $20 or less. A portable self-powered radio, two-way radio, or weather band radio selling for $50 or less. A tarpaulin or other flexible waterproof sheeting selling for $50 or less. A self-contained rst-aid kit selling for $30 or less. A ground anchor system or tiedown kit selling for $50 or less. A gas or diesel fuel tank selling for $25 or less. A package of AA-cell, C-cell, D-cell, 6-volt, or 9-volt batteries, excluding automobile and boat batteries, selling for $30 or less. A nonelectric food storage cooler selling for $30 or less. A portable generator selling for $750 or less. Reusable ice for $10 or less.Tax breaks on hurricane supplies May 31 June 8Dont miss librarys book talkSpecial to the NewsHerb Donaldson will be speaking at Wakulla Library on his book Southern Shock Americana Thursday at 6 p.m. Guests to include Agnes Furey (Achieve Higher Ground, author Wildowers in the Median); Sheila Meehan (Tallahassee Citizens Against the Death Penalty) and others. Light refreshments will be provided. 000i9v1 UNDER NEW MANAGEMENTCattail Creek RV ParkLevy County74 sites 30 and 50 amp serviceBeautiful tree lined park, Swimming pool, ClubhouseMinutes to beach and river$30 nightly and $255 monthly352-447-3050 TILE ~ CARPET ~ WOOD ~ LAMINATE ~ VINYLKaren Richardson, Design Consultant850-491-3358www.SouthernFlooring.net Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING SETTING THE STANDARD WITH StyleBring in Photos of your Room or Patio...We can help you Create YOUR DREAM!! Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION ON A BUDGET? WE CAN RE-PURPOSE! LETS TALK!

PAGE 10

Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsShadeville Elementary held its annual Fifth Grade Brain Brawl competition on Friday, May 9. The Brain Brawl is sponsored by The Coastal Optimist Club in an effort to support and encourage our youngsters to stretch their minds and to provide an opportunity for students to shine academically. Under the direction of Shadevilles outstanding fifth grade team of teachers, Suzie McCord (chairman), Kerry Adams, Judy Paris, Rachel Harper and Debbie Marsh, the students rst battled it out in the classrooms to earn a seat on one of the two teams. Team A members included: Cole Baggett (captain), Karen Voyles, Steven Adams, and Keegan Davis. Team B members included: Peyton Bishop (captain), Jarren Harris, Daniel Chambers, and Glen Smith. Also competing in the alternate positions were: MLynn Creek and Garrett Paugh. When all was said and done, the last questions answered and points awarded the members of Team B had earned the right to wear the medallions held by blue ribbons. Team A also earned beautiful medallions held with red ribbons. Karen Voyles was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team A and Glen Smith was awarded the medal for high scorer on Team B. Glen Smith also earned the coveted medallion held by a red, white, and blue ribbon for providing the most correct answers throughout the contest. It was certainly an exciting morning watching these students show what they know in reading, math, science, social studies, geography, and current events. We are proud of each of the members of the 2014 Brain Brawl Team and will look for them to excel in the future as they continue with their educations and careers.Special to The NewsBrevard College in Brevard, North Carolina has named 2013 Wakulla High School alumnus Caleb Stephens of Crawfordville to the Deans List for the spring semester of the 2013-2014 academic year. Stephens was also named to the Brevard Deans List for the fall semester. Stephens is majoring business and organizational leadership. He was a quarterback for the Wakulla High School War Eagles, and went to state playoffs with the team. He started as a freshman quarterback for the Brevard Tornadoes, and has been awarded for highest academic achievement. Locally he is also known for a ministry he conceived, with bracelets he created and distributed that said: Do Your Best, Leave the Results to God. To be eligible for the Deans List, a student must be enrolled full-time and earn a 3.50 grade point average or higher for the semester. Brevard College (www. brevard.edu) is committed to an experiential liberal arts education that encourages personal growth and inspires artistic, intellectual, and social action.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Chamber of Commerce is offering two one time FULL scholarships for the fall Green Guide Course, funded from proceeds of our annual Low Country Boil fundraiser. Course Description: The 90-hour certi cation course, mixed with both classroom and eld trip experiences, is designed for job seekers looking for employment in a nature-based eld, entrepreneurs interested in starting a nature-based business, or those who want to learn more about the North Florida environment for personal enrichment. Course Objectives: Provide educational experiences on North Florida ecosystems Equip potential guides with the knowledge to provide environmentally and socially responsible nature-based experiences to clients Educate business owners and employees on resource sustainability Provide accurate and up-to-date information for natural resource conservation best practices Create a nature-centered network of guides and program participants When: The course start date is September 2, with an end date of November 4. The deadline for applying for the scholarship award is 4 pm Tuesday, July 15. See the application for details. If you would like to learn more about the Green Certi cation Course or to apply for the scholarship, contact Kathie Mackie (850) 9226290 or mackiek@tcc. .edu.Special to The News TutoringByCynthia. com is proud to announce that the Homeschool Classroom will be open for summer school. The Homeschool Classroom is located at 2908 W. Lakeshore Drive. The Classroom is targeted towards grades 6 -12 and supports Florida Virtual, Leon County Virtual, and K12 curricula. While in the classroom, students receive instruction in the following: Test-taking skills; Organizational skills; Behavior modification; Mentoring; and Tutoring Summer school is a great time for grade recovery, as well as advancement in preparation for the upcoming school year. There are a variety of virtual classes to choose from. The Classroom staff will assist with choosing classes, requesting transcripts and reporting credits. My sons grades dramatically improved. Im so glad we chose the Homeschool Classroom, states Nona McCall, parent of a 10th grader. The ratio of instructor to student is 1:4. Each student receives individualized attention which results in enhanced comprehension and improved grades. The Homeschool Classroom is open Monday Friday, from 7am 3pm providing supervision and instruction for Middle and High School students taking virtual school courses. Students bring their laptops and lunch. The environment is teenager-friendly and promotes learning, critical thinking, and tolerance. Visit the Facebook page at https:// www.facebook.com/TutoringByCynthia Call 850.329.7684 to enroll your student today.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla High School War Eagles Invite you to come celebrate with the Class of 2014, at its Baccalaureate on Wednesday, June 4 at 7 p.m. Gates open at 6 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Graduation is scheduled for Friday, June 6 at 7:30 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Gates open at 6:30 p.m. Congratulations to all Wakulla High School graduates.Special to The NewsWakulla High School (WHS) is proud to announce our Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs are achieving outstanding results again this year. WHS currently offers programs in Architecture and Construction, A/V Technology and Communication, Automotive Services, Business Management and Administration, and Hospitality and Tourism as well as two Academies, Engineering and Medical. Each area offers industry certi cation tests to their fourth-year students. While some CTE programs are currently testing others have already taken the tests for their area. The CTE programs currently testing are Automotive, Business, Engineering, and TV Pro. The Automotive students are planning on taking the Florida Automobile Dealers Association (FADA) Certi ed Technician industry certi cation exam. The automotive industry uses the certi cation for employing trusted, reliable, and skilled employees. Business students are currently taking tests involving software programs. The students are seeking certi cation in Microsoft Bundle, Adobe, FLASH, Photoshop, and Dream weaver. TV Pro students will be taking Premier Pro certication test in the coming weeks. Carpentry IV students are allowed to take the industry certi cation test issued by The National Center for Construction Education and Research (NCCER). This year we had 14 students, the largest number in school history, take and pass the NCCER. Our Medical Academy students also set another record. 28 students took and passed the Certi ed Nursing Assistant (CNA) test. These students also passed the First Responder course and now have certi cations in both areas, all before graduating from WHS. All Culinary Students (over 100) currently possess a certi cation in SafeStaff. Since 1997, the State of Florida has mandated that all foodservice workers be trained in food safety. The SafeStaff Foodhandler Safety Program is founded on 6 principles: Ensuring proper personal hygiene, preventing cross-contamination, controlling time and temperature when handling food, proper cleaning and sanitizing, the causes and effects of major foodborne illnesses, and ensuring proper vermin control. Students will also be taking the ServSafe certi cation. Wakulla High School is also adding Welding to CTE programs next year and we look forward to our students succeeding in this new vocational area as well continuing all the success in the other programs. Excellence in education has always been the driving force at WHS as our students continue to prove each year. Shadeville 2014 Brain Brawlers PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Wakulla High graduation events scheduledGreen Guide scholarships offered Special to The NewsCongratulations to Artigua J. Kilpatrick, who graduated with a bachelors degree in business management from St. Leo University in St. Leo, Florida on May 3. Kilpatrick is a 2010 graduate of Wakulla High School. She is the daughter of Antonio and Andrea Kilpatrick of Sopchoppy. She is the granddaughter of Flossie and Lester Denmark of Crawfordville; and Betty and James Green of Sopchoppy; and Willie and Fronia Dupree of Tallahassee. She is the goddaughter of Fred L. Harvey of Sopchoppy.St. Leo Graduate WHS to offer new career and technical programs Caleb Stephens on Deans List Homeschool Classroom open for summer

PAGE 11

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 13Aeducation news from local schools School Rotary names Interact ScholarsWILLIAM SNOWDENThe Rotary Club of Wakulla presented scholarship checks last week to ve students for their involvement with Interact, the youth version of Rotary. With the students are Brad Harvey, treasurer of Rotary and Interact liasion, Missy Rudd, Interact sponsor, and Richard Russell, Rotary president. The ve students who received scholarships were Tamara Arnold for $1,000, Emily Rudd for $500, Colby King for $250, and Rachel Rudd for $250. Charles Moss, who received $250, was not present because of testing. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netAssistant Superintendent for Instruction Beth ODonnell will retire in July, it was announced at this weeks school board meeting. The longtime educator, who has been a teacher and assistant principal before joining the district staff, will continue for a period as a consultant. Superintendent Bobby Pearce said at the school board meeting on Monday, May 19, that ODonnells job duties will be divided up under a new plan: Beth Mims, who is currently Chief Academic Of cer, will take over K-12 instruction, and current Sopchoppy Second Chance Principal Dod Walker will move to the district as Director of Adult, Athletic and Dropout Prevention Progams. Its been previously announced that current Wakulla High School Principal Mike Crouch will take the job as head of the Second Chance School and Wakulla Middle School Principal Mike Barwick will go to the high school. Pearce praised ODonnell for her work, especially her work with the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) program, which has focused on helping middle-of-the-road students become more focused on school, offering such things as study tips, visits to colleges, and volunteer opportunities. The program has proven so successful that other students have sought to join AVID. Im going to miss her involvement in AVID, and working with her everyday, Pearce said. In other matters: The school board approved a low bid of $544,648 for campus-wide renovations at Wakulla Middle School. Randy Bristol, facilities manager for the district, noted that most of the improvements include replacing doors and hardware. One topic of conversation was that the gym oors have been found to contain mercury and may require some hazardous materials work to remove and replace, which would substantially increase the costs. Bristol said he initially priced the work at around $50,000, but the mercury took the costs up over $122,000. He said he is working to nd a cheaper alternative. Pearce said that the renovations are needed because Wakulla Middle, built in 1980, needs improvements to match the facilities at the newer Riversprings Middle School. A 5th grade student was expelled for possesing a knife on campus. The knife was discovered in the students backpack by a teacher, according to the sheriffs of ce. The 9-inch long knife contained a 5-inch blade. The student was expelled for the remainder of this year and will be attend to attend Sopchoppy Second Chance next year and transfer to Wakulla Middle School if there are no other problems. Missy Rudd, president of the Wakulla Classroom Teachers Association, the local teachers union, announced during citizens to be heard that the Florida Education Association, the statewide teachers union, had endorsed Democrat Charlie Crist for governor. At the school board meeting last month, there were a couple of controversial items discussed, including a new tobacco-free policy that would prohibit tobacco product on campus. The tobacco-free policy ultimately passed, with school board members Becky Cook, Jerry Evans and Ray Gray voting for it. But school board members Greg Thomas and Melisa Taylor voted against the policy, expressing concerns about unintended consequences. Thomas began his comments saying he deeply disliked tobacco but was concerned about a part of the policy that called for possible termination after a fth violation by an employee. Prior violations are to be dealt with by offering the employee help with tobacco cessation classes. It is an addictive drug, and a legal one at that, Thomas said, questioning whether dismissal might open the district up to lawsuits. Taylor agreed, saying she knows of an excellent teacher who smokes. One of the best teachers I know, if taken of the classroom beause of something that had nothing to do with her job performance I dont support that. Gray said he supported the policy, noting that Wakulla was one of only seven districts without it. Cook said she would be willing to discuss whatever changes might be needed to the policy, but we need somewhere to start, she said in voting for it. There was also a split vote at that same meeting over the districts cyberbullying policy, with Taylor casting a lone dissenting vote in that. Taylor rst commented that she didnt want students or employees to be bullied, but had heartburn over what is de ned as bullying. I worry, seriously, that it doesnt matter where the alleged bullying takes place, that it would amount to the schools stepping into peoples personal homes. Its become common for schools to punish online bullying by students that occurs in social media such as Facebook and Twitter because of its impact on school conduct.Beth ODonnell, longtime educator, will retire Special to The NewsSuperintendent Robert Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the endurance and dedication given to the children of Wakulla County and the loyalty displayed on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities Sally Watson serves. Watson, May Employee of the Month, has been an administrative secretary in the ESE and Student Service Department for more than a decade. Prior to that time she served as the secretary in the district Personnel Department. Watson came to the school district after years of secretarial experience with the Wakulla County Probation Department and the Florida Department of Labor. Watson said, There is never a dull moment working with the school district. Beyond being challenged, the job is ful lling as I am always learning something new. Most of all, I love working with my wonderful fellow employees. Watson and her husband moved to Wakulla County after researching the schools. Originally from Ravenna, Ohio where she graduated and attended vocational school, they relocated to be closer to her husbands family. She shares, Working for the Wakulla County School Board has been a blessing for me. Executive Director Tanya English notes, Sallys knowledge of program procedures spanning exceptional student education and student services makes her a vital part of the team, as does her heart for students. This sentiment is echoed by her co-workers, as she was selected by district staff to receive the Awesome Award last month. Participation in Special Olympic district events is another love of Sallys. She always lends a hand with score keeping and enjoys encouraging the students during their events. She has been an avid supporter of the Legacy Caf and assisted with the ordering of supplies securing a successfully launched set up. Sallys participation in education extends beyond the school district. She participates in classes as both a student and teacher in the arts of knitting, spinning and weaving. She and husband John spend many weekends at events across the south serving as interpreters of the 19th century life by demonstrating black-smith skills and textile talents. When not traveling and demonstrating and working for the school district, Watson is active at The Pioneer Baptist Church where she is presently serving as a Sunday school teacher. She is an organizing member of the Wakulla Pearls Fiber Club and a member of the Florida Blacksmith Association. Sally Watson is schools employee of the month Diving, other new courses offered in fallWAKULLA ENVIRONMENTAL INSTITUTESpecial to The NewsStudents interested in studying professional diving and environmental studies can sign up for courses through Wakulla Environmental Institute. New courses offered by the institute include Natural Resources Conservation and Management (3 credits), Environmental Sampling and Analysis I (3 credits), and Environmental Regulation and Compliance (3 credits). New programs include Environmental Science Technology, A.S., and Water Quality Technician Certi cate. The professional diving course also earns 3 credits. Prerequisite: Ability to swim. This is a multidisciplinary course to expose students to the environment (physiology and medicine), the living occupants that live within (biology), and the tools (technology) available to successfully work in this aquatic world. Students will become familiar with and dive surface-supplied air, open circuit air and Nitrox scuba and closed circuit re-breather. Class time is 1 to 6 p.m., Tuesdays. The instructor is Gregg Stanton. This class is held at FAMU. For more information, visit www.tcc. .edu and search for Wakulla Environmental Institute, call 9226290, or e-mail mackiek@tcc. .edu. By MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAAfter more than a decade of trying, students watched as lawmakers passed a bill granting in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants who have attended Florida secondary schools for at least three years. Gov. Rick Scott has promised to sign the measure. It took a lot of courage to do what they did, said House Speaker Will Weatherford, a Wesley Chapel Republican whose support powered the bill to passage. Theyre the face of what we were trying to articulate. Wearing orange mortarboards and brandishing their high-school diplomas, the students repeated their stories of hard work and good grades, their dreams of higher education colliding with the cost of out-of-state tuition. When HB 851 stalled in the Senate, they held a sit-in outside Senate President Don Gaetzs of ce, calling on him to allow a oor vote. He did. Lawmakers also passed a bill allowing Jose Godinez-Samperio, an undocumented immigrant with a law degree, to be admitted to The Florida Bar. Scott signed the measure on Monday.In-state tuition granted to some undocumented Florida students FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Sally Watson

