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By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netWakulla Countians and visitors across the region are more likely to make sustainable lifestyle choices after visiting the Green Living Expo in Crawfordville Saturday.Hudson Park and the TCC Wakulla campus were buzzing with edutainment as part of the Sustainable Big Bend event, which featured interesting exhibits, enthralling talks and fun activities. Madeline Carr, one of the many who helped organize the event, said the goal of the expo was to encourage Wakulla County to be more aware of what it means to live a sustainable life at home and in our daily habits. The Green Living Expo certainly achieved this objective, Carr said. This Green Living Expo was about providing a vision for people to think. Hopefully visitors had fun and left with the idea that there is plenty of room in all our lives to spark some thoughts about whether we can continue to sustain our current state of thoughtless wastefulness. Eleanor Dietrich, Panhandle Wildflower Alliance liaison with the state Department of Transportation, presented a talk about the importance of wild owers in the food chain. She said Wakulla County has been instrumental in changing right-of-way DOT mowing policies in the state. Plants and animals are the rivets that hold the ecosystem together, Dietrich said. Wild owers are a particularly important part of the food web. Its not just something pretty on the roadside plants are a matter of life and death. Dietrich said because so many insects depend on wild owers for survival, their food source is destroyed when they are mowed on right-of-ways. If there are no insects, there is no food for small animals. Eventually the loss of wild owers impacts humans at the top of the chain. She said wildflower areas should be identied and reported to the Panhandle Wildflower Alliance. Visit flawildflowers.org/fpwa.php and click on concern or praise link. There is also a Facebook page. Visitors also had a chance to calculate their impact on the climate through a carbon footprint calculator at the computer lab. A simple online quiz measured the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses individual or household choices create annually. Lynn Artz, another organizer who helped monitor the lab, said people in the U.S. account for less than 5 percent of the worlds population, yet we are responsible for 20 percent of global carbon emissions. The average carbon footprint of a US household is about 50 tons of carbon dioxide equivalents per year. The quiz can be access from any home computer by visiting www.nature. org/greenliving/carboncalculator/ or www.myfootprint.org. After a sustainable gardening presentation by Trevor Hylton, family and consumer sciences extension agent Shelley Swenson demonstrated how to create delicious and healthy salads from the garden. We are losing the battle with health in this country, Swenson said. With heart disease, diabetes and obesity, this is the rst time that we expect our kids to have a shorter lifespan than us. Half our plate at the end of the day needs to be fruit and vegetables salads are a great solution. Swenson lled a mixing bowl with fresh kale and handed participant Rodney Peacock rubber gloves to massage the leafy green super food. Massaging the kale mellows it, Swenson said. It has over 800 percent of vitamin K in a serving, which is good for blood and healing. While iceberg lettuce is popular, Swenson said it has limited nutritional value. She said the more color in your lettuce, the better. Delicate lettuces like arugula and spinach are available everywhere. She added that Bay Leaf Market sells organic kale by the bagful. Turn to Page 15ABy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netJerry Moore announced this week he would be seeking re-election as county commissioner for district 4. Moore, a Republican, has served one fouryear term on the board. Three potential challengers have filed to run against him, Steve Cushman and Bill Anderson, both of whom are running without party affiliation, and Steve Fults, a Republican, led on Monday and would face Moore in the GOP primary in August. When I ran in 2010, I said I would not vote for any taxes, he said. I have not voted for any taxes and I will pledge that, if elected, I will not vote for any taxes. Moore said that politicians often lose sight of who put them in of ce. The people who elected me, want me to work really hard for jobs, he said, adding that he had also worked to make the county more business-friendly, and said it was also a priority to send wetlands back to the state. In 2010, he said, I ran on business and jobs and nothings changed... Business pays the cost of government, provides jobs, builds neighborhoods and pays taxes. No longer in Wakulla do people who want to do business fear the county government. Since the change in leadership in 2012 of our county government, we are now open for business clean business. As an example, the new TCC Environmental Institute, which will create 950 jobs when completed. Moore also noted that, in 2012, there were 80 building permits pulled for single-family homes in the county. For the first quarter of 2014, there have already been 41 permits pulled. If that trend continues at the same rate, that would be 160 permits for the year, a 100 percent increase over two years ago, Moore said. One issue that has been a de ning one for his term is the repeal of the county ordinance that created 75-foot buffers around wetlands.Turn to Page 2A Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .................................................................Pages 8-9A School .....................................................................Pages 10-11A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 3B Taking Care of Business ..............................................Pages 4-5B Senior Citizens Celebrate Life ....................................Pages 6-7B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 10B Thinking Outside the Book ............................................Page 11B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 12B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 15BINDEX OBITUARIES E.W. Captain Ed Bradley Jr. Cynthia Carol Glover Donna Diane Council Harrell Slaughter Waldo E. Thomas Dave Gary Whitlock Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 18th Issue Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 1BSports SportsGreen Living Expo educates and entertainsWILLIAM SNOWDENVirginia and Jerry Moore at last weekends NAMI Derby.LEAH BOWMAN/Special to The NewsA rain barrel demonstration by Jeannie Brodhead at the Green Living Expo at Hudson Park.Panacea city bill languishesJerry Moore seeks re-election to county commissionBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netHigh hopes for the incorporation of the City of Panacea were dashed two weeks ago, when the bill failed to move on from committee to the oor of the Florida Legislature. Lifelong Panacea resident Ronald Fred Crum said he and other community members have tried for four years to get the incorporation initiative on the ballot. Crum believes being an of cial city will mean more jobs and opportunity in the area. District leaders are con dent the bill will progress to the Florida House next session. Incorporated communities are ourishing, Crum said. Being incorporated would give us the ability to ght for ourselves. If youre sinking, youve got to do something. State Rep. Halsey Beshears said the analyst for the Local and State Affairs Committee does not feel like the numbers, in terms of validation of tax receipts, support the incorporation of Panacea at this time. Its not validated or justi able because they havent been vetted in terms of what Panacea can and cannot support, Beshears said. Thats part of the quandary. Panacea is doing the best they can with what they have. But what they are asking for is not 100 percent possible. Crum said he and other community members want to present a case for incorporating Panacea to the committee. Turn to Page 5BSustainable Wakulla Sustainable Wakulla Rep. Halsey Beshears con dent that bill will move to house next sessionWar Eagles win softball, baseball playoff games NICOLE ZEMAShelley Swenson prepares a kale salad at the Growing and feasting on salads presentation, as Rodney and Terry Peacock look on. Rock the Dock Rock the DockPage 9B Page 9B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom the Front PageMoore contends that only 6/10ths of 1 percent of nitrogen and other pollutants harming Wakulla Springs and the aquifer come from within Wakulla County. So what are the buffers intended to protect wetlands from? The stream ow into the Wakulla Springs basin is 98 percent beyond Wakullas borders, and the major pollutor is the Tallahassee sprayfield on Tram Road in south Leon County none of which would change or be helped by the wetlands buffers, he said. With environmental issues, there is no easy answer and I refuse to let anyone scientists, biologists or otherwise to lay the blame on the citizens of Wakulla for the damage to the environment. At the same time, he acknowledged that You cannot turn around in Wakulla County without being in a wetland. But he countered that Ninety-nine percent of Wakulla citizens care and protect wetlands and they do not need to be slapped with additional restrictions on the use of their property because of the perception of what 1 percent may do. With the new FEMA flood maps creating more restrictions on development, Moore warned that, If we keep throwing restrictions on our lands, only the wealthy will be able in live in Wakulla County and that just doesnt y. He claimed that Its only the wealthy who are advocating wetlands restrictions. Between the Apalachicola National Forest, the Wakulla State Forest, the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and the new FEMA maps, we will absolutely have so little land available that your children wont be able to live here only the wealthy, Moore said. Theres probably only 100 lots on the coast where you build now, Moore estimated. One issue Moore has worked on is trying to nd property for a recreation park in the northern part of the county. He negotiated for a 175-acre parcel in the Shadeville area, but the deal fell through twice. Now hes excited about a 100-acre parcel near Wal-Mart that the county could exchange to the U.S. Forest Service for the horse arena with the Wakulla County Horsemans Association keeping rights to use the property where the arena is currently located. Its a total win-win for the county, Moore said. With a rec park in the northern part of the county which has been desperately needed the mothers all wont have to spend all day driving kids back and forth on 98 Highway. Moore was enthusiastic that a new rec park could generate money from tournaments for the county. A proper facility can bring 3,000 to 5,000 people in a weekend to the county and when the tournaments over, they go home, he said. The money generated from tournaments could help underwrite the costs for local youth to participate, and might help cover the cost of the community center if the current grants that support it dont continue in the future. Moore was born in 1941 in North Carolina, attended Young Harris College and later the School of Pharmacy at Auburn University, where he graduated in 1964. His wife of 47 years, Virginia, is originally from DeFuniak Springs. They have two children, David and Donna, both graduates of the University of Georgia. Moore was involved in real estate in Atlanta, in sales and management and later development. The Moores moved to Wakulla in 2004 because of the outdoors acitivities they had enjoyed here. Jerry Moore seeks re-election to county commission NAMI Triple Crown Derby Top: Ladies line up for the hat contest, left; a horse and rider competing in barrel racing; Middle: NAMI Wakullas Susie Tookes and Joann Strickland, left; Katrina Cochran in the shooting competition, center; Dr. Ed Gardner and Judy Hampton enjoy the events; Bottom: kids sit on a fence rail to watch the races, left; and celebrity horse owner Dalynda Vauses horse won the competition. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111 Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 TILE ~ CARPET ~ WOOD ~ LAMINATE ~ VINYLKaren Richardson, Interior Design Consultant850-491-3358www.SouthernFlooring.net Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING SETTING THE STANDARD WITH Style Saturday Only May 3 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms IN-SHORE FISHING IS HOT AND SO IS THE WEATHER HOOK UP YOUR BOAT See us for All your boating supplies!Troll In for Grouper Gear GROUPER SEASON IS GROUPERSEASON IS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Please RecycleBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Board of Commissioners took up issues with wetlands ordinance language, veterans affairs, and a DOT realignment project at the meeting on April 21. A request for board approval of a resolution certifying the wetlands ordinance for referendum hit a snag because the ballot summary did not exactly match the language on a petition signed by 30 percent of Wakulla Countys registered voters. The motion passed 3-2. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said the ballot message was not changed, but supplemented. The ballot language has been supplemented with some additional information in order to provide a clear message to the voter about what theyre voting on, Encinosa said. The proposed ballot summary cannot exceed 75 words. Nine community members, and a newly retained attorney for the Wetlands Alliance, took an opportunity to address the board about the wetlands issue. Me, personally, Im thinking if I signed a petition to get it on the ballot, thats the wording I would want, said citizen Chris Russell. Ross Burnaman, a Tallahassee lawyer who represents the Wetlands Alliance, told commissioners: We urge you to adopt the resolution. With the revisions made by the county attorney, we believe that the proposed resolution and ballot title and summary meet the statutory requirements. So, the alliance believes that the revised ballot title and summary is legally suf cient, and urges adoption of the resolution. Wilson Cook spoke to support the original language on the resolution. The new language doesnt quite re ect exactly whats going on, Cook said. It seems to have left out the agricultural, as well as 35-foot setback restrictions, so it doesnt really cover what it initially was. Its only been a couple years that weve been under a charter, and I believe that requires that the different city of cers do certain functions, and I dont think our county attorney is appropriate for coming in and changing the wording on this already sufficient document. Commissioner Ralph Thomas said he was concerned if the board has the authority to change the language on the resolution. (The alliance) went out and got 30 percent signatures based on that proposed ballot summary, Thomas said. I dont think we should have the authority to change the proposed ballot summary or the ordinance. I think the intent of this citizens initiative was for it to move forward as it was presented. I am suggesting we allow it to move forward exactly the way it was proposed to the citizens. Encinosa said it is important that voters who arent familiar with the wetlands issue know what they are voting for. The intent of the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance has been preserved, which is to put the existing wetlands ordinance on the books, and provide that it can only be amended per repeal by another voter referendum, she said. We have used most of the wording they used, and added additional details so that when the voter steps in that ballot box, who has no idea whats going on with the wetlands ordinance, they at least know what it does and what it covers. Board Chairman Richard Harden pointed out that the Wetlands Alliance did approve the rewritten ballot summary. I want to thank our county attorney for going ahead and making contact with the alliance and letting them know the change and allowing them to view the language before tonight, Harden said. But Thomas was still uneasy. I understand this is cleaner, but unless we go back to the original, Im going to oppose this tonight, Thomas said. I think were in a dangerous place to change midstream. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he would vote with Thomas. The board approved the resolution certifying the wetlands ordinance for referendum 3-2. Voters can expect to see the new wetlands ordinance summary on the November ballot. In other matters: The board voted to approve an order for an engineering study on the relocation of utilities for the road widening and realignment project at the 319 and 98 intersection. Commissioner Moore recused himself from voting because he owns the property, and did not want there to be a con ict of interest. It passed 3-1. County Administrator David Edwards said DOT will study the intersection for realignment, and return the estimate for what it will cost to move a sewer. The engineering study will cost $13,425, which will be paid for out of the countys sewer fund. Edwards said the sewer force main has to be moved, because when the road widens, there will not be access to it for maintenance and repair. The sewer currently runs parallel to the road, so if the road widens 10 feet, the sewer line will need to move 10 feet also, he said. Commissioner Howard Kessler was concerned about the cost to the county, and voted against it. A group of veterans came to the meeting, asking the board to reinstate a full-time veterans service of cer in the county. A service of cer from Gadsden County has been lling in for former county veteran services officer J.D. Johnson, who was badly injured in a traf c accident in January. Tallahassee VA Volunteer Service Officer Michael Ford said Wakulla veterans want to talk to a service of cer from their own home. When a veteran misses a day of a claim, it may add a long time to the claim process, Ford said. The VA is doing what they can do, but as a volunteer, I was able to pick up my phone and call J.D. I need a (Wakulla) county service of cer to help me do my job. I am asking you for your support. Thomas said if a parttime position doesnt work out, the board will revisit the issue. I think I speak for everyone saying that none of us want to catch our veterans short, Thomas said. If we can save a little money and still achieve our mission, then doing it part time would work. Our commitment is to the veterans who have served. Mark Alvarez, District 2 Commander of the VFW and legislative chairman, said there are 3,500 veterans in Wakulla County. A motion to maintain the part-time position of a veterans service of cer in Wakulla County passed unanimously. The next meeting will be at commission chambers on Monday, May 5, with a workshop to discuss nonpartisan elections beginning at 4 p.m.Board votes 3-2 to clarify language on wetlands ballotOLD LANGUAGE: Wakulla County, Florida, Wetlands Protection Ordinance 10-16, as constituted on July 19, 2013, is hereby adopted by reference and amended to include: ARTICLE V. ORDINANCE MODIFICATION OR REPEAL. This ordinance may only be modi ed or repealed by a referendum of the voters in Wakulla County, as provided for in the Wakulla County Charter, or by a unanimous vote of all ve Wakulla County Commissioners at a legally called Wakulla County Commission Meeting. In addition an, ARTICLE IV. EFFECTIVE DATE is amended to state: This ordinance as amended shall take effect immediately after passage. CLARIFIED LANGUAGE: Shall Wakulla County Ordinances 10-16 and 1301 be readopted to provide local control and protections for Wakulla Countys wetlands, and surface waters by regulating development and other activities that could degrade, destroy, or negatively impact these waters and the 75-feet of upland around these waters and providing that these ordinances can only be modi ed or repealed by referendum vote or unanimous vote of all ve county commissioners, to take effect upon passage? Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Alvin and Gloria Sharp would like to wish their son Danny a Happy 38th Birthday on May 2nd. Danny will celebrate with family and friends. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on June 2, 2014 at 6:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Purpose of Hearing: To Consider a Purchase and Sale Agreement for the Acquisition of Lots 10 and 11, a Boat Basin, and Conservation Areas at Shell Point for a County Boat Ramp Facility and Wetland Mitigation. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Office at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com MAY 1, 2014

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Thursday night I was witness to a painstaking process. Of course I would rather have been home watching reruns of NBCs The Celebrity Apprentice than covering the Charter Review Commission meeting at TCC Wakulla. But the longer I sat there listening, the more I understood that I was witness to something very important the implementation of a governments foundation. Donald Trump and the B-list celebs on his reality show would still be there when I got home. The discourse at the meeting was productive, and everyone around the table has an opportunity to express themselves as amendments were analyzed, written, discussed and rewritten. Others in the committee had important things to do (besides watch bad reality TV). One was missing his wifes birthday, another his anniversary, and someone else didnt get to see their kid play volleyball. Those are the sacri ces people make for the good of local government. Chairman Chris Russell and the group of 14 community members hashed out small details on big issues. Two amendments were written, setting guidelines to how our community will deal with debt and fund balances; and how petitions should be handled going forward. But the biggest impression the committee made on me, was a plea to have more public involvement. The meetings arent known for political drama or snappy comments, but work is getting accomplished. This committee needs your input, especially as the meeting schedule is winding down. And who is more entitled to have a say in the county charter than the people who live here? The next meeting will be Tuesday, May 6 at 6 p.m. at TCC Wakulla. Yeah, you might miss out on something more fun Tuesday night, but what is accomplished in that room will affect us day-to-day for years to come.Nicole Zema is the reporter at The Wakulla News. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Im on a roll so dont rock my boat Cape Leisure to leave Wakulla Lodge Worm Gruntin 5K race results Register to fish in annual Kayak Classic Week in Wakulla for April 24, 2014 Artifacts from Wakullas past Sopchoppy Mud Run is April 26thewakullanews.com Hope you didnt miss Heides last rose sale You cant eat money support wetlands Cause for concern with Ray Gray Disappointed in lack of coverage Commissioners have heads in the sandCharter needs your input Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.net Follow us on Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE: Editor, The News: If you didnt come to Heides 18th Rose Sale on April 12 to buy any of her heritage roses to beautify your yard, then you missed the last chance to acquire any of these beautiful, easy to take care of roses that do so well in our area. This has always been CHATs best fundraiser and the fact that it was the last sale ever caused rose lovers from all over to line up along the highway long before the gates opened to the public, and was a sell out on Saturday. After 18 years of fretting over newly planted cuttings for several weeks, and pampering hundreds of young plants for one year, Heide decided it is time for her to follow other interests, put off for too long, and check things off that infamous bucket list. Heide was one of the original founders of the former Wakulla County Humane Society, now known as CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment), and has done a tremendous job for homeless animals in our county. Heides interest in antique roses started in the late 1980s-early s. Modern roses were too much of a challenge for her. All that spraying for insects and leaf disease were something that she could not tolerate. Antique Roses, also known as Heritage Roses, are wonderful in the landscape. They require a minimum of care and will reward you with many months of blooming. If the roses have a little black spot from time to time and a few bugs eat some of the blooms.so be it. The leaves come back in no time. It is thrilling to look at a rose such as the Bourbon Souvenir d la Malmaison and know that Napoleons wife Josephine had that same exact rose growing in her garden. All proceeds from this fundraiser go toward CHAT programs like Kind News Magazine for our elementary school students, the Seniors Pets Meals on Wheels and more. Please mark your calendar for our Pamper your Pooch dog wash May 3rd, and if you would like to volunteer that day please email chatwakulla@ yahoo.com. We encourage all pet owners dont litter, x your critter! Petra Shuff CHAT Editor, The News: Preservation of Wakulla Countys wetlands are crucial to preserving our way of life. Wetlands are said to be the most biologically productive ecosystems in the world. They are of extreme importance. More than one third of the species listed as threatened or endangered in the U.S. live solely in wetlands and nearly half use the wetlands at some point in their lives (USEPA, 1995.) The Earthalk environmental magazine states that more than half of the original 221,000,000 acres of wetlands that existed in the continental U.S. at the time of white settlement were destroyed by the 1980s. Please come out in record numbers in November to re-instate our Wetland Ordinance that was put in place by unanimous vote of the Wakulla County Commissioners in 2006 and re-adopted unanimously in 2010. This Wetland Ordinance was removed from the County Code this month by four of our county commissioners even after being given a recommendation by the Northwest Florida Water Management District AND The Florida Department of Environmental Protection AND The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission all of which told the county commissioners that ensuring continued protection of wetland and water resources is recommended and that the county should keep the wetland resource protection and buffer zones in place. And DEP further noted that the Countys wetland buffer requirement does add protection beyond that provided by DEPs permitting regulations. Id like to close my letter with an American Cree Indian prophecy, and it is this: When the last tree is cut down, the last sh eaten, and the last stream poisoned, you will realize that you cannot eat money. Thank you, Carmen Sturchio Sopchoppy Editor, The News: Seems our five Policy Makers, chose to stick their minds in the sand, instead of being exposed to NOAAs SeaGrant Climate Change presentation recently in Sopchoppy. Presented to the public by experts on the affects of continuing Sea Level Rise and smarter Coastal Planning as it relates to our Big Bend counties, which just happen to have the highest potential storm surge exposure in the U.S. But...heck, who needs any exposure to new education, particularly when it contradicts your blind-sighted thinking on wetland setbacks. After all, the water will never reach Wakulla, Kansas. Those ve better take a snorkel with their head in the sand at Mashes Sands Beach, good chance your neck will be getting wet soon. https://www.flseagrant.org/climatechange/ ....in case others might have an inquiring mind Knox Bagwell knoxberries@msn.com Editor, The News: I was disappointed with The Wakulla News lack of reporting that our county commission voted to forward the Ballot Initiative put forth by the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance to the supervisor of elections. It will now be of cially put on the November ballot. This is historic and yet not a word from The Wakulla News! Where was the headline? The Wakulla Wetlands Alliance managed to get 30 percent the registered voters to sign a petition to get to this point. This was over 5,500 signatures! The highest percentage of any of the chartered counties in the state.This is also the rst citizen-led initiative in Wakulla history. This was done in spite of the fact that the majority of the county commission worked against them every step of the way both of cially at county commission meetings and separately on public Facebook postings. After the board refused to put this on the ballot, the citizens had to get their right to vote the hard way. The overwhelming majority of citizens asked to sign the petition gladly did so not only to give themselves and their neighbors a chance to vote on this important issue but also they want to keep their local wetlands protections. We ought to be proud of our citizens for speaking out and demanding a voice! Al Shylkofski Crawfordville Editors Note: We cant get everything in the paper the week of a commission meeting. Our story about the wetlands issue appears in this weeks issue on Page 3A. An article in last weeks edition headlined Repurposing helps the environment was actually written by Sandy Cook, but was mistakenly credited to Lynn Artz. We regret the error. Editor, The News:Wakulla students are our most valuable natural resource and informed voters can make wise decisions concerning their education. Ray Gray should not be re-elected to serve on our School Board for the following reasons: 1. Court Case 13-48CC is a Judgment for Default on Payment of a Promissory Note to the Florida Ethics Commission. Rays School Board salary is now being garnished to pay the $8,738.59 he owes for falsifying information to the Ethics Commission. Rays actions put our school board at risk. If the school board hadnt responded in time, the Attorney Generals of ce could have brought a judgment against our school board for the total amount owed by Ray. 2. He has an active court case 11-175CA against him for FRAUD and CIVIL THEFT. The plaintiff, the estate of a deceased disabled veteran, alleges that Ray befriended and gained the con dence of the veteran, then took unfair advantage of him by fraudulently misrepresenting transactions and defaulting on loans. Ray has not declared with the elections of ce that he is running for re-election, but told me that he intends to. He is con dent of winning because he agreed to the garnishment of his school board salary. We discussed the above issues and his response was to blame others and claim that he gave too much information on his Form 6 reports for the Ethics Commission. My response, He gave too much FALSE information, thats why he was ned. Everything I state about Ray is documented. Lets have a big turnout for the Primary Election. Early voting is Aug.16-23 at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce. The Primary Election at the individual precincts is Aug. 26. Donna Sanford CrawfordvilleCorrection

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 5A SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN pat h EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Mike Carlton drawn from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: What is your favorite day of the week ?JIM SMITHWAKULLA NEWS DRIVERMondays! I get to go shing and its not crowded, its just me and the sh! JUDY PARKERRETIREDSaturday. That is the day all my kids are off work and the grandkids are available to come over. CRISTGEN GRAHAMLEON COUNTY EMSSaturday! That is the day you go out and do the things for yourself, theres football, and you dont have to work the next day! Sundays. Those are the days I can spend time with God and let things just kind of cool down. REBEKAH SIMMONSSTAY AT HOME MOMDEVELIN MANNINGMUSICIANI like Saturday mornings because that is the only day I get to sleep in! Compiled by Lynda KinseyFrom Front Page We wanted our day before the state government, saying we can make it (as a city), and this is why, Crum said. We never have had a chance to present how to solve this problem. Ive lost con dence in government. He added that analysts from the University of Florida reviewed the bill. They did the analysis for us, said our application is good, Crum said. This is clearly just a political issue. The consultants said its more than adequate. The governor does not want additional bureaucracy, because it becomes a burden on the people. This is supposed to be the jobs governor. The governor talks real jobs, sustainable jobs, but I think hes hurting that. Beshears confirmed that part of the reason the bill languished this session is because of political reasons. There seems to be pushback against growing government in the state of Florida, Beshears said. Around the time Beshears took of ce, the bill was brought in, but it missed summer deadline, he said. We started working on getting entire packet validated, Beshears said. It got down to supporting the city nancially, and on paper, it wasnt working. Crum differs. He said the packet was submitted ahead of schedule. It was finished months before legislative session, Crum said. There is nothing truthful to support those allegations. Beshears said even though the incorporation of Panacea is not going to happen this session, he is con dent the bill will move to the house oor next year. He said historically it takes three to ve years to incorporate a community after the bill has been presented. Because he took office 15 months ago, Beshears said he has not had time to push for it. Now we have it vetted by two different staffers, and Ive spoken with leadership for next year, they assured me they will help me get this through, Beshears said. I cant ask for anymore than that. Unfortunately, its not fast enough. It does not help the City of Panacea, I know that, Beshears said. We have a lot of other stuff on budget to help Wakulla County as a whole. Am I frustrated? Absolutely, unbelievably so. Crum said he acknowledges that Beshears has worked to move the bill forward. I will give Halsey credit, Crum said. He worked hard, and was a champion for people of this town. Beshears said next year he hopes and believes the Panacea incorporation item will be on the ballot.Panacea bill languishes SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW www.cjmalphursseptic.com Your Complete Septic Service rr sTM LIC #SM0951220 to Receive $10 OFF any septic tank pumping.Mention this Ad

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Reinhert St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE And then it was May Revival set at Charlotte Faith beginning May 1A healing, deliverance and mIracle revival will be held at Charlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple, Thursday, May 1, to Saturday, May 3, beginning at 7:30 p.m. nightly. Bishop Alice Williams with prophet Michael Turner will be preaching. Charlotte Faith is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road in Crawfordville. Call (850) 926-7322 for more information. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t.The ministry is free. Volunteers needed for prison ministryCaring, Christian volunteers are needed to go to prison on Saturday, May 31. The Bill Glass Prison Ministrys A Day of Champions will team athletes, entertainers, musicians and volunteers to share their stories and their faith with inmates at seven area correctional facilities. If you are willing to step behind the prison walls to share the gospel with men and women eager to turn their lives toward God, contact the Bill Glass Prison Ministry in Dallas at (972) 298-1101 or visit the website at BillGlass.org/tallahassee. Volunteers will receive practical information and simple evangelistic tools to guide them on their mission. Over a million inmates have been brought to Christ by everyday, good people stepping out of their comfort zones and reaching out to men and women behind bars. Volunteer for A Day of Champions Prison Ministry on Saturday, May 31. Crawfordville UMC to hold fundraiser May 31The Crawfordville United Methodist Church (CUMC) is sponsoring a festival to kick off the summer.There will be local vendors, crafts, food, games and BINGO! The festival is on May 31 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Booth spaces cost $15. Please contact Christina DeProspero at F_christina@hotmail.com or (850) 591-0082 to reserve your space now. Bring your children and families to this festival for a great time! Proceeds from the food and games goes to the 2014 CUMC Mission trip to Ecuador. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDER For a very brief time last week I was under the impression I was all caught up. Dont you like the feeling that comes knowing you are up to date and everything is accomplished? I do, I just do not experience it enough. It was entirely my own fault. I was gloating over the fact I had accomplished everything on my to-do-list and had some time to spare. Spare time is a rare commodity these days, at least for me. I do not even have spare change and it has been months since I have seen my spare tire. Time is a different matter altogether. Just when I think I have a little spare time on my hands, I nd it slipping through my ngers. As I said, I was gloating over the fact I was all caught up. Being in a rather cheerful mood, I thought I would look at my calendar. I do not look at my calendar that often. It is so depressing, always telling me what to do. I hate it when somebody tells me what to do. My calendar looks at me and I look back and it simply says, do this. And there it is in black and white. What else can I do? Without actually thinking the issue through carefully, I opened up my calendar and discovered something quite startling. It takes a whole lot to startle me. In fact, it takes a whole lot just to get me started on anything. However, I looked at my calendar and was woefully startled. I noticed on my calendar it was the month of May. What happened to March and April? In fact, what happened to January and February? I should have gotten a hint with all the rain we had in April. Remember that little line that goes, April showers bring May owers? While I was focused on the showers in April, I did not notice that April was exhausting itself and May was sneaking around the corner to surprise me. Boy, did it surprise me. I guess I was just too occupied during the month of April to realize that April has a time limit. April has 30 days and when those 30 days are kaput, April is over and it is May. I do not think May is any different from any other month. It is just that I wish the months would slow down a little bit. It seems at the beginning of the month everything is going rather slowly and then when you hit the middle of the month the days must go into some kind of panic and race towards the end. Why these days of the month have to hasten towards the remainder of the month is something I will never wrap my head around. I believe there ought to be a month, at least one month in the year, where there are like 75 to 80 days. Why be so legalistic about all of this? When I go on a vacation, I know where I am going and the sad part of my vacation is at the end of the vacation I come back. Now where does time go? And, why doesnt it ever return. For instance. I am thinking of celebrating my 37th birthday this year. I am not 37 years old, but I cannot remember what I did on my 37th birthday. I think that if I cannot remember what happened on my 37th birthday, I should be able to repeat it. Why cant I go back and be 37 for just one day? I do not need to be 37 forever, just one day! But no, Father Time has made a rule that you can only be 37 one day out of the year and you can never repeat that, ever again. Of course, there was Jack Benny who was 39 all his life. I noticed in my calendar there were many items that needed doing. As I looked at them, I realized I had done them the month before. Some things are so insistent that you do them every month. My electric bill, for instance. Why do I have to pay that every month? Why cant the electric company give me a vacation once a year? Another thing that bothers me. When I am having a good time at whatever I am doing, why does time pass so quickly? I remember in school the time leading up to recess went ever so slow and I never thought it would arrive. Once I got out to recess, it went so quickly I had to return to class almost before I left the classroom. What is that all about? I took a little bit of time to think about what good old King Solomon said about the subject. To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven (Ecclesiastes 3:1). Time is a commodity either you spend it or lose it. The bad part is once you lose it you can never get it back. Enjoy today, its the only today you have..The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORBy CYNTHIA WEBSTERSpecial to The NewsWhereas many communities in our country do not observe the National Day of Prayer we are blessed in Wakulla County to have two programs scheduled for this day. Between noon and 1 p.m. on Thursday, May 1, pastors of Sopchoppy will hold an observance at the Sopchoppy City Hall. And the Pioneer Baptist Church, 486 Beechwood Drive (off Spring Creek Highway) will host an evening service at 7 p.m. A National Day of Prayer has been of cially sanctioned by our country since 1952 although national days of prayer go back to the very foundation of this Nation. Through the Grace of God we live in a country that not only guarantees religious choice but encourages prayer. I hope you will be able to attend one of these events so your voice can join with others as we pray for our Nation, our Government and our Leaders.National Day of Prayer will be observed May 1

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 7AWaldo E. Thomas, 82, of Wakulla County, passed away on Tuesday, April 15, 2014 in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Phyllis Spears Thomas. He was retired as Bureau Chief with the City of Tallahassee Electrical Department and was a member of the Tallahassee Elks Lodge. Earlier, he served his country by entering the U.S. Navy at the age of 15 and served on a destroyer during the Korean Con ict. His joy in life was entertaining family and friends, and helping family, friends and neighbors who were in need. Other survivors include his son, Ronald Thomas (Chantel); his daughter, Jeanyne Thomas Stokeley; three grandsons, Kevin Thomas (Dora), Ron-Ron Thomas Jr. and Jeff Stokeley, Jr.; three great-grandchildren, Alissa Thomas, Kevin Thomas, Jr. and Kayla Thomas; as well as two nephews, Ralph Thomas and Carl Thomas, Jr. To honor Waldos wishes, there will be no service. Condolences may be mailed to the family c/o Bevis Funeral Home, 2710 N. Monroe St., Tallahassee FL 32303; or www. bevisfh.com. Cynthia Carol Glover died on Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Services will be Friday, May 2, 2014 at 3 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include two sons, Jonathan Glover and Micah Glover; a daughter, Suzane Glover Behnke; her ex-husband, George Glover; three brothers, John Futo, Donald Futo and Charles Dowell; ve grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel is assisting the family with arrangements (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com).E.W. Bradley Jr., known to his friends and family as Captain Ed, died on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at Hospice House in Tallahassee. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Georgia Bradley of Alligator Point; sons, Thomas Bradley of Boynton Beach, and Joseph Bradley of Carol Stream, Ill.; daughters, Sharon Fitzgerald and Elizabeth Jenkins of Crawfordville; and six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Visitation was held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014 at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. A private memorial service for the family will be held at a later date. In lieu of owers, the family requests donation be made to the Alzheimers Resource Center, P.O. Box 35553, Tallahassee FL 32315 or the Second Harvest of the Big Bend, 110 Four Points Way, Tallahassee, FL 32305. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangement (850-926-3333 or bevisfh). Dave Gary Whitlock, 57, of Hayward, Calif., died on Sunday, April 13, 2014 at his home. He was born Feb. 28, 1957 in Lakeland to David Giles and Patsy Ruth (Russ) Whitlock. Survivors include his wife. Linda; mother, Patsy Ackett; brother, Buddy Anderson; sister, Carla Anderson; maternal grandmother, Eva Russ; and two uncles. Funeral services were held Friday, April 25, 2014, at Kersey Funeral Home in Auburndale, Florida. Visitation was held Thursday, April 24, 2014.Donna Diane Council Harrell Slaughter, 72, passed away on Monday, April 21, 2014, in Crawfordville. Diana was a native of Crawfordville. She moved brie y to Jacksonville, Tallahassee, and North Palm Beach, and returned to Crawfordville in her later years. She had a tremendous love for gardening, music and reading. She was also known for her delicious baking and cooking. She was a loving and selfless friend, wife, and mother and she was an adoring grandmother and great-grandmother. A visitation at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Services were held at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville on Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 11:30 a.m. Burial followed at Council Cemetery. Diana left a legacy of generosity to her friends and family. Her family requests that in lieu of owers, donations be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308 or St. Judes Childrens Hospital, Tribute Program, P.O. Box 1000, Dept.142, Memphis TN 38148-0142. Survivors include her husband of 24 years, Frank W. Slaughter. Other survivors include her beloved girls, her daughters, Stephanie Harrell Cash (Jimmy) and Sonja Harrell Marguin (Rick), and step-daughters, Taija Slaughter (friend Janet Conner) and Kristina Slaughter Petrandis (Jonny II); granddaughters, Tara Kirchgessner Collins (Joe), Anna Kirchgessner, Claudia Marguin, Amelia Marguin, Sophia Marguin, and Adeline Petrandis; and great-granddaughters, Darcy Kirchgessner and Ella Collins. Diana is also survived by two sisters: Sandra Mock of Tallahassee and Sue Lovett of Woodville; and a brother, Edmond Pappy Council of Tallahassee. Preceding her in death are her parents, Eugene Buck Council and Orlene Council; and brothers, Luther Sonny Council and Dennis Council. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Obituaries E.W. Captain Ed Bradley Jr. Cynthia Carol Glover Donna Diane Council Harrell Slaughter Waldo E. Thomas Dave Gary Whitlock Cynthia Carol Glover E.W. Bradley Jr. Dave Gary Whitlock Donna Diene Council Harrell Slaughter Waldo E.ThomasBy TRACY RENEE LEEAs I was ordering lunch at a local fast food restaurant, my cell phone rang. I stepped to the side and answered the call. It was my three oclock appointment. He said that he had come by early and was sitting in front of my funeral home with his mother. I canceled my order and returned to my of ce. As I parked my car, I saw his mother rst. She was a beautiful woman, tall with striking silver hair. She was dressed in purple, and it suited her. As we greeted, I looked deep into her eyes, from the depth of her soul, she radiated gentleness and kindheartedness. Her son was exiting their car. As I turned my attention toward him, I noticed that although he was young, his movements were measured with caution. As he rose, I could see that he, as his mother, stood tall. He matched her beauty, both inwardly and outwardly. He was remarkably handsome and radiated a tranquility one does not often witness in young adult men. They were both friendly, and I invited them into my funeral home. As we walked the rst 20 feet or so, I could see the young mans strength waver. He immediately sought out a couch and sat down. His mother and I spoke for another few moments, and then I invited them into my arrangement room. I immediately offered each of them a General Price Sheet and began narrowing their needs. The handsome young man asked about various funeral options, and as he began to make choices, a tear or two would spill out of the corner of his eye. He would immediately brush it away, perhaps pause for a moment, regain his composure and continue with his arrangements. For a brief moment, he excused himself from the room. I could hear him in the hallway. He was very ill. I was overcome with respect and love for this young man and his mother. I looked at her. She sat there silent and still, listening to her son, as he struggled to catch his breath and regain his strength. I could see the worry and fear in her countenance. A tear or two spilled out of the corner of her eye as she struggled to maintain her composure. Her eyes met mine; they were wide and fearful. She excused herself and went into the hall to shore up her son. As I listened to her encourage him, she emptied her heart with tenderness. Her expressions were the deepest love of a mother, witnessing the premature and painful death of her young adult child. I was overwhelmed with heartache for them. The reverence and pain of the moment was a heavy burden to witness. I do not know what disease he suffers, only that it will take his life in the near future. A handsome young man in the prime of his life is losing his life, before his loving mothers eyes. For those few brief moments that I shared with them, I witnessed the unconditional love and excruciating heartache of a mother for her dying child. I could see in her eyes, and witness in her soul, that she would take his burden and trade his suffering for her health. If it were possible, she would gladly die in his place. We completed his arrangements. He wanted it all written down and signed. His final act of strength was to lift this burden from his mother on the day she will suffer the most tremendous heartache known to mothers, the day of her beloved sons death, his death.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushinup-daisies.blogspot. com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.The arrangement conference BEREAVEMENT COLUMN THANK YOU. On behalf of our family I would like to thank all our friends, neighbors and community associates for their expression of love in the form of emails, cards, deeds and tons of food when Bobby went to be with the Lord. A million thanks to the members of Wakulla Springs Church for their love and support from the beginning of Bobby being sick. And last, but not least, a big thank you to the team of the Crawfordville Branch of the Big Bend Hospice that helped his last week be a peaceful. You guys are the best and may God Bless you. Sincerely, Catherine R. CameronCameron family says thanksLocal author takes old barbecue pit as inspiration for book Special to The NewsPork, Beef, Chicken, and Ribs refers to an abandoned barbecue pit alongside the road that inspired the writing of this book. Much like the promise of that non-existent food, there are many religions today that claim to offer spiritual nourishment but leave their followers hungering for more. Author Harold Owen Gregg of Crawfordville cooks up a scriptural comparison that the soul can chew on. Gregg, after failing to be baptized as an adolescent because of bad theology, was visited by God in mid-life and became an avid religious scholar. This book provides you with Gods plan for the salvation of mankind and will bene t anyone that will read it both Christians and Muslims. Muslims have been taught that the god of the Koran is the same god worshipped by the Christians and the Jews, but this book provides scriptural proof that refutes that premise. Published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, the book is available through bookstores nationwide, from the publisher at www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore, or by visiting barnesandnoble.com or amazon. com. Call Lynda or Denise at 926-7102or email: denise@thewakullanews.netSend us Her Photo & a Message or Advertise your Mothers Day Special!Just $25 Deadline: May 2 Publication: May 8 Recognize Moms of Wakulla

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBy Lynn ArtzSpecial to The News Have you spotted a hummingbird yet? Brandy Cowley-Gilbert of Just Fruits and Exotics saw her rst hummingbird of the season on March 31. If you spot a hummingbird, consider reporting it to Audubons Hummingbirds at Home program. To sign up and report sightings, use their website (www.hummingbirdsathome.org/) or download an app for the iPhone. The Audubon Society needs many citizen scientists to take part. You may report single sightings. Or you can conduct regular surveys of a patch you select in your yard. Even a porch with hanging baskets of owers can be a patch. Im planning to do a nectar watch by logging hummingbird visits to a single nectar source, a native crimson honeysuckle vine on a trellis that I can see from my window. The Audubon Society will use crowdsource data about hummingbird sightings to study the effect of climate change on hummingbird migration. Hummingbirds must synchronize their migration and nesting times with the owering of nectar-bearing plants. These birds must eat once every 10 to 15 minutes and visit between 1,000 and 2,000 owers per day to sustain their high-energy metabolisms. However, owers are blooming earlier due to warming temperatures. How well are hummingbirds adapting to these changes? No one knows. The goal of the Hummingbirds at Home program is to learn how hummingbirds are affected by climate change and how to help them. By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netShedding light on topics that are often swept under the rug can promote awareness and save lives. More than 60 people gathered at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville to learn about the prevalence of sexual violence, and how to assist victims. Because April is Sexual Violence Awareness Month, teal awareness ribbons were pinned to lapels on everyone from Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce employees to members of the Attorney Generals of ce and area social workers. Moore compared physical scars to emotional scars. He said the scar he earned in a bicycle accident 30 years ago is a reminder of foolishness. But no one can see your inner scars from sexual abuse, Moore said. However, I am still alive despite calamity. In 1982, Moore said his world changed when his uncle, who was two years older and struggling in school, came to live with his family. For two years I was physically, emotionally and mentally abused, Moore said. That was the grooming stage. My uncle made me out to be a pathological liar in the grooming process. In 1984, the sexual abuse started. The mantra in Moores house was: What happens in this house, stays in this house. Moore said that attitude of secrecy can be very dangerous. At age 10, Moore made a joke to classmates about the abuse he was enduring at the hands of his uncle. The principal asked him what was going on. As a 10-year-old autistic child, I lied and said it happened only once, Moore said. Eventually the sexual abuse stopped, and Moore turned to writing as a way to process what he had experienced. He eventually wrote the novel Deaf, Dumb, Blind & Stupid. My message to teens who have struggled with abuse journal, Moore said. If a child does not journal, they could explode; maybe commit suicide. In 2009, Moore said he was leading a poetry group with 12 teenage girls. He asked how many have contemplated suicide, and six raised their hands. It was all because of family abuse, Moore said. Unfortunately some people side with their relative instead of their own child. Denial is one of the worst things that can be done. Moore said part of the reason he wrote the novel, was to educate communities about abuse and teenage suicide. Folks in and out of the faith community are repulsed thinking about suicide, Moore said, adding that the deal with it yourself attitude is a huge problem. Suicide among teens is the third leading cause of death. Just look at the news. Moore said its important for parents, social workers and educators to notice unusual patterns behavioral and academic. My grades were good, but my behavior was terrible, Moore said. Moore said eventually he was suspended for inappropriately touching another student, which is also a sign of abuse. They focused on what I did, not what I went through, Moore said. Moore provided alarming statistics about sexual abuse. He said one in three girls, one in ve boys, and one in three siblings experience sexual abuse. He added that one in six autistic youth are also sexually abused. Kathy Asbell, a Refuge House Inc. adult advocate, recognized representatives from the host of agencies present. This is a message of hope, Asbell said. Its great to hear how (Moore) overcame all of that. Asbell said the rst and best thing to do for a victim of sexual violence is to listen, believe the victim, and let him or her talk. Allow the victim to make decisions about what steps to take next, but encourage medical attention. Remain calm and suggest counseling or a consultation with a crisis center like Refuge House Inc. The local number for Refuge House is 850-681-2111. The information line for the Florida Council Against Sexual Violence is 1-888956-RAPE.Sexual violence awareness raised Kathy Asbell, an advocate with Refuge House Inc., thanks speaker and author Tremayne Moore for sharing his life story in the fellowship hall of First Baptist Church of Crawfordville.Watch for hummingbirdsNICOLE ZEMA LYNN ARTZThe native crimson honeysuckle vine is an ideal patch for hummingbirds. By BETTY GREENSpecial to The NewsLooking Back at area communities has been the theme this year for the Wakulla County Historical Society programs and we so appreciate David Miller, Bobby Pearce, Randy Pearce, Joe Duggar, and Rhett Strickland on April 8 when members and guests enjoyed the discussion on the community of Riversink when the panel shared pictures, maps, artifacts, stories and memories during the evening. All ve gentlemen have roots in Riversink and grew up swimming in the sink, playing in the woods, and enjoying life amongst their friends and family. In 1998 Governor Lawton Chiles purchased from Tad Strickland the William Buck Strickland log cabin and moved it to his hunting camp Jubilee to be built into a cook shed. Of particular interest was how places like Gopher Scuf e and Ben Haden were named. Ben Haden was the postmaster. The Historical Society is thankful for these gentlemen who added so much by leading the discussion. Digging into Riversink historyPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS David Miller, Bobby Pearce, Randy Pearce, Joe Duggar, and Rhett Strickland led the discussion on Riversinks history. Wyatt Laird Roberts was born April 11, 2013, and just turned 1. Parents are Anthony Lyle Roberts and Cassidy Randolph Roberts of Crawfordville. Paternal Grandparents are Delbert and Marian Roberts of Catlett, Virginia. Maternal Grandparents are Eddie Randolph of Havana, and Carol and Larry Powell of Tallahassee. Paternal Great Grandparents are Zylphia Roberts and the late Delbert Bud Roberts of Sopchoppy, and the late William Bill Laird and the late Clora Mae Laird of Crawfordville. Maternal Great Grandparents are Jane Randolph and the late Roy Randolph of Quincy, and Jim and Anne Voyles of Gainesville.Lizzie Grace Allen is 1 Lizzie Grace is the daughter of Jonathan and Amber Allen, and the little sister to Chance Allen. Wyatt Laird Roberts is 1 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Ashlee and Joey Fairclothof Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughterKylee Rae FairclothBorn on April 4, 2014, (7 lbs. 10 oz, 19 1/4 inches)Her grandparents are Sharilyn and Ed Ryals of Crawfordville the late Gilbert Faircloth of Wewahitchka and Cathy and Allen Hattaway of Tallahassee. Kylee Rae has a sister, Katie Faircloth. Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor Lillie A. Triplett Proverbs5 Trust in the Lord with all thine heart and lean not unto thine own understanding. 6. In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy paths.Love you a bunch, your husband TripHappy Retirement