PAGE 12

Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports By PAUL HOOVER WHS Track CoachThe 2014 track season is now in the books and there were many things that contributed to making this one of the most successful seasons yet at Wakulla High School. CORION KNIGHT, KEITH GAVIN DOMINATE HIGH JUMP High jumpers Corion Knight and Keith Gavin started the year ranked at the top of Class 2A and dominated the local high jump scene all season long. One or the other won every local competition they entered and had great performances in two of the states largest and most competitive meets of the year the FSU and Florida Relays. At FSU Knight tied Gavins school record of 6 and placed second, based on the number of misses. At the Florida Relays, Knight was third and Gavin fth. They then proceeded to place rst and second at the District, Region and, nally, the State Meet, with Knight capturing the State Title. Both also excelled in the long jump this year, culminating with Knight, the ying brick, placing seventh at the State Meet. The WHS team, of Knight and Gavin, placed sixth overall at the State Meet. Gavin is just a sophomore, so will return next year for another outstanding season. MADISON HARRIS RANKS IN 800M Senior Madison Harris continued her tremendous run in the 800 meters, ranking as high as fth in the nation at one point in the season. Included in her wins were victories at the FSU and Florida Relays, the Big Bend Championships and a fourth consecutive District title. She ended the season with runner-up nishes at the Regional and State Meets. She was also an integral part of the success of the girls 4x400 and 4x800 relay teams, both of whom quali ed for the Regional Meet and the 4x800 quali ed for the the State Meet for the second straight year. Harris ended up posting the second fastest 800 meter time of the year in the State. GIRLS 4x800 RELAY The girls 4x800 relays performance at the State Meet was another season highlight.The team, minus Harris, the teams fastest runner, still ran the second fastest relay time in school history, 9:59.75, placing seventh and earning the schools rst ever relay podium nish. The nal State team of consisted of Marty Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Haleigh Martin, Lydia Wiedeman and alternates Madison Harris and Connie Lewis. Other highlights of the season included the emergence of some young and talented track athletes. Freshman Adrianna Mitchell became the brightest spot among the sprint athletes, with outstanding season performances in all the sprint events and the long jump. At the Chiles Freshman/Sophomore Championship meet she won the 100, 200 and 400 meters, as well as the long jump. She also jumped over 17 feet in the long jump. Freshman Haleigh Martin became one of the teams best and most consistent middle distance runners, becoming the District Champion in the 1600 meters and an integral part of the 4x400 and 4x800 meter relay teams. At the State Meet, she ran an outstanding 2:22 leg on the 4x800 relay team. Kayla Webbe also won the District 3200 meters and Shelby Alsup placed fth in the shotput and Ashley Carr placed fth in the discus for outstanding performances. For the boys, freshman Bryce Cole became, argueably the best middle distance runner on the squad. His performances culminated in a District 1600 meter title, a third place nish in the 800 meters and a spot on the 4x800 meter relay team at Regionals. Albert Smythe, battling asthma problems all season long, still had an outstanding season and emerged, surprisingly, as a real factor in the 800 meters. Both Smythe and Cole, along with J.P. Piotrowski and Alan Pearson, comprised the 4x800 relay team that placed fth at the Regional Meet, missing qualifying for the State Meet by only 1 1/2 seconds. This year, graduation will signi cantly impact the team, with the loss of such outstanding athletes as Madison Harris, Corion Knight, Margaret Wiedeman and Kayla Webbe, but this season also saw the emergence of some additional top young and returning talent, that should help form a good base for next years team. In addition to those noted above, these include Mikala Gavin (sprints/long jump), Connie Lewis (middle distance), Lydia Wiedeman (800 meters), Sean Hill (400 & 800 meters) and middle distance runners Evan Guarino, Travis Parks, Riley Welch, Mitchell Atkinson and William Thomas and the boys 4x800 meter relay team that should return all of its members. 2014 will go down as one of the best years ever for the WHS track teams due to the hard work and dedication of a lot of athletes. They have set the bar for the teams to come and will serve as the standard by which subsequent teams will be judged. 2014 SCHOOL RECORDS Girls: 800 meters: Madison Harris 2:13.33 400 meters: Madison Harris 57.87 Indoor Mile: Haleigh Martin 6:08.52 Shotput: Shelby Alsup 30.5 Discus: Ashley Carr 92 4x400 relay: 4:13.15 (Lydia Wiedeman, Sarah Thigpen, Adrianna Mitchell, Madison Harris) 4x200 relay: 1:55.26 (Adrianna Mitchell, Dazaha Jackson, Mikala Gavin, Shanise Johnson) 4x1600 relay: 24:00.18 (Margaret Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Connie Lewis, Madison Harris) Boys: High Jump: Corion Knight & Keith Gavin tie school record with jumps of 6 Long Jump: Corion Knight 23.25 400 meters: Sean Hill :51.90 800 meters: Bryce Cole 2:03.47 Indoor Mile: Bryce Cole 5:02.22 110 meter hurdles: Patrick Harvey :16.91 4x800 relay: 8:30.47 (J.P. Piotrowski, Alan Pearson, Bryce Cole, Albert Smythe) End of Year Track Cookout ScheduledThe annual end-ofthe-year awards cookout will be held at Wakulla Springs on May 31, starting at noon. All track athletes should plan on attending and must bring their uniforms to turn in, if they havent already done so. The unifoms should be turned in to Coach Amos no later than May 21. Everyone should also check with their respective coach to nd out what they should bring. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles will be playing their annual Blue & Red game this Friday night at 7 p.m. on Reynolds Field at JD Jones Stadium. Both JV & Varsity will be participating. The boys have been working hard getting ready for their spring game vs. Trinity Catholic from Ocala on May 30, and are ready to show off this years War Eagles. The spring game will also be held here in Wakulla. The Blue & Red Game is also a big fundraiser for the gridiron club. The boys have been selling tickets for a fried chicken dinner beginning at 6 p.m. Tickets may be purchased in advance by contacting any player or grid iron member. A limited number of dinners may be available after all ticket holders have been served. The admission is $10 for the dinner and the game, or $3 admission to the game only. Come out and support your War Eagles.Jake Walker, a 2013 WHS graduate and standout pitcher in the War Eagle baseball program, nished his rst year of college with the same work ethic and determination he was known for at Wakulla High. The Daytona State pitcher completed his rst season with a 2.25 ERA in limited action. He also earned the title of Baseball Scholar Athlete of the Year at DSC with a 4.0 grade point average. He plans to return to Daytona in the fall and compete for a starting position in the weekly rotation. A past St. Marks Powder scholarship recipient, Jake plans to complete his studies at Daytona next year and then pursue a degree in business at a four-year university.FOOTBALL TRACK BASEBALLTRACKBlue & Red game is FridayA look back at a record-setting seasonWalker nishes year at DaytonaLinton excels at FSU track SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakullas 4x800 relay team nished seventh in the state and was Wakullas rst-ever relay podium nish. The team consisted of Marty Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Haleigh Martin, Lydia Wiedeman and alternates Madison Harris and Connie Lewis. Former top WHS runner Stanley Linton, a late addition to the FSU Track Team, is making his presence felt at the collegiate level. In the rst 5K track race of his college career he placed first at the Seminole Invitational on April 11, in a new PR (personal record) of 14:56.02. He followed that up with an outstanding debut 10,000 meter run at the Virginia Challenge Meet in Charlottesville, Va. on Saturday, May 10, placing fourth in another PR time of 30:41.60. Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Have something on your mind?Send it to William Snowden, Editoreditor@thewakullanews.net Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

PAGE 13

What a beautiful weekend we just had. Cool mornings, very little wind and not too hot in the afternoon. Next Monday will be Memorial Day and most folks will have a three-day weekend. Theres going to be a lot of boats on the water so be careful and watch out for other people. Im sure many of them dont know the rules of the water or what the green and red markers mean. The water temperature is up around 76 and still pretty dirty. The farther east you go the clearer it seems to get. Someone said around Keaton Beach its crystal clear. Scallop season is a little over a month away and with all the rain we have had I would really be surprised if there were any scallops around St. Marks. I do remember one year though that the water was awfully dirty but we still had scallops so lets keep our ngers crossed. Capt. Luke Frasier was back on the job at AMS and he was looking good. He said he hadnt been out shing in quite a while and, hopefully, Capt. David Fife and I will be able to get him on the water in the coming weeks. If the county gets the money from the state that it hopes to get, they will be putting in several kayak launch sites. Any more you see about as many kayaks on cars and trucks as you do boats being hauled down the road and the tournament they just had for the Wakulla seniors had 93 kayaks entered. They are relatively inexpensive, easy to haul and launch and it doesnt matter how low the tides are you can launch and get where normal boats cant get. If youre quiet the sh wont even know youre there. Capt. David Fife has been catching quite a few reds around the Oyster Bay area using live minnows. Dr. Jim ONeil from Tallahassee went Saturday and they had 10 nice trout and several reds. They were using live shrimp and shed east of Live Oak Island for the trout and mum was the word on the reds. Mark and Louise Prance from Shell Point shed Saturday and caught two nice reds three trout and four flounder. They were using pin sh and shiner tails. Mike Pearson from Tifton said they went east of St. Marks and caught quite a few trout using grubs and the Ewings from Shell Point shed the same area with live shrimp and caught sh until they ran out of bait. I took three high school buddies from the Atlanta area out on Sunday and they went home with six ounder, seven trout and three Spanish. I spent too much time looking for reds which again I couldnt nd. Thats what they wanted to catch but they just didnt bite for me. It was a beautiful day and we laughed a lot and reminisced about the good old days. We had a great time but it just went by too fast. The Warriors and Quiet Waters soldiers are here and I hope they catch a bunch of sh and have a great time in Wakulla County. Capt. David Fife and I took three of the rst warriors to come to Wakulla County and we had a great time fishing with those guys. Remember to know your limits. If you are on the water or on the road this weekend be careful. Good luck and good shing! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 15ABy MARJ LAWRecently, I wrote about chicken kick shooting. This is what I prefer, and a lot of other people do as well. Chicken kick refers to shooting a gun with less recoil to the action. So, OK, I like less recoil. Im a chicken when it comes to a gun that kicks a lot. Im not fond of kick at all. When you have little recoil, the gun does not jump in your hand as it will with more recoil. This is important if you ever have to get of another round rapidly. This way, your sight picture will stay in place from the rst to the second shot. When you are learning to shoot, its important to have little recoil. Recoil tends to make you inch. When you inch, your eyes squeeze shut and your hands holding the gun jerk. Naturally, you cant hit the target well with your eyes shut and your hands jerking the gun wide. Not only will you miss your target, youll set up a bad habit of flinching every time you shoot. You dont want to begin shooting with a bad habit. You want to begin with success! Back to the issue of recoil. Since you have your gun already, lets discuss how you can lessen recoil. In my umble opinion, certain guns have more kick, and also certain bullets have more kick. The first refers to the way the gun is made, how tight its springs are set, whether its high or low caliber and other considerations. When it comes to the bullets, you have choices that will affect recoil. Target loads and wadcutters have less powder in them, so they come out of the gun with less kick and less velocity. All wadcutters are target loads, but not all target loads are wadcutters. Confusing? Wadcutters are bullets that have at projectiles. The projectile part is even with the end of the casing. If you only saw the casing, youd think there was no bullet inside, but when you look, youll see theres a at something inside. Target loads, however, can be wadcutters, semi-wadcutters or round nose bullets. The round nose can be typically lead, but they can be clad in a shiny metal. Both wadcutters and target loads have a lower velocity than hunting or defensive loads. Wadcutters make fat, round, perfect holes in targets. They are easy to see when youre practicing. Semi-wadcutters have a rounded noses that are lopped-off and flat looking, so they appear to be normal bullets where someone chopped part of the tip off. A match grade bullet can be either a wadcutter, semi wadcutter or round-nose bullet, but it has an exacting and consistent amount of powder and weight which increases accuracy of shooting. Match grade rounds are target loads, and they are of high quality consistency because the weight of the bullet and the amount of powder is tightly controlled. Youll pay for the level of quality! One of my gal friends at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce range told me she was going to get rid of her .38 revolver because the kick hurt her hands. She tried a wadcutter and decided to keep the .38. Now, I wouldnt want to be politically incorrect or anything like that, but as a generalization, I think women like these wadcutters, semi-wadcutters and match grade bullets because they reduce the kick from shooting. Men, however, like them because they want the accuracy to beat the competition at matches; not because of the kick. Ahem.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.outdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Using wadcutter bullets result in less kickWater gets clearer the further east you head HOME ON THE RANGE From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL $1,49999SPECIAL OF THE WEEK 28 10HP REAR ENGINE RIDER From FWC NewsThe recreational red snapper season in Gulf state waters opens Saturday, May 24, and will remain open through July 14, a total of 52 days, closing July 15. This season was set at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) meeting in April. Opening the season the Saturday before Memorial Day will provide recreational red snapper fishing opportunities through an important holiday weekend, helping attract more visitors and bringing economic bene ts to our coastal communities. The federal season will be 9 days, starting June 1 and remaining open through June 9, closing June 10. Florida state waters in the Gulf are from shore to 9 nautical miles. Federal waters extend from where state waters end, out to about 200 nautical miles. The daily bag limit for red snapper will remain 2 per person in Gulf state and federal waters. The minimum size limit is 16 inches total length. There is a zero daily bag and possession limit for captain and crew of for-hire vessels. Recreational anglers targeting reef sh such as red snapper in Gulf state and federal waters are required to use dehooking devices and non-offset, non-stainless steel circle hooks when shing with natural bait. These devices are designed to help increase the likelihood a sh will survive if it is released. Venting tools are no longer required when targeting reef sh. This requirement was removed to allow shermen the freedom to use the methods or tools of their choosing when releasing reef sh. To learn more about recreational red snapper shing in the Gulf of Mexico, visit MyFWC. com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Snapper. Gulf red snapper season opens May 24 in state waters