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 9Ahappenings in our community CommunityWed like to thank everyone who came out to our two big events this past weekend at WCPL. First our Volunteer dinner on Friday Night was a great success as we proudly honored the volunteers who are so indispensable to my staff. Without them we would not be able to provide the high level of service that Wakulla County citizens have come to expect and deserve from WCPL. We also had the privilege of presenting Nancy Myers with our 2014 Gloria Hatton Library Volunteer of the Year award. Nancy has been volunteering at WCPL for years and assists us with organizing our library card applications, processing items which need to be discarded from our collection, as well as many other tasks that she always completes with a great attitude and smile on her face. She received a plaque to take home and her name is now displayed on the permanent plaque at WCPL. Thank you to all of our volunteers and thank you to all the local businesses who donated items for door prizes and food for the dinner. The local support for WCPL always impresses us and is appreciated! The following night we celebrated the Friends of the Library 38th anniversary with a great evening highlighted by an entertaining and enlightening performance by Chautauqua speaker Betty Jean Steinshouer as she inhabited legendary literary gures Willa Cather, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, and Gertrude Stein as they shared their thoughts on Earnest Hemingway. The packed house enjoyed the entire program which was presented through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council. At the end on the evening, we announced the winner of the Samsung Pro tablet drawing which the Friends have been selling tickets for the past six weeks. Your always generous support has raised nearly $1200 for the Friends of the Library! Ms. Steinshouer drew Layne Davis name and we hope that Layne enjoys and gets great use out of this device, and thank her and all who purchased tickets for their support of WCPL. Keep an eye on us for more drawings coming soon! Friday Night Movie Our Friday Night Movie this week is the remake of the 1947 Danny Kaye lm, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, this time starring and directed by Ben Stiller. This PG rated lm (some language and action scenes) also stars Kristin Wiig, Shirley MacLaine, and Sean Penn among others. This lm tells the tale of a day-dreamer who escapes his anonymous life by disappearing into a world of fantasies lled with heroism, romance and action. When his job along with that of his co-worker are threatened, he takes action in the real world embarking on a global journey that turns into an adventure more extraordinary than anything he could have ever imagined. Doors open at 6:45 for the 7:00 show and we ask that all children be accompanied by an adult. Computer classes return at WCPL The new round of computer classes begun this week and we have added a webcam to our computer lab which allows Deanna Ramsey to teach some classes remotely while she is out of town! Come by or call us to sign up for everything from Computer Basics & using an iPad, to Facebook business pages, and Microsoft Excel. You can sign up for these free classes either by calling us at 926-7415 or stopping by the front desk the next time youre in. Dont let this free way to learn increasingly needed skills pass you by! Special to The NewsJustin Haire, an eleventh grader at Wakulla High School was born and raised in Wakulla County and is very proud of his Wakulla roots. Justin is a kind and fun-loving young man with a positive attitude despite the challenges he has endured and continues to face. His will is truly inspirational. Justin was diagnosed with Legg Perthes disease in 2007. This condition limits Justins physical activity and causes him a great deal of pain. Justin had hip reconstruction surgery in April of 2010 and is scheduled for a second major surgery on June 11 in West Palm Beach. This procedure will help eliminate his pain, increase his range of motion, and help lessen the 3-inch difference in the length of his leg, therefore providing him with a better quality of life. Justin will be required to stay in West Palm Beach for at least a minimum of eight weeks following this surgery for special physical therapy. This extended stay will place a huge nancial burden on the Haire family. Donations to assist the Haire family can be deposited into the bene t account for Justin Haire at any Centennial Bank location or can be mailed to Centennial Bank, 8232 Woodville Hwy., Woodville, FL 32362. Donations should be addressed to the bene t account for Justin Haire. Contributions, as well as thoughts and prayers, will be received with much gratitude from the Haire family. Kitten and puppy season is right around the corner! Every spring, most unaltered female dogs and cats go in heat. Males can sense this for miles around. Dogs and cats that dont normally leave their yard will climb fences, break out windows and run for their new girlfriend to make litters of unwanted babies. So, please keep a close eye on your animals this time of year. Please have your animals spayed or neutered, and then there is no worry about your animal making more unwanted litters. If you would like to get your animal(s) fixed but need nancial help, go to www.bethesolution.us and look for Be the Solution on Facebook or call them at 850-545-2043. This wonderful group provides consistent low-cost vouchers for animals in our county and you can use our local vets. This time of year puts additional pressure on the shelter as the intake of animals escalates. Caring for pregnant animals or infants is very dif cult. If you are interested in fostering animals, please contact the shelter at 850926-0902. We can put you in touch with Cauzican Animal Rescue, a group of volunteers who are working hard to nd homes, rescues and fosters for the unwanted animals of our county. There is an application process and all fosters must be approved. It is a fantastic way help the animals get out of the shelter environment while a permanent, loving home can be arranged. Last week, this shelter took in 30 animals. Of this number, nine were owner surrendered, meaning the owner brought them to the shelter because they were no longer wanted. The number of animals that were picked up by an Animal Control Of cer was 13. There were eight animals that were either left in the Drop Box (the 24 hour kennel at our gate) or were found by citizens and dropped at the shelter. During the same week, we returned seven animals to their owners, two were euthanized (both for behavior issues) and seven were released to rescue groups that will then be adopted. We thank all of the Rescue Groups that we work with locally and all over the Southeastern US. Earlier this month, we arrived at the shelter early in the morning to nd six hounds all stuffed in one of our drop boxes. These dogs are healthy and happy, not like some of the less fortunate hounds that come through our shelter. If you want to see a video that will make you smile, go to Cauzican Care on Facebook and watch the video named Who let the dogs out? posted yesterday. Seeing these hounds play, run and play tug-of-war makes me so happy. Make sure you like the page so you can see daily updates on the animals that come in the shelter. And if you hit the share button, all of your friends on Facebook can see it, too. It is a small, almost effortless, way to help our animals nd their way out of the shelter. Thank you in advance. A happy story begins with a yellow lab mix puppy that was dropped off at a shelter in Walton County last summer. Guinness was adopted through CHAT when he was about eight weeks old. Sadly, he was returned to our shelter in March of this year because he and his brother could not seem to get along. Unfortunately, Guinness was seen as the aggressor and lost his home. Many labs are returned to shelters for being unruly, chewing, digging or jumping. Because labs are a working breed, they need a job! The awesome volunteers for Cauzican got in touch with a group that trains dogs to help victims with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Guinness is now on his way to learn how to help humans with the help of a group called K-9 for Warriors. Sometimes the love from an animal is just what a human may need. And always, the love of a dog for his human is unwavering. Way to go Guinness, we are proud of you!Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary Director Community rallying to help local student Justin Haire was diagnosed with Legg Perthes disease in 2007. Animal Shelter news... By IVANHOE CARROLLShelter Director Dont miss Baconfest 2014Staff ReportThe 21st Annual BaconFest SouthPork event this Saturday and Sunday is free and open to the public, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Enjoy art, live music and baconeverything. You bring dessert. The venue is Pelican Place, 1357 Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road in Crawfordville, at the home of Hugh Taylor and Mary Cortese. The quirky festival began at Shell Point, when Taylor lived there. This year they will hold Baconfest at their house and their newly-opened gallery and event space, notable for where the mastodon lives. Everybody loves bacon, right? So, we said, lets have a Bacon Festival, says Taylor about the inception of Baconfest, over two decades ago. During Baconfest XXI SouthPork, there will be plenty of bacon, and things made with bacon, he said. Lets just say, its a lot of bacon. For more information call 926-6058 or visit www.pelicanplace.net. Also check out the Facebook page. Doggie spa in Hudson Park on SaturdayStaff ReportCHAT will host Pamper Your Pooch, a dog wash and micro chipping event at Hudson Park from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Treat your furbaby to all-natural dog baths, towel dry, ea and tick spray, nail clipping, anal expression, micro chipping and pet photos. Chips are a $25 donation. Proceeds will bene t the Seniors Pets Meals on Wheels, TNR program and educational materials for elementary students. FILE PHOTOA pooch gets a good scrub at last years pampering event. Call Lynda or Denise at 926-7102or email: denise@thewakullanews.netSend us Her Photo & a Message or Advertise your Mothers Day Special!Just $25 Deadline: May 2 Publication: May 8 Recognize Moms of Wakulla Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsBecton James Roddenberry of Sopchoppy has been accepted to the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at Duke University for the fall 2014 semester. This is a Nurse Practitioner degree at the Doctorate level, as opposed to the traditional Masters prepared programs. This is an online program with Roddenberry being able to complete his clincals, residencies, and internship here in the Big Bend Region, also attending campus in Durham, North Carolina 6-8 weekends throughout the year. Roddenberrys Doctorate Degree will specialize in Family Practice Medicine and Emergency & Trauma Medicine. After graduation, Roddenberry will be eligible to sit for the Board Certi cations for Family Nurse Practitioner and Emergency Nurse Practitioner. Roddenberry graduated Magna Cum Laude for Wakulla High School in 2002, and from Tallahassee Community College in 2006 with an Associate of Science in Nursing, later graduating Cum Laude from Thomas University, Thomasville, Georgia, in 2013 with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Roddenberry is a Board Certi ed Emergency Nurse and certi ed with the American College of Surgeons as an Advanced Trauma Care Nurse, specializing in trauma care with a concentration in burn critical care. Roddenberry is also certi ed in pediatric and neonatal emergencies with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Roddenberrys passion for emergency and trauma nursing started at the early age of 18 when he became a Medical First Responder for the Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department. He then became an Emergency Medical Technician with the Wakulla County Emergency Medical Service, eventually becoming a Paramedic. Soon after, he started his career at the Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Bixler Trauma & Emergency Center as a Clinical Registered Nurse. Roddenberrys plan with his DNP Degree is to continue his career at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital as an Emergency Nurse Practitioner in the Trauma & Emergency Center. Roddenberry states, This is truly the highest of honor to be accepted to Duke University. More so, I am extremely blessed to be able to serve my community in this capacity in the future. I want to thank my family, friends, instructors, colleagues, and the community for the overwhelming amount of support I have been given throughout the years! I would not be where I am today without you all.Special to The NewsDr. Sean Keith Padgett earned his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic, Port Orange, in March 2014 at the Palmer Graduation Convocation. Sean served as a member of Palmer Campus Guides and President of Gonstead Chiropractic Technique Club for which he was bestowed a Leadership Award by Palmer College. Upon graduation he was nominated for the Clinical Excellence Award and the Virgil Strange Philosophy Award. While attending Palmer he traveled to Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Vietnam to serve in chiropractic mission work. Sean is very appreciative of having the opportunity to shadow with Dr. William Treichel, D.C. of Crawfordville on several occasions while in school. Sean is the son of Keith and Janise Padgett of Wakulla Springs. He attended Taylor County High School, graduating summa cum laude and then earned a Bachelor of Science degree from FSU in Exercise Science graduating magna cum laude. Dr. Padgett plans to begin practicing in Ft Myers and Sanibel Island. By MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsThe Sopchoppy Lions Club is pleased to announce that Taylor Rowan won the Lions Club Northern Districts Peace Poster Contest. Each year, Sopchoppy Lions work with Wakulla Middle Schools art teacher, Carol Balancsik, to encourage young people to participate in this program. Lions Club Internationals theme for 2013 was Our World, Our Future. Taylor won rst place for her school, and Sopchoppy Lions congratulated her with a $50 rst prize check. Then, Poster Contest leader Lion Marshall Catoe sent Taylors poster on to the Lions Club District 35L for the next level of competition. District 35 is comprised of 25 Lions Clubs, and Taylor won 1st place in this contest as well. Lion Delores C. Farris, Peace Poster Chairperson for District 35L, sent a letter of congratulations and a prize of $200. Sopchoppy Lions invited Taylor to the April 14 meeting so that we could show our appreciation for her ne efforts. Her friends Sue Hooper, Rachel Ryan and her grandmother, Marsha Vance visited our club too.Becton Roddenberry accepted to Duke University medical program Sean Padgett earns doctor of chiropractic WMS student Taylor Rowan wins Lions Club Peace PrizeSAL MARTOCCI/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTaylor Rowan, center, won the peace poster contest sponsored by the Sopchoppy Lions Club. Special to The NewsKarrie Musgrove, April Teacher of the Month, has been helping the students of Wakulla County for 20 years. She was recently recognized by the Wakulla County School Board. Musgrove dedicated her rst 14 years to the WHS students as an ESE and reading teacher. When Riversink opened in 2008, she made the choice to be a part of the inaugural faculty and transferred as an elementary ESE teacher. Originally from the Panama City area, Musgrove and her family moved to Wakulla County in 1990 to assume the reigns of a family business. As soon as she was able she returned to FSU to continue her education. Musgrove lovingly refers to her job as Otter Heaven. She notes, I work with the most wonderful, hardworking, intelligent, kind, caring, cooperative people in the world. Every member of our faculty and staff is an inspiration in some way. We are a true community and everyone helps to make every student successful. I have delightful students and the latest technology to teach them. Whats not to love? Musgrove serves as the Chair of the School Advisory Council and a team leader for the positive behavior support program. Riversink Principal Jackie High adds, Musgrove has proven to be successful with any age student. I believe her success is born from the love and enthusiasm she has for each child. She is a joyful spirit and her leadership is greatly appreciated. Karrie Musgrove is April teacher of the month Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 21, Noon Publication Date: June 5 Remember This Years Graduate Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by The Wakulla News CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2014Sponsor Line ........$25 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available RowellAuctions.comFor Detailed Property Info Visit RowellAuctions.comWednesday -:May 14th -:2 p.m. (CDT)22 Properties Florida PanhandleBank Owned Real EstateOnline Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute!Auction Site: Hilton Garden Inn, 1144 Airport Blvd., Pensacola, FLCantonment, Jay Milton, Pace, Panama City Beach & Pensacola, FLA MarkNet Alliance Member AU 479, AB 296 10% Buyers PremiumExcellent Commercial Buildings, Beautiful Acreage Tracts & Commercial & Residential TractsRowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388 BANK ORDERED FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 11Aeducation news from local schools School Prom 2014 Wakulla High School PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAThe weather Friday, April 25 was perfect for prom as Wakulla High School students and parents gathered in Azalea Park for photos before heading off to the event. Pictures in the park has become a tradition of Wakulla High School prom-goers. Photos, clockwise from top: Senior Emily Davis and freshman Desmond Maxwell share a laugh while posing for pictures at the park. Inset photo: Evening gowns sparkled as students walked to meet friends. Senior Shannan Wood stops to assist Tamia Potter with her hair while posing for photos. Junior Cody Ochat poses with his mother, Stacy, as his dad Mike snaps a picture. Seniors Andrew Lewis and Brooke Saladin pause to pose for a photo. Kyla Kerce and Emily Rudd, both seniors, make their way to the car after posing for pictures. Read The Wakulla News for special holiday deadlines. Advertising: Noon Wednesday for all ads requiring proof. 10 a.m. Thursday for all legal notices. Noon Thursday for all other advertising. 11 a.m. Friday for Classied Ads. The Wakulla News office will be closed Monday May 26Memorial Day Deadlines Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

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By MARJ LAWOwning a stainless steel gun offers lots of opportunity to learn how to keep your revolver in pristine cleanliness. Of course, the bad news is, you can see every dirty part because the black residue from your ammo is going to leave black marks on the stainless. When you see black, its time to scrub. Sigh Cleaning a revolver is simple, one friend told me gleefully. All you have to do is run the snake through the barrel with a cleaning/ oiling solution on the snake. Then you run it through the chambers as well. Piece o cake. Sure. Your chambers and barrel will appreciate that run-through after you shoot, but what about the rest of the revolver? Guns have more hidden places to clean than a newborn babys neck. First, always make sure than revolver is unloaded, and no ammo is in the area. Unlatch the cylinder part of the gun and roll it open. Push the rod to dump any shells or ammo that might be inside. Notice the part of the cylinder where you just ejected the bullets. Is there any black on it? All that black has got to go! Wait! Wait! Dont close the cylinder yet! Youre not nished. Look at the opposite side of the cylinder. Thats the side closest to the barrel. Yep. There it is. Youll see perfect black circles around the opening of every cylinder. Since they are perfectly round, thats part of the revolver, right? No such luck. I held in my hand a new used Ruger Security-Six. Maybe the backside of the cylinder had never been cleaned. My usual XCOTE cleaning/lubing solution didnt touch it, so I called one of my walking encyclopedia buddies: Mark from Masters of Guns and Rods. Okay, Mark, how can I clean this thing? Will the black circles ever come off? Mark says to go to an auto parts store and find Mothers Mag & Aluminum Polish. I nd it, and its reasonably inexpensive. Taking a piece of old toweling, I rub. And rub. Finally, those circles are gone. Thinking Im done, I start to roll the cylinder back into the frame of the gun. And, there before me, is the forcing cone. Thats the mouth of the barrel closest to the wheel part of the gun. And yes, its totally black. Sorta crusty. I know by now that its made of stainless steel; just like the rest of the gun. And this stainless is not black. The forcing cone is small and round; not easy to scrub. So you have to rub and rub. Fingernails and a small piece of toweling with Mothers works, but whatever tool works that wont scratch the metal. Finally, the gun is clean. No black anywhere. The good news is that its easy to see when a stainless gun is clean. Anything not silver colored is dirt and it has to go, go, go. Now I am ready to go to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Range and do it all over again. Sigh.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will hold six public workshops to discuss management of black bears in the eastern portion of the Florida Panhandle and how people can get involved in working with the FWC on local bear issues. Under the FWCs Florida Black Bear Management Plan, approved in 2012, seven bear management units (BMUs) will be established throughout the state. The BMU approach will allow the FWC to manage bears based on the characteristics of bears, people and habitat in different parts of Florida. The rst steps are being taken to create the East Panhandle BMU to manage the bear subpopulation in the Apalachicola National Forest and surrounding areas. Workshops will offer the public a chance to provide input on local bear issues and allow interested individuals to sign up to be active members of the East Panhandle Bear Stakeholder Group. The meetings will be from 6:30 to 8 p.m. local time at the following locations: May 6 Tallahassee, Woodville Community Center, 8000 Old Woodville Highway May 8 Panama City, Bay County Public Library, 898 West 11th St. May 13 Perry, Forest Capital Hall, 204 Forest Park Dr. May 15 Carrabelle, city of Carrabelle Auditorium, 1001 Gray Ave. May 20 Port St. Joe. Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin Campus, 3800 Garrison Ave. The FWC isexcited about getting the perspective of local residents and stakeholders on bear management in the east Panhandle of Florida, said Dave Telesco, FWC Bear Management Program coordinator. These workshops allow more interaction between participants and FWC staff than a regular meeting. We will be listening more than talking. The East Panhandle BMU includes Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla and Washington counties. The West Panhandle BMU was put into action in fall 2013, and the Central BMU was initiated in March of this year. Go to MyFWC. com/Bear and look for Which BMU are you? to nd out more about black bears in the East Panhandle BMU. A guide to living in bear country is also available at MyFWC. com/Bear by clicking on Brochures and Other Materials, and you can nd more on bears and the bear management plan at MyFWC.com/Bear.From U.S. Forest ServiceAs the 2014 wild re season approaches, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, and Council on Environmental Quality Acting Chair Mike Boots today released the Administrations National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy. This strategy, developed by federal, state, tribal and local community partners, and public stakeholders, outlines new approaches to coordinate and integrate efforts to restore and maintain healthy landscapes, prepare communities for fire season, and better address the nations wildland re threats. Through more strategic coordination with local communities, the National Cohesive Strategy will help us better protect the 46 million homes in 70,000 communities along the wildlandurban interface from catastrophic wild res, said Secretary Vilsack. This effort, combined with the Administrations newly proposed wildland re management funding strategy, will allow USDA and our partners to more effectively restore forested landscapes, treat forests for the increasing effects of climate change, and help avert and minimize destructive future wild res. The National Cohesive Strategy is the result of an ongoing partnership that is providing us with a collaborative roadmap for how we better work together across federal, tribal, state and local governments and with our NGO partners to effectively manage landscapes, said Secretary Jewell. Relying on a science-based approach to managing risks, this effort embodies the type of intergovernmental coordination that citizens and communities expect. As climate change spurs extended droughts and longer re seasons, this collaborative wildfire blueprint will help us restore forests and rangelands to make communities less vulnerable to catastrophic re, said Acting Chair Boots. The Strategy includes both national strategic planning and regionally-speci c assessment and risk analysis to address such factors as climate change, increasing community sprawl, and pests and disease affecting forest health across landscapes, regardless of ownership. Approaches include: Adopting preventive measures, such as fuels thinning and controlled burns; Promoting effective municipal, county and state building and zoning codes and ordinances; Ensuring that watersheds, transportation and utility corridors are part of future management plans; and Determining how organizations can best work together to reduce and manage human-caused ignitions. The Strategy will encourage knowledge sharing between communities and expand best practices to other projects and locations across the country. As we move into implementation, it is important to note that this collaborative effort is broader and more inclusive than previous efforts, said National Association of State Foresters President and Alaska State Forester Chris Maisch. It is national in scope, includes all lands, is grounded in a sciencebased risk analysis, and built with an emphasis on the eld level perspective. Together, these actions support the Obama Administrations Climate Action Plans call to reduce wild re risks.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsFWC to hold workshops on managing bears in PanhandleNew strategy proposed to protect from threat of wild re TRIMMER $21995SPECIAL OF THE WEEKFS56 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 MARJ LAWThe left two chambers are dirty, with black eyes, where the other two visible chambers have seen Mothers. Its important to clean your revolver HOME ON THE RANGE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 13A It was another slow week for members of Flotilla 12. However, we were deeply saddened by the loss of life from the ferry accident in South Korea. This event reminds us all how quickly things can change when out on the water, even when all appears to be going smoothly. Federal and state laws require that all boats have a USCGapproved life jackets for every person on board. That life jacket must be the proper size and ready to use in the event of an emergency. Ready for use means that it is out of the packaging, with tags removed and sized for the person who will use it. It also needs to be easy to access. Children 6 and younger MUST always wear a life jacket on a vessel less than 26 feet in length that is underway upon Florida waters. Passengers aboard a jet ski and individuals being towed on skis, ski boards or other devices must also wear a USCG-approved life jacket. Outside of Florida waters (which is defined as three miles or the edge of the Gulf Stream, whichever is greater, off the Atlantic coast or nine miles off the Gulf of Mexico coast), children younger than 13 MUST wear a life jacket while underway unless they are in a cabin or below deck. Before leaving the docks, it is also a good idea to talk about what to do in an emergency. Accidents happen and knowing what to do can save lives! For more information on life jackets, consider taking our safe boating class. If you are not a primary boat operator and would like to learn some basic safety skills, please consider our Suddenly in Command class. If you are interested in learning more about out classes, please contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Public Education, Alexander Gulde, at fso-pe@uscgaux. net. The boating season is upon us and our Members are available to assist area boaters with complimentary Vessel Examinations, scheduled Boat Safety Courses as well as participating in the many upcoming events promoting Boating Safety. Flotilla 12 will hold out monthly meeting Saturday, May 3, beginning at 9:15 a.m. We will meet at the volunteer re station in Crawfordville. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net or contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident being prepared is your best defense!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD The authority. Wikipedia de nes the word authority, which is derived from the Latin word auctoritas, to mean invention, advice, opinion, in uence, or command. These days authority is most often described as a government statement of control. Police have the authority or the Port Authority controls the bay. But I prefer the earlier interpretation as more along the lines of a keeper of knowledge. We often seek someone for information and if useful, de ne them as an authority. We start out in life seeking authorities, such as teachers and mentors, only to ultimately become an authority in some small or grand way in later life. There is great pride in sharing knowledge, something that an authority does not lose in the giving. Authors are people who write and thus share knowledge with others, becoming authorities on selected subjects. We are all authorities in our own way. As a scientist, I am thrilled to investigate marine behavior. As an engineer, I am thrilled to develop new diving technology that will enhance my marine observations. As a teacher, I enjoy sharing. This week we both nish and begin anew the sharing of our underwater knowledge. This is nals week for the TCC PEN 2136 Introduction to Professional Diving class, taught in cooperation with FAMUs Aquatics Department under the leadership of our Wakulla Environmental Institute. Like thousands of students before, I send them out into the marine world to become, in due time, authorities in their respective disciplines. In one semester they learned about working underwater, from Air to Trimix breathing gasses, from side mount to back mount technology, from open circuit to closed circuit rebreathers. They manage details of diving physics, physiology and marine life, and complete dives in fresh and salt water. We will hear from them again. This week we begin a new program with the Boy Scouts of America. A Tallahassee troop will begin a Scouting merit badge that will culminate in junior certi cation, and the start of a new orientation to the aquatic environment. The class is a family affair! A parent and a child are required to participate, both to create better bonds and share in mutual memories. In 1964 I was required to bring my father to Pearl Harbor so that we could get trained by UDT (Underwater Demolition) divers on R&R from Vietnam. I nd that class not only created a lifelong bond with my father (I take care of him at age 95), but it lead me into Marine Biology, diver education, a faculty career and now ownership of a dive center over the next 50 years. Later this summer we will offer a similar set of courses at Wallwood Scout Camp near Lake Talquin. Bob Ballard keeps telling me I am his authority on diving and related subterranean resources that pass under the Wakulla Environmental Institute. We have a broad spectrum of diving possibilities here in Wakulla County, all of which make for good times ahead. I hope to chronicle the collaboration currently planned and underway in future columns. Stay tuned.. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 3.3 ft. 4:35 AM 3.1 ft. 5:13 AM 3.0 ft. 5:53 AM High 1.2 ft. 9:47 AM 1.3 ft. 10:19 AM 1.4 ft. 10:53 AM 0.2 ft. 12:05 AM 0.5 ft. 12:48 AM 0.7 ft. 1:40 AM 0.9 ft. 2:45 AM Low 3.9 ft. 3:41 PM 3.8 ft. 4:09 PM 3.6 ft. 4:40 PM 2.8 ft. 6:37 AM 2.7 ft. 7:30 AM 2.6 ft. 8:37 AM 2.7 ft. 9:52 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:51 PM -0.1 ft. 11:27 PM 1.6 ft. 11:32 AM 1.7 ft. 12:23 PM 1.8 ft. 1:34 PM 1.8 ft. 3:13 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:14 PM 3.1 ft. 5:56 PM 2.8 ft. 6:54 PM 2.5 ft. 8:36 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 4:27 AM 2.4 ft. 5:05 AM 2.2 ft. 5:45 AM High 0.9 ft. 9:58 AM 1.0 ft. 10:30 AM 1.1 ft. 11:04 AM 0.1 ft. 12:16 AM 0.3 ft. 12:59 AM 0.5 ft. 1:51 AM 0.7 ft. 2:56 AM Low 2.9 ft. 3:33 PM 2.8 ft. 4:01 PM 2.7 ft. 4:32 PM 2.1 ft. 6:29 AM 2.0 ft. 7:22 AM 2.0 ft. 8:29 AM 2.0 ft. 9:44 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:02 PM -0.1 ft. 11:38 PM 1.2 ft. 11:43 AM 1.3 ft. 12:34 PM 1.3 ft. 1:45 PM 1.3 ft. 3:24 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:06 PM 2.3 ft. 5:48 PM 2.1 ft. 6:46 PM 1.9 ft. 8:28 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 5:11 AM 2.9 ft. 5:49 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:51 AM 1.2 ft. 11:23 AM -0.1 ft. 12:31 AM 0.2 ft. 1:09 AM 0.4 ft. 1:52 AM 0.6 ft. 2:44 AM 0.8 ft. 3:49 AM Low 3.6 ft. 4:17 PM 3.5 ft. 4:45 PM 2.8 ft. 6:29 AM 2.6 ft. 7:13 AM 2.5 ft. 8:06 AM 2.4 ft. 9:13 AM 2.5 ft. 10:28 AM High -0.3 ft. 11:55 PM 1.3 ft. 11:57 AM 1.4 ft. 12:36 PM 1.6 ft. 1:27 PM 1.7 ft. 2:38 PM 1.6 ft. 4:17 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:16 PM 3.1 ft. 5:50 PM 2.9 ft. 6:32 PM 2.6 ft. 7:30 PM 2.4 ft. 9:12 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 2.6 ft. 4:19 AM 2.4 ft. 4:57 AM 2.3 ft. 5:37 AM 2.2 ft. 6:21 AM High 1.2 ft. 9:26 AM 1.3 ft. 9:58 AM 1.4 ft. 10:32 AM 1.6 ft. 11:11 AM 0.4 ft. 12:27 AM 0.7 ft. 1:19 AM 0.9 ft. 2:24 AM Low 3.0 ft. 3:25 PM 2.9 ft. 3:53 PM 2.8 ft. 4:24 PM 2.6 ft. 4:58 PM 2.1 ft. 7:14 AM 2.0 ft. 8:21 AM 2.1 ft. 9:36 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:30 PM -0.1 ft. 11:06 PM 0.2 ft. 11:44 PM 1.7 ft. 12:02 PM 1.8 ft. 1:13 PM 1.8 ft. 2:52 PM Low 2.4 ft. 5:40 PM 2.2 ft. 6:38 PM 2.0 ft. 8:20 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed May 7, 14 Date 3.3 ft. 4:32 AM 3.2 ft. 5:10 AM 3.0 ft. 5:50 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:44 AM 1.4 ft. 10:16 AM 1.6 ft. 10:50 AM 0.2 ft. 12:02 AM 0.5 ft. 12:45 AM 0.8 ft. 1:37 AM 1.0 ft. 2:42 AM Low 4.0 ft. 3:38 PM 3.9 ft. 4:06 PM 3.7 ft. 4:37 PM 2.9 ft. 6:34 AM 2.7 ft. 7:27 AM 2.7 ft. 8:34 AM 2.7 ft. 9:49 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:48 PM -0.1 ft. 11:24 PM 1.7 ft. 11:29 AM 1.9 ft. 12:20 PM 2.0 ft. 1:31 PM 1.9 ft. 3:10 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:11 PM 3.2 ft. 5:53 PM 2.8 ft. 6:51 PM 2.6 ft. 8:33 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 5:30 AM 2.4 ft. 6:12 AM 2.4 ft. 6:55 AM 2.4 ft. 7:39 AM High 1.6 ft. 9:10 AM 1.6 ft. 9:46 AM 1.6 ft. 10:31 AM 1.6 ft. 11:27 AM 0.2 ft. 12:16 AM 0.3 ft. 1:07 AM 0.5 ft. 2:03 AM Low 2.8 ft. 2:50 PM 2.8 ft. 3:27 PM 2.7 ft. 4:08 PM 2.5 ft. 4:56 PM 2.4 ft. 8:24 AM 2.4 ft. 9:08 AM 2.4 ft. 9:49 AM High -0.1 ft. 10:14 PM -0.1 ft. 10:51 PM 0.0 ft. 11:31 PM 1.5 ft. 12:38 PM 1.4 ft. 2:01 PM 1.2 ft. 3:21 PM Low 2.3 ft. 5:54 PM 2.1 ft. 7:05 PM 2.0 ft. 8:32 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 1 May 7First May 7 Full May 14 Last May 21 New May 283:18 am-5:18 am 3:43 pm-5:43 pm 8:44 am-9:44 am 10:41 pm-11:41 pm 4:08 am-6:08 am 4:34 pm-6:34 pm 9:33 am-10:33 am 11:32 pm-12:32 am 4:58 am-6:58 am 5:23 pm-7:23 pm 10:23 am-11:23 am --:-----:-5:47 am-7:47 am 6:10 pm-8:10 pm 12:18 am-1:18 am 11:15 am-12:15 pm 6:34 am-8:34 am 6:56 pm-8:56 pm 1:01 am-2:01 am 12:07 pm-1:07 pm 7:19 am-9:19 am 7:41 pm-9:41 pm 1:40 am-2:40 am 12:59 pm-1:59 pm 8:03 am-10:03 am 8:25 pm-10:25 pm 2:16 am-3:16 am 1:52 pm-2:52 pm Good Average Average Average Average Average Average6:54 am 8:14 pm 8:45 am 10:42 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:53 am 8:15 pm 9:34 am 11:33 pm 6:52 am 8:16 pm 10:25 am --:-6:51 am 8:16 pm 11:16 am 12:19 am 6:50 am 8:17 pm 12:08 pm 1:02 am 6:50 am 8:18 pm 1:00 pm 1:41 am 6:49 am 8:18 pm 1:52 pm 2:18 am14% 20% 27% 33% 39% 45% 51%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. By MICHELLE GOMEZOf Gulf SpecimenGulf Specimen Marine Lab is hosting its 5th annual benefit event, Sharks & Chablis, on Sunday, May 18, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 222 Clark Drive in Panacea. The street party features live entertainment, seafood by the Seineyard Seafood Restaurant, Barefoot Wines and craft beer, silent auction and guided tours of the aquarium. Exhibitors add to the fun with live birds and reptiles, wilderness awareness and unique photo ops. Sharks & Chablis is a miraculous gathering of people who come to say Thank you for having Gulf Specimen, says Jack Rudloe, GSML president. We have tremendous food, great music. Its a wonderful event. This year marks a half century that GSML has been sourcing scientific discovery, ghting for habitat protection and educating students of all ages on the wonders of Floridas Gulf Coast. Internationally recognized for sustainable collection methods that support cancer research, the lab is the supplier of choice for universities across the country and around the world. The aquarium and educational center, built by the tireless work of founders Jack and Anne Rudloe, now boast 20,000 visitors annually. With even more to celebrate in 2014, Jack Rudloe and his family travel to Washington, D.C. to accept the prestigious National Wetlands Award in Outreach and Education, administered by the Environmental Law Institute. The award is validation of a lifelong battle to save North Floridas unique landscape and the wealth of animals it supports. As further evidence of GSMLs influence on the international marine science community, Rudloe also recently achieved immortality as the namesake for a new species of jellyfish found in Madagascar Chiropsella rudloei. Rudloe had travelled to the Indian Ocean decades earlier on an expedition funded by the United Nations Educational, Scienti c and Cultural Organization. During the trip, he made extensive field notes which were ultimately used in the discovery of the new sea wasp species. GSMLs staff plans to extend its educational reach through live aquarium feeds and marine science material for schools. The SeaMobile continues to amaze with its innovative brand of hands-on awareness techniques. Money raised through the Sharks & Chablis event will help to fund these projects and further GSMLs legacy of conservation and education that highlights the natural treasures of the Florida Panhandle. The funds we raise enable the projects that really set Gulf Specimen apart, said GSMLs Executive Director Cypress Rudloe. Were striving to become the leading marine science educational center in North Florida. To buy tickets or make a donation, visit www.gulfspecimen. org/sharks-and-chablis. To learn more about the work being done at GSML, visit www. gulfspecimen.org.Sharks & Chablis fundraiser set for May 18