PAGE 14

Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com The following article is a press release provided by the National Safe Boating Council: Boating safety advocates remind boaters to Wear It! during National Safe Boating Week, May 17-23 Life jacket wear is an effective and simple lifesaving strategy for safe recreational boating Boating safety advocates across the U.S. and Canada are teaming up to promote safe and responsible boating, including consistent life jacket wear each and every time boaters are on the water, during National Safe Boating Week, held from May 17-23, 2014. National Safe Boating Week is the official launch of the 2014 North American Safe Boating Campaign. This yearlong campaign promotes safe and responsible boating and the value of voluntary life jacket wear by recreational boaters through the national theme, Wear It! Every day I hear about the grim consequences of not wearing a life jacket while boating, said Rachel Johnson, executive director of the National Safe Boating Council, the lead organization for the Wear It! campaign. You can still have fun on the water while choosing to always wear a life jacket and boating responsibly. U.S. Coast Guard statistics show that drowning was the reported cause of death in almost three-fourths of recreational boating fatalities in 2012, and that 85 percent of those who drowned were not wearing life jackets. Thats why boating safety advocates continue to push for increased and consistent life jacket wear on the water. Accidents on the water happen much too fast to reach and put on a stowed life jacket, said John Johnson, chief executive of cer of the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators. Its important that everyone consistently wears a life jacket while on the water and always boats responsibly. Todays life jackets are comfortable, stylish and easy to wear. In fact, they dont even have to be jackets anymore. Old-fashioned, bulky orange life jackets have been replaced with innovative options, such as in atable life jackets, allowing mobility and exibility for activities like boating, fishing, paddling or hunting, and are much cooler in the warmer weather. This year during National Safe Boating Week and throughout the year, the campaign will highlight stories of real boaters whose lives were saved by wearing a life jacket. In addition, the campaign will remind boaters of the importance of boating safely, including consistent life jacket wear, boating sober, knowing navigational rules and having a proper lookout. The North American Safe Boating Campaign unites the efforts of a wide variety of boating safety advocates, including the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators, Canadian Safe Boating Council and many members of the National Safe Boating Council. The campaign is produced under a grant from the Sports Fish Restoration and Boating Trust Fund, administered by the U.S. Coast Guard. Partners hold local events, teach classes, offer on-water training, distribute educational materials and perform free vessel safety checks, among other activities. Be sure to follow the campaign on Twitter at twitter.com/boatingcampaign and like us at facebook.com/SafeBoatCampaign. Share your boating story at SafeBoatingCampaign. com. The National Safe Boating Council (NSBC) is the foremost coalition for the advancement and promotion of safer boating through education, outreach and training. The NSBC accomplishes this mission by promoting outreach and research initiatives that support boating education and safety awareness; improving the professional development of boating safety educators through training; and developing and recognizing outstanding boating safety programs. Visit SafeBoatingCampaign.com for campaign materials and additional safe boating resources. We will be holding a Free Vessel Examination Ramp Day Saturday, May 24, at the fort in St. Marks. If you are not able to attend, our members are available to assist area boaters with complimentary Vessel Examinations, and scheduling Boat Safety Courses. Contact our staff ofcer for vessel exams at fso-ve@uscaux.net and our public education of cer at fso-pe@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says Safe boating is no accident. Wear it!!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD The spear shing tournament. Divers have a long tradition harvesting sh and other marine life for food and sport. Breath-hold diving (snorkeling) began the sport centuries ago. All marine collections in the Bahamas is currently limited to breath-hold diving. In Florida, limitations are placed on scuba diving collections underwater, principally forbidding the spearing of selected species such as spiny lobsters and a few recreational sh species, and the use of rebreathers to spear sh within state waters (in the Gulf out 9 miles). Everyone (line and spear shing) must follow the established shing rules for Florida (out 9 miles) and Federal waters beyond 9 miles out in the Gulf. The unfortunate truth about line shing is that every sh brought to the surface can be injured during the ascent. Many, if not most, never make it back to the bottom alive, making catch and release practices somewhat limited. Undersized catches that must be released become prey to other predators attracted to the boat. Spear shing, as opposed to hook-and-line shing, is far more selective. The spear sherman selects the sh of choice and takes his prey, leaving undersized sh to grow up. They do learn about spear shermen and thus become more dif cult to catch when they do reach legal sizes. There is a bit of a con ict between the two groups, but they usually each respect the others rights to a shing site. Line shing is often accompanied by chumming the waters with bait. Sharks are attracted to the blood at places shared with divers, like K Tower, making diving less desirable. Many divers linesh rst to nd sh before expending the energy to get into the water. Many non-divers sh using lines while divers hunt for the big boys below. To my knowledge, we just held the rst Wakulla County based spear shing tournament, at least in recent history. Dive shops in Tallahassee have sponsored tournaments in the past. Folks asked us to step in and sponsor a local tournament when another shop went out of business. We have no experience doing a tournament, but Travis Kersting took it on anyway. The theme was an aggregate tournament with an effort to learn more about the Lion sh off our coastline. Any three of the largest sh were weighed in at one time, of course the largest sh, and the most/largest Lion sh. We then asked everyone to donate sh to the sh fry, including the Lion sh they were delicious! The largest sh was a Cubberra Snapper at 89 pounds! The largest Lion sh was over a foot. The weather cooperated! The seas were a bit rougher than expected but, by all accounts, everyone did a great job and had a great time. We had 30 registrations with 90 folks (lots of kids) attending the sh fry after the check in on last Saturday. We set up over $5,000 in prizes, spent the evening with an abundance of music and sh stories. I was asked to make this an annual event, with volunteers to help guide the next one. Yes, we learned a lot! Next year there will be fun things for the kids to do (not just eat fresh sh), better advertising, live music, more tents and more tables. Thank you to all the volunteers this year. Hey, we had to start somewhere!Red tide detected in south Florida Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 12:47 AM 3.2 ft. 1:41 AM 3.3 ft. 2:27 AM 3.3 ft. 3:08 AM High 0.7 ft. 3:04 AM 1.0 ft. 4:11 AM 1.2 ft. 5:14 AM 1.3 ft. 6:09 AM 1.4 ft. 6:56 AM 1.4 ft. 7:38 AM 1.4 ft. 8:16 AM Low 3.2 ft. 9:44 AM 3.3 ft. 10:45 AM 3.5 ft. 11:38 AM 3.7 ft. 12:24 PM 3.9 ft. 1:05 PM 3.9 ft. 1:42 PM 4.0 ft. 2:17 PM High 1.3 ft. 3:58 PM 0.9 ft. 5:23 PM 0.4 ft. 6:28 PM 0.1 ft. 7:20 PM -0.2 ft. 8:06 PM -0.3 ft. 8:47 PM -0.4 ft. 9:25 PM Low 2.8 ft. 10:06 PM 2.9 ft. 11:39 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.3 ft. 12:39 AM 2.4 ft. 1:33 AM 2.4 ft. 2:19 AM 2.5 ft. 3:00 AM High 0.5 ft. 3:15 AM 0.7 ft. 4:22 AM 0.9 ft. 5:25 AM 0.9 ft. 6:20 AM 1.0 ft. 7:07 AM 1.0 ft. 7:49 AM 1.0 ft. 8:27 AM Low 2.4 ft. 9:36 AM 2.5 ft. 10:37 AM 2.6 ft. 11:30 AM 2.8 ft. 12:16 PM 2.9 ft. 12:57 PM 3.0 ft. 1:34 PM 3.0 ft. 2:09 PM High 0.9 ft. 4:09 PM 0.6 ft. 5:34 PM 0.3 ft. 6:39 PM 0.0 ft. 7:31 PM -0.1 ft. 8:17 PM -0.3 ft. 8:58 PM -0.3 ft. 9:36 PM Low 2.1 ft. 9:58 PM 2.1 ft. 11:31 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:15 AM 2.8 ft. 1:23 AM 2.9 ft. 2:17 AM 3.0 ft. 3:03 AM 3.1 ft. 3:44 AM High 0.6 ft. 4:08 AM 0.9 ft. 5:15 AM 1.1 ft. 6:18 AM 1.2 ft. 7:13 AM 1.2 ft. 8:00 AM 1.3 ft. 8:42 AM 1.3 ft. 9:20 AM Low 2.9 ft. 10:20 AM 3.1 ft. 11:21 AM 3.3 ft. 12:14 PM 3.4 ft. 1:00 PM 3.6 ft. 1:41 PM 3.7 ft. 2:18 PM 3.7 ft. 2:53 PM High 1.2 ft. 5:02 PM 0.8 ft. 6:27 PM 0.4 ft. 7:32 PM 0.1 ft. 8:24 PM -0.2 ft. 9:10 PM -0.3 ft. 9:51 PM -0.3 ft. 10:29 PM Low 2.6 ft. 10:42 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.3 ft. 12:31 AM 2.5 ft. 1:25 AM 2.5 ft. 2:11 AM 2.6 ft. 2:52 AM High 0.7 ft. 2:43 AM 1.0 ft. 3:50 AM 1.2 ft. 4:53 AM 1.3 ft. 5:48 AM 1.3 ft. 6:35 AM 1.4 ft. 7:17 AM 1.4 ft. 7:55 AM Low 2.5 ft. 9:28 AM 2.6 ft. 10:29 AM 2.7 ft. 11:22 AM 2.9 ft. 12:08 PM 3.0 ft. 12:49 PM 3.1 ft. 1:26 PM 3.1 ft. 2:01 PM High 1.3 ft. 3:37 PM 0.9 ft. 5:02 PM 0.4 ft. 6:07 PM 0.1 ft. 6:59 PM -0.2 ft. 7:45 PM -0.3 ft. 8:26 PM -0.4 ft. 9:04 PM Low 2.2 ft. 9:50 PM 2.2 ft. 11:23 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed May 28, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 12:44 AM 3.2 ft. 1:38 AM 3.3 ft. 2:24 AM 3.4 ft. 3:05 AM High 0.8 ft. 3:01 AM 1.1 ft. 4:08 AM 1.3 ft. 5:11 AM 1.4 ft. 6:06 AM 1.5 ft. 6:53 AM 1.5 ft. 7:35 AM 1.5 ft. 8:13 AM Low 3.2 ft. 9:41 AM 3.4 ft. 10:42 AM 3.6 ft. 11:35 AM 3.8 ft. 12:21 PM 3.9 ft. 1:02 PM 4.0 ft. 1:39 PM 4.1 ft. 2:14 PM High 1.4 ft. 3:55 PM 0.9 ft. 5:20 PM 0.5 ft. 6:25 PM 0.1 ft. 7:17 PM -0.2 ft. 8:03 PM -0.4 ft. 8:44 PM -0.4 ft. 9:22 PM Low 2.8 ft. 10:03 PM 2.9 ft. 11:36 PM High Thu May 22, 14 Fri May 23, 14 Sat May 24, 14 Sun May 25, 14 Mon May 26, 14 Tue May 27, 14 Wed Ma y 28, 14 Date 2.1 ft. 1:30 AM 2.3 ft. 2:40 AM 2.4 ft. 3:35 AM 2.5 ft. 4:20 AM High 0.5 ft. 2:39 AM 0.8 ft. 3:38 AM 1.1 ft. 4:34 AM 1.3 ft. 5:26 AM 1.5 ft. 6:13 AM 1.6 ft. 6:55 AM 1.7 ft. 7:34 AM Low 2.5 ft. 9:59 AM 2.6 ft. 10:32 AM 2.6 ft. 11:03 AM 2.7 ft. 11:33 AM 2.8 ft. 12:03 PM 2.8 ft. 12:34 PM 2.9 ft. 1:07 PM High 0.9 ft. 3:57 PM 0.6 ft. 5:03 PM 0.2 ft. 5:59 PM -0.0 ft. 6:48 PM -0.2 ft. 7:33 PM -0.3 ft. 8:14 PM -0.3 ft. 8:52 PM Low 2.0 ft. 9:56 PM 2.0 ft. 11:54 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 22 May 28First June 5 Full June 13 Last June 19 New May 288:33 am-10:33 am 8:58 pm-10:58 pm 2:29 am-3:29 am 2:40 pm-3:40 pm 9:23 am-11:23 am 9:48 pm-11:48 pm 3:09 am-4:09 am 3:41 pm-4:41 pm 10:13 am-12:13 pm 10:38 pm-12:38 am 3:48 am-4:48 am 4:41 pm-5:41 pm 11:03 am-1:03 pm 11:28 pm-1:28 am 4:27 am-5:27 am 5:41 pm-6:41 pm 11:53 am-1:53 pm --:-----:-5:08 am-6:08 am 6:40 pm-7:40 pm 12:18 am-2:18 am 12:44 pm-2:44 pm 5:51 am-6:51 am 7:37 pm-8:37 pm 1:09 am-3:09 am 1:35 pm-3:35 pm 6:37 am-7:37 am 8:32 pm-9:32 pm Average Average Average Average Better Better Best6:39 am 8:28 pm 2:31 am 2:41 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:39 am 8:28 pm 3:10 am 3:42 pm 6:38 am 8:29 pm 3:49 am 4:43 pm 6:38 am 8:30 pm 4:28 am 5:42 pm 6:38 am 8:30 pm 5:09 am 6:41 pm 6:37 am 8:31 pm 5:52 am 7:38 pm 6:37 am 8:31 pm 6:38 am 8:33 pm45% 38% 30% 23% 17% 10% 3%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Biggest Fish: 1stRichard Todd Langford 2ndMatt Paarlberg 3rdMurray Baker Aggregate: 1stDamon Jasper 2ndTodd Thompson 3rdJeemiah Slaymaker Lion sh: 1stBrian Bond 2ndJosh Reynolds 3rdDesmond KieserFrom FWC NewsKarenia brevis, the Florida red tide organism, was detected in background concentrations in four water samples collected this week alongshore and inshore of Pinellas, Hillsborough, and Sarasota counties. Additional samples collected throughout Florida this week did not contain K. brevis. Tables and maps of sample results are available on our Web site: (http://myfwc.com/research/redtide/events/ status/statewide/). The website also provides links to additional information related to the topic of Florida red tide including satellite imagery, experimental red tide forecasts, shellsh harvesting areas, the FWC Fish Kill Hotline, the Florida Poison Information Center (to report human health effects related to exposure to red tide), and other wildlife related hotlines: (http:// myfwc.com/research/ redtide/events/status/ contact/). To learn more about various organisms that have been known to cause algal blooms in Florida waters, see our flickr page at (http:// www.flickr.com/photos/myfwc) and click on Harmful Algal Bloom Species. The FWRI HAB group in conjunction with Mote Marine Laboratory now have a facebook page. Please come like our page and learn interesting facts concerning red tide and other harmful algal blooms in Florida at http://facebook.com/ FLHABs Information, including maps and reports with additional details, is available on our website, (http://myfwc.com/research/redtide/events/ status/statewide/).

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 17A By Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.netThe Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea celebrated its 50th birthday and fth annual Sharks and Chablis bene t on May 18. Cypress Rudloe, executive director of the lab, said the event continues to grow every year. About 300 attendees strolled the grounds, sipped beverages, enjoyed live music, checked out wildlife displays, and perused the labs numerous exhibits featuring sea turtles, fiddler crabs, nurse sharks, starfish and much more. The smell of blooming honeysuckle permeated the air. Were very happy with the turnout, Cypress said. Overall everyone seemed to have a good time. Funds raised through the bene t will help build a new tank for a goliath grouper. Cypress said an 8,000-gallon tank and construction of a surrounding deck will cost approximately $15,000 by time the project is done. The Seineyard Seafood Restaurant donated food and labor for the event. Guests seemed to enjoy the fried sh and shrimp, with sides of cheese grits, fresh coleslaw and hush puppies. Cypress said the 300 guests were served quickly and ef ciently. True to the events name, participants enjoyed a selection of wines and beers to suit every taste. Jack Rudloe, the labs founder, said the response from the community to support the efforts of the marine lab is heartwarming. Rudloe said he was just a kid when he and Colin Phipps started the operation in 1964. Rudloe said imparting a message about conservation and environmental protection to children, which is the labs mission, will be the key to undoing harm caused by policies that hurt the environment. We want to wake up and say, That was just a bad dream, Rudloe said. And build an economy based around the wonderful things that we have the shing, the bird watching. We have to move beyond the idea that we have to ll in and destroy land. Sharks and Chablis says that we as a society are ready to move beyond the old type of thinking that has been so destructive and blinding. Rudloe said volunteers, interns, and an association with the Florida State University biology department move the GSMLs mission forward. FSU biological sciences professor Janie Wulff, PhD, said the partnership with the lab is an incredible asset to the university. What an over-the-top astounding resource this is, Wulff said. Wulff said as an invertebrate zoology professor at Yale, students looked forward to specimen shipments from the mythical place, Panacea. I never imagined I would be able to drive to Gulf Specimen, Wulff said. Jack and his people have very generously allowed me to root about in the tanks and carry things back with me for my courses. The name the goliath grouper campaign is ongoing, with a name being chosen on July 4. Cypress said people can still suggest names through the Facebook page, and donate $3 for a name. & Sharks Sharks Chablis Chablis5th annual 5th annualPHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAMore photos online at thewakullanews.com

PAGE 16

Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Monday, May 12, Riversprings Middle School Principal Michele Baggett reported a student selling marijuana on school grounds. A small amount of marijuana was recovered from a male student who purchased the marijuana from another student. The $5 used to purchase the pot was seized from one of the juveniles and a small amount of marijuana was seized from the other student. The two students will receive discipline from the school system and they will also receive juvenile civil citations for possession of 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Nick Boutwell investigated. In other activity reported this week by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce: THURSDAY, MAY 8 Melissa Paul of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of $56 from inside the unsecured vehicle. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Melissa Brown of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim was in the process of moving from the residence when she observed some of her property along the side of the road. Several other items were in the back yard burning. Damaged property was valued at an estimated $800. Damage was also done to vehicle tires and the vehicles paint job. The criminal mischief damage was estimated at $3,000. Suspects have been identied. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Anthony Lariscy of Panacea reported a theft at Coastal Corner in Ochlockonee Bay. A suspect came into the store and stole beer without paying for it. The beer is valued at $16 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Three females were observed leaving the store without paying for merchandise. The total value of the unpaid merchandise was $84. Allison Freeman, 19, of Crawfordville, Nancy Sharlie Grantham, 22, of Tallahassee and Samantha Dawna Grantham, 23, of Tallahassee were all charged with retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Susan Lorraine Potwin, 55, of Crawfordville was involved in a scooter accident on U.S. Highway 319 near Carraway Cutoff. Potwin did not have a valid driver license. Potwin was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge. Potwin was also issued a citation for possession of an open container. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks and Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. FRIDAY, MAY 9 Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. John David Corathers, 27, of Crawfordville left the store without paying for $132 worth of merchandise including a video game controller, baby diapers, shoes, peanut butter, baby formula, childrens bowls and childrens clothing. Deputy Stephen Simmons observed the suspect on Allen Harvey Road. The stolen items were returned to the store and the suspect was given a notice to appear in court for retail theft. He was also issued a criminal citation for driving while his license was suspended or revoked second or subsequent conviction. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Holly Harrell of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized $85 charge on her bank account. Deputy Ross Hasty and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Marvin Libby of Titanium Motors in Crawfordville reported a grand theft of auto parts. The victim purchased a vehicle for parts from a suspect. It was determined after the sale that the vehicle was stolen from Samuel Logan of Ochlockonee Bay. A suspect has been identi ed. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. SATURDAY, MAY 10 David Williams of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported $1,220 worth of property being stolen including electronic games, a DVD player, movies, childrens toys, shoes and toys. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Amanda Rhodes of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The contents of the victims purse were stolen. The stolen property is valued at $205. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Betty Willis of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim determined that many of the missing items were not of any value. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. James Moore of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone went through the victims truck and stole his wallet. The vehicle was left unsecured and a bank card was taken with the wallet. The stolen property was valued at $15. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Charles Heether of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A gym bag and two custom made knives were stolen from the unsecured vehicle. The property is valued at $610. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. John Newell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A rearm was stolen from a vehicle. It is valued at $250. A second vehicle burglary resulted in the theft of business cards which were recovered. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Sarah Grindle Rollins of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Two vehicles on the victims property were entered but nothing was reported missing. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Catherine Criswell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left her purse in the vehicle and her wallet was stolen. The wallet and contents were valued at $310. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Michelle McKenzie of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. Someone entered the victims vehicle and stole an iPod cord and U.S. currency valued at $20. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Monica Pitts of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A purse was stolen from the inside of her unsecured vehicle. It is valued at $15. A search of the area discovered the purse and contents thrown into a wooded area. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Sgt. Ryan Muse conducted a traf c stop due to an expired sticker on the vehicle tag. Jonathan Flinkman, 46, of Crawfordville did not possess a valid driver license. Flinkman was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked habitual offender. He also had an outstanding warrant for unpaid nancial obligations. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Steve Stange of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone stole cordless headphones and U.S. currency valued at $106. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ross Hasty and Detective Cole Wells investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Store staff observed Kris Bellamy Holt, 35, of Marietta, Ga. fail to scan some items in the self checkout line and attempt to leave the store. The value of the stolen items was $161 and included food and kitchen items. Holt was issued a notice to appear in court for petit theft and also given a trespass warning. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. A citizen came into the Medart Kangaroo and turned in a wallet that was found on U.S. Highway 98. The property was owned by Emily Oliver of Cairo, Ga. The value of the wallet and contents was $189. Detectives are still working to contact the owner. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. SUNDAY, MAY 11 Florida Highway Patrol Trooper John Tallman arrested Alice Marie Causseaux, 34, of Tallahassee for DUI, driving while license suspended or revoked, possession of drug paraphernalia and providing a false name to law enforcement. Deputy Stephen Simmons reportedly observed Causseauxs vehicle leave the roadway multiple times and the driver was unable to maintain a single lane in a safe manner. The suspect allegedly gave Trooper Tallman a false name. Causseaux also had an active contempt of court writ for nancial obligations out of Wakulla. During the search of the vehicle drug paraphernalia and marijuana shake was discovered. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough also investigated. William Roddenberry of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief. Two suspects, who have been identi ed, vandalized a residence he owns. Extensive damage was observed throughout the home and the value of the damage was estimated at $20,000. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Amber Michele Paulette, 26, of Crawfordville was arrested for counterfeiting of license plates, attached tag not assigned, driving while license is suspended or revoked second or subsequent conviction, possession of a controlled substance, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Ross Hasty were on patrol on Crawfordville Highway when they observed a vehicle without a tag. Paulette stopped at a fast food restaurant and the deputies conducted their investigation. They determined that the suspect had a suspended license. A strong odor of marijuana was emitting from the vehicle and the suspect. A marijuana pipe was recovered inside the vehicle along with a bag of marijuana. The suspect also admitted to the vehicle tag being a fake. During the search of the vehicle white powder was found in a capsule that tested positive for amphetamines. The marijuana weighed 2.5 grams. Sgt. Ryan Muse also investigated. Orlando Hero of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from the Crawfordville Shell Station. The bike is valued at $200 and was used to go to work. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. MONDAY, MAY 12 Thomas C. Revell of Crawfordville reported a business burglary at the Panacea Area Water System. A golf cart was stolen from the water systems fenced-in water tower in Ochlockonee Bay. The fencing was cut and the cart, valued at $5,000, was missing. Damage to the fence was estimated at $100. The golf cart was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Tiffany Ann Hudson, 25, of Crawfordville was arrested for trespass after warning at Wal-Mart. The subject was observed by Wal-Mart staff at the customer service desk attempting to obtain a refund for products without a receipt. Store staff had knowledge of the active trespass warning and contacted Deputy Anthony Paul. Deputy Gibby Gibson also investigated. Rebecca Humphries of Carrabelle reported the theft of her purse from Winn-Dixie. The victim left her purse in a cart in the parking lot. A white four door sedan was observed with a subject getting out of the vehicle and taking the purse from the cart before leaving the scene. The purse was later recovered in a bush at Walgreens. Prescription medications and cash, valued at $623, were stolen. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. TUESDAY, MAY 13 Joanna Johnson of Tallahassee reported discovering a marijuana plant at her Crawfordville of ce. The immature plant was found in a ower bed and was seized for destruction. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Timothy Peterson of Crawfordville reported the theft of prescription medications. The medications were removed from the victims backpack while he was at work. The medications are valued at $30. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Rebecca Conrad of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered two unauthorized credit card accounts that were opened. The investigation was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Matt Hedges investigated. A clerk at Mashes Sands BP in Ochlockonee Bay reported a retail theft. Mark L. Dunsmore, 26, of Crawfordville was observed drinking a bottle of milk and hiding the empty bottle. Deputy Vicki Mitchell attempted to issue a notice to appear in court but when Dunsmore failed to give an exact address he was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The milk was valued at $1.99. WEDNESDAY, MAY 14 Cesar Plata of Murphy Oil Company in Crawfordville reported the theft of gasoline. A male driver pumped $20 worth of gas and left without paying for the fuel. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Lanette Gibson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a trailer tag. The tag is valued at $40 and it was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Animal Control Officer Mark Carter investigated an animal complaint involving two abused dogs. The first dog was suffering from malnutrition and had been ghting with a kennel mate. A second dog was discovered in a cage with no food or water. The animals were taken to a veterinarian for treatment and the case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. A suspect has been identied. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Germaine Lee of Norfolk, Va. reported leaving her wallet at a peanut stand on U.S. Highway 98. Sgt. Ryan Muse asked Deputy Ross Hasty to check all the peanut stands on Coastal Highway east of Medart. Deputy Hasty spoke to John Robinson of Crawfordville who recovered the victims wallet. The wallet was held for family members to retrieve at the WCSO. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,134 calls for service during the past week including 18 vehicle burglaries; 100 citizen contacts; 12 disturbances; 24 E-911 calls; 64 investigations; 41 medical emergencies; 129 traf c stops; 14 reckless vehicles; and 21 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 www.coastalgems.com33 Years of Experience!850566-9293 Est. 2000Carol Ann Williams, Licensed Real Estate Broker/Owner 33 Years Experience Dawn ReedRealtor, GRI 850-294-3468 ofce 745-8046 www.FloridaBigBendRealty.com Joi HopeBroker 850-210-7300211 Beaty Taff Rd. $299,9003/2 home on canal with a dock so easy access to the Gulf Call us today for more information! Florida Big B end Realty14 Medallion Lane Crawfordville FL 32327 (next to Gulf Coast Lumber)DawnJReed@yahoo.com Joi@JoisHouses.comFull Service Real Estate Company including Property Management Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991