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Monday, April 21, Joe Holmes of Tallahassee reported the theft of his vehicle. The victim entered the St. Marks Express Lane but left his vehicle running and unsecured. Witnesses observed a Hispanic subject enter the vehicle and drive off as the victim attempted to stop the suspect. Deputies and the Florida Highway Patrol observed the suspect vehicle and followed in a pursuit that took law enforcement on U.S. Highway 98, U.S. Highway 319 and Highway 267 before the subject continued west on Highway 267 before increasing speed and traveling toward Highway 20 where the pursuit was discontinued. The suspect threw some of the victims belongings out the window of the vehicle during the pursuit. On Wednesday, April 23, WCSO deputies made three arrests following a high speed pursuit at 3:21 a.m. Deputy Stephen Simmons observed a vehicle with an expired tag that was involved in previous law enforcement encounters during the past week. Deputy Simmons attempted to conduct a traf c stop at Shadeville Highway and Spring Creek Highway but the driver accelerated to more than 80 mph in a 55 mph speed zone. The vehicle turned east and then north on Highway 61 and reached speeds of more than 100 miles per hour. As the vehicle crossed Highway 267 at a high rate of speed the vehicle bottomed out on the road and was damaged. Deputy Simmons caught up to the damaged vehicle at Strattonwood Drive. The vehicle stopped and a male subject ran into the woods and two females were captured at the vehicle. Deputy Ross Hasty captured Jeffrey Allyn Saba, 26, of Crawfordville hiding on the ground in the woods. He was in possession of a box which contained pills, crack cocaine and drug paraphernalia. Inside the vehicle, cocaine was observed along with marijuana, pills and more drug paraphernalia. Saba was charged with possession of cocaine with intent to sell, possession of Schedule II and Schedule III narcotics, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, eeing and eluding and felony driving while license is suspended or revoked. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail and is being held on a $36,500 bond. The females in the vehicle were identi ed as Chelsie Elizabeth Corin Andrews, 21, of Crawfordville and Louann Clark Maiorano, 28, of Panacea. Andrews was charged with obstruction of justice/resisting without violence and is being held in jail under a $500 bond. Maiorano was charged with allowing an unauthorized person to drive her vehicle and possession of drug paraphernalia. She posted a $1,250 bond and was released. The investigation also included Deputy Gibby Gibson, Lt. Mike Kemp, Sgt. Ryan Muse and FHP Trooper Josh Greene. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: THURSDAY, APRIL 17 Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated a residential burglary in Sopchoppy. A concerned citizen contacted the WCSO about a damaged window at the home. It has not been determined if anything was removed from the home. The victim is Brenda Eaton of Sharpsburg, Ga. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated a prowler complaint in Wakulla Gardens. Deputy Yarbrough made contact with a white male standing in a front yard. Tyson Lyn Scott, 24, of Crawfordville granted Deputy Yarbrough permission to search his backpack. A light bulb was discovered with a cut out section and narcotics residue on it. The contents of the bulb tested positive for methamphetamine. Scott was arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of methamphetamine and transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Stephen Simmons also investigated. FRIDAY, APRIL 18 Cindy Cross of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. Prescription medication was stolen from the victims mailbox. The medications are valued at $30. The victim also contacted the U.S. Postal Service Inspection Services to report the theft of mail. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Linda Franklin Davis of St. Marks backed into Kenneth Myron Kirtons truck while it was parked at Centennial Bank on U.S. Highway 98 and Highway 363. There were no injuries. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Sarah Mendenhall of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Window coverings were cut and damaged at her home. A person of interest has been identified. Damage was estimated at $15. Deputy David Pienta and Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. SATURDAY, APRIL 19 Deputy Alan Middlebrooks was conducting traffic enforcement at Bloxham Cutoff Road and FH 313 when he observed Zachariah William Faulkner, 24, of Crawfordville. Deputy Middlebrooks knew Faulkner did not possess a valid driver license through previous contacts with him. Deputy Middlebrooks conducted a traf c stop and determined that his license was still suspended. Faulkner was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked second or subsequent conviction. Antonio Costello Hobbs Jr., 26, of Tallahassee was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Roy Gunnarsson was operating stationary radar when he observed a vehicle driving at 66 mph in a 45 mph zone. The deputy conducted a traf c stop. Deputy Gunnarsson could smell the odor of marijuana emitting from the vehicle. Hobbs granted the deputy permission to search the vehicle and marijuana shake and seeds were observed in the vehicle. Deputy Gunnarsson issued the notice to appear and a Uniform Traf c Citation for speeding. The weight of the marijuana was .1 of a gram. Deputy Anthony Paul also investigated. David Shane Woodard, 38, of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic stop for failure to use a turn signal. Woodard was found to have a suspended driver license. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Lt. Mike Kemp were granted permission to search the vehicle and cannabis and a smoking pipe was discovered inside the vehicle. Woodard was issued two criminal citations for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge. The marijuana weighed approximately one gram. SUNDAY, APRIL 20 Tallahassee Police Department notied the WCSO about recovering a stolen vehicle from Wakulla County in Tallahassee. The vehicle was reported stolen April 12 by victim Robert Livingston of Sopchoppy. A suspect has been identi ed and the vehicle is being held for the WCSO. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Detective Clint Beam investigated. John Conley of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re. Individuals were attempting to remove items from a burning vehicle as Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Wakulla Firefighters arrived on the scene and put out the blaze. The vehicle was a total loss. The vehicle caught re as the victim was attempting to drive. The vehicle was valued at $5,000 and the re has been ruled accidental. A nurse from Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee reported a 35-year-old Tallahassee man being admitted for multiple lacerations on his body. The man reported receiving the lacerations at an unknown Wakulla County location. The man and a female friend attended an outdoor party and reported being jumped at the event. The victim was unable to provide deputies with much speci c information. Deputy Will Hudson and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Pamela Fox of Crawfordville reported losing her rearm after leaving it on her vehicle and driving off. The firearm is valued at $400 and was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as lost. A search for the firearm resulted in negative results. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Decetti Ligon of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c stop after being observed with a non-functioning headlight. Ligon did not have a valid driver license and had two previous convictions for driving without a valid license. She was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction. Deputy Matt Hedges and Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. Joshua David Colvin, 23, of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic stop for an inoperative tail light and an expired tag. While the subject was pulling his wallet out of his pocket during the stop a clear plastic baggy containing suspect marijuana fell out. Colvin was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. He was also given verbal warnings for faulty equipment and the expired tag. The marijuana weighed 4.6 grams. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. MONDAY, APRIL 21 Vernon Key of Greenville and Burford Tree Company of Anniston, Ala., reported a vehicle burglary. Two commercial vehicles were burglarized on U.S. Highway 98 east of Woodville Highway. A forced entry was observed and an ignition was pulled. A second vehicle had wiring damaged. Damage to the vehicles is estimated at $350. Deputy Adam Pendris and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Carolyn Fields of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The charges totaled $345 and were created on electronic gaming systems in California. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Roy Thompson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noted that two unauthorized orders were made online using his bank card. A charge of $147 was observed. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Kenneth Dodson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed three unauthorized charges on his bank account. The charges were created at a Wal-Mart in Rialto, Calif., and totaled $87. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. A 17-year-old male was observed putting a bottle of pills inside his pants and attempting to leave the facility without paying for them. The pills are valued at $6. The juvenile was arrested for retail theft and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. He was turned over to his parents after he did not meet the criteria for the juvenile detention center. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. David Jay Wilkinson, 43, of Crawfordville was observed taking a ceiling fan and ice out of the store without paying for them. The items are valued at $117. Wilkinson was transported to the Wakulla County Jail and charged with retail theft. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. TUESDAY, APRIL 22 Christopher Bunger of Crawfordville reported a burglary to his shed. A forced entry was observed and tools, valued at $450, were reported missing. Damage to the shed is estimated at $25. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. John Kane of Panacea reported a felony criminal mischief to a camper trailer owned by a 77-year-old Dennison, Ohio, resident. The complainant reported that someone forcible entered the camper and created $400 worth of damage. Broken glass and damaged windows and doors were observed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23 Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated a retail theft at Wal-Mart. Store Asset Protection staff detailed a female for attempting to leave the store without paying for all of the items in her cart. Phyllis Bond Smith, 62, of Crawfordville entered the check-out line and paid for items in only one section of her cart. She was detained as she attempted to leave the store. She was arrested for retail theft and given a trespass warning for the store. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Amanda Richburg, 33, of Carrabelle was arrested for retail theft at Wal-Mart. The suspect attempted to conceal $169 worth of merchandise in her purse and leave the store without paying for the items. The subject was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Eunice Selewski of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry, bed linens and medications were stolen from the home. Damage was observed to the home which was valued at $300. The missing property is valued at $3,690. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ashley McAlister, Sgt. Jeremy Johnston, Deputy Matt Hedges and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,103 calls for service during the past week including 17 business and residential alarms; 10 assists to other agencies; 85 citizen contacts; 14 E-911 abandoned cell calls; eight E-911 abandoned calls; 16 E-911 calls; 10 ag downs; 44 investigations; 39 medical emergencies; 17 school security checks; 352 business and residential security checks; 23 special details; 15 suspicious vehicles; 59 traf c enforcements; 213 traf c stops; and 14 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 15APeople on special diets get tired of salads all the time, Swenson said. But they dont know how good it can be. We have to be in control about what goes into our bodies. Weve got to get back to basics. Swenson prepared and served two tasty salads with homemade dressing wholewheat pasta salad with baby greens, and massaged kale salad with apple, quinoa and radishes. For recipes, e-mail Swenson at sswenson@ufl. edu. A representative from Duke Energy was available on the sidewalk to answer questions on how to conserve energy and lower energy costs. Duke provides free home energy checks and ef ciency kits to anyone interested. Visit duke-energy. com/save for more information. Jess Beatty, with the Florida Wild Mammal Association, had special critters to impart a living, breathing message of environmentalism at Hudson Park. Doofy, a 9-year-old brown pelican, was injured in Hurricane Dennis, and is a xture within the association. Doofy cannot survive on his own. Beatty also had Gordy, a sulcata tortoise from Africa. They are excellent at escape, Beatty said. So theyve become an invasive species problem. Cycling as a means to living green was one focus of the Green Living Expo. Sergeant William Jones and Deputy Mike Crum of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce t and provided a free helmet for each participating child, and held a bicycle rodeo to teach rules of the road and safe riding. For adults, workshops included helmet tting, a free helmet plus other cycling accessories. Leah Bowman reported that the Florida Department of Transportation gave away 85 adult bicycle helmets, and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce gave away 33 childrens helmets, all free. Bowman said the bicycle exhibitors were pleased with the number of people who visited their exhibits and the connections they made while at the expo. Leilania Nichols estimated that at least 50 children enjoyed the various Eco-Kids activities, often returning to her tent multiples times. It is estimated more than 350 people attended the event throughout the day. Registrants were gifted with reusable shopping bags from Bay Leaf Market. The Wakulla County Historical Societys sh fry raised about $1,000 for the Heritage Village. Sandy Cook said several visitors came to look at the repurposed items on display and left inspired. Fortyve vendors and exhibitors were set up throughout the park, and on the sidewalk in front of TCC Wakulla. Kathryn Gibson said vendors and exhibitors reported valuing the opportunity to network, greet and meet others with similar green interests. They were pleased to see that the community was genuinely interested and curios about the natural and organic ingredients and asked lots of questions, Gibson said. Newer vendors especially appreciated the low-cost opportunity to showcase their products and businesses. Gibson said there were numerous requests to coordinate and facilitate repurposing workshops, which is planned for fall. As events wound down, local singer songwriter Ernest Toole sang and played guitar to original songs about Florida. Barry Sager, who played the pan flute, and Tooles granddaughter Sarah Toole, who sang and played the baritone ukulele, accompanied him. Tooles lyrics were appropriate for the event. Water, water, water, everywhere. Without that water, we couldnt be here. Without that water, we would disappear.Sustainable Wakulla: Sustainable Wakulla: Green Living Expo educates and entertains Green Living Expo educates and entertains PHOTOS BY LEAH BOWMAN, SANDY COOK, ERIC LIVINGSTON, JO ANN PALMER AND NICOLE ZEMAMore photos online at thewakullanews.com 40th Annual 40th AnnualSchedule of Events and 2014 Blue Crab Festival Band Schedule www.bluecrabfest.com 850-984-CRAB Thanks to our Sponsors! Thanks to our Sponsors! Saturday, May 3, 2014 W oolley P ark on Beautiful Dic k e r son Bay Arts & Crafts Entertainment Crab Picking Contest Kids Activities Fresh Local Seafood Gulf Specimen Mobile Marine Lab10:00-11:00AM The Coastal Optimist Club Parade 11:00 Master Chief 12:15 Mullet Toss 1:00 Mountain Dew Cloggers 2:00 Crab Pickin' Contest! 2:30 Gypsy Darlings 3:30 Mountain Dew Cloggers 4:30 Dean Newman, Kim Thomas, Kit Goodner and Charlie Wilkinson 5:15 Lost Creek 6:00 Park Closes Located at the Historic St. Marks River at Newport Bridge(850) 925-6448 SLOHAN PETE CREATURES OF HABIT KOMINATED FOR A FUN DAY ONLY AT OUZTS TOO LIVE MUSIC 12-6 p.m. LIVE MUSIC 12-6 p.m. NEWPORT JAM NEWPORT JAM ANNUAL Mullet Toss Games & Fun Vendors Food Specials Beer

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThe spring season in Wakulla County is colorful. Every location from frequently manicured gardens to untended fields and pastures are exploding with hues and tones pleasing to the eye. These heralds of the warmer weather to come are trailed by the warm seasons greenery which lls in the gaps between blooms. The consistent and ample rains have assured the continuance of a bright and pleasing landscape backed by countless shades and textures of green. The adequate moisture has also assured the aggressive growth of an individually small, but collectively gigantic, weed which plagues every member of humanity associated with attempting to cultivate plants. Purple nut sedge, Cyprus rotundus, has emerged en masse from every possible sunny location with soil. This native plant is a rapidly spreading perennial which will take every opportunity to colonize new locations. The identi er purple is in the name because there is a purple-tinged section of this sedge where it emerges from the ground. The plant is sometimes referred to as purple nut grass because of its long narrow leaves and its erect growth pattern originate from a nutlike basal bulb. There are other sedges in Wakulla County, but only yellow nut sedge is identified by a specific color. It is sometimes called chufa and is a popular feed for wild turkeys and turkey hunters. The dark green, smooth leaves blend in easily with many turf grasses. Beneath the soils surface and out of sight, the root system grows in every direction. Purple nut sedges roots are a series of spreading rhizomes and tubers or bulbs identied as nutlets. Each nutlet sprouts a new bunch of grasslike leaves and continues growing the rhizomes. The densely population of this sedge quickly crowds out most other plants, but most especially turf and forage grasses. It can reach a height of 18 inches on its triangle shaped stem. The root systems design assures this plants survival and continued success. If pulled, the rhizomes break off leaving a large number of nutlets to develop and emerge at a later date. If plowed or tilled, the nutlets are detached and spread to new and inviting locations. Many times nutlets lodge in tillage equipment only to shake loose and deposited in un-colonized locations. Most herbicides have little effect on this sedges hardy root system. Selected preemergent herbicides will prevent many of the nutlets from germinating in spring. Wakulla Countys sandy soils provide an ideal growing environment for purple nut sedge. The occasional periods of water saturation from storms do not deter this plants rapid growth and expansion to new areas, but it will not tolerate heavy shade. Purple nut sedges extreme competitive nature is a heavy consumer of plant nutrients and robs rivals of important compounds necessary for their survival. Additionally, it produces an allelopathic substance which is toxic to some plants. Purple nut sedge is found in many locales in North America where the environment is hospitable to its growth. The lush green leaves and touch of purple signify work for anyone who is maintaining a lawn or garden. To learn more about purple nut sedge in Wakulla County contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas. u .edu/. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Rhizomes and bulb-like nutlets branch out in all directions from this sedge, above. Purple Nut Sedge appears to be a grass and is easily overlooked in turf, below. It will aggressively occupy many environments in Wakulla County and replace any plants already established. Purple nut sedge can spread rapidly Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Expert physicians.Quality care. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalGroup.comRobert Frable, DOSpecializing in: Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Group accepts Capital Health Plan and most all other insurance carriers.850 9266363 Aida Torres, ARNP Flu and pneumonia vaccination

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Alligator Point Sea Turtle PatrolPage 16BSenior Citizen NewsPage 6BChamber NewsPage 4B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 sports news and team views SportsBy DAVID MONTEZSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Lady War Eagles girls softball team dispatched with the Gulf Breeze Dolphins 7-3 in exciting and convincing fashion last Thursday night at home in the Regional Quarter nals. A strong outing by Lady War Eagles starting pitcher Meghan Sarvis, ef cient hitting and signi cant contributions from two freshman call-ups propel the team to next weeks regional seminals. The rst two innings of the game played out much like Wakullas district nal championship versus Suwannee with both starting pitchers and defenses holding strong. By the middle of the third, the Dolphins had opened up a one run lead. Through opportunistic base running and timely hits, the Lady War Eagles nished the third inning with a three-run urry. With one out, starting pitcher Meghan Sarvis was hit by a pitch and advanced to second on a wild pitch. After the innings second out, freshman Brianna Prichard had a base hit scoring Sarvis and advancing to second, bringing up to bat the Lady War Eagles leader in hits, senior Michael Cooper. Cooper slapped a double scoring Prichard. Cooper eventually crossed home plate with the innings third run for Wakulla after a series of throwing errors by the Dolphins first a wild pitch to home and then an overthrow to third in an attempt to tag Cooper. After a scoreless fourth, in the fth inning the Dolphins mustered two runs in much the same fashion as the War Eagles did in the third. A series of three errors in the out eld and in eld allowed two Gulf Breeze players to score. Turn to Page 2BBy DAVID MONTEZSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles baseball team showed little rust after having nearly two weeks off defeating the Suwannee Bulldogs by the mercy rule 14-4 last Thursday night. The all-around dominant win clinched the 5A-2 District Championship for the War Eagles and was redemption for a 1310 loss in last years district championship. Senior Kaleb Atkins proved to be well in control of the Suwannee line-up giving up only ve hits and two earned runs over ve complete innings. As team, the War Eagles offensive could do no wrong batting together an average of .464, scattering 13 hits over six innings. In an interview after the game, Head Coach Mike Gauger admitted to being conscious about the team possibly being rusty after having two successive regular season games cancelled due to inclement weather. To insure that his players were well prepared, the team played a live scrimmage the Monday before the game. It gave wouldbe starter Kaleb Atkins the opportunity to warm-up against stiff competition after pitching only two innings over the previous two weeks. Gauger reported that from the start of the game his players exhibited a level of intensity, ready to get to work, that they had not previously. This intensity proved productive early and often for the War Eagles scoring ve runs in just the rst inning, three in the second and two in the third. Turn to Page 2B SOFTBALL BASEBALLLady War Eagles reach regional seminalsWar Eagles dominate in District Championship DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSenior Kaleb Atkins shuts down Suwannee in the fourth inning. Lady War Eagles Pitcher Meghan Sarvis against Gulf Breeze. Lady War Eagles Pitcher Meghan Sarvis winds up to throw. Junior Jake Webb drives in a run during Wakullas win over Suwannee. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER LUNCH PARTNER F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of A SPRINGS SERENADE At WAKULLA SPRING S Saturday, May 3 4:30 8 p.m.Trio Del Mar Specialty Menu Boat Ride Program Tickets: WakullaSprings.org SinkHole SinkHole SinkHoleFRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netFamily and teammates surrounded William Bill Morgan IV as he signed a wrestling scholarship with Coker College on April 23 at the War Eagle Caf at Wakulla High School. Morgan, wrestling team captain, will be headed to the college located in Hartsville, S.C. in the fall. His coach, Will Pafford, said Bill is the rst student he has had sign. Bill was the rst to buy into my program, buy into this team, and rst to sign, Pafford said. I cant wait to see whats going to happen. He has demonstrated a lot of team leadership, showing moves and helping the younger guys. Coaches said the War Eagles team was district and regional champions this year, and Bill was a three-time state quali er and regional champion. This year he was 28-2 on the season, with 150 career wins an astounding record. His coaches said most wrestlers get 60 or 70 career wins. Assistant coach Shannon Smith congratulated the athlete who walked away from all other sports to concentrate on wrestling. When Bill was playing football at the rec park, he was the smallest but probably the toughest, Smith said. I convinced him to try wrestling. He walked away from everything else and put all his time into it. Its paying off for him today. Bill Morgan III, Bills dad, was beaming with pride at the scholarship signing. Were nervous and excited, he said. Hes going to be away from us. But Im proud of him and his accomplishments. I love this county, but I want him to get out and see something. He wants to come back and coach, but well see what happens in four years. Bill said he toured the Coker College campus and met his new teammates. He said the wrestling program at Coker College is like one big family. The team is newly formed, and Bill is thrilled to set a standard of success with them. It was their rst year last year, and I think they got 30th in the nation, and thats fair, Bill said. Bill said he will study to become a physical therapist. Bills grandfather, Bill Morgan Jr., was misty-eyed talking about his grandson. Its all right here, he said, pointing to his heart. But hes not going so far that me and his Nanny cant get to him.Special to The NewsWakullas Jordan Trussell, striker, and Lucas Briggs, center midfielder/goalkeeper, helped lead Tallahassees ASG Premier U15 Soccer Team to a Championship at the Florida State Invitational Soccer Tournament at Florida State University April 12-13. The invitational tournament hosted 133 teams from the Southeast states and provided recruiting opportunities to college coaches. The ASG U15 Boys opened the tournament against the Jacksonville Florida Creeks Kraze with a 4-1 win. The ASG Team then shut out the Baton Rouge South Carolina Maroon 3-0 on Saturday afternoon, advancing to the seminals. The boys won the Sunday morning SemiFinal against the CSA Internationals 4-1 to advance to the championship game. The 15s completed their unblemished run through the tournament with a 2-1 rematch win over Creeks Kraze. Jordan and Lucas have been a soccer duo through Riversprings Middle School coached by Chad Linville, continuing their attacking on the eld together with the ASG Premier Club, directed by Coach Andy Warner. Briggs plays varsity soccer and baseball for Maclay High School, and Trussell plays varsity soccer for Wakulla High School. NICOLE ZEMAWRESTLING SOCCERBill Morgan signs with Coker CollegeFrom Page 1BDespite the three runs on the board for the Dolphins, Sarvis through ve had only allowed one earned run, three hits and three walks. Going into the sixth Head Coach Tom Graham opted for a fresh arm from the bullpen, speci cally, freshman Brianna Prichard, who was previously the junior varsity squads lead pitcher. After Prichard held the Dolphins scoreless in the sixth, the Lady War Eagles broke open the game with a 4-run rally again through defensive miscues and timely hitting. The Lady War Eagles started the sixth with great promise after getting runners on second and third from a Cooper single and a Dolphin throwing error off junior Kenzie Lees in eld grounder. Two successive groundouts put the teams momentum on hold. Subsequently, freshman Lauren Lewis was hit by a pitch to load the bases for another freshman, Skylar Sullivan, with two outs. On a 3-1 pitch Sullivan pulled through for the War Eagles smashing a line-drive triple to the left-center eld gap clearing the bases. Sarvis continued the rally with a base hit scoring Sullivan before the inning ended. Prichard, as in the sixth, held Gulf Breeze from scoring in the seventh to earn the win. The Lady War Eagles next game was set for Tuesday, April 29, against the Mosley Dolphins in Lynn Haven. You can follow game updates of Wakullas boys and girls games on Twitter @WakullaNews. Thanks to Anthony Romanus for helping live-tweet Thursday nights game. From Page 1BThursdays result was polar-opposite from Wakullas previous match-up versus Suwannee early in the season when the War Eagles, despite winning, were only able to muster 3 runs over seven innings. In this latest round, the War Eagles had little dif culty hitting for extra bases and driving in runs. Senior James Estes was perfect on day going 4-for-4 with a double and scoring four runs. Junior Bailey Metcalf was 3-for-4 with a double, triple and 3 RBIs. Metcalf also closed out the game in relief of Atkins striking out the side in the sixth inning. Sophomore Nick Lentz showed patience at the plate earning two walks, along with going 1-for-2 and scoring two runs. The War Eagles next game will take place Wednesday, April 30, at home at 7 p.m. against the 24-3 Mosley Dolphins, the 5A-1 district runnersup. Wakulla will need to maintain their offensive momentum against Mosley, ranked third in the 5A FHSAA rankings, which carries a 1.02 team ERA. Wakulla improved its own ranking in the FHSAA index to 5th in 5A after its win against Suwannee. You can follow game updates of Wakullas baseball and softball games on Twitter @WakullaNews.Wakullas elite players win FSU InvitationalLady War Eagles reach regional semi- nalsWar Eagles dominate in District ChampionshipJENNIFER BRIGGS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe U15 team includesWakullas Jordan Trussell and Lucas Briggs. Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL *Potential savings may vary based upon individual circumstances. Consult your agent for more details. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 3BClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m.Friday, May 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Saturday, May 3 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, May 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for ve classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Monday, May 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, May 6 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.Wednesday, May 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Upcoming Events Friday, May 2 The second annual BIG BEND KAYAK CLASSIC tournament will be Friday and Saturday, at Harvey Young Farm in Crawfordville. To register, go to www.bigbendkayakclassic.com or call 850-9267145. Registraton is $75 for adults and $50 for youth 17 and under. Fishing is within a 50 miles radius of Wakulla County. Proceeds bene t Meals on Wheels and other senior services.Saturday, May 3 THE 40th ANNUAL PANACEA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL PARADE. Line up is at 9 a.m., parade begins at 10 a.m. on Jer-Be-Lou Blvd. and US 98. Arts, crafts, food vendors, mullet toss, crab picking contest, Mountain Dew Cloggers and music by Gypsy Darlings, Dean Newman & Friends and many more. For parade applications, call June Vause at 545-0077 or Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480. Or email: jcvause@yahoo.com or wversiga@yahoo.com. AN ENCHANTED EVENING for local students with special needs will be from 7 to 10 p.m. This event is a special needs prom, with dinner and dancing at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Guests 7th grade through post-graduate students with special needs who registed by the April 25 deadline are invited to join. CHAT will host PAMPER YOUR POOCH, a dog wash and micro chipping event at Hudson park from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. All-natural dog baths, towel dry, ea and tick spray, nail clipping, anal expression, micro chipping and pet photos. Proceeds will bene t the Seniors Pets Meals on Wheels, TNR program and educational materials for our elementary students. The 21st Annual BACONFEST SOUTHPORK event is free and open to the public, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Sunday. Enjoy art, live music and bacon-everything. You bring dessert. Venue is Pelican Place, 1357 Martin Luther King Jr Memorial Road in Crawfordville. For more information call 926-6058 or visit www.pelicanplace.net. FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK invites the community to the family friendly evening for SINKHOLE DE MAYO. Guitarists Trio del Mar will perform, state geologist Dr. Harley Means will lead a short program about Cenotes, and a themed menu is being prepared by Chef Jody Perez of the Lodge. There are a limited number of all-inclusive advance tickets available at wakullasprings.org, $25 adults and $13 children under 12 years old. The event begins at 4:30 in the afternoon and ends after a boat ride, walk, dinner and music at 8 p.m. Free park admission only with advance ticket purchase. For additional ticket information contact Bob Peolquin, 556-9758. GOLF GONE WILD bene tting the FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION will be at St. James Bay Golf Resort in Carrabelle. Sign-in begins at 8:30. Shotgun start is at 10 a.m. Breakfast and lunch will be served. Register teams of four, $100 per player. Winners take home cash and prizes. To enter, e-mail Rob Burlison at rob@stjamesbay.com. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National Button Society) will meet at the central location of Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. Wakulla, Franklin, Okaloosa and guests welcome. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson 926-7812, President Don/Barbara Lanier 729-7594, email bardon56@aol.com, Linda Wood 850-899-0025, or a local email: skpsky2000@comcast.net. A short interesting presentation about unique buttons is given at each meeting. Monday, May 5 A CAREGIVER SUPPORT MEETING will be at 1 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church. The discussion will be: Challenges of caregiving. All caregivers are welcome to attend. For more information, call Pat 984-5277.Tuesday, May 6 P.A.S.T. ARCHEOLOGY will have a meeting at 7 p.m., as Dr. Lou Hill presents Less is Moore -a reexamination of two Woodland occupations on the north central Florida Gulf Coast, (the Bird Hammock and Tucker sites). Vanue is B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Gov. Martin House, 1001 De Soto Park Dr., Tallahassee. Call 245-6444 for details.Wednesday, May 7 The next regularly-scheduled meeting of the WAKULLA COUNTY COALITION FOR YOUTH Inc. is from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center. Regional agencies and interested parties are welcome to join for news and networking. Feel free to bring your lunch to eat during the meeting.Saturday, May 10 In Wild Florida Adventures, AUTHOR DOUG ALDERSONS newest non ction book, youll be inspired to pick up a paddle or lace up the hiking boots and start exploring the Sunshine State. A BOOK SIGNING will be from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Bay Leaf Market in Crawfordville. Useful how-to information at the end of each chapter helps people plan their own adventures. Wild Florida Adventures is available on Amazon and at select locations. For more information, visit the authors website, www.dougalderson.net. A CAREGIVER SUPPORT MEETING will be at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Special guest will be a representative from Culleys Funeral Home. All caregivers are welcome to attend. For more information, call Pat 984-5277.Thursday, May 15 A Wakulla County TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP Meeting will be from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Please call Tonya Hobby at 926-0401 ext 217 for more information.Friday, May 16 The rst annual ABC STORAGE ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR will be May 16 and 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Arts and crafts by local artists and creators will be for sale. Additional vendors are welcome. Space is limited. Call 508-5177 for a booth, or more information.Sunday, May 18 The fth annual SHARKS & CHABLIS bene t will be from 2 to 7 p.m. at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, 222 Clark Drive, Panacea. Around 300 loyal patrons, community leaders, government of cials and nature enthusiasts enjoy fresh local seafood, good music, wine and beer while touring the facilities and exhibitor booths, and vie for works by acclaimed local artists in the silent auction. Tickets are $35. For sponsorship information, call Michelle Gomez 766-6505 or Cypress Rudloe 445-8618.To purchase tickets, or for more information, visit http://www.gulfspecimen.org/sharks-and-chablis. Government MeetingsMonday, May 5 The Wakulla County BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS will hold a public workshop to discuss nonpartisain elections at 4 p.m., followed by the regular meeting at 6 p.m. at the commission chambers behind the courthouse. Tuesday, May 6 The Wakulla County CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION will hold a Public Meeting at 6 p.m., at the TCC Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Hwy. The public is urged to attend and give input. Thursday, May 8 The Wakulla County TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Inn & Suites at 3292 Coastal Hwy.Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Big Bend Kayak ClassicHarvey Young Farm All dayBlue Crab Festival & ParadePanacea 10 a.m. all dayPamper Your Pooch Hudson Park 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.Sinkhole de Mayo Wakulla Springs 4:30 8:30 p.m.Fri. & Sat.SaturdaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla May 2 May 18 NICOLE ZEMAErnest Toole sang original songs about Old Florida and Wakulla County at the Green Living Expo Saturday, accompanied by Barry Sager playing the quills.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.com Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from New members: Business Women of Wakulla Association of women owned business, PO Box 694, Panacea FL 32346. Phone (404) 643-8272. Welcome Gena Green. Flying Papi Mobile Food Truck Specializing in our famous hot dogs! Also breakfast, lunch & special occasions. Phone (850) 321.7575. Welcome Gordon McCleary. Purple Frog specializing in construction/management, renovations/additions, 149 Mulberry Circle, Crawfordville FL 32327. Phone (850) 570-3764. Welcome Mike Eakin Double D Storage specializing in all your storage needs, 289 Cajer Posey Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 (850) 524-0473. Welcome Donna Dickens. Structure Commercial Real Estate specializing in commercial real estate sale, leasing, and property management, 249 Pinewood Dr., Tallahassee FL 32303. Phone (850) 656-6555. Welcome George Banks. Metro Electrical Services specializing in residential/commercial construction, security & generator installations, voice/data wiring and more, 110B Hamilton Park Dr., Tallahassee, FL 32304. Phone (850) 222-2804. Welcome Justin Bozone. By PETRA SHUFFOf the ChamberSt. Marks Yacht Club was a perfect venue for our networking luncheon on this beautiful April day, and the aroma of food cooking lled the air as soon as you opened the door. Commodore Billy Bishop welcomed guests, and shared members of the yacht club prepared the very tasty grouper au gratin, green beans almondine, roasted potatoes and salad for the luncheon. Commodore Bishop himself baked our dessert, a rum cake, which got lots of compliments. Bishop also made everyone aware that they cook monthly for socials. The yacht club provided yers for several different memberships and announced that the club is available to rent for weddings, anniversaries and other parties. The yacht club advertised their pool membership, and donated a pool membership to our drawing. Mary Wallace hated to miss hosting the luncheon, but left it in good hands with Chamber Vice President Dustin Grubbs, who asked everyone to keep our members Noah Posey, Steve Brown, and Tim Jordan in their prayers and thoughts; all three currently are in the hospital for open heart surgery. We wish them all a full and speedy recovery! Dustin then announced our ve new members for April: Flying Papi, Structure Commercial Real Estate, Double D Storage, Business Women of Wakulla Pam Moss was present and stated that this is a group of women owned businesses that meet to network and support each other and please look them up on Facebook; and newly signed up at this luncheon, Michael Eakin with Purple Frog LLC. Welcome to our new members for April! T.E. Lunn, P.E., who joined in February, had brochures available about his engineering business. Services include forensic engineering, structural design and analysis, specifications and project manual preparation, building inspections, property condition reports, manufactured product design, product approval evaluation and validation, code consulting, construction document analysis, dispute investigation and expert testimony, and solutions to water intrusion problems. Our spotlight business, Wakulla Medical Center is part of North Florida Medical Centers, Inc. consisting of 12 community health centers located throughout North Florida that provide a quality and affordable medical and dental care for the entire family. The presenter, Stan Mitchell, is a licensed clinical social worker, and is pleased that Wakulla Medical Center also offers clinical counseling to our residents. Mitchell drew Thrivent Financial for our May spotlight. We always appreciate our guests bringing their own guests to introduce Sharol Brown introduced her administrative assistant Roberta. Betty Ann Korzenny brought her husband Philippe, who works in market research and consulting, and was seriously considering joining our chamber. Zoe Mansfield was proud to re-introduce Mickey Cantner, who she called St. Marks own professional photographer. Cantner was one of the many winning photographers who spent weeks observing local fishermen, taking photographs and chronicling the Wakulla seafood industry for the Working Waterfronts exhibit currently on display at the One Stop Community Center. Cantner is also very involved in the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival taking place in October, and is seeking vendors and sponsors for the event. Ms. Zoe always brings her office administrator, Ethel Jefferson, and since today was of ce administrator appreciation day, all of ce admins got a round of applause. Shelley Homan and Virginia Moore were present on behalf of the Senior Citizens Center and recruiting kayakers for the upcoming event Big Bend Kayak Classic to be held at 3Y Ranch on May 3 and 4. This would be a perfect event for father and son teams, to have some guy time. Susan Schatzman shared the upcoming Habitat for Humanity Motorcycle Poker Run, June 14. You can register at both locations, Capital City Harley Davidson and Hardees in Crawfordville and follow the route through Wakulla County to collect your cards, ending up at Skybox for lunch, and drawings. Proceeds from this run will benefit the next Habitat House Build. Shelley Swenson invited everyone to the Green Expo at TCC Wakulla and Hudson Park on April 26. Fran Pybus with American Elder Care joined us to briefly mention the new Long Time Care program, rolled out by the state late last year. Walt Dickson invited everyone to the Captains Dinner for the 6th Annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament. Steve Cushman, owner of Cave Connections, CEO of North Florida Seafoods, teacher of oyster farming classes at TCC, president of KWCB, and member of the Wakulla Code Enforcement Board, announced his candidacy for County Commissioner District 4. He invited anyone interested in nding out more about where he stands on local issues to a dinner, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on May 10 at the Camp Indian Springs lunch hall. Janice Eakin, wearing several hats, gave an overview of the free services NAMI Wakulla (National Alliance on Mental Illness) offers in Wakulla County, and invited everyone to the Triple Crown Derby on April 26. In addition, NAMI Wakulla will also be showing the movie Call me Crazy on April 28. Janice also made everyone aware of CHATs Pamper your Pooch event to held May 3 at Hudson Park, and introduced Robin Lunn, who will be making solicitations on behalf of Operation Santa. Michelle Baragona joined us on behalf of TCC Workforce Development Corporate Solutions. Michelle serves the business community, offering strategic planning, assessments, and customized training. Michelle will be sending a survey via the chamber of ce to determine the needs of business owners. Patrick Strauss won the $56 cash drawing. We thank the following members for contributing items to our drawing: Lionel and Marianne Dazevedo, Charlean Lanier, Petra Shuff, Cook Insurance, Red Hills Broadcasting, Capital Health Plan, Wakulla Senior Center, St. Marks Yacht Club, City of St. Marks, NAMI Wakulla, CHAT of Wakulla, Inc., Wakulla Medical Center, Edwin G. Brown & Associates, Tallahassee Community College, and The Wakulla News.Next Networking Luncheon will be held at the Legacy Caf/Old Crawfordville Elementary School cafeteria. After Hours Networking Ed Gardner, O.D. from the Wal-Mart Vision Center and Riverside Caf in St. Marks will be holding an after hours networking event on May 15 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. There will be door prizes and giveaways. Appetizers will be served. Cash Bar. The doctors staff will be available for questions about your eye care needs. Come to Riverside Caf and enjoy an evening of food and fun! Ribbon Cutting the chamber will hold a ribbon cutting for Flying Papi Friday, 11:30 am. May 9 at the Chamber of ce at 23 High Drive.St. Marks Yacht Club hosts Chamber luncheon PHOTOS BY LYNDA KINSEYChamber members go through the buffet line at the St. Marks Yacht Club. Sharol Brown introduces Roberta, above, and Yacht Club Commodore Billy Bishop welcomes Chamber members, below.Upcoming Chamber events:

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 5B Tell us about your business: The idea for Make A Statement began long ago with a dream and a plan, but that dream began to develop into much more beginning in April of 2013. As Wakulla natives and a mother/daughter team, we have always enjoyed sewing and crafting and used that love as our inspiration for the original store idea. What services, products do you offer? In addition to handcrafted items, Make A Statement offers apparel, jewelry, and gifts, as well as vinyl and embroidery monogramming services. Make A Statement is the perfect place to find a cute casual out t or summer dress and the perfect accessories to accent the look. If customers are in need of a wedding gift, a baby shower gift, a bag or beach towel, a visit to Make A Statement can save them the drive to Tallahassee or the cost of shipping and handling for online orders. What sets your business apart from the competition? Make A Statement is dedicated to providing unique and affordable accessories, apparel and gifts to women of all ages.We strive to go above and beyond to insure the customers happiness and, in turn, earn their respect and loyalty. Our business is set apart from our competitors because of the uniqueness of our store and the range of products offered. We work very hard to keep our merchandise affordable (most items are $30 or less) so customers can stop in and buy a special gift for a friend, family member or treat themselves to something new. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? Customers should expect to experience a friendly environment where stopping in just to say hello is always welcome. We enjoy talking to customers and learning from their unique stories and experiences. They will also nd products that cannot be found in any other stores in the county. We always look for one-of-a-kind items that are just as special and unique as our patrons. How long have you been a Chamber member? December 2013. Why did you join the Chamber? We joined the Chamber to help our business grow and to get our name out in the community. We also wanted to take advantage of the networking bene ts of being a member and learn from others involved. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? We enjoy taking part in FOCUS chamber events and will continue to bene t from the networking and social media advice from the Chamber in the coming months and years. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Shopping locally benefits EVERYONE involved. The storeowners need the communitys support to stay open and continue to serve and provide wonderful products to the patrons. Shopping locally also provides our county with much needed tax dollars. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Our storefront is located at 2698 Crawfordville Hwy, Unit A in Crawfordville, next to Panhandle Pizza. We can also be reached by phone or email. The store telephone number is (850) 9267030 and our email address is makeastatement32327@yahoo.com. We have social networking pages on Facebook and Instagram as well which can be found by searching for MakeAStatement32327. Community involvement: We believe in supporting the local community and enjoy helping out with events by way of sponsorships and donations. We have contributed to the 2013 Fire ghters BBQ, 2013 Stone Crab Festival, Studio 88 Dance Productions, Wakulla High School Cross Country Team, Medart Elementary Schools 2013 Winter Festival, Wakulla High Schools Yearbook Staff, Wakulla Middle School Cheerleaders, Wakulla High School Gridiron Boosters, Florida State University Speech and Hearing Clinic and many other local events and fundraisers. Address: 2698 Crawfordville Hwy, Unit A, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Phone: (850) 926-7030. Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from By JO ANN PALMERof KWCB My grandmother taught me a saying, many hands make light work, and, boy, did that become evident last Saturday at the historic courthouse building. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful partnered with Comcast Cares Day, CHAT, Boy Scout Troop 8 and the Wakulla High School NJROTC cadets to give the grounds of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce a face lift and the courthouse block a cleaning. At 8 a.m. the clouds completely covered the sky but there was no rain in sight in spite the threat continuing following the downpour all day Friday. Volunteers began arriving and started working unloading plants, shovels, rakes, compost and pine straw, eager to get started with the real work. Betsy Smith gave an overview of what the plan was, what went where and the work began. Within three hours, 74 volunteers had removed grass, dirt and existing plants, installed two huge hollies and several dozen native plants to create a beautiful landscape garden around the building. The plants were all purchased locally by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful as part of the commitment to beautification projects with the county. The new plants were filled in with pine straw and soaker hoses in an effort to decrease resources in sustaining them. There were also two rain barrels installed to stop the harsh run off from the roof and to provide 130 gallons of water to use for watering the plants. Around the perimeter of the building landscape fabric was installed as a ground cover for the installation of river rock. The rock border was designed as a safety buffer from the bedding materials and to stop the erosion of dirt during hard rains. At 11:15 the hotdogs were coming off the grill and by noon everyone was headed home. We had expected the project to take until mid-afternoon but, like I said, the proof of many hands making such a tremendous difference, is in the results. We hope you will drive by and take a look. It is really an attractive view that will give visitors to our area the confidence that we, as a community, care about our environment and our historic building. Thanks again to Stephanie Bowden and Comcast for suggesting the joint workday and all the volunteers who sacri ced a morning for their community. Thanks also to Wal-Mart for their continued commitment and for donating the lunch for our volunteers. If you are not familiar with your Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce, check out their website at http://wakullacountychamber.com. If you want to become involved with Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, contact us at helpkwcb@gmail. com or check out our website kwcb.orgBusiness: Make A Statement Owners: Treva McKenzie & Suzie ShiverKeep Wakulla County Beautiful and partners work on old courthouses landscaping Spotlight On Business PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMERVolunteers work on landscaping the grounds at the old courthouse, which houses the Chamber.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.com Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeBy SHERYL SMYTHEMarch was a very busy and colorful month at the Senior Center. We had two really fun and bright parties and lots of special events during the month. The rst was an awesome Mardi Gras Party. The dining area was dressed in green, gold and purple colors. The senior citizens made masks for everyone to wear during the party and lots of beads. We had king cakes and Frank Storm was the winner and found the baby in his piece of cake. It was great fun. Then with St. Patricks Day approaching we changed over our colorful dining room to all green. We all wore green and had a fabulous corn beef and cabbage lunch. We had lots of St. Patricks Day puzzles and trivia. Then to nish off our party Eden Springs treated everyone to an ice cream social. Days after our St. Patricks Party we had the Wild Wakulla Wigglers Dance Group perform to Irish music. They did such a nice job and we enjoyed watching them perform. The Senior Center Team was at Hudson Park for the St. Patricks Day Festival to sell food and raise money for a new grill for the kitchen to use for functions and to grill for our Senior Citizens at lunch time. We do so many fun things here on a daily basis and some of it is silly and fun like playing Old Maid. Our daily schedule is always so busy. Please stop by the Senior Center and get a calendar of events so you can join in our daily fun. We are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. We serve lunch daily at noon but you can always come earlier and enjoy our activities. Our food pantry supplied by Farm Share and Second Harvest is open for pick up on Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. If you are a senior who is 60 or older and are home bound and would like to make an appointment with our Meals on Wheels program you may call Pat or Angel at 926-7145 ext 223. All donations are tax deductible and go to our Meals on Wheels, and other senior programs provided through the center.Turn to Page 7BJoy is like a boomerang, each time you throw some out it will come right back at you and hit you in the head and the heart! Everything we throw around will come back around. TWML. Ive never seen a more hellish disease than Alzheimers. The name of the disease strikes terror in the lives of the victims and their families. Caring for an Alzheimers patient is a process that will utterly consume the lives and well-being of the people giving care, just as the disorder consumes its victims. I guess every family has been effected by this disease or some form of dementia. I know I am not supposed to hate but I hate Alzheimers. It is one of the most horri c things because, you have a loved one and you have loved that one dearly for maybe 30-40 years or longer, and suddenly, that person is gone. Theyre gone. There they are right in front of you yet they are gone. That personality that you have known you no longer know. Ive been told that personality is made up of mind, emotion and will. This disease takes who they are (personality) from you and from themselves while breath is left in their body. The family photo albums, the babys scrapbook, the love letters from the war, the marriage license on the wall, the personal diary, and the stories once told, even the memory of the grandchildren fade now into some fog bank. I spent 32 years of my life working traumatic cases from murders to terrible car wrecks involving children and adults alike. While I was sometimes surprised at what I saw, I was never shocked. Alzheimers shocked me. About the time I thought I was desensitized to most of the things my eyes could see then in steps Alzheimers and sat me in my chair. Yet families deal with it until they are no longer able to provide hands-on care, and then the professionals step in and families still have to deal with it just on another level, be it a higher level or a lower level, but nevertheless another level. As their loved one digresses, the family is confronted with death many times a day and at some point comes to the conclusion there are some things worse than death! The fact is not so much a thought as it is a realization. I know there is not, but dear God, what I would give to be able to recover lost memories from people with this disease. Ive seen some wonderful people I would love to be able to plug into, highlight, copy, and cut and paste their memories on a page.So much could be learned about the process, not to mention the love, goodness, kindness and other characteristics could be harnessed. The history of a more complex time could be resurrected and make us all more appreciative of all we do have. However, Ive learned that at times long-term memory is better than short term memory. If even a few past times can be captured or taken into our custody; shouldnt we take time to capture them? Ive heard stories of family asking their loved ones with Alzheimers if they have had breakfast yet? The response was, I havent had breakfast in days. Why dont you cook me some! Only to learn the facility just served them breakfast. However, they remember a pet from their childhood but presently are unaware of the poodle (Prissy) being kept by her son. Other times they remember the visits of suitors who came courting and wooing in her younger days, but says she hasnt seen her son for months although he visited her last night. When rst confronted with this disease in an older person I was stumped and stupe ed. A woman from my church whom I had never seen angry or heard utter a cuss word in her life had turned the treatment facility air around her blue, so to speak. Turn to Page 7B THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director Alzheimers: Capture every moment, every moment! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCelebrating St. Patricks Day at the Senior Center in March.In March, seniors celebrated Mardi Gras, St. Patricks Day and moreCelebrating Mardi Gras at the Senior Center. A colorful King Cake, above, and Frank Storm, right, who found the baby.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 7BFrom Page 6BThere are many more activities that go on here at the center, so stop by and pick up a calendar of events. You can also nd us on Facebook athttps:// www.facebook.com/ WakullaSeniorCenter, or go to your Facebook page and type in Wakulla Senior Center in the search box. Click on the like button and you will get all our post and keep up with what is going on here. Any questions please call the center at 926-7145 ext. 221. You can also pick up a brochure on all the other services that are provider through the Wakulla Senior Center. Senior Center wish list: dog and cat food, silk owers, wide wire ribbon and Bingo Prizes. Thank you in advance if you can help supply these needs to the Senior Center. In March, seniors celebrated Mardi Gras, St. Patricks Day and moreCooking at the St. Patricks Day Festival. Playing Old Maid. The Wakulla Wigglers dance group. Stuck with the Old Maid. From Page 6BIt was worse than any Tourette syndrome I had encountered. I realized then the disease had stolen the woman I once knew, however, I still loved and respected the woman that she had become. I just didnt understand her. She didnt know how inappropriately she was talking and matter of fact she didnt know me either. Early on I thought how she must have been terrorized by the diagnosis and being aware that she was not always aware anymore. Did she feel she was living in the shadow of someone else, peeking out a few times on her good days? Was it hard work for her to try and remember during the onset of the illness? When someone reminded her of a pleasant and recent past memory, did she smile and act like she remembered when truly she did not? You really know how old she is, but at what age is she living? She left a legacy while she could and was in good health. We must not forget her legacy ourselves. Maybe if we would stop looking at all they had lost, we could focus more intensely on what they have and take that information and create moments of happiness and joy for them. Alzheimer patients are patients but for us many times they are still family. I was told by a husband of many years. I went to see my wife today but she didnt remember me. Maybe she does remember him, but doesnt recognize him. Perhaps shes living in the early years of marriage and he did not look the same to her as he did then. Could it be when the son does visit she does not recognize him because she is living in a stage when he was a child and not in the now when her son is in his late 50s? There is a difference between remembering and recognizing! Jolene Brackley writes of a gentleman by the name of Bud who had this encounter with his wife now suffering from Alzheimers. He took his wife to a park where they once sat as young lovers. Bud leans over and touches her face and says, I love you! Her response, Im sorry, sir, but my heart is for Bud. He was thrilled, elated and returned and proclaimed she did not recognize me today, but she remembered me today. Priceless. I just wanted to let you know that if your loved one has this disease, they may not recognize you, but they may still remember you, even if it was in a former decade or so. We try too hard to make them come back to our time; they may not, ever. So lets make an attempt to gure out what time they are in and drop back into their earlier time. It could mean the difference between a brief connection vs. no connection at all. Could it be that a connection is easier made by a recognition of our voice without them seeing the strangers face? Should we stand behind the door, call them by name or title and just listen to see if they made a voice recognition? While reading and researching this dreadful disease one writer posed this scenario to the readers: You have Alzheimers, but you dont remember you do. You think youre fine. You are 85 but think you are 25. You wake up in a strange place every morning, its a whole new world every day. You know you have children but are perplexed that you cant find them near you. You ask a stranger; where are my children? They tell you the truth, they live in Alabama and that is where you are at too but dont worry everything will be ne. Not so, everything is not ne. Now you are in a panic. This is not your home, and you think that the nurse/stranger is lying to you. Now you are frightened. Now that weve stepped out of that world back into our present world possibly you can see the mental condition of this 24-year-old mother who has lost her children, is in a strange place with strangers lying to her. Maybe this is why a patient can go into a rage, curse like a young sailor and cry like hungry newborn babies. I presented that scenario to you because there is no reasoning with a person with Alzheimers. You will NOT be able to make them live in your reality. They will never choose your reality so theres only one thing to do in my opinion; choose to live in theirs. Investigate and see where they are, what age they are, and step into their world. Its the only way we will bring any understanding to the misunderstandings. Also, they make the same mistakes many times a day all day long. They ask the same questions all day long. Why? I believe they are searching for their right answer. Therefore, you may have to keep adjusting your answer until the expression on their face shows acceptance. Once that happens, they usually move to the next question and start searching for the correct answer to this new question.Anything that triggers a positive response write it down. Before long you will have a diary full of correct responses. You may be wondering, is he asking me to lie? Its not lying if you are responding to their truth! Remember, its not your truth but it is theirs and they perhaps are living in a different decade. You want them to change but they are not going to so someone in this formula has to change. You! Ive seen families who are always correcting their loved one/ patient. When they act like children we tend to treat them like children and correct them like children. They are not and will never again be children. Perhaps we should ask ourselves three questions: what they are doing right now, is it hurting them, is it hurting me or is it hurting someone else? If the answer is no! Leave them alone. Why correct them? Maybe its what they want to do and you are the only one that feels uncomfortable. After all, you and I do what we want to do! If you come to the realization that you are wrong and they are right then anxiety, arguments and aggravation subsides. I guess our role in this is to take care of their basic needs and as many wants as we can. Provide for them security. Finally provide them love unconditionally. Unconditional love is what everyone everywhere wants. M.F.K. Fisher wrote, It seems to me our basic needs, for food and security and love, are so entwined that we cannot think of one without the other. So all in all you change what you can and manage what you cant! You cant change this disease, you cant cure it and you cannot control this disease but you can change and control how you respond to the actions of the person who has this disease. A person can either respond or react to any given situation. To respond is a positive outcome while a reaction is negative because its sometimes a knee-jerk reaction. Never react respond. I told my wife not long ago, when Im old I may forget you but I know you will not forget me. Or, if by chance you forget me, I will never forget you. Capture the moment, every moment!Langston: Alzheimers: Capture every moment, every moment!