PAGE 17

By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netDozens of Wakulla County citizens attended an open house hosted by the Florida Department of Transportation regarding road realignment and improvements on May 15. Display panels were erected at the fellowship hall of Medart Assembly of God, showing maps and plans to realign the intersection of U.S. Highway 319 and U.S. 98 and continuing to north of Alaska Way. Attendees were be able to preview maps and documents, ask questions of DOT employees, and provide comments concerning the project. Ian Satter, DOTs public information director, said he is always glad when a large number of people turn out at meetings and information sessions. Public comment is important, Satter said. This is going to affect people who live here, so we want their opinion. A stack of public comment cards accumulated in a basket at the event. Satter said the cards are scanned, read, and become part of the data packet for the project. He said 90 percent of the planning process is complete, and 100 percent of the plans are due in July. The public input meeting was a requirement to reach 100 percent of provided plans. There will be no more public information meetings scheduled before construction begins. Satter said the old section of Crawfordville Highway will remain in place, and will intersect with the new alignment. Drivers will not be able to make a left turn from Highway 98 going north on the old roadway. It will be a while before construction on the intersection will begin, with right of way acquisition on the intersection not scheduled until 2016. Luis Serna, Director of Wakulla County Planning and Development, said there have been problems with the intersection in the past. A lot of high school students drive across the road or park at the convenience store where its not safe to walk across, Serna said. There has been concern for quite some time on that. The intersection is also intended to make it easier and safer for traf c to turn left from Crawfordville Highway, onto Highway 98, since a traf c light will be installed. Mike Morgan, owner of Mikes Paint and Body shop, was concerned that the intersection alignment would affect his business. Maps showed the right-of-way, depicted with a red line, running right through the middle of his shop. Morgan said he was frustrated that he was not informed of the plans ahead of time. Others at the event voiced concerns that the intersection would slow traf c and increase congestion in front of the high school. Another aspect of the controversy is political, in that Jerry Moore, a county commissioner running for reelection, sold property to DOT at the proposed intersection. His political opponents are seeking to use the sale against him. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 19ABy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netAndrew Michael Wilson and his attorneys admitted in a pre-trial hearing last week that he is responsible for a double-murder in 2011, but without conceding that it was rst degree murder. At a pre-trial hearing on Thursday, May 15, Wilsons defense attorney, Steve Allan Been, told the court: We want you to be aware the defense is not going to dispute, and will af rmatively be conceding that he is the person who committed these violent acts... We will be conceding that he is guilty of some form of murder. Assistant State Attorney Eddie Evans, a prosecutor in the case, said the admission raised some questions in his mind, such as if the murders were committed during the commission of a felony, then the crime is rst-degree felony murder. One of the charges Wilson faces is burglary of occupied dwelling while armed, which is a felony. Wakulla Circuit Judge Charles Dodson, who will preside over the trial, said at the hearing that he understood the defense strategy: The defense will require the state to prove the evidence that Wilson committed the murders without necessarily contesting the evidence, but not conceding or stipulating to it. It appears the defense will be focused on the penalty phase of the trial, when the state presents its case on why jurors should recommend the court impose the death penalty, and the defense presents its case on mitigating factors for why the defendant should not be sentenced to death. It would be up to Judge Dodson to sentence Wilson, though he is supposed to give great weight to the jurys recommendation. Wilson, now 27, faces two counts of rst-degree murder for killing John McKenzie, 62, and Patrick Pittman, 24, in a home in Wakulla Station on March 30, 2011. Wilson is also charged with the attempted murder his former girlfriend, Gabrielle McKenzie, who was 19 at the time of the attack, now 22. John McKenzie was Gabrielle McKenzies father, and Pittman was her boyfriend. According to reports at the time, Gabrielle McKenzie and her 1-year-old son by Wilson were staying at her fathers house. She already had a domestic violence injunction against Wilson, who allegedly broke into the house during the night and attacked the family. Pittman reportedly called 911 to summon help before he died. Gabrielle McKenzies neck was slashed and she had been stabbed, but the deputy responding to the scene was able to stablize her. She reportedly spoke Wilsons name as the person who attacked her. McKenzie attended the hearing with a victim advocate, but had no public comment. The trial is scheduled to get underway beginning with jury selection on June 16. Twelve jurors and two alternates will be selected from a pool of 200 potential jurors. Presuming Wilson is found guilty of rst-degree murder, the penalty phase would get underway starting June 23. Wilson was wearing chains and an orange prison jumpsuit at the hearing. After the murders were discovered, an alert went out to law enforcement agencies to be on the lookout for Wilson, who was located in south Georgia after he crashed his truck in a deputys yard. He was later extradited back to Florida to face the murder charges.Andrew Wilson, facing death penalty for double murder, admits to killing at pre-trial hearingFrom Front PageWe need to widen 319 and improve mobility and traffic congestion, especially here through Crawfordville, Williams said. She said that the widening might impact churches and businesses, which is why public feedback is so important. We need to know what the town wants, Williams said. The wildcard here is public input. Traf c engineering and environmental analysis is ongoing. Final conceptual plans will be ready later this fall, based on the input that comes out of the public hearing. Commissioner Ralph Thomas and Commissioner Chair Richard Harden both said public input is crucial to the widening project. Its impossible to do something like this without impacting someone, Thomas said. Someone is going to be displaced. Kessler acknowledged that Williams is not the project manager for the intersection realignment (also known as Segment 1, under project management of Sandra Lamb), and asked to see the traffic safety studies, because he has yet to review them. Williams said Lamb is working through public response from the open house regarding road realignment and improvements on May 15, to return a response to the board. I dont think the department was anticipating that kind of pushback, Williams said. Commissioner Jerry Moore said the intersection realignment is pretty much a done deal. It was studied by the DOT, in multiple fashions, with professionals doing that with credibility in what they do, Moore said. Thats what they have chosen with all the criteria they could nd. They already made that decision for you. In other matters: Keith Lawhon of the Wakulla County Health Department announced the official start of mosquito control season. Lawhon said citizens can request mosquito spray or larvicide at 926-0410 or visit www.wakullahealthdept.com. Citizens who wish not to be sprayed may also submit a request. Sprays are limited to two per residence, unless the need for an increase is verified. Lawhon said many factors determine spray times, conditions must be right, so it is not possible to schedule spray times. Susan Willis presented a proclamation to name May 2014 as Mental Illness Awareness Month. She said one in four adults live with mental illness, and less than half receive treatment. She hoped to raise awareness about the availability of local mental health services, like NAMI Wakulla. County Administrator David Edwards asked for board confirmation to appoint Cody Solburg as director of parks and facilities. The board approved the appointment. Edwards said Solburg will be a great asset to the county. Moore said he will make a future agenda item, possibly in the next budget year, to ask the board to waive building fees for the construction of Heritage Village an undertaking of the Wakulla County Historical Society. Moore said he will assess of the fees. He said Heritage Village will be a 10-to-1 return on the investment for the interest it will generate.Light requested at WHS MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Andrew Wilson Dozens turn out for workshop on 319 realignment Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners wants to remind citizens that the FY 2013/14 Solid Waste and Fire Hardship Applications are due by June 1. The Hardship Assistance Program assists residential property owners who meet the eligibility criteria, with the nancial burden imposed by the Solid Waste and Fire Services Assessments. In order to qualify for assistance, the applicant must complete an application and le with the County Administrators Of ce by June 1. Its important to note that citizens must apply for this assistance on an annual basis. To learn more about the eligibility criteria for the Hardship Assistance Application and to obtain the application, please visit the County website (www.mywakulla. com) or contact Patty Taylor at (850) 9260919 ext. 701.Deadline nears for application for solid waste, re hardship

PAGE 18

There is a long running joke which identi es the mosquito as the State Bird of Florida. No doubt this attempt at humor was conceived by some competing states tourist development agency which desired to distract potential visitors from their own shortcomings, like snow 10 months of the year. It is possible this is the same group of conspirators who initiated the rumor claiming the University of Florida released the Lovebug, Plecia nearctica. It is true Florida has ying bugs and some are a nuisance. Actually, Lovebugs originated in Central America, but migrated north. By 1949 they had reached Escambia County and today are found in every Florida county. Embellishing the finish of automobile and trucks is this insects specialty. They have a justi able reputation for etching vehicle paint at the point of impact, but it is a combination of factors at work. Their body fluids are slightly acidic and capable of damaging the nish slowly. Bacterial action on the Lovebugs residue increases the acidity if they remain on the vehicle for several days. These creatures have an unfortunate attraction to compounds in diesel and gasoline exhaust fumes. Hot engines and vehicle vibrations may also contribute to the demise of many unlucky pairs. Post-appearance chemical control of Lovebugs is pointless. Adult males live for two to three days or a bit longer and females may live for a week, if they avoid roadways. April through May is the largest population emergence of Lovebugs in spring, but this species has been collected in Florida every month of the year except November. The females lay approximately 350 gray, irregularly-shaped eggs in or on the soil surface under partially decayed vegetable matter which is used for food and shelter. Slate-gray larvae are often found in groups where moisture under the decaying vegetation is constantly present, but not excessive. One of the positive byproducts of the heavy rains and standing waters currently being experienced in Wakulla County is many of the larvae will drown. Unfortunately, standing water does encourage other problems. Not as well know, but just as infamous is the Yellow Fly. This Horse Fly and Deer Fly relative is a tenacious pest with a vicious and painful bite. As with many other biting or stinging insects, it is the female Yellow Fly which bites. She uses knife-like mandibles to access the blood of her victims, and is not particular about the source. The spring hatch is currently underway in Wakulla County which created a sudden population eruption, but Yellow Flies will be active all summer. They are active during the daylight hours in shade or full sun. Females deposit egg masses on plants, rocks, sticks or other similar objects usually over water or other favorable larval habitat. Eggs are deposited throughout the life cycle of the female. After ve to 12 days, the eggs hatch and the young larvae drop into the water or mud where they feed on organic debris or prey on other small aquatic organisms.Upon hatching, the larvae burrow into mud or moist earth and begin feeding. No matter the year, there will be ying insect pests. Still, it is better than 10 months of snow. To learn more about Wakulla Countys ying insects, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension website at http:// wakulla.ifas.ufl.edu or call 850-926-3931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 9263931. Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comWhile Lovebugs, above, are a nuisance to drivers, they spend most of their days among the owers and foliage in Wakulla County. Yellow Flies, like the one above, are a notorious, and sometimes painful pest in Wakulla County. Lovebugs and yellow ies are the seasons ying pests Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Free Checkingwith Interest... 1.50 %APY**Account opening subject to approval. Certain restrictions apply. Annual Percentage Yield (APY) accurate as of 07/24/13. Rate t iers are as follows: 1.50% APY applies to balances of $.01 $10,000 and 0.10% APY applies to balances over $10,000 as long as qualications are met each monthly qualication cycle. 0.05% APY applies to all balances if qualications are not met. All balances will earn 1.50% APY to 0.10% APY as long as quali cations are met. Rates may change after the account is opened. Fees may reduce earnings. No minimum balance required. No monthly service charge. Available to personal accounts only. Federally insured by NCUA. You Deserve Better Banking 6 MO. FORCHOOSE AS YOUR NEWS SOURCE FOR EVERYTHING LOCAL AND SAVE!!! JUST $ 12 Promo Code: SPECIAL Expires: 05-31-14Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:www.TheWakullaNews.com1-877-401-6408 Please accept my new 6 Month subscription at the price of $12* Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $20.14. Local delivery area only.The Wakulla newsSign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the ofce. Name ______________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________State ___Zip ________________ Phone# ( ) _______Cell Phone# ( ) ________E-mail _______________________ Credit Card _________-_________-_________-_________ Exp. _______3119-A Crawfordville Hwy.

PAGE 19

Lt. j.g. Phil Canter U.S. Navy Helicopter pilot Was in Vietnam in 1968-69, when he was 20-21. Cantner was a helicopter pilot ying Hueys for the Navy along the coast defending waterways. He spent a lot of his time ying on the Cambodian border and in Cambodia, working the small rivers that fed into the Mekong River. The helicopters always ew in pairs with a lead ship and a trail. He recalled there was triple canopy jungle in the area that gave bad guys a place to hide, though if the helicopters could be seen from the ground if they were ying high enough. Occasionally, there would be green tracers come up from the jungle, and the idea was to drop altitude to treetop height so that the helicopters were no longer easily seen and nose over where the re seemed to be coming from and do a pop up maneuver and open up with mini guns and rockets. That was one way to make people be quiet, he said, though he added that the pilots never knew if theyd hit anything or if the enemy was just hiding. The Mekong Delta is generally a at region with the exception of the Black Virgin Mountain, and Cantner recalled the Viet Cong had a series of caves in the mountain from which they would shoot at helicopters. That would stir up some hostility right quick, Cantner said. The trick was to get a rocket right into the mouth of the cave, he said, adding that again the pilots relied on a pop-up manuever to get in range and that, one the chopper red, you had to break off and y for your life. He also remembered the dif culty of trying to get enough lift to take off from a ight deck, and he recalled that some ended up in the Mekong River if they didnt pull it off. The Hueys the Navy had came from the Army, Cantner said, and were overhauled and repainted. Flying the underpowered helicopters was probably more dangerous than getting shot at, Cantner said. Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com memorial day salute to local vietnam veteransDonnie Sparkman U.S. Army 199 Light Infantry Brigade From April 1969 to April 1970. He turned 21 five days after he arrived in Vietnam. He went in as a PFC and came out a sergeant E-5. For the rst three or four months, Sparkman served in the area southwest of Saigon, an area largely made up of rice paddies. Later, he served in an north of Saigon, near the II Corps-III Corps tactical zone, which he described as being more into the woods, with rubber plantations. I didnt like it at the time, he said of his experience. Now, I dont regret it... It teaches you to grow up in a hurry. It also gave him a perspective and helped him when his three sons served in Iraq, he said. One memory he shared was of trying to cook a duck they had caught, but the re wasnt hot enough so the duck meat was raw. After eating out of a can, anything tastes good, he said. He also recalled going back to base camp one time and running into fellow Sopchoppy native Thurman Roddenberry there. He chuckled remembering that, saying you travel halfway around the world and run into somebody else from Wakulla County. Sparkman remembered never being so cold as during monsoon season the heavy rains would soak everything. It would be 60 degrees and my teeth would be chattering, he remembered. The most frustrating thing was never knowing who was the enemy. During the day, theyd be your best friend, and theyd be shooting at you at night, he said. Coming back from that unpopular war, he said, You were looked down on... People were very disrespecful and all that we were just doing our job. He admitted feeling somewhat jealous of the reaction veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq have gotten, with public embracing and revering soldiers today. He recalled that, years ago, even the older veterans of World War II and Korea at VFWx werent especially welcoming to Vietnam vets. Perhaps it was just a reflection of the wars unpopularity, he said. Editors Note: The idea for these stories was prompted by a realization that most of our World War II veterans are gone and a lot of the Vietnam veterans are getting older. I had originally envisioned a page with shorter, questionaire-type interviews with several more veterans. But the veterans I talked to were so interesting and what I wrote got longer. I hope to continue the series with more interviews for the Fourth of July and Veterans Day papers, and perhaps adding some veterans from Iraq and Afghanistan. Thanks to these veterans for being generous with their time and sitting down and talking with me. Stories by WILLIAM SNOWDEN Lt. Col. Thomas Case and Staff Sgt. Mike Long at Hudson Park. Lining up along the highway at Hudson Park as the Wakulla Sheriffs Of ce leads the procession. Jimmie Smith U.S. Army 1st Cavalry. He went in a PFC and came out a Spec 4. 1969-70. He was 18 years old. He recalled serving during the invasion of Laos when he was attached to the Army Rangers. A couple of miles in, they a camp with caches of AK-47s and areas set up as classrooms with chalkboards as big as billboards. We went in and blew them up, he said. The best part of the experience was the camraderie with the guys in his platoon, Smith said. You had their back, they had yours. No matter who they were or what color... We all bleed red... But it hurt when you lose somebody. He said nowadays he understands that the Vietnamese were ghting for their country and admits a respect for his enemy they fought against overwhelming odds, he said. Everybody was just doing their job, he said. During most of his tour, he was assigned to do recon, and they were supposed to observe the enemy and report back on their strength and types of weapons for later engagement. He recalled a couple of experiences, including an officer change of command ceremony. The of cers inside the of cers club were eating steak and having mixed drinks while enlisted men outside had hot dogs and 3.2 beer. One disgruntled soldier red a gas round into the group of of cers, which filled the club with smoke and forced all the of cers unhappily outside. Smiths whole company was punished with double guard duty because they wouldnt tell who did it. He recalled another experience of being on an ambush patrol in area with rubber plantations and that a new gunnery sergeant, who had just transferred in from Germany and didnt have combat experience, got nervous after sensing movement in the woods and called in an artillery strike but gave the wrong coordinates. He called it in on us, Smith said. Nobody was hurt, and the sergeant was transferred out. Smith remembered the day he was discharged at Fort Dix, N.J., running across the parade eld trying to make it to a flight home. He was stopped by a drill instructor with some brand new recruits and asked why he was running. Going home? the DI asked. Let me give you a piece of advice change into your civilian clothes. Smith did, and when his plane landed at home in Michigan, there were protestors at the airport, but he had taken the DIs advice and changed into his civilian clothes and so nothing was said to him. Still, he said, he felt like a pariah in society because of his service. People asked when I came back, Where have you been? Havent seen you in a while. I made up stories about where Id been. I was ashamed. Youre forced to go and youre a bad guy, he said. He said when he sees soldiers today returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, he thanks them for their service, and says he has a lot of respect for them because they arent drafted, they volunteer. Its like volunteering to get in a car crash, he said. Of his own service, Smith re ected that, I feel better for it for some reason. I have no fear of death why worry about it? And he said hed like to go back to Vietnam as a tourist. Id like to go back, just to visit, he said. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 11A Dusty Cook U.S. Navy, E-5Served aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany. He was discharged in 1973. The Oriskany was decommissioned in 1976 and was ultimately was sunk in May 2006 off the coast of Pensacola to become the largest vessel ever sunk to create an arti cal reef. Photos submitted by his wife, Becky Cook. Patriot Guard guide the van with the soldiers past Hudson Park. Well-wishers sign posterboard cards for the soldiers. They were supposed to just drive past Hudson Park on Saturday afternoon as well-wishers waved ags and welcomed them to Wakulla County. But the two soldiers arrived early, and so organizers with Warriors and Quiet Waters brought them to Hudson Park where they mingled with the crowd and shook hands. Lt. Col. Thomas Case and Staff Sgt. Mike Long, both U.S. Army, are two visitors to Wakulla County to do some shing over the next week. Steve Fults, one of theorganizers of the event, said the early arrival was an happy accident Long at Hudson Park. Soldiers visiting from Warriors and Quiet Waters given warm welcomethat worked out well the 100 or so people who turned out were happy for the opportunity to meet and greet the soldiers. The Warriors and Quiet Waters Southern Chapter provides traumatically injured U.S. service men and women from the Iraq and Afghanistan wars a high quality restorative program, utilizing the therapeutic experience of shing on the Gulf of Mexico. Serving those who served for usTCC IS A MILITARY FRIENDLY SCHOOL Happy Memorial Day Buddy Wells

PAGE 20

Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director The Big Bend Kayak Tournament was once again a success for anglers and senior citizens. The weekend of May 2 and 3, brought in the 2nd Annual Big Bend Kayak Classic fishing tournament. Wakulla County and the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center team welcomed local and outof-town anglers from all over the southeastern United States to the cool, clear, waters of our bays, beaches and estuaries. So what do kayaking anglers and senior citizens have in common? They both love the meals on wheels program at the senior center. The anglers enjoy giving back to the generation of people that gave them so much beauty and the overall Wakulla way of life. Many seniors were on hand and stepped up to the microphone at 3Y Ranch and genuinely and sincerely thanked the anglers for contributing to their quality of life. The anglers gave the seniors their undivided attention and a healthy round of applause after each thank you had been offered to them. How did this get started? A group of kayak anglers named the Forgotten Coast Kayak Anglers started the trend locally, conducting a professional tournament mainly among friends and acquaintances who love the sport of kayak shing. The fellow who started the paddles to moving lives right here in Crawfordville, Jeff Suber a big man with an equally as big heart conducted the tournament each year and brought a check for thousands of dollars to the senior center each year. When Jeff retired, the center took on the event with a promise from Jeff and other kayak angling professionals to conduct the actual tournament. At the event, the senior center team, board of directors and friend-raising committee stepped up to the plate, literally, and served food at the Captains Meeting on Friday night and a low country boil was prepared by Scott Homan and devoured by the anglers on Saturday night after a long, enjoyable and sunny day on the water. The anglers always enjoy the low country boil as it has been a tradition at the kayak tournament for the last eight years. Professional kayak anglers like Rob Baker, Mike McNamara, Gregg Blakney and Liam Callaghan were on hand to oversee that the tournament maintained professional standards yet afforded all round family fun. The sponsors came through from all over the region to support Meals-on-Wheels and to keep the services to senior citizens a oat! While the Friday night rains came in, it did not dampen the spirits of the 92 anglers who assembled for a Captains Meeting under the arena at the ranch. Food and drinks were plenteous and the anglers left that night after some great food, fun and fellowship ready to sh at 6:45 a.m. Saturday morning. The weather cleared and a great day was had by all anglers. Redfish, trout and largemouth bass were caught in abundance in and around the area of Wakulla County. The tournament is a catch, photo, and release tournament so no sh were killed or harmed during the event. Saturday evening brought the anglers back to the arena where multiple prizes were given away for their attendance! Kayaks were donated as rst place prizes for all categories, including a youth division. Cash and other prizes were given to anglers for second and third place prizes. The anglers left the event and promised to return for the 3rd Annual Big Bend Kayak Classic which will be held the first Friday and Saturday of May each year. Hobie always comes through as the headline sponsor and donates a high-end Kayak for the grand slam division winner (longest red sh/trout combo). Maurice Langston, the director of the center said, Its wonderful to see local and regional support caring for the greatest generation of senior citizens in Wakulla County. Our sponsors take their efforts personally and they know they are taking care of the generation of people who took care of them and are feeding those who have fed them and have made this county the great county that it is today. National sporting good chains gave of their resources however, most resources for the event came from local help and loving hearts. Not one sponsor said no to supporting Meals-on-Wheels, according to Langston. Many cuts in federal and state programs have taken their toll on senior citizens and while many counties are having to step back on services, Wakulla County is kicking up its services to senior citizens. A big thank you to our sponsors and a great thank you goes out to all of Wakulla County. We live in the most blessed and best county in the region; second to none, said Langston. Now, let me set the stage as a kayak angler in the Big Bend. It could be possible that my vision of Big Bend kayak shers is biased, but I see our peers as a spectacular diverse group of folks that love to sh. Add to the mix a true sense of charity, and the warm feeling of the tournament will be overwhelming. Do not get me wrong, this is a shing tournament, and the competition was erce, as this tournament attracted the best kayak anglers from several states. If you are worthy to compete with the best of the best, this is the place to bring your Agame. If competition seems to not be your thing, then you could come as you are and learn from the best. Some folks won big money and prizes, and everyone else won by being part of the kayak shing community. The tournament was a two day event, with a captains meeting on Friday night, and shing on Saturday. Both events were full of awesome food, raf e prizes, and buzzing with kayak shing friendship. Kayak fishing tournament was successful fundraiser By SHERYL SMYTHEOf the Senior CenterThe Senior Center Team is always looking for ways to raise money for all the programs and services offered at the Senior Center. One of the fundraisers is the Big Bend Classic Kayak Tournament for The Meals on Wheels Program. The Kayak tournament was held this year at 3Y Ranch on May 2 and 3 and it was a shing and nancial success. Since this fundraiser directly impacted the Meals on Wheels program we thought we would give a sneak peek into the program. Meals on Wheels is a program offered at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center for individuals age 60 and older and who are homebound. Frozen meals along with other consumable items such as milk and bread are delivered to clients each week to assist in meeting the clients nutritional needs. In the public eye, Meals on Wheels is just that. But in reality, there are more aspects to this program. Our clients bene t in so many other ways one cannot imagine and are often in more need than the average person could even imagine. Every client has a story and every story is different. When our dedicated volunteers or team members deliver to their clients they are able to get behind the scenes and become familiar with every individual situation. Some clients have more needs than just meals and through this program we are able to identify them. Some of the needs range from socializing, home repairs, to getting the mail or having yard work done, etc. Through our volunteers and outreach in the community we try to accomplish helping them with the speci c problem. In addition to this service, we also offer supplemental food for their pets (specifically cats and dogs) to ensure that the client does not have to share their meals with their companions. When a client owns a pet they often feed their little companions part of their meals due to lack of finance or simply by not being able to go to the store and purchase pet food. We help with this need by sending donated pet food to them. Meals on Wheels is such a wonderful program for our community and the clients that need the service. Please, next time you see the Senior Center advertising about a fundraiser come out and support the people in need. We want to say a special thanks to County Commissioners Jerry Moore and Richard Harden for their constant kind donations of their raises to the Senior Citizens Center. Moore brings food to raffle to the seniors once a month and Harden brings a check. A look at the Senior Centers Meal on Wheels PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMaurice Langston, above, shows off a craw sh at the senior centers low country boil at 3Y Ranch for its kayak shing tournament. At right, a kettle of cooked craw sh. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms IN-SHORE FISHING IS HOT AND SO IS THE WEATHER HOOK UP YOUR BOAT See us for All your boating supplies! MAY. 24IN STATE WATERSO P ENS As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926

PAGE 21

Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 12345 6789 10111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 2526 272829 303132 33 34 3536 3738 3940 41 4243 44 4546 4748 49 5051 52 5354 55 565758 59 606162 636465 6667 68 69 70 71 72 73 74 75 Across 1 In the midst of 6 High tennis shots 10 Copy a baseball player, at times (ick!) 14 Brown shade 15 Freshly 16 Song 17 Patriot who went on a "Midnight Ride" 19 Time ___ half 20 Matthew and John: abbr. 21 Toothbrush part 23 One of the Kardashians 24 Enemies 25 Some astrological signs 27 Dog food brand 30 Possesses 33 Day-___ paint 34 Rough 37 Last drink of the evening 41 Toy that spins 42 Person who never throws anything away 44 First aid ___ 45 Very thin 47 Singer Easton 49 Kind of bread 50 Director Craven 52 ___ and crafts 53 Be in charge of a movie 56 Burn 59 Yoko ___ 60 Whaler's weapon 63 Cat's place 66 Easy victory 68 Caribbean island owned by the U.S. 70 Tiny bit 71 "What ___ is new?" 72 Running on ___ (almost out of fuel) 73 Wintertime fun 74 Tennis match parts 75 Grand banquet Down 1 Scary snakes 2 Beef or turkey, e.g. 3 Masterwork 4 Zero, in soccer 5 Gorgeous Greta 6 Sparing no expense 7 Dollar bills 8 Ernie's pal, on "Sesame Street" 9 Just fine and dandy 10 Train stop: abbr. 11 Musician with a mohawk, maybe 12 Country whose capital is New Delhi 13 Cowboys, Broncos, Seahawks, etc. 18 Before, in poems 22 Between seventh and ninth 24 In favor of 26 Three-letter sandwich 27 Hits the stage 28 "Check it out!" 29 One way for a kid to earn money 31 Foot joint 32 Gentleman 35 Politician's words 36 Devour 38 Fuel 39 "___ Misbehavin'" 40 School orgs. 43 Crow's sound 46 Soap ingredient 48 One of two on your head 51 Makes a goal 53 College dwellings 54 One way to saute 55 Scotch and masking 57 Burning 58 Have ___ day 61 Law 62 Irritating person 63 ___ beans 64 Four in a deck of cards 65 Blog item 67 Baseball great Williams 69 Wish you hadn't Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 1 23 3456 2758 3 148 69 5234 6 739 4917 782 2009 HometownContent 517 9862 4 3 983412576 624375189 396 147852 842659317 175823964 261 738495 459261738 738594621 AMONG LOBS SPIT SEPIA ANEW TUNE PAULREVERE ANDA STS BRISTLE KIM FOES LIBRAS ALPO HAS GLO COARSE NIGHTCAP TOP PACKRAT KIT SKELETAL SHEENA RYE WES ARTS DIRECT CHAR ONO HARPOON LAP ROUT PUERTORICO MITE ELSE FUMES SLED SETS FEAST Second Harvest food distribution held Saturday at the Senior Center By William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.netAn estimated 250 cars were lined up around the block at the senior center on Saturday, May 17, for the free food distribution from Second Harvest. Richard English, executive director of Second Harvest of the Big Bend, was at the distribution and estimated some 20,000 pounds of food was brought and distributed to families. The food included frozen chicken, fresh tomatoes and squash, canned goods, juice, peanut butter, bottled water and bread and buns. English said Second Harvest is trying to nd local businesses interested in sponsoring distributions. He noted the Saturday distribution was costing a lot of money for the two trucks that delivered the food with fuel costs and overtime for the drivers. Second Harvest operates on donations from the community, English said, adding: The hardest thing is covering our costs. English said he has seen an increase in local need since the reduction in benefits for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, SNAP, or food stamps as its more commonly known. Were out there in the community trying to distribute as much food as we can, English said. Wakulla Senior Center staff and volunteers were joined by several area church organizations in distributing the food.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

PAGE 22

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 3BClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m.Friday, May 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Saturday, May 24 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, May 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for ve classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Monday, May 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, May 27 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.Wednesday, May 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Upcoming Events Wednesday, May 21 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOl will hold its nal SCHOOL ADVISORY COUNCIL meeting from 3 to 5 pm in the WHS library. Anyone interested is invited to attend. Thursday, May 22 A BOOK EVENT featuring Southern Shock Americana: The Life and Execution of John Mills, Jr. by local author HERB DONALDSON will be at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla Public Library. Donaldson will discuss his book and community. Guests are Agnes Furey (Achieve Higher Ground, author Wild owers in the Median); Sheila Meehan (Tallahassee Citizens Against the Death Penalty) and others. The NOAA HURRICANE HUNTERS are coming to Tallahassee at the Tallahassee Regional Airport and does include tours of the aircraft as well as many other exhibits on hurricane preparedness, response, and recovery. The event begins at 9:30 a.m. and continues until around 5 p.m. This is an excellent opportunity for residents in North Florida, South Georgia, and Southeast Alabama to learn about the hurricane hunters and ways that your residents can prepare for the coming hurricane season. Friday, May 23 A SUMMERTIME BLOOD DRIVE will be from noon to 6 p.m. at Walmart in Crawfordville. Donors will receive a $10 WALMART GIFT CARD, and a coupon for $5 off two entrees at Outback Steakhouse. Donate blood twice before August 31 and receive a free lunch courtesy of Outback, and be entered to win outback for a year. Donors are encouraged to make an appointment online at www.oneblooddonor.org, and use sponsor code #G1915. Monday, May 26 Wakulla County announces the ANNUAL MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY at 10 a.m. in front of the courthouse. This Memorial is dedicated to the lasting memory and sacred honor of the brave American servicemen and servicewomen who gave their lives for our Country and a special emphasis of Wakulla Countys own heroes. This years ceremony includes keynote speaker Commissioner Ralph Thomas and will highlight patriotic music, laying of the wreath, and raising of the ag. All are welcome to attend to honor those who served. Saturday, May 31 THE SOPCHOPPY OPRY and South Bound Band welcomes Tom & Janie Roberts with the Way Up Band in a special MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE SHOW, 1 to 7 p.m. in historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. The show will include a variety of patriotic music performed by some of the best singers and musicians in this area. Tickets are $12. Call 962-3711 for information or log onto sopchoppyopry.com. Wednesday, June 4 The Class of 2014, WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL War Eagles invite you to come celebrate with them at BACCALAUREATE at 7 p.m. (Gates Open at 6 pm) at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Friday, June 6 Class of 2014, WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL War Eagles GRADUATION will beat 7:30 p.m. (Gates Open at 6:30 p.m.) at J.D. Jones Stadium at Jerry Reynolds Field. Thursday, June 12 WAKULLA PREGNANCY CENTER is partnering with the Community Foundation of North Florida on MATCH DAY 2014 on JUNE 12 ONLY. The Foundation will match your donations to us dollar-for-dollar up to $5,000 on gifts made ONLY THROUGH THEIR WEBSITE. Simply go to www.Findlearngive.org and make a gift by credit card using the Donate Now Match Day button between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m. to be eligible for the Match Day grants and incentive prizes. Select Wakulla Pregnancy Center as your chosen charity. The earlier in the day the better as there is a maximum dollar amount available to be awarded. For details of the rules go to http:// ndlearngive.guidestar.org/ or follow this link.Saturday, June 14 WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL CLASS OF 1994 20-year reunion will be held at Wakulla Springs Lodge from 6 to 10 p.m. Reunion Ticket are $40 and includes admission to event at Wakulla Springs Lodge, heavy hors odourves, entertainment, and door prizes. Wakulla Springs Lodge will be providing a cash bar on the terrace. Online payments are preferred, the website to make your online payment and RSVP is www.WHSWarEagles1994. myevent.com. Payments can also be mailed to the following address. Attention: Ashley Savary, Centennial Bank, P.O. Box 610, Crawfordville, FL 32326. Make Checks payable to WHS Class of 1994. For more information e-mail Hunter Versiga Tucker at htucker32327@yahoo.com. Government MeetingsWednesday, May 21 The WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMITTEE is holding a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room, to review and make recommendations to the BOCC on matters related to historical, cultural and architectural resources. The WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a Public Meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn and Suite 3292 Coastal Hwy. Monday, June 2 The WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. to give citizens an opportunity to become acquainted with the proposed WASTEWATER SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS and to comment on such items as to the economic and environmental impacts, service area, alternatives to the project and other matters of concern. Tuesday, June 3 The Wakulla County Tourist Development Council will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn and Suites 3292 Coastal Hwy.Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Wakulla Library Book/Author EventCrawfordville 6 p.m. NOAA Hurricane Hunters Tallahassee Airport 9:30 a.m. 5 p.m.Crawfordville High School Reunion Reservation required All Day Memorial Day Ceremony Courthouse Lawn 10 a.m.ThursdayThursdaySaturdayMonday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla May 21 June 14 Friday Night Movie Our rescheduled Friday Night Movie for May 23 is the multi Academy Award nominated film, Philomena. This PG-13 (language, some sexual references, and thematic elements) rated lm stars Oscar winner Judi Dench and Steve Coogan and is based on the New York Times bestseller The Lost Child of Philomena Lee. This true story was nominated for Best Picture, Actress, Original Score, and Screenplay at the 2014 Academy Awards and is sure to touch your heart and mind. Doors open at 6:45 for the 7 p.m. show. Author Herb Donaldson Herb Donaldson will be speaking for the second time at WCPL on his book Southern Shock Americana Thursday at 6 p.m. in our Main Meeting Room. Guests to include Agnes Furey (Achieve Higher Ground, author Wildflowers in the Median); Sheila Meehan (Tallahassee Citizens Against the Death Penalty) and others. Please join us for another discussion on this profound and controversial work about the death penalty, Wakulla County, and the impact of tragedy on two families. Copies will be available to purchase and light refreshments will be provided. Summer Reading Books With the nearing end of the school year, we are beginning to stock up on copies of the summer reading books requested by Wakulla County Schools for all of the great students in the county. Some are already on hand with more coming in daily. We are doing things a little different this year with allowing only 2 of the Summer Reading Books to be checked out per card at a time and only for two weeks. This hopefully will allow us to work our way through the hold lists quicker than in the past and allow more students access to these materials. Dont wait until school is about to start in August, please allow your child to read the Summer Books they want early so they dont miss out on this years great titles. Summer Program Brochures Keep an eye out next week as we plan to pass out our annual brochures about all the great programs well be providing the children of Wakulla County this summer at the local schools. This years theme is, Fizz, Boom, Read, and will have a science focus. We also have many great performers which will be coming to see us for the rst time, as well as visits from the Challenger Learning Center, Tallahassee Museum of Natural Science (Jr. Museum), as well as bringing back our Cinemaniacs program for teens where they will work on a short lm over the summer to be shown at the end. All of the fun this summer is free thanks to the continued support of the Friends of the Library. Check with you children next week as they bring home the brochures with information on all the fun (and learning) going on here this summer!Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary Director