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.com By Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.netThe third annual Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department Mud Run was a big success April 26, with $2,813.74 raised to bene t the Wakulla County Fire Explorers. Fire Explorers leader Ian Brazier said the number of participants well exceeded expectations. Fortyve participated last year, and more than 100 joined the muddy fun this year. Because of the outpouring of support sponsorship wise, every $1 that came in for each registration went directly to Explorer program, Brazier said. We were in the black before we registered anyone thanks to our sponsors. Part of the money raised Saturday is attributed to a matching fund from Wakulla County United Fire ghter Association. The Wakulla County Fire Explorers program is for youth ages 14 to18 interested in potentially becoming re ghters and EMS workers or volunteers. We train them (to be) rst responders, so when they turn 18, they already have all that knowledge, Brazier said. They can get certi ed and join a volunteer re department and become active members, able to respond to any incident within the county. Brazier said it was a fantastic year for the Mud Run. We got a lot of good feedback from participants, a bunch of new obstacles, and for the rst time opened it to adult participants as well. Event Results Adult Individual: Zane Daniels Child Individual: Andrew Buchleitner 1st place team: Panacea (24 minutes) Best Individual costume: Madison Metcalf Best Team costume: Team Olgesby Team Times Matt Jones 24:02 Phil Davis 24:05 Josh Peebles 27:00 Zach Robinson 28:55 Crawfordville VFD 29:00 Jim Burholter 29:00 Chris Russell 33:422014 Sopchoppy Mud RunPHOTOS: 1. Wakulla County Fire Explorers are Justin Roddenberry, Jimmy French, Dustin Colvin, Reid Tilley and Brayden Russ. (Photo special to The News.) 2. Andrew Puchleitner and Levi Robison, both 10, ip tires together toward the end of the course. 3. Georgia Gumphrey, 8, climbs to the top of a wooden wall on the Mud Run obstacle course. 4.Reid Tilley, a Wakulla High School senior and Fire Explorer, is covered in mud as he races to nish the course. 5. The Tillman family: Joey, Melanie, Jimmy, Jordyn and Mason carry a log as a team through he obstacle course. 6. Costume contest winner Madison Metcalf sprints through the course, covered in mud. (Photo special to The News.) 7. Individual winner Zane Daniels treks through the muddy course. (Photo special to The News.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7More photos online at thewakullanews.comPHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 9B Rock the Dock Rock the DockSpecial to The NewsThe sixth annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament was April 26 and 27 in Panacea. Funds raised from the tournament will benet the revitalization of projects of the Panacea area and further the goals of the partnership for assuring public access to the waterfront. The Lady Angler prize basket winner was Kristi Sanders. The Youth Division winner of the G3 Jon Boat, Yamaha outboard and trailer was Owen Bearden. The Kayak Division winner of 12-foot kayak was Nathan Tyre. A $1,000 Seatow cash prize went to Brad Funkhouser. The $2,500 king sh jackpot winner was Matthew Bradshaw. The $1,500 trout jackpot winner was Bryce Hill. RECREATIONAL DIVISION: AMBERJACK 1st: Chester Cowart, 90lb 0oz 2nd: Chris Oaks, 57lb 2oz 3rd: Sean Merchant, 39lb 15oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: COBIA 1st: Eric Day, 53lb 15oz 2nd: David Walls, 35lb 8oz 3rd: Mike Chavez, 33lb 10oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: GROUPER 1st: Allen Mortham, 29lb 1oz 2nd: Chris Oaks, 19lb 10oz 3rd: Michael Bodiford, 15lb 11oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: KINGFISH 1st: Matthew Bradshaw, 35lb 1oz 2nd: Josh Brown, 33lb 15oz 3rd: Blake Gardner, 33lb 7oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: FLOUNDER 1st: Ray Solomon, 2lb 8oz 2nd: Marilyn Lawhon, 2lb 7oz 3rd: Huck Finn, 2lb 4oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: REDFISH 1st: Ray Solomon, 8lb 1oz 2nd: Brandon Stubbs, 7lb 3oz 3rd: Kyle Marsh, 7lb 3oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: SPANISH 1st: Bryce Hill, 4lb 12oz 2nd: Curtis Mooney, 4lb 6oz 3rd: John Swanson, 4lb 5oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: TROUT 1st: Bryce Hill, 7lb 1oz 2nd: George Marquer, 6lb 10oz 3rd: Matt Sims, 6lb 3oz YOUTH DIVISION: AMBERJACK 1st: Caleb Joiner, 26lb 8oz 2nd: Jake Williams, 26lb 5oz 3rd: Shelby Whiting, 19lb 7oz. YOUTH DIVISION: KINGFISH 1st: Hunter Heydenreich, 20lb 5oz 2nd: Owen Bearden, 13lb 4oz 3rd: Wade Rainey, 11lb 5oz YOUTH DIVISION: REDFISH 1st: Carson Falk, 5lb 15oz 2nd: Hunter Bennett Hyatt, 5lb 1oz 3rd: Lyric Oaks, 4lb 11oz YOUTH DIVISION: SPANISH 1st: Austin Williams, 3lb 6oz 2nd: Chance Murphy, 2lb 7oz 3rd: Skye McKinney, 2lb 6oz YOUTH DIVISION: TROUT 1st: Maverick Stubbs, 4lb 0oz 2nd: Casey Koon, 3lb 7oz 3rd: Charles Troy Jr, 3lb 4oz YOUTH DIVISION: FLOUNDER 1st: Maverick Stubbs, 2lb 13oz 2nd: Cole Baggett, 1lb 12oz 3rd: Fincher Davis, 1lb 8oz YOUTH DIVISION: GROUPER 1st: Tyler Cureton, 13lb 0oz 2nd: Brandon Whiting, 12lb 15oz 3rd: Jake Williams, 12lb 10oz YOUTH DIVISION: ROCK BASS 1st: Macy Coddington, 1lb 14oz 2nd: Charlie Johnson, 1lb 9oz 3rd: Chance Allen, 1lb 7oz KAYAK DIVISION: FLOUNDER 1st: Benjamin Colona, 1lb 10oz 2nd: Brandon Nichols, 1lb 4oz KAYAK DIVISION: REDFISH 1st: Robert Baker, 7lb 8oz 2nd: Greg Blakney, 7lb 2oz 3rd: Austin Burroughs, 6lb 11oz KAYAK DIVISION: TROUT 1st: Chris Clark York, 4lb 0oz 2nd: Brad Mook, 3lb 14oz 3rd: Paul Nichols, 3lb 13oz PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Scott, seersucker and shadows By DARA KAM AND BRANDON LARABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 25 The Capitol crowd blended a air for fashion into the mix of the sessions penultimate week, creating a bright and cheery impression as more sober discussions about pot, immigration and state nances intensi ed. Lawmakers drew and erased lines in the sand about the two chambers spending plans and a variety of other issues, handing off the thorniest subjects to the budget chiefs, Rep. Seth McKeel and Sen. Joe Negron. And, as the session clock seemed to wind down more rapidly, Gov. Rick Scott waded into the fray on two high-prole issues --medical marijuana and in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants. Legislators, lobbyists and staffers wound up a week of sartorial sidetracks with a nod to Southern elegance on Friday in the guise of Seersucker Day, an annual celebration of the puckered cotton cloth evocative of Tennessee Williams that felt and looked oh-so-comfy as the humidity began to climb. Two days earlier, the Capitol burst into bloom as those with the most re ned tastes paid homage to the late Palm Beach fashionista, Lilly Pulitzer, in pastel shades of green and pink. Sandwiched in between on Thursday, the more rebelminded slipped on ostrich, alligator or plain old cowhide to kick some boot on yet another tailor-made legislative day. SCOTT STEPS OUT FROM THE SHADOWS Scotts support for in-state tuition rates for students who dont have authorization to be in the country is a major turnaround from the Republican who promised to bring an Arizona-style immigration law to Florida in his rst bid for governor. The proposal, a top priority of House Speaker Will Weatherford, is stuck in the Senate, where Negron, the appropriations chairman, refused to slate it for a committee hearing this week. Early in the session, Democrats joined moderate and Weatherfordfaithful House Republicans to pass the measure, a higher-ed hodgepodge that also would scale back from 15 to 6 percent the annual amount universities can hike tuition without the Legislatures approval. Scott had been mum until recently on the part of the bill that would allow undocumented immigrant students to pay in-state tuition rates as long as they attend four years of secondary school in the state. Instead, the governor had focused on lowering tuition for all students, something he has pushed by asking colleges to provide four-year degrees for $10,000 and by telling universities to forego tuition increases. But on Tuesday, Scotts ofce arranged a hastily called press conference after a move to get the issue onto the oor stalled in the Senate Appropriations Committee. For Floridas students, its extremely disappointing, Scott told reporters outside his of ce. We have 21 Senate sponsors, we have four other senators that have voted for this in committee assignments this needs to get to the oor of the Senate. Children brought to this country by their parents deserve the same opportunities of all children, Scott said. Whatever country you were born in whatever family or ZIP code you ought to have the chance to live the dream. Senate bill sponsor Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, has insisted he has enough votes to pass the measure half the members of the Senate have formally signed on as co-sponsors if he could get it to the oor. Late in the week, Latvala said he believes the bill will come up for a vote during the last week of session. A separate immigrationrelated issue popped up in the Senate, telegraphing the popularity of Latvalas proposal in the chamber. With a 25-12 vote Friday, the Senate passed a measure (HB 755) that would allow certain undocumented immigrants to gain admission to The Florida Bar. The vote count likely mirrors a Senate oor vote on the in-state tuition proposal. The bill is aimed at helping Jose Godinez-Samperio, who came to the United States at age 9 from Mexico, graduated from law school at Florida State University and passed the Bar exam more than two years ago. Last month, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that undocumented immigrants like Godinez-Samperio cannot be admitted to The Florida Bar and called on the Legislature to change state law to allow so-called Dreamers to become attorneys. The bill approved Friday would give the Supreme Court the ability to admit Bar applicants who were brought to the state as minors and have been residents of Florida for more than 10 years. Weatherford said late Thursday he supports the measure and that there is plenty of time left for the issue to be resolved and sent to Scott, who did not directly answer when asked whether he backs the bill. This case demonstrates how broken our federal immigration laws are. Stories like this are why I am ghting to keep tuition low for every Florida student who wants to follow their dreams right here in our state, Scott said in a statement. SCOTT COMES OUT OF THE SHADOWS, SORT OF The governor this week also staked out a position on a hybrid of marijuana known as Charlottes Web that many believe can dramatically reduce life-threatening seizures in children with a rare form of epilepsy. Parents of the children, some in wheelchairs, have repeatedly made tearful pleas during committee hearings and in private meetings with lawmakers while recounting the drama of the form of the disease that does not respond to other treatments and can cause hundreds of seizures per day. The issue has become one of the hottest topics of the 2014 session. Many atrst reluctant GOP lawmakers have rallied around the substance after hearing emotionally charged testimony from parents whose children suffer hundreds of seizures per month. But other Republicans are concerned that the proposals en route to the chamber oors could wrongly give the public the idea that the lawmakers support a constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would allow doctors to order traditional marijuana for severely ill patients. The House and Senate have been working toward common ground on making available a form of marijuana that is high in cannabidiol (CBD) and low in euphoria-inducing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). On Monday, the House Judiciary Committee approved a plan that includes language proposed by Scott, who wants to limit the use of the drug to clinical trials. The bill (HB 843) would create an Of ce of Compassionate Use within the Department of Health that would enhance access to investigational new drugs for Florida patients through approved clinical treatment plans or studies. Studies on investigational new drugs are the first step in the Food and Drug Administration approval process. Under Scotts plan, the Of ce of Compassionate Use could create a network of state universities and medical centers and apply to the FDA or a drug manufacturer for a study. The House measure also includes $1 million for the clinical studies. As a father and a grandfather, I cannot imagine what it would be like to have a family member suffering. We want to make sure those suffering get access to treatments in the fastest possible way. And that is why we have proposed language to ensure the safety of our children and have been working with the Legislature to see it included in the nal bill, Scott said in an e-mail Tuesday. The House sponsor balked at the restrictions proposed by Scott. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach, wanted a more free-market approach but bowed to the Senates preference for a vertical distribution system where growers would also serve as manufacturers and distributors. The two chambers still havent ironed out all the kinks, however. The governors suggestions are good. Weve taken those suggestions but were thinking a little bolder, Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach, said Monday evening. I would like to do that and have little kids who cant get into a clinical trial still have their lives saved. The Senate is slated to take up its approach to medical marijuana (SB 1030) on Monday. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott calls for the Senate to vote on a bill that would offer in-state tuition rates to undocumented immigrants. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This session will not end peacefully if that bill does not get a vote on the Senate oor. I dont think anyones operating under any alternative illusion. So they can posture and dream in Technicolor all they want, but this issue will come up on the Senate oor or this session will melt down. Sen. Tom Lee, R-Brandon, discussing the in-state tuition issue. WHITES WINESDrinking wine in bourbon countryBy DAVID WHITEFor two minutes each May, the world turns its attention to Churchill Downs for the Kentucky Derby. Wine enthusiasts visiting Louisville for the race might expect a city thats fueled by bourbon, bourbon, and more bourbon -along with some fresh mint and sugar for the occasional julep, of course. But like a growing number of small American cities, a vibrant wine culture has emerged. The Louisville wine scene has evolved dramatically over the last 10 years, said David DuBou of Vintner Select, one of the regions top distributors. Louisville has come a long way from mostly being about big-name California brands. The embrace of the independent producer who makes unique, terroir-driven wines has slowly taken center stage. On a recent visit to Louisville, I was oored by the citys wine offerings. Louisvilles retailers, sommeliers, and consumers seemed eager to drink with an open mind and an open palate. The first sign that bourbon country had embraced wine country came during lunch at Harvest, a casual restaurant dedicated to southern comfort food. While farm to table has become a clich, Harvest is the real deal; 80 percent of its ingredients come from within 100 miles. Just as telling? Harvests list was adorned by a quote by New York Times wine critic Eric Asimov: Heres my resolution for 2014: Drink adventurously. As my trip to Louisville continued, it seemed as if everyone had taken Asimovs advice to heart. A few doors down from Harvest sat a tiny retailer, Taste Fine Wines and Bourbons. Given the locale, I assumed bourbon would be the focus. But the bourbon was in the back of the store, with a small-butthoughtful selection of wines up front. Impressively, the store carried wine from Bedrock Wine Company. The proprietor, Morgan Twain-Peterson, sources his grapes from some of Californias oldest vines and makes his wine using old-fashioned techniques. If the store had carried impossible-to-find bourbon like Pappy Van Winkle, I would have been surprised. But when I saw Bedrock, I was shocked. When I praised this retailer, DuBou wasnt fazed. Louisville is blessed with several amazing and progressive independent retailer owners, who devote a great deal of time to educating, he said. Our wine professionals believe theres an obligation to help drinkers know more about wine, keep an open and adventurous mind, and keep it weird. The third sign of Louisvilles exciting wine scene came at Rye. Recently called one of the nations New Whiskey Temples by GQ, I knew the restaurant would take booze seriously and expected to nd an impressive selection of small-batch whiskeys. I didnt expect an accessible and eclectic wine list that would electrify any wine geek. Decca, a restaurant that has effortlessly combined West Coast cuisine with Kentucky charm, provided another data point. The list had Txakoli, the slightly sparkling white from Spains Basque Country that has become popular among New York City sommeliers. It had wine from Romain Papilloud, an acclaimed Swiss producer. It offered wine from Francois Chidaine, a Loire Valley vintner that oenophiles adore. And it had an extensive selection of grower Champagne. Made by the farmers who grow the grapes, these wines offer a refreshing alternative to big brands like Veuve Clicquot. Another sign came at Proof on Main. On offer was wine from Abe Schoener, the iconoclastic California winemaker who once taught ancient Greek philosophy at St. Johns College. One wouldnt miss 610 Magnolia while visiting Louisville; its been considered the citys best restaurant for years. While I expected a solid list, I didnt expect a well-curated selection that would rival top restaurants in major cities. Louisville will forever be the heart of bourbon country. But like so many other cities, its residents have started drinking wine adventurously. David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 11B American Asking Assigned Attic Brought Crest Crews Crust Dearly Eighty Exotic Fists Float Flown HopedIdenti cationIntend Magnet Nines Noises Nurse Orderly Organisms Porch Pronounced Rafts Rather ReportingResponsibilityReveal Roast Rolls Seesaw Select Settle Shots Stray Threw Uncle Visitor Wanted Wishes Worry The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.com A-1PRESSURECLEANING with the purchase of any color servicewhen you book your appointment withJESSICA OR ASHLEY! FREE HAIRCUT Mention this ad when you book your appointment with Jessica Hood and Ashley Braswell at Dazzles Hair Studio 158 Ochlockonee St. (behind Hardees) in Crawfordville.850926-6772 ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEPIT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC MungesTree ServiceMichael Mongeon850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIEDARBORISTFL-6125 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Call Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and InsuredTree Trimming Special Touch Cleaning Service Polly Nichols Construction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100 Facial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsColor PermsFeather LocksHighlights Cuts Low Lights STYLESFOR MEN & WOMEN 850 926-6020 Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLESaturday May 3, 8 a.m. Yard Sale. Until. Large variety of items. 196 Magnolia Ridge North LAKEFRONT Mobile Home on 300 foot lot along Lake Ellen Dr at boat ramp. 14 ft wide, 2 Br/1Ba, Screen porch, CHA, kitchen equiped $80,000 (850) 576-2695 P/T Church Pianist and Pastors Assistant seeking church to serve Retired husband &wife team,very experienced & Inter-denominational salary & mileage reqd (850) 878-3850 NURSING CAREERSbegin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 Wildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Aucilla Wildlife Mgt. Area Jefferson County $27,482.52 Annual, Operate Heavy Equipment, Perform Road and Facility Maintenance, Conduct Controlled Burns and Wildlife Surveys. Applications must be completed online at: https://jobs.myflori da.com/ For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer JOB CLOSES MAY 8TH DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (1-888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 877-741-9260 www .fixjet s.com OWN YOUR own Medical Alert Company. Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. CRAWFORDVILLESaturday May 3, 8 a.m. Yard Sale. Until. Large variety of items. 196 Magnolia Ridge North PANACEA MOVING SALE Saturday 9a-4p 51 Sunrise Lane Wanted: Refrigerator Single door, Good Condition (850) 926-9540 PANACEARent to Own 3BR doublewide Mobile Home. $600 +deposit (850) 926-9540 LAKEFRONT Mobile Home on 300 foot lot along Lake Ellen Dr at boat ramp. 14 ft wide, 2 Br/1Ba, Screen porch, CHA, kitchen equiped $80,000 (850) 576-2695 CRAWFORDVILLETownhouse for Rent 2BD, /2 BA $800. mo. (850) 933-5242 NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273ext91 194 Carousel Circle This lovely, very well maintained 2-story, 1-car garage home built in 2008 features 1674 sq.ft., 3BR, 2.5 BA. Bright and open floor plan. Spacious living area. Kitchen with bar. Stainless steel appliances. Beautiful wood cabinets. Inside laundry room. Separate shower and jetted tub in the master bathroom. Fenced in. Mariana D. Doseanu, Realtor, Keller Williams Realty (850)339-5671 RE ADVERTISEMENTSeasonal EmploymentParks & Facilities Management Dept. APPLICATIONANDSEC.DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACEAVAILABLE2 Br 1 Ba Duplex, $625 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Hs, $1,000 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $775 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $875 mo. 4 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $900 mo. 2 Br 2 1/2 Ba T wnhs, $775 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Hs, $1,100 mo.1500 sq ft $1500 mo. Crawfordville 700 sq ft $700 mo. Tallahassee RENTALS: C OMMERCIAL Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. FREEESTIMATESWorry Free withA to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414 Renegades VAPESHOPof The GulfTRY VAPING forFREEVisit our RELAXING ROOM to TRY UNLIMITED FLAVORS... forFREE!Owned & Operated by Casey Hodges & son Chris Hodges, formerly of Bayside Seafood Restaurant PanaceaBring in this ad for $1 OFF 10 ml or $3 OFF 30 ml E-Juice 8503010 B Crawfordville Hwy., Downtown Crawfordville 8AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDS!TWO BIGMAY 2 & 3MAY 16 & 17 MAY DAYSYARD SALES NOW HIRING!Laborer needed immediately for local established company. Room for advancement. Call F red at 850-251-21 36. 1346 SHADEVILLE HIGHWAYWOW! Seriously beautiful 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath brand new luxuryhome by PAFFORD CONSTRUCTION! All the upgrades you expect from PAFFORD CONSTRUCTION: Granite countertops, stainless appliances, nail down wood oors, gorgeous stepped up trey ceilings, exquisite trim package, tile in the laundry room and bathrooms, carpet in the bedrooms and a screened in porch. Oversized 1.69 acre lot, double car garage, plusgas replace. Come by andview this unbelievable home! Asking $219,900. Dir.: South on Hwy. 319 to Crawfordville, L across from Hardees to Shadeville Hwy., home on left before Spring Creek Intersection COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. The Wakulla news Pelican Post Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADSStarting at just $12.00 a week! 877-676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 13B Retire to Kentuckys BlueGrass Country! Enjoy maintenance free living! BRAND NEW LUXURY HOMES Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA, 1,800 sf, from the low $200s. Lowest price per sq ft in the area! Mild climate, low taxes, minutes to shopping, dining, medical & Keeneland Horse Racing. Perfect for retirement/2nd home. Call now for details: 877-333-2412, x 121 SugarT r ee Homes.com AUCTION Custom Home on 145 acres and 16 Home Sites at Lake Guntersville Some selling Absolute Scottsboro, AL Saturday May 17th 10:00am www .t arget auction.com 800 473-3939 djacobs#5060 LOANS FOR LANDLORDS! We Finance From 5-500 Units As Low As 5.5 %. 1-4 Family, Townhome, Condos OK. Contact B2R: 1-855-940-0227 www.B2R Finance.com BAYSIDE MARINA PANACEA2014 Slip Rental Option 6 Month @ $100 Month Due in Full 1 Month @ $150 Month 2273 Surf Rd Panacea Info 850-222-5865 baysideslip s @gmail.com WINTONS POOL SERVICES LET US HELPTAKE THE HASSLE OUT OF YOUR SUMMER FUN Certified & Reliable Tony 850-284-2205 P/T Church Pianist and Pastors Assistant seeking church to serve Retired husband &wife team,very experienced & Inter-denominational salary & mileage reqd (850) 878-3850 5039-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Wedding Belles Photo of Tallahassee located at 10376 Crystalline Ct., Tallahassee, Florida 32305, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Tallahassee, FL, this 21 day of April, 2014. /s/ Stacy Prato /s/ Meredyth Hall Owners Published May 1, 2014. 5046-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Cooter Stew Cafe located at 859 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL 32355, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 14 day of April, 2014. /s/ John S. Gunter Owner Published May 1, 2014. 5047-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Little Blue Daisy located at 21 Meadowlark Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 24 day of April, 2014. /s/ Jeanette Villa Owner Published May 1, 2014. 5043-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE : School Board Policy 2.95*+ -Wellness Program PURPOSE AND EFFECT : To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures LEGAL AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: PL 108-265, Section 204 National School Lunch Act (42 USC 1751 et seq.) Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 USC 1771 et seq.) 1004.43, 1006.06, 1006.0606, Florida Statutes ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent REVISION APPROVED BY : Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELDTIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: June 16, 2014 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 May 1, 2014. 5044-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE : School Board Policy 2.90 -Tobacco Use in District Facilities PURPOSE AND EFFECT : To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures LEGAL AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 386.201 -386.209, 1001.43, Florida Statutes ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent REVISION APPROVED BY : Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELDTIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: June 16, 2014 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 May 1, 2014. 5036-0501 TWN vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Parcel 2) 2012-CA-000409 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Par cel 2: 1384 Coastal Highway, Panacea, Florida Lot 7, Block A of the Town of Panacea as shown per plat thereof of record on Page 7 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla, County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop produces, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The Term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbearance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. 5037-0501 TWN vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Beverage License) 2012-CA-000409 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described Beverage License situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Beverage License : Alcoholic Beverage License Number #BEV7500231 (the Beverage License) More particularly described in UCC financing statement filed with the Florida Secured Transaction Registry, at filing number 200901465958 pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbearance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; TRIPLETAIL INVESTMENTS, INC., a Florida corporation, d/b/a WAKULLA DISCOUNT LIQUORS; RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO; and THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000409 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of Feb., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA [SEAL OF THE COURT] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk April 24 & May 1, 2014. 5038-0501 TWN vs. Kane, Georgia L. 13000236CAAXMX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000236CAAXMX CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGIA L. KANE, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment dated April 8, 2014, entered in Civil Case Number 13000236CAAXMX, in the Circuit Court for Wakulla, Florida, wherein CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2 is the Plaintiff, and GEORGIA L. KANE, et al, are the Defendants, Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Wakulla Florida, described as: THE FOLLOWING REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF WAKULLA, STATE OF FLORIDA: LOT 5, BLOCK A, HAMMOCK WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM. on the 15th day of May, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: April 9, 2014. Wakulla County Clerk of Court CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC 4855 Technology Way, Suite 500, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (727) 446-4826 April 24 & May 1, 2014. CA 13-02556 /DB 5040-0508 TWN vs. Costantino, Damian F. 2013-CA-000182 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000182 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Damian F. Costantino and Sharla Costantino, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE 5041-0508 TWN vs. Hagan Jr., Howard 12000482CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 12000482CAAXMX OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN, JR. AND KIM HAGAN A/K/A KIM COX A/K/A, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sept. 10, 2013, and entered in 12000482CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is the Plaintiff and HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN, JR.; KIM HAGAN A/K/A KIM COX A/K/A KIM WYNETTE COX; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM HAGAN A/K/A KIM COX A/K/A KIM WYNETTE COX; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 AM on May 22, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 43, THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 790.93 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-368, THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 463.32 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1860.07 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 25 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 355.71 FEET, CORD OF SAID ARC BEING 58 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 355.17 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 265.90 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 282.15 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF APPALOOSA ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 329.38 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 50.32 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 38 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 78.63 FEET, CORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 27 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 70.84 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF PALOMINO ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 232.19 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 379.35 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 17th day of April, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 May 1 & 8, 2014. 13-10770 5042-0508 TWN vs. Rose, Paula C. 65-2012-CA-000114 Re-Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000114 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. PAULA C. ROSE, ET. AL.; Defendants RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated April 22, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000114 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff and M PAULA C. ROSE, ET AL; are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATTUES, AT 11:00 AM, May 29, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:: LOT 2, BLOCK B, HUDSON HEIGHTS, ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 24 OCHLOCKONEE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, this 23rd day of April, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 644-8704 May 1 & 8, 2014 11-10749 5048-0509 TWN vs. Montgomery, Michael W. 2012-CA-0483 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2012-CA-0483 Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Michael W. Montgomery; Andrea N. Montgomery, Any and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; Clerk of the Court for Wakulla County, Florida; and Tenant, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 22, 2014, entered in Case No. 2012-CA-0483 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Michael W. Montgomery; Andrea N. Montgomery; Any and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; Clerk of the Court for Wakulla County, Florida; and Tenant are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the May 22, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 38 AND 39, IN BLOCK 20, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT THREE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 23 day of April, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brock & Scott PLLC, 1501 NW 49th St, Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Attorney for Plaintiff May 1 & 8, 2014. 13-F05584 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 15, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000182 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Damian F. Costantino and Sharla Costantino, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on May 22, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 19, RUBY HILLS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700, (561) 998-6707 May 1 & 8, 2014. 13-257973 FC02 CHE 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit. 3/2, ,$975. mo., $975 Deposit. 3/2 $950 Mo., $950 Deposit, No smoking, pets negotiable. Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., mo. No smoking, No pets.25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated comSmoking, No Pets. B5 Marina Village 2BR/2BA on Mashes Sands Rd., 2-story Condo, Fully Fur695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/ No smoking, No pets. 57 Fairway Ct. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEE O REN YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 12345 6789 10111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2223 24 25 26 27 28 293031 323334 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 4647 48 495051 5253 54 55 56 5758 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Across 1 Capital of Idaho 6 Not many 10 Pollution problem 14 Between March and May 15 Hayworth or Moreno 16 Soap opera plot device, often 17 It keeps you cool in summer 19 Kitchen cooker 20 Approximately 21 Pool stick 22 Courageous 24 "I don't think so" 25 Hollywood legend ___ West 26 Keller or Mirren 27 Split ___ soup 28 Give a hoot 29 Car's navigation system, for short 32 Diet, casually 35 Puzzle with a "finish" you must get to 36 Round shape 37 Makes a mistake 38 Asked, as a question 39 One gender 40 Votes against 41 Cain's brother 42 Ate out 43 Muhammad in the ring 44 Eye part that's also a flower 45 Ancient Egypt's King ___ 46 Rafael of tennis fame 48 Papa 49 Take all of, as the blankets 52 Traffic 54 Common container 55 Move slowly 56 Army rank: abbr. 57 Cary Grant in "North by Northwest," for example 60 Have ___ (enjoy good times) 61 Waffle brand 62 On your toes 63 Soprano or Bennett 64 Defeat 65 Extra benefits at work Down 1 Food that comes in strips 2 Mozart work, often 3 Like people from Dublin 4 Farm building 5 Quarterback Manning 6 Bicker 7 ___ and drum (Colonial Era instruments) 8 Greek letter 9 Roamed far and wide 10 Make a goal or a basket 11 Vehicle stuffed with furniture 12 Sign of what's to come 13 Scary group 18 "March Madness" org. 23 Ginger ___ 25 Was introduced to 26 Eye color 27 Throw the football 28 Book holders 30 Ashen 31 Wintertime fun 32 Singing great Horne 33 Spoken 34 What you might cook 1-Down in 35 Company that merged with Exxon 36 Leave out 38 Like lines that never meet 42 Firecracker that doesn't go off 44 Actress Lupino 45 Cab 47 Feeling nervous 48 Extinct birds 49 Marge Simpson's husband 50 ___ Mountains (Springfield, Missouri is there) 51 Fellas 52 "Beat it!" 53 Shakespeare villain 54 Grocery store "Paper or plastic?" items 55 Stare 58 Self-importance 59 SnoozeEach puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 12 3 4 451 6127 58 43 96 7852 2648 518 1974 00 9 HometownContent 172 8936 4 5 389456217 645127839 528 649371 931572486 467381592 793 264158 254718963 816935724 BOISE AFEW SMOG APRIL RITA COMA CEILINGFAN OVEN ORSO CUE DARING NAH MAE HELEN PEA CARE GPS LOFAT MAZE OVAL ERRS POSED MALE NAYS ABEL DINED ALI IRIS TUT NADAL DAD HOG SIGNAL BOX OOZE CAPT LEADINGMAN AGAS EGGO ALERT TONY LOSS PERKS PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; TRIPLETAIL INVESTMENTS, INC., a Florida corporation, d/b/a WAKULLA DISCOUNT LIQUORS; RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO; and THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000409 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of Feb., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA [SEAL OF THE COURT] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk April 24 & May 1, 2014. 5035-0501 TWN vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Lot 29) 2012-CA-000411 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty Lot 29, and the East 1/2 of Lot 30, Section B of Ochlockonee shores, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 16 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbearance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000411 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 5045-0508 TWN 5/17 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 17th, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouses containing personal property of: ADRIANNE BOONE Before the sale date of May 17th, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. Publish: May 1 & 8, 2014. 5010-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 017 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1015 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 30-2S-01E-000-04952-002 Description of property: 30-2S-1E P-5-2-M-70 PARCEL CONTAINING 1 ACRE OR 74 P 54 & OR 96 P 484 OR 150 P 143 Name in which assessed __ SAMUEL LEE SCOTT JR & P A TRICIA ANN SCOTT Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. 5011-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 018 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 942 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 07-6S-01W-026-04663-000 Description of property: OCHLOCKNEE SHORES SECTION B LOT 12 DB 52 P 117 & OR 99 P 937 OR 169 P 855 OR 290 P 850 OR 601 P 380 Name in which assessed _MAR THA S & HAROLD A HALL JR Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. 5012-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EMILE JUSTIN MEYER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 981 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 09-6S-01W-000-04864-003 Description of property: 9-6S-1W P-1-3-M-60-1 LYING IN SEC 9-6S-1W OR 77 P624 Name in which assessed _SYCAMORE CREEK INC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. 5013-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 020 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US Bank the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2104 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 00-00-077-000-10322-003 Description of property: LOT 77 HS P-33-3-M-21B IN NW 1/4 OF LOT 77 HS OR 66 P 174 & OR 72 P 315 OR 102 P 22 & 23 Name in which assessed G & S Inc. of T allahassee Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk 5014-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that USAmeriBank the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 93 Date of Issuance May 27th, 2010 Parcel # 25-2S-02W-000-01423-006 Description of property: 25-2S-2W P-5-6-M-45 COMM. AT THE NE COR. OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC. 25 PARCEL CONT. .55 ACRE M/L OR 242 P 475 OR 365 P 437 Name in which assessed _Neal & T racy White Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of Feb., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA [SEAL OF THE COURT] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk April 24 & May 1, 2014. By: Carla M. Ziemer, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 15B 1. GEOGRAPHY: What two bodies of water does the Strait of Hormuz link? 2. MEDICINE: What would a patient with ankylosis be suffering from? 3. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel Mrs. Dalloway? 4. FAMOUS QUOTES: What famous military leader once said, Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever? 5. AD SLOGANS: What companys logo advised consumers to put a tiger in your tank? 6. TELEVISION: What phrase was on the UFO poster in Agent Mulders office in The X-Files? 7. MOVIES: What kind of candy did the boy use to lure the extraterrestrial in E.T.? 8. LANGUAGE: A jarhead is slang for what kind of military personnel? 9. MUSIC: What kind of musical instrument is a sitar? 10. GEOLOGY: What kind of landform is described as a flat-topped hill with steep sides? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman 2. A stiff joint 3. Virginia Woolf 4. Napoleon Bonaparte 5. Esso/Exxon 6. I Want to Believe 7. Reeses Pieces 8. A U.S. Marine 9. A lute 10. A butte Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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By BILL WARGOSpecial to The News The Gulf of Mexico sea turtle season begins on May 1 and ends Oct. 31. Of the seven sea turtle species in the world, Florida gets ve of them -loggerheads, green sea turtles, leatherbacks, Kemps Ridleys, and hawksbills. All are threatened or endangered, the Kemps Ridley being the rarest and most endangered in the world. The loggerhead is by far the most common turtle found on Alligator Point. The Alligator Point Sea Turtle Patrol (APSTP) is directed by Bill Wargo under Florida Wildlife Commission marine turtle permit #151. Several trained and dedicated volunteers are also listed on the permit and can be seen every morning at dawn patrolling for nests and at other times when the hatchlings emerge or when rescuing or releasing stranded turtles. Educating the public is another important function of APSTP whether at a nest site or participating in presentations, exhibits, or media events. The FWC marine turtle program is one of the best and most successful wildlife conservation operations in both the nation and world. As part of that program APSTP has the responsibility of monitoring, protecting, marking, and reporting all sea turtle nesting and related activities. All sea turtles are protected by federal and state laws. Only trained and permitted individuals can legally touch nesting sea turtles, hatchlings, or their nests. The average number of nests on Alligator Point is around 25 per season. Approximately 90-120 hatchlings emerge from a single nest after an incubation period of 60-65 days. It is important to allow hatchlings to crawl to sea on their own as that is how they map into their instinctive memories the characteristics of the beach enabling them to return to it 30 years later to nest. It is commonly believed by biologists that only one in 1,000 hatchlings will survive. When visiting Alligator Point, please help us protect our sea turtles, other wildlife, and their habitats. Please remember a few simple things to protect these magni cent creatures and their habitats: 1. Keep the beach dark. Do not use ashlights unless covered with a red lter. 2. Turn off all outside lights from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. 3. Close drapes/ blinds of windows that can be seen from the beach. 4. No bon res on the beach. 5. No vehicles on the beach. 6. Remind neighbors to turn off their outside lights. 7. Do not use ash if taking pictures. 8. Do not allow pets, children, or anyone else to disturb turtles or their nests. 9. Please remove furniture, umbrellas, and other obstacles from the beach at night. 10. Pick up trash and debris that you see along the beaches, and be sure not to leave your own trash behind. 11. Give nesting sea turtles plenty of space and observe them from a distance. 12. Take care not to step on hatchlings heading to the water and let them crawl down the beach on their own. 13.While boating, take care not to strike sea turtles. 14.Report any stranded, injured, or dead sea turtles to APSTP at (850) 567-5369. You can follow APSTP at https://www. facebook.com/AlligatorPointSeaTurtlePatrol. Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comAlligator Points Sea Turtle Patrol is active PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHatchlings on the beach at Alligator Point, above. APSTP Patroller Bill Wargo releasing a Kemps Ridley at Alligator Point. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op -ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2013. Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage are HMO plans with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage depends on contract renewal. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., sev en days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_DP 610 CMS Accepted 12252013 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield AssociationLive Well. Choose Well. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd and at 5:30 p.m. on Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQA May 9 M a y 23 May 8 June 12 July 10 June 13 June 27 July 11 July 25 Give her the gift of this Mothers DaynewsThe WakullaONLY $ 27FOR ONE YEAR Promo Code: MOM Expires: 05-16-14Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:www.TheWakullaNews.com1-877-401-6408 Please accept my new 1 Year subscription at the price of $27* Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $20.14. Local delivery area only.The Wakulla newsSign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the ofce. Name ______________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________State ___Zip ________________ Phone# ( ) _______Cell Phone# ( ) ________E-mail _______________________ Credit Card _________-_________-_________-_________ Exp. _______3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. WE ARE HEREFOR YOU For more Information and to Schedule a Portfolio ReviewTrustYourPlan.comBob Beargie, Wealth Advisorbob.beargie@raymondjames.com 850-562-6702Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS.The Raymond James Wealth Advisors at Gulf Winds are ready to help you create a Life Well Planned. 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By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netWakulla Countians and visitors across the region are more likely to make sustainable lifestyle choices after visiting the Green Living Expo in Crawfordville Saturday.Hudson Park and the TCC Wakulla campus were buzzing with edutainment as part of the Sustainable Big Bend event, which featured interesting exhibits, enthralling talks and fun activities. Madeline Carr, one of the many who helped organize the event, said the goal of the expo was to encourage Wakulla County to be more aware of what it means to live a sustainable life at home and in our daily habits. The Green Living Expo certainly achieved this objective, Carr said. This Green Living Expo was about providing a vision for people to think. Hopefully visitors had fun and left with the idea that there is plenty of room in all our lives to spark some thoughts about whether we can continue to sustain our current state of thoughtless wastefulness. Eleanor Dietrich, Panhandle Wildflower Alliance liaison with the state Department of Transportation, presented a talk about the importance of wild owers in the food chain. She said Wakulla County has been instrumental in changing right-of-way DOT mowing policies in the state. Plants and animals are the rivets that hold the ecosystem together, Dietrich said. Wild owers are a particularly important part of the food web. Its not just something pretty on the roadside plants are a matter of life and death. Dietrich said because so many insects depend on wild owers for survival, their food source is destroyed when they are mowed on right-of-ways. If there are no insects, there is no food for small animals. Eventually the loss of wild owers impacts humans at the top of the chain. She said wildflower areas should be identied and reported to the Panhandle Wildflower Alliance. Visit flawildflowers.org/fpwa.php and click on concern or praise link. There is also a Facebook page. Visitors also had a chance to calculate their impact on the climate through a carbon footprint calculator at the computer lab. A simple online quiz measured the carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses individual or household choices create annually. Lynn Artz, another organizer who helped monitor the lab, said people in the U.S. account for less than 5 percent of the worlds population, yet we are responsible for 20 percent of global carbon emissions. The average carbon footprint of a US household is about 50 tons of carbon dioxide equivalents per year. The quiz can be access from any home computer by visiting www.nature. org/greenliving/carboncalculator/ or www.myfootprint.org. After a sustainable gardening presentation by Trevor Hylton, family and consumer sciences extension agent Shelley Swenson demonstrated how to create delicious and healthy salads from the garden. We are losing the battle with health in this country, Swenson said. With heart disease, diabetes and obesity, this is the rst time that we expect our kids to have a shorter lifespan than us. Half our plate at the end of the day needs to be fruit and vegetables salads are a great solution. Swenson lled a mixing bowl with fresh kale and handed participant Rodney Peacock rubber gloves to massage the leafy green super food. Massaging the kale mellows it, Swenson said. It has over 800 percent of vitamin K in a serving, which is good for blood and healing. While iceberg lettuce is popular, Swenson said it has limited nutritional value. She said the more color in your lettuce, the better. Delicate lettuces like arugula and spinach are available everywhere. She added that Bay Leaf Market sells organic kale by the bagful. Turn to Page 15ABy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netJerry Moore announced this week he would be seeking re-election as county commissioner for district 4. Moore, a Republican, has served one fouryear term on the board. Three potential challengers have filed to run against him, Steve Cushman and Bill Anderson, both of whom are running without party affiliation, and Steve Fults, a Republican, led on Monday and would face Moore in the GOP primary in August. When I ran in 2010, I said I would not vote for any taxes, he said. I have not voted for any taxes and I will pledge that, if elected, I will not vote for any taxes. Moore said that politicians often lose sight of who put them in of ce. The people who elected me, want me to work really hard for jobs, he said, adding that he had also worked to make the county more business-friendly, and said it was also a priority to send wetlands back to the state. In 2010, he said, I ran on business and jobs and nothings changed... Business pays the cost of government, provides jobs, builds neighborhoods and pays taxes. No longer in Wakulla do people who want to do business fear the county government. Since the change in leadership in 2012 of our county government, we are now open for business clean business. As an example, the new TCC Environmental Institute, which will create 950 jobs when completed. Moore also noted that, in 2012, there were 80 building permits pulled for single-family homes in the county. For the first quarter of 2014, there have already been 41 permits pulled. If that trend continues at the same rate, that would be 160 permits for the year, a 100 percent increase over two years ago, Moore said. One issue that has been a de ning one for his term is the repeal of the county ordinance that created 75-foot buffers around wetlands.Turn to Page 2A Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .................................................................Pages 8-9A School .....................................................................Pages 10-11A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 3B Taking Care of Business ..............................................Pages 4-5B Senior Citizens Celebrate Life ....................................Pages 6-7B Weekly Roundup ............................................................Page 10B Thinking Outside the Book ............................................Page 11B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 12B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 12B Comics ...........................................................................Page 15BINDEX OBITUARIES E.W. Captain Ed Bradley Jr. Cynthia Carol Glover Donna Diane Council Harrell Slaughter Waldo E. Thomas Dave Gary Whitlock Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 18th Issue Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 1BSports SportsGreen Living Expo educates and entertainsWILLIAM SNOWDENVirginia and Jerry Moore at last weekends NAMI Derby.LEAH BOWMAN/Special to The NewsA rain barrel demonstration by Jeannie Brodhead at the Green Living Expo at Hudson Park.Panacea city bill languishesJerry Moore seeks re-election to county commissionBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netHigh hopes for the incorporation of the City of Panacea were dashed two weeks ago, when the bill failed to move on from committee to the oor of the Florida Legislature. Lifelong Panacea resident Ronald Fred Crum said he and other community members have tried for four years to get the incorporation initiative on the ballot. Crum believes being an of cial city will mean more jobs and opportunity in the area. District leaders are con dent the bill will progress to the Florida House next session. Incorporated communities are ourishing, Crum said. Being incorporated would give us the ability to ght for ourselves. If youre sinking, youve got to do something. State Rep. Halsey Beshears said the analyst for the Local and State Affairs Committee does not feel like the numbers, in terms of validation of tax receipts, support the incorporation of Panacea at this time. Its not validated or justi able because they havent been vetted in terms of what Panacea can and cannot support, Beshears said. Thats part of the quandary. Panacea is doing the best they can with what they have. But what they are asking for is not 100 percent possible. Crum said he and other community members want to present a case for incorporating Panacea to the committee. Turn to Page 5BSustainable Wakulla Sustainable Wakulla Rep. Halsey Beshears con dent that bill will move to house next sessionWar Eagles win softball, baseball playoff games NICOLE ZEMAShelley Swenson prepares a kale salad at the Growing and feasting on salads presentation, as Rodney and Terry Peacock look on. Rock the Dock Rock the DockPage 9B Page 9B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom the Front PageMoore contends that only 6/10ths of 1 percent of nitrogen and other pollutants harming Wakulla Springs and the aquifer come from within Wakulla County. So what are the buffers intended to protect wetlands from? The stream ow into the Wakulla Springs basin is 98 percent beyond Wakullas borders, and the major pollutor is the Tallahassee sprayfield on Tram Road in south Leon County none of which would change or be helped by the wetlands buffers, he said. With environmental issues, there is no easy answer and I refuse to let anyone scientists, biologists or otherwise to lay the blame on the citizens of Wakulla for the damage to the environment. At the same time, he acknowledged that You cannot turn around in Wakulla County without being in a wetland. But he countered that Ninety-nine percent of Wakulla citizens care and protect wetlands and they do not need to be slapped with additional restrictions on the use of their property because of the perception of what 1 percent may do. With the new FEMA flood maps creating more restrictions on development, Moore warned that, If we keep throwing restrictions on our lands, only the wealthy will be able in live in Wakulla County and that just doesnt y. He claimed that Its only the wealthy who are advocating wetlands restrictions. Between the Apalachicola National Forest, the Wakulla State Forest, the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and the new FEMA maps, we will absolutely have so little land available that your children wont be able to live here only the wealthy, Moore said. Theres probably only 100 lots on the coast where you build now, Moore estimated. One issue Moore has worked on is trying to nd property for a recreation park in the northern part of the county. He negotiated for a 175-acre parcel in the Shadeville area, but the deal fell through twice. Now hes excited about a 100-acre parcel near Wal-Mart that the county could exchange to the U.S. Forest Service for the horse arena with the Wakulla County Horsemans Association keeping rights to use the property where the arena is currently located. Its a total win-win for the county, Moore said. With a rec park in the northern part of the county which has been desperately needed the mothers all wont have to spend all day driving kids back and forth on 98 Highway. Moore was enthusiastic that a new rec park could generate money from tournaments for the county. A proper facility can bring 3,000 to 5,000 people in a weekend to the county and when the tournaments over, they go home, he said. The money generated from tournaments could help underwrite the costs for local youth to participate, and might help cover the cost of the community center if the current grants that support it dont continue in the future. Moore was born in 1941 in North Carolina, attended Young Harris College and later the School of Pharmacy at Auburn University, where he graduated in 1964. His wife of 47 years, Virginia, is originally from DeFuniak Springs. They have two children, David and Donna, both graduates of the University of Georgia. Moore was involved in real estate in Atlanta, in sales and management and later development. The Moores moved to Wakulla in 2004 because of the outdoors acitivities they had enjoyed here. Jerry Moore seeks re-election to county commission NAMI Triple Crown Derby Top: Ladies line up for the hat contest, left; a horse and rider competing in barrel racing; Middle: NAMI Wakullas Susie Tookes and Joann Strickland, left; Katrina Cochran in the shooting competition, center; Dr. Ed Gardner and Judy Hampton enjoy the events; Bottom: kids sit on a fence rail to watch the races, left; and celebrity horse owner Dalynda Vauses horse won the competition. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Rhonda A. Carroll, MAIState Certied General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459575-1999 926-6111 Fax 575-1911Competitive Rates County Resident Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) Leon/Wakulla Native 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com rr sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 TILE ~ CARPET ~ WOOD ~ LAMINATE ~ VINYLKaren Richardson, Interior Design Consultant850-491-3358www.SouthernFlooring.net Call Us for Your Free In-Home Estimate!FLOORING SETTING THE STANDARD WITH Style Saturday Only May 3 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION Call for an Appointment to pre-measure or to receive a FREE DESIGN CONSULTATION As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Bait Shop Shrimp Crickets Worms IN-SHORE FISHING IS HOT AND SO IS THE WEATHER HOOK UP YOUR BOAT See us for All your boating supplies!Troll In for Grouper Gear GROUPER SEASON IS GROUPERSEASON IS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Please RecycleBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Board of Commissioners took up issues with wetlands ordinance language, veterans affairs, and a DOT realignment project at the meeting on April 21. A request for board approval of a resolution certifying the wetlands ordinance for referendum hit a snag because the ballot summary did not exactly match the language on a petition signed by 30 percent of Wakulla Countys registered voters. The motion passed 3-2. County Attorney Heather Encinosa said the ballot message was not changed, but supplemented. The ballot language has been supplemented with some additional information in order to provide a clear message to the voter about what theyre voting on, Encinosa said. The proposed ballot summary cannot exceed 75 words. Nine community members, and a newly retained attorney for the Wetlands Alliance, took an opportunity to address the board about the wetlands issue. Me, personally, Im thinking if I signed a petition to get it on the ballot, thats the wording I would want, said citizen Chris Russell. Ross Burnaman, a Tallahassee lawyer who represents the Wetlands Alliance, told commissioners: We urge you to adopt the resolution. With the revisions made by the county attorney, we believe that the proposed resolution and ballot title and summary meet the statutory requirements. So, the alliance believes that the revised ballot title and summary is legally suf cient, and urges adoption of the resolution. Wilson Cook spoke to support the original language on the resolution. The new language doesnt quite re ect exactly whats going on, Cook said. It seems to have left out the agricultural, as well as 35-foot setback restrictions, so it doesnt really cover what it initially was. Its only been a couple years that weve been under a charter, and I believe that requires that the different city of cers do certain functions, and I dont think our county attorney is appropriate for coming in and changing the wording on this already sufficient document. Commissioner Ralph Thomas said he was concerned if the board has the authority to change the language on the resolution. (The alliance) went out and got 30 percent signatures based on that proposed ballot summary, Thomas said. I dont think we should have the authority to change the proposed ballot summary or the ordinance. I think the intent of this citizens initiative was for it to move forward as it was presented. I am suggesting we allow it to move forward exactly the way it was proposed to the citizens. Encinosa said it is important that voters who arent familiar with the wetlands issue know what they are voting for. The intent of the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance has been preserved, which is to put the existing wetlands ordinance on the books, and provide that it can only be amended per repeal by another voter referendum, she said. We have used most of the wording they used, and added additional details so that when the voter steps in that ballot box, who has no idea whats going on with the wetlands ordinance, they at least know what it does and what it covers. Board Chairman Richard Harden pointed out that the Wetlands Alliance did approve the rewritten ballot summary. I want to thank our county attorney for going ahead and making contact with the alliance and letting them know the change and allowing them to view the language before tonight, Harden said. But Thomas was still uneasy. I understand this is cleaner, but unless we go back to the original, Im going to oppose this tonight, Thomas said. I think were in a dangerous place to change midstream. Commissioner Jerry Moore said he would vote with Thomas. The board approved the resolution certifying the wetlands ordinance for referendum 3-2. Voters can expect to see the new wetlands ordinance summary on the November ballot. In other matters: The board voted to approve an order for an engineering study on the relocation of utilities for the road widening and realignment project at the 319 and 98 intersection. Commissioner Moore recused himself from voting because he owns the property, and did not want there to be a con ict of interest. It passed 3-1. County Administrator David Edwards said DOT will study the intersection for realignment, and return the estimate for what it will cost to move a sewer. The engineering study will cost $13,425, which will be paid for out of the countys sewer fund. Edwards said the sewer force main has to be moved, because when the road widens, there will not be access to it for maintenance and repair. The sewer currently runs parallel to the road, so if the road widens 10 feet, the sewer line will need to move 10 feet also, he said. Commissioner Howard Kessler was concerned about the cost to the county, and voted against it. A group of veterans came to the meeting, asking the board to reinstate a full-time veterans service of cer in the county. A service of cer from Gadsden County has been lling in for former county veteran services officer J.D. Johnson, who was badly injured in a traf c accident in January. Tallahassee VA Volunteer Service Officer Michael Ford said Wakulla veterans want to talk to a service of cer from their own home. When a veteran misses a day of a claim, it may add a long time to the claim process, Ford said. The VA is doing what they can do, but as a volunteer, I was able to pick up my phone and call J.D. I need a (Wakulla) county service of cer to help me do my job. I am asking you for your support. Thomas said if a parttime position doesnt work out, the board will revisit the issue. I think I speak for everyone saying that none of us want to catch our veterans short, Thomas said. If we can save a little money and still achieve our mission, then doing it part time would work. Our commitment is to the veterans who have served. Mark Alvarez, District 2 Commander of the VFW and legislative chairman, said there are 3,500 veterans in Wakulla County. A motion to maintain the part-time position of a veterans service of cer in Wakulla County passed unanimously. The next meeting will be at commission chambers on Monday, May 5, with a workshop to discuss nonpartisan elections beginning at 4 p.m.Board votes 3-2 to clarify language on wetlands ballotOLD LANGUAGE: Wakulla County, Florida, Wetlands Protection Ordinance 10-16, as constituted on July 19, 2013, is hereby adopted by reference and amended to include: ARTICLE V. ORDINANCE MODIFICATION OR REPEAL. This ordinance may only be modi ed or repealed by a referendum of the voters in Wakulla County, as provided for in the Wakulla County Charter, or by a unanimous vote of all ve Wakulla County Commissioners at a legally called Wakulla County Commission Meeting. In addition an, ARTICLE IV. EFFECTIVE DATE is amended to state: This ordinance as amended shall take effect immediately after passage. CLARIFIED LANGUAGE: Shall Wakulla County Ordinances 10-16 and 1301 be readopted to provide local control and protections for Wakulla Countys wetlands, and surface waters by regulating development and other activities that could degrade, destroy, or negatively impact these waters and the 75-feet of upland around these waters and providing that these ordinances can only be modi ed or repealed by referendum vote or unanimous vote of all ve county commissioners, to take effect upon passage? Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Alvin and Gloria Sharp would like to wish their son Danny a Happy 38th Birthday on May 2nd. Danny will celebrate with family and friends. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on June 2, 2014 at 6:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Purpose of Hearing: To Consider a Purchase and Sale Agreement for the Acquisition of Lots 10 and 11, a Boat Basin, and Conservation Areas at Shell Point for a County Boat Ramp Facility and Wetland Mitigation. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Office at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com MAY 1, 2014

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Thursday night I was witness to a painstaking process. Of course I would rather have been home watching reruns of NBCs The Celebrity Apprentice than covering the Charter Review Commission meeting at TCC Wakulla. But the longer I sat there listening, the more I understood that I was witness to something very important the implementation of a governments foundation. Donald Trump and the B-list celebs on his reality show would still be there when I got home. The discourse at the meeting was productive, and everyone around the table has an opportunity to express themselves as amendments were analyzed, written, discussed and rewritten. Others in the committee had important things to do (besides watch bad reality TV). One was missing his wifes birthday, another his anniversary, and someone else didnt get to see their kid play volleyball. Those are the sacri ces people make for the good of local government. Chairman Chris Russell and the group of 14 community members hashed out small details on big issues. Two amendments were written, setting guidelines to how our community will deal with debt and fund balances; and how petitions should be handled going forward. But the biggest impression the committee made on me, was a plea to have more public involvement. The meetings arent known for political drama or snappy comments, but work is getting accomplished. This committee needs your input, especially as the meeting schedule is winding down. And who is more entitled to have a say in the county charter than the people who live here? The next meeting will be Tuesday, May 6 at 6 p.m. at TCC Wakulla. Yeah, you might miss out on something more fun Tuesday night, but what is accomplished in that room will affect us day-to-day for years to come.Nicole Zema is the reporter at The Wakulla News. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNR Most popular stories online: Im on a roll so dont rock my boat Cape Leisure to leave Wakulla Lodge Worm Gruntin 5K race results Register to fish in annual Kayak Classic Week in Wakulla for April 24, 2014 Artifacts from Wakullas past Sopchoppy Mud Run is April 26thewakullanews.com Hope you didnt miss Heides last rose sale You cant eat money support wetlands Cause for concern with Ray Gray Disappointed in lack of coverage Commissioners have heads in the sandCharter needs your input Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.net Follow us on Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.READERS WRITE: Editor, The News: If you didnt come to Heides 18th Rose Sale on April 12 to buy any of her heritage roses to beautify your yard, then you missed the last chance to acquire any of these beautiful, easy to take care of roses that do so well in our area. This has always been CHATs best fundraiser and the fact that it was the last sale ever caused rose lovers from all over to line up along the highway long before the gates opened to the public, and was a sell out on Saturday. After 18 years of fretting over newly planted cuttings for several weeks, and pampering hundreds of young plants for one year, Heide decided it is time for her to follow other interests, put off for too long, and check things off that infamous bucket list. Heide was one of the original founders of the former Wakulla County Humane Society, now known as CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment), and has done a tremendous job for homeless animals in our county. Heides interest in antique roses started in the late 1980s-early s. Modern roses were too much of a challenge for her. All that spraying for insects and leaf disease were something that she could not tolerate. Antique Roses, also known as Heritage Roses, are wonderful in the landscape. They require a minimum of care and will reward you with many months of blooming. If the roses have a little black spot from time to time and a few bugs eat some of the blooms.so be it. The leaves come back in no time. It is thrilling to look at a rose such as the Bourbon Souvenir d la Malmaison and know that Napoleons wife Josephine had that same exact rose growing in her garden. All proceeds from this fundraiser go toward CHAT programs like Kind News Magazine for our elementary school students, the Seniors Pets Meals on Wheels and more. Please mark your calendar for our Pamper your Pooch dog wash May 3rd, and if you would like to volunteer that day please email chatwakulla@ yahoo.com. We encourage all pet owners dont litter, x your critter! Petra Shuff CHAT Editor, The News: Preservation of Wakulla Countys wetlands are crucial to preserving our way of life. Wetlands are said to be the most biologically productive ecosystems in the world. They are of extreme importance. More than one third of the species listed as threatened or endangered in the U.S. live solely in wetlands and nearly half use the wetlands at some point in their lives (USEPA, 1995.) The Earthalk environmental magazine states that more than half of the original 221,000,000 acres of wetlands that existed in the continental U.S. at the time of white settlement were destroyed by the 1980s. Please come out in record numbers in November to re-instate our Wetland Ordinance that was put in place by unanimous vote of the Wakulla County Commissioners in 2006 and re-adopted unanimously in 2010. This Wetland Ordinance was removed from the County Code this month by four of our county commissioners even after being given a recommendation by the Northwest Florida Water Management District AND The Florida Department of Environmental Protection AND The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission all of which told the county commissioners that ensuring continued protection of wetland and water resources is recommended and that the county should keep the wetland resource protection and buffer zones in place. And DEP further noted that the Countys wetland buffer requirement does add protection beyond that provided by DEPs permitting regulations. Id like to close my letter with an American Cree Indian prophecy, and it is this: When the last tree is cut down, the last sh eaten, and the last stream poisoned, you will realize that you cannot eat money. Thank you, Carmen Sturchio Sopchoppy Editor, The News: Seems our five Policy Makers, chose to stick their minds in the sand, instead of being exposed to NOAAs SeaGrant Climate Change presentation recently in Sopchoppy. Presented to the public by experts on the affects of continuing Sea Level Rise and smarter Coastal Planning as it relates to our Big Bend counties, which just happen to have the highest potential storm surge exposure in the U.S. But...heck, who needs any exposure to new education, particularly when it contradicts your blind-sighted thinking on wetland setbacks. After all, the water will never reach Wakulla, Kansas. Those ve better take a snorkel with their head in the sand at Mashes Sands Beach, good chance your neck will be getting wet soon. https://www.flseagrant.org/climatechange/ ....in case others might have an inquiring mind Knox Bagwell knoxberries@msn.com Editor, The News: I was disappointed with The Wakulla News lack of reporting that our county commission voted to forward the Ballot Initiative put forth by the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance to the supervisor of elections. It will now be of cially put on the November ballot. This is historic and yet not a word from The Wakulla News! Where was the headline? The Wakulla Wetlands Alliance managed to get 30 percent the registered voters to sign a petition to get to this point. This was over 5,500 signatures! The highest percentage of any of the chartered counties in the state.This is also the rst citizen-led initiative in Wakulla history. This was done in spite of the fact that the majority of the county commission worked against them every step of the way both of cially at county commission meetings and separately on public Facebook postings. After the board refused to put this on the ballot, the citizens had to get their right to vote the hard way. The overwhelming majority of citizens asked to sign the petition gladly did so not only to give themselves and their neighbors a chance to vote on this important issue but also they want to keep their local wetlands protections. We ought to be proud of our citizens for speaking out and demanding a voice! Al Shylkofski Crawfordville Editors Note: We cant get everything in the paper the week of a commission meeting. Our story about the wetlands issue appears in this weeks issue on Page 3A. An article in last weeks edition headlined Repurposing helps the environment was actually written by Sandy Cook, but was mistakenly credited to Lynn Artz. We regret the error. Editor, The News:Wakulla students are our most valuable natural resource and informed voters can make wise decisions concerning their education. Ray Gray should not be re-elected to serve on our School Board for the following reasons: 1. Court Case 13-48CC is a Judgment for Default on Payment of a Promissory Note to the Florida Ethics Commission. Rays School Board salary is now being garnished to pay the $8,738.59 he owes for falsifying information to the Ethics Commission. Rays actions put our school board at risk. If the school board hadnt responded in time, the Attorney Generals of ce could have brought a judgment against our school board for the total amount owed by Ray. 2. He has an active court case 11-175CA against him for FRAUD and CIVIL THEFT. The plaintiff, the estate of a deceased disabled veteran, alleges that Ray befriended and gained the con dence of the veteran, then took unfair advantage of him by fraudulently misrepresenting transactions and defaulting on loans. Ray has not declared with the elections of ce that he is running for re-election, but told me that he intends to. He is con dent of winning because he agreed to the garnishment of his school board salary. We discussed the above issues and his response was to blame others and claim that he gave too much information on his Form 6 reports for the Ethics Commission. My response, He gave too much FALSE information, thats why he was ned. Everything I state about Ray is documented. Lets have a big turnout for the Primary Election. Early voting is Aug.16-23 at the Supervisor of Elections Of ce. The Primary Election at the individual precincts is Aug. 26. Donna Sanford CrawfordvilleCorrection

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 5A SandwichesCrab PattysSoft Shell CrabsGrouper Shrimp Mullet We Catch itBurgers & DogsPulled Pork & RibsGator BitesSoftshell Crab Are InDinnersIce Cream & Snow ConesOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Mike Carlton drawn from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: What is your favorite day of the week ?JIM SMITHWAKULLA NEWS DRIVERMondays! I get to go shing and its not crowded, its just me and the sh! JUDY PARKERRETIREDSaturday. That is the day all my kids are off work and the grandkids are available to come over. CRISTGEN GRAHAMLEON COUNTY EMSSaturday! That is the day you go out and do the things for yourself, theres football, and you dont have to work the next day! Sundays. Those are the days I can spend time with God and let things just kind of cool down. REBEKAH SIMMONSSTAY AT HOME MOMDEVELIN MANNINGMUSICIANI like Saturday mornings because that is the only day I get to sleep in! Compiled by Lynda KinseyFrom Front Page We wanted our day before the state government, saying we can make it (as a city), and this is why, Crum said. We never have had a chance to present how to solve this problem. Ive lost con dence in government. He added that analysts from the University of Florida reviewed the bill. They did the analysis for us, said our application is good, Crum said. This is clearly just a political issue. The consultants said its more than adequate. The governor does not want additional bureaucracy, because it becomes a burden on the people. This is supposed to be the jobs governor. The governor talks real jobs, sustainable jobs, but I think hes hurting that. Beshears confirmed that part of the reason the bill languished this session is because of political reasons. There seems to be pushback against growing government in the state of Florida, Beshears said. Around the time Beshears took of ce, the bill was brought in, but it missed summer deadline, he said. We started working on getting entire packet validated, Beshears said. It got down to supporting the city nancially, and on paper, it wasnt working. Crum differs. He said the packet was submitted ahead of schedule. It was finished months before legislative session, Crum said. There is nothing truthful to support those allegations. Beshears said even though the incorporation of Panacea is not going to happen this session, he is con dent the bill will move to the house oor next year. He said historically it takes three to ve years to incorporate a community after the bill has been presented. Because he took office 15 months ago, Beshears said he has not had time to push for it. Now we have it vetted by two different staffers, and Ive spoken with leadership for next year, they assured me they will help me get this through, Beshears said. I cant ask for anymore than that. Unfortunately, its not fast enough. It does not help the City of Panacea, I know that, Beshears said. We have a lot of other stuff on budget to help Wakulla County as a whole. Am I frustrated? Absolutely, unbelievably so. Crum said he acknowledges that Beshears has worked to move the bill forward. I will give Halsey credit, Crum said. He worked hard, and was a champion for people of this town. Beshears said next year he hopes and believes the Panacea incorporation item will be on the ballot.Panacea bill languishes SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW www.cjmalphursseptic.com Your Complete Septic Service rr sTM LIC #SM0951220 to Receive $10 OFF any septic tank pumping.Mention this Ad

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist Church8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service 10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service 6 p.m. Choir Practice1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Janice Henry Reinhert St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE And then it was May Revival set at Charlotte Faith beginning May 1A healing, deliverance and mIracle revival will be held at Charlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple, Thursday, May 1, to Saturday, May 3, beginning at 7:30 p.m. nightly. Bishop Alice Williams with prophet Michael Turner will be preaching. Charlotte Faith is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road in Crawfordville. Call (850) 926-7322 for more information. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t.The ministry is free. Volunteers needed for prison ministryCaring, Christian volunteers are needed to go to prison on Saturday, May 31. The Bill Glass Prison Ministrys A Day of Champions will team athletes, entertainers, musicians and volunteers to share their stories and their faith with inmates at seven area correctional facilities. If you are willing to step behind the prison walls to share the gospel with men and women eager to turn their lives toward God, contact the Bill Glass Prison Ministry in Dallas at (972) 298-1101 or visit the website at BillGlass.org/tallahassee. Volunteers will receive practical information and simple evangelistic tools to guide them on their mission. Over a million inmates have been brought to Christ by everyday, good people stepping out of their comfort zones and reaching out to men and women behind bars. Volunteer for A Day of Champions Prison Ministry on Saturday, May 31. Crawfordville UMC to hold fundraiser May 31The Crawfordville United Methodist Church (CUMC) is sponsoring a festival to kick off the summer.There will be local vendors, crafts, food, games and BINGO! The festival is on May 31 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Booth spaces cost $15. Please contact Christina DeProspero at F_christina@hotmail.com or (850) 591-0082 to reserve your space now. Bring your children and families to this festival for a great time! Proceeds from the food and games goes to the 2014 CUMC Mission trip to Ecuador. Staff reportsChurch BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDER For a very brief time last week I was under the impression I was all caught up. Dont you like the feeling that comes knowing you are up to date and everything is accomplished? I do, I just do not experience it enough. It was entirely my own fault. I was gloating over the fact I had accomplished everything on my to-do-list and had some time to spare. Spare time is a rare commodity these days, at least for me. I do not even have spare change and it has been months since I have seen my spare tire. Time is a different matter altogether. Just when I think I have a little spare time on my hands, I nd it slipping through my ngers. As I said, I was gloating over the fact I was all caught up. Being in a rather cheerful mood, I thought I would look at my calendar. I do not look at my calendar that often. It is so depressing, always telling me what to do. I hate it when somebody tells me what to do. My calendar looks at me and I look back and it simply says, do this. And there it is in black and white. What else can I do? Without actually thinking the issue through carefully, I opened up my calendar and discovered something quite startling. It takes a whole lot to startle me. In fact, it takes a whole lot just to get me started on anything. However, I looked at my calendar and was woefully startled. I noticed on my calendar it was the month of May. What happened to March and April? In fact, what happened to January and February? I should have gotten a hint with all the rain we had in April. Remember that little line that goes, April showers bring May owers? While I was focused on the showers in April, I did not notice that April was exhausting itself and May was sneaking around the corner to surprise me. Boy, did it surprise me. I guess I was just too occupied during the month of April to realize that April has a time limit. April has 30 days and when those 30 days are kaput, April is over and it is May. I do not think May is any different from any other month. It is just that I wish the months would slow down a little bit. It seems at the beginning of the month everything is going rather slowly and then when you hit the middle of the month the days must go into some kind of panic and race towards the end. Why these days of the month have to hasten towards the remainder of the month is something I will never wrap my head around. I believe there ought to be a month, at least one month in the year, where there are like 75 to 80 days. Why be so legalistic about all of this? When I go on a vacation, I know where I am going and the sad part of my vacation is at the end of the vacation I come back. Now where does time go? And, why doesnt it ever return. For instance. I am thinking of celebrating my 37th birthday this year. I am not 37 years old, but I cannot remember what I did on my 37th birthday. I think that if I cannot remember what happened on my 37th birthday, I should be able to repeat it. Why cant I go back and be 37 for just one day? I do not need to be 37 forever, just one day! But no, Father Time has made a rule that you can only be 37 one day out of the year and you can never repeat that, ever again. Of course, there was Jack Benny who was 39 all his life. I noticed in my calendar there were many items that needed doing. As I looked at them, I realized I had done them the month before. Some things are so insistent that you do them every month. My electric bill, for instance. Why do I have to pay that every month? Why cant the electric company give me a vacation once a year? Another thing that bothers me. When I am having a good time at whatever I am doing, why does time pass so quickly? I remember in school the time leading up to recess went ever so slow and I never thought it would arrive. Once I got out to recess, it went so quickly I had to return to class almost before I left the classroom. What is that all about? I took a little bit of time to think about what good old King Solomon said about the subject. To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven (Ecclesiastes 3:1). Time is a commodity either you spend it or lose it. The bad part is once you lose it you can never get it back. Enjoy today, its the only today you have..The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORBy CYNTHIA WEBSTERSpecial to The NewsWhereas many communities in our country do not observe the National Day of Prayer we are blessed in Wakulla County to have two programs scheduled for this day. Between noon and 1 p.m. on Thursday, May 1, pastors of Sopchoppy will hold an observance at the Sopchoppy City Hall. And the Pioneer Baptist Church, 486 Beechwood Drive (off Spring Creek Highway) will host an evening service at 7 p.m. A National Day of Prayer has been of cially sanctioned by our country since 1952 although national days of prayer go back to the very foundation of this Nation. Through the Grace of God we live in a country that not only guarantees religious choice but encourages prayer. I hope you will be able to attend one of these events so your voice can join with others as we pray for our Nation, our Government and our Leaders.National Day of Prayer will be observed May 1

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 7AWaldo E. Thomas, 82, of Wakulla County, passed away on Tuesday, April 15, 2014 in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 58 years, Phyllis Spears Thomas. He was retired as Bureau Chief with the City of Tallahassee Electrical Department and was a member of the Tallahassee Elks Lodge. Earlier, he served his country by entering the U.S. Navy at the age of 15 and served on a destroyer during the Korean Con ict. His joy in life was entertaining family and friends, and helping family, friends and neighbors who were in need. Other survivors include his son, Ronald Thomas (Chantel); his daughter, Jeanyne Thomas Stokeley; three grandsons, Kevin Thomas (Dora), Ron-Ron Thomas Jr. and Jeff Stokeley, Jr.; three great-grandchildren, Alissa Thomas, Kevin Thomas, Jr. and Kayla Thomas; as well as two nephews, Ralph Thomas and Carl Thomas, Jr. To honor Waldos wishes, there will be no service. Condolences may be mailed to the family c/o Bevis Funeral Home, 2710 N. Monroe St., Tallahassee FL 32303; or www. bevisfh.com. Cynthia Carol Glover died on Tuesday, April 22, 2014. Services will be Friday, May 2, 2014 at 3 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include two sons, Jonathan Glover and Micah Glover; a daughter, Suzane Glover Behnke; her ex-husband, George Glover; three brothers, John Futo, Donald Futo and Charles Dowell; ve grandchildren and one greatgrandchild. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel is assisting the family with arrangements (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com).E.W. Bradley Jr., known to his friends and family as Captain Ed, died on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at Hospice House in Tallahassee. Survivors include his wife of 55 years, Georgia Bradley of Alligator Point; sons, Thomas Bradley of Boynton Beach, and Joseph Bradley of Carol Stream, Ill.; daughters, Sharon Fitzgerald and Elizabeth Jenkins of Crawfordville; and six grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Visitation was held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, April 25, 2014 at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. A private memorial service for the family will be held at a later date. In lieu of owers, the family requests donation be made to the Alzheimers Resource Center, P.O. Box 35553, Tallahassee FL 32315 or the Second Harvest of the Big Bend, 110 Four Points Way, Tallahassee, FL 32305. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangement (850-926-3333 or bevisfh). Dave Gary Whitlock, 57, of Hayward, Calif., died on Sunday, April 13, 2014 at his home. He was born Feb. 28, 1957 in Lakeland to David Giles and Patsy Ruth (Russ) Whitlock. Survivors include his wife. Linda; mother, Patsy Ackett; brother, Buddy Anderson; sister, Carla Anderson; maternal grandmother, Eva Russ; and two uncles. Funeral services were held Friday, April 25, 2014, at Kersey Funeral Home in Auburndale, Florida. Visitation was held Thursday, April 24, 2014.Donna Diane Council Harrell Slaughter, 72, passed away on Monday, April 21, 2014, in Crawfordville. Diana was a native of Crawfordville. She moved brie y to Jacksonville, Tallahassee, and North Palm Beach, and returned to Crawfordville in her later years. She had a tremendous love for gardening, music and reading. She was also known for her delicious baking and cooking. She was a loving and selfless friend, wife, and mother and she was an adoring grandmother and great-grandmother. A visitation at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville was held from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, April 23, 2014. Services were held at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville on Thursday, April 24, 2014 at 11:30 a.m. Burial followed at Council Cemetery. Diana left a legacy of generosity to her friends and family. Her family requests that in lieu of owers, donations be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308 or St. Judes Childrens Hospital, Tribute Program, P.O. Box 1000, Dept.142, Memphis TN 38148-0142. Survivors include her husband of 24 years, Frank W. Slaughter. Other survivors include her beloved girls, her daughters, Stephanie Harrell Cash (Jimmy) and Sonja Harrell Marguin (Rick), and step-daughters, Taija Slaughter (friend Janet Conner) and Kristina Slaughter Petrandis (Jonny II); granddaughters, Tara Kirchgessner Collins (Joe), Anna Kirchgessner, Claudia Marguin, Amelia Marguin, Sophia Marguin, and Adeline Petrandis; and great-granddaughters, Darcy Kirchgessner and Ella Collins. Diana is also survived by two sisters: Sandra Mock of Tallahassee and Sue Lovett of Woodville; and a brother, Edmond Pappy Council of Tallahassee. Preceding her in death are her parents, Eugene Buck Council and Orlene Council; and brothers, Luther Sonny Council and Dennis Council. Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Obituaries E.W. Captain Ed Bradley Jr. Cynthia Carol Glover Donna Diane Council Harrell Slaughter Waldo E. Thomas Dave Gary Whitlock Cynthia Carol Glover E.W. Bradley Jr. Dave Gary Whitlock Donna Diene Council Harrell Slaughter Waldo E.ThomasBy TRACY RENEE LEEAs I was ordering lunch at a local fast food restaurant, my cell phone rang. I stepped to the side and answered the call. It was my three oclock appointment. He said that he had come by early and was sitting in front of my funeral home with his mother. I canceled my order and returned to my of ce. As I parked my car, I saw his mother rst. She was a beautiful woman, tall with striking silver hair. She was dressed in purple, and it suited her. As we greeted, I looked deep into her eyes, from the depth of her soul, she radiated gentleness and kindheartedness. Her son was exiting their car. As I turned my attention toward him, I noticed that although he was young, his movements were measured with caution. As he rose, I could see that he, as his mother, stood tall. He matched her beauty, both inwardly and outwardly. He was remarkably handsome and radiated a tranquility one does not often witness in young adult men. They were both friendly, and I invited them into my funeral home. As we walked the rst 20 feet or so, I could see the young mans strength waver. He immediately sought out a couch and sat down. His mother and I spoke for another few moments, and then I invited them into my arrangement room. I immediately offered each of them a General Price Sheet and began narrowing their needs. The handsome young man asked about various funeral options, and as he began to make choices, a tear or two would spill out of the corner of his eye. He would immediately brush it away, perhaps pause for a moment, regain his composure and continue with his arrangements. For a brief moment, he excused himself from the room. I could hear him in the hallway. He was very ill. I was overcome with respect and love for this young man and his mother. I looked at her. She sat there silent and still, listening to her son, as he struggled to catch his breath and regain his strength. I could see the worry and fear in her countenance. A tear or two spilled out of the corner of her eye as she struggled to maintain her composure. Her eyes met mine; they were wide and fearful. She excused herself and went into the hall to shore up her son. As I listened to her encourage him, she emptied her heart with tenderness. Her expressions were the deepest love of a mother, witnessing the premature and painful death of her young adult child. I was overwhelmed with heartache for them. The reverence and pain of the moment was a heavy burden to witness. I do not know what disease he suffers, only that it will take his life in the near future. A handsome young man in the prime of his life is losing his life, before his loving mothers eyes. For those few brief moments that I shared with them, I witnessed the unconditional love and excruciating heartache of a mother for her dying child. I could see in her eyes, and witness in her soul, that she would take his burden and trade his suffering for her health. If it were possible, she would gladly die in his place. We completed his arrangements. He wanted it all written down and signed. His final act of strength was to lift this burden from his mother on the day she will suffer the most tremendous heartache known to mothers, the day of her beloved sons death, his death.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushinup-daisies.blogspot. com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.The arrangement conference BEREAVEMENT COLUMN THANK YOU. On behalf of our family I would like to thank all our friends, neighbors and community associates for their expression of love in the form of emails, cards, deeds and tons of food when Bobby went to be with the Lord. A million thanks to the members of Wakulla Springs Church for their love and support from the beginning of Bobby being sick. And last, but not least, a big thank you to the team of the Crawfordville Branch of the Big Bend Hospice that helped his last week be a peaceful. You guys are the best and may God Bless you. Sincerely, Catherine R. CameronCameron family says thanksLocal author takes old barbecue pit as inspiration for book Special to The NewsPork, Beef, Chicken, and Ribs refers to an abandoned barbecue pit alongside the road that inspired the writing of this book. Much like the promise of that non-existent food, there are many religions today that claim to offer spiritual nourishment but leave their followers hungering for more. Author Harold Owen Gregg of Crawfordville cooks up a scriptural comparison that the soul can chew on. Gregg, after failing to be baptized as an adolescent because of bad theology, was visited by God in mid-life and became an avid religious scholar. This book provides you with Gods plan for the salvation of mankind and will bene t anyone that will read it both Christians and Muslims. Muslims have been taught that the god of the Koran is the same god worshipped by the Christians and the Jews, but this book provides scriptural proof that refutes that premise. Published by Tate Publishing and Enterprises, the book is available through bookstores nationwide, from the publisher at www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore, or by visiting barnesandnoble.com or amazon. com. Call Lynda or Denise at 926-7102or email: denise@thewakullanews.netSend us Her Photo & a Message or Advertise your Mothers Day Special!Just $25 Deadline: May 2 Publication: May 8 Recognize Moms of Wakulla

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBy Lynn ArtzSpecial to The News Have you spotted a hummingbird yet? Brandy Cowley-Gilbert of Just Fruits and Exotics saw her rst hummingbird of the season on March 31. If you spot a hummingbird, consider reporting it to Audubons Hummingbirds at Home program. To sign up and report sightings, use their website (www.hummingbirdsathome.org/) or download an app for the iPhone. The Audubon Society needs many citizen scientists to take part. You may report single sightings. Or you can conduct regular surveys of a patch you select in your yard. Even a porch with hanging baskets of owers can be a patch. Im planning to do a nectar watch by logging hummingbird visits to a single nectar source, a native crimson honeysuckle vine on a trellis that I can see from my window. The Audubon Society will use crowdsource data about hummingbird sightings to study the effect of climate change on hummingbird migration. Hummingbirds must synchronize their migration and nesting times with the owering of nectar-bearing plants. These birds must eat once every 10 to 15 minutes and visit between 1,000 and 2,000 owers per day to sustain their high-energy metabolisms. However, owers are blooming earlier due to warming temperatures. How well are hummingbirds adapting to these changes? No one knows. The goal of the Hummingbirds at Home program is to learn how hummingbirds are affected by climate change and how to help them. By NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netShedding light on topics that are often swept under the rug can promote awareness and save lives. More than 60 people gathered at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville to learn about the prevalence of sexual violence, and how to assist victims. Because April is Sexual Violence Awareness Month, teal awareness ribbons were pinned to lapels on everyone from Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce employees to members of the Attorney Generals of ce and area social workers. Moore compared physical scars to emotional scars. He said the scar he earned in a bicycle accident 30 years ago is a reminder of foolishness. But no one can see your inner scars from sexual abuse, Moore said. However, I am still alive despite calamity. In 1982, Moore said his world changed when his uncle, who was two years older and struggling in school, came to live with his family. For two years I was physically, emotionally and mentally abused, Moore said. That was the grooming stage. My uncle made me out to be a pathological liar in the grooming process. In 1984, the sexual abuse started. The mantra in Moores house was: What happens in this house, stays in this house. Moore said that attitude of secrecy can be very dangerous. At age 10, Moore made a joke to classmates about the abuse he was enduring at the hands of his uncle. The principal asked him what was going on. As a 10-year-old autistic child, I lied and said it happened only once, Moore said. Eventually the sexual abuse stopped, and Moore turned to writing as a way to process what he had experienced. He eventually wrote the novel Deaf, Dumb, Blind & Stupid. My message to teens who have struggled with abuse journal, Moore said. If a child does not journal, they could explode; maybe commit suicide. In 2009, Moore said he was leading a poetry group with 12 teenage girls. He asked how many have contemplated suicide, and six raised their hands. It was all because of family abuse, Moore said. Unfortunately some people side with their relative instead of their own child. Denial is one of the worst things that can be done. Moore said part of the reason he wrote the novel, was to educate communities about abuse and teenage suicide. Folks in and out of the faith community are repulsed thinking about suicide, Moore said, adding that the deal with it yourself attitude is a huge problem. Suicide among teens is the third leading cause of death. Just look at the news. Moore said its important for parents, social workers and educators to notice unusual patterns behavioral and academic. My grades were good, but my behavior was terrible, Moore said. Moore said eventually he was suspended for inappropriately touching another student, which is also a sign of abuse. They focused on what I did, not what I went through, Moore said. Moore provided alarming statistics about sexual abuse. He said one in three girls, one in ve boys, and one in three siblings experience sexual abuse. He added that one in six autistic youth are also sexually abused. Kathy Asbell, a Refuge House Inc. adult advocate, recognized representatives from the host of agencies present. This is a message of hope, Asbell said. Its great to hear how (Moore) overcame all of that. Asbell said the rst and best thing to do for a victim of sexual violence is to listen, believe the victim, and let him or her talk. Allow the victim to make decisions about what steps to take next, but encourage medical attention. Remain calm and suggest counseling or a consultation with a crisis center like Refuge House Inc. The local number for Refuge House is 850-681-2111. The information line for the Florida Council Against Sexual Violence is 1-888956-RAPE.Sexual violence awareness raised Kathy Asbell, an advocate with Refuge House Inc., thanks speaker and author Tremayne Moore for sharing his life story in the fellowship hall of First Baptist Church of Crawfordville.Watch for hummingbirdsNICOLE ZEMA LYNN ARTZThe native crimson honeysuckle vine is an ideal patch for hummingbirds. By BETTY GREENSpecial to The NewsLooking Back at area communities has been the theme this year for the Wakulla County Historical Society programs and we so appreciate David Miller, Bobby Pearce, Randy Pearce, Joe Duggar, and Rhett Strickland on April 8 when members and guests enjoyed the discussion on the community of Riversink when the panel shared pictures, maps, artifacts, stories and memories during the evening. All ve gentlemen have roots in Riversink and grew up swimming in the sink, playing in the woods, and enjoying life amongst their friends and family. In 1998 Governor Lawton Chiles purchased from Tad Strickland the William Buck Strickland log cabin and moved it to his hunting camp Jubilee to be built into a cook shed. Of particular interest was how places like Gopher Scuf e and Ben Haden were named. Ben Haden was the postmaster. The Historical Society is thankful for these gentlemen who added so much by leading the discussion. Digging into Riversink historyPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS David Miller, Bobby Pearce, Randy Pearce, Joe Duggar, and Rhett Strickland led the discussion on Riversinks history. Wyatt Laird Roberts was born April 11, 2013, and just turned 1. Parents are Anthony Lyle Roberts and Cassidy Randolph Roberts of Crawfordville. Paternal Grandparents are Delbert and Marian Roberts of Catlett, Virginia. Maternal Grandparents are Eddie Randolph of Havana, and Carol and Larry Powell of Tallahassee. Paternal Great Grandparents are Zylphia Roberts and the late Delbert Bud Roberts of Sopchoppy, and the late William Bill Laird and the late Clora Mae Laird of Crawfordville. Maternal Great Grandparents are Jane Randolph and the late Roy Randolph of Quincy, and Jim and Anne Voyles of Gainesville.Lizzie Grace Allen is 1 Lizzie Grace is the daughter of Jonathan and Amber Allen, and the little sister to Chance Allen. Wyatt Laird Roberts is 1 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Ashlee and Joey Fairclothof Crawfordville announce the birth of their daughterKylee Rae FairclothBorn on April 4, 2014, (7 lbs. 10 oz, 19 1/4 inches)Her grandparents are Sharilyn and Ed Ryals of Crawfordville the late Gilbert Faircloth of Wewahitchka and Cathy and Allen Hattaway of Tallahassee. Kylee Rae has a sister, Katie Faircloth. Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor Lillie A. Triplett Proverbs5 Trust in the Lord with all thine heart and lean not unto thine own understanding. 6. In all thy ways acknowledge Him and He shall direct thy paths.Love you a bunch, your husband TripHappy Retirement