PAGE 23

Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 16 The dual roles of the governors office during an election year were on full display this week. On the one hand, Gov. Rick Scott was signing and at least preparing to veto some of the bills approved in this springs legislative session --including accidentally signing one bill before it had been sent to him. New restrictions on education standards, the last half of a sizable tax cut and a bill paving the way for undocumented immigrants to practice law in Florida all met with Scotts approval. Whatever Scotts motive for signing them, several of the bills served political ends. At the same time, the governor said a bill that would increase how fast motorists could drive on state highways wasnt his speed. Meanwhile, blind trusts like the one Scott has used to handle his assets during his time in office came under fire from advocacy groups who object that, while the mechanism might shield knowledge about investments from elected officials, it also keeps their financial interests secret from the public. And the fundraising machine continued to churn for Scott, his rivals and dozens of other candidates and causes across the board, as the November elections loomed. SIGNING BILLS, WHEREVER THEY ARE The closest intersection between the governors campaign and his official duties was the signing Monday of the final portion of his $500 million reduction in taxes and fees, something already transitioning from the cornerstone of Scotts legislative agenda to the centerpiece of his campaign for reelection. The bill we signed today is $121 million right back into Florida citizens hands, Scott said during a Monday news conference. Scott last month had already signed a larger part of the tax and fee cuts, rolling back vehicle registration fees, that was expected to save motorists on average savings of $20 to $25 per vehicle. Lawmakers approved the most recent tax-cut package (HB 5601) called the patchwork of awesomeness by House Finance & Tax Chairman Ritch Workman, R-Melbourne on the final day of the legislative session, saying it would save Floridians about $105 million. But Scott put the number Monday at $121 million, and his office also repeated that figure in a news release. The savings include sales-tax holidays on hurricane gear, school supplies and energy-efficient appliances. It reduces or gets rid of taxes on college meal plans, therapeutic pet food, car seats and bicycle helmets for kids. Scott also autographed a set of bills aimed at calming down activists worried about the states version of the Common Core education standards. The governor was so eager to get the proposals into law, his office announced that he had authorized a bill that he was technically unable to sign. The brief mix-up began when the governors office announced that Scott had signed bills meant to push back on federal intrusion. The bills included measures that would give parents more opportunities to challenge their school boards choice of textbooks; remove the words Common Core from state law while leaving unchanged the states modified version of the benchmarks; and ban the collection of students biometric and other personal information by school districts. There was just one hitch the Legislature had not yet sent Scott the education privacy bill, meaning that he could not sign it. After the announcement, Scotts office asked the Legislature to send the bill to him. Lawmakers complied, and Scott inked it along with another measure giving school districts one year to transition to a new state test. Scott approved several other proposals this week, including a bill that would allow admission to The Florida Bar for a Mexicanborn law school graduate who was brought to the country at age 9 by his parents and became an undocumented immigrant. But the governor announced he would slam the brakes on an effort to increase speeds on state highways by vetoing a bill that would have allowed the Florida Department of Transportation to consider hiking maximum speed limits by 5 mph. Im going to stand with law enforcement and I want everybody to stay safe, Scott said less than a week after a Florida Highway Patrol trooper made an impassioned plea for him to veto the bill at a fellow troopers funeral. DO TRUSTS BLIND THE PUBLIC? Open-government advocates didnt attack any of the bills that Scott signed into law this week, but they did take aim at a 2013 law that allows elected officials to put financial assets in blind trusts that do not offer detailed public disclosure of the holdings. Jim Apthorp, former chief of staff to the late Gov. Reubin Askew, filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the law. The suit has the backing of the First Amendment Foundation, the League of Women Voters and half a dozen media organizations that will file friend-of-thecourt briefs, including the Associated Press, The Miami Herald and The Florida Times-Union. Apthorp and the attorney in the case, Talbot Sandy DAlemberte, said the use of blind trusts circumvents the full disclosure of public officials holdings required by the Sunshine Amendment, which Askew spearheaded and Florida voters overwhelmingly passed in 1976. Apthorps petition asks the high court to prohibit Secretary of State Ken Detzner from accepting the qualifying papers of any candidate who has placed finances in a blind trust. Senate President Don Gaetz and House Speaker Will Weatherford released a joint statement Wednesday defending the law, which was known as Senate Bill 2 and followed a 2010 grand jury recommendation about the use of blind trusts and a 2012 recommendation from the Commission on Ethics and suggested that the lawsuit was politically motivated. For the plaintiff to suddenly come forward with his objections four years after the grand jury report, two years after the ethics commissions recommendations and one year after Senate Bill 2 was enacted raises the suspicion that this is not a serious or sincere constitutional challenge but a cynically timed political ploy designed and timed to affect the outcome of this years elections, the statement said. Although Apthorp and DAlemberte are Democrats, as was Askew, they said the lawsuit doesnt target Scott, a Republican. Gov. Scott did everything that the ethics commission and the Legislature asked him to do, Apthorp said. So I dont think hes done anything wrong here. The problem is that the statute under which he received advice is not constitutional. Scotts campaign manager Melissa Sellers on Thursday sent a letter to Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner, making clear the governor would comply with disclosing his individual investments if blind trusts are barred. If the courts believe the trust should be dissolved, all assets will be disclosed in accordance with the law for qualifying, Sellers wrote. STORY OF THE WEEK: Open-government advocates filed suit against a law allowing elected officials to put their assets in blind trusts, saying the mechanisms kept the public from knowing about the officials financial holdings. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: There wont be fields of marijuana growing in Florida. It will be grown under roof, in controlled environments, inside, for obvious security reasons. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, speaking about the potential impact of the impending legalization of low-THC marijuana, in a videotaped interview with the South Florida Sun Sentinel editorial board. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Two sides of the governors of ce WHITES WINESEmbracing the unknown at restaurantsBy DAVID WHITERepresenting real people who make real wine has always been very important to me, explained Danny Fisher, the general manager and beverage director of Ripple, a wine-focused restaurant in Washington, D.C. When youre drinking wine -or any kind of beverage, really -you want to know that someone has put time and effort into it. It shouldnt be mass produced, toyed with, or manipulated. Fisher and I were chatting about the wisdom or foolishness of loading up a restaurant wine list with smallproduction, unfamiliar offerings. Sure, Americans have fallen for wine. We surpassed France as the worlds largest wine-consuming nation in 2010 and have been drinking more each year. But consumers still feel most comfortable with major grapes like Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Sauvignon Blanc. And most stick with easily recognized brands, like Duckhorn, Kendall-Jackson, and Chateau Ste. Michelle. In restaurants and wine bars across the country, however, a growing number of courageous sommeliers are eschewing these obvious choices and gently guiding patrons outside their comfort zones. These efforts are having an impact. Thanks in no small part to people like Fisher, Americans are beginning to embrace the unknown. Consider Ripples bythe-glass list. Its home to 40 different wines, including an unusual blend of Vermentino and Grenache Blanc from maverick California vintner Steve Edmunds; an orange wine from Channing Daughters on Long Island; and a Teroldego from superstar Italian winemaker Elisabetta Foradori. From the beginning, one of our biggest things was that we wanted people to be able to taste different wines -and thats why we have so many by the glass, Fisher explained. Its so our customers can explore what different wines taste like with foods. You can do half glasses if you want; its all about tasting and seeing what you like and maybe discovering something new. The focus on food is echoed by David McCarus, the proprietor of a boutique wine distribution agency in South Carolina. While the general manager and beverage director of FIG, an award-winning restaurant in Charleston, he focused on the interaction of wine with food and the role wine should play at the table. And he saw how eager consumers were to learn. When McCarus moved to Charleston from San Francisco in 2012, he wasnt sure he would nd a receptive clientele. I didnt know if there was an appetite in town, he explained. But I had a strong enough belief that people would understand the wine program if it made the food taste better. Consumers might not know what theyre looking for. They might not really know what they want. But if the wine and food can combine into this organic dance and it makes sense while its happening people will be comfortable. And people will come back. McCarus saw his patrons come back again and again. A successful wine program satis es virtually every customer, of course, so McCarus made sure to always have something for everyone, even if it was obscure and didnt match the exact request. My point was always, Why dont we try this? he continued. So If someone comes in and asks for a glass of Pinot Grigio, we can say, No, we dont have a glass of Pinot Grigio, but we have this beautiful Erbaluce from Piedmont made by this great producer and its really delicious and it will be really good with your sh. What McCarus and Fisher have done isnt unique. Nationwide, more and more sommeliers are showcasing small-production, interesting wines and providing opportunities for people to try things that arent available at the local supermarket. Theyre acting as educators, eager to share their palates and preferences with their customers. The wine world is vast. And thanks to this work, Americans are beginning to make all sorts of discoveries. David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

PAGE 24

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 5B Accompanied Acted Along Angle Arabs Barns Basin Beast Birds Books Cheek Choirs Crystals Damage Dream Feels Given Horses Illustrations Immense Irons Items Jigsaws Meats Naming Nosey Novel Organ Perch Pianos Queens Reeds Rightly Rivers Search Sicker Sleek Smooth Snails Stationery Status Storage Studio Suits Tiles Tribe Trouble Vapor Views The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

PAGE 25

Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comEXPLORATION STATIONThree Camps Designed to Explore The academic/artistic based camps hosted at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center that focus on aspects of culture/history, science based, economy, finance, politics, and a host of other topics as students take part in camps designed to foster creativity while using real world skills and collaboration with other students. Camp dates are TBA but each camp will be one week Monday through Friday 8 am to 11 a.m. $75 per week. Please, contact Catherine Harris Small at Ms.Catherapy@gmail.com or 850-274-6810 to reserve your spot and make payments. Ambassadors Camp designed for students to use creativity and communication skills to create their own country and collaborate with other campers in trading, managing, and developing ways for their own country to survive a host of circumstances both positive and negative that will occur with their country as the World Summit approaches. Countries and campers must work together to survive. Inventors Camp designed for campers to invent their own items. They will be creating blueprints, designing and developing their plans, and creating prototypes artistically of their inventions to share in a Mock Scientific Convention where other inventors will be critiquing and discussing their inventions while they market their promising items to a welcoming public. Entrepreneurs Camp designed for students to use creativity and communication to design their own food business restaurant or food developer. These new business owners must go through the hoops of developing their own marketing process, products, using finances, and finally present their business propositions to an excited market of stockholders who would love to invest in an original business. These campers must work together to make a business and a profit.SCOUTINGCub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Eagle Scouts. Ages 1st GradeAge 20. To learn more contact David Damon 850-251-4166.PROVIDENCE CHRISTIAN ACADEMYSummer School Private Tutoring. Courses as needed. English, Algebra, remedial reading. Call for further information. 850-926-2456, 710 Shadeville Hwy, Crawfordville.CAMP INDIAN SPRINGSTraditional Over Night Camp Ages 7 to 16 year old. Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! Note: Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www.campindiansprings.comWAKEBOARDINGVictory Wakeboarding Instruction will feature Wakeboarding, wakeskating, wakesurfing, skiing, tubing & Birthday Parties. Half day or full day lessons available. www. Victorywakeboard.comFLORIDA SHERIFFS YOUTH RANCHESTwo Locations The Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches has two locations which provide a positive camping experience for many of Floridas deserving children. The purpose of these camps is to provide a wholesome atmosphere and positive camping experience for boys and girls. At the Youth Camp/Barberville and Caruth CampInglis/Yankeetown, boys and girls experience many different therapeutic camping activities. Canoeing, archery, swimming, and many other recreational activities allow them the opportunity to build basic teamwork and peer communication skills. Additionally, they can spend the week enjoying the beautiful, tranquil outdoor environment. Ages 10-15, 5 & 6 Day Sessions. Contact: Cori Welbes, Director Camping Services, Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches, Inc. Office Caruth Camp (352) 447-2259 x 3607 Office Youth Camp (386) 749-9999 x 3916 Cell (386) 688-4337 Caruth Camp is located at 14770 SE Highway 19 in Inglis, Florida, which is about 20 minutes north of Crystal River, in Levy County. Youth Camp is located at 1170 Youth Camp Lane in Barberville, Florida, which is about 30 minutes west of Ormond Beach, in Volusia County. ITS FREE! The only cost is your time in completing the application; getting it notarized, signed by the Sheriff in your county, filling out the physical, and postage to mail it back.4H CAMP CHERRY LAKEJune 23-27, 2014 Accepting Campers, Counselors In Training and Counselors. Traditional Rustic Cabin Camping Experience at Camp Cherry Lake in Madison. Leave Monday at 8a.m. and return Friday at noon. Ages 8 to 13, Campers $230, Counselors in Training $230, Counselors $180. $50 non-refundable deposit due before Thursday June, 19 at Registration. For More Information Contact: Les Harrison Phone: 850-926-3931 Email: harrisog@ufl.edu. FREE Summer Youth Camo Sheriffs Youth Ranch.HAPPY TIMESOffering Full or Part time Childcare and Before & After School Programs. Summer Childcare includes a wide variety of field trips and adventures for your children. We enjoy skating, museums, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally owned and operated by Linda Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Weekly and Daily rates available. 850-926-5226KNOWLEDGE TREE ACADEMYFull Day Summer Camp, Ages K-5th Grade, $135 per week. USDA Breakfast, Lunch & Snack. Weekly Field Trips 850-926-5557BUSY BEE LEARNING CENTERChildCare 6 weeks to 8 years of age. Before & After School for Riversink and WEK. FREE VPK and Warp around care, School Readiness Provider. Discounts offered for Multi-Child, Military, Civil Service, Teacher Discount. For more information contact 850-745-6053 or busybeelearning32327@ yahoo.com.GAMERZ PARADISEVideo Games, Pool Tournaments, Ping Pong Tournaments, Foosball and more! Kinect, X-Box Live, PS3, WII & WII-Fit. All in A/C and Supervised Environment. Contact: 850-926-9100 Open All Summer Long.WERE ALL SO PRECIOUS Offering Full or Part time Childcare Infants thru 5 years old. Before & After School Programs Pre-k thru 5th Grade. Summer Camps Daily Field Trips and more! 850-745-8234DREAMS DAY CARE CENTER850-926-0200SAVARY ACADEMYWe are pleased to be able to offer students the opportunity to earn credits while they are out of school for the summer! Savary Academy will be open on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.to enable the students to work solely on one or two subjects for credit recovery, earn credit in AP areas or participate in classes such as Drivers Education. Students do not need to be enrolled in Savary Academy during the traditional school year to participate for the summer! If you are interested, contact us today space is limited! Enrollment deadline is June 4.THE LEARNING CURVEIntro to Kindergarten ABCs & 123s. Intro to next grade level of elementary. Intro to 3rd grade Common Core Math. For students scoring below grade level in Reading gr 3, 6, 7, 8, or 10. Designed to help students meet graduation requirements if they have not passed FCAT Algebra 1 Summer EOC Retakes; Kindergarten Ready; Jump Start!; 3rd grade math camp; FCAT remediation; the ACT replace high school FCAT reading; Algebra 1 bootcamp; Home school portfolio evaluation; Financial literacy for high school students; College assignment proofreading; One-on-one tutoring all summer; Learn to Excel! Call Melisa Taylor & register today! 850-926-2179 www.thelearningcurvetutoring.com TYS US TAI KARATE SCHOOLCome join for Mixed Martial Arts, Realistic Women Self-Defense, Tactics & Techniques for Women and more! FREE 2 Introduction Classes, $40 per month, and Family Rates! Tiny Dragons 3-5 years Old. Kids 6-12 years Old. Teens & Adults. For more information please contact the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 850-745-6042 or Sensei Ray Tyree at 706-993-7140.C.O.R.E. Challenging Obstacles Require Effort FREE Fitness Fun for the WHOLE FAMILY! Tuesday 5-6 pm at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center Contact 850-224-1177 or 850-745-6045EARLY LEARNING COALITION OF THE BIG BEND REGION The Voluntary PreKindergarten program (VPK) helps children prepare for success in school and it is FREE! Will your child be 4 years old by September 1st? Does your child reside in Florida? Need Help? Call us at 1-866-973-9030 or email vpk@ elcbigbend.org Single Point of Entry Need Help? Call us at 1 866 973 9030 or email vpk@elc bigbend.org. The Voluntary PreKindergarten program (VPK) helps children prepare for success in school and it is FREE! Will your child be 4 years old by September 1st? Does your child reside in Florida? Register online at www.elcbig bend.org Make Your Summer AWESOME!1/2 or FULL Day Lessons AvailableSkiing Wakeboarding Tubing Birthday Parties VictoryWakeboard.com Programs offered all summer long:

PAGE 26

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 7BPrograms offered month-by-month: May FREE SPORTS AND CAMP PHYSICALS for Middle & High School students at Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Wakulla Center, May 17 9 a.m. to noon. High School Football Players at 9 a.m. Riversprings and Wakulla Middle School Students at 10 a.m. Wakulla High School Students at 11 a.m. If Student arrive at a time not designated for their school, they will be worked in after students from the school are served. Families with siblings at two school may choose the most convenient time and bring both students. For more information call your school Athletic Directors. The WAKULLA CHILDRENS FISHING TOURNAMENT will be May 17 from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., at Wooley Park, and is open to boys and girls ages 3-15. The tournament is free to all children with lunch provided. Children can also enjoy games, rides and exhibits. Trophies will be awarded after weigh-in from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Children may fish from a boat, or another legal fishing site, including Mashes Sands Pier, Otter Lake and Woolley Park. For more information, contact David Moody at 925-6121, or Bruce Ashley at 745-7162.June PALAVER TREES SUMMERBURN 2014 YOUNG ADULT THEATRE WORKSHOP for age range 13-20 years. Cost: TBA. Requirements: All students must dedicate themselves to the 7 days of the Workshop. Students must also show an interest in the performing arts, or the development of artistic performance. Workshop One: June 10-20. Times: 12-4 p.m. June 10, 11, 12 (Tues. Wed. Thurs.) June 17, 18, 19, 20* (Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri.) (*Time for the 20th may be changed due to public performance.) For more information contact the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 850-745-6042. FLORIDA FORESIGHT BOAT BUILDING SUMMER CAMP: Learn to build your own boat. Male and female young adults: Ages 12 16. TWO 6 Day Sesions: June 9 June 14 June 16June 21 Mon. Fri. 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday morning to launch with parents and choose who takes home the boat. Bring your own lunch and snacks. Water & Gatorade provided. $125 per student. Big Bend Maritime Center at Woolley Park. Contact Roger Pinholster 850728-2121 or e-mail RPinholster@gmail.com. CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Over Night Camp Ages 7 to 16 year old Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! June 9 June 13 June 16 June 20 June 23 June 27 June 30 July 4 $200 per child per session. Note: Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www. campindiansprings.com WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY PROGRAMS and Reading Programs offered throughout the summer. FUN DAYS Registration: 6/12 5:00-8:00, 6/13 10:00-Noon Enrichment Programs begin Tuesday 6/17 Each Tuesday: Book Bunch (preschoolers) 10:30 Childrens Room; Book Nook 3rd-5th grades 10:30 Main Meeting Room. Each Wednesday: Book Babies (infants) 10:30 Childrens Room; Book Blas K-2nd grades 10:30 Main Meeting Room; Cinemaniacs Teen Film Program 12:00 Main Meeting Room. PERFORMERS (all performances at 7:00) All Ages. For more information call 850-926-7415. Performers are as follows: Anna Moo Song Writer of Childrens Entertainer/ Performer 6/19 Windell Campbell Incorporates the Art of Puppetry with the art of storytelling 6/26July PALAVER TREES SUMMERBURN 2014 YOUNG ADULT THEATRE WORKSHOP for ages 13-20 years. Cost: TBA. Requirements: All students must dedicate themselves to the 7 days of the Workshop. Students must also show an interest in the performing arts, or the development of artistic performance. Workshop Two: July 8-18 Time: 12-4 p.m. July 8, 9, 10 (Tues. Wed. Thurs.) July 15, 16, 17, 18* (Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri.) (*Time for the 18th may be changed due to public performance.) For more information contact the Wakulla One Stop Community Center at 850-745-6042.WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY PROGRAMS PERFORMERS (all performances at 7:00): Michael White High Energy interactive program for students $ Adults 7/10 Balloon Man Dewayne Reynolds 7/17 Curious Moon Puppets 7/24 Challenger Learning Center 7/31 All Ages. For more information call 850-9267415. CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Over Night Camp, Ages 7 to 16. Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! July 7 July 11 July 14 July 18 July 21 July 25 July 28 August 1 $200. per child per session Note: Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www. campindiansprings.comAugustWAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY PROGRAMS: End of Summer Ice Cream Party 8/6 2:00 3rd annual talent show 8/7 7:00 Teen Film Night 8/8 7:00 For more information call 850-926-7415CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Over Night Camp for Ages 7 to 16. Horseback riding, Scuba, ATV, Skateboarding, Fencing, Music, Go Radio Invasion, Rope Challenge Courses, The BLOB, Canoeing, Archery, Arts and Crafts, Dance, Film, Nature Survival, and more! August 4 August 8 Not all classes are available during each session. Call for more information.850-926-3361 or www.campindiansprings.com PHOTOS SUBMITTED BY DAVID DAMON Big Bend Maritime Center B B i i g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g g B B e e e n n n d d d d d d d M a a r r r i t t t m m m e e e e e C C C e e e e n n n t t t t t t e g g g g g g g g g g g g g g n n a a e e n n B B B B B B B B B B B B B B e e e B B e B B e e B B B d M M M M M M M M t t t t t m m t m t i m m m t t C C C C C C e e e e C e e C e e e e e C C e e e e r r r r e e BOAT BUILDING SUMMER CAMPWOOLLEY PARK PANACEALEARN TO BUILD YOUR OWN BOAT!Young Adults Boys and Girls Ages 12 to 16 Work Together in Small CrewsTWO 6 Day SessionsJune 9 June 14 June 16 June 21Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.Saturday Morning to Launch with Parents & choose who takes home the boat.$125 a week per student Contact Roger Pinholster850728-2121rpinholster@gmail.com Bring your own lunch and snacks. Water and Gatorade provided. SUMMER CHILDCAREIncludes a wide variety of field trips and adventure during the summer for your children We enjoy skating, museums, movies, bowling and so much more. Call today for our very affordable pricing. Monthly, Daily and weekly rates available.HAPPY TIMEInstructional Child Care CenterEstablished 1983HAPPY TIMELocally Owned and Operated By Linda Wicker since 1983Offering Full or Part time Childcare year around AND before and after school programs 926-5226

PAGE 27

Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.com FREE ESTIMATESWorry Free with A to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414A-1PRESSURE CLEANING ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEP IT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f l l l f f d d Call Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and InsuredTree Trimming Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100Facial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsColor PermsFeather LocksHighlights Cuts Low Lights STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN F u ll Se r v i c e Ha i g a i i c e Ha e g g g g 850 926-6020 Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES RenegadesVAPE SHOPof The GulfTRY VAPING for FREEVisit our RELAXING ROOM to TRY UNLIMITED FLAVORS... for FREE!Owned & Operated by Casey Hodges & son Chris Hodges, formerly of Bayside Seafood Restaurant PanaceaBring in this ad for $1 OFF 10 ml or $3 OFF 30 ml E-Juice 850 3010 B Crawfordville Hwy., Downtown Crawfordville THE MOST NATURAL WAY TO LOSE WEIGHTFinally there is an all-natural, healthy solution to help you lose weight. The synergistic effect of Plexus Slim and Accelerator taken together can help you lose more weight faster than you ever thought possible. Experience great results and keep the weight off. People around the country are experiencing amazing results and you can too!Call Rhonda Sapp today at 850-544-2110http://rhondasapp.myplexusproducts.com Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Randall Pest Management 850 570-7085850570-7085 850 570-7084850570-7084 CLIP and SAVE$200 OFFADULT HAIRCUTS prices @ $12.95 CLIP and SAVE$1000 OFFMinzani Hair Relaxers prices @ $65.00 CLIP and SAVE$500 OFFMATRIX PERMS prices start at $34.95 haircut/style not includedCLIP and SAVE$1000 OFFFOIL HI & LO LITES prices start at $59.95CLIP and SAVE$300 OFFSingle Process HAIRCOLOR prices start at $34.95No appointment Necessary One coupon per VisitShear ExpressionsFamily Hair Salon where families and budget meet850-984-3100 Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLE, FLSaturday May 24, 7:00am to 3:00pm at 36 Covington Circle Antiques -lamps,dressers,mirrors,ta bles & misc items. Also girls twin bed & dresser, clothes, couch, kingsize bedframe toys,lots of items. or call 850-321-2703. New Refrigerator, Frigridaire, side by side Cost New $800-$1,000 Asking $400. (850) 926-7473 Todays New Ads GANOEGalvanized Trailer with 4 stroke Outboard motor, $1,500. (850) 926-7473 MEDART AREA3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking.References required. $650mo., $400/Security no inside pets (352) 493-2232 Todays New Ads CRA WFORDVILLE 2BR/1BA CozyCottage on large wooded lot. 1266 MLK Memorial Blvd. West of Spring Creek Hwy. Close to Crawfordville area schools. CH/A, diswasher, laundry room with W/D. Seperatestorage shed/garage. $700/mo, security dep, pet deposit, and references required. 850 926 7439 or 850 294 8654 ONE ACRE, qtr cleared, qtr woodedwith septic, & light pool, city water. Mobile home and shed on property that must be moved. $12,000 ** Negotiable ** (850)519-4830 5072-0612 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Writ of Execution issued in the County Court of Leon County, Florida, on the 22nd day of February, 2013, in the cause wherein FSU Credit Union, was Plaintiff, and Tanesia Thomas was Defendant, being Case Number 2011SC003321 in said Court; Court, I, Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff of Wakulla County, Florida have levied upon all the right, title, and interest of Tanesia Thomas in and to the following described Personal Property to-wit: 1. 2005 GMC, White in Color, FL Tag/2381IR, Vin/1GKES63M252334452 Further, on the 24th day of June, 2014 at the hour of 10:00 A.M. or as soon thereafter as possible at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office located at 15 Oak Street, Crawfordville, Florida, I will offer for sale all the said right, title and interest in the afore said Personal Property at Public Auction and will sell the same, subject to taxes, all prior liens, encumbrances and judgments, if any to the highest and best bidder for CASH IN HAND. The proceeds to be applied as far as may be to the payment of costs and the satisfaction of the above-described execution. /s/ Charlie W. Creel, Sheriff Wakulla County, Florida By: Lt. Steve Willis, Deputy Sheriff STATE OF FLORIDA COUNTY OF WAKULLA Sworn to and subscribed before me this 13 day of May, 2014 by Sheriff Charlie W. Creel and Lt. Steve Willis who are personally known or has produced _________ as Identification. /s/ Amy Lamarche Notary Public (Seal) Published May 22, 29, June 5 & 12, 2014. 5079-0529 TWN vs. Edwards, Donald W. 14000030CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 14000030CAAXMX Capital One, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Donald W. Edwards; Suzanne S. Edwards; Colin Dunbar; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION -CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE TO: Colin Dunbar Last Known Address: 4095 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT 3,381.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 160.4 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 40.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365; THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 33 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A 2 INCH IRON PIPE ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365 TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 17 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 31 SECONDS EAST A DISTANCE OF 278.63 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 49 MINUTES EAST ALONG A FENCE LINE 117.4 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 27 DEGREES 10 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID FENCE LINE 78.3 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF FRANCES SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES EAST ALONG SAID Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 WANTED! School Bus Drivers

PAGE 28

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 9B CJIS GROUP Inc.,a Market Research firm, has a full time position opening. Potential candidates must be dependable, focused, and capable of meeting production quotas. Good grammar, reading and writing skills are required. Daily job tasks include cold calling government officials, conducting investigative interviews, researching government doc-uments, and report writing. The starting/training salary ranges from $20K to $24K based on qualifications, with continuing increases based on production. CJIS GROUP benefits include 11 paid holidays, monthly leave accrual, Health, Dental, Suppl. Ins, and 401K. Please E-mail resume to gina@cjisgroup.com CJIS GROUP LLC.,Crawfordville, FL, has an open position for an Office Administrator. The position requires a mature individual with work experience in HR administration and general office management. Responsibilities will include human resources, recruiting, benefits, employee supervision, facilities and office management, administrative duties, and support with special projects. Salary commensurate with experience, benefits include 11 holidays, monthly leave accrual, health, dental and 401(K). Please E-mail Resume to: David Heinemann, CEO, CJIS GROUP at dheinemann@ cjisgroup.com. DRIVERS 25 DriverTrainees Needed NOW! Learn to drive for Werner Enterprises. Earn $750 per week! No experience needed Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days 1-888-368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 877-741-9260 www .fixjet s.com New Refrigerator, Frigridaire, side by side Cost New $800-$1,000 Asking $400. (850) 926-7473 CRAWFORDVILLE, FLSaturday May 24, 7:00am to 3:00pm at 36 Covington Circle Antiques -lamps,dressers,mirrors,ta bles & misc items. Also girls twin bed & dresser, clothes, couch, kingsize bedframe toys,lots of items. or call 850-321-2703. CRAWFORDVILLE ESTATE SALE Friday 23rd & Saturday 24th 9am 2758 Spring Creek Hwy CrawfordvilleFriday & Saturday 8am-5pm ESTATE SALE 466 River Plantation Road Chinese porcelain, oriental rugs, TVs, primitive hooked rugs, antiques, 50s collectibles, mahogany tables, lamps, bistro set, china cabinet, wing chairs, bar stools, tools, books, rain barrel waterford crystal and china. MUCH MORE (850) 745-8494 $ $ Absolute Bargain New Qn Pillow-top Mattress $150. (850) 745-4960 CRAWFORDVILLE4/2, DW MH, on 1 Acres, Nice & Well Maintained 1,900 sf, $900. mo. 144 Leslie Circle Available for Sale (850)443-3300 MEDART AREA3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking. References required. $650mo., $400/Security no inside pets (352) 493-2232 LAKEFRONT Mobile Home on 300 foot lot along Lake Ellen Dr at boat ramp. 14 ft wide, 2 Br/1Ba, Screen porch, CHA, kitchen equiped $80,000 (850) 576-2695 CRA WFORDVILLE 2BR/1BA CozyCottage on large wooded lot. 1266 MLK Memorial Blvd. West of Spring Creek Hwy. Close to Crawfordville area schools. CH/A, diswasher, laundry room with W/D. Seperatestorage shed/garage. $700/mo, security dep, pet deposit, and references required. 850 926 7439 or 850 294 8654 CRAWFORDVILLENewly Remodeled 3Bedroom/2Bath; W/D Hook-up, $850. month plus Dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLELooking for individual to share my 3 bedroom, 2 Bath, 2 Car Garage home. $400 + half utilities (elec + cable) (850) 509-3456 25 Shadow Oaks Circle 3 bedroom 2 bath home in safe and quiet neighborhood. 1486 sf, on .5 acre lot. 159,900 ONE ACRE, qtr cleared, qtr woodedwith septic, & light pool, city water. Mobile home and shed on property that must be moved. $12,000 ** Negotiable ** (850)519-4830 Bank Owned Auction-160+/1 Acres Divided of Higher Elevation Pasture & Timber Land with Beautiful Views for Miles in Clyde, NC, Haywood County. Saturday, May 31st at 11am. Auction At Haywood County Fairgrounds, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc. ir onhorse auction.com 800-997-2248. NCAL3936 GANOEGalvanized Trailer with 4 stroke Outboard motor, $1,500. (850) 926-7473 Sheas Family Child Care has openings for children ages one to five yrs old for the Summer and the 2014-15 School year. Contact Betty Shea 850-933-2747. Church Pianist and Pastors Assistant seeking church to serve P/T. Retired husband & wife team, very exp. & Inter-denominational salary & mileage reqd (850) 878-3850 SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY 590.28 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SPOTTSWOOD PROPERTY 60.15 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF THE HANCOCK PROPERTY 150 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 44 DEGREES 31 MINUTES WEST 227.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF A CANAL, THENCE RUN NORTH 25 DEGREES 20 MINUTES WEST 275.5 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH IRON PIPE AT THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER OF EDWARD JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREE 47 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 238 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE AT THE NORTHEASTERLY CORNER OF SAID JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 59 DEGREES 40 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID JONES PROPERTY 118 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 00 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 40.4 FEET TO A 3/4 INCH PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE NORTHERN BOUNDARY OF JAKE RAULERSON PROPERTY 99.8 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 25 DEGREES 10 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID RAULERSON PROPERTY AND 70 FEET TO A POINT IN A CANAL, THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 45 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID CANAL 88.45 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 55 DEGREES 57 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID CANAL 24.85 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 44 DEGREES 51 MINUTES WEST 47.8 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS, IN WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT A PERPETUAL EASEMENT FOR THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED ROADWAY, TO WIT: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE WEST LINE OF SAID LOT THE DISTANCE OF 3,381.48 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 48 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 160.4 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 41 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 40.0 FEET TO A POINT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 33 DEGREES 22 MINUTES EAST A DISTANCE OF 200 FEET TO A 2 INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE CONTINUE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT A CHORD BEARING OF NORTH 23 DEGREES 43 MINUTES EAST 60.3 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES EAST 97.7 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 65 DEGREES 50 MINUTES EAST 59.6 FEET TO THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF JAKE RAULERSON PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID RAULERSON PROPERTY 99.8 FEET TO THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF EDWARD JONES PROPERTY, THENCE RUN NORTH 21 DEGREES WEST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID JONES PROPERTY 23.2 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 82 DEGREES 42 MINUTES WEST 42.3 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 44 MINUTES WEST 46.35 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 65 DEGREES 50 MINUTES WEST 55 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 51 DEGREES 04 MINUTES WEST 100.65 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LIMITS OF STATE ROAD S-365, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY 15.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 115 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Yashmin Chen-Alexis, Esquire, Brock & Scott, PLLC., the Plaintifs attorney, whose address is 1501 N.W. 49th Street, Suite 200, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, on or before June 20, 2014, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on May 13, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. 13-F 04995 5076-0529 TWN vs. The Sights and Sounds Co. of Wakulla, Inc. 13-38-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-38-CA CRE VENTURE 2011-1, LLC a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. 5078-0529 TWN vs. Langford, Mary L. heirs 2014 CA 000005 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2014 CA 000005 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARY L. LANGFORD, ET AL., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, AND OTHER UNKNOWN PERSONS OR UNKNOWN SPOUSES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST MARY L. LANGFORD LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: Lot 34, Block M of Aqua De Vida, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 12, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Monica D. Shepard, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 13th day of May, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. B&H# 337855 THE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA, INC., a Florida corporation, NORMAN D. SHEPPARD an individual, MILDRED C. SHEPPARD, an individual, AMERICAN EXPRESS BANK a federal savings bank, and FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION, in its capacity as receiver for WAKULLA BANK, UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 2, and UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION 3 Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered on March 5, 2014, in that certain cause pending in the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein THE SIGHTS AND SOUNDS COMPANY OF WAKULLA, INC., a Florida corporation, NORMAN D. SHEPPARD, an individual, MILDRED C. SHEPPARD, an individual, AMERICAN EXPRESS BANK a federal savings bank, FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION, in its capacity as receiver for WAKULLA BANK, CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC and SEAVENTURES USA, INC. d/b/a Down Under Dive Center, are the Defendants, in Civil Action Case No.: 2013-38-CA, I, Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the aforesaid Court, will at 11:00 a.m., on June 12, 2014, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property, situate and being in Wakulla County, Florida to-wit: REAL PROPERTY: COMMENCE at a nail & cap marking the Northeast corner of Lot 76, THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; thence run South 72 49 47 West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 76, a distance of 1047.37 feet to the Westerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. 369; thence run South 18 37 47 West along said right-of-way boundary, a distance of 277.95 feet to a concrete monument and the POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE continue South 18 37 47 West along said right-of-way boundary, a distance of 129.84 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run North 71 19 32 West, a distance of 182.87 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run South 73 12 37 West, a distance of 101.31 feet to a nail & cap; THENCE run North 16 56 53 West, a distance of 135.52 feet to a re-rod on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of the Wakulla-Arran Road; THENCE run North 73 24 48 East along said right-of-way boundary, a distance of 200.10 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run South 16 50 03 East, a distance of 135.40 feet to a concrete monument; THENCE run North 73 04 22 East, a distance of 125.67 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER with all right, title and interest of, in and to any streets and roads abutting the above described premises. LESS AND EXCEPT COMMENCE at the Northeast corner of Lot 76 of THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; thence run South 72 49 47 West a distance of 1047.37 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 319; thence run along said right of way South 18 37 47 West a distance of 407.79 feet to a concrete monument; thence leaving said right of way run North 71 19 32 West, a distance of 182.87 feet to a concrete monument and the POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 73 12 37 West, a distance of 101.31 feet to a nail and cap; THENCE run North 16 56 53 West, a distance of 135.52 feet to a rod and cap lying on the Southerly right of way of Wakulla/Arran Road; THENCE run along said right of way North 73 24 48 East, a distance of 170.67 feet; THENCE leaving said right of way run South 16 01 55 West, a distance of 84.66 feet; THENCE run South 04 43 39 East, a distance of 55.23 feet; THENCE run South 33 05 49 West, a distance of 15.06 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established except as herein before set forth, in accordance with Fla.Stat. 45.031. The highest bidder for purposes of this Notice of Sale, is defined as the party who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property and who completes the sale in a timely fashion, as hereinafter set out. The one who bids the largest amount of money to purchase the Property shall be permitted to complete the sale by delivering to the Clerk, the balance of such bid, over and above the deposit, by 4:30 p.m. on the day of sale. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: March 5, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By /s/ Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, Office of Court Administration, 301 S. Monroe Street, Rm. 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4430, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 22 & 29, 2014. 2719652:1 5075-0529 TWN vs. Tucker, Kimberly D. 10-00199 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS2 /2 $750. mo., $750 Deposit 3/2, $925. mo., $925 Deposit 2/2, $850. mo., $850 Deposit 3/2, $950. mo., $950 Deposit 3/2, $750. mo., $800 Deposit Stunning 4 bedroom, 3 bath home in the desirable Sweetwater Ridge Subdivision. Living room has stone replace with gorgeous entertainment center. Eat in kitchen with all upgraded appliances. Elegant dining room with wood oors and trey ceiling. Sunroom/family room with loads of windows overlooking sparkling in ground pool. Spacious master suite with beautiful master bath. 2 large bedrooms upstairs with cozy 31 x 13 bonus room with replace over garage. 35 x 45 Morton building w 3 bays, electricity, and concrete oor. Separate workshop/garage insulated and has air conditioner. 5 acres, professionally landscaped and fenced with long driveway and lots of parking. Please call owner for appointment or more information. (850) 545-2312. Virtual tour can be seen on Youtube, just type in address. Asking $425,000. Owner will work with licensed Realtors. FOR SALE BY OWNER 107 SWEETWATER CIRCLE, CRAWFORDVILLE Specializing in new home constructionCongratulations JANE ROBINSONTOP PRODUCERAPRIL 2014 COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 850 545-4294jrobinsoncoastwise@embarqmail.com Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has 46 Savannah Forrest 636 Coastal Hwy. 98 B5 Marina Village 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 7 Big White Oak Lane Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyEED TO RET YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE4 Br 1 Ba Hs $750 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $875 mo.3 Br 1 1/2 Ba Hs, $900 mo. 3 Br 2 1/2 Ba Twnhs, $900 mo. 3 Br. 2 Ba Hs, $850 mo. 1500 sq ft $1500 mo. Crawfordville 700 sq ft $700 mo. Tallahassee RENTALS: COMMERCIAL Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