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 9Ahappenings in our community CommunityWed like to thank everyone who came out to our two big events this past weekend at WCPL. First our Volunteer dinner on Friday Night was a great success as we proudly honored the volunteers who are so indispensable to my staff. Without them we would not be able to provide the high level of service that Wakulla County citizens have come to expect and deserve from WCPL. We also had the privilege of presenting Nancy Myers with our 2014 Gloria Hatton Library Volunteer of the Year award. Nancy has been volunteering at WCPL for years and assists us with organizing our library card applications, processing items which need to be discarded from our collection, as well as many other tasks that she always completes with a great attitude and smile on her face. She received a plaque to take home and her name is now displayed on the permanent plaque at WCPL. Thank you to all of our volunteers and thank you to all the local businesses who donated items for door prizes and food for the dinner. The local support for WCPL always impresses us and is appreciated! The following night we celebrated the Friends of the Library 38th anniversary with a great evening highlighted by an entertaining and enlightening performance by Chautauqua speaker Betty Jean Steinshouer as she inhabited legendary literary gures Willa Cather, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, and Gertrude Stein as they shared their thoughts on Earnest Hemingway. The packed house enjoyed the entire program which was presented through a grant from the Florida Humanities Council. At the end on the evening, we announced the winner of the Samsung Pro tablet drawing which the Friends have been selling tickets for the past six weeks. Your always generous support has raised nearly $1200 for the Friends of the Library! Ms. Steinshouer drew Layne Davis name and we hope that Layne enjoys and gets great use out of this device, and thank her and all who purchased tickets for their support of WCPL. Keep an eye on us for more drawings coming soon! Friday Night Movie Our Friday Night Movie this week is the remake of the 1947 Danny Kaye lm, The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, this time starring and directed by Ben Stiller. This PG rated lm (some language and action scenes) also stars Kristin Wiig, Shirley MacLaine, and Sean Penn among others. This lm tells the tale of a day-dreamer who escapes his anonymous life by disappearing into a world of fantasies lled with heroism, romance and action. When his job along with that of his co-worker are threatened, he takes action in the real world embarking on a global journey that turns into an adventure more extraordinary than anything he could have ever imagined. Doors open at 6:45 for the 7:00 show and we ask that all children be accompanied by an adult. Computer classes return at WCPL The new round of computer classes begun this week and we have added a webcam to our computer lab which allows Deanna Ramsey to teach some classes remotely while she is out of town! Come by or call us to sign up for everything from Computer Basics & using an iPad, to Facebook business pages, and Microsoft Excel. You can sign up for these free classes either by calling us at 926-7415 or stopping by the front desk the next time youre in. Dont let this free way to learn increasingly needed skills pass you by! Special to The NewsJustin Haire, an eleventh grader at Wakulla High School was born and raised in Wakulla County and is very proud of his Wakulla roots. Justin is a kind and fun-loving young man with a positive attitude despite the challenges he has endured and continues to face. His will is truly inspirational. Justin was diagnosed with Legg Perthes disease in 2007. This condition limits Justins physical activity and causes him a great deal of pain. Justin had hip reconstruction surgery in April of 2010 and is scheduled for a second major surgery on June 11 in West Palm Beach. This procedure will help eliminate his pain, increase his range of motion, and help lessen the 3-inch difference in the length of his leg, therefore providing him with a better quality of life. Justin will be required to stay in West Palm Beach for at least a minimum of eight weeks following this surgery for special physical therapy. This extended stay will place a huge nancial burden on the Haire family. Donations to assist the Haire family can be deposited into the bene t account for Justin Haire at any Centennial Bank location or can be mailed to Centennial Bank, 8232 Woodville Hwy., Woodville, FL 32362. Donations should be addressed to the bene t account for Justin Haire. Contributions, as well as thoughts and prayers, will be received with much gratitude from the Haire family. Kitten and puppy season is right around the corner! Every spring, most unaltered female dogs and cats go in heat. Males can sense this for miles around. Dogs and cats that dont normally leave their yard will climb fences, break out windows and run for their new girlfriend to make litters of unwanted babies. So, please keep a close eye on your animals this time of year. Please have your animals spayed or neutered, and then there is no worry about your animal making more unwanted litters. If you would like to get your animal(s) fixed but need nancial help, go to www.bethesolution.us and look for Be the Solution on Facebook or call them at 850-545-2043. This wonderful group provides consistent low-cost vouchers for animals in our county and you can use our local vets. This time of year puts additional pressure on the shelter as the intake of animals escalates. Caring for pregnant animals or infants is very dif cult. If you are interested in fostering animals, please contact the shelter at 850926-0902. We can put you in touch with Cauzican Animal Rescue, a group of volunteers who are working hard to nd homes, rescues and fosters for the unwanted animals of our county. There is an application process and all fosters must be approved. It is a fantastic way help the animals get out of the shelter environment while a permanent, loving home can be arranged. Last week, this shelter took in 30 animals. Of this number, nine were owner surrendered, meaning the owner brought them to the shelter because they were no longer wanted. The number of animals that were picked up by an Animal Control Of cer was 13. There were eight animals that were either left in the Drop Box (the 24 hour kennel at our gate) or were found by citizens and dropped at the shelter. During the same week, we returned seven animals to their owners, two were euthanized (both for behavior issues) and seven were released to rescue groups that will then be adopted. We thank all of the Rescue Groups that we work with locally and all over the Southeastern US. Earlier this month, we arrived at the shelter early in the morning to nd six hounds all stuffed in one of our drop boxes. These dogs are healthy and happy, not like some of the less fortunate hounds that come through our shelter. If you want to see a video that will make you smile, go to Cauzican Care on Facebook and watch the video named Who let the dogs out? posted yesterday. Seeing these hounds play, run and play tug-of-war makes me so happy. Make sure you like the page so you can see daily updates on the animals that come in the shelter. And if you hit the share button, all of your friends on Facebook can see it, too. It is a small, almost effortless, way to help our animals nd their way out of the shelter. Thank you in advance. A happy story begins with a yellow lab mix puppy that was dropped off at a shelter in Walton County last summer. Guinness was adopted through CHAT when he was about eight weeks old. Sadly, he was returned to our shelter in March of this year because he and his brother could not seem to get along. Unfortunately, Guinness was seen as the aggressor and lost his home. Many labs are returned to shelters for being unruly, chewing, digging or jumping. Because labs are a working breed, they need a job! The awesome volunteers for Cauzican got in touch with a group that trains dogs to help victims with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Guinness is now on his way to learn how to help humans with the help of a group called K-9 for Warriors. Sometimes the love from an animal is just what a human may need. And always, the love of a dog for his human is unwavering. Way to go Guinness, we are proud of you!Library News...By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary Director Community rallying to help local student Justin Haire was diagnosed with Legg Perthes disease in 2007. Animal Shelter news... By IVANHOE CARROLLShelter Director Dont miss Baconfest 2014Staff ReportThe 21st Annual BaconFest SouthPork event this Saturday and Sunday is free and open to the public, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Enjoy art, live music and baconeverything. You bring dessert. The venue is Pelican Place, 1357 Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road in Crawfordville, at the home of Hugh Taylor and Mary Cortese. The quirky festival began at Shell Point, when Taylor lived there. This year they will hold Baconfest at their house and their newly-opened gallery and event space, notable for where the mastodon lives. Everybody loves bacon, right? So, we said, lets have a Bacon Festival, says Taylor about the inception of Baconfest, over two decades ago. During Baconfest XXI SouthPork, there will be plenty of bacon, and things made with bacon, he said. Lets just say, its a lot of bacon. For more information call 926-6058 or visit www.pelicanplace.net. Also check out the Facebook page. Doggie spa in Hudson Park on SaturdayStaff ReportCHAT will host Pamper Your Pooch, a dog wash and micro chipping event at Hudson Park from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Saturday. Treat your furbaby to all-natural dog baths, towel dry, ea and tick spray, nail clipping, anal expression, micro chipping and pet photos. Chips are a $25 donation. Proceeds will bene t the Seniors Pets Meals on Wheels, TNR program and educational materials for elementary students. FILE PHOTOA pooch gets a good scrub at last years pampering event. Call Lynda or Denise at 926-7102or email: denise@thewakullanews.netSend us Her Photo & a Message or Advertise your Mothers Day Special!Just $25 Deadline: May 2 Publication: May 8 Recognize Moms of Wakulla Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsBecton James Roddenberry of Sopchoppy has been accepted to the Doctor of Nursing Practice program at Duke University for the fall 2014 semester. This is a Nurse Practitioner degree at the Doctorate level, as opposed to the traditional Masters prepared programs. This is an online program with Roddenberry being able to complete his clincals, residencies, and internship here in the Big Bend Region, also attending campus in Durham, North Carolina 6-8 weekends throughout the year. Roddenberrys Doctorate Degree will specialize in Family Practice Medicine and Emergency & Trauma Medicine. After graduation, Roddenberry will be eligible to sit for the Board Certi cations for Family Nurse Practitioner and Emergency Nurse Practitioner. Roddenberry graduated Magna Cum Laude for Wakulla High School in 2002, and from Tallahassee Community College in 2006 with an Associate of Science in Nursing, later graduating Cum Laude from Thomas University, Thomasville, Georgia, in 2013 with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. Roddenberry is a Board Certi ed Emergency Nurse and certi ed with the American College of Surgeons as an Advanced Trauma Care Nurse, specializing in trauma care with a concentration in burn critical care. Roddenberry is also certi ed in pediatric and neonatal emergencies with the American Academy of Pediatrics. Roddenberrys passion for emergency and trauma nursing started at the early age of 18 when he became a Medical First Responder for the Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department. He then became an Emergency Medical Technician with the Wakulla County Emergency Medical Service, eventually becoming a Paramedic. Soon after, he started his career at the Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Bixler Trauma & Emergency Center as a Clinical Registered Nurse. Roddenberrys plan with his DNP Degree is to continue his career at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital as an Emergency Nurse Practitioner in the Trauma & Emergency Center. Roddenberry states, This is truly the highest of honor to be accepted to Duke University. More so, I am extremely blessed to be able to serve my community in this capacity in the future. I want to thank my family, friends, instructors, colleagues, and the community for the overwhelming amount of support I have been given throughout the years! I would not be where I am today without you all.Special to The NewsDr. Sean Keith Padgett earned his Doctor of Chiropractic degree from Palmer College of Chiropractic, Port Orange, in March 2014 at the Palmer Graduation Convocation. Sean served as a member of Palmer Campus Guides and President of Gonstead Chiropractic Technique Club for which he was bestowed a Leadership Award by Palmer College. Upon graduation he was nominated for the Clinical Excellence Award and the Virgil Strange Philosophy Award. While attending Palmer he traveled to Haiti, the Dominican Republic and Vietnam to serve in chiropractic mission work. Sean is very appreciative of having the opportunity to shadow with Dr. William Treichel, D.C. of Crawfordville on several occasions while in school. Sean is the son of Keith and Janise Padgett of Wakulla Springs. He attended Taylor County High School, graduating summa cum laude and then earned a Bachelor of Science degree from FSU in Exercise Science graduating magna cum laude. Dr. Padgett plans to begin practicing in Ft Myers and Sanibel Island. By MARJ LAWSpecial to The NewsThe Sopchoppy Lions Club is pleased to announce that Taylor Rowan won the Lions Club Northern Districts Peace Poster Contest. Each year, Sopchoppy Lions work with Wakulla Middle Schools art teacher, Carol Balancsik, to encourage young people to participate in this program. Lions Club Internationals theme for 2013 was Our World, Our Future. Taylor won rst place for her school, and Sopchoppy Lions congratulated her with a $50 rst prize check. Then, Poster Contest leader Lion Marshall Catoe sent Taylors poster on to the Lions Club District 35L for the next level of competition. District 35 is comprised of 25 Lions Clubs, and Taylor won 1st place in this contest as well. Lion Delores C. Farris, Peace Poster Chairperson for District 35L, sent a letter of congratulations and a prize of $200. Sopchoppy Lions invited Taylor to the April 14 meeting so that we could show our appreciation for her ne efforts. Her friends Sue Hooper, Rachel Ryan and her grandmother, Marsha Vance visited our club too.Becton Roddenberry accepted to Duke University medical program Sean Padgett earns doctor of chiropractic WMS student Taylor Rowan wins Lions Club Peace PrizeSAL MARTOCCI/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTaylor Rowan, center, won the peace poster contest sponsored by the Sopchoppy Lions Club. Special to The NewsKarrie Musgrove, April Teacher of the Month, has been helping the students of Wakulla County for 20 years. She was recently recognized by the Wakulla County School Board. Musgrove dedicated her rst 14 years to the WHS students as an ESE and reading teacher. When Riversink opened in 2008, she made the choice to be a part of the inaugural faculty and transferred as an elementary ESE teacher. Originally from the Panama City area, Musgrove and her family moved to Wakulla County in 1990 to assume the reigns of a family business. As soon as she was able she returned to FSU to continue her education. Musgrove lovingly refers to her job as Otter Heaven. She notes, I work with the most wonderful, hardworking, intelligent, kind, caring, cooperative people in the world. Every member of our faculty and staff is an inspiration in some way. We are a true community and everyone helps to make every student successful. I have delightful students and the latest technology to teach them. Whats not to love? Musgrove serves as the Chair of the School Advisory Council and a team leader for the positive behavior support program. Riversink Principal Jackie High adds, Musgrove has proven to be successful with any age student. I believe her success is born from the love and enthusiasm she has for each child. She is a joyful spirit and her leadership is greatly appreciated. Karrie Musgrove is April teacher of the month Senior Photos, Awards, Senior Trip, Prom and moreAdvertising Deadline: May 21, Noon Publication Date: June 5 Remember This Years Graduate Congratulate Them in the WHS Graduation Special SectionProduced by The Wakulla News CONGRATULATE THE CLASS OF 2014Sponsor Line ........$25 Eighth Page ...........$50 Quarter Page ......$100 .............................................................. $50 Half Page ..............$200 .............................................................. $75 Full Page ...............$300 ............................................................. $125 Back Page .............$500 Businesses Congratulating with Coupons ............$30Call Lynda or Denise 926-7102Full Color As Available RowellAuctions.comFor Detailed Property Info Visit RowellAuctions.comWednesday -:May 14th -:2 p.m. (CDT)22 Properties Florida PanhandleBank Owned Real EstateOnline Bidding Available Many Selling Absolute!Auction Site: Hilton Garden Inn, 1144 Airport Blvd., Pensacola, FLCantonment, Jay Milton, Pace, Panama City Beach & Pensacola, FLA MarkNet Alliance Member AU 479, AB 296 10% Buyers PremiumExcellent Commercial Buildings, Beautiful Acreage Tracts & Commercial & Residential TractsRowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388 BANK ORDERED FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 11Aeducation news from local schools School Prom 2014 Wakulla High School PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMAThe weather Friday, April 25 was perfect for prom as Wakulla High School students and parents gathered in Azalea Park for photos before heading off to the event. Pictures in the park has become a tradition of Wakulla High School prom-goers. Photos, clockwise from top: Senior Emily Davis and freshman Desmond Maxwell share a laugh while posing for pictures at the park. Inset photo: Evening gowns sparkled as students walked to meet friends. Senior Shannan Wood stops to assist Tamia Potter with her hair while posing for photos. Junior Cody Ochat poses with his mother, Stacy, as his dad Mike snaps a picture. Seniors Andrew Lewis and Brooke Saladin pause to pose for a photo. Kyla Kerce and Emily Rudd, both seniors, make their way to the car after posing for pictures. Read The Wakulla News for special holiday deadlines. Advertising: Noon Wednesday for all ads requiring proof. 10 a.m. Thursday for all legal notices. Noon Thursday for all other advertising. 11 a.m. Friday for Classied Ads. The Wakulla News office will be closed Monday May 26Memorial Day Deadlines Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

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By MARJ LAWOwning a stainless steel gun offers lots of opportunity to learn how to keep your revolver in pristine cleanliness. Of course, the bad news is, you can see every dirty part because the black residue from your ammo is going to leave black marks on the stainless. When you see black, its time to scrub. Sigh Cleaning a revolver is simple, one friend told me gleefully. All you have to do is run the snake through the barrel with a cleaning/ oiling solution on the snake. Then you run it through the chambers as well. Piece o cake. Sure. Your chambers and barrel will appreciate that run-through after you shoot, but what about the rest of the revolver? Guns have more hidden places to clean than a newborn babys neck. First, always make sure than revolver is unloaded, and no ammo is in the area. Unlatch the cylinder part of the gun and roll it open. Push the rod to dump any shells or ammo that might be inside. Notice the part of the cylinder where you just ejected the bullets. Is there any black on it? All that black has got to go! Wait! Wait! Dont close the cylinder yet! Youre not nished. Look at the opposite side of the cylinder. Thats the side closest to the barrel. Yep. There it is. Youll see perfect black circles around the opening of every cylinder. Since they are perfectly round, thats part of the revolver, right? No such luck. I held in my hand a new used Ruger Security-Six. Maybe the backside of the cylinder had never been cleaned. My usual XCOTE cleaning/lubing solution didnt touch it, so I called one of my walking encyclopedia buddies: Mark from Masters of Guns and Rods. Okay, Mark, how can I clean this thing? Will the black circles ever come off? Mark says to go to an auto parts store and find Mothers Mag & Aluminum Polish. I nd it, and its reasonably inexpensive. Taking a piece of old toweling, I rub. And rub. Finally, those circles are gone. Thinking Im done, I start to roll the cylinder back into the frame of the gun. And, there before me, is the forcing cone. Thats the mouth of the barrel closest to the wheel part of the gun. And yes, its totally black. Sorta crusty. I know by now that its made of stainless steel; just like the rest of the gun. And this stainless is not black. The forcing cone is small and round; not easy to scrub. So you have to rub and rub. Fingernails and a small piece of toweling with Mothers works, but whatever tool works that wont scratch the metal. Finally, the gun is clean. No black anywhere. The good news is that its easy to see when a stainless gun is clean. Anything not silver colored is dirt and it has to go, go, go. Now I am ready to go to the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Range and do it all over again. Sigh.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom FWC NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will hold six public workshops to discuss management of black bears in the eastern portion of the Florida Panhandle and how people can get involved in working with the FWC on local bear issues. Under the FWCs Florida Black Bear Management Plan, approved in 2012, seven bear management units (BMUs) will be established throughout the state. The BMU approach will allow the FWC to manage bears based on the characteristics of bears, people and habitat in different parts of Florida. The rst steps are being taken to create the East Panhandle BMU to manage the bear subpopulation in the Apalachicola National Forest and surrounding areas. Workshops will offer the public a chance to provide input on local bear issues and allow interested individuals to sign up to be active members of the East Panhandle Bear Stakeholder Group. The meetings will be from 6:30 to 8 p.m. local time at the following locations: May 6 Tallahassee, Woodville Community Center, 8000 Old Woodville Highway May 8 Panama City, Bay County Public Library, 898 West 11th St. May 13 Perry, Forest Capital Hall, 204 Forest Park Dr. May 15 Carrabelle, city of Carrabelle Auditorium, 1001 Gray Ave. May 20 Port St. Joe. Gulf Coast State College, Gulf/Franklin Campus, 3800 Garrison Ave. The FWC isexcited about getting the perspective of local residents and stakeholders on bear management in the east Panhandle of Florida, said Dave Telesco, FWC Bear Management Program coordinator. These workshops allow more interaction between participants and FWC staff than a regular meeting. We will be listening more than talking. The East Panhandle BMU includes Bay, Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jackson, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor, Wakulla and Washington counties. The West Panhandle BMU was put into action in fall 2013, and the Central BMU was initiated in March of this year. Go to MyFWC. com/Bear and look for Which BMU are you? to nd out more about black bears in the East Panhandle BMU. A guide to living in bear country is also available at MyFWC. com/Bear by clicking on Brochures and Other Materials, and you can nd more on bears and the bear management plan at MyFWC.com/Bear.From U.S. Forest ServiceAs the 2014 wild re season approaches, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack, U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, and Council on Environmental Quality Acting Chair Mike Boots today released the Administrations National Cohesive Wildland Fire Management Strategy. This strategy, developed by federal, state, tribal and local community partners, and public stakeholders, outlines new approaches to coordinate and integrate efforts to restore and maintain healthy landscapes, prepare communities for fire season, and better address the nations wildland re threats. Through more strategic coordination with local communities, the National Cohesive Strategy will help us better protect the 46 million homes in 70,000 communities along the wildlandurban interface from catastrophic wild res, said Secretary Vilsack. This effort, combined with the Administrations newly proposed wildland re management funding strategy, will allow USDA and our partners to more effectively restore forested landscapes, treat forests for the increasing effects of climate change, and help avert and minimize destructive future wild res. The National Cohesive Strategy is the result of an ongoing partnership that is providing us with a collaborative roadmap for how we better work together across federal, tribal, state and local governments and with our NGO partners to effectively manage landscapes, said Secretary Jewell. Relying on a science-based approach to managing risks, this effort embodies the type of intergovernmental coordination that citizens and communities expect. As climate change spurs extended droughts and longer re seasons, this collaborative wildfire blueprint will help us restore forests and rangelands to make communities less vulnerable to catastrophic re, said Acting Chair Boots. The Strategy includes both national strategic planning and regionally-speci c assessment and risk analysis to address such factors as climate change, increasing community sprawl, and pests and disease affecting forest health across landscapes, regardless of ownership. Approaches include: Adopting preventive measures, such as fuels thinning and controlled burns; Promoting effective municipal, county and state building and zoning codes and ordinances; Ensuring that watersheds, transportation and utility corridors are part of future management plans; and Determining how organizations can best work together to reduce and manage human-caused ignitions. The Strategy will encourage knowledge sharing between communities and expand best practices to other projects and locations across the country. As we move into implementation, it is important to note that this collaborative effort is broader and more inclusive than previous efforts, said National Association of State Foresters President and Alaska State Forester Chris Maisch. It is national in scope, includes all lands, is grounded in a sciencebased risk analysis, and built with an emphasis on the eld level perspective. Together, these actions support the Obama Administrations Climate Action Plans call to reduce wild re risks.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsFWC to hold workshops on managing bears in PanhandleNew strategy proposed to protect from threat of wild re TRIMMER $21995SPECIAL OF THE WEEKFS56 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 MARJ LAWThe left two chambers are dirty, with black eyes, where the other two visible chambers have seen Mothers. Its important to clean your revolver HOME ON THE RANGE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 13A It was another slow week for members of Flotilla 12. However, we were deeply saddened by the loss of life from the ferry accident in South Korea. This event reminds us all how quickly things can change when out on the water, even when all appears to be going smoothly. Federal and state laws require that all boats have a USCGapproved life jackets for every person on board. That life jacket must be the proper size and ready to use in the event of an emergency. Ready for use means that it is out of the packaging, with tags removed and sized for the person who will use it. It also needs to be easy to access. Children 6 and younger MUST always wear a life jacket on a vessel less than 26 feet in length that is underway upon Florida waters. Passengers aboard a jet ski and individuals being towed on skis, ski boards or other devices must also wear a USCG-approved life jacket. Outside of Florida waters (which is defined as three miles or the edge of the Gulf Stream, whichever is greater, off the Atlantic coast or nine miles off the Gulf of Mexico coast), children younger than 13 MUST wear a life jacket while underway unless they are in a cabin or below deck. Before leaving the docks, it is also a good idea to talk about what to do in an emergency. Accidents happen and knowing what to do can save lives! For more information on life jackets, consider taking our safe boating class. If you are not a primary boat operator and would like to learn some basic safety skills, please consider our Suddenly in Command class. If you are interested in learning more about out classes, please contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Public Education, Alexander Gulde, at fso-pe@uscgaux. net. The boating season is upon us and our Members are available to assist area boaters with complimentary Vessel Examinations, scheduled Boat Safety Courses as well as participating in the many upcoming events promoting Boating Safety. Flotilla 12 will hold out monthly meeting Saturday, May 3, beginning at 9:15 a.m. We will meet at the volunteer re station in Crawfordville. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net or contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident being prepared is your best defense!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD The authority. Wikipedia de nes the word authority, which is derived from the Latin word auctoritas, to mean invention, advice, opinion, in uence, or command. These days authority is most often described as a government statement of control. Police have the authority or the Port Authority controls the bay. But I prefer the earlier interpretation as more along the lines of a keeper of knowledge. We often seek someone for information and if useful, de ne them as an authority. We start out in life seeking authorities, such as teachers and mentors, only to ultimately become an authority in some small or grand way in later life. There is great pride in sharing knowledge, something that an authority does not lose in the giving. Authors are people who write and thus share knowledge with others, becoming authorities on selected subjects. We are all authorities in our own way. As a scientist, I am thrilled to investigate marine behavior. As an engineer, I am thrilled to develop new diving technology that will enhance my marine observations. As a teacher, I enjoy sharing. This week we both nish and begin anew the sharing of our underwater knowledge. This is nals week for the TCC PEN 2136 Introduction to Professional Diving class, taught in cooperation with FAMUs Aquatics Department under the leadership of our Wakulla Environmental Institute. Like thousands of students before, I send them out into the marine world to become, in due time, authorities in their respective disciplines. In one semester they learned about working underwater, from Air to Trimix breathing gasses, from side mount to back mount technology, from open circuit to closed circuit rebreathers. They manage details of diving physics, physiology and marine life, and complete dives in fresh and salt water. We will hear from them again. This week we begin a new program with the Boy Scouts of America. A Tallahassee troop will begin a Scouting merit badge that will culminate in junior certi cation, and the start of a new orientation to the aquatic environment. The class is a family affair! A parent and a child are required to participate, both to create better bonds and share in mutual memories. In 1964 I was required to bring my father to Pearl Harbor so that we could get trained by UDT (Underwater Demolition) divers on R&R from Vietnam. I nd that class not only created a lifelong bond with my father (I take care of him at age 95), but it lead me into Marine Biology, diver education, a faculty career and now ownership of a dive center over the next 50 years. Later this summer we will offer a similar set of courses at Wallwood Scout Camp near Lake Talquin. Bob Ballard keeps telling me I am his authority on diving and related subterranean resources that pass under the Wakulla Environmental Institute. We have a broad spectrum of diving possibilities here in Wakulla County, all of which make for good times ahead. I hope to chronicle the collaboration currently planned and underway in future columns. Stay tuned.. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 3.3 ft. 4:35 AM 3.1 ft. 5:13 AM 3.0 ft. 5:53 AM High 1.2 ft. 9:47 AM 1.3 ft. 10:19 AM 1.4 ft. 10:53 AM 0.2 ft. 12:05 AM 0.5 ft. 12:48 AM 0.7 ft. 1:40 AM 0.9 ft. 2:45 AM Low 3.9 ft. 3:41 PM 3.8 ft. 4:09 PM 3.6 ft. 4:40 PM 2.8 ft. 6:37 AM 2.7 ft. 7:30 AM 2.6 ft. 8:37 AM 2.7 ft. 9:52 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:51 PM -0.1 ft. 11:27 PM 1.6 ft. 11:32 AM 1.7 ft. 12:23 PM 1.8 ft. 1:34 PM 1.8 ft. 3:13 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:14 PM 3.1 ft. 5:56 PM 2.8 ft. 6:54 PM 2.5 ft. 8:36 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 4:27 AM 2.4 ft. 5:05 AM 2.2 ft. 5:45 AM High 0.9 ft. 9:58 AM 1.0 ft. 10:30 AM 1.1 ft. 11:04 AM 0.1 ft. 12:16 AM 0.3 ft. 12:59 AM 0.5 ft. 1:51 AM 0.7 ft. 2:56 AM Low 2.9 ft. 3:33 PM 2.8 ft. 4:01 PM 2.7 ft. 4:32 PM 2.1 ft. 6:29 AM 2.0 ft. 7:22 AM 2.0 ft. 8:29 AM 2.0 ft. 9:44 AM High -0.2 ft. 11:02 PM -0.1 ft. 11:38 PM 1.2 ft. 11:43 AM 1.3 ft. 12:34 PM 1.3 ft. 1:45 PM 1.3 ft. 3:24 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:06 PM 2.3 ft. 5:48 PM 2.1 ft. 6:46 PM 1.9 ft. 8:28 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 5:11 AM 2.9 ft. 5:49 AM High 1.1 ft. 10:51 AM 1.2 ft. 11:23 AM -0.1 ft. 12:31 AM 0.2 ft. 1:09 AM 0.4 ft. 1:52 AM 0.6 ft. 2:44 AM 0.8 ft. 3:49 AM Low 3.6 ft. 4:17 PM 3.5 ft. 4:45 PM 2.8 ft. 6:29 AM 2.6 ft. 7:13 AM 2.5 ft. 8:06 AM 2.4 ft. 9:13 AM 2.5 ft. 10:28 AM High -0.3 ft. 11:55 PM 1.3 ft. 11:57 AM 1.4 ft. 12:36 PM 1.6 ft. 1:27 PM 1.7 ft. 2:38 PM 1.6 ft. 4:17 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:16 PM 3.1 ft. 5:50 PM 2.9 ft. 6:32 PM 2.6 ft. 7:30 PM 2.4 ft. 9:12 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 2.6 ft. 4:19 AM 2.4 ft. 4:57 AM 2.3 ft. 5:37 AM 2.2 ft. 6:21 AM High 1.2 ft. 9:26 AM 1.3 ft. 9:58 AM 1.4 ft. 10:32 AM 1.6 ft. 11:11 AM 0.4 ft. 12:27 AM 0.7 ft. 1:19 AM 0.9 ft. 2:24 AM Low 3.0 ft. 3:25 PM 2.9 ft. 3:53 PM 2.8 ft. 4:24 PM 2.6 ft. 4:58 PM 2.1 ft. 7:14 AM 2.0 ft. 8:21 AM 2.1 ft. 9:36 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:30 PM -0.1 ft. 11:06 PM 0.2 ft. 11:44 PM 1.7 ft. 12:02 PM 1.8 ft. 1:13 PM 1.8 ft. 2:52 PM Low 2.4 ft. 5:40 PM 2.2 ft. 6:38 PM 2.0 ft. 8:20 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed May 7, 14 Date 3.3 ft. 4:32 AM 3.2 ft. 5:10 AM 3.0 ft. 5:50 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:44 AM 1.4 ft. 10:16 AM 1.6 ft. 10:50 AM 0.2 ft. 12:02 AM 0.5 ft. 12:45 AM 0.8 ft. 1:37 AM 1.0 ft. 2:42 AM Low 4.0 ft. 3:38 PM 3.9 ft. 4:06 PM 3.7 ft. 4:37 PM 2.9 ft. 6:34 AM 2.7 ft. 7:27 AM 2.7 ft. 8:34 AM 2.7 ft. 9:49 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:48 PM -0.1 ft. 11:24 PM 1.7 ft. 11:29 AM 1.9 ft. 12:20 PM 2.0 ft. 1:31 PM 1.9 ft. 3:10 PM Low 3.4 ft. 5:11 PM 3.2 ft. 5:53 PM 2.8 ft. 6:51 PM 2.6 ft. 8:33 PM High Thu May 1, 14 Fri May 2, 14 Sat May 3, 14 Sun May 4, 14 Mon May 5, 14 Tue May 6, 14 Wed Ma y 7, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 5:30 AM 2.4 ft. 6:12 AM 2.4 ft. 6:55 AM 2.4 ft. 7:39 AM High 1.6 ft. 9:10 AM 1.6 ft. 9:46 AM 1.6 ft. 10:31 AM 1.6 ft. 11:27 AM 0.2 ft. 12:16 AM 0.3 ft. 1:07 AM 0.5 ft. 2:03 AM Low 2.8 ft. 2:50 PM 2.8 ft. 3:27 PM 2.7 ft. 4:08 PM 2.5 ft. 4:56 PM 2.4 ft. 8:24 AM 2.4 ft. 9:08 AM 2.4 ft. 9:49 AM High -0.1 ft. 10:14 PM -0.1 ft. 10:51 PM 0.0 ft. 11:31 PM 1.5 ft. 12:38 PM 1.4 ft. 2:01 PM 1.2 ft. 3:21 PM Low 2.3 ft. 5:54 PM 2.1 ft. 7:05 PM 2.0 ft. 8:32 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 1 May 7First May 7 Full May 14 Last May 21 New May 283:18 am-5:18 am 3:43 pm-5:43 pm 8:44 am-9:44 am 10:41 pm-11:41 pm 4:08 am-6:08 am 4:34 pm-6:34 pm 9:33 am-10:33 am 11:32 pm-12:32 am 4:58 am-6:58 am 5:23 pm-7:23 pm 10:23 am-11:23 am --:-----:-5:47 am-7:47 am 6:10 pm-8:10 pm 12:18 am-1:18 am 11:15 am-12:15 pm 6:34 am-8:34 am 6:56 pm-8:56 pm 1:01 am-2:01 am 12:07 pm-1:07 pm 7:19 am-9:19 am 7:41 pm-9:41 pm 1:40 am-2:40 am 12:59 pm-1:59 pm 8:03 am-10:03 am 8:25 pm-10:25 pm 2:16 am-3:16 am 1:52 pm-2:52 pm Good Average Average Average Average Average Average6:54 am 8:14 pm 8:45 am 10:42 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:53 am 8:15 pm 9:34 am 11:33 pm 6:52 am 8:16 pm 10:25 am --:-6:51 am 8:16 pm 11:16 am 12:19 am 6:50 am 8:17 pm 12:08 pm 1:02 am 6:50 am 8:18 pm 1:00 pm 1:41 am 6:49 am 8:18 pm 1:52 pm 2:18 am14% 20% 27% 33% 39% 45% 51%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. By MICHELLE GOMEZOf Gulf SpecimenGulf Specimen Marine Lab is hosting its 5th annual benefit event, Sharks & Chablis, on Sunday, May 18, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 222 Clark Drive in Panacea. The street party features live entertainment, seafood by the Seineyard Seafood Restaurant, Barefoot Wines and craft beer, silent auction and guided tours of the aquarium. Exhibitors add to the fun with live birds and reptiles, wilderness awareness and unique photo ops. Sharks & Chablis is a miraculous gathering of people who come to say Thank you for having Gulf Specimen, says Jack Rudloe, GSML president. We have tremendous food, great music. Its a wonderful event. This year marks a half century that GSML has been sourcing scientific discovery, ghting for habitat protection and educating students of all ages on the wonders of Floridas Gulf Coast. Internationally recognized for sustainable collection methods that support cancer research, the lab is the supplier of choice for universities across the country and around the world. The aquarium and educational center, built by the tireless work of founders Jack and Anne Rudloe, now boast 20,000 visitors annually. With even more to celebrate in 2014, Jack Rudloe and his family travel to Washington, D.C. to accept the prestigious National Wetlands Award in Outreach and Education, administered by the Environmental Law Institute. The award is validation of a lifelong battle to save North Floridas unique landscape and the wealth of animals it supports. As further evidence of GSMLs influence on the international marine science community, Rudloe also recently achieved immortality as the namesake for a new species of jellyfish found in Madagascar Chiropsella rudloei. Rudloe had travelled to the Indian Ocean decades earlier on an expedition funded by the United Nations Educational, Scienti c and Cultural Organization. During the trip, he made extensive field notes which were ultimately used in the discovery of the new sea wasp species. GSMLs staff plans to extend its educational reach through live aquarium feeds and marine science material for schools. The SeaMobile continues to amaze with its innovative brand of hands-on awareness techniques. Money raised through the Sharks & Chablis event will help to fund these projects and further GSMLs legacy of conservation and education that highlights the natural treasures of the Florida Panhandle. The funds we raise enable the projects that really set Gulf Specimen apart, said GSMLs Executive Director Cypress Rudloe. Were striving to become the leading marine science educational center in North Florida. To buy tickets or make a donation, visit www.gulfspecimen. org/sharks-and-chablis. To learn more about the work being done at GSML, visit www. gulfspecimen.org.Sharks & Chablis fundraiser set for May 18

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comOn Monday, April 21, Joe Holmes of Tallahassee reported the theft of his vehicle. The victim entered the St. Marks Express Lane but left his vehicle running and unsecured. Witnesses observed a Hispanic subject enter the vehicle and drive off as the victim attempted to stop the suspect. Deputies and the Florida Highway Patrol observed the suspect vehicle and followed in a pursuit that took law enforcement on U.S. Highway 98, U.S. Highway 319 and Highway 267 before the subject continued west on Highway 267 before increasing speed and traveling toward Highway 20 where the pursuit was discontinued. The suspect threw some of the victims belongings out the window of the vehicle during the pursuit. On Wednesday, April 23, WCSO deputies made three arrests following a high speed pursuit at 3:21 a.m. Deputy Stephen Simmons observed a vehicle with an expired tag that was involved in previous law enforcement encounters during the past week. Deputy Simmons attempted to conduct a traf c stop at Shadeville Highway and Spring Creek Highway but the driver accelerated to more than 80 mph in a 55 mph speed zone. The vehicle turned east and then north on Highway 61 and reached speeds of more than 100 miles per hour. As the vehicle crossed Highway 267 at a high rate of speed the vehicle bottomed out on the road and was damaged. Deputy Simmons caught up to the damaged vehicle at Strattonwood Drive. The vehicle stopped and a male subject ran into the woods and two females were captured at the vehicle. Deputy Ross Hasty captured Jeffrey Allyn Saba, 26, of Crawfordville hiding on the ground in the woods. He was in possession of a box which contained pills, crack cocaine and drug paraphernalia. Inside the vehicle, cocaine was observed along with marijuana, pills and more drug paraphernalia. Saba was charged with possession of cocaine with intent to sell, possession of Schedule II and Schedule III narcotics, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, eeing and eluding and felony driving while license is suspended or revoked. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail and is being held on a $36,500 bond. The females in the vehicle were identi ed as Chelsie Elizabeth Corin Andrews, 21, of Crawfordville and Louann Clark Maiorano, 28, of Panacea. Andrews was charged with obstruction of justice/resisting without violence and is being held in jail under a $500 bond. Maiorano was charged with allowing an unauthorized person to drive her vehicle and possession of drug paraphernalia. She posted a $1,250 bond and was released. The investigation also included Deputy Gibby Gibson, Lt. Mike Kemp, Sgt. Ryan Muse and FHP Trooper Josh Greene. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: THURSDAY, APRIL 17 Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated a residential burglary in Sopchoppy. A concerned citizen contacted the WCSO about a damaged window at the home. It has not been determined if anything was removed from the home. The victim is Brenda Eaton of Sharpsburg, Ga. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated a prowler complaint in Wakulla Gardens. Deputy Yarbrough made contact with a white male standing in a front yard. Tyson Lyn Scott, 24, of Crawfordville granted Deputy Yarbrough permission to search his backpack. A light bulb was discovered with a cut out section and narcotics residue on it. The contents of the bulb tested positive for methamphetamine. Scott was arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of methamphetamine and transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Stephen Simmons also investigated. FRIDAY, APRIL 18 Cindy Cross of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. Prescription medication was stolen from the victims mailbox. The medications are valued at $30. The victim also contacted the U.S. Postal Service Inspection Services to report the theft of mail. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Linda Franklin Davis of St. Marks backed into Kenneth Myron Kirtons truck while it was parked at Centennial Bank on U.S. Highway 98 and Highway 363. There were no injuries. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Sarah Mendenhall of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Window coverings were cut and damaged at her home. A person of interest has been identified. Damage was estimated at $15. Deputy David Pienta and Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. SATURDAY, APRIL 19 Deputy Alan Middlebrooks was conducting traffic enforcement at Bloxham Cutoff Road and FH 313 when he observed Zachariah William Faulkner, 24, of Crawfordville. Deputy Middlebrooks knew Faulkner did not possess a valid driver license through previous contacts with him. Deputy Middlebrooks conducted a traf c stop and determined that his license was still suspended. Faulkner was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked second or subsequent conviction. Antonio Costello Hobbs Jr., 26, of Tallahassee was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Roy Gunnarsson was operating stationary radar when he observed a vehicle driving at 66 mph in a 45 mph zone. The deputy conducted a traf c stop. Deputy Gunnarsson could smell the odor of marijuana emitting from the vehicle. Hobbs granted the deputy permission to search the vehicle and marijuana shake and seeds were observed in the vehicle. Deputy Gunnarsson issued the notice to appear and a Uniform Traf c Citation for speeding. The weight of the marijuana was .1 of a gram. Deputy Anthony Paul also investigated. David Shane Woodard, 38, of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic stop for failure to use a turn signal. Woodard was found to have a suspended driver license. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Lt. Mike Kemp were granted permission to search the vehicle and cannabis and a smoking pipe was discovered inside the vehicle. Woodard was issued two criminal citations for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge. The marijuana weighed approximately one gram. SUNDAY, APRIL 20 Tallahassee Police Department notied the WCSO about recovering a stolen vehicle from Wakulla County in Tallahassee. The vehicle was reported stolen April 12 by victim Robert Livingston of Sopchoppy. A suspect has been identi ed and the vehicle is being held for the WCSO. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Detective Clint Beam investigated. John Conley of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re. Individuals were attempting to remove items from a burning vehicle as Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Wakulla Firefighters arrived on the scene and put out the blaze. The vehicle was a total loss. The vehicle caught re as the victim was attempting to drive. The vehicle was valued at $5,000 and the re has been ruled accidental. A nurse from Capital Regional Medical Center in Tallahassee reported a 35-year-old Tallahassee man being admitted for multiple lacerations on his body. The man reported receiving the lacerations at an unknown Wakulla County location. The man and a female friend attended an outdoor party and reported being jumped at the event. The victim was unable to provide deputies with much speci c information. Deputy Will Hudson and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Pamela Fox of Crawfordville reported losing her rearm after leaving it on her vehicle and driving off. The firearm is valued at $400 and was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as lost. A search for the firearm resulted in negative results. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Decetti Ligon of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c stop after being observed with a non-functioning headlight. Ligon did not have a valid driver license and had two previous convictions for driving without a valid license. She was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction. Deputy Matt Hedges and Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. Joshua David Colvin, 23, of Crawfordville was involved in a traffic stop for an inoperative tail light and an expired tag. While the subject was pulling his wallet out of his pocket during the stop a clear plastic baggy containing suspect marijuana fell out. Colvin was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. He was also given verbal warnings for faulty equipment and the expired tag. The marijuana weighed 4.6 grams. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. MONDAY, APRIL 21 Vernon Key of Greenville and Burford Tree Company of Anniston, Ala., reported a vehicle burglary. Two commercial vehicles were burglarized on U.S. Highway 98 east of Woodville Highway. A forced entry was observed and an ignition was pulled. A second vehicle had wiring damaged. Damage to the vehicles is estimated at $350. Deputy Adam Pendris and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Carolyn Fields of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The charges totaled $345 and were created on electronic gaming systems in California. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Roy Thompson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noted that two unauthorized orders were made online using his bank card. A charge of $147 was observed. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Kenneth Dodson of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed three unauthorized charges on his bank account. The charges were created at a Wal-Mart in Rialto, Calif., and totaled $87. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. A 17-year-old male was observed putting a bottle of pills inside his pants and attempting to leave the facility without paying for them. The pills are valued at $6. The juvenile was arrested for retail theft and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. He was turned over to his parents after he did not meet the criteria for the juvenile detention center. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. David Jay Wilkinson, 43, of Crawfordville was observed taking a ceiling fan and ice out of the store without paying for them. The items are valued at $117. Wilkinson was transported to the Wakulla County Jail and charged with retail theft. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. TUESDAY, APRIL 22 Christopher Bunger of Crawfordville reported a burglary to his shed. A forced entry was observed and tools, valued at $450, were reported missing. Damage to the shed is estimated at $25. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. John Kane of Panacea reported a felony criminal mischief to a camper trailer owned by a 77-year-old Dennison, Ohio, resident. The complainant reported that someone forcible entered the camper and created $400 worth of damage. Broken glass and damaged windows and doors were observed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. WEDNESDAY, APRIL 23 Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated a retail theft at Wal-Mart. Store Asset Protection staff detailed a female for attempting to leave the store without paying for all of the items in her cart. Phyllis Bond Smith, 62, of Crawfordville entered the check-out line and paid for items in only one section of her cart. She was detained as she attempted to leave the store. She was arrested for retail theft and given a trespass warning for the store. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Amanda Richburg, 33, of Carrabelle was arrested for retail theft at Wal-Mart. The suspect attempted to conceal $169 worth of merchandise in her purse and leave the store without paying for the items. The subject was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Eunice Selewski of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry, bed linens and medications were stolen from the home. Damage was observed to the home which was valued at $300. The missing property is valued at $3,690. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Ashley McAlister, Sgt. Jeremy Johnston, Deputy Matt Hedges and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,103 calls for service during the past week including 17 business and residential alarms; 10 assists to other agencies; 85 citizen contacts; 14 E-911 abandoned cell calls; eight E-911 abandoned calls; 16 E-911 calls; 10 ag downs; 44 investigations; 39 medical emergencies; 17 school security checks; 352 business and residential security checks; 23 special details; 15 suspicious vehicles; 59 traf c enforcements; 213 traf c stops; and 14 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 15APeople on special diets get tired of salads all the time, Swenson said. But they dont know how good it can be. We have to be in control about what goes into our bodies. Weve got to get back to basics. Swenson prepared and served two tasty salads with homemade dressing wholewheat pasta salad with baby greens, and massaged kale salad with apple, quinoa and radishes. For recipes, e-mail Swenson at sswenson@ufl. edu. A representative from Duke Energy was available on the sidewalk to answer questions on how to conserve energy and lower energy costs. Duke provides free home energy checks and ef ciency kits to anyone interested. Visit duke-energy. com/save for more information. Jess Beatty, with the Florida Wild Mammal Association, had special critters to impart a living, breathing message of environmentalism at Hudson Park. Doofy, a 9-year-old brown pelican, was injured in Hurricane Dennis, and is a xture within the association. Doofy cannot survive on his own. Beatty also had Gordy, a sulcata tortoise from Africa. They are excellent at escape, Beatty said. So theyve become an invasive species problem. Cycling as a means to living green was one focus of the Green Living Expo. Sergeant William Jones and Deputy Mike Crum of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce t and provided a free helmet for each participating child, and held a bicycle rodeo to teach rules of the road and safe riding. For adults, workshops included helmet tting, a free helmet plus other cycling accessories. Leah Bowman reported that the Florida Department of Transportation gave away 85 adult bicycle helmets, and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce gave away 33 childrens helmets, all free. Bowman said the bicycle exhibitors were pleased with the number of people who visited their exhibits and the connections they made while at the expo. Leilania Nichols estimated that at least 50 children enjoyed the various Eco-Kids activities, often returning to her tent multiples times. It is estimated more than 350 people attended the event throughout the day. Registrants were gifted with reusable shopping bags from Bay Leaf Market. The Wakulla County Historical Societys sh fry raised about $1,000 for the Heritage Village. Sandy Cook said several visitors came to look at the repurposed items on display and left inspired. Fortyve vendors and exhibitors were set up throughout the park, and on the sidewalk in front of TCC Wakulla. Kathryn Gibson said vendors and exhibitors reported valuing the opportunity to network, greet and meet others with similar green interests. They were pleased to see that the community was genuinely interested and curios about the natural and organic ingredients and asked lots of questions, Gibson said. Newer vendors especially appreciated the low-cost opportunity to showcase their products and businesses. Gibson said there were numerous requests to coordinate and facilitate repurposing workshops, which is planned for fall. As events wound down, local singer songwriter Ernest Toole sang and played guitar to original songs about Florida. Barry Sager, who played the pan flute, and Tooles granddaughter Sarah Toole, who sang and played the baritone ukulele, accompanied him. Tooles lyrics were appropriate for the event. Water, water, water, everywhere. Without that water, we couldnt be here. Without that water, we would disappear.Sustainable Wakulla: Sustainable Wakulla: Green Living Expo educates and entertains Green Living Expo educates and entertains PHOTOS BY LEAH BOWMAN, SANDY COOK, ERIC LIVINGSTON, JO ANN PALMER AND NICOLE ZEMAMore photos online at thewakullanews.com 40th Annual 40th AnnualSchedule of Events and 2014 Blue Crab Festival Band Schedule www.bluecrabfest.com 850-984-CRAB Thanks to our Sponsors! Thanks to our Sponsors! Saturday, May 3, 2014 W oolley P ark on Beautiful Dic k e r son Bay Arts & Crafts Entertainment Crab Picking Contest Kids Activities Fresh Local Seafood Gulf Specimen Mobile Marine Lab10:00-11:00AM The Coastal Optimist Club Parade 11:00 Master Chief 12:15 Mullet Toss 1:00 Mountain Dew Cloggers 2:00 Crab Pickin' Contest! 2:30 Gypsy Darlings 3:30 Mountain Dew Cloggers 4:30 Dean Newman, Kim Thomas, Kit Goodner and Charlie Wilkinson 5:15 Lost Creek 6:00 Park Closes Located at the Historic St. Marks River at Newport Bridge(850) 925-6448 SLOHAN PETE CREATURES OF HABIT KOMINATED FOR A FUN DAY ONLY AT OUZTS TOO LIVE MUSIC 12-6 p.m. LIVE MUSIC 12-6 p.m. NEWPORT JAM NEWPORT JAM ANNUAL Mullet Toss Games & Fun Vendors Food Specials Beer

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThe spring season in Wakulla County is colorful. Every location from frequently manicured gardens to untended fields and pastures are exploding with hues and tones pleasing to the eye. These heralds of the warmer weather to come are trailed by the warm seasons greenery which lls in the gaps between blooms. The consistent and ample rains have assured the continuance of a bright and pleasing landscape backed by countless shades and textures of green. The adequate moisture has also assured the aggressive growth of an individually small, but collectively gigantic, weed which plagues every member of humanity associated with attempting to cultivate plants. Purple nut sedge, Cyprus rotundus, has emerged en masse from every possible sunny location with soil. This native plant is a rapidly spreading perennial which will take every opportunity to colonize new locations. The identi er purple is in the name because there is a purple-tinged section of this sedge where it emerges from the ground. The plant is sometimes referred to as purple nut grass because of its long narrow leaves and its erect growth pattern originate from a nutlike basal bulb. There are other sedges in Wakulla County, but only yellow nut sedge is identified by a specific color. It is sometimes called chufa and is a popular feed for wild turkeys and turkey hunters. The dark green, smooth leaves blend in easily with many turf grasses. Beneath the soils surface and out of sight, the root system grows in every direction. Purple nut sedges roots are a series of spreading rhizomes and tubers or bulbs identied as nutlets. Each nutlet sprouts a new bunch of grasslike leaves and continues growing the rhizomes. The densely population of this sedge quickly crowds out most other plants, but most especially turf and forage grasses. It can reach a height of 18 inches on its triangle shaped stem. The root systems design assures this plants survival and continued success. If pulled, the rhizomes break off leaving a large number of nutlets to develop and emerge at a later date. If plowed or tilled, the nutlets are detached and spread to new and inviting locations. Many times nutlets lodge in tillage equipment only to shake loose and deposited in un-colonized locations. Most herbicides have little effect on this sedges hardy root system. Selected preemergent herbicides will prevent many of the nutlets from germinating in spring. Wakulla Countys sandy soils provide an ideal growing environment for purple nut sedge. The occasional periods of water saturation from storms do not deter this plants rapid growth and expansion to new areas, but it will not tolerate heavy shade. Purple nut sedges extreme competitive nature is a heavy consumer of plant nutrients and robs rivals of important compounds necessary for their survival. Additionally, it produces an allelopathic substance which is toxic to some plants. Purple nut sedge is found in many locales in North America where the environment is hospitable to its growth. The lush green leaves and touch of purple signify work for anyone who is maintaining a lawn or garden. To learn more about purple nut sedge in Wakulla County contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas. u .edu/. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Rhizomes and bulb-like nutlets branch out in all directions from this sedge, above. Purple Nut Sedge appears to be a grass and is easily overlooked in turf, below. It will aggressively occupy many environments in Wakulla County and replace any plants already established. Purple nut sedge can spread rapidly Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Expert physicians.Quality care. 2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32308 | CapitalRegionalMedicalGroup.comRobert Frable, DOSpecializing in: Ofce Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.Capital Regional Medical Group accepts Capital Health Plan and most all other insurance carriers.850 9266363 Aida Torres, ARNP Flu and pneumonia vaccination

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Alligator Point Sea Turtle PatrolPage 16BSenior Citizen NewsPage 6BChamber NewsPage 4B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 sports news and team views SportsBy DAVID MONTEZSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Lady War Eagles girls softball team dispatched with the Gulf Breeze Dolphins 7-3 in exciting and convincing fashion last Thursday night at home in the Regional Quarter nals. A strong outing by Lady War Eagles starting pitcher Meghan Sarvis, ef cient hitting and signi cant contributions from two freshman call-ups propel the team to next weeks regional seminals. The rst two innings of the game played out much like Wakullas district nal championship versus Suwannee with both starting pitchers and defenses holding strong. By the middle of the third, the Dolphins had opened up a one run lead. Through opportunistic base running and timely hits, the Lady War Eagles nished the third inning with a three-run urry. With one out, starting pitcher Meghan Sarvis was hit by a pitch and advanced to second on a wild pitch. After the innings second out, freshman Brianna Prichard had a base hit scoring Sarvis and advancing to second, bringing up to bat the Lady War Eagles leader in hits, senior Michael Cooper. Cooper slapped a double scoring Prichard. Cooper eventually crossed home plate with the innings third run for Wakulla after a series of throwing errors by the Dolphins first a wild pitch to home and then an overthrow to third in an attempt to tag Cooper. After a scoreless fourth, in the fth inning the Dolphins mustered two runs in much the same fashion as the War Eagles did in the third. A series of three errors in the out eld and in eld allowed two Gulf Breeze players to score. Turn to Page 2BBy DAVID MONTEZSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles baseball team showed little rust after having nearly two weeks off defeating the Suwannee Bulldogs by the mercy rule 14-4 last Thursday night. The all-around dominant win clinched the 5A-2 District Championship for the War Eagles and was redemption for a 1310 loss in last years district championship. Senior Kaleb Atkins proved to be well in control of the Suwannee line-up giving up only ve hits and two earned runs over ve complete innings. As team, the War Eagles offensive could do no wrong batting together an average of .464, scattering 13 hits over six innings. In an interview after the game, Head Coach Mike Gauger admitted to being conscious about the team possibly being rusty after having two successive regular season games cancelled due to inclement weather. To insure that his players were well prepared, the team played a live scrimmage the Monday before the game. It gave wouldbe starter Kaleb Atkins the opportunity to warm-up against stiff competition after pitching only two innings over the previous two weeks. Gauger reported that from the start of the game his players exhibited a level of intensity, ready to get to work, that they had not previously. This intensity proved productive early and often for the War Eagles scoring ve runs in just the rst inning, three in the second and two in the third. Turn to Page 2B SOFTBALL BASEBALLLady War Eagles reach regional seminalsWar Eagles dominate in District Championship DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSenior Kaleb Atkins shuts down Suwannee in the fourth inning. Lady War Eagles Pitcher Meghan Sarvis against Gulf Breeze. Lady War Eagles Pitcher Meghan Sarvis winds up to throw. Junior Jake Webb drives in a run during Wakullas win over Suwannee. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER LUNCH PARTNER F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of A SPRINGS SERENADE At WAKULLA SPRING S Saturday, May 3 4:30 8 p.m.Trio Del Mar Specialty Menu Boat Ride Program Tickets: WakullaSprings.org SinkHol e SinkHol e SinkHol eFRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy NICOLE ZEMAnzema@thewakullanews.netFamily and teammates surrounded William Bill Morgan IV as he signed a wrestling scholarship with Coker College on April 23 at the War Eagle Caf at Wakulla High School. Morgan, wrestling team captain, will be headed to the college located in Hartsville, S.C. in the fall. His coach, Will Pafford, said Bill is the rst student he has had sign. Bill was the rst to buy into my program, buy into this team, and rst to sign, Pafford said. I cant wait to see whats going to happen. He has demonstrated a lot of team leadership, showing moves and helping the younger guys. Coaches said the War Eagles team was district and regional champions this year, and Bill was a three-time state quali er and regional champion. This year he was 28-2 on the season, with 150 career wins an astounding record. His coaches said most wrestlers get 60 or 70 career wins. Assistant coach Shannon Smith congratulated the athlete who walked away from all other sports to concentrate on wrestling. When Bill was playing football at the rec park, he was the smallest but probably the toughest, Smith said. I convinced him to try wrestling. He walked away from everything else and put all his time into it. Its paying off for him today. Bill Morgan III, Bills dad, was beaming with pride at the scholarship signing. Were nervous and excited, he said. Hes going to be away from us. But Im proud of him and his accomplishments. I love this county, but I want him to get out and see something. He wants to come back and coach, but well see what happens in four years. Bill said he toured the Coker College campus and met his new teammates. He said the wrestling program at Coker College is like one big family. The team is newly formed, and Bill is thrilled to set a standard of success with them. It was their rst year last year, and I think they got 30th in the nation, and thats fair, Bill said. Bill said he will study to become a physical therapist. Bills grandfather, Bill Morgan Jr., was misty-eyed talking about his grandson. Its all right here, he said, pointing to his heart. But hes not going so far that me and his Nanny cant get to him.Special to The NewsWakullas Jordan Trussell, striker, and Lucas Briggs, center midfielder/goalkeeper, helped lead Tallahassees ASG Premier U15 Soccer Team to a Championship at the Florida State Invitational Soccer Tournament at Florida State University April 12-13. The invitational tournament hosted 133 teams from the Southeast states and provided recruiting opportunities to college coaches. The ASG U15 Boys opened the tournament against the Jacksonville Florida Creeks Kraze with a 4-1 win. The ASG Team then shut out the Baton Rouge South Carolina Maroon 3-0 on Saturday afternoon, advancing to the seminals. The boys won the Sunday morning SemiFinal against the CSA Internationals 4-1 to advance to the championship game. The 15s completed their unblemished run through the tournament with a 2-1 rematch win over Creeks Kraze. Jordan and Lucas have been a soccer duo through Riversprings Middle School coached by Chad Linville, continuing their attacking on the eld together with the ASG Premier Club, directed by Coach Andy Warner. Briggs plays varsity soccer and baseball for Maclay High School, and Trussell plays varsity soccer for Wakulla High School. NICOLE ZEMAWRESTLING SOCCERBill Morgan signs with Coker CollegeFrom Page 1BDespite the three runs on the board for the Dolphins, Sarvis through ve had only allowed one earned run, three hits and three walks. Going into the sixth Head Coach Tom Graham opted for a fresh arm from the bullpen, speci cally, freshman Brianna Prichard, who was previously the junior varsity squads lead pitcher. After Prichard held the Dolphins scoreless in the sixth, the Lady War Eagles broke open the game with a 4-run rally again through defensive miscues and timely hitting. The Lady War Eagles started the sixth with great promise after getting runners on second and third from a Cooper single and a Dolphin throwing error off junior Kenzie Lees in eld grounder. Two successive groundouts put the teams momentum on hold. Subsequently, freshman Lauren Lewis was hit by a pitch to load the bases for another freshman, Skylar Sullivan, with two outs. On a 3-1 pitch Sullivan pulled through for the War Eagles smashing a line-drive triple to the left-center eld gap clearing the bases. Sarvis continued the rally with a base hit scoring Sullivan before the inning ended. Prichard, as in the sixth, held Gulf Breeze from scoring in the seventh to earn the win. The Lady War Eagles next game was set for Tuesday, April 29, against the Mosley Dolphins in Lynn Haven. You can follow game updates of Wakullas boys and girls games on Twitter @WakullaNews. Thanks to Anthony Romanus for helping live-tweet Thursday nights game. From Page 1BThursdays result was polar-opposite from Wakullas previous match-up versus Suwannee early in the season when the War Eagles, despite winning, were only able to muster 3 runs over seven innings. In this latest round, the War Eagles had little dif culty hitting for extra bases and driving in runs. Senior James Estes was perfect on day going 4-for-4 with a double and scoring four runs. Junior Bailey Metcalf was 3-for-4 with a double, triple and 3 RBIs. Metcalf also closed out the game in relief of Atkins striking out the side in the sixth inning. Sophomore Nick Lentz showed patience at the plate earning two walks, along with going 1-for-2 and scoring two runs. The War Eagles next game will take place Wednesday, April 30, at home at 7 p.m. against the 24-3 Mosley Dolphins, the 5A-1 district runnersup. Wakulla will need to maintain their offensive momentum against Mosley, ranked third in the 5A FHSAA rankings, which carries a 1.02 team ERA. Wakulla improved its own ranking in the FHSAA index to 5th in 5A after its win against Suwannee. You can follow game updates of Wakullas baseball and softball games on Twitter @WakullaNews.Wakullas elite players win FSU InvitationalLady War Eagles reach regional semi- nalsWar Eagles dominate in District ChampionshipJENNIFER BRIGGS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe U15 team includesWakullas Jordan Trussell and Lucas Briggs. Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL *Potential savings may vary based upon individual circumstances. Consult your agent for more details. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 3BClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, May 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042. WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Center from 2 to 4 p.m.Friday, May 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Saturday, May 3 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, May 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for ve classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Monday, May 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, May 6 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.Wednesday, May 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Upcoming Events Friday, May 2 The second annual BIG BEND KAYAK CLASSIC tournament will be Friday and Saturday, at Harvey Young Farm in Crawfordville. To register, go to www.bigbendkayakclassic.com or call 850-9267145. Registraton is $75 for adults and $50 for youth 17 and under. Fishing is within a 50 miles radius of Wakulla County. Proceeds bene t Meals on Wheels and other senior services.Saturday, May 3 THE 40th ANNUAL PANACEA BLUE CRAB FESTIVAL PARADE. Line up is at 9 a.m., parade begins at 10 a.m. on Jer-Be-Lou Blvd. and US 98. Arts, crafts, food vendors, mullet toss, crab picking contest, Mountain Dew Cloggers and music by Gypsy Darlings, Dean Newman & Friends and many more. For parade applications, call June Vause at 545-0077 or Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480. Or email: jcvause@yahoo.com or wversiga@yahoo.com. AN ENCHANTED EVENING for local students with special needs will be from 7 to 10 p.m. This event is a special needs prom, with dinner and dancing at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Guests 7th grade through post-graduate students with special needs who registed by the April 25 deadline are invited to join. CHAT will host PAMPER YOUR POOCH, a dog wash and micro chipping event at Hudson park from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. All-natural dog baths, towel dry, ea and tick spray, nail clipping, anal expression, micro chipping and pet photos. Proceeds will bene t the Seniors Pets Meals on Wheels, TNR program and educational materials for our elementary students. The 21st Annual BACONFEST SOUTHPORK event is free and open to the public, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Sunday. Enjoy art, live music and bacon-everything. You bring dessert. Venue is Pelican Place, 1357 Martin Luther King Jr Memorial Road in Crawfordville. For more information call 926-6058 or visit www.pelicanplace.net. FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK invites the community to the family friendly evening for SINKHOLE DE MAYO. Guitarists Trio del Mar will perform, state geologist Dr. Harley Means will lead a short program about Cenotes, and a themed menu is being prepared by Chef Jody Perez of the Lodge. There are a limited number of all-inclusive advance tickets available at wakullasprings.org, $25 adults and $13 children under 12 years old. The event begins at 4:30 in the afternoon and ends after a boat ride, walk, dinner and music at 8 p.m. Free park admission only with advance ticket purchase. For additional ticket information contact Bob Peolquin, 556-9758. GOLF GONE WILD bene tting the FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATION will be at St. James Bay Golf Resort in Carrabelle. Sign-in begins at 8:30. Shotgun start is at 10 a.m. Breakfast and lunch will be served. Register teams of four, $100 per player. Winners take home cash and prizes. To enter, e-mail Rob Burlison at rob@stjamesbay.com. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB (Member of National Button Society) will meet at the central location of Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. Wakulla, Franklin, Okaloosa and guests welcome. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson 926-7812, President Don/Barbara Lanier 729-7594, email bardon56@aol.com, Linda Wood 850-899-0025, or a local email: skpsky2000@comcast.net. A short interesting presentation about unique buttons is given at each meeting. Monday, May 5 A CAREGIVER SUPPORT MEETING will be at 1 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church. The discussion will be: Challenges of caregiving. All caregivers are welcome to attend. For more information, call Pat 984-5277.Tuesday, May 6 P.A.S.T. ARCHEOLOGY will have a meeting at 7 p.m., as Dr. Lou Hill presents Less is Moore -a reexamination of two Woodland occupations on the north central Florida Gulf Coast, (the Bird Hammock and Tucker sites). Vanue is B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Gov. Martin House, 1001 De Soto Park Dr., Tallahassee. Call 245-6444 for details.Wednesday, May 7 The next regularly-scheduled meeting of the WAKULLA COUNTY COALITION FOR YOUTH Inc. is from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center. Regional agencies and interested parties are welcome to join for news and networking. Feel free to bring your lunch to eat during the meeting.Saturday, May 10 In Wild Florida Adventures, AUTHOR DOUG ALDERSONS newest non ction book, youll be inspired to pick up a paddle or lace up the hiking boots and start exploring the Sunshine State. A BOOK SIGNING will be from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Bay Leaf Market in Crawfordville. Useful how-to information at the end of each chapter helps people plan their own adventures. Wild Florida Adventures is available on Amazon and at select locations. For more information, visit the authors website, www.dougalderson.net. A CAREGIVER SUPPORT MEETING will be at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Special guest will be a representative from Culleys Funeral Home. All caregivers are welcome to attend. For more information, call Pat 984-5277.Thursday, May 15 A Wakulla County TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP Meeting will be from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. Please call Tonya Hobby at 926-0401 ext 217 for more information.Friday, May 16 The rst annual ABC STORAGE ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR will be May 16 and 17, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Arts and crafts by local artists and creators will be for sale. Additional vendors are welcome. Space is limited. Call 508-5177 for a booth, or more information.Sunday, May 18 The fth annual SHARKS & CHABLIS bene t will be from 2 to 7 p.m. at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, 222 Clark Drive, Panacea. Around 300 loyal patrons, community leaders, government of cials and nature enthusiasts enjoy fresh local seafood, good music, wine and beer while touring the facilities and exhibitor booths, and vie for works by acclaimed local artists in the silent auction. Tickets are $35. For sponsorship information, call Michelle Gomez 766-6505 or Cypress Rudloe 445-8618.To purchase tickets, or for more information, visit http://www.gulfspecimen.org/sharks-and-chablis. Government MeetingsMonday, May 5 The Wakulla County BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS will hold a public workshop to discuss nonpartisain elections at 4 p.m., followed by the regular meeting at 6 p.m. at the commission chambers behind the courthouse. Tuesday, May 6 The Wakulla County CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION will hold a Public Meeting at 6 p.m., at the TCC Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Hwy. The public is urged to attend and give input. Thursday, May 8 The Wakulla County TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Best Western Inn & Suites at 3292 Coastal Hwy.Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net Big Bend Kayak ClassicHarvey Young Farm All dayBlue Crab Festival & ParadePanacea 10 a.m. all dayPamper Your Pooch Hudson Park 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.Sinkhole de Mayo Wakulla Springs 4:30 8:30 p.m.Fri. & Sat.SaturdaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in inW akulla akulla W akulla akulla May 2 May 18 NICOLE ZEMAErnest Toole sang original songs about Old Florida and Wakulla County at the Green Living Expo Saturday, accompanied by Barry Sager playing the quills.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.com Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from New members: Business Women of Wakulla Association of women owned business, PO Box 694, Panacea FL 32346. Phone (404) 643-8272. Welcome Gena Green. Flying Papi Mobile Food Truck Specializing in our famous hot dogs! Also breakfast, lunch & special occasions. Phone (850) 321.7575. Welcome Gordon McCleary. Purple Frog specializing in construction/management, renovations/additions, 149 Mulberry Circle, Crawfordville FL 32327. Phone (850) 570-3764. Welcome Mike Eakin Double D Storage specializing in all your storage needs, 289 Cajer Posey Road, Crawfordville FL 32327 (850) 524-0473. Welcome Donna Dickens. Structure Commercial Real Estate specializing in commercial real estate sale, leasing, and property management, 249 Pinewood Dr., Tallahassee FL 32303. Phone (850) 656-6555. Welcome George Banks. Metro Electrical Services specializing in residential/commercial construction, security & generator installations, voice/data wiring and more, 110B Hamilton Park Dr., Tallahassee, FL 32304. Phone (850) 222-2804. Welcome Justin Bozone. By PETRA SHUFFOf the ChamberSt. Marks Yacht Club was a perfect venue for our networking luncheon on this beautiful April day, and the aroma of food cooking lled the air as soon as you opened the door. Commodore Billy Bishop welcomed guests, and shared members of the yacht club prepared the very tasty grouper au gratin, green beans almondine, roasted potatoes and salad for the luncheon. Commodore Bishop himself baked our dessert, a rum cake, which got lots of compliments. Bishop also made everyone aware that they cook monthly for socials. The yacht club provided yers for several different memberships and announced that the club is available to rent for weddings, anniversaries and other parties. The yacht club advertised their pool membership, and donated a pool membership to our drawing. Mary Wallace hated to miss hosting the luncheon, but left it in good hands with Chamber Vice President Dustin Grubbs, who asked everyone to keep our members Noah Posey, Steve Brown, and Tim Jordan in their prayers and thoughts; all three currently are in the hospital for open heart surgery. We wish them all a full and speedy recovery! Dustin then announced our ve new members for April: Flying Papi, Structure Commercial Real Estate, Double D Storage, Business Women of Wakulla Pam Moss was present and stated that this is a group of women owned businesses that meet to network and support each other and please look them up on Facebook; and newly signed up at this luncheon, Michael Eakin with Purple Frog LLC. Welcome to our new members for April! T.E. Lunn, P.E., who joined in February, had brochures available about his engineering business. Services include forensic engineering, structural design and analysis, specifications and project manual preparation, building inspections, property condition reports, manufactured product design, product approval evaluation and validation, code consulting, construction document analysis, dispute investigation and expert testimony, and solutions to water intrusion problems. Our spotlight business, Wakulla Medical Center is part of North Florida Medical Centers, Inc. consisting of 12 community health centers located throughout North Florida that provide a quality and affordable medical and dental care for the entire family. The presenter, Stan Mitchell, is a licensed clinical social worker, and is pleased that Wakulla Medical Center also offers clinical counseling to our residents. Mitchell drew Thrivent Financial for our May spotlight. We always appreciate our guests bringing their own guests to introduce Sharol Brown introduced her administrative assistant Roberta. Betty Ann Korzenny brought her husband Philippe, who works in market research and consulting, and was seriously considering joining our chamber. Zoe Mansfield was proud to re-introduce Mickey Cantner, who she called St. Marks own professional photographer. Cantner was one of the many winning photographers who spent weeks observing local fishermen, taking photographs and chronicling the Wakulla seafood industry for the Working Waterfronts exhibit currently on display at the One Stop Community Center. Cantner is also very involved in the St. Marks Stone Crab Festival taking place in October, and is seeking vendors and sponsors for the event. Ms. Zoe always brings her office administrator, Ethel Jefferson, and since today was of ce administrator appreciation day, all of ce admins got a round of applause. Shelley Homan and Virginia Moore were present on behalf of the Senior Citizens Center and recruiting kayakers for the upcoming event Big Bend Kayak Classic to be held at 3Y Ranch on May 3 and 4. This would be a perfect event for father and son teams, to have some guy time. Susan Schatzman shared the upcoming Habitat for Humanity Motorcycle Poker Run, June 14. You can register at both locations, Capital City Harley Davidson and Hardees in Crawfordville and follow the route through Wakulla County to collect your cards, ending up at Skybox for lunch, and drawings. Proceeds from this run will benefit the next Habitat House Build. Shelley Swenson invited everyone to the Green Expo at TCC Wakulla and Hudson Park on April 26. Fran Pybus with American Elder Care joined us to briefly mention the new Long Time Care program, rolled out by the state late last year. Walt Dickson invited everyone to the Captains Dinner for the 6th Annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament. Steve Cushman, owner of Cave Connections, CEO of North Florida Seafoods, teacher of oyster farming classes at TCC, president of KWCB, and member of the Wakulla Code Enforcement Board, announced his candidacy for County Commissioner District 4. He invited anyone interested in nding out more about where he stands on local issues to a dinner, from 6 p.m. to 10 p.m. on May 10 at the Camp Indian Springs lunch hall. Janice Eakin, wearing several hats, gave an overview of the free services NAMI Wakulla (National Alliance on Mental Illness) offers in Wakulla County, and invited everyone to the Triple Crown Derby on April 26. In addition, NAMI Wakulla will also be showing the movie Call me Crazy on April 28. Janice also made everyone aware of CHATs Pamper your Pooch event to held May 3 at Hudson Park, and introduced Robin Lunn, who will be making solicitations on behalf of Operation Santa. Michelle Baragona joined us on behalf of TCC Workforce Development Corporate Solutions. Michelle serves the business community, offering strategic planning, assessments, and customized training. Michelle will be sending a survey via the chamber of ce to determine the needs of business owners. Patrick Strauss won the $56 cash drawing. We thank the following members for contributing items to our drawing: Lionel and Marianne Dazevedo, Charlean Lanier, Petra Shuff, Cook Insurance, Red Hills Broadcasting, Capital Health Plan, Wakulla Senior Center, St. Marks Yacht Club, City of St. Marks, NAMI Wakulla, CHAT of Wakulla, Inc., Wakulla Medical Center, Edwin G. Brown & Associates, Tallahassee Community College, and The Wakulla News.Next Networking Luncheon will be held at the Legacy Caf/Old Crawfordville Elementary School cafeteria. After Hours Networking Ed Gardner, O.D. from the Wal-Mart Vision Center and Riverside Caf in St. Marks will be holding an after hours networking event on May 15 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. There will be door prizes and giveaways. Appetizers will be served. Cash Bar. The doctors staff will be available for questions about your eye care needs. Come to Riverside Caf and enjoy an evening of food and fun! Ribbon Cutting the chamber will hold a ribbon cutting for Flying Papi Friday, 11:30 am. May 9 at the Chamber of ce at 23 High Drive.St. Marks Yacht Club hosts Chamber luncheon PHOTOS BY LYNDA KINSEYChamber members go through the buffet line at the St. Marks Yacht Club. Sharol Brown introduces Roberta, above, and Yacht Club Commodore Billy Bishop welcomes Chamber members, below.Upcoming Chamber events:

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 5B Tell us about your business: The idea for Make A Statement began long ago with a dream and a plan, but that dream began to develop into much more beginning in April of 2013. As Wakulla natives and a mother/daughter team, we have always enjoyed sewing and crafting and used that love as our inspiration for the original store idea. What services, products do you offer? In addition to handcrafted items, Make A Statement offers apparel, jewelry, and gifts, as well as vinyl and embroidery monogramming services. Make A Statement is the perfect place to find a cute casual out t or summer dress and the perfect accessories to accent the look. If customers are in need of a wedding gift, a baby shower gift, a bag or beach towel, a visit to Make A Statement can save them the drive to Tallahassee or the cost of shipping and handling for online orders. What sets your business apart from the competition? Make A Statement is dedicated to providing unique and affordable accessories, apparel and gifts to women of all ages.We strive to go above and beyond to insure the customers happiness and, in turn, earn their respect and loyalty. Our business is set apart from our competitors because of the uniqueness of our store and the range of products offered. We work very hard to keep our merchandise affordable (most items are $30 or less) so customers can stop in and buy a special gift for a friend, family member or treat themselves to something new. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? Customers should expect to experience a friendly environment where stopping in just to say hello is always welcome. We enjoy talking to customers and learning from their unique stories and experiences. They will also nd products that cannot be found in any other stores in the county. We always look for one-of-a-kind items that are just as special and unique as our patrons. How long have you been a Chamber member? December 2013. Why did you join the Chamber? We joined the Chamber to help our business grow and to get our name out in the community. We also wanted to take advantage of the networking bene ts of being a member and learn from others involved. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? We enjoy taking part in FOCUS chamber events and will continue to bene t from the networking and social media advice from the Chamber in the coming months and years. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Shopping locally benefits EVERYONE involved. The storeowners need the communitys support to stay open and continue to serve and provide wonderful products to the patrons. Shopping locally also provides our county with much needed tax dollars. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Our storefront is located at 2698 Crawfordville Hwy, Unit A in Crawfordville, next to Panhandle Pizza. We can also be reached by phone or email. The store telephone number is (850) 9267030 and our email address is makeastatement32327@yahoo.com. We have social networking pages on Facebook and Instagram as well which can be found by searching for MakeAStatement32327. Community involvement: We believe in supporting the local community and enjoy helping out with events by way of sponsorships and donations. We have contributed to the 2013 Fire ghters BBQ, 2013 Stone Crab Festival, Studio 88 Dance Productions, Wakulla High School Cross Country Team, Medart Elementary Schools 2013 Winter Festival, Wakulla High Schools Yearbook Staff, Wakulla Middle School Cheerleaders, Wakulla High School Gridiron Boosters, Florida State University Speech and Hearing Clinic and many other local events and fundraisers. Address: 2698 Crawfordville Hwy, Unit A, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Phone: (850) 926-7030. Taking Care of Business Taking Care of BusinessBusiness News from Business News from By JO ANN PALMERof KWCB My grandmother taught me a saying, many hands make light work, and, boy, did that become evident last Saturday at the historic courthouse building. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful partnered with Comcast Cares Day, CHAT, Boy Scout Troop 8 and the Wakulla High School NJROTC cadets to give the grounds of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce a face lift and the courthouse block a cleaning. At 8 a.m. the clouds completely covered the sky but there was no rain in sight in spite the threat continuing following the downpour all day Friday. Volunteers began arriving and started working unloading plants, shovels, rakes, compost and pine straw, eager to get started with the real work. Betsy Smith gave an overview of what the plan was, what went where and the work began. Within three hours, 74 volunteers had removed grass, dirt and existing plants, installed two huge hollies and several dozen native plants to create a beautiful landscape garden around the building. The plants were all purchased locally by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful as part of the commitment to beautification projects with the county. The new plants were filled in with pine straw and soaker hoses in an effort to decrease resources in sustaining them. There were also two rain barrels installed to stop the harsh run off from the roof and to provide 130 gallons of water to use for watering the plants. Around the perimeter of the building landscape fabric was installed as a ground cover for the installation of river rock. The rock border was designed as a safety buffer from the bedding materials and to stop the erosion of dirt during hard rains. At 11:15 the hotdogs were coming off the grill and by noon everyone was headed home. We had expected the project to take until mid-afternoon but, like I said, the proof of many hands making such a tremendous difference, is in the results. We hope you will drive by and take a look. It is really an attractive view that will give visitors to our area the confidence that we, as a community, care about our environment and our historic building. Thanks again to Stephanie Bowden and Comcast for suggesting the joint workday and all the volunteers who sacri ced a morning for their community. Thanks also to Wal-Mart for their continued commitment and for donating the lunch for our volunteers. If you are not familiar with your Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce, check out their website at http://wakullacountychamber.com. If you want to become involved with Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, contact us at helpkwcb@gmail. com or check out our website kwcb.orgBusiness: Make A Statement Owners: Treva McKenzie & Suzie ShiverKeep Wakulla County Beautiful and partners work on old courthouses landscaping Spotlight On Business PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMERVolunteers work on landscaping the grounds at the old courthouse, which houses the Chamber.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.com Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeBy SHERYL SMYTHEMarch was a very busy and colorful month at the Senior Center. We had two really fun and bright parties and lots of special events during the month. The rst was an awesome Mardi Gras Party. The dining area was dressed in green, gold and purple colors. The senior citizens made masks for everyone to wear during the party and lots of beads. We had king cakes and Frank Storm was the winner and found the baby in his piece of cake. It was great fun. Then with St. Patricks Day approaching we changed over our colorful dining room to all green. We all wore green and had a fabulous corn beef and cabbage lunch. We had lots of St. Patricks Day puzzles and trivia. Then to nish off our party Eden Springs treated everyone to an ice cream social. Days after our St. Patricks Party we had the Wild Wakulla Wigglers Dance Group perform to Irish music. They did such a nice job and we enjoyed watching them perform. The Senior Center Team was at Hudson Park for the St. Patricks Day Festival to sell food and raise money for a new grill for the kitchen to use for functions and to grill for our Senior Citizens at lunch time. We do so many fun things here on a daily basis and some of it is silly and fun like playing Old Maid. Our daily schedule is always so busy. Please stop by the Senior Center and get a calendar of events so you can join in our daily fun. We are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. We serve lunch daily at noon but you can always come earlier and enjoy our activities. Our food pantry supplied by Farm Share and Second Harvest is open for pick up on Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. If you are a senior who is 60 or older and are home bound and would like to make an appointment with our Meals on Wheels program you may call Pat or Angel at 926-7145 ext 223. All donations are tax deductible and go to our Meals on Wheels, and other senior programs provided through the center.Turn to Page 7BJoy is like a boomerang, each time you throw some out it will come right back at you and hit you in the head and the heart! Everything we throw around will come back around. TWML. Ive never seen a more hellish disease than Alzheimers. The name of the disease strikes terror in the lives of the victims and their families. Caring for an Alzheimers patient is a process that will utterly consume the lives and well-being of the people giving care, just as the disorder consumes its victims. I guess every family has been effected by this disease or some form of dementia. I know I am not supposed to hate but I hate Alzheimers. It is one of the most horri c things because, you have a loved one and you have loved that one dearly for maybe 30-40 years or longer, and suddenly, that person is gone. Theyre gone. There they are right in front of you yet they are gone. That personality that you have known you no longer know. Ive been told that personality is made up of mind, emotion and will. This disease takes who they are (personality) from you and from themselves while breath is left in their body. The family photo albums, the babys scrapbook, the love letters from the war, the marriage license on the wall, the personal diary, and the stories once told, even the memory of the grandchildren fade now into some fog bank. I spent 32 years of my life working traumatic cases from murders to terrible car wrecks involving children and adults alike. While I was sometimes surprised at what I saw, I was never shocked. Alzheimers shocked me. About the time I thought I was desensitized to most of the things my eyes could see then in steps Alzheimers and sat me in my chair. Yet families deal with it until they are no longer able to provide hands-on care, and then the professionals step in and families still have to deal with it just on another level, be it a higher level or a lower level, but nevertheless another level. As their loved one digresses, the family is confronted with death many times a day and at some point comes to the conclusion there are some things worse than death! The fact is not so much a thought as it is a realization. I know there is not, but dear God, what I would give to be able to recover lost memories from people with this disease. Ive seen some wonderful people I would love to be able to plug into, highlight, copy, and cut and paste their memories on a page.So much could be learned about the process, not to mention the love, goodness, kindness and other characteristics could be harnessed. The history of a more complex time could be resurrected and make us all more appreciative of all we do have. However, Ive learned that at times long-term memory is better than short term memory. If even a few past times can be captured or taken into our custody; shouldnt we take time to capture them? Ive heard stories of family asking their loved ones with Alzheimers if they have had breakfast yet? The response was, I havent had breakfast in days. Why dont you cook me some! Only to learn the facility just served them breakfast. However, they remember a pet from their childhood but presently are unaware of the poodle (Prissy) being kept by her son. Other times they remember the visits of suitors who came courting and wooing in her younger days, but says she hasnt seen her son for months although he visited her last night. When rst confronted with this disease in an older person I was stumped and stupe ed. A woman from my church whom I had never seen angry or heard utter a cuss word in her life had turned the treatment facility air around her blue, so to speak. Turn to Page 7B THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director Alzheimers: Capture every moment, every moment! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCelebrating St. Patricks Day at the Senior Center in March.In March, seniors celebrated Mardi Gras, St. Patricks Day and moreCelebrating Mardi Gras at the Senior Center. A colorful King Cake, above, and Frank Storm, right, who found the baby.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 7BFrom Page 6BThere are many more activities that go on here at the center, so stop by and pick up a calendar of events. You can also nd us on Facebook athttps:// www.facebook.com/ WakullaSeniorCenter, or go to your Facebook page and type in Wakulla Senior Center in the search box. Click on the like button and you will get all our post and keep up with what is going on here. Any questions please call the center at 926-7145 ext. 221. You can also pick up a brochure on all the other services that are provider through the Wakulla Senior Center. Senior Center wish list: dog and cat food, silk owers, wide wire ribbon and Bingo Prizes. Thank you in advance if you can help supply these needs to the Senior Center. In March, seniors celebrated Mardi Gras, St. Patricks Day and moreCooking at the St. Patricks Day Festival. Playing Old Maid. The Wakulla Wigglers dance group. Stuck with the Old Maid. From Page 6BIt was worse than any Tourette syndrome I had encountered. I realized then the disease had stolen the woman I once knew, however, I still loved and respected the woman that she had become. I just didnt understand her. She didnt know how inappropriately she was talking and matter of fact she didnt know me either. Early on I thought how she must have been terrorized by the diagnosis and being aware that she was not always aware anymore. Did she feel she was living in the shadow of someone else, peeking out a few times on her good days? Was it hard work for her to try and remember during the onset of the illness? When someone reminded her of a pleasant and recent past memory, did she smile and act like she remembered when truly she did not? You really know how old she is, but at what age is she living? She left a legacy while she could and was in good health. We must not forget her legacy ourselves. Maybe if we would stop looking at all they had lost, we could focus more intensely on what they have and take that information and create moments of happiness and joy for them. Alzheimer patients are patients but for us many times they are still family. I was told by a husband of many years. I went to see my wife today but she didnt remember me. Maybe she does remember him, but doesnt recognize him. Perhaps shes living in the early years of marriage and he did not look the same to her as he did then. Could it be when the son does visit she does not recognize him because she is living in a stage when he was a child and not in the now when her son is in his late 50s? There is a difference between remembering and recognizing! Jolene Brackley writes of a gentleman by the name of Bud who had this encounter with his wife now suffering from Alzheimers. He took his wife to a park where they once sat as young lovers. Bud leans over and touches her face and says, I love you! Her response, Im sorry, sir, but my heart is for Bud. He was thrilled, elated and returned and proclaimed she did not recognize me today, but she remembered me today. Priceless. I just wanted to let you know that if your loved one has this disease, they may not recognize you, but they may still remember you, even if it was in a former decade or so. We try too hard to make them come back to our time; they may not, ever. So lets make an attempt to gure out what time they are in and drop back into their earlier time. It could mean the difference between a brief connection vs. no connection at all. Could it be that a connection is easier made by a recognition of our voice without them seeing the strangers face? Should we stand behind the door, call them by name or title and just listen to see if they made a voice recognition? While reading and researching this dreadful disease one writer posed this scenario to the readers: You have Alzheimers, but you dont remember you do. You think youre fine. You are 85 but think you are 25. You wake up in a strange place every morning, its a whole new world every day. You know you have children but are perplexed that you cant find them near you. You ask a stranger; where are my children? They tell you the truth, they live in Alabama and that is where you are at too but dont worry everything will be ne. Not so, everything is not ne. Now you are in a panic. This is not your home, and you think that the nurse/stranger is lying to you. Now you are frightened. Now that weve stepped out of that world back into our present world possibly you can see the mental condition of this 24-year-old mother who has lost her children, is in a strange place with strangers lying to her. Maybe this is why a patient can go into a rage, curse like a young sailor and cry like hungry newborn babies. I presented that scenario to you because there is no reasoning with a person with Alzheimers. You will NOT be able to make them live in your reality. They will never choose your reality so theres only one thing to do in my opinion; choose to live in theirs. Investigate and see where they are, what age they are, and step into their world. Its the only way we will bring any understanding to the misunderstandings. Also, they make the same mistakes many times a day all day long. They ask the same questions all day long. Why? I believe they are searching for their right answer. Therefore, you may have to keep adjusting your answer until the expression on their face shows acceptance. Once that happens, they usually move to the next question and start searching for the correct answer to this new question.Anything that triggers a positive response write it down. Before long you will have a diary full of correct responses. You may be wondering, is he asking me to lie? Its not lying if you are responding to their truth! Remember, its not your truth but it is theirs and they perhaps are living in a different decade. You want them to change but they are not going to so someone in this formula has to change. You! Ive seen families who are always correcting their loved one/ patient. When they act like children we tend to treat them like children and correct them like children. They are not and will never again be children. Perhaps we should ask ourselves three questions: what they are doing right now, is it hurting them, is it hurting me or is it hurting someone else? If the answer is no! Leave them alone. Why correct them? Maybe its what they want to do and you are the only one that feels uncomfortable. After all, you and I do what we want to do! If you come to the realization that you are wrong and they are right then anxiety, arguments and aggravation subsides. I guess our role in this is to take care of their basic needs and as many wants as we can. Provide for them security. Finally provide them love unconditionally. Unconditional love is what everyone everywhere wants. M.F.K. Fisher wrote, It seems to me our basic needs, for food and security and love, are so entwined that we cannot think of one without the other. So all in all you change what you can and manage what you cant! You cant change this disease, you cant cure it and you cannot control this disease but you can change and control how you respond to the actions of the person who has this disease. A person can either respond or react to any given situation. To respond is a positive outcome while a reaction is negative because its sometimes a knee-jerk reaction. Never react respond. I told my wife not long ago, when Im old I may forget you but I know you will not forget me. Or, if by chance you forget me, I will never forget you. Capture the moment, every moment!Langston: Alzheimers: Capture every moment, every moment!

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.com By Nicole Zemanzema@thewakullanews.netThe third annual Sopchoppy Volunteer Fire Department Mud Run was a big success April 26, with $2,813.74 raised to bene t the Wakulla County Fire Explorers. Fire Explorers leader Ian Brazier said the number of participants well exceeded expectations. Fortyve participated last year, and more than 100 joined the muddy fun this year. Because of the outpouring of support sponsorship wise, every $1 that came in for each registration went directly to Explorer program, Brazier said. We were in the black before we registered anyone thanks to our sponsors. Part of the money raised Saturday is attributed to a matching fund from Wakulla County United Fire ghter Association. The Wakulla County Fire Explorers program is for youth ages 14 to18 interested in potentially becoming re ghters and EMS workers or volunteers. We train them (to be) rst responders, so when they turn 18, they already have all that knowledge, Brazier said. They can get certi ed and join a volunteer re department and become active members, able to respond to any incident within the county. Brazier said it was a fantastic year for the Mud Run. We got a lot of good feedback from participants, a bunch of new obstacles, and for the rst time opened it to adult participants as well. Event Results Adult Individual: Zane Daniels Child Individual: Andrew Buchleitner 1st place team: Panacea (24 minutes) Best Individual costume: Madison Metcalf Best Team costume: Team Olgesby Team Times Matt Jones 24:02 Phil Davis 24:05 Josh Peebles 27:00 Zach Robinson 28:55 Crawfordville VFD 29:00 Jim Burholter 29:00 Chris Russell 33:422014 Sopchoppy Mud RunPHOTOS: 1. Wakulla County Fire Explorers are Justin Roddenberry, Jimmy French, Dustin Colvin, Reid Tilley and Brayden Russ. (Photo special to The News.) 2. Andrew Puchleitner and Levi Robison, both 10, ip tires together toward the end of the course. 3. Georgia Gumphrey, 8, climbs to the top of a wooden wall on the Mud Run obstacle course. 4.Reid Tilley, a Wakulla High School senior and Fire Explorer, is covered in mud as he races to nish the course. 5. The Tillman family: Joey, Melanie, Jimmy, Jordyn and Mason carry a log as a team through he obstacle course. 6. Costume contest winner Madison Metcalf sprints through the course, covered in mud. (Photo special to The News.) 7. Individual winner Zane Daniels treks through the muddy course. (Photo special to The News.) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7More photos online at thewakullanews.comPHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 9B Rock the Dock Rock the DockSpecial to The NewsThe sixth annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament was April 26 and 27 in Panacea. Funds raised from the tournament will benet the revitalization of projects of the Panacea area and further the goals of the partnership for assuring public access to the waterfront. The Lady Angler prize basket winner was Kristi Sanders. The Youth Division winner of the G3 Jon Boat, Yamaha outboard and trailer was Owen Bearden. The Kayak Division winner of 12-foot kayak was Nathan Tyre. A $1,000 Seatow cash prize went to Brad Funkhouser. The $2,500 king sh jackpot winner was Matthew Bradshaw. The $1,500 trout jackpot winner was Bryce Hill. RECREATIONAL DIVISION: AMBERJACK 1st: Chester Cowart, 90lb 0oz 2nd: Chris Oaks, 57lb 2oz 3rd: Sean Merchant, 39lb 15oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: COBIA 1st: Eric Day, 53lb 15oz 2nd: David Walls, 35lb 8oz 3rd: Mike Chavez, 33lb 10oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: GROUPER 1st: Allen Mortham, 29lb 1oz 2nd: Chris Oaks, 19lb 10oz 3rd: Michael Bodiford, 15lb 11oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: KINGFISH 1st: Matthew Bradshaw, 35lb 1oz 2nd: Josh Brown, 33lb 15oz 3rd: Blake Gardner, 33lb 7oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: FLOUNDER 1st: Ray Solomon, 2lb 8oz 2nd: Marilyn Lawhon, 2lb 7oz 3rd: Huck Finn, 2lb 4oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: REDFISH 1st: Ray Solomon, 8lb 1oz 2nd: Brandon Stubbs, 7lb 3oz 3rd: Kyle Marsh, 7lb 3oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: SPANISH 1st: Bryce Hill, 4lb 12oz 2nd: Curtis Mooney, 4lb 6oz 3rd: John Swanson, 4lb 5oz RECREATIONAL DIVISION: TROUT 1st: Bryce Hill, 7lb 1oz 2nd: George Marquer, 6lb 10oz 3rd: Matt Sims, 6lb 3oz YOUTH DIVISION: AMBERJACK 1st: Caleb Joiner, 26lb 8oz 2nd: Jake Williams, 26lb 5oz 3rd: Shelby Whiting, 19lb 7oz. YOUTH DIVISION: KINGFISH 1st: Hunter Heydenreich, 20lb 5oz 2nd: Owen Bearden, 13lb 4oz 3rd: Wade Rainey, 11lb 5oz YOUTH DIVISION: REDFISH 1st: Carson Falk, 5lb 15oz 2nd: Hunter Bennett Hyatt, 5lb 1oz 3rd: Lyric Oaks, 4lb 11oz YOUTH DIVISION: SPANISH 1st: Austin Williams, 3lb 6oz 2nd: Chance Murphy, 2lb 7oz 3rd: Skye McKinney, 2lb 6oz YOUTH DIVISION: TROUT 1st: Maverick Stubbs, 4lb 0oz 2nd: Casey Koon, 3lb 7oz 3rd: Charles Troy Jr, 3lb 4oz YOUTH DIVISION: FLOUNDER 1st: Maverick Stubbs, 2lb 13oz 2nd: Cole Baggett, 1lb 12oz 3rd: Fincher Davis, 1lb 8oz YOUTH DIVISION: GROUPER 1st: Tyler Cureton, 13lb 0oz 2nd: Brandon Whiting, 12lb 15oz 3rd: Jake Williams, 12lb 10oz YOUTH DIVISION: ROCK BASS 1st: Macy Coddington, 1lb 14oz 2nd: Charlie Johnson, 1lb 9oz 3rd: Chance Allen, 1lb 7oz KAYAK DIVISION: FLOUNDER 1st: Benjamin Colona, 1lb 10oz 2nd: Brandon Nichols, 1lb 4oz KAYAK DIVISION: REDFISH 1st: Robert Baker, 7lb 8oz 2nd: Greg Blakney, 7lb 2oz 3rd: Austin Burroughs, 6lb 11oz KAYAK DIVISION: TROUT 1st: Chris Clark York, 4lb 0oz 2nd: Brad Mook, 3lb 14oz 3rd: Paul Nichols, 3lb 13oz PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Scott, seersucker and shadows By DARA KAM AND BRANDON LARABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 25 The Capitol crowd blended a air for fashion into the mix of the sessions penultimate week, creating a bright and cheery impression as more sober discussions about pot, immigration and state nances intensi ed. Lawmakers drew and erased lines in the sand about the two chambers spending plans and a variety of other issues, handing off the thorniest subjects to the budget chiefs, Rep. Seth McKeel and Sen. Joe Negron. And, as the session clock seemed to wind down more rapidly, Gov. Rick Scott waded into the fray on two high-prole issues --medical marijuana and in-state tuition for undocumented immigrants. Legislators, lobbyists and staffers wound up a week of sartorial sidetracks with a nod to Southern elegance on Friday in the guise of Seersucker Day, an annual celebration of the puckered cotton cloth evocative of Tennessee Williams that felt and looked oh-so-comfy as the humidity began to climb. Two days earlier, the Capitol burst into bloom as those with the most re ned tastes paid homage to the late Palm Beach fashionista, Lilly Pulitzer, in pastel shades of green and pink. Sandwiched in between on Thursday, the more rebelminded slipped on ostrich, alligator or plain old cowhide to kick some boot on yet another tailor-made legislative day. SCOTT STEPS OUT FROM THE SHADOWS Scotts support for in-state tuition rates for students who dont have authorization to be in the country is a major turnaround from the Republican who promised to bring an Arizona-style immigration law to Florida in his rst bid for governor. The proposal, a top priority of House Speaker Will Weatherford, is stuck in the Senate, where Negron, the appropriations chairman, refused to slate it for a committee hearing this week. Early in the session, Democrats joined moderate and Weatherfordfaithful House Republicans to pass the measure, a higher-ed hodgepodge that also would scale back from 15 to 6 percent the annual amount universities can hike tuition without the Legislatures approval. Scott had been mum until recently on the part of the bill that would allow undocumented immigrant students to pay in-state tuition rates as long as they attend four years of secondary school in the state. Instead, the governor had focused on lowering tuition for all students, something he has pushed by asking colleges to provide four-year degrees for $10,000 and by telling universities to forego tuition increases. But on Tuesday, Scotts ofce arranged a hastily called press conference after a move to get the issue onto the oor stalled in the Senate Appropriations Committee. For Floridas students, its extremely disappointing, Scott told reporters outside his of ce. We have 21 Senate sponsors, we have four other senators that have voted for this in committee assignments this needs to get to the oor of the Senate. Children brought to this country by their parents deserve the same opportunities of all children, Scott said. Whatever country you were born in whatever family or ZIP code you ought to have the chance to live the dream. Senate bill sponsor Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, has insisted he has enough votes to pass the measure half the members of the Senate have formally signed on as co-sponsors if he could get it to the oor. Late in the week, Latvala said he believes the bill will come up for a vote during the last week of session. A separate immigrationrelated issue popped up in the Senate, telegraphing the popularity of Latvalas proposal in the chamber. With a 25-12 vote Friday, the Senate passed a measure (HB 755) that would allow certain undocumented immigrants to gain admission to The Florida Bar. The vote count likely mirrors a Senate oor vote on the in-state tuition proposal. The bill is aimed at helping Jose Godinez-Samperio, who came to the United States at age 9 from Mexico, graduated from law school at Florida State University and passed the Bar exam more than two years ago. Last month, the Supreme Court unanimously ruled that undocumented immigrants like Godinez-Samperio cannot be admitted to The Florida Bar and called on the Legislature to change state law to allow so-called Dreamers to become attorneys. The bill approved Friday would give the Supreme Court the ability to admit Bar applicants who were brought to the state as minors and have been residents of Florida for more than 10 years. Weatherford said late Thursday he supports the measure and that there is plenty of time left for the issue to be resolved and sent to Scott, who did not directly answer when asked whether he backs the bill. This case demonstrates how broken our federal immigration laws are. Stories like this are why I am ghting to keep tuition low for every Florida student who wants to follow their dreams right here in our state, Scott said in a statement. SCOTT COMES OUT OF THE SHADOWS, SORT OF The governor this week also staked out a position on a hybrid of marijuana known as Charlottes Web that many believe can dramatically reduce life-threatening seizures in children with a rare form of epilepsy. Parents of the children, some in wheelchairs, have repeatedly made tearful pleas during committee hearings and in private meetings with lawmakers while recounting the drama of the form of the disease that does not respond to other treatments and can cause hundreds of seizures per day. The issue has become one of the hottest topics of the 2014 session. Many atrst reluctant GOP lawmakers have rallied around the substance after hearing emotionally charged testimony from parents whose children suffer hundreds of seizures per month. But other Republicans are concerned that the proposals en route to the chamber oors could wrongly give the public the idea that the lawmakers support a constitutional amendment on the November ballot that would allow doctors to order traditional marijuana for severely ill patients. The House and Senate have been working toward common ground on making available a form of marijuana that is high in cannabidiol (CBD) and low in euphoria-inducing tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). On Monday, the House Judiciary Committee approved a plan that includes language proposed by Scott, who wants to limit the use of the drug to clinical trials. The bill (HB 843) would create an Of ce of Compassionate Use within the Department of Health that would enhance access to investigational new drugs for Florida patients through approved clinical treatment plans or studies. Studies on investigational new drugs are the first step in the Food and Drug Administration approval process. Under Scotts plan, the Of ce of Compassionate Use could create a network of state universities and medical centers and apply to the FDA or a drug manufacturer for a study. The House measure also includes $1 million for the clinical studies. As a father and a grandfather, I cannot imagine what it would be like to have a family member suffering. We want to make sure those suffering get access to treatments in the fastest possible way. And that is why we have proposed language to ensure the safety of our children and have been working with the Legislature to see it included in the nal bill, Scott said in an e-mail Tuesday. The House sponsor balked at the restrictions proposed by Scott. Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach, wanted a more free-market approach but bowed to the Senates preference for a vertical distribution system where growers would also serve as manufacturers and distributors. The two chambers still havent ironed out all the kinks, however. The governors suggestions are good. Weve taken those suggestions but were thinking a little bolder, Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach, said Monday evening. I would like to do that and have little kids who cant get into a clinical trial still have their lives saved. The Senate is slated to take up its approach to medical marijuana (SB 1030) on Monday. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott calls for the Senate to vote on a bill that would offer in-state tuition rates to undocumented immigrants. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This session will not end peacefully if that bill does not get a vote on the Senate oor. I dont think anyones operating under any alternative illusion. So they can posture and dream in Technicolor all they want, but this issue will come up on the Senate oor or this session will melt down. Sen. Tom Lee, R-Brandon, discussing the in-state tuition issue. WHITES WINESDrinking wine in bourbon countryBy DAVID WHITEFor two minutes each May, the world turns its attention to Churchill Downs for the Kentucky Derby. Wine enthusiasts visiting Louisville for the race might expect a city thats fueled by bourbon, bourbon, and more bourbon -along with some fresh mint and sugar for the occasional julep, of course. But like a growing number of small American cities, a vibrant wine culture has emerged. The Louisville wine scene has evolved dramatically over the last 10 years, said David DuBou of Vintner Select, one of the regions top distributors. Louisville has come a long way from mostly being about big-name California brands. The embrace of the independent producer who makes unique, terroir-driven wines has slowly taken center stage. On a recent visit to Louisville, I was oored by the citys wine offerings. Louisvilles retailers, sommeliers, and consumers seemed eager to drink with an open mind and an open palate. The first sign that bourbon country had embraced wine country came during lunch at Harvest, a casual restaurant dedicated to southern comfort food. While farm to table has become a clich, Harvest is the real deal; 80 percent of its ingredients come from within 100 miles. Just as telling? Harvests list was adorned by a quote by New York Times wine critic Eric Asimov: Heres my resolution for 2014: Drink adventurously. As my trip to Louisville continued, it seemed as if everyone had taken Asimovs advice to heart. A few doors down from Harvest sat a tiny retailer, Taste Fine Wines and Bourbons. Given the locale, I assumed bourbon would be the focus. But the bourbon was in the back of the store, with a small-butthoughtful selection of wines up front. Impressively, the store carried wine from Bedrock Wine Company. The proprietor, Morgan Twain-Peterson, sources his grapes from some of Californias oldest vines and makes his wine using old-fashioned techniques. If the store had carried impossible-to-find bourbon like Pappy Van Winkle, I would have been surprised. But when I saw Bedrock, I was shocked. When I praised this retailer, DuBou wasnt fazed. Louisville is blessed with several amazing and progressive independent retailer owners, who devote a great deal of time to educating, he said. Our wine professionals believe theres an obligation to help drinkers know more about wine, keep an open and adventurous mind, and keep it weird. The third sign of Louisvilles exciting wine scene came at Rye. Recently called one of the nations New Whiskey Temples by GQ, I knew the restaurant would take booze seriously and expected to nd an impressive selection of small-batch whiskeys. I didnt expect an accessible and eclectic wine list that would electrify any wine geek. Decca, a restaurant that has effortlessly combined West Coast cuisine with Kentucky charm, provided another data point. The list had Txakoli, the slightly sparkling white from Spains Basque Country that has become popular among New York City sommeliers. It had wine from Romain Papilloud, an acclaimed Swiss producer. It offered wine from Francois Chidaine, a Loire Valley vintner that oenophiles adore. And it had an extensive selection of grower Champagne. Made by the farmers who grow the grapes, these wines offer a refreshing alternative to big brands like Veuve Clicquot. Another sign came at Proof on Main. On offer was wine from Abe Schoener, the iconoclastic California winemaker who once taught ancient Greek philosophy at St. Johns College. One wouldnt miss 610 Magnolia while visiting Louisville; its been considered the citys best restaurant for years. While I expected a solid list, I didnt expect a well-curated selection that would rival top restaurants in major cities. Louisville will forever be the heart of bourbon country. But like so many other cities, its residents have started drinking wine adventurously. David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 11B American Asking Assigned Attic Brought Crest Crews Crust Dearly Eighty Exotic Fists Float Flown HopedIdenti cationIntend Magnet Nines Noises Nurse Orderly Organisms Porch Pronounced Rafts Rather ReportingResponsibilityReveal Roast Rolls Seesaw Select Settle Shots Stray Threw Uncle Visitor Wanted Wishes Worry The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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(850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 Call Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and InsuredTree Trimming Special Touch Cleaning Service Polly Nichols Construction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon for ages 1-100 Facial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsColor PermsFeather LocksHighlights Cuts Low Lights STYLESFOR MEN & WOMEN 850 926-6020 Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLESaturday May 3, 8 a.m. Yard Sale. Until. Large variety of items. 196 Magnolia Ridge North LAKEFRONT Mobile Home on 300 foot lot along Lake Ellen Dr at boat ramp. 14 ft wide, 2 Br/1Ba, Screen porch, CHA, kitchen equiped $80,000 (850) 576-2695 P/T Church Pianist and Pastors Assistant seeking church to serve Retired husband &wife team,very experienced & Inter-denominational salary & mileage reqd (850) 878-3850 NURSING CAREERSbegin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 Wildlife TechnicianFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Aucilla Wildlife Mgt. Area Jefferson County $27,482.52 Annual, Operate Heavy Equipment, Perform Road and Facility Maintenance, Conduct Controlled Burns and Wildlife Surveys. Applications must be completed online at: https://jobs.myflori da.com/ For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer JOB CLOSES MAY 8TH DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (1-888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 877-741-9260 www .fixjet s.com OWN YOUR own Medical Alert Company. Be the 1st and Only Distributor in your area! Unlimited $ return. Small investment required. Call toll free 1-844-225-1200. CRAWFORDVILLESaturday May 3, 8 a.m. Yard Sale. Until. Large variety of items. 196 Magnolia Ridge North PANACEA MOVING SALE Saturday 9a-4p 51 Sunrise Lane Wanted: Refrigerator Single door, Good Condition (850) 926-9540 PANACEARent to Own 3BR doublewide Mobile Home. $600 +deposit (850) 926-9540 LAKEFRONT Mobile Home on 300 foot lot along Lake Ellen Dr at boat ramp. 14 ft wide, 2 Br/1Ba, Screen porch, CHA, kitchen equiped $80,000 (850) 576-2695 CRAWFORDVILLETownhouse for Rent 2BD, /2 BA $800. mo. (850) 933-5242 NEAR BOONE, NC 2+/-ac. tract 350ft of rushing streams 3000ft elevation private and secluded underground utilities and paved roads from only $9900. Call 1-877-717-5273ext91 194 Carousel Circle This lovely, very well maintained 2-story, 1-car garage home built in 2008 features 1674 sq.ft., 3BR, 2.5 BA. Bright and open floor plan. Spacious living area. Kitchen with bar. Stainless steel appliances. Beautiful wood cabinets. Inside laundry room. Separate shower and jetted tub in the master bathroom. Fenced in. Mariana D. Doseanu, Realtor, Keller Williams Realty (850)339-5671 RE ADVERTISEMENTSeasonal EmploymentParks & Facilities Management Dept. APPLICATIONANDSEC.DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACEAVAILABLE2 Br 1 Ba Duplex, $625 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Hs, $1,000 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $775 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $875 mo. 4 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $900 mo. 2 Br 2 1/2 Ba T wnhs, $775 mo. 3 Br 2 Ba Hs, $1,100 mo.1500 sq ft $1500 mo. Crawfordville 700 sq ft $700 mo. Tallahassee RENTALS: C OMMERCIAL Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. FREEESTIMATESWorry Free withA to Z850 -889-0989License # CCC1328414 Renegades VAPESHOPof The GulfTRY VAPING forFREEVisit our RELAXING ROOM to TRY UNLIMITED FLAVORS... forFREE!Owned & Operated by Casey Hodges & son Chris Hodges, formerly of Bayside Seafood Restaurant PanaceaBring in this ad for $1 OFF 10 ml or $3 OFF 30 ml E-Juice 8503010 B Crawfordville Hwy., Downtown Crawfordville 8AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDS!TWO BIGMAY 2 & 3MAY 16 & 17 MAY DAYSYARD SALES NOW HIRING!Laborer needed immediately for local established company. Room for advancement. Call F red at 850-251-21 36. 1346 SHADEVILLE HIGHWAYWOW! Seriously beautiful 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath brand new luxuryhome by PAFFORD CONSTRUCTION! All the upgrades you expect from PAFFORD CONSTRUCTION: Granite countertops, stainless appliances, nail down wood oors, gorgeous stepped up trey ceilings, exquisite trim package, tile in the laundry room and bathrooms, carpet in the bedrooms and a screened in porch. Oversized 1.69 acre lot, double car garage, plusgas replace. Come by andview this unbelievable home! Asking $219,900. Dir.: South on Hwy. 319 to Crawfordville, L across from Hardees to Shadeville Hwy., home on left before Spring Creek Intersection COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. The Wakulla news Pelican Post Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADSStarting at just $12.00 a week! 877-676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 13B Retire to Kentuckys BlueGrass Country! Enjoy maintenance free living! BRAND NEW LUXURY HOMES Beautiful 3 BR, 3 BA, 1,800 sf, from the low $200s. Lowest price per sq ft in the area! Mild climate, low taxes, minutes to shopping, dining, medical & Keeneland Horse Racing. Perfect for retirement/2nd home. Call now for details: 877-333-2412, x 121 SugarT r ee Homes.com AUCTION Custom Home on 145 acres and 16 Home Sites at Lake Guntersville Some selling Absolute Scottsboro, AL Saturday May 17th 10:00am www .t arget auction.com 800 473-3939 djacobs#5060 LOANS FOR LANDLORDS! We Finance From 5-500 Units As Low As 5.5 %. 1-4 Family, Townhome, Condos OK. Contact B2R: 1-855-940-0227 www.B2R Finance.com BAYSIDE MARINA PANACEA2014 Slip Rental Option 6 Month @ $100 Month Due in Full 1 Month @ $150 Month 2273 Surf Rd Panacea Info 850-222-5865 baysideslip s @gmail.com WINTONS POOL SERVICES LET US HELPTAKE THE HASSLE OUT OF YOUR SUMMER FUN Certified & Reliable Tony 850-284-2205 P/T Church Pianist and Pastors Assistant seeking church to serve Retired husband &wife team,very experienced & Inter-denominational salary & mileage reqd (850) 878-3850 5039-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Wedding Belles Photo of Tallahassee located at 10376 Crystalline Ct., Tallahassee, Florida 32305, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Tallahassee, FL, this 21 day of April, 2014. /s/ Stacy Prato /s/ Meredyth Hall Owners Published May 1, 2014. 5046-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Cooter Stew Cafe located at 859 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, FL 32355, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 14 day of April, 2014. /s/ John S. Gunter Owner Published May 1, 2014. 5047-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Little Blue Daisy located at 21 Meadowlark Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 24 day of April, 2014. /s/ Jeanette Villa Owner Published May 1, 2014. 5043-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE : School Board Policy 2.95*+ -Wellness Program PURPOSE AND EFFECT : To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures LEGAL AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: PL 108-265, Section 204 National School Lunch Act (42 USC 1751 et seq.) Child Nutrition Act of 1966 (42 USC 1771 et seq.) 1004.43, 1006.06, 1006.0606, Florida Statutes ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent REVISION APPROVED BY : Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELDTIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: June 16, 2014 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 May 1, 2014. 5044-0501 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE : School Board Policy 2.90 -Tobacco Use in District Facilities PURPOSE AND EFFECT : To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures LEGAL AUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 386.201 -386.209, 1001.43, Florida Statutes ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent REVISION APPROVED BY : Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, A HEARING WILL BE HELDTIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: June 16, 2014 A COPY OF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAY BE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board Post Office Box 100, 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 May 1, 2014. 5036-0501 TWN vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Parcel 2) 2012-CA-000409 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Par cel 2: 1384 Coastal Highway, Panacea, Florida Lot 7, Block A of the Town of Panacea as shown per plat thereof of record on Page 7 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla, County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop produces, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The Term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbearance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. 5037-0501 TWN vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Beverage License) 2012-CA-000409 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described Beverage License situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Beverage License : Alcoholic Beverage License Number #BEV7500231 (the Beverage License) More particularly described in UCC financing statement filed with the Florida Secured Transaction Registry, at filing number 200901465958 pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbearance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; TRIPLETAIL INVESTMENTS, INC., a Florida corporation, d/b/a WAKULLA DISCOUNT LIQUORS; RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO; and THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000409 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of Feb., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA [SEAL OF THE COURT] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk April 24 & May 1, 2014. 5038-0501 TWN vs. Kane, Georgia L. 13000236CAAXMX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000236CAAXMX CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2, Plaintiff, vs. GEORGIA L. KANE, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment dated April 8, 2014, entered in Civil Case Number 13000236CAAXMX, in the Circuit Court for Wakulla, Florida, wherein CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2 is the Plaintiff, and GEORGIA L. KANE, et al, are the Defendants, Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Wakulla Florida, described as: THE FOLLOWING REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF WAKULLA, STATE OF FLORIDA: LOT 5, BLOCK A, HAMMOCK WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM. on the 15th day of May, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: April 9, 2014. Wakulla County Clerk of Court CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC 4855 Technology Way, Suite 500, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (727) 446-4826 April 24 & May 1, 2014. CA 13-02556 /DB 5040-0508 TWN vs. Costantino, Damian F. 2013-CA-000182 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000182 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Damian F. Costantino and Sharla Costantino, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE 5041-0508 TWN vs. Hagan Jr., Howard 12000482CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 12000482CAAXMX OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN, JR. AND KIM HAGAN A/K/A KIM COX A/K/A, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Sept. 10, 2013, and entered in 12000482CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is the Plaintiff and HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN, JR.; KIM HAGAN A/K/A KIM COX A/K/A KIM WYNETTE COX; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/A HOWARD C. HAGAN, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM HAGAN A/K/A KIM COX A/K/A KIM WYNETTE COX; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at 11:00 AM on May 22, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 43, THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 790.93 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-368, THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 463.32 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND SAID CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH A RADIUS OF 1860.07 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 25 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 355.71 FEET, CORD OF SAID ARC BEING 58 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 355.17 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 265.90 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 282.15 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF APPALOOSA ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 329.38 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH A RADIUS OF 50.32 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 38 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 78.63 FEET, CORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 27 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 70.84 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF PALOMINO ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 232.19 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 379.35 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 17th day of April, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By: Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL 33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-910-0902 May 1 & 8, 2014. 13-10770 5042-0508 TWN vs. Rose, Paula C. 65-2012-CA-000114 Re-Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000114 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; Plaintiff, vs. PAULA C. ROSE, ET. AL.; Defendants RE-NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale dated April 22, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000114 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff and M PAULA C. ROSE, ET AL; are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 IN ACCORDANCE WITH CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATTUES, AT 11:00 AM, May 29, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:: LOT 2, BLOCK B, HUDSON HEIGHTS, ADDITION TO CRAWFORDVILLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 15 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 24 OCHLOCKONEE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, this 23rd day of April, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Circuit Court (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk MARINOSCI LAW GROUP, P.C., Attorney for Plaintiff 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Suite 1045, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Phone: (954) 644-8704 May 1 & 8, 2014 11-10749 5048-0509 TWN vs. Montgomery, Michael W. 2012-CA-0483 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION Case No. 2012-CA-0483 Bank of America, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. Michael W. Montgomery; Andrea N. Montgomery, Any and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; Clerk of the Court for Wakulla County, Florida; and Tenant, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 22, 2014, entered in Case No. 2012-CA-0483 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Michael W. Montgomery; Andrea N. Montgomery; Any and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, devisees, grantees, or other claimants; Clerk of the Court for Wakulla County, Florida; and Tenant are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the May 22, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 38 AND 39, IN BLOCK 20, OF WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT THREE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 43 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 23 day of April, 2014. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brock & Scott PLLC, 1501 NW 49th St, Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309 Attorney for Plaintiff May 1 & 8, 2014. 13-F05584 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 15, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000182 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Damian F. Costantino and Sharla Costantino, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on May 22, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 19, RUBY HILLS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700, (561) 998-6707 May 1 & 8, 2014. 13-257973 FC02 CHE 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit. 3/2, ,$975. mo., $975 Deposit. 3/2 $950 Mo., $950 Deposit, No smoking, pets negotiable. Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., mo. No smoking, No pets.25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated comSmoking, No Pets. B5 Marina Village 2BR/2BA on Mashes Sands Rd., 2-story Condo, Fully Fur695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/ No smoking, No pets. 57 Fairway Ct. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEE O REN YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 12345 6789 10111213 14 15 16 1718 19 20 21 2223 24 25 26 27 28 293031 323334 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 4647 48 495051 5253 54 55 56 5758 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 Across 1 Capital of Idaho 6 Not many 10 Pollution problem 14 Between March and May 15 Hayworth or Moreno 16 Soap opera plot device, often 17 It keeps you cool in summer 19 Kitchen cooker 20 Approximately 21 Pool stick 22 Courageous 24 "I don't think so" 25 Hollywood legend ___ West 26 Keller or Mirren 27 Split ___ soup 28 Give a hoot 29 Car's navigation system, for short 32 Diet, casually 35 Puzzle with a "finish" you must get to 36 Round shape 37 Makes a mistake 38 Asked, as a question 39 One gender 40 Votes against 41 Cain's brother 42 Ate out 43 Muhammad in the ring 44 Eye part that's also a flower 45 Ancient Egypt's King ___ 46 Rafael of tennis fame 48 Papa 49 Take all of, as the blankets 52 Traffic 54 Common container 55 Move slowly 56 Army rank: abbr. 57 Cary Grant in "North by Northwest," for example 60 Have ___ (enjoy good times) 61 Waffle brand 62 On your toes 63 Soprano or Bennett 64 Defeat 65 Extra benefits at work Down 1 Food that comes in strips 2 Mozart work, often 3 Like people from Dublin 4 Farm building 5 Quarterback Manning 6 Bicker 7 ___ and drum (Colonial Era instruments) 8 Greek letter 9 Roamed far and wide 10 Make a goal or a basket 11 Vehicle stuffed with furniture 12 Sign of what's to come 13 Scary group 18 "March Madness" org. 23 Ginger ___ 25 Was introduced to 26 Eye color 27 Throw the football 28 Book holders 30 Ashen 31 Wintertime fun 32 Singing great Horne 33 Spoken 34 What you might cook 1-Down in 35 Company that merged with Exxon 36 Leave out 38 Like lines that never meet 42 Firecracker that doesn't go off 44 Actress Lupino 45 Cab 47 Feeling nervous 48 Extinct birds 49 Marge Simpson's husband 50 ___ Mountains (Springfield, Missouri is there) 51 Fellas 52 "Beat it!" 53 Shakespeare villain 54 Grocery store "Paper or plastic?" items 55 Stare 58 Self-importance 59 SnoozeEach puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 12 3 4 451 6127 58 43 96 7852 2648 518 1974 00 9 HometownContent 172 8936 4 5 389456217 645127839 528 649371 931572486 467381592 793 264158 254718963 816935724 BOISE AFEW SMOG APRIL RITA COMA CEILINGFAN OVEN ORSO CUE DARING NAH MAE HELEN PEA CARE GPS LOFAT MAZE OVAL ERRS POSED MALE NAYS ABEL DINED ALI IRIS TUT NADAL DAD HOG SIGNAL BOX OOZE CAPT LEADINGMAN AGAS EGGO ALERT TONY LOSS PERKS PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; TRIPLETAIL INVESTMENTS, INC., a Florida corporation, d/b/a WAKULLA DISCOUNT LIQUORS; RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES AND TOBACCO; and THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000409 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of Feb., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA [SEAL OF THE COURT] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk April 24 & May 1, 2014. 5035-0501 TWN vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Lot 29) 2012-CA-000411 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Pr operty Lot 29, and the East 1/2 of Lot 30, Section B of Ochlockonee shores, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 16 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbearance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; Defendants. and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000411 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 5045-0508 TWN 5/17 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 17th, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouses containing personal property of: ADRIANNE BOONE Before the sale date of May 17th, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. Publish: May 1 & 8, 2014. 5010-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 017 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1015 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 30-2S-01E-000-04952-002 Description of property: 30-2S-1E P-5-2-M-70 PARCEL CONTAINING 1 ACRE OR 74 P 54 & OR 96 P 484 OR 150 P 143 Name in which assessed __ SAMUEL LEE SCOTT JR & P A TRICIA ANN SCOTT Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. 5011-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 018 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 942 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 07-6S-01W-026-04663-000 Description of property: OCHLOCKNEE SHORES SECTION B LOT 12 DB 52 P 117 & OR 99 P 937 OR 169 P 855 OR 290 P 850 OR 601 P 380 Name in which assessed _MAR THA S & HAROLD A HALL JR Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. 5012-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EMILE JUSTIN MEYER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 981 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 09-6S-01W-000-04864-003 Description of property: 96S-1W P-1-3-M-60-1 LYING IN SEC 9-6S-1W OR 77 P624 Name in which assessed _SYCAMORE CREEK INC Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. 5013-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 020 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US Bank the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2104 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 00-00-077-000-10322-003 Description of property: LOT 77 HS P-33-3-M-21B IN NW 1/4 OF LOT 77 HS OR 66 P 174 & OR 72 P 315 OR 102 P 22 & 23 Name in which assessed G & S Inc. of T allahassee Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk 5014-0501 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that USAmeriBank the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 93 Date of Issuance May 27th, 2010 Parcel # 25-2S-02W-000-01423-006 Description of property: 25-2S-2W P-5-6-M-45 COMM. AT THE NE COR. OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC. 25 PARCEL CONT. .55 ACRE M/L OR 242 P 475 OR 365 P 437 Name in which assessed _Neal & T racy White Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: March 12, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of Feb., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA [SEAL OF THE COURT] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk April 24 & May 1, 2014. By: Carla M. Ziemer, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 Page 15B 1. GEOGRAPHY: What two bodies of water does the Strait of Hormuz link? 2. MEDICINE: What would a patient with ankylosis be suffering from? 3. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel Mrs. Dalloway? 4. FAMOUS QUOTES: What famous military leader once said, Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever? 5. AD SLOGANS: What companys logo advised consumers to put a tiger in your tank? 6. TELEVISION: What phrase was on the UFO poster in Agent Mulders office in The X-Files? 7. MOVIES: What kind of candy did the boy use to lure the extraterrestrial in E.T.? 8. LANGUAGE: A jarhead is slang for what kind of military personnel? 9. MUSIC: What kind of musical instrument is a sitar? 10. GEOLOGY: What kind of landform is described as a flat-topped hill with steep sides? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Persian Gulf and Gulf of Oman 2. A stiff joint 3. Virginia Woolf 4. Napoleon Bonaparte 5. Esso/Exxon 6. I Want to Believe 7. Reeses Pieces 8. A U.S. Marine 9. A lute 10. A butte Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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By BILL WARGOSpecial to The News The Gulf of Mexico sea turtle season begins on May 1 and ends Oct. 31. Of the seven sea turtle species in the world, Florida gets ve of them -loggerheads, green sea turtles, leatherbacks, Kemps Ridleys, and hawksbills. All are threatened or endangered, the Kemps Ridley being the rarest and most endangered in the world. The loggerhead is by far the most common turtle found on Alligator Point. The Alligator Point Sea Turtle Patrol (APSTP) is directed by Bill Wargo under Florida Wildlife Commission marine turtle permit #151. Several trained and dedicated volunteers are also listed on the permit and can be seen every morning at dawn patrolling for nests and at other times when the hatchlings emerge or when rescuing or releasing stranded turtles. Educating the public is another important function of APSTP whether at a nest site or participating in presentations, exhibits, or media events. The FWC marine turtle program is one of the best and most successful wildlife conservation operations in both the nation and world. As part of that program APSTP has the responsibility of monitoring, protecting, marking, and reporting all sea turtle nesting and related activities. All sea turtles are protected by federal and state laws. Only trained and permitted individuals can legally touch nesting sea turtles, hatchlings, or their nests. The average number of nests on Alligator Point is around 25 per season. Approximately 90-120 hatchlings emerge from a single nest after an incubation period of 60-65 days. It is important to allow hatchlings to crawl to sea on their own as that is how they map into their instinctive memories the characteristics of the beach enabling them to return to it 30 years later to nest. It is commonly believed by biologists that only one in 1,000 hatchlings will survive. When visiting Alligator Point, please help us protect our sea turtles, other wildlife, and their habitats. Please remember a few simple things to protect these magni cent creatures and their habitats: 1. Keep the beach dark. Do not use ashlights unless covered with a red lter. 2. Turn off all outside lights from 9 p.m. to 7 a.m. 3. Close drapes/ blinds of windows that can be seen from the beach. 4. No bon res on the beach. 5. No vehicles on the beach. 6. Remind neighbors to turn off their outside lights. 7. Do not use ash if taking pictures. 8. Do not allow pets, children, or anyone else to disturb turtles or their nests. 9. Please remove furniture, umbrellas, and other obstacles from the beach at night. 10. Pick up trash and debris that you see along the beaches, and be sure not to leave your own trash behind. 11. Give nesting sea turtles plenty of space and observe them from a distance. 12. Take care not to step on hatchlings heading to the water and let them crawl down the beach on their own. 13.While boating, take care not to strike sea turtles. 14.Report any stranded, injured, or dead sea turtles to APSTP at (850) 567-5369. You can follow APSTP at https://www. facebook.com/AlligatorPointSeaTurtlePatrol. Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 1, 2014 thewakullanews.comAlligator Points Sea Turtle Patrol is active PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHatchlings on the beach at Alligator Point, above. APSTP Patroller Bill Wargo releasing a Kemps Ridley at Alligator Point. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2013. Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage are HMO plans with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage depends on contract renewal. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., seven days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_DP 610 CMS Accepted 12252013 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield AssociationLive Well. Choose Well. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd and at 5:30 p.m. on Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQA May 9 M ay 23 May 8 June 12 July 10 June 13 June 27 July 11 July 25 Give her the gift of this Mothers DaynewsThe WakullaONLY $ 27FOR ONE YEAR Promo Code: MOM Expires: 05-16-14Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:www.TheWakullaNews.com1-877-401-6408 Please accept my new 1 Year subscription at the price of $27* Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $20.14. Local delivery area only.The Wakulla newsSign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the ofce. Name ______________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________State ___Zip ________________ Phone# ( ) _______Cell Phone# ( ) ________E-mail _______________________ Credit Card _________-_________-_________-_________ Exp. _______3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. WE ARE HEREFOR YOU For more Information and to Schedule a Portfolio ReviewTrustYourPlan.comBob Beargie, Wealth Advisorbob.beargie@raymondjames.com 850-562-6702Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS.The Raymond James Wealth Advisors at Gulf Winds are ready to help you create a Life Well Planned. Conveniently located in Crawfordville, we offer the nancial strength of Raymond James and the reliability of being local. If you would like to get started with your nancial plan, or if you just need a second opinion, give us a call. We are here for you.1447 Mahan Drive Tallahassee, FL 32308