PAGE 29

Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.com 5061-0522 TWN Vs. Falk, Jennifer L. Estate 2014-81-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-81-CA CAPITAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, v. THE ESTATE OF JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED; THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED; STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE; UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE RURAL HOUSING SERVICE; WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JENNIFER L. FALK A/K/A JENNIFER LYNN FALK, DECEASED : YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the real property located at 480 Lonnie Raker Lane, Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida being more particularly described as follows: Begin at a concrete monument marking the intersection of the Northeasterly right of way of State Road Number 267 with the South Boundary of Section 32, Township 2 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence run East along the South boundary of Section 32 for a distance of 476.00 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly maintained right of way of Lonnie Raker Road; thence run along said maintained right of way South 00 degrees 46 minutes 39 seconds East 291.73 feet to a rod and cap lying on the intersection of said maintained right of way and the Northeasterly right of way of State Road Number 267 also being a point of curve to the right having a radius of 2814.93; thence run Northwesterly along said right of way of 478.88 feet with a central angle of 09 degrees 44 minutes 50 seconds, chord of said arc being North 59 degrees 25 minutes 31 seconds West 478.30 feet to a concrete monument; thence continue along said right of way North 54 degrees 36 minutes 59 seconds West 83.60 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on GARVIN B. BOWDEN, the plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A., 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, within 30 days of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on the plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED: May 5, 2014.BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court(SEAL) BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 15 & 22, 2014. 13267304 5062-0522 TWN vs. Morris, Charles Wayne 652013CA000252CAAXMX Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652013CA000252CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES WAYNE MORRIS; DEBRA ELAINE MORRIS A/K/A DEBRA MORRIS, ET AL. Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 652013CA000252CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC (hereafter Plaintiff ), is Plaintiff and and CHARLES WAYNE MORRIS; DEBRA ELAINE MORRIS A/K/A DEBRA MORRIS; THE GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE I PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCITION, INC., are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT DOOR of the Courthouse; 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, at 11:00 a.m., on the 19th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 58, BLOCK A OF GARDENS OF SARALAN, PHASE I, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 77-78 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Dated this 5 day of May, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk Van Ness Law Firm, PLC 1239 E. Newport Center Drive Suite #110, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442 Phone: (954) 571-2031 Fax: (954) 571-2033, Pleadings@vanlawfl.com Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. May 15 & 22, 2014. NS2659-13/cl 5063-0515 TWN vs. Victoriana-Powell, April M. 65-2013-CA-000011 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000011 Division: FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB Plaintiff, vs. APRIL M. VICTORIANA-POWELL; ET AL. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated April 7, 2014, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2013-CA-000011, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB is Plaintiff, and APRIL M. VICTORIANA-POWELL; SAMUEL B. POWELL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMUEL B. POWELL; GIBBES MILLER CONSTRUCTION, INC.; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendant(s). BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Court, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m. in front lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 29th day of May, 2014 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 19 AND THE WEST HALF OF LOT 20, BLOCK 11 OF GRIENERS ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on May 5, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff:Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 350 Jim Moran Blvd, Suite 100, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442 Telephone: (954) 354-3544 Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 15 & 22, 2014. 3524ST-40814 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 28, 2014. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT: DANNY DAVIS, COURT TECHNOLOGY OFFICE, OFFICE OF COURT ADMINISTRATION, 301 S MONROE ST, RM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, AT LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711 By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of Court, Wakulla County (COURT SEAL) MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C., Attorney for the Plaintiff 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 644-8704; Fax: (954) 772-9601 ServiceFL@mlg-defaultlaw.com ServiceFL2@mlg-defaultlaw.com May 15 & 22, 2014 11-11959 5065-0522 TWN vs. Yates, Jason D. 65-2013-CA-000203 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000203 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. JASON D. YATES; SHAWN E. YATES; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on March 11, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 15, OF ELLENWOOD, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 10 AND 11, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on June 12, 2014 at 11:00 A.M. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dated this 11th day of March, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716 PHONE 727-536-4911 FAX 727-539-1094 EFILING@DCZAHM.COM IF YOU HAVE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDSANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. May 15 & 22, 2014. 888131142 5066-0522 TWN vs. Parker, Gregory E. 10000304CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 10000304CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. GREGORY E. PARKER, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of foreclosure dated January 24, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10000304CA of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is Plaintiff, and GREGORY E. PARKER, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 12 day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 13, Block R, Hudson Heights, Unit 4, addition to Crawfordville, Florida, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 38, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: April 23, 2014 Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Tel: 954-462-7000 Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Lindsay R. Dunn Phelan Hallinan, PLC Linda R. Dunn, Esq., Florida Bar No. 55740 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303. 850-577-4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 15 & 22, 2014 PH # 14192 5067-0522 TWN vs. Harper, Marylynn M. 2013-CA-000352 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2013-CA-000352 VANDERBILT MORTGAGE AND FINANCE, INC., a Tennessee Corporation, P.O. Box 9800 Maryville, TN 37802 Plaintiff, v. MARYLYNN M. HARPER, HOUSEHOLD FINANCE CORPORATION III, THE UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 1196 SOPCHOPPY HIGHWAY, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THAT CERTAIN TRACT OF LAND CONVEYED TO C.K. GREEN BY JOHN C. HODGE BY DEED DATED NOVEMBER 29, 1941 AND RECORDED ON PAGE 10 OF DEED BOOK 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT OF LAND THE DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH PARALLEL WITH THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT OF LAND THE DISTANCE OF 300 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 319 (OLD STATE ROAD NO. 10), THENCE RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF SAID U.S. #319 THE DISTANCE OF 50 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF THE ABOVE MENTIONED TRACT OF LAND, THENCE RUN NORTH ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID TRACT OF LAND 300 FEET, MORE OR LESS TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, BEING IN THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER (SW1/4 OF SW1/4) OF SECTION FOUR (4), TOWNSHIP FIVE (5) SOUTH, RANGE TWO (2) WEST. COMMONLY KNOWN AS 1196 SOPCHOPPY HIGHWAY, SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358. at public sale on June 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, to the highest bidder for cash, in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 CLERK OF COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 15 & 22, 2014. 5068-0522 TWN Vs. Lancaster, Stephen 09000496CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09000496CAAXMX 5071-0522 TWN vs. Pope, Daniel N. 65-2012-CA-000088 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2012-CA-000088 PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. DANIEL N. POPE AKA DANIEL POPE, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DANIEL N. POPE AKA DANIEL POPE, JESSICA POPE, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JESSICA POPE, ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, THENANT #1 AND TENANT #2 Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 5, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000088 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Corporation, is the Plaintiff and Daniel N. Pope aka Daniel Pope and Jessica Pope, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 5th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 44 AND 45, BLOCK 10, WAKULLA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 3 PAWNEE TRL CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327-2877 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 5 day of May, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile E-Serve: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 May 15 & 22, 2014. 001338F01 5073-0529 TWN vs. Smith, William Earl 13-282-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-282-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA 39828, Plaintiff, v. WILLIAM EARL SMITH A/K/A WILLIAM E. SMITH II, SHERRY SMITH A/K/A SHERRY LEE SMITH, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM EARL SMITH A/K/A WILLIAM E. SMITH II, and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHERRY SMITH A/K/A SHERRY LEE SMITH, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: TRACT 4 COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, 1660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11391.20 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 210.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 10.65 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST 327.93 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 74 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST 161.81 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES WEST 325.81 FEET, THENCE NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 151.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A NON-EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 49 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1660.43 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 11391.20 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 170.65 FEET, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 210.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES EAST 155.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 15.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 06 MINUTES WEST 155.49 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 210.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY 98, AND THENCE RUN WESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 15.00 FEET, MORE OR LESS, TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1992 GMC TRUCK WITH VIN #1GTGK24N3NE554606 Commonly known as: 4735 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, on June 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. 5074-0529 TWN vs. Lastowski, Steven P. 2014-CA-000007 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2014-CA-000007 CENTENNIAL BANK an Arkansas banking corporation authorized to transact business in Florida Plaintiff, vs. STEVEN P. LASTOWSKI, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2 Defendant. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Lot 3, Block B of A REPLAT OF LOTS 16 THRU 36 OF SNUG HARBOR, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 117, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at the Clerks office in the Courthouse of Wakulla County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 19th day of June, 2014. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNERS AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated this 6th day of May, 2014. Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk May 22 & 29, 2014. 5064-0522 TWN vs. Martin, Frances E. 65-2012-CA-000026 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000026 Division #: WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. FRANCES E. MARTIN ET. AL.; Defendants NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 23, 2013, in the above-styled cause, the Clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 A.M. on June 5, 2014, the following described property: LOT 6, BLOCK C HIGHWOODS PLACE, PHASE 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 66 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 1999 PALM TITLE #77489861 & 77489858 AND ID #PH164090A AND PH 164090B. Property Address: 40 RIDGEWAY COURT, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 10-00199 DIVISION: U.S. BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY D. TUCKER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 22, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10-00199 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank, N.A.,, is the Plaintiff and Kimberly D. Tucker, Todd W. Tucker, Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lendingtree Loans, a California Corporation, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 12th day of June, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 37, BLOCK A, OF MAGNOLIA RIDGE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 55 THROUGH 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 204 MAGNOLIA RIDGE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 23rd day of April, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff: Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901 May 22 & 29, 2014. 10-38222 LOANCARE, A DIVISION OF FNF SERVICING, INC. PLAINTIFF, VS. STEPHAN LANCASTER, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on June 12, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for the following described property: Lot 10, Replat of Lake Ellen Shores, Phase I, as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 8 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with a 1995 MERI MOBILE HOME VIN #FLHML2F56012287A AND FLHML2F56012287B, TITLE NOS, 69495209 AND 69492510 and VIN#FLHML2F56012287C, TITLE NO. 69495211. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: February 12, 2014 [COURT SEAL] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of the Court Gladstone Law Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 May 15 & 22, 2014. 08-000194 5077-0522 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EMILE JUSTIN MEYER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 981 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 09-6S-01W-000-04864-003 Description of property: 9-6S-1W P-1-3-M-60-1 LYING IN SEC 9-6S-1W OR 77 P624 Name in which assessed _SYCAMORE CREEK INC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on June 4, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: May 18, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Published May 22, 2014. Tax Deed Notices 5069-0522 TWN 5/30 sale PUBLIC NOTICE LEGAL NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Seminole Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid May 30, 2014 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. May 15 & 22, 2014. May 30, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, of the contents of MiniWarehouse containing personal property of: ANGELA FORD ED UNDERWOOD Before the sale date of Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices

PAGE 30

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 Page 11B 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is a sheet of printed stamps called? 2. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of Canadas Northwest Territories? 3. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a baby bat called? 4. MUSIC: How many holes does the musical instrument called a recorder have? 5. LANGUAGE: What is a lazaretto? 6. ARCHITECTURE: What is adobe made of? 7. MYTHOLOGY: Who was the Greek god of medicine? 8. DISCOVERIES: Who is credited with discovering the air brake? 9. BIRTHSTONES: What is Februarys traditional birthstone? 10. MATH: What is the Arabic equivalent of the Roman numeral CMXC? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. A pane 2. Yellowknife 3. A pup 4. Seven in the front and a thumbhole in the back 5. A place to quarantine people with infectious disease, such as leprosy 6. The building material is made of dried earth and straw. 7. Asclepius 8. George Westinghouse 9. Amethyst 10. 990 Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

PAGE 31

Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 22, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsWhats in a name? This one, devised by travel agents in the 1950s, describes the road between Wurzburg and Fussen, Germany. An apt description given youll get to explore storybook German villages full of multi-story plaster and timber houses crafted to fairytale perfection on what was once a trade route. The crown jewel of them all is Rotenberg ob der Tauber. This 13th century medieval walled city is lled with narrow lanes and alleys, half-timbered houses and clock towers that chime on the hour. A fully intact city wall, 1.5 miles long, is still lined by battlements and circled by stairs and walkways; perfect for exploring. At its peak in the 15th century the city was home to around 6,000 residents, at a time when Germanys major cities had not even been settled. The city was constructed at a time when security was paramount. Gates were closed nightly to prevent attack. Perched high above the valley floor the charming fountains served an added purpose. Cisterns located under the fountains would continue to provide fresh water even in the event of a prolonged siege. Today the number of visitors dwarfs the number of residents.Annually around 2.5 million tourists include a day trip here on their itinerary, but a fractional number spend the night. With so much charm, just go ahead and plan to stay. Every pastry shop window is full of softball shaped desserts. Constructed of shortcrust, which is similar to a piecrust. The baker splashes it with plum schnapps and winds it around the handle of a spoon to form its shape. They are covered by chocolate, confectioners sugar, or nuts and sometimes lled with marzipan, this treat has been served here for over 400 years. With a name like schneeball, you simply have to sample one Climb to the top of the town hall tower located in the citys center market square. For only 1 Euro, plus the challenge of ascending the 241 steps, you are rewarded with a birds eye view of the city. The citys most famous site is the church of St Jacob. Home to a relic that purports to contain some of Jesus blood, it has drawn many pilgrims. Today the citys churches are mostly Lutheran, although they were built before the time of Martin Luther. A city policy that the church will be the denomination of the city council, brought the changes, and in its time those that did not change their religion, simply lost all their property. Not to be missed is the Medieval Crime and Punishment Museum. A glimpse at some of these diabolical horrors will leave you glad youre a 21st century visitor. Include a visit to the Katie Wolhlfahrt Christmas shop. Stroll through rooms chocked full of different style ornaments, trees and themes. Explore the Christmas Museum, with old Christmas cards, advent calendars, and ornaments, even mini Christmas trees sent to World War II soldiers. Encompassing a huge display, the throng of tourists makes even moving in this winter wonderland challenging, but worthwhile. Like many German cities, almost 40 percent of the city was destroyed during World War II. Partially rebuilt with private donations from all over the world after the war, it is once again historically accurate. Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www.luxurycruise-travel. com.Follow Germanys Romantic Road to Rotenberg PHOTOS BY LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL Storybook buildings in Rotenberg, above, and a gate to the city, below. Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 21, Noon Publication Date: June 5 Remember This Years Graduate Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by The Wakulla News CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2014Sponsor Line ........$25 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available LUNCH PARTNER FREE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER