Wakulla news

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Wakulla news
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Our 119th Year, 17th Issue
Thursday, April 24, 2014


Published Weekly, Read Daily
Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Lady War Eagles

win

district

championship

F1 'IS] H

Two Sections

75 Cents


Wakulla Environmental



Institute moving forward


The first

building of

WEI will

be open in

June 2015

By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

A Wakulla
County
institu-
tion spe-
cializing in envi-
ronmental studies
must be organically
designed to embody
the biodiversity
that surrounds it.
Construction of the
first building of Talla-
hassee Community Col-
lege's newest entity-
Wakulla Environmental
Institute will begin in
June, and is projected to
wrap in spring of 2015.
Bob Ballard, execu-
tive director of WEI, has
worked with the board of
trustees to plan a high-
tech campus in an old
Florida setting.

THE PROPERTY

While the building is
thoughtfully designed,
just as much learning
will occur outside the in-
stitute's walls. WEI cur-


10oJ--L MF--


AV; t



An architect's rendering of Wakulla Environmental Institute, above, and
WEI Executive Director Bob Ballard, below, at a presentation last year.


rently owns 158 acres
nestled east of U.S. 319,
3.2 miles south of Craw-
fordville, just south of
River of Life Church.
The land is a biodiverse
sampler of ecosystems
- sinkholes and caves,
flowering fields, plant-
ed pine, swamps, and
dense, green forest.
WEI's location had to
reflect its mission, Bal-


lard said.
"We are here to teach
about the environment
and help people under-
stand and work with the
environment, because
we're surrounded by a
million acres of conser-
vation land," Ballard
said. "This is the fifth
most biodiverse hot spot
in North America. That's
outrageous! What else


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS


A sinkhole on the WEI property.


could you have here
but an environmental
institute?"
Ballard said another
property was already
selected when the land-
owner approached WEI
directors about a pos-
sible sale. When he saw
the current property,
Ballard said he experi-
enced a profound "this
is it" moment. WEI paid
$382,000 budgeted by
TCC for the 158 acres.
"It was a home run for
us," Ballard said.
Over time, WEI direc-
tors want to purchase a
total of 250 more acres.
Ballard said the board
is seeking private dona-
tions to buy the rest of
property, which will cost
about $2 million.
Ballard said two years
ago the Florida Legisla-
ture directed $4.5 mil-
lion to pay for the insti-
tute's first building.
"The legislature put
that in play, and the
Governor did not veto it,"
Ballard said. "Because
this is an environmental
teaching institution, and
because of the economic
value WEI will bring in,
I believe in (Gov. Rick
Scott's) mind, it means
jobs for Wakulla Coun-
ty."
Ballard said when the
property was purchased,
no one realized a mas-
sive cave system snaked
beneath it. The cave is
estimated to be 80 feet
wide and 60 feet tall.
Turn to Page 10A


Sheriff Creel


talks budget


with board
Says $400,000 in cuts have been
made, and expects to return
$350,000 to county at end of year
By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@(thewakullanews.net

Sheriff Charlie Creel spoke on the Wakulla
County Sheriffs Office budget issues at the
Wakulla County Board of Commissioners
meeting on April 21. Creel highlighted points of
interest on this year's budget, and elaborated
on plans for next year's budget, which will be
presented in the next week or two.
The sheriff said last year, the board asked the
WCSO to cut three positions, and $150,000 out
of the 2014-15 budget. Creel said WCSO has cut
seven positions, and $400,000 out of budget.
-- He added that the
vacant positions were
not refilled. WCSO
Public Information Of-
ficer Keith Blackmar
explained that vacant
positions include a
communications offi-
cer, road patrol deputy,
correctional assistant,
maintenance worker,
detective, IT officer and
correctional officer.
The completion of
Sheriff Charlie Creel a staffing study will
make clear if the WCSO
has too much staff, or not enough to create a
safe environment.
Turn to Page 3A


OBITUARIES
Jeremy Shane Brown
Dorothy Ruth Clarke
William Russell 'Rusty' Fowler Jr.
Florence Mary Palmisano Martin
Dan E. Zemel


INDEX
Public Notices ................................................................. Page 3A
The Opinion Page ........................................................... Page 4A
Street Beat...................................................................... Page 5A
Church ............................................................................. Page 6A
Obituaries ........................................................................ Page 7A
Community .................................................................. Pages 8-9A
Outdoors ....................................................................... Page 12A
W after W ays .................................................................... Page 13A
Sheriff's Report.............................................................. Page 14A
Natural Wakulla .............................................Page 16A
Sports ............................................................................... Page 1B
Working Waterfronts exhibit....................Page 2B
W eek in W akulla .............................................................. Page 3B
W weekly Roundup...............................................................Page 4B
Thinking Outside the Book.....................Page 6B
Classifieds ........................................................................ Page 7B
Legal Notices .................................................................... Page 7B
Com ics ............................................................................ Page 1 0B
Wildlife Festival photos......................Page 11 B
Travel ............................................................................. Page 12B


Randy Merritt seeks re-election to county commission


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor@thewakullanews.net

Randy Merritt, who
has served one four-






6 184578 202154I o


year term as county
commissioner for Dis-
trict 2, announced this
week he will be seeking
re-election.
So far, no one has
filed to run against
him.
Merritt has been a
moderate on the board,
and says he has tried to
put as much common
sense as possible into
his decision-making.
During his tenure
as chairman, he said
he offered two pieces
of advice to the newer
commissioners: "Don't
take yourself so seri-
ously" and "Don't be
afraid to change your
mind."
Merritt said that he
changed his mind, for
example, on the gar-
bage issue. At first, he
said, "I was absolutely
dead-set against it."
Later, he said, he saw
the benefits of paying


NICOLE ZEMA
County Commissioner Randy Merritt


a little bit extra to pay
for the costs of closing
the landfill.


He acknowledges
that it did cost more for
those who, like he did,


hauled their garbage to
the transfer station and
sorted their recycling.
While there have been
complaints from some
residents about the
quality of the service,
he notes that there is
more recycling going
on now.
During his time as
chair, Merritt said he
worked to foster a more
civil attitude at board
meetings.
He also said he has
tried during his time on
the board to bring up
items that would pass.
If he didn't have three
votes to get approval
from the board, then
he didn't want to waste
time on it.
One of those issues
is wetlands.
The matter started
with Merritt trying to
move forward with the
board being able to
grant buffers within the


35-foot no-touch zone.
He withdrew his mo-
tion when it became
obvious that the other
commissioners weren't
going to pass it.
Instead, after study-
ing Merritt's propos-
al to allow variances,
Commissioner Richard
Harden came back with
a proposal to repeal
the county's wetlands
protection, contending
that the county's regu-
lations are duplicative
of state regulation.
That issue has
moved forward with
commissioners have
repealed the buffer in
the county's compre-
hensive growth plan,
and poised on the brink
of repealing the ordi-
nance.
At the same time, cit-
izens with the Wakulla
Wetlands Alliance have
gathered the necessary
Turn to Page 3A






Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


St. Marks, Tallahassee partner to clean up refinery site


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

Ground was broken
for a major brownfields
cleanup project at the
former site of Seminole
Asphalt Refinery in St.
Marks on Thursday,
April 17.
The project is funded
in part by a $200,000
subgrant from the City
of Tallahassee Brown-
fields Coalition, and
from the Environmen-
tal Protection Agency's
Brownfields Revolving
Loans Fund.
Upon completion of
these cleanup and re-
development activities,
the site will be referred
to as "St. Marks Inno-
vation Park" and will
accommodate commer-
cial or retail establish-
ments and enhance
economic development
in the community.
Completion of the proj-
ect is expected in 2015.
St. Marks City Man-
ager Zoe Mansfield said
the site was home to
the only refinery in the
State of Florida. St.
Marks Refinery pro-
cessed asphalt, no. 6
burner fuel, and jet
fuel. The refinery closed
in 1985, taking 127
jobs down with it.
"It was a sad day
when it closed," Mans-
field said. "We appreci-
ate the City of Talla-
hassee for their gener-
ous contribution of our
small city, and for being
such a good neighbor."
Mansfield conveyed
regrets from Commis-
sioner Chuck Shields,
who could not attend
due to recovery from a
recent surgery.
"He sends his ap-
preciation to the City
of Tallahassee, and ev-


eryone who has been
involved, in making this
site a more environ-
mentally friendly proj-
ect," Mansfield said.
St. Marks Mayor
Allen Hobbs said the
community had a vi-
sion for the property,
even before it belonged
to the city.
"We had all kinds of
ideas this land could be
used for, not knowing
that one day it would
be ours," Hobbs said.
Hobbs said the De-
partment of Environ-
mental Protection did a
$10 million cleanup of
the site before the city
had a chance to acquire
the property in 2010.
"They removed some
of the fuel storage tanks
and built a 10-foot dike
around the eastern part
to keep the runoff from
reaching the St. Marks
River," he said.
The mayor credited
former commissioner
Phil Cantner with help-
ing the city acquire the
property.
"He did us agoodjob,
and he didn't do it for
the pay," Hobbs said.
"He did it for St. Marks
because he wanted to
help us."
The city then hired
Roger Register from
Cardno TBE Consult-
ing Engineering as a
consultant to adminis-
ter the grant.
Hobbs thanked the
City of Tallahassee for
the grant money to de-
contaminate the prop-
erty.
"If you think about
it, your neighbors don't
just give you $200,000
every day," Hobbs
said. "And a city like
St. Marks, with limited
resources, $200,000
goes a long way. We


A,


NICOLE ZEMA
BREAKING GROUND: Tallahassee Mayor John Marks, Cynthia Barber, director of Tallahassee's
Environmental Policy and Energy Resources Department, St. Marks City Manager Zoe Mans-
field, St. Marks Mayor Allen Hobbs, and Margaret Olson, of the US EPA, Region 4.


are going to be able to
turn this into a much
more useful and envi-
ronmentally-friendly
property."
According to a press
release, the two cities
have a long history in
the area. Tallahassee
is a long-time employer
in St. Marks, operating
the Sam. 0. Purdom
Power Generating Plant
since 1952. The Gen-
erating Plant property,
which is adjacent to
the former St. Marks
Refinery, was impacted
by petroleum contami-
nation stemming from
the operations at the
Refinery.
"We love St. Marks,"
Tallahassee Mayor
John Marks said. "We
like that St. Marks is


part of this region, and
regionalism is some-
thing we've been pro-
moting ever since I
became mayor. This
partnership with the
City of St. Marks means
we can do a lot. After
all, we have this plant
down here. Without
that plant, the City
of Tallahassee would
not be in the position
we are in today. This
$200,000 is a win-win,
because it allows us to
do some other things
too. We appreciate what
everyone is doing for
our region."
Cynthia Barber, di-
rector of Tallahassee's
Environmental Policy
and Energy Resources
Department elaborated
on the partnership,
made possible through
EPA funding.


'The City ofTallahas-
see has been fortunate
enough to receive over
$2.4 million in brown-
fields funding from the
US EPA, which has al-
lowed us to build one
of the most successful
brownfields programs
in the state, and the
Southeast region," she
said. "When we had the
opportunity to help our
neighbors in St. Marks,
we certainly jumped at
that opportunity."
Barber said besides
the brownfields pro-
gram being a perfect
example of sustain-
ability, the cleanup will
also have a positive en-
vironmental and social
impact on St. Marks.
"The previous owner
of this site created an
environmental prob-
lem and walked away,"


Barber said. "It was not
just an environmental
impact, but an eco-
nomic impact on this
community. This fund-
ing will help restore this
property."
Mansfield acknowl-
edged the contribution
of Margaret Olson, of
the US EPA, Region 4.
She also thanked Tal-
lahassee Mayor John
Marks, his staff, and
dozens of others who
have worked to make
St. Marks Innovation
Park a reality.
Hobbs closed the
groundbreaking cer-
emony.
"Someone going to
come here with an in-
dustry or business,
and they will need this
spot," Hobbs said. "St.
Marks is going to be
ready."


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 3A


Randy Merritt seeks re-election to county commission


From Front Page


signatures for a November
referendum to put wet-
lands protections in the
county charter.
Merritt said he sees a
difference between exist-
ing lots with wetlands in
which a landowner wants
to build something, and
the expectation that new
development will buffer
wetlands.
He expresses some
frustration that it has
become an all-or-nothing
question. "One side won't
compromise," he said,
"and the other side won't
compromise."
The issue, he said, has
been oversimplified by
both sides. "It's not that
simple as I love wetlands'
or 'I love property rights."
Still, given the all-or-
nothing mindset, he said,
he came down on the side
of the county's repealing
wetlands buffers.
One of the biggest is-
sues facing commission-
ers in the future, he said,
is the shortfall of jail-bed
revenues.
For years, the Wakulla
County Jail was profitable
leasing bed space to state
and federal prisoners.
The state Department of
Corrections ended its jail-
bed program several years
ago, while the federal Im-
migration and Customs
Enforcement and U.S.
Marshal Service have con-
tinued to lease some beds.
But ever since last
year's federal budget
standoff- the so-called
osequestration the
number of inmates has
dropped significantly and
been well below the num-


bers the county budget
anticipated.
County Administra-
tor David Edwards has
warned that the short-
fall could be as much as
$600,000 in jail revenues
by the end of the year, and
took steps several weeks
ago to cut the county bud-
get by firing employees in
Code Enforcement to save
an estimated $100,000.
Merritt sees two sides
in that issue: One he char-
acterizes as the sheriffs
view as "This is how much
money I need for my bud-
get and it's the county
commission's responsibil-
ity to provide it." The other
is the county commission
n's position of "This is
how much money we can
give you, and you have to
make it work."
The commission, he
said, "is not going to raise
taxes and we're not going
to cut kids' programs."
He doesn't know what
the ultimate solution is -
besides making cuts.
Merritt noted that, over
the years, jail-bed rev-
enues were a boon to the
county. "The jail-bed has
been subdisizing the mill-
age rate," he said.
Ultimately, the issue
facing the county, he said,
is that with the loss ofjail-
bed money, there needs
to be a decision about the
level of service from the
sheriffs office that citizens
are willing to pay for.
Another big issue is
getting voters to again ap-
prove the one-cent sales
tax that pays for road
paving and capital im-
provements.
Yet another is needed
expansion of the county's


sewer plant, which is near
capacity now. The facil-
ity needs to be expand-
ed, using USDA loans
and grants, soon before
growth picks back up.
And he does believe
Wakulla is on the verge
of sustainable growth.
Nothing like the boom
years prior to the eco-
nomic collapse of 2008.
"We need 90 new homes
a yar just to keep up with
depreciation on the tax
roll," he said.
Merritt notes that
when he first came in
office four years ago, the
county was on the verge of
a financial cliff. "I've made
some tough decisions," he
said, "including the Public
Services Tax." That tax
broadened who pays for
county services, he said,
with everybody paying in,
not just property owners.
"People don't like taxes,
but the best you can do
is manage the spending
wisely," he said. "It doesn't
hurt as bad if you know it
isn't being wasted."
Some issues he has
pushed for including lo-
cal preference for bid-
ders, revised septic tank
regulations, and non-
interference rules to keep
county politicians out of
day-to-day government
operations.
A county commission-
er's proper role is to "de-
bate, legislate, but not to
run the county."
He was recently named
chair of the Capitol Region
Transportation Planning
Agency, which studies
transportation issues for
the area, and named vice-
chair of the Apalachee
Regional Planning Council


that discuss area growth
management issues.
There is movement on
improvements on U.S.
Highway 319 in the fu-
ture, he said, with $8
million for design of the
Crawfordville area.
He also noted that the
planned Capital City to
the Sea bike trail is going
to be "huge." He credited
Leon County Commis-
sioner Bryan Desloge and
Wakulla County Commis-
sioner Howard Kessler
with pushing for the proj-
ect. "It's not just regional,
but a national trail that
will bring people from
everywhere."
As for his role as com-
missioner, Merritt said, "I
don't have an agenda. I
didn't make any campaign
promises."


The one promise he
does make, he said, is "I
promise to look at each
issue and make a decision
based on what I think is
in the best interest of the
citizens."
His philosophy, he
said, has been to "be con-
sistent, but be fair."
Merritt was born in
Beaumont, Texas, where
his father was working as
a chemical engineer. The
family moved to Smith
Creek in Wakulla County
in 1972 to take up the
profession of his mother's
family, beekeeping.
He attended Sopchop-
py Elementary, Wakulla
Middle School and Wakul-
la High School, graduating
in 1986. He then attended
Tallahassee Community
College and joined the


U.S. Army Reserve to pay
for college, and served in
the Gulf War in 1990-91
in Saudi Arabia. He later
attended Florida State
University, earning his
bachelor's degree in civil
engineering in 1993 and
a master's in 1994.
He's married and has
three children, ages 19,
17, and 12 years old.
In 1994, Merritt was
project engineer for PSG,
the private company that
operated the county's
public works department.
He left for a time to work
for local surveying and
land development com-
pany Edwin Brown &
Associates, then returned
to PSG and its successor
USFilter for the county
from 1999 to 2006.


Sheriff Creel talks budget with board


From Front Page


The department will
also conduct an internal
review to show how ef-
ficiently core services are
provided to the citizens of
Wakulla County.
Creel went on to note
WCSO's only budget re-
quest this year, which is
a capital outlay for air
conditioning units, cost-
ing $15,000.
"Once we close books
on 2013-2014 budget,
we anticipate return-
ing to you $350,000,"
Creel told to the board.
"With $162,000 cut last
year, and $350,000, plus
$400,000 in budget cuts,
that's $912,000 last year
- almost a million dollars
- that we are saving the


tax payers.
The sheriff addressed
rumblings about debt
within the WCSO.
"There have been some
questions, and rumors
are floating all around,
about us being $800,000
in the red," Creel said.
"We're not- the coun-
ty is. Everybody knows
how that happened. It's a
county issue and an ICE
detainee issue."
To find a solution for
the ICE detainee jail bed
budget problem, Creel
said the WCSO has re-
tained an ICE attorney
and a lobbyist in Wash-
ington D.C. to set a mini-
mum number guarantee
of detainees.
"That will require us
to go up there and meet


with Senator Nelson and
ICE in Washington about
this," Creel said. "We want
a guaranteed number. Not
having a minimum num-
ber makes it impossible to
craft the budget."
Creel said he or Un-
dersheriff Trey Morrison
signs every purchase or-
der or check that comes
through the WCSO.
"We're good stewards
of the county's money,"
Creel said. "We are watch-
ing the county's money.
We're open for business,
and we're open to show
people the books if they
want to come over and
look at them. It takes
money to keep Wakulla
County safe. We're going
to watch every penny
spent."


PUBLIC NOTh.ICES I L


FLORIDA
PUBLIC NOTICES

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ADVERTISEMENT TO BID WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Pre-qualified bidders are invited to bid on a General Contract for the construc-
tion of the Campus Wide Renovations at Wakulla Middle School in accordance
with Contract Documents. All bids must be a lump sum basis; segregated Bids
will not be accepted.
PROJECT: Campus Wide Renovations
PROJECT NO.: 13/14-07
BID DATE: May 13, 2014 TIME: 2:00 pm
The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida will receive sealed bids until 2:00
pm local time on May 13, 2014. Bids received after this time will not be ac-
cepted. All interested parties are invited to attend the Bid Opening; Bids will be
opened publicly and read aloud at the following location:
Wakulla County School Board, Florida Administration Building (Board Room)
69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327
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Wakulla County School Board Administration Building
PR 0. Box 100,69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32327
and be marked: 1. Campus Wide Renovations, Wakulla Middle School
2. (Name of Bidder)
3. (Address of Bidder)
4. City, State, Zip Code)
5. OWNER'S BID NO. 13/14-07
All bids shall be delivered by a representative of the Bidder or by registered
mail with return receipt requested. Bid security in the amount of five percent
of the Bid must accompany each Bid in accordance with the Instruction to
Bidders.
In the event the Contract is awarded to the Bidder, Bidder shall, within eight
(8) Owner business days after the award by the Owner of the Contract shall
furnish the required Performance and Payment Bonds; failing to do such, Bid-
der shall forfeit their bid guarantee as liquidated damages. The Performance
and Payment Bonds shall be secured from any agency of a surety or insurance
company, which agency shall have an established place of business in the
State of Florida and be duly licensed to conduct business there.
The Owner reserves the right to waive irregularities and/or informalities in any
Bid and to reject any or all Bids in whole or part, with or without cause, and/
or accept the Bid that in its judgment will be for the best interest of the School
Board of Wakulla County, Florida.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
POST OFFICE BOX 100 CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32326-0100
ROBERT PEARCE, SUPERINTENDENT

iLegal Advertising
WAKULLA COUNTY
WA K U L L A BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

ROAD STRIPING SERVICES
Invitation to Bid No. ITB 2014-10
Advertisement Begin Date/Time:
April 24,2014 8:00 a.m.
Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Sealed responses for Road Striping Services addressed to the
Wakulla County Procurement Coordinator, at 3093 Crawfordville
Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until May 22,
2014, 2:00 p.m., at which time all bids will be publicly opened.
Any responses received after the time and date specified will not
be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder.
Please direct all questions to:
Katie Taft
Ph: 850.926.0919, Ext. 704
FAX: 850.926.0940
E-Mail: ktaff@mywakulla.com

Copies of the Invitation to Bid may be obtained at the Wakulla
County Purchasing Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, FL 32327 or can be found on the County website at www.
mywakulla.com
No pre-bid meeting will be held for this project.
Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommo-
dations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone
number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event.
If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office
by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at
1.800.955.8771 (TDD).
The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject
any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest
of Wakulla County.
Richard Harden, Chairman Katie Taft, Procurement
and Contracts Management Coordinator
APRIL 24, 2014


SNotice of

AKUA Comprehensive

Plan Text Amendment

Transmittal Public Hearing
The Wakulla County Planning Commission
and Wakulla County Board of County Com-
missioners proposes to consider the following
application and/or adopt the following by ordi-
nance and has scheduled Public Hearings be-
fore the Wakulla County Planning Commis-
sion on Monday, May 12, 2014, beginning
at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County
Board of County Commissioners on Mon-
day, June 2, 2014, beginning at 6:00 PM,
or as soon thereafter as the matter can be
heard. All public hearings will be held at the
County Commission Chambers located west
of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road,
Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested par-
ties are invited to attend and present testimo-
ny. The proposed amendment is included in a
proposed ordinance entitled:
AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA; AMENDING AND REVISING Policy 1.2.10
Bloxham Special Area Plan of the FUTURE
LAND USE ELEMENT OF THE WAKULLA COUN-
TY COMPREHENSIVE GROWTH MANAGEMENT
PLAN, AS ADOPTED BY ORDINANCE NO. 10-05,
AS AMENDED; PROVIDING FOR PURPOSE AND
INTENT; PROVIDING FOR APPLICABILITY AND
EFFECT; PROVIDING SEVERABILITY AND FOR
FILING; AND PROVIDING AN EFFECTIVE DATE.
1. Application for Comprehensive Plan
Text Amendment: CP14-01
Applicant: Ben C. Boynton
Proposal: Transmittal of Comprehensive Plan text
amendment to Policy 1.2.10 of the Future Land Use
Element
Hearings Required:
Planning Commission Monday, May 12,2014,7:00 PM
County Commission Monday, June 2,2014, 6:00PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files
may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Develop-
ment Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL
32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desir-
ing to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a
verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented
at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call
the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes.
The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 926- 0919 or TDD 926-7962.
NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED
AMENDMENTWILL BETAKEN ATTHESE MEETINGS.
APRIL 24 2014


,Notice of
CPU NV Public Hearing


The Wakulla County Planning Commission
and Wakulla County Board of County Com-
missioners proposes to consider the fol-
lowing applications and/or adopt the fol-
lowing by ordinance and has scheduled
Public Hearings before the Wakulla County
Planning Commission on Monday, May 12,
2014, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the
Wakulla County Board of County Com-
missioners on Monday, June 2, 2014, be-
ginning at 6:00 PM, or as soon thereaf-
ter as the matter can be heard. All public
hearings will be held at the County Commis-
sion Chambers located west of the County
Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited
to attend and present testimony.

AN ORDINANCE OF THE BOARD OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS OFWAKUL-
LA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PERTAINING TO
NON-CONFORMING SIGNS ERECTED
PRIOR TO JULY 23,1985; AMENDING
SECTION 6-18 OF THE LAND DEVEL-
OPMENT CODE; AND PROVIDING SEV-
ERABILITY AND AN EFFECTIVE DATE.


1. Application for Text Amendment: TA14-04
Applicant: Wakulla County
Proposal: Revise Section 6-18 of the Wakulla
County Land Development Code Pertaining to Non-
Conforming Signs Erected Prior to July 23,1985
Hearings Required: Planning Commission:
Monday, May 12,2014,7:00 PM
Board of County Commissioners:
Monday, June 2,2014 @ 6:00 PM
Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record files
may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Develop-
ment Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL
32327, 8AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring
to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a ver-
batim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at
said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call
the Board Office at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes.
The Board Office may be contacted at (850) 926- 0919 or TDD 926-7962.
APRIL 24, 2014


www.thewakullanews.com


Rw






Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


The Opinion Pae


www.thewakullanews.com



readers speak out


READERS WRITE:

Green Living Expo is Saturday


By LYNN ARTZ

On Saturday, April
26, Sustainable Big
Bend will present the
Green Living Expo in
Hudson Park and the
TCC Wakulla Center
in Crawfordville from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. You
are invited to join the
fun and learn practical
ways to save money
and reduce your impact
on the earth.
Hudson Park will be
filled with bicycle activ-
ities, an eco-kids tent,
a fundraiser fish fry,
and numerous exhibi-
tors. Bicycle activities
include free helmets for
adults and kids, bike
checks and repairs, an
hourly bicycle rodeo,
and raffles for three
bicycles.
Dozens of interest-


ing workshops will be
offered inside and out-
side the TCC Wakulla
Center including ones
on Wild Game and Fish
Cookery and Growing
and Feasting on Sal-
ads. Other workshops
will address everything
from beekeeping, but-
terflies, and wildflowers
to landscaping on the
(coastal) edge.
Don't miss the silent
auction, the Repurpos-
ing Corner, and Duke
Energy's exhibit on how
to lower your electric
bills, all in the lobby
of the TCC Wakulla
Center.
In Hudson Park, look
for the bargains at the
Green Flea Market and
help yourself to freebies
at the Freecycle table.
Sign up for a table at
this giant yard sale


by contacting Kathryn
Gibson at 926-9519
or topazgibson@gmail.
com.
The registration area
near the intersection
of Dogwood and Och-
lockonee streets also
is where you also will
find several raffles.
To enter the raffle for
a pomegranate tree
from Just Fruits, bring
empty black plant pots
6-inches or larger in
good condition.
Enjoy the music of
Ernest Toole and his
granddaughter. Be sure
to bring a canteen or
reusable water bottle
to refill at free water
stations.
Whether you seek a
simpler, more sustain-
able life or a day of
fun, the Green Living
Expo is for you.


Eatfish and recycle the crackers at Expo


Editor, The News:

Eat fish and recycle the crack-
ers!
The phrase may seem a little odd,
but The Wakulla County Historical
Society will be partnering with the
Green Living Expo this Saturday,
April 26, at Hudson Park. We will
be frying mullet with cracker meal
and serving cheese grits, coleslaw,
hush puppies and ice tea to raise
funds for the Heritage Village Park.
Plates will be $8 or two for $15. The
crackers we hope to recycle are the
historic Wakulla "cracker homes"
we will relocate and restore as a
part of our plans for the Heritage
Village Park.
We are excited as we make
progress toward establishing this
collection of historic homes and
structures at the Heritage Village
Park off Zion Hill Road. Our vision
is a park where visitors and people
of Wakulla County can stroll among
these historic structures and ex-
perience the lives and times of our
early Wakulla County families.
In addition, to display of the
historic homes, long range plans
will include a farm setting complete
with farm house and accessories,
festivals and events featuring early
Wakulla lifestyles with syrup mak-
ing, turpentine demonstrations,
blacksmithing, quilting and holi-
day festivals. An amphitheater for
historical plays and performances
will also be featured.
The park includes some environ-
mentally sensitive areas including
a sinkhole that will remain pro-
tected and interpretive trails with
educational kiosks will be estab-
lished to inform the public of the
importance of our aquifer system.
We envision the park as pedestrian
only with the use of horse drawn
wagons or other non-motorized
vehicles for traversing almost 38
acres that will make up the park.
Yes, it is a large undertaking


that will take a number of years to
complete.
The community will benefit
greatly as heritage tourism is big
business. Utilizing data from simi-
lar parks, the park should generate
10,000 visitors annually. This cre-
ates tourism jobs and establishes
more small businesses. Come
dream with us. Find your niche
and volunteer. Some of the areas
where we need help are as follows:
Donate your time and equip-
ment to help clear land for staging
the historic structures.
Share your carpentry and
construction skills as we weather-
ize and stabilize structures that
have been donated but we can't yet
move. We have several that are in
imminent danger of deterioration.
We need construction esti-
mates for weatherizing and stabi-
lizing several structures that will
be part of a grant application next
month.
Consider having your firm
donate engineering, design and
surveying work.
Have your business or family
become a sponsor of a Cracker
Home Site.
Make a memorial contribution
honoring an early pioneer family
whose homes will be relocated.
Call and have your name
placed in our volunteer pool. You
will receive notice of events we are
planning and you can decide where
and when you want to help.
Become a member of the
Wakulla County Historical Society
for $25 individual, $35 family.
Finally, come have lunch with
us Saturday, April 26 at Hudson
Park and enjoy the great exhibits
and seminars planned by the Green
Living Expo.

Murray McLaughlin
Vice President
Wakulla County Historical Society
Heritage Village Park


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thewakullanews.com



16 .j


ROTC reunion

Editor, The News:

The Wakulla ROTC program is in
the planning stages of a reunion. We
are hoping to get the word out for ALL
cadets who were in the program from
1993 to the present.
The tentative date is June 28,


is beingplanned

2014, at River Of Life with time TBA.
For information, contact Michelle
Conway at (850) 728-6295 or mom-
maconway@gmail.com.
Please help us spread the word.

Michelle Conway


Man's lawflows from God


Editor, The News:

Our concept of law,
comprising enforce-
ment, judicial and
corrections, are mani-
festations of God's will,
just as much as that
found in our institutions
of religion.


Since the U.S. Su-
preme Court has yet to
paint over references
to the Ten Command-
ments in their own
chamber, they are in
tacit agreement that the
spirit of the law is not in
conflict with the letter of
the law, which requires


separation of church
and state.
Mercy is the great-
est part of law and it is
not a coincidence that
mercy is what we seek
from God.

James Kish
Wakulla County


Enjoying The Wakulla News


Editor, The News:

Dear Staff,

I have quite liked the Wakulla News
format this last month or two. I often
miss changes for a while, however,
the paper is really great these days.
I liked the Historical Society/Mu-
seum/Artifacts, Sopchoppy Worm
Gruntin' Festival, Letters to Editor,
What is Your Fondest Easter memory,
especially church announcements
(as Seafarer's Chapel at Shell Point),
Pedicure, Man of Steel, Obits, Regatta
announcement, Sydney/Jones, Wild-
life Festival announcement, CHAT,


notebook/Wakulla Wildlife, Tortoises,
Natural Wakulla, Mastodon (always
wondered!), Easter Egg pics, espe-
cially Upcoming Events, Green Living
Events, Week in Wakulla, Turtling,
Community Center, Linda Carter's ar-
ticles on Nuremberg, Wakulla Senior
Citizens Center with all the volunteer
names, as well as the personnel.
I planned to compliment on just
three items, but decided that all these
items, and others, had caught my
eye for a read through. So I enjoyed
naming them!
Sincerely,

Sheri Potter


Disappointed by The Wakulla News


Editor, The News:

As a resident of Sop-
choppy, and subscriber,
I am upset by the lack
of coverage in your pa-
per of the Worm Grun-
tin' festival. Half a page
of pictures and not so
much as a paragraph of
an article talking about
a day long event in the
county.
Worm gruntin' is one
of the biggest festivals
of the year in Wakulla
County but you wouldn't
know it from reading


your paper.
I guess a 5K run,
events all day, and live
music until 10 p.m. fea-
turing a world famous
musician was not news-
worthy.
I do wonder how
much Chris Russell paid
you to give him two
pages about his political
aspirations.

Tom Porter
Sopchoppy

Editor's Note: You're
right: we ran a half-page


of color photos from the
Worm Gruntin' Festival.
We also had a lengthy
story on musician Bob
Malone the week before
the festival, in the April
10 edition. The 5K re-
sults we got too late to
include in last week's
paper they are on Page
5B this week.
And all the candidate
announcements seem
to be running long this
year. The candidate an-
nouncements are news
stories and are free.


Protect wetlands forfuture generations


Editor, The News:

As summer draws near and resi-
dents and visitors are out enjoying the
beauty of Wakulla County, I hope we
can all remember why we are blessed
with such a special place to live in and
visit: wetlands.
Local governments that have wet-
lands within their boundaries have
the opportunity to conserve them and
to control development that might
impair their ability to provide benefits
to the community and to the environ-
ment. Wakulla County's past Board
of County Commissioners believed in,
and voted to protect, Wakulla's natural
and beautiful wetlands. However on the
new board, four of five want to do away
with your local wetland protections.
State agencies recommended in 2013,
that Wakulla County keep its wetland
buffers.
When developers come in and de-
stroy your wetlands, it is the communi-
ty that suffers. When local government
ignores the pleas of the people, one has
to wonder why.
If we lose what brings people and
businesses to our county, we can kiss
our way of life goodbye. Maybe some
people couldn't care less about "the en-
vironment" but they, as taxpayers, will
pay the bill in attempts to fix the mess
if our water is not properly managed.
We pass bogs, swamps, and water-
ways daily never giving them a thought.
We enjoy what they bring to us without
even realizing their benefits. Every wet-
land takes the water that flows into it
and cleans it and lets it slowly perco-
late back into the aquifer as recharge,
improving water quality. They also re-
duce erosion by decreasing floodwater,
thereby lowering our insurance rates.


They act as a nursery and a nutri-
ent source for fish and other aquatic
organisms. They provide habitat for a
variety of wildlife, such as waterfowl,
amphibians, and insects. They bring us
abundant opportunities for recreational
fishing, hunting, swimming, etc.
To remain healthy, wetlands require
buffers. Buffers provide protection
much like bumpers on cars, distancing
them so as to prevent damage. These
buffer zones surrounding wetlands are
critical to their survival.
In Wakulla, you have a choice. As
most of you know, despite the objec-
tions of commissioners, volunteers
spent countless hours gathering almost
6,000 petitions signed by voters to give
you, the voters of our county, the right
to have a say in how we grow.
Keep in mind, your Board of County
Commissioners did not do this for you.
It was a small group of committed citi-
zens who worked tirelessly for you. In
the November election, now you will be
able to vote on this critical issue. You
can vote to keep our current wetland
setback and keep local control, or
eliminate our setback to the minimal
state standards.
Retaining the buffers and keeping
the current ordinance in place has a
great positive impact on the economy,
water quality, environment, and the
natural resources for all of Wakulla
County. I ask that you stay informed
on this issue during the coming months
leading into the general election. Please
do your own research and learn about
the value of our wetlands and the im-
portance of their protection, not just for
us, but for generations to come.

Sue Damon


Letters to the Editor
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. It's preferred that you email it to edi-
tor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville
FL 32326 or drop it off at The News office, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway.
Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the author's
first and last name, mailing address and telephone number for verification pur-
poses. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length
and clarity.


TO V~akilaj@ti
The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at
3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
hi i 1 '... i William Snowden............................. editor@thewakullanews.net

Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net

Advertising: Lynda Kinsey....................................... lkinsey@thewakullanews.net

Advertising/reception: Denise Folh........................... denise@thewakullanews.net

Production Coordinator/IT: Eric ".i i. ..1 ii ,. ._, ii,. i ii ,,.. .. 1
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo.
Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.


Ak R





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 5A


< STREET BEAT>


Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question:


-- ~- 4~


Which of the many fesitvals do you attend?;


r / f AF


TINA BAKER
SFSU ADMISSIONS
S"Rock the Dock and'
the Blue Crab Festi-
Sval, and all the oth-
Sers in Crawfordville
That my grandchil-
/ dren like to go to."


BENJAMIN ACHONG
TCC INFORMATION TECH
"I can't say I have,
my family all go.
Most are family
oriented events. I
have only lived in
Wakulla for about a.
year."


i fk / -. f..' - ..- ,
JEFFERY WAITES MATT IRWIN
COLLEGE STUDENT OWNER-BUGS UNLIMITED


"Usually the Blue
Crab Festival. They
usually have a lot of
good food and I like,
to participate in the
mullet toss."


"Definitely the Stone
Crab Festival, Blue
Crab, St. Patrick's
Day Celebration, the
Valentine Festival,
Smoke and Fire... We
go to a lot of them."


NORMAN REEVES
UNION PIPE FITTERS
'"Fourth of Juy
FestivalThat is,
the main one 1I
go to."


' \~


Cape Leisure

to leave

Wakulla Lodge
Staff Report
Cape Leisure Corporation and the Florida De-
partment of Environmental Protection have agreed
to an early termination of the concession agreement
at Wakulla Springs Lodge at Edward Ball Wakulla
Springs State Park, effective Sept. 30.
"Cape Leisure is a valuable partner with the
Florida Park Service," said Donald Forgione, direc-
tor of the Florida Park Service.
"We are committed to outstanding customer
service through Sept. 30," said Dan LeBlanc, presi-
dent of Cape Leisure Corporation. "We will assist
the department in every way to ensure a smooth
transition to another concessionaire."
The Wakulla Lodge will operate fully over the
summer months. The Wakulla Lodge will honor all
booked special events and overnight accommoda-
tions. All reservation dates, deposits and pricing
will be honored. New special events are welcome.
The Ball Room Restaurant will be open daily for
its normal schedule: breakfast 7:30 a.m. to 10 a.m.;
lunch 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.; and dinner 6 p.m. to
8 p.m. The Soda Fountain and Gift Shop will be
open daily for sandwiches, milk shakes and gifts.
A spokesperson for DEP said the agency is work-
ing on issuing a Call for Business Plans to secure
another concessionaire to begin services on Oct. 1.
Cape Leisure began operating the Wakulla
Springs Lodge in July 2011.
The 27-room lodge was built in 1937 and is listed
on the National Register of Historic Places.


NICOLE ZEMA
Construction work on the Surf Road bridge.

Bridge work underway
The bridge at Surf Road will be reinforced and
more resistant to water erosion when it reopens in
another four to six weeks, Wakulla County Admin-
istrator David Edwards said.
Edwards said the bridge was closed at Buckhorn
Creek on Surf Road just south of Sopchoppy after
storm events caused severe water erosion around
the structure which undermined the road.
"The steps being taken now will fix that," Ed-
wards said.
Culverts are being extended and headwall struc-
tures installed to keep water from spilling out at
the roadway.
Edwards said funding to fix the bridge comes
from a FEMA mitigation grant. Matching funds of 25
percent were required from the county to complete
the project. Edwards said matching funds come
from 1-cent sales tax for the road department.
Nicole Zema


V



Locally Owned by CharlieI
:(850)926-65
charliegrim@ms.comi Lube-Xpi
Mon.-Fri.8am-6pm Sat.8am
2219 Crawfordville Hwy.,Crawfordv


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ertmi
ie-4p
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7~zQ 1


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9&2?pS3





Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


Church


Church Briefs


* Banquet set to honor
Ethel Skipper

Tallahassee Church of Christ
Written in Heaven's District's Pre-
Meeting Banquet honoring Pre-
siding Elder Dr. Edward Brigham
and District Mother Ethel Skipper
will be held Saturday, April 26 at 7
p.m. at the Wakulla County Shri-
ners Club.
The theme for the event is
"Keep the Fire Burning" from Le-
viticus 6:12-13.
The Shriners Club is located at
4141 Crawfordville Hwy. south of
Crawfordville.
For more information, contact
Elder Alfred Nelson at (850) 264-
6621.

* Pioneer Baptist to host
National Day of Prayer

Pioneer Baptist Church will host
a community-wide National Day of
Prayer Service on Thursday, May
1, at 7 p.m.
The service will consist of
prayers for our community, state,
nation, and our military. Sacred
and patriotic music will be sung.
Pioneer Baptist Church is
located at 486 Beechwood in
Crawfordville, 300 yards north of
the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Me-
morial Road and the Spring Creek
Highway intersection.
The public is cordially invited to
come and worship.
For more information, please
contact Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-
5224.
We look forward to worshipping
together.

* Worship schedule for
Wakulla UMC

Wakulla United Methodist
Church announced its worship
schedule:
On Sunday at 8:30 a.m. the
church holds its Contemporary
Service, at 10 a.m. Sunday


School, at 11 a.m. Traditional
Worship Service, and at 6 p.m. is
Choir Practice.
Wakulla UMC is located at 1584
Old Woodville Road in Wakulla
Station. For more information, call
(850) 421-5741 or email wakul-
laumc@centurylink.net.

* Medart Assembly hosts
Trading Closet ministry

The last Saturday of every
month at noon, Emily Sellmer of
the Medart Assembly of God hosts
a Trading Closet ministry where
families can trade clothes children
have outgrown for other families'
clothes that fit.
The ministry is free.

* Volunteers needed for
prison ministry

Caring, Christian volunteers are
needed to go to prison on Satur-
day, May 31.
The Bill Glass Prison Ministry's
"A Day of Champions" will team
athletes, entertainers, musicians
and volunteers to share their sto-
ries and their faith with inmates at
seven area correctional facilities.
If you are willing to step behind
the prison walls to share the gos-
pel with men and women eager to
turn their lives toward God, con-
tact the Bill Glass Prison Ministry
in Dallas at (972) 298-1101 or visit
the website at BillGlass.org/tal-
lahassee.
Volunteers will receive practical
information and simple evange-
listic tools to guide them on their
mission.
Over a million inmates have
been brought to Christ by every-
day, good people stepping out of
their comfort zones and reaching
out to men and women behind
bars.
Volunteer for A Day of Champi-
ons Prison Ministry on Saturday,
May 31.
Staff reports


religious views and events


OUT TO PASTOR

I'm on a roll so don't


By JAMES L. SN'S

Have you ever ha
of those weeks whe
erything went exac
planned? Well, ne
have I, except for
week. I do not 1
what was going or
week, all I know is e
thing went accord
plan. My plan, tha
was on a roll.
In a sense, that
ries me. I am no
customer to havin
week work out acco
to my plans. Norr
if I can get 50 percE
my plans accompli
in a week, I am
pretty good.
In contrast, the
before it was ho:
dous.
I was out of tow
business for the
and had to return
the airplane. If you
ever been on an
plane, you know thE
10 dwarfs of Snow
fame designed the
I think the one in cl
of the seat project
Grumpy.
I was flying frorr
cago to Orlando, \
is not that bad of a
I boarded the pla
Chicago and tool
seat at B3. I got all
gled and strapped
and was prepare
the trip. No soone:
I gotten into this
of affairs, and you
getting into those
is one of the great
lenges that a real
has, somebody
and stood at the
looking at me and
in a high pitch gri
voice, "You are sitti
my seat."
The emphasis o
word "my" indicate
me I was up ag
someone I did not
to be up against.
"I'm sorry, mac
I stated as calm
possible, "but this
seat." I tried to en
size the word "my"
the message across,
She stared at me
one of those stares


rock my boat
FDER penetrates the very soul of th
of a person's manhood, socie
done Then she waved her perm
re ev- ticket at me and said, from
tly as "You are sitting in MY coun
either seat." reaso
- last I took out my ticket husba
know to wave at her and prove secre
n last she was wrong. Much to It
Every- my chagrin, my seat was long t
.ng to B13. Do you know what point
t is. I it takes to get unbuckled While
from a plane seat and ing tc
wor- extradite yourself out the w
t ac- of it? schec
1g my I went back to B13 oppol
)rding and went through the trusic
nally, same procedure to get honey
ent of myself situated in the W1
ished seat for someone half one il
doing my size. Just before the do lis
plane took off, I heard appeal
week in the seat behind me a is vir
rren- little baby start to cry. to fin
In the seat behind me that 1
vn on was a baby with lungs Be:
week the size of an elephant, roll in
n via I tried pretending I did is no
Shave not hear, but the more I thou
air- I pretended the more I now c
at the heard. That baby cried desk
White from the moment we finish
seats, took off until the mo- of eac
charge ment we landed. When Sir
t was we landed, the baby fell of tin
asleep. I wanted to cry readA
iChi- myself. Solon
vhich That was last week. that
Strip. This week was differ- along
ne in ent in every respect. I "W
k my enjoyed this week, par- findel
snug- ticularly the fact that I thy n
ed in got all my to-do list ac- nowc
d for complished and by early know
r had Friday afternoon, I had in th
state nothing to do. thou
know Nothing to do! 9:10).
seats Then a thought wres- If I
chal- tied my brain to the mat. to the
man What if the Gracious ity, ti
came Mistress of the Parson- pretty
aisle age found out I had fin- will ir
I said ished all my work and time t
umpy had nothing to do?
ing in When I thought about Th
this, one thought that Snyd
n the was predominant was Fami
ed to that it is a good thing ship .
ainst when I do NOT finish at (8
want everything in a week. e-ma
Then, I have the excuse att.ne
lam," that I have too much
ly as to do to delve into the
is my honey-do list of which
nipha- my wife is most famous.
to get I believe this hon-
s. ey-do list is something
e with mothers pass on to their
s that daughters. It is part


e women's secret
ty that does not
lit any intrusion
the non-female
terpart. It is the
n wives prefer their
hands call them the
t name, "Honey."
has taken me a
time to come to this
of understanding.
e, it is very gratify-
Sget your work for
*eek done ahead of
lule, it creates an
rtunity for the in-
n of that infamous
y-do list.
ien you accomplish
tem on the honey-
t, three other items
ar automatically. It
rtually impossible
fish everything on
ist.
ing on such a good
n any given week
t the grand thing
tight it was. I am
content to have my
piled high with un-
hed work at the end
ch week.
ice I had a little bit
ne on my hands, I
what good old King
ion, the wisest man
ever lived, thought
these lines.
whatsoever thy hand
th to do, do it with
night; for there is
)rk, nor device, nor
ledge, nor wisdom,
le grave, whither
goest" (Ecclesiastes

do not use my time
e best of my abil-
he probabilities are
y high somebody
itrude and use that
for some other use.

e Rev. James L.
er is pastor of the
fly of God Fellow-
in Ocala. Call him
366) 552-2543 or
ii jamessnyder2@
et.


I Waku fff[ rsl**pCnters ;di


I Crawfordville Area


Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
1^^ / ^"C- & W-k# Wfik W'~Us
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School ........................ 10 a.m .
Sunday Worship...................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship................... 6 p.m.
W wednesday Service ..................7 p.m.
& Youth Service ........................7 p.m .
Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m .
M issionettes .............................. 7 p.m .



Coastal


Ochlockonee


SUnited
Methodist
Church
SundayWorship 9 a.m.
Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.
Vastor Xevin Oitll
(850) 984-0127


rBig Bend
SHospice
your hometown hospice, licensed since 1983
2889C Crawfordville Hwy
850.926.9308
bigbendhospice. org


Crawfordville United
Methodist Church
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road "Come Grow With Us"www.crawfordville-umc.org

96,,,10,inq 9!, h %#am DO ttd*e v9z!
FREE St.iiLud ibitiui i.L i The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102


Sopchoppy


SSopchoppy
-United
I Methodist

Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
Worship I I a.m.
Pastor Kevin Hall
850-962-2511


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...? p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Spirit Life Church
Pentecostal
131 Rose Street Sopchoppy FL
962-9000
Schedule of Services
SUNDAY
Refreshments 930am
Sunday School 10:00am
Worship ll:00am
Prayer 6:00pm
WEDNESDAY
Supper 6:00pm
Pioneer Club:
Youth and Adult Classes 630pm
Blood Bought .I -I
Word Ta,,qht I
Spirit' I


l i i' lll '. IIllllll1
(From Rhema Bible Training Center)
wwwochccorg

Your church ad here!




(850) 926-7102


19 Promise Land
THRIFT STORE
Open 9-5
Closed Sun. & Wed.
Mon.---- Furniture 25%
Tues.----- Seniors 25%
Fri. & Sat.- Select Items 50%

926-3281
3299 Crawfordville Hwy. -
Approx. I mile S. of County Courthouse
www.promiselandministries.org

Wakulla7
Station

j| Wakulla United
Methodist Church
8:30 a.m. Sunday Contemporary Service
10 a.m. Sunday School for all ages
11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service
6 p.m. Choir Practice 0

1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Jasia Hewry Riishut

"I'm not afraid to be the pale girl in the bathing
It doesn't bother me anymore."
"I h-ve tnnd h.e -o ta g be. dsrheoutthe
I teff them b..t Ja-m
J.-m -- nher ear 20, when she w-, dugnsd fwi


ZMedartArea


St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church
Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797
Sunday Mass 10:00 am
Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm
Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs
1' Saturday of ever month:
u', C..er er i..n 1nn lots a nd man spcnn
iB ^?^..! I,,j ii,1 !. i~ii.i'infilimfB d



"Hwy 319 Medart,
rakeE Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
lb n ) Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
S Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
p h AWANA 5:00 p.m.
Ch rc Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
operatingg like a family; strong in the Word of GLod, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.IakeeHlenbaptistchurch.org

SaTrinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School1926-5557


www.thewakullanews.com






www.thewakullanews.com


Obituaries


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 7A


Jeremy Shane Brown
Dorothy Ruth Clarke
William Russell 'Rusty' Fowler Jr.
Florence Mary Palmisano Martin
Dan E. Zemel


Jeremy Shane Brown
Jeremy Shane
Brown, 29, of Craw-
fordville, died on Sat-
urday, April 5, 2014.
Survivors include
his father, William
P. Holley of Wood-
ville; mother, Sandra
(Fred) Harting of Tal-
lahassee; grandfather,


James Holley of Tal-
lahassee; sisters, Mi-
chelle (Mike) Sellars,
Tricia Holley, Crystal
Holley, Amy Holley,
and Deanna Holley,
all of Tallahassee, and
Ashley Holley of Ken-
tucky.
A celebration of
his life will be held


at 2 p.m.,


Dorothy Ruth Clarke

Dorothy Ruth Clarke, 85, passed
away on Wednesday, April 16, 2014
in Tallahassee.
She was born in Queens, N.Y.
and had lived in the Tallahassee
area for eight years. She was a
seamstress.
She is survived by son, Harold
Burton (wife Lorraine) of Tallahas-
see; daughter, Dorothy Hernandez
of Houston; grandchildren, Donna


Dan E. Zemel
Dan E. Zemel, 63,
of Panacea, died on
Tuesday, April 8,
2014.
He was a U.S.
Navy veteran and a
U.S. Coast Guards-
man.
He is survived by
a loving compan-
ion, Dona Swindle
of Crawfordville;
daughter, Dawn (Da-
vid Seman) Stanton
of Ohio; stepmoth-


Saturday,


April 26, 2014 at 8837
Crawfordville Hwy., in
Crawfordville.
Arrangements are
under the care and
direction of Forbes
Funeral Home, 768
W. Duval Street, Lake
City (386) 752-5212.
Please sign the online
guestbook at www.for-
besfuneralhome.net


Savary of Crawfordville, Samuel
Clark of Madison, Ala., Matthew
Burton, James Schofill, Denise
Burton and Ron Burton; nine
great-grandchildren and three
great-great-grandchildren.
She was predeceased by her
husband, Samuel H. Clarke.
Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is
assisting the family with arrange-
ments (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.
com).


er, Helaine Zemel;
brothers, Kevin (An-
drea) Zemel, Neil Ze-
mel, Glenn (Virginia)
Zemel, and Devlin
(July) Pierce; sisters,
Davida (Sonny) Mar-
shall, Michelle Zemel,
Tracy Zemel, Denise
(Chris) Cowan, and
Dawn Skaggs; one
granddaughter; and
numerous nieces,
nephews, and other
friends and family
members.
He was prede-


ceased by his parents,
Herman Zemel and
Frances Pierce, and
stepfather, Scotty
Pierce.
A celebration of his
life will be held at a
later date.
Arrangements are
under the care and
direction of Forbes
Funeral Home, Lake
City (386) 752-5212.
Please sign the online
guestbook at http://
www.forbesfuneral-
home.net/


BEREAVEMENT COLUMN


The importance of obituaries


William R. 'Rusty' Fowler Jr.

William Russell "Rusty" Fowl-
er Jr., 65, passed away in a
tragic accident on Friday, April
18, 2014 in Tallahassee.
He was born in West Palm
Beach, and had lived in Wood-
ville for 45 years. He was a night
shift supervisor for Olin Corpo-
ration for more than 30 years.
He was a lifetime NRA Member
and a die-hard FSU fan who bled
garnet and gold.
Visitation was held Wednes-
day, April 23, 2014, at White
Primitive Baptist Church in


Florence Mary
Palmisano Martin

Florence Mary
Palmisano Martin,
82, longtime resident
of Merritt Island, and
resident of Crawford-
ville, passed away on
April 19, 2014, at
Broadview Assisted
Living in Pensacola.
Beloved wife of
47 years to the late
Miguel "Mike" Mar-
tin, and cherished
mother and grand-
mother, Florence
lived a rich, full life.
Born and raised in
Oneida, N.Y., she
graduated from
Oneida High School.
She then graduat-
ed from Katherine
Gibbs Secretarial
School in New York
City and went to
work for the fash-
ion magazine "Flair"
in Manhattan. Flo
also sold hotdogs at
the horse race track,
and worked as an Air
Force civil servant.
As young wife and
mother, she moved to


Woodville from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m.
Services were held Wednesday,
April 23, 2014 at White Primi-
tive Baptist Church in Woodville,
FL at 3 p.m. Burial followed at
Woodville Cemetery.
Survivors include two daugh-
ters, Jessica Fowler and Hannah
Fowler; sister, Dianne Smith;
and his faithful companion, who
survived the accident, Kenzlie,
his Pomeranian dog.
Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel, Crawfordville,
FL is assisting the family with
arrangements 850-926-3333 or
bevisfh. com).


the Washington, D.C.
metropolitan area,
where she worked
for the Army Corps
of Engineers and for
the Food and Drug
Administration. In
1976, she moved to
Merritt Island and
worked at Kennedy
Space Center, in-
cluding more than
20 years with NA-
SA's Project Engi-
neering office. She
was awarded the
Astronaut's "Silver
Snoopy" award.
A lifetime faith-
ful Catholic and an
active citizen, Flor-
ence volunteered as
a scout leader school
secretary, President
of Women's Coun-
cil at Divine Mercy
Catholic Church,
and as leader of "the
Marthas" at that
church.
Flo moved to Craw-
fordville in 2006, and
joined St. Elizabeth
Ann Seton Catho-
lic Church, which
she dearly loved, and
through which she


met some wonderful
friends.
She is survived by
her children, Mary
Ellen Davis (Hugh),
Paul Joseph Mar-
tin, Catherine Mar-
tin Kent, and Peter
Joseph Martin; her
grandchildren, Alex-
ander James Scrug-
gs, Nicholas Martin
"Nick" Davis, Analise
Virginia Scruggs,
and Damian Phoenix
Martin; step-grand-
children, Kelly Shine
(Joe), Dr. Hugh C.
Davis IV (Becky), Dr.
Ricklie Julian (Liam),
and Hilary Davis; her
sister, Mary Palmi-
sano Rullo; brother-
in-law, Alfred Mar-
tin (Shari); sister-
in-law, Marguerite
Martin; and many
nieces and nephews
and great-nieces and
nephews.
Funeral Mass will
be held at Nativity
of Our Lord Catholic
Church in Pensacola
on Friday, April 25,
2014 at 11 a.m.


By TRACY RENEE LEE

Occasionally, I work
with a family wishing
to forgo the printing of
the death announce-
ment, a.k.a. obituary,
in the newspaper.
Before becoming a
funeral practitioner,
I thought, as these
families sometimes do,
that obituaries were
unnecessary and a bit
obsolete, especially if
the decedent's circles
of friends and family
were small.
I have a rather small
group of immediate
and intimate friends
and family, and have
thought in the past,
that when my time
comes, the printing of
an obituary would be
unnecessary. After be-
coming a funeral direc-
tor and working with
families for a few years,
my opinion of the ne-
cessity of an obituary
notice, printed in the
newspaper, has most
definitely changed. It
is a small bit of money,
very well spent.
An obituary is a
quick and fairly inex-
pensive way of notify-
ing the living that an
acquaintance, friend,
relative, co-worker, etc.
has recently died. It
also informs them of
the service dates and
times if they wish to
attend or send condo-
lences.
The obituary lists
the names of family
who have preceded
the decedent in death,
as well as the survi-
vors. This is a very
important part of the
obituary. Listing the
preceding kinship and
surviving kinship al-
lows readers to rec-
ognize those in their
community that will be
entering bereavement.
It also allows them
to link families and
verify that they may, or
may not know the de-
cedent. This knowledge


also allows the com-
munity to understand
the unusual melan-
choly behavior among
the survivors with
greater understanding
and compassion.
The obituary may
also be used by HR ser-
vices to verify and al-
low bereavement leave
for family members. It
also verifies time off
for staff and personnel
wishing to attend ser-
vices. On occasion, it
may be used for certain
bereavement allow-
ances and discounts.
The most important
role of the obituary,
however, is to link ge-
nealogy. The listing
of kindred dead and
living survivors serves
as a printed witness for
family historians and
genealogists.
The obituary lists
personality character-
istics of the decedent,
as well. This informa-
tion is a treasure trove
for the generations
that follow.
If you have suffered


the loss of a loved one
or expect a loss in the
future, please consider
the importance of a
well-written obituary.
I have researched loved
ones through obituar-
ies. If fortune is smiling
upon me, there will be
a picture included.
These tiny bits of
genealogical treasure
bring me great joy.

Tracy Renee Lee
is a funeral director,
author, and freelance
writer. It is my life's
work to comfort the be-
reaved and help them
live on.

Please follow
my blog at http://
pushin-up-daisies.
blogspot.com/ and
Twitter account @
PushnUpDaisies, visit
my website www.Que-
enCityFuneralHome.
corn or read my book
"Pushin' Up Daisies"
for additional encour-
agement and informa-
tion.


switch your subscriptionto


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GREEN LIVING EXPO


By Kathryn Gibson
Special to The News


happenings in our communi


Wakulla County


awarded highway


beautification gra


and depleted natural resources.
What could someone do with the 21 discard-
ed plastic bags that I counted along the side of


)uld tell by the quizzical look on his face the road between Crawfordville and Medart? In
ie had no idea what "repurposing" meant, addition to being an embarrassing eyesore,
he beamed and said "like when my grand- they pose a deadly threat to wildlife that
Dr took all our old shirts and pants and mistake pieces of plastic for
them into beautiful quills which food. If people had to pay for
;ave us when we left home to plastic bags, as they do in
*e we'd never forget where we other communities and
from and to keep us warm."e countries, they might
imong us does not remem- not toss them or al-
he adage "waste not, low them to fly out
not" offered lovingly the back of a truck
we clamored for the Gree or boat trailer. The
,t version of some item. bin accompanying pho-




lay, whether out of eco-w tos from pinterest.com
necessity, concern for show what some inven-
nvironment, or the plea- tive people have done to
of allowing our imagina- repurpose" plastic bags.
o run riot, more people are Ifyou would like to see
icing "green" choices by meeting how local citizens have rein-
through ingenuity rather than vented items to give them new life and
gh a gas guzzling trip to buy new purpose, visit the Repurposing Corner at the
(often imported) at a store. Green Living Expo on April 26 in the TCC annex
rking with rescued materials is a concrete building next to Hudson Park. A banjo made
effective response to overflowing landfills from a Spam can, anyone?


epurposing helps the environment


By Lynn Artz
Special to The News

-re are many ways to prevent items
entering the waste stream; Reduce the
nt of trash you generate, Reuse items
ir them to someone else for use, or Re-
)se items for a different purpose.
Green Living Expo will offer opportu-
for each method waste reduction on
day, April 26, at Hudson Park and the
Vakulla Center in Crawfordville from 9
o 2 p.m.
public is invited to join the fun and
practical ways to save money and re-
their impact on the earth.
DUCE Food will be served in com-
ble containers. A composting station
e staffed by the UF Extension Master
mners. Master Gardeners will insure the
is placed in the proper containers for
Placement in the compost pile at the UF
sion Office
Water refill stations
11 be provided. Peo-
le are encouraged
to bring canteens or
E a nKater bottles (rather
Lhan sell bottled wa-
ter, canned sodas, or


i6 C -I.HWS.R B S .)9 N





)ental

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e-Health
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, Tucker, Agent V
l Life Underwriter
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Gayla Parks, Agent
State Farm Agent
2905 Apalachee Parkway
Tallahassee, FL 32301
Bus: 850-222-6208


drinks in plastic or styrofoam cups).
Reusable bags will be offered in an effort
to reduce use of disposable plastic or paper
bags.
REUSE-A Green Flea Market will be held
in conjunction with the Expo. There is still
time to register. It's a great opportunity to
sell items you no longer need but someone
else may desire. It's a great way for you or
your organization to give items a new home
and make a few dollars.
If addition there will be a FreeCycle Station
where items will be placed, free for the taking,
in hopes they find a new home.
If you have items you no longer need but
may be of benefit to someone else please feel
free to donate them. (Clothing items will not
be accepted). Come browse and see if there
is something for you.
REPURPOSE- Artist, craftspeople and DI-
Yers have donated items that are made from
75% reclaimed material. Items will be offered
at a Silent Auction.
There will also be a collection of Re-Pur-
posed items displayed. If you have something
you would like to show off please let us know.
It is often said one person's trash is an-
other's treasure. Come join us to see what
treasures you might find.


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Special to The News

Wakulla County has
received a Highway Beau-
tification grant in the
amount of $99,801 for
a Landscape and Irriga-
tion System Design and
Installation near the Och-
lockonee Bay Bridge on
Highway 98.
This project will provide
gateway landscaping in
the right-of-ways at the


intersection of Highi
and Surf Road, to ii
all four corners. Sc
the landscaping v
clude sabal palms,
saw palms, sand
grass, and mimosa
new design will en
this location ma!k
more attractive foi
business, resident:
tourist traveling U.
It is anticipated the
struction for this I
will begin May 1.


NAMI to hoe


film screening


" CALL ME CRAZY
LIFE IS ANYTHING BUT NORMAL


Special to The News


NAMI Wakulla is presenting a free screening
Lifetime original movie "Call Me Crazy" Monday, A]
at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla One Stop Community C
The star-studded movie focuses on the challenge
triumphs of living with mental illness. All are we
Light refreshments will be served.
The goal of the film, and its screening loca
to help eradicate the stigma that surrounds n
illness and to raise mental health awareness
film brings together a prolific cast, including G
Globe winners Jennifer Hudson, Melissa Leo ar
tavia Spencer, Sarah Hyland, Sofia Vassilieva,
tany Snow, Ernie Hudson, Jason Ritter, three
Emmy Award winner Jean Smart, Lea Thorn
Oscar nominee Melanie Griffith and Chelsea Ha
NAMI Wakulla (National Alliance on Mental II
was one of 100 NAMI affiliates that were give
opportunity to show the movie, as a courtesy o
Television Network LLC.

Register to fish ir

annual Kayak Clas!


Special to The News

The second annual Big
Bend Kayak Classic tour-
nament will be May 2
and 3, at Harvey Young
Farm in Crawfordville.
To register, go to www.
bigbendkayakclassic.com
or call 850-926-7145. Reg-
istraton is $75 for adults
and $50 for youth 17 and
under.


A Captains meet
Friday, May 2 at 7
Registered angerler
enjoy grilled burger
hot dogs, chicken
will also be provide
urday's menu will
seafood boil.
Fishing is within
miles radius of We
County. Proceeds
efit Meals on Wheel
other senior service,


Anita's Funky Emporium will have local artist , people showing their ware
Rick's Shabby Shack lots of refinished furniture & all kinds of vintage goodies.
RE-TAIL which is an animal rescue group, has all sorts of. ...., ,'r.' ',..,' has been don
by animal lovers to be sold at bottom dollar prices.
Frontier Trading Company -Antiques, collectables, bottle and glass crafts from Wakulla C
GREAT savings on COLLECTABLES, ANTIQUES, FURNITU
HOUSEHOLD and All Sorts of GOOD STUFF.
The big event takes place on Sunday, April 27, 201
Noon until 5p.m. Look for the Flags!

COMEANDVSTO HSSPE IADA F
FRE DINKS SACKS,& GRATDS
368 Wodill ihaTlaase(/ ile suthof tefirgronds


-29


Get a

better ride

with a

better loan.





www.thewakullanews.com


Community


Rock the

Dock this
weekend l


Special to the News
The sixth annual
Rock the Dock Fishing
Tournament will be at
Rock Landing Dock in
Panacea April 26 and
27. A Captain's meeting
will be Friday. Registra-
tion begins at 4 p.m.
Happy hour begins at
6 p.m. Tobacco Road


Band will play from 7 to
10 p.m.
Division prizes in-
clude cash, boats,
equipment and mer-
chandise. For more in-
formation, to register,
download minors' con-
sent form, see maps or
purchase T-shirts, go to
www.panacearockthed-
ock.com.


Blue Crab Fest


will be May 3
Special to The News
Join us in Panacea, Florida on Saturday, May
3, for the 40th Annual Blue Crab Festival. Held
annually at Woolley Park on scenic Dickerson Bay,
the quaint festival originated in 1975 to promote the
crab industry in Wakulla County.
Forty years later, the festival has grown in size
and tradition. The festival is kicked off each year by
a parade down US 98 starting at 10 a.m. After the
parade, the gates open to Woolley Park. where the
old, young and young-at-heart can enjoy a day's full
of waterfront fun.
Enjoy arts, crafts, food vendors, mullet toss, crab
picking contest, Mountain Dew Cloggers and music
by Gypsy Darlings, Coon Bottom Creek, CB Project,
Lindsay Sparkman with The Rick Ott Band, Dean
Newman & Friends and many more.
Park Admission is $3 per person. Children under
12 get in free.
The Coastal Optimist Club is accepting applica-
tions for parade entire. Line up is at 9 a.m., parade
begins at 10 a.m. on Jer-Be-Lou Blvd. and US 98.
For parade applications, call June Vause at 545-
0077 or Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480. Or e-mail:
jcvause@yahoo.com or wversiga@yahoo.com. A
registration form, and complete information about
the festival, can be seen at www.bluecrabfest.com.

FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS

Come celebrate

'Sinkhole de Mayo'

next Saturday
Special to The News
The second in a series of three Springs Serenades
is the annual Sinkhole de Mayo. This year, the event
celebrates our area's similarities with the Latin
American geology, namely Cenotes, or sinkholes.
Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park invites
the community to the family-friendly evening on
Saturday, May 3. Guitarists Trio del Mar will per-
form, state geologist Dr. Harley Means will lead a
short program about Cenotes, and a themed menu
is being prepared by Chef Jody Perez of the Lodge.
There are a limited number of all-inclusive ad-
vance tickets available at wakullasprings.org, $25
adults and $13 children under 12 years old. The
event begins at 4:30 in the afternoon and ends after
a boat ride, walk, dinner and music at 8 p.m. Free
park admission only with advance ticket purchase.
Guests are requested to select times for boat
rides and programs when they make their advance
ticket purchase. For additional ticket information
contact Bob Peolquin, 556-9758.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 9A


happenings in our community


Local Walmart sets fundraising



goal for Children's Miracle Network


Special to The News
Over the last 25 years, Walmart
Stores, Inc. has partnered with
Children's Miracle Network Hos-
pitals to raise more than $650
million for sick and injured chil-
dren. The driving force behind
the longstanding partnership has
never wavered to provide each
and every child the best possible
chance.
In 1987, Sam Walton, affection-
ately known to CMN Hospitals as
"Mr. Sam," committed his com-
pany and its resources to raising
money for children's hospitals with
the promise that "the associates
will amaze you."
Beginning May 1, Walmart will
continue that promise with a six-
week-long fundraising campaign
for CMN within Walmart stores
nationwide, continuing through
June 11.
This year, Crawfordville's
Walmart #3307 has set a goal of
raising $36,000 for its CMN Hos-
pital, UF Health Shands Children's


Hospital in Gainesville, Fla. Man-
ager Richard Russell said his team
intends to reach their goal with
the help of customers, associates
and the community. In addition
to the numerous in- and out-of-
store events including cookouts
and auctions, cashiers will ask
customers upon check out for a
25-cent donation.
Area businesses have also com-
mitted to helping Crawfordville
Walmart meet its goal. Three local
El Jalisco Restaurants in both
Crawfordville and Tallahassee will
be hosting a "Share Night" on May
1, in which 10 percent of proceeds
will be donated to #3307."We
would like to invite the Crawford-
ville community out on May 1 to
participate in our efforts along
with El Jalisco to raise money for
Children's Miracle Network and
enjoy an night with friends or fam-
ily" said Russell. The event will be
from 5 p.m. to close.
The Wakulla County and Frank-
lin County Sheriffs Offices, as well
as Auto Trim in Crawfordville, have


Westfield 1924 to play

Sopchoppy Opry


PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Jeff Tilley and Dana Clarke will debut this weekend
as Westfield 1924 at 7 p.m. at the Historic Sopchoppy
High School Auditorium. Known for its authentic acous-
tic sound, Westfield 1924 will join Southbound Band for
evening of classic country, bluegrass and gospel music.
Tickets are $12. The event is sponsored by Quigg's Tax
Service. Call 962-3711 for more information.


donated wagons through Walmart
#3307 that will be used to provide
pediatric patients with fun and
exciting transportation throughout
the hospital. Wagon donations by
individuals and area business can
be made throughout the six-week
campaign and will be personally
delivered to UF Health Shands by
Crawfordville Walmart associates.
Since 1983, CMN has raised
more than $4.7 billion for children
like those in Crawfordville and sur-
rounding areas, who unexpectedly
find themselves in need of special-
ized pediatric care not available to
them locally.
To support these patients, 100
percent of the funds raised by
Walmart #3307 go directly to UF
Health Shands Children's Hospital
to fund pediatric research grants,
state-of-the-art medical equip-
ment, patient care needs, patient
education, pediatric programs and
diversionary items.
For information on how you can
help, or to volunteer, contact TC at
(850) 926-1560.


Sopchoppy

Mud Run

is April 26
Special to The News
What is a mud run? It's a series
obstacles stretched over a 2 mile
ail that challenge individuals and
omote teamwork.
The event, hosted by Sopchoppy
lunteer Fire Department, will be
)m 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday,
pril 26.
All proceeds will go to the Wakulla
county Fire Explorer program to
lp support and enable our youth
pursue education and certifica-
)ns related to Fire and EMS.
To register, visit www.sopchoppy-
idrun.com, or call 850-962-4611.
The event will feature adult and
i courses, with a one-mile Little
uidder for ages 5-10, and a two-
le adult course for ages 11 and
Participants will receive T-shirts.
p finishers and best costumes will
awarded.
Pulled chicken dinners are on
e menu. Also enjoy live music and
mnily fun.


Loud & Clear


anFl FREE

Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to ,
receive a free amplified phone from the non-profit '
Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. Cordless
and corded phones for persons with mild to severe *9get
hearing loss are available at 23 distribution centers ac .
statewide Limit one pei cUistonlei

CONTACT YOUR AREA CENTER FOR DETAILS E 1F1


Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. .
1820 E Park Avenue, SLite 101 Ise
Tallahas see, FL 32301
800-222-3448 iv'
888-447-5620 (tty)


1iNlfi Wakulla
National Alliance on Mental Illness PRESENTS


A Lifetime Original Movie about the challenges and triumphs of
living with mental illness. Its goal is to help eradicate the stigma that
surrounds mental illness and to raise mental health awareness.
STARRING
Jennifer Hudson, Melissa Leo and Octavia Spencer, Sarah Hyland, Sofia Vassilieva, Brittany Snow,
Ernie Hudson, Jason Ritter, Jean Smart, Lea Thompson, Melanie Griffith and Chelsea Handler.
FREE & OPEN TO THE PUBLIC
WAKULLA ONE STOP COMMUNITY CENTER
318 Shadeville Hwy. (corner of Trice Lane and Shadeville Hwy.)
For more information call: 745-6042 or 926-1033
NAMI Wakulla was one of 100 NAMI affiliates that were given the opportunity to show the movie
Call Me Crazy, as a courtesy of A&E Television Network, LLC








Wakulla Environmental Institute movingfor ward


From Front Page


"We've had divers go
under, and say there's a
pretty significant flow un-
der there." Ballard said. "It
goes deeper, but doesn't
constrict. So, what we want
to do is put hydro-turbines
in there and generate more
electricity for us, so we
have a campus that is
totally energy renewable."
Ballard said the board
is applying for a grant from
the Department of Energy,
and considering working
with FAMU engineering to
see how well a hydro-tur-
bine project would work.
At the same time, Bal-
lard said, "We do not want
to build over the cave sys-
tem. So we're doing ground
penetrating radar and bor-
ings to make sure that
we're not."

THE BUILDING

The first building, which
will be about 10,000 square
feet, is designed to surpass
most modern green con-
struction practices, such
as Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design
(LEED).
"This building will create
more energy than it uses,"
Ballard said. "We have a
guarantee on that from the
architects. We wanted to
do better than just LEED
certification. We want to
show the world how to do
it right and better."
Its design has the feel
of a cabin; reinforced with
strong materials, and a
technological feather in
its cap. The walls will be a
foot thick, super-insulated
and filled with concrete.
The standing-seam metal
roof, a product credited for
its strength, will be hyper-
insulated. Ballard said the
roof will loaded with solar
panels and a wind turbine,
with a cistern attached.
"It's built in the Flor-
ida Cracker style, which
means that it has a large,
overhanging roof and it's
positioned where we get full
exposure for solar panels,"


Ballard said. "There is also
a dogtrot, or mall, as the ar-
chitects refer to it. If you're
familiar with Cracker style,
a dogtrot is a covered area
that allows wind to blow
through it, like natural air
conditioning. It will feel 10
degrees cooler than the
actual temperature."
The mall, and a spa-
cious wrap-around porch,
will be screened in to keep
insects out. There will be a
large fireplace at the head
of the dogtrot.
"And we can have pre-
sentations, speeches and
lunches going on in the
mall too, depending on the
weather, for probably nine
months out of the year,"
Ballard said.
Monitors affixed on the
walls of the mall will convey
up-to-the-minute energy
production and consump-
tion data.
"The monitors will show
what the cistern and wind
turbine are doing- all sorts
of different things that
make the building itself a
science project. There will
also be a cut-away of the
wall to show how it's energy
efficient," Ballard said. "We
want to take the mystery
out of building green; to
make people understand
that financially it can make
sense, it's not some voodoo
science out there. It's here
to stay. And by doing some
really simple stuff you to
can reduce your energy
costs."

CURRICULUM,
CLASSROOMS
AND LABS

The main mission of
WEI is to prepare students
for careers in aquaculture,
forestry management, ho-
tel and leisure, parks and
recreation, environmental
science, and recycling.
These fields offer opportu-
nities to work in a variety
of settings, ranging from of-
fices, to laboratories, to the
outdoors, with employers
ranging from government,
to non-profits, to private
enterprise.


A 125-student lecture
hall will be included in the
first building. The space
will have a moveable par-
tition to divide it into two
separate classrooms when
needed. There will be bath-
rooms of course, and ad-
ministration offices. There
will also be a fully equipped
laboratory that will seat 24
students, and a prep lab.
Showers and bathrooms
can be accessed from the
outside.
"When people come in
from the field, waist high in
muck from taking samples,
they would be able to come
to the outside bathroom,
take showers, change, go
back to class and examine
samples they brought in,"
Ballard said.
To find out more about
registering for classes, call
Bonnie Holub, Director
of TCC Wakulla Center at
922-2416.

POSSIBLE
CAMPGROUND AT
WAKULLA SPRINGS

Other local resources,
like Wakulla Springs State
Park, would also provide a
diversified learning expe-
rience for WEI students.
Ballard said he approached
the director of the Florida
Park Service about a 50-
year lease for 2,000 acres
of unmanaged land within
the park, just west of U.S.
Highway 61. The lease
would mean the reopening
of Cherokee Sink (because
required bathrooms would
be built), and the addi-
tion of a small parking lot,
60 tent and RV sites, ten
yurts, picnic area, bath-
rooms with showers and a
playground.
Ballard said partnering
with the park is a one-stop
educational cross-training
opportunity, which will
also provide management
for the land and camp-
ground.
"We want to have a place
to train the next genera-
tion of park rangers, forest
rangers, fish and wildlife
(employees) state and


national," he said. "So, not
only do park rangers have
to do land management
training, they also have to
do hospitality training. So,
with our AS degree in parks
and recreation, they would
also be trained in hospital-
ity. That means we would
have interns coming in to
run the campground."
Ballard said the Florida
Park Service designed the
campground. He added
that most state parks have
a campground of some
kind.
WEI administrators
envision the institute as
ground zero for environ-
mental jobs, and the part-
nership with FPS to man-
age the campground is part
of that.
"What the TCC Police
Academy in Gadsden
County is to law enforce-
ment, we want to be for
the environment," Ballard
said. "We want to be the
place where if you want to
be a park ranger, you come
here, get training, and you
can be hired by the Florida
Park Service, Forest Service
or National Park Service."
Ballard said process-
ing the plans must first
go through an ARC, or Ac-
quisition and Restoration
Council. ARC has respon-
sibility for the evaluation,
selection and ranking of
state land acquisition proj-
ects on the Florida Forever
priority list, as well as the
review of management
plans and land uses for all
state-owned conservation
lands.
"There will be public
meetings, people of the
state get to weigh in on
this and give us sugges-
tions and comments, and
ARC votes to see if this was
consistent with FPS land
unit management plan,"
Ballard said. "If they liked
idea, they vote for it, if not,
they vote against it based
on input from the public,
FPS, biologists and experts.
But to me this seems like
such a natural- everybody
wins."
Ballard said he antici-


pates a six-month process
between now and the time
of an ARC decision. He
said Audubon of Florida
representatives are also
intrigued by a Wakulla
Springs campground and
training program. Addi-
tionally, Ballard said he
sought advice from WEI
board members who are
also Friends of Wakulla
Springs State Park, about
how to proceed correctly so
they would be more inter-
ested in supporting it.
"The public has a place
to camp at one of the best
state parks in the country,"
he said. "And Cherokee
Sink gets opened up for
swimming for the first time
in 14 years."

TOURISM AND
EXPANSION

Classroom annexes will
be built in the future, and
WEI is projected to be an
international destination
as a trailhead for the Capi-
tal City to the Sea Trail
regional project.
"We have been asked
to be a trailhead," Ballard
said. "It's an 185 mile loop
trail. Any loop trail above
50 miles in considered an
international trail."
Ballard said it is esti-
mated that every mile in
a loop trail brings in $2
million in tourism dollars.
"This is a trailhead wait-
ing to happen," Ballard
said. "And we don't only
want to be a trailhead, we
want to be a destination.
So, visitors 365 days a year
will use our parking and
our bathrooms. If they have
to wait, we have exhibits
they can look at in the mall
of green technology."
An international des-
tination like Wakulla En-
vironmental Institute will
eventually need a luxury
hotel and spa.
"If we're going to bring in
tourists around the world
- we're looking at 200
families a week coming into
Wakulla County they
need a place to stay that
will pamper them," Ballard


said. "They will be out in
the weather paddling, get-
ting muddy or dirty, having
fun out in the wilderness
during the day, but at
night we want them to have
luxury."
Ballard said there is a
long timeline, more than
10 years, before those ac-
commodations are built as
to not interfere negatively
with the local economy.
Ballard said existing hotels
in Wakulla County need to
be so consistently full of
tourists that more rooms
are needed.
Right next to the hotel
would be a center used for
training or conventions,
Ballard said. The structure
would be built to accom-
modate large audiences,
like Wakulla High School
graduations.
Tree houses on high
stilts near a sinkhole are
also included in the long-
term plan. Ballard believes
that the unique accommo-
dations would rent out 365
days a year.
"Your attention will
be focused on part of the
environment that people
don't see often, which is
the canopy," Ballard said.
"When you go out and have
your coffee on the porch,
and you're 30 feet up in the
air, your view is the canopy.
We asked, how could we do
something different, and
better, that gives us the
wow factor? We actually
want to design it so you
can do a prescribed burn
right underneath it without
hurting it."
Ballard said eventually
boardwalks will be built
over sinkholes to put peo-
ple at eye level with nature.
"The reason you have
boardwalks, particularly
around sinkholes, is to
prevent erosion," Ballard
said. "It gets people to enter
a certain place if they want
to go swimming, or to walk
a certain place, so they're
not interrupting the natu-
ral vegetation, and they can
see what a sinkhole looked
like 500 or 1,000 years ago
- the 'real' Florida."


moni


Give her the gift of



ZiZbe *1akulla






Iletius,


this Mothers Day




ONLY



FOR


ONE


YEAR


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NOTICE OF

TALQUIN ELECTRIC

COOPERATIVE, INC.

ANNUAL MEETING


SATURDAY, APRIL 26, 2014


Registration and Voting:

8:30 10:00 a.m.


Business Portion of Meeting:

10:00 a.m.


100 VALUABLE PRIZES


Including 42" flat screen TV,

Apple iPad, Kindle Fire, iPods,

trolling motor, digital cameras,

gift cards & much more!


Entertainment:

9:00 9:45 a.m.

"Country Connections"


Location -

East Gadsden High School Gymnasium

27001 Blue Star Highway

Havana/Midway Area



ALQUIN
ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC.


WATER & WASTEWATER, INC.


Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


www.thewakullanews.com




THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 11A


Do you need someone to listen?


Does life hurt?

|WE CAN HELP!
1 E fc-.^ tA A


TIME TO CHANGE
COUNSELING CENTER, P.A.
Locally owned practice, established in 2003
and staffed by residents of Wakulla County
who care about their community and neighbors.
* Individual, Family and Couples Therapy
* Premarital Preparation Course Providers
* ADHD Assessment and Treatment
* Psychological Evaluations


* Supervised Visitations
* Anger Management
* Christian Counseling


MOST
ISURAICES
ACCEPTED


* Certified in E.M.D.R.
For your convenience we can provide
our services in the privacy of our office,
or in any of our schools

Our newest addition!

MATRIX-WAKULLA


I Intensive Outpatient Program
for Addictions recognized by the
| National Institute for Drug Abuse


I


www.thewakullanews.com






Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


Outdoors


outdoor sports and fishing reports


A 'Fall Out' of migrating birds could be this week


WiEdtiieYU
BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


Every year as best
as I can I try to go to
our local events like
the Worm Gruntin'
Festival, etc., and
also be prepared for
various nature hap-
penings too, such as
fall archery season/
spring turkey season
and summer scallop
season.
I also try to pur-
sue my many inter-
ests depending on
the time of year, and
somewhat predict-
able weather, such
during super heavy
rains I look for,
herps (reptiles and
amphibians on the
move), late summer
for butterflies, dead
of winter I check out
waterfowl (especially
in the St. Marks Ref-
uge) and at times try
to fish, and mid-April
for spring migrating
birds.
Since it is just past
mid-April, Patti and
I are now focused on
seeing the neo (new
world) tropical mi-
grant birds pouring
out of Central and
South America and
the Caribbean as they
mostly head north to
nest. At times they
are so abundant the
flocks will show up
on the Doppler radar
as storms!
Most of the time
passerines, or song-
birds migrate during
the night and will
feed briefly through
the day to keep their
energy level up.
As they fly non-stop
across the Gulf (say
from the Yucatan) to


our coastal regions,
and they suddenly
fly into an advancing
cold front blasting
from the north they
will tire easily some
may not make it -
perhaps hundreds
or thousands may
perish.
But, IF they do
reach our coast, par-
ticularly if the wind is
still strong from the
north, they will fall
out of the sky like it is
raining birds not only
to land and rest from
flying into a head
wind, but to finally
feed since they've
reached land!
Sometimes they
are so tired you can
get inches from them!
This natural phe-
nomen is called a
"Fall Out" and on this
coming Wednesday
when The Wakulla
News hits the news
stands there will like-
ly be another Fall Out
along our coast ac-
cording to the weath-
er forecast.
Patti and I have
witnessed two al-
ready this last week.
The best spot to
witness a Fall Out
along our coast is at
the Youth Camp on
St. George Island.
You drive a half
mile past the state
park entrance gate
(the fee is $6 per ve-
hicle) to a paved road
leading to the bay
side, where you will
see a boat launching
sign with the words
"Youth Camp."
Pull into a desig-
nated parking area


GEORGWi I W Yfx UT/u I AL / TrO, TH E El l aln wO
A Great Blue Heron fishing along the edge of a tidal pool.


next to modern rest
room facilities and
brace yourself! If
the conditions are
right such as the
front's rains are end-
ing and the wind has
switched to the north
coming across the
bay briskly there
will likely be birds all
over the place.
And birders from
the whole Big Bend
region may be there
too, even from nearby
states!
That is how hot
this spot can be.
Yes, there will be
"little old ladies in
blue sneakers," the
typical mental image
many have of Bird
Watchers, but there
will also be biologists,
naturalists, couples,
young and old, a lot
of men and women of
all ages.


Nearly all are ex-
cellent in their abil-
ity at identifying our
avian friends.
Indeed, I feel many
I see are like see-
ing an old friend.
Most I have not seen
since last April when
I was able to get a
glimpse of them as
they passed through
the Big Bend.
"Hello Scarlet Tan-
ager, you are as stun-
ning as you were last
spring. Good to see
you again."
The Youth Camp is
situated in a narrow
stretch of the island's
state park as it ex-
tends to the east, and
is a good birding spot
the year around.
The bay area this
last Sunday had
Common Loons,
many species of gulls
and terns, pelicans,


etc. as well as wad-
ers and shorebirds
along the beach too,
like the Solitary and
Spotted Sandpipers
we saw, and often
with their (black and
white plumage and
red trim) Black Skim-
mers and American
Oystercatchers are
seen there too.
We had three
Whimbrel fly over
us with their down
curved ibis-like beaks
while watching the
medium sized cousin
of the Peregrine Fal-
con the Merlin or
Pigeon Hawk.
We had in the
three days last week
we visited the park
many views of Rose-
breasted Grosbeaks,
Scarlet and Summer
Tanagers, and Yel-
low-billed Cuckoos.
The big attraction


though are the war-
blers. Of the some 40
potential species of
warblers possible to
be recorded there, in
those three days we
recorded 20.
Here are just
roughly the times we
saw each species:
Blue-winged 8, Ten-
nessee 15, North-
ern Parula 20, Cape
May 1, Magnolia 8,
Black and White 30,
Black-throated Blue
6, Yellow-throated
2, Prairie 12, Pine
3, Palm 6, Yellow 9,
Kentucky 1, Hooded
30, Worm-eating 4,
Ovenbird 6, Northern
Waterthrush 7, Com-
mon Yellowthroat 3,
and American Red-
start 8.
Look these up in a
field guide most are
absolutely stunning!


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Local writers share their exnerients


Weather, water are warming up


It's hard to believe
that Easter has come
and gone. My mother
always said you could
expect cold weather up
until Easter. It wasn't
freezing but it was
downright nasty and
cold. Hopefully the rest
of the week and upcom-
ing weekend will be like
today sunny and 82
with a light breeze.
The water tempera-
ture was starting to
come up and the water
was clearing somewhat
but that cold rain we
had on Tuesday and
Friday of last week will
surely change that.
Capt. David Fife did
real good fishing last
Wednesday and he said
on Thursday he strug-
gled. Limited out on
reds on Wednesday and
none on Thursday.
Capt. Randy Peart
said he fished 4 days
at the Econfina and
caught lots of trout and
finally started catching
reds. Most of his trout
were caught on white
Gulp. He also did a little
trolling in about 20
feet of water and didn't
catch a bunch of grou-
per but the ones he did
catch were around 30
inches. He was using


BFrom The Dock

S. BYCAPT. JODY CAMPBELL


a Stretch 25 in char-
treuse.
Michael Jarmon said
they caught some big
bull reds over at Dog
Island and caught some
nice Spanish and kings
around Dog Island
Reef. The ledge that
runs from Dog Island
to Alligator Point has
produced some nice
grouper.
One of my neighbors
fished out at the Rotary
on Sunday and caught
four grouper and saw
some huge cobia but
couldn't get them to
bite.
Fishing over our en-
tire area has been very
good and hopefully all
the rain we had and
drop in water tempera-
ture won't hurt too bad.
I fished weekend before
last and the water tem-
perature hit 72 degrees
and you could see the
bottom in 4 feet of wa-
ter but it was still aw-


fully stained and that
was when the sun was
shining.
I fished with Bill Grif-
fin and some of his bud-
dies on Saturday and
Sunday and we got our
limit of trout both days
and threw 5 or 6 back
that were over 20 inch-
es. I typically fish from
Shell Point to Panacea
but due to the number
of boats and lack of fish
we were catching I went
East.
On Saturday we
caught 18 trout in an
hour and all they want-
ed were live shrimp. I
fished that spot for a
couple of hours on Fri-
day and all they wanted
was a white Gulp. You
just never know.
It's going to be busy
on the water this week-
end with the Stephen C.
Smith Regatta at Shell
Point and then on Sat-
urday and Sunday you
have the Rock The Dock


tournament out of Rock
Landing.
Capt. John Swan-
son, founder of Fish-
ing For The Brave, will
have three members of
the military fishing the
tournament and I wish
him the best and hope
to see their names on
the big board.
The Big Bend Kayak
Classic will be on May 2
and 3 and proceeds will
go to help the seniors in
Wakulla County.
Last Thursday at the
Wakulla Community
Center, at the corner of
Trice Lane and Shadev-
ille Hwy, 42 amazing
pictures were dis-
played. Local photogra-
phers took amazing pic-
tures of folks involved
in the commercial fish-
ing industry in Wakulla
County and they can be
seen Monday through
Friday from 10 till 5.
This is all part of the
Wakulla Working Wa-
terfront project. The
pictures are amazing
and you need to get by
and see them.
Remember to take
those kids fishing and
be careful out there.
Good luck and good
fishing.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 13A



a peek into life on and under the water


Underwaater

By Gregg StantonM CVtk tIt/


Science Diver Training.

My first course offered at FSU was Introduction
to Science Diving. I had recently graduated from the
Scientist-In-The-Sea Program and was determined
to change the way we taught aspiring scientists to
work underwater.
I landed on a practical solution, that each stu-
dent must design, and implement a pilot project
of their own making, convince the rest of the class
of its validity and over a weekend, conduct the
research using the rest of the class as their staff.
I hosted over 300 such pilot projects during
my career, such as the future of artificial reefs in
Wakulla County, which I have already presented
in this column.
I learned early on not to discourage anyone, but
to let their peers help develop each plan. I would
tell myself this one or that one simply could not
work, only to proven wrong many times. Others I
thought were sure fire success stories go down in
flames once in the field.
Success (and thus the grade) was determined by
how well they went about conducting their project.
In one year, a group of Navy engineers took the
class. They proposed building and launching a
simple- to-use habitat (underwater living quarters).
When they presented their design and concluded it
was much too ambitious for a simple weekend pilot
project, I intervened to suggest they expand their
literature research to include Wakulla Springs State
Park and Dr. Bill Stone's Deep Cave Diving Team.
When they did they were amazed to find a design
that met their criteria.
What they did not know was that all of the com-
ponents of Bill's Habitat had been thrown out into
the forest near Wakulla Springs to waste away in
time. With calls to Dr. Stone and Wakulla Springs
State Park for permission to recover the technology,
and track down the missing canvas dome, I had but
only line up available transport of the thousands
of pounds of ballast this contraption required for
"easy deployment."
Once acquired, the habitat disappeared into the
Navy base in Panama City, to be tested against Dr.
Stone's blueprints. They flipped the thing over and
filled it with water, a hydrostatic test of sorts, and
it passed with flying colors.
When the weekend came to conduct their pilot
study, we were taken to Vortex Springs north of
Ponce De Leon and participated in the U/W as-
sembly of this "portable" habitat.
Not to leave any doubt by anyone else, they then
occupied the habitat for 24 hours using both open
and closed circuit life support technology.
We were fortunate to have (Captain) Dr. Claude
Harvey (Retired) serve as our program physician.
He attended and monitored all students while they
saturated at 16 feet in this student project.
Now many were concerned that this was not
science, the deployment of a habitat, but in fact it
was. The engineers served as scientists measuring
the technology before deployment, the efficiency of
the deployment, and the viability of the structure
over a 24 hour period. The report was complete with
many tables of data documenting the science of this
project. The rest of the class learned a lot about
data collections under a very real environment.
And of course the project data was then absorbed
into the military program, but not before this habi-
tat was donated to the Man in the Sea Museum
located in Panama City, where it is on display today.
Thank you Dr. Bill Stone, Wakulla Springs State
Park, the U.S. Navy and FSU for the synergism that
brought such opportunity to aspiring students of
the sea.
And thank you Bob Ballard, TCC and FAMU
for the opportunity to offer this class once again
through the Wakulla Environmental Institute.


U Coast Guard Auxiliary Reports "
Vf By Carolyn Brown Treadon A ,


After several busy
weeks, members of
Flotilla 12 took the
past weekend to re-
main dockside.
The weather was not
conducive to being out
on the water nor at-
tending the outdoor
festivities of the An-
tique Boat Show.
In years past, Flotil-
la 12 has participated
in the parade as well as
an informational booth
at the event, however
this year we were not
able.
We all hope that you
and yours had a very
special holiday, wheth-
er you were celebrating
Easter, Passover or
just being together as
a family.
While the rain kept
many dockside this
past week, the after-
math of all the storms


has yet to finish im-
pacting our rivers and
the flats.
Be mindful of debris
that may have been
washed into the water-
way by the heavy rains.
Often items can be
just below the surface
and can cause great
damage. It is a good
idea to always have
some watching the wa-
ter, on the lookout for
any dangerous items.


The amount of rain
we had can also change
the flow of silt in the
rivers making some ar-
eas more shallow than
normal.
Be mindful of your
depth and if in doubt,
slow down!
If you are interested
in learning more about
being safe this season
while out on the wa-
ter, please contact our
Flotilla Staff Officer


for Public Education,
Alexander Guide, at
fso-pe@uscgaux.net.
The boating season
is upon us and our
Members are available
to assist area boaters
with complimentary
Vessel Examinations,
scheduled Boat Safety
Courses as well as par-
ticipating in the many
upcoming events pro-
moting Boating Safety.
If you are interested
in becoming involved
in the Auxiliary, check
out our website at www.
uscgaux.net or contact
our Flotilla Staff Officer
for Human Resources
at fso-hr@uscgaux.net
or Flotilla Commander
Duane Treadon at FC@
uscgaux.net.
As Sherrie says, Safe
Boating is no Accident
- being prepared is
your best defense!


FSTKL>Ltiit


Wakulla Financial Center

, 2190 Crawfordville Highway
224-4960, ext. 1254 I www.fsucu.org


U U


Thursday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:00 am 3:50 am
8:10pm 3:45 pm
Brightness- 36%
Friday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
6:59 am 4:30 am
8:10pm 4:48pm
Brightness- 28%
Saturday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
6:58 am 5:10 am
8:11 pm 5:50 pm
Brightness- 21%
Sunday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
6:57 am 5:50 am
8:12 pm 6:51 pm
Brightness- 14%
Monday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
6:56 am 6:31 am
8:12pm 7:52 pm
Brightness- 7%
Tuesday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
6:56 am 7:13 am
8:13 pm 8:51 pm
Brightness- 0%
Wednesday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
6:55 am 7:58 am
8:14 pm 9:48 pm
Brightness- 7%


4
First
May 7


G If C a Wy Al For tides at the following points add to
G ulf Coast W weekly A lm anac Dog Island Listings: HighTide LowTide
1Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min.
Full Last New April 24 April 30 Apalachicola 1Hr.,53Min. 2Hrs.,38Min.
May 14 May21 April29 A, p' r ,I Cat Point 1 Hr, 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31Min.
l I 'H'' "' Tide charts by LowerAnchorage 1 Hr, 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min.
SZihua Soa fwe, LLC West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.
-- ^-Waft Zha Software, LLC ^A ^ ^


St. Marks River Entrance


City of St. Marks


Date High Low High Low High Date High Low High Low
Thu 0.4 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.0 ft. Thu 0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.0 ft.
Apr24, 14 4:59 AM 11:35 AM 5:39 PM 11:48 PM Apr 24, 14 6:03 AM 12:11 PM 6:43 PM
Fri 0.5 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.6 ft. Fri 2.8 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.5 ft.
Apr 25, 14 5:59 AM 12:22 PM 6:42 PM Apr 25, 14 12:24 AM 7:03 AM 12:58 PM 7:46 PM
Sat 3.2 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.1 ft. Sat 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr26, 14 12:54 AM 6:49 AM 1:02 PM 7:33 PM ____ Apr 26, 14 1:30 AM 7:53 AM 1:38 PM 8:37 PM
Sun 3.4 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.2 ft. Sun 3.2 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 27,14 1:48 AM 7:32 AM 1:38 PM 8:17 PM ____ Apr 27, 14 2:24 AM 8:36 AM 2:14 PM 9:21 PM
Mon 3.5 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.4 ft. Mon 3.2 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 28,14 2:35 AM 8:09 AM 2:11 PM 8:59 PM ____ Apr 28,14 3:11 AM 9:13AM 2:47 PM 10:03 PM
Tue 3.5 ft. 1.0 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.5 ft. Tue 3.2 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr29, 14 3:18AM 8:44 AM 2:42 PM 9:38 PM ____ Apr29, 14 3:54 AM 9:48 AM 3:18PM 10:42 PM
Wed 3.4 ft. 1.1 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.4 ft. Wed 3.2 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr30, 14 3:57AM 9:16 AM 3:12 PM 10:15 PM Apr30, 14 4:33 AM 10:20 AM 3:48 PM 11:19PM
Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.
Date High Low Hiqh h L Hih Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.3 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.3 ft. Thu 0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.4 ft.
Apr 24,14 5:10AM 11:27 AM 5:50 PM 11:40 PM Apr 24,14 4:38 AM 11:19 AM 5:18 PM 11:32 PM
Fri 0.4 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.4 ft. Fri 0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.5 ft.
Apr 25, 14 6:10 AM 12:14 PM 6:53 PM Apr 25, 14 5:38 AM 12:06 PM 6:21 PM
Sat 2.4 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.1 ft. Sat 2.5 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr 26, 1412:46 AM 7:00 AM 12:54 PM 7:44 PM Apr 26, 14 12:38 AM 6:28 AM 12:46 PM 7:12 PM
Sun 2.5 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.2 ft. Sun 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 27,141:40 AM 7:43 AM 1:30 PM 8:28 PM Apr 27,14 1:32 AM 7:11 AM 1:22 PM 7:56 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.3 ft. Mon 2.7 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 28,142:27 AM 8:20 AM 2:03 PM 9:10 PM Apr 28,14 2:19 AM 7:48 AM 1:55 PM 8:38 PM
Tue 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.4 ft. Tue 2.7 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 29,143:10 AM 8:55 AM 2:34 PM 9:49 PM Apr 29,14 3:02 AM 8:23 AM 2:26 PM 9:17 PM
Wed 2.6 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.3 ft. Wed 2.7 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 30,14 3:49 AM 9:27 AM 3:04 PM 10:26 PM Apr 30,14 3:41 AM 8:55 AM 2:56 PM 9:54 PM


Shell Point, Spring Creek
Date High Low High Low High


Thu
Apr 24, 14


0.5 ft. 3.2 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.1 ft.
4:56 AM 11:32 AM 5:36 PM 11:45 :,r


Thursday
Major Times MnorTimes
944a-ll 1144m 348 m448m
1010 pm-1210 m 344pm444pm
Average
Friday
Major Times MnorTimes
10 36 m-1236pm 4 29m-5'29n
1101 ptn-101 m1 446pm-5 46pan
Average
Saturday


Fri 0.6 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.6 ft. Ma~r~ime or
Apr 25, 14 ____ 5:56 AM 12:19 PM 6:39 PM M2IorTim- 727p m 9nTimO9
Sat 3.3 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.7 ft. 0.1 ft. l1527pm-1527m 5 49p mn49pn
Apr 26, 14 12:51 AM 6:46 AM 12:59 PM 7:30 PM ____ i5 -


Sun 3. tt. i0.8 ft. 13.9 ft.
Ar 27.14 1'45 AM 7:29 AM 1:35PM


-0.3 t.
8:14 PM


'" "1 .. 1 ,.. .. ...... .. . .... ... ..... . . ..
Mon 3.5 ft. 0.9 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr28,142:32 AM 8:06 AM 2:08 PM 8:56 PM
Tue 3.5 ft. 1.1 ft. 4.1 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 29, 143:15 AM 8:41 AM 2:39 PM 9:35 PM
Wed 3.5 ft. 1.2 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 30, 143:54 AM 9:13 AM 3:09 PM 10:12 PM
Dog Island WVest End
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.4 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.2 ft.
Apr 24,14 4:35 AM 11:44 AM 5:11 PM 11:26 PM
Fri 0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft.
Apr 25, 14 5:30 AM 12:13 PM 6:07 PM
Sat 2.3 ft. 0.8 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.3 ft.
Apr 26, 14 12:56 AM 6:18 AM 12:38 PM 6:55 PM
Sun 2.4 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.0 ft.
Apr 27,142:07 AM 6:59 AM 1:02 PM 7:40 PM
Mon 2.4 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
Apr 28,143:07 AM 7:35AM 1:25PM 8:21 PM
Tue 2.5 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 29,143:59 AM 8:07 AM 1:50 PM 9:00 PM
Wed 2.5 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 30, 14 4:46 AM 8:38 AM 2:18 PM 9:37 PM


Good
Sunday
Major Times MnorTimes
12 18ptn-2 18pmo 5 49 m-6 49 m
1... 650ppm-750ppm
Better
Monday
Major Times MnorTimes
1243 m-2 43 m 6 29 m-7 29 m
109ptn-3 09pm 751pm-851pm
Best
Tuesday
Major Times Mlnor Times
135 m-3 35 mn 712 m-812 m
2 00 p400p1 850 p-950 p
Best
Wednesday
Major Times MnorTimcs
2 26 m4 26mn 7 57 m-8 57 m
252 p452p1 948 p-1048 p
Belter


I A


Boating Emergencies

Coast Guard Station
Panam a City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500
or ............................................................................ (850) 284-1166


0 1 i I z 0 1, 0 1 1, i i


-j






Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


Law Enforcement and Courts


reports


Sheriff's Report


On Tuesday, April
15, Deputy Ashley
McAlister investi-
gated a complaint at
Burger King that a
small child was left
unattended in a vehi-
cle in the parking lot.
As Deputy McAli-
ster arrived at the
scene, Cameron Gar-
rett McCarty, 24, of
Crawfordville, was
observed laying in the
driver's seat. McCarty
was holding a glass
pipe and the odor of
marijuana was com-
ing off his person. A
search of the vehicle
resulted in additional
marijuana being lo-
cated. The marijuana
weighed 5.3 grams.
McCarty was ar-
rested for possession
of less than 20 grams
of marijuana and
possession of drug
paraphernalia.
The 11-month-old
child was appeared
to be unharmed when
checked by deputies
and was turned over
to his mother. Sgt.
Jeremy Johnston and
Deputy Matt Hedges
also investigated. The
Department of Chil-
dren and Families
was also contacted
about the incident.
In other activity re-
ported by the sheriffs
office this week:

THURSDAY, APRIL
10

SPatricia Carmi-
chael of Crawfordville
reported a vehicle
burglary. The victim
reported the theft
of medications from
her vehicle. The loss
of the medications
is valued at $6.50
as 133 tablets were
taken. Deputy Ward
Kromer investigated.
Michael Simpkins
of Crawfordville re-
ported a fraud. Some-
one used the victim's
Social Security num-
ber to file a tax re-
turn. Deputy Ward
Kromer investigated.
Jonathan Stewart
Belle, 31, of Hilliard
was arrested for pro-
viding a false name
to law enforcement.
Deputy Alan Middle-
brooks conducted
a traffic stop on a
tractor trailer due
to an obscured tag.
The passenger gave
Deputy Middlebrooks
two false names be-
fore dispatch con-
tacted the deputy and
noted that Jonathan
Belle had active war-
rants. The three ac-
tive warrants were
out of Leon County


and Belle was arrest-
ed on the warrants
and for resisting an
officer-obstruction by
a disguised person.
A concerned
citizen reported an
unconscious man
in the parking lot of
CVS Pharmacy. The
70-year-old Panacea
man was unrespon-
sive and the Wakulla
Fire Department was
contacted along with
Wakulla EMS. An
AED and CPR were
used in an effort to
assist the man. He
was transported to
Tallahassee Memo-
rial Hospital where
he was pronounced
dead. There were no
signs of foul play. Lt.
Jimmy Sessor, Detec-
tive Rachel Wheeler
and Tallahassee Po-
lice Officer Clayton
assisted.
Jason David Tay-
lor, 23, of Panacea
received a notice to
appear in court for
criminal mischief af-
ter striking a female
victim's vehicle which
created a dent follow-
ing a dispute. Dam-
age was estimated at
$150. Deputy Matt
Helms investigated.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11

Ryan Travis Per-
ez, 21, of Crawford-
ville was issued a no-
tice to appear in court
for reckless driving
after Perez violently
spun his tires on a
dirt road and struck
Deputy Alan Middle-
brooks with rocks
and dirt while the
off-duty deputy was
mowing his property.
Deputy Middlebrooks
contacted Deputy
Mike Crum who was
on duty. He met Dep-
uty Crum as he con-
ducted a traffic stop
and issued the traffic
citation. Perez left the
scene with a female
passenger driving the
vehicle.
Claretha Show
of Crawfordville re-
ported a credit card
offense. Three unau-
thorized charges were
observed on her bank
account. The charges
were created in South
Florida and amount-
ed to $252. Deputy
Roy Gunnarsson and
Detective Randy Phil-
lips investigated.
Patches S. Rakes
of Panacea reported
a fraud. The victim
attempted to open an
account with a tele-
phone company but
was told she had an
outstanding balance.


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The past due charge
was $254 and the vic-
tim was informed it
was created at a Tal-
lahassee address and
the account included
her husband in Ala-
bama. The victim in-
formed the company
that she has never
lived at the Tallahas-
see address or been
married or visited Al-
abama. Deputy Gibby
Gibson and Detective
Randy Phillips inves-
tigated.
Joseph Tyner of
Crawfordville report-
ed the theft of a ve-
hicle tag. It appeared
someone stole the
victim's tag and re-
placed it with another
tag. The missing tag
was entered into the
NCIC/FCIC data base
as stolen. Deputy Roy
Gunnarsson investi-
gated.
Ben Arnett, 63,
of Crawfordville was
arrested for DUI and
driving while license
suspended or revoked
second or subsequent
conviction. Lt. Jim-
my Sessor observed
Arnett cross the fog
line with his vehicle
five times while driv-
ing near Sopchoppy.
Lt. Sessor conducted
field sobriety exercis-
es and ran a check on
the subject's driver
license. The vehicle
was turned over to a
family member. Sgt.
Lorne Whaley also
investigated.

SATURDAY, APRIL
12

SMisty A. Weeks
of Crawfordville was
involved in a one ve-
hicle traffic crash on
Sopchoppy Highway.
There were no inju-
ries and only minor
damage to the ve-
hicle. Deputy Gibby
Gibson investigated.
Deputy Stephen
Simmons and Deputy
Ross Hasty observed
a vehicle fail to stop
at a stop sign at Dux
Liquors. The motor-
ist turned west onto
Lawhon Mill Road
and continued at a
high rate of speed.
The subject traveled
in excess of 75 mph
and traveled 65 mph
around curves where
the speed limit was
35 mph. Michael War-
ren Monteith, 29, of
Crawfordville eventu-
ally came to stop at
Mill Creek Road where
deputies questioned
him. Monteith was
charged with DUI and
failure to maintain a
single lane. Deputy
Jeff Yarbrough also
investigated.
Robert Livingston
of Sopchoppy report-
ed a vehicle theft. The
victim loaned his ve-
hicle to a friend who
was not using it for
its intended purpose.
The victim asked the
suspect to return the
vehicle but it remains
in her possession.
The vehicle was en-
tered into the NCIC/
FCIC data base as
stolen. Deputy Scott
Powell investigated.
Sgt. Ryan Muse
was on patrol on Dr.
Martin Luther King
Jr. Memorial Road


when he observed
Jeffrey Allyn Saba,
26, of Crawfordville
operating a motor ve-
hicle. Sgt. Muse knew
that Saba had a sus-


pended driver license
and he conducted a
traffic stop. Saba's
passenger jumped
out of the vehicle and
fled into a wooded
area. Saba was given
a traffic citation for
driving while license
is suspended or re-
voked. The vehicle
was turned over to
the registered own-
er who was verbally
abusive toward depu-
ties. The passenger
who fled the vehicle
was caught by the
WCSO on April 14.
Deputy Gibby Gibson
also investigated.
Deputy Stephen
Simmons responded
to a retail theft com-
plaint from Wal-Mart.
Two female juveniles,
ages 15 and 17, were
detained at the store.
The juveniles placed
items into a purse
and walked beyond
the last point of sale
without paying for the
items. Miscellaneous
items including cos-
metics, clothing and
pens, valued at $99,
were recovered. The
females were issued
juvenile civil citations
for retail theft.

SUNDAY, APRIL 13

Jon Paul Forney,
26, of Crawfordville
was arrested for pos-
session of cocaine,
possession of less
than 20 grams of
marijuana and pos-
session of drug para-
phernalia following a
traffic stop. Deputy
Ross Hasty observed
an inoperable head-
light and conducted
a traffic stop at which
he allegedly observed
a white residue on
Forney's clothing.
Three syringes were
discovered in the ve-
hicle along with co-
caine residue.
Deputies were un-
able to locate the co-
cain which Forney
reportedly said he
had thrown out the
car window before
stopping.
Forney possessed
.03 of a gram of mari-
juana and a smok-
ing pipe containing
marijuana residue.
Deputy Will Hudson,
Sgt. Lorne Whaley
and Deputy Stephen
Simmons also inves-
tigated.
Donald Clevenger
of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of a
bicycle. The victim's
bike was taken from
his porch. The bike is
valued at $120. Sgt.
Danny Harrell inves-
tigated.

MONDAY, APRIL 14

Deputies Stephen
Simmons and Ross
Hasty observed a ve-
hicle traveling on U.S.
Highway 98 toward
Panacea changing
speeds from 40 mph
to 65 mph in a 55
mph zone. The ve-
hicle also crossed the
centerline and fog
line of the roadway. A
traffic stop was con-
ducted and Deputy
Simmons detected
the strong odor of
marijuana coming
from inside the ve-


hidcle. The deputy was
given verbal consent
to search the vehicle.
A straw was ob-
served in a cup with
cocaine residue on it.


Marijuana was also
observed inside the
vehicle. The mari-
juana weighed 2.5
grams and the co-
caine weighed one
gram.
Joshua Bryant
Sparks, 22, of Pana-
cea was charged with
possession of co-
caine, possession of
less than 20 grams of
marijuana and pos-
session of drug para-
phernalia. He was
issued a warning for
failure to maintain a
single lane.

MONDAY, APRIL 14

Tre Allen Mc-
Cullough, 22, of
Crawfordville was
apprehended on out-
standing warrants
and a resisting ar-
rest without violence
charge was issued.
McCullough fled from
law enforcement offi-
cers at a Spring Creek
Highway convenience
store. McCullough
ran to a pond at a
location south of the
store where he was
apprehended by law
enforcement officials
in waist deep water.
He was returned to
the Wakulla County
Jail without incident.
The Narcotics Unit,
Deputy Vicki Mitch-
ell, Detective Randy
Phillips, Deputy Ward
Kromer and Deputy
Alan Middlebrooks
investigated.
Randall Pelt
of Crawfordville re-
ported a criminal
mischief. The vic-
tim's fence had been
struck by a vehicle.
The fence was valued
at $500 and appeared
to have been run over
intentionally. Deputy
Alan Middlebrooks
investigated.
Catherine Nel-
son of Crawfordville
reported a fraud.
Someone used the
victim's Social Se-
curity number to file
taxes in New Jersey.
Sgt. Ray Johnson in-
vestigated.
Michael Foster
of Crawfordville re-
ported a residential
theft. The victim lost
a large sum of money
from his home in two
separate incidents.
Deputy Ashley McAli-
ster investigated.

TUESDAY, APRIL
15

STravis O'Farrell
of Crawfordville re-
ported a residential
burglary. Someone
removed a large
television from the
residence. The TV
is valued at $600.
A person of interest
was identified. Dep-
uty Ashley McAlister
investigated.
Marcus Beard of
the U.S. Forest Ser-
vice reported find-
ing property at Leon
Sinks Recreational
Area. The wallet
was turned in to of-
ficials in Crawford-
ville. Charles How-
land of Tallahassee
was notified of the
found property and
promised to come to
the sheriffs office to
pick it up. The prop-


erty was turned in
to the Property and
Evidence Division.
Deputy Alan Middle-
brooks investigated.
Betty Scott of


Crawfordville report-
ed the theft of a ve-
hicle tag. The tag is
valued at $80. The
victim is unsure of
when or where the
tag was stolen. Sgt.
Ray Johnson inves-
tigated.
Ralph Larue of
Crawfordville report-
ed a vehicle burglary
at Southern Spirits
Lounge. The victim
lost cash and a cell
phone. The vehicle
was left unsecured.
The stolen property
is valued at $156.
Deputy Alan Middle-
brooks investigated.

WEDNESDAY,
APRIL 16

Alison Smith of
Crawfordville report-
ed the theft of vehicle
keys from her car.
The keys were left
inside the unsecured
vehicle at Wal-Mart.
A person of interest
has been identified.
Deputy Ashley McAli-
ster investigated.
Earl Scott of
Crawfordville report-
ed finding keys at
Spring Creek High-
way and Cayuse
Drive. The keys were
turned over to Deputy
Adam Pendris and
included a vehicle
key and various other
keys. The keys were
turned into the Prop-
erty and Evidence
Division.
Nathaniel Rawls
of Crawfordville re-
ported an attempted
grand theft. Someone
attempted to remove
a shed from his rela-
tive's property. The
victim confronted the
suspect and he left
the scene on foot.
A forced entry was
discovered and a bi-
cycle was reported
missing. A trailer left
at the scene by the
suspect was towed to
the WCSO Impound
Yard. Deputy Adam
Pendris, Sgt. Danny
Harrell and Detective
Clint Beam investi-
gated.
Randy Paul of
Crawfordville re-
ported a residential
burglary. A forced
entry was discovered
at the home and dam-
age was estimated
at $175. Televisions,
jewelry, diving equip-
ment, a camera and
other items were re-
ported missing. The
items are valued at
$4,010. Deputy Gib-
by Gibson and De-
tective Clint Beam
investigated.
Wal-Mart Asset
Protection staff re-
ported a retail theft.
Two males were ob-
served leaving the
store with unpaid
merchandise. One of
the suspects entered
the store a second
time and was con-
fronted by staff. He
fled the area on foot
while the first sus-
pect fled the area in
a vehicle. The value
of the stolen items
was $143. Evidence
was collected at the
scene. Deputy Jeff
Yarbrough investi-
gated.

The Wakulla Coun-


ty Sheriff's Office re-
ceived 1,056 calls for
service during the
past week.


www.thewakullanews.com






www.thewakullanews.com


Court shorts


By WILLIAM SNOWDEN
editor@thewakullanews.net

Fred Bradford Jr. pleaded
no contest to a number of
felony charges in three differ-
ent cases and was sentenced to
11 months and 29 days in the
Wakulla County Jail as part of
a plea deal to resolve the cases.
Bradford, 34, entered the
plea before Circuit Judge
Charles Dodson on Wednes-
day, April 9.
In one case, Bradford was
charged with setting fire to a
vacant mobile home at his fa-
ther's property in Panacea back
in September 2012.
According to the probable
cause affadavit, Bradford and
his father, Fred Bradford Sr.,
got into an argument. The
son was intoxicated and the
father told him to leave. They
continued arguing and, accord-
ing to an eyewitness, Bradford
Jr. threatened to "Burn the
mother(expletive) down."
A deputy was called to the
scene and, soon after, the mo-
bile home was found to be on
fire. Bradford Jr. could not be
located.
Later, Bradford was located
in the Dollar General parking
lot passed out.
In June 2013, with a war-
rant out for him for arson, a
second degree felony, deputies
found Bradford at a gas station


as they were investigating a
drunk driver call about some-
one operating a moped scooter
on Highway 98. As deputies
attempted to arrest him, Brad-
ford allegedly resisted arrest
and had to be taken to the
ground to be handcuffed. When
he was searched, deputies
found a bottle of whiskey and
a small amount of marijuana.
Additional charges of felony
driving while license revoked
and misdemeanors for resist-
ing officer without violence and
possession of marijuana.
A month later, in July 2013,
deputies were called out to a
Panacea home in response to
a disturbance call. According
to the report, deputies saw
and heard Bradford yelling
obscenities and threatening
to fight a man who was walk-
ing away from the house. The
man approached deputies for
assistance.
Deputy Jared Taylor and
Sgt. Jeremy Johnston ap-
proached the house and found
Bradford in the front yard
yelling. When the deputies at-
tempted to take him into cus-
tody, "he began resisting our
verbal commands by clinching
his fist and yelling obscene
language at us."
Bradford allegedly shoved
Sgt. Johnston in the chest
and tried to run back in the
house, according the report.


Drug Take-Back Day is Saturday
Special to The News

The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office will take part in the
National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday,
April 26.
The National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day aims to
provide a safe, convenient and responsible means of dispos-
ing of prescription drugs, while also educating the public
about the potential for abuse of medications.
Sheriffs deputies will be assigned to Crum's Mini Mall on
U.S. Highway 98 in Panacea; the Kangaroo Store on Wood-
ville Highway in Wakulla Station and at the Wakulla County
Health Department in Crawfordville. Collections of unwanted
medications will be accepted from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m.
For those unable to dispose of their medications on Drug
Take-Back day, the WCSO has a disposal receptacle in the
lobby of the sheriff's office that is secure and available 24
hours a day to accept unwanted medications.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 15A


The deputies grabbed Bradford
by his arms and took him to the
ground. He reportedly began
to kick his legs wildly and had
to be placed in arm bar trans-
porter to get into the patrol
vehicle, according to the report.
Deputies at already been
called out to the house two
times that day for disturbances.
On one call, deputies arrived to
find Bradford and Eldon Theo-
dore Hicks Jr. fighting.
Hicks, who had warrants
out for his arrest, reportedly
fled the scene and the report
said that none of the people at
the house would talk to depu-
ties about what had happened
- "all persons present were
very intoxicated and uncoop-
erative."
At both of the earlier vis-
its, deputies reported warned
Bradford about not causing
any further disturbance.
Rodney Cruse, charged
with felony battery after a
June 2013 attack on a victim,
pleaded no contest to a lesser
charge of simple battery, a
misdemeanor, and was adju-
dicated guilty and ordered to
serve one year of probation and
pay $1,806 in restitution to the
victim for medical costs.
According to the report,
the charge stemmed from an
incident at Lake Ellen Boat
Ramp back in June 2013 when
Cruse, 43, allegedly walked up
to a man and punched him in
the face.
The man had reportedly had
a previous run-in a few years
earlier with Cruse's father,
Ronnie Cruse, who is now de-
ceased. The elder Cruse had
allegedly battered the man
and the alleged victim pressed
charges so that the elder Cruse
was arrested.
At the Lake Ellen Boat
Ramp, witnesses said that
Rodney Cruse appeared to be
heavily intoxicated and had
walked up to the victim and
punched him in the face with-
out provocation.
At the scene, EMS advised
deputies that the victim ap-
peared to have a fractured
cheekbone.


Library News...


By SCOTT JOYNER
Library Director

WCPL honoring
our volunteers

This will be a busy and
fun-filled weekend coming
up at WCPL. On Friday, April
25 we will be having our an-
nual Volunteer Appreciation
Dinner at 6 p.m. We will
be honoring our volunteers
for all their hard work over
the course of the year. Over
1000 man hours are saved
each year by our volunteer
corp's excellent work which
frees up our staff to work
on programs and projects
which enrich WCPL and
gives our patrons the great
library they so richly deserve.
After a dinner catered by El
Jaliscos, and remarks by
Commissioner Howard Kes-
sler, we will be awarding the
3rd annual Gloria Hatton
Library Volunteer of the Year
Award to a well deserving
person whom you'll learn
more about in next week's
article. On behalf of my staff
let me thank all of our vol-
unteers, past and present,
for continuing to help build
WCPL into one of the area's
great libraries.
Come Join us as the
Friends of the Library Cel-
ebration brings back a great
performer!
On Saturday. April 26 at
6 p.m., the Friends of the
Library celebrate their 38th
birthday with a celebration,
performance by Betty Jean
Steinshouer, and the an-
nouncement of the winner of
the Samsung Pro Tablet the
Friends have been holding a
drawing for. We are lucky to
once again host Betty Jean


Steinshouer who has been
doing public programs and
teacher seminars for the
Florida Humanities Council
since 1989 and has toured
43 other states for the Na-
tional Endowment for the
Humanities. Steinshouer's
program "3 Views of Heming-
way", examines the author of
machismo, Earnest Heming-
way, from a woman's point
of view. Gertrude Stein, Act
One, shares memories of a
young and "impossibly hand-
some" reporter who came to
her door in Paris one of the
"Lost Generation" of Ameri-
cans created by World War 1.
Willa Cather, Act Two, places
Hemingway in company with
other writers such as F. Scoot
Fitzgerald, Ford Maddox
Ford, and Gertrude Stein.
And finally, in Act Three,
Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings
talks about "Hem," her friend
and colleague at Scribner's.
She knows, better than any,
his deep affection for Florida
and his fatal flaws. This
program was made possible
through a grant from the
Florida Humanities Council.
The evening will finish with
the drawing for the Samsung
Galaxy tablet. Please come
out and join us for all the
fun as we celebrate all that
the Friends do for WCPL and
Wakulla County as a whole!
Computer classes
return at WCPL

The new round of com-
puter classes begun this
week and we have added a
webcam to our computer
lab which allows Deanna
Ramsey to teach classes
remotely while she is out of
town. Come by or call us to
sign up for everything from
Computer Basics and using
an iPad, to Facebook busi-
ness pages, and Microsoft
Excel. You can sign up for
these free classes either by
calling us at 926-7415 or
stopping by the front desk
the next time you're in. Don't
let this free way to learn in-
creasingly needed skills pass
you by!


NEW PROGRAM from



in lmli Wakulla
National Alliance on Mental Illness


'I'


liii


I,
vi


"NAMI BASICS"


NAMI Basics is a Six Week Program
Completely FREE for Parents and Caregivers!

If you're a parent or caregiver who has struggled in
raising a child who has shown signs or symptoms of
possible behavioral problems, brain disorders or mental
illness this program is for you.

You are trained in preparedness and emotional
resiliency, the fundamentals of caring for self, family
and empowerment as an effective advocate!


WHEN: Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 6pm until 8:30pm
and every Tuesday through June 3rd.

WHERE: Wakulla One Stop Community Center,
WOSCC, Corner of Shadeville Highway
and Trice Lane

A LIGHT DINNER WILL BE SERVED

CONTACT: NAMI Wakulla at the WCCOSC (850) 745-6042

ENROLL IN PERSON AT WCCOSC


May 2nd & 3rd 2014


Tournament at the 3Y Ranch
195 Harvey Young Farm In Crawfordville, Florida
Camping Available Contact: Skip@3yranch.com
Registration Fee $75.00 Adults & $50.00 Youth 17 & under

Fishing within 50 Mile Radius Of Wakulla County


Grand Prize Slam: Hobie Outback Kayak

Prizes includes Kayaks $1,000 *$500 *$250
First 25 Registrants will receive a special prize
First 100 Registrants will receive Classic T-Shirt & Bag
ALL Registered Anglers will receive a Iyear digital subscription
to Kayak Angler Magazine


Freshwater Division
Large Mouth Bass
ONLY!


Youth Division
Ages 17 & Under
Fish by Length



^


Saltwater Division
Red Fish &
Trout


For Registration go to: www.bigbendkayakclassic.com or
Call 850-926-7145
Proceeds Benefit Meals on Wheels & Other Senior Services






Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


Carpenter bees nest by boring tunnels into wood


By Les Harrison
By Les Harrison


. _' .- . ,A s
S. .* .
i- E. .p


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--. .... r --/ -' ^^ ,- -"^i^
.. ~ ~ ~ -., ...a- ,_..-_


Carpentry is an
honorable and ancient
profession. It requires
the builder to have
awareness of the en-
vironmental require-
ments and recognition
of the construction
materials at hand.
It was early car-
penters who built the
first shelters in which
humans lived. These
shelters allowed for
the occupants to stay
relatively comfortable
and protected from the
outside elements.
With these comfort-
able surroundings,
sometime marginally
better than the over-
all environs, the resi-
dents were better able
to prepare for upcom-
ing challenges. Car-
pentry literally became
the basis for human
advancement and oc-
cupation of the globe.
In the insect world
in Wakulla County and
the southeast, being a
carpenter has much
different implications.
Eastern Carpenter
Bees (Xylocopa vir-
ginica) are the most
common of several car-
penter bee species.
They are widely
known for their be-
havior of boring into
and destroying wood
products. Other large
and small carpenter
bees bore into wood or
pithy stems, but are
not of as much eco-
nomic importance.
While there is a
strong similarity, there
is a difference between
this carpenter bees


and bumble bees.
The easiest way to
recognize a carpen-
ter bee is they have a
shiny abdomen, while
the bumblebee is cov-
ered with fine hairs.
Both carpenter bees
and bumblebees are
effective native pol-
linators, but it is the
nesting habits of the
carpenter bees which
become a problem for
anyone who owns or
manages a structure
with untreated wood.
Carpenter bees
nest by boring tun-
nels into wood, while
bumblebees will use
pre-existing cavities or
other protected sites
for nest.
The entrance to a
carpenter bee's nest
is a 5/8-inch (16 mil-
limeter) circular hole.
The dimensions of the
opening are so impec-
cable as to have the
appearance of being
drilled by a precision
tool.
Instead of boring
straight through, the
carpenter bee quickly
takes a right turn and
extends the nest half a
foot or more. The holes
are at or near the bot-
tom of the nest and
multiple tunnels will
branch off the single
opening.
To penetrate the
wood, the carpenter
bees use their hard
and durable mandibles
on the front of their
head as a rasp to wear
away the wood. They
vibrate their bodies
to scrape wood into a


S. --




**'
- .'* ..


-. A..


C .




PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS


A carpenter bee at work drilling a tunnel in wood, above. Another bee collecting pollen, below.


near dust-like consis-
tency.
The wood particles
are discarded through
the opening or used
to build partitions be-
tween the cells where
the next generation
of carpenter bees are
incubated.
The bees do not eat
the wood residue.
Eggs are laid in a
specific tunnel and it
is sealed with a wood
particle, nectar and
pollen paste then an-
other egg is deposited
and sealed for incu-
bation. This pattern
maybe repeated up to
a dozen times.
The eggs are large
relative to the females
and are some of the
largest domestic insect
eggs.
Other chambers
in the tunnel system


store pollen and nectar
for future use.
The repeated bor-
ing takes a toll on the
structural integrity of
wood.
The irregular pat-
tern of holes and saw-
dust are unsightly to
people, but it attracts
the attention of wood-
peckers who see an
easy meal.
The hard beaks of
woodpeckers make
quick work of the shal-
low brood chamber.
Unfortunately they
have no appreciation
for the property own-
er's need for shelter
when structures are
involved, so a carpen-
ter will be needed to
repair the damage.
To learn more about
eastern carpenter bees
in Wakulla County
contact the UF/IFAS


Wakulla County Ex-
tension Office at (850)
926-3931 or http://
wakulla.ifas.ufl.edu/.

Les Harrison is the


t'AF
^^B ,^If ^G^






Wakulla County Exten-
sion Director. He can
be reached by email at
harrisog@ufl. edu or at
(850) 926-3931.


. . . .. l ,



;Baccto ,Potting Soil ........40 OT J.

Oldecastle Potting Soil...75 CF -

Top Soil...........................75 CF G
Garden Hos
Cypress Mulch ................. 2 CF S5/8 IN X 75 FT

Marble Marine Chips.......4 CF N vw

Vegetable Plants .............4 PK 1,k 10,

Double Knock out Roses.1 GAL^JihiT U


r '


f V Lattice

SGreen Thumb Resin Planter
Shovel 18 IN
I SQUARE OR ROUND ----/q


^I1JLJ-


www.thewakullanews.com


*w







sports


alla's Shelby Harrell hits a double down the left field line scoring
two crucial runs in the sixth inning.
SOFTBALL

Lady War Eagles win


district championship


)AVID MONTEZ
icial to The News
Strains that soaked
of the Big Bend
this past week
*d down enough
turday to dry out
akulla High School
l1 field so that the
.lla Lady Eagles
faceoff against the
nnee Bulldogs for


the 5A-2 District Cham-
pionship.
Fans in attendance
were not disappointed
as the Lady War Eagles
broke free from a pitch-
ers duel scoring the
games only runs in the
sixth inning.
Wakulla's Meghan
Sarvis (So.) and Suwan-
nee's Haejin Choe (Jr.)
shut out their respective


opponents going into
the sixth inning.
Despite the Bulldogs
being able to place run-
ners in scoring position
in the fourth, fifth and
sixth innings, the Lady
Eagles were able to keep
them scoreless through
pinpoint pitch place-
ment and a calm cool
defense.
Turn to Page 5B


DAVID MONTEZ/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
:ing pitcher Meghan Sarvis pitches to Suwannee's Kirsten Rogers
to close out the game in the seventh inning.







THIRD ANNUAL



R ,I in Franklin
-W, mE) OR County
Saturday, April 26 at 11 a.m.
Ateran's Memorial Plaza, on Market Street in Apalachicola
The program will begin with a welcome from Jimmy Mosconis
followed by an invocation by Rev. Charles Scott and
the Presentation of Colors by the Port St Joe High School ROTC.
Tamara Marsh will sing the Star Spangled Banner.
'rant Smith will lead the Pledge of Allegiance and veterans David Butler and
Arnold Toliver will place a patriotic wreath at the foot of the memorial.
)n Carroll will close the ceremony with a benediction and blessing of the food.




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.,LIUII U


By PAUL HOOVER
WHS Track Coach
On Thursday, April 17, the WHS
track teams made their annual trek
to Bolles High School in Jackson-
ville for the 2014 Regional Track
Meet.
Thirteen individuals and three
relay teams had qualified for the
meet and, on paper, it looked like
this group might be capable of mak-
ing the best showing ever for both
the boys and girls teams.
The cool weather was advanta-
geous, but the 15-20 mph northeast
wind promised to be a challenge for
the running events. By the time the
meet wrapped up at 9:30 that eve-
ning, both the boys and girls teams
had made their presence felt and
ended up scoring more points and
placing higher than any previous
WHS teams.
At this meet, the first four indi-
viduals and relay squads in each
event qualified for the State Meet
which will be held at the University
of North Florida in Jacksonville on
May 2.
The action started at 1 p.m. with
the girls 4x800 relay and the local
girls had a solid outing, placing
third out of 16 teams and securing
their spot in the State Meet for the
second consecutive year. Margaret
Wiedeman led off the relay, running
a solid 2:39 leg and then handed
the baton off to Haleigh Martin who
ran a superb leg (2:25) and moved
the local squad into third place.
Lydia Wiedeman ran next, record-
ing a 2:33 leg and not only held
the team's position, but opened a
significant gap on Episcopal High
School. Madison Harris ran the
anchor leg and cruised the 800


meters, just maintaining the I
position. The squad finished
excellent time of 10:09.43.
Next up were the boys, wh(
ranked 8th coming into the
Bryce Cole led off the relay, ru
an excellent time of 2:03, fo]
by solid legs from Alan Pe
and J.P. Piotrowski. Albert S:
finished with a great effort, ru
2:03, to bring the squad horr
time of 8:30.47, a new school i
by almost 10 seconds.
The team finished in fifth
and missed qualifying for St
1.2 seconds and scored 4 poii
their efforts. This is the first
WHS boys relay team ever fir
in the top eight at a Regiona
and earned team points.
While the relays were goil
the WHS field competitors
competing in the long jump.
For the girls, freshman Adr
Mitchell jumped 17'01" and I
ninth, an excellent showing f
first Regional Meet.
On the boys side, senior (
Knight had another excellent
ing, placing second overall
jump of 22'11.75", his second
jump of the season, and soph,
Keith Gavin jumped 21'07..
claim 7th place.
Next up was the boys high
and as expected, Knight and
made their presence felt. The,
came into the meet with a
leading jump of 6'8" and boti
clearing heights until it was d(
just them and ajumper from']
Christian High School. All -
after clearing 6'6" and Knigl
fered a strained muscle an
Trinity Christian jumper got
leg cramps.
Turn to Page 5B


P Blue Crab Festiv4
( First Saturday of May. Panacea, Florida





Sckecdue of Eets

2014 vuce Ca6 Fet i Vag S ed",

10:00-11:00AM The Coastal Optimist Club Parade
11:00 Master Chie6
12:15 Mullet Toss
1:00 Mountain Dew dCloers
2:00 Crab Pickin' Contest!
2:50 Gupsu Darlings
5:50 Mountain Dew dCloers
4-:50 Dean Newman, Kim Thomas,
Kit Goodner and Charlie Wilkinson

5:15 Lost Creek
6:00 Park Closes

Arts & Crafts Entertainment

Crab PicLing Contest Kids Activities

Fresh Local Seafood

GulF Specimen Mobile Marine Lab


74ns4 to or Sfontsors

'Wahullla A'^ o~ ^b3yf
v~nWOPTIMIST rs
IMTERN4AIKU FrICSk
@ omcalst. -.fsoo
wwwb le bes. Gulf.Seafoc

www.bluecrabfest. corn

80-194-CRAB


sports news and team viev


TRACK

Teams set records 4


regional meet

Corion Knight (long jump, high jump), Keith Gavin (
jump), the girls 4x800 relay team and Madison Hari
qualify for the State Meet on May 2























































The work of six local photographers
documenting life and work in Wakulla
County's maritime industry was on
display April 17 at the Wakulla One
top Community Center. Guests viewed
aore than 40 photographs and enjoyed
'eshments. The exhibit will be on display
the center for two weeks for those who
missed the exhibit opening. Also featured
the exhibit was a maritime family tree,
at compiled the maritime contributions
individuals in Wakulla County. Photos,
zkwise from top left are as follows: Betsy
mith leans in to get a close look at the
photographs Herb Donaldson, who co-
,anized the exhibit, welcomes the crowd
thanks sponsors as he stands in front of
e maritime equipment displays. Morgan
ays views the photos with his daughter
likely. Food included cake, pastries, cold
s and local rock shrimp. Albert Hartsfield
acts to his portrait at the exhibit. Niraj
'atel notes details in the exhibit to his
ghter Riddhi. It is estimated 200 people
Owed up to view the exhibit and show
apport of the area's maritime workers.


NOW OPEN
)AM 7PM Mon-Fri
S 9AM 4PM Sat

,ME FURN ITU R E Llllmore.
1 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL
Ldcock.com 850926-2281

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More photos online at
thewvakullanew\s.com


J'wat gowt pachI to

a dat attfef Spa!

SATURDAY, May 3rd
Pr_. 9:30 A.M. 2:30 P.M.
Hudson Park
Spa amenities Crawfordville
include:
All Natural Ingredients
Aromatherapy Bubble Bath
(lavender, vanilla, mint and more)
Le Flea & Tick Spray .. '1
Towel Drying A l
PAWdecure .

Donations: f


$12
$7
$10

$7
$25


All amenities (flea dip included)
Regular bath only
Glamour Photos
(pearls, bow ties, hats, ribbons,
Anal Gland Extraction


boas, etc.


Micro-chipping
(includes registration of micro-chip)


SCHIAT Citizens for Human Animal Treatment
%.L.A. Serving Wakulla County since 2001
I CHAT ofWakulla Inc PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326 w chatofwakulla orq *
A copy of the official registration CH -13163 and financial information maybe obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services
Reistration does not imply endorsement approval, or recommendation by the State






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 3B


JtpatiQ 25 -








Upcoming Events

Friday, April 25

THE 41ST ANNUAL STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMORIAL
REGATTA will be held at Shell Point Beach. This year's event is
scheduled forApril 25-27. Pre-register at www.smithregatta.com.

Saturday, April 26

2014 GREEN LIVING EXPO AND GREEN FLEA MARKET
presented by Sustainable Big Bend, Inc. and to be at the TCC
Wakulla Center and Hudson Park in Crawfordville from 9 a.m.-
2 p.m. The event is free.

6th ANNUAL ROCK THE DOCK FISHING TOURNA-
MENT will be held at Rock Landing Dock in Panacea. Cap-
tain's Meeting on Friday, April 25 beginning at 6 p.m.; Reg-
istration begins at 4 p.m. Entertainment by Tobacco Road
Band, 7 to 10 p.m. For more information go to www.pan-
acearockthedock.com.

The 2014 SOPCHOPPY MUD RUN will be from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m., benefitting the WAKULLA COUNTY FIRE EXPLORER
program. To register, visit http://www.sopchoppymudrun.com, or
call 850-962-4611.

WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will host a
fish fry to raise funds for the Heritage Village Park, which will
be the featured food entree for the Green Expo being held in
Hudson Park and TCC facilities.

The 4th annual NAMI TRIPLE CROWN DERBY FOR
MENTAL ILLNESS will be at the Wakulla County Horse-
man's Association located at 1757 Lawhon Mill Road in Me-
dart. Races begin at 5 p.m. Dinner and awards will follow the
event. Tickets are $20 for adults and $7 for ages 7 through
15. Ages 6 and under get in free. Children's entertainment,
celebrity emcee and live music.

FRIENDS OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY PUBLIC LI-
BRARY kick off their annual membership drive with a "Buy
a Ticket, Win a Tablet" campaign.The drawing and celebra-
tion at the library at 6 p.m. Snacks will be served before our


speaker begins at 6:45. Special speaker is Betty Jean Stein-
shouer.

DESCENDANTS OF EPHRAIM AND MARGARET REV-
ELL Vause will be at 10:30 a.m. at Pee Wee Vause Farm. For
more information call Claxton Vause at 962-2371.

SOPCHOPPY OPRY presents SOUTH BOUND BAND
with special guest WESTFIELD 1924, featuring JEFF TIL-
LEYAND DANA CLARKE at 7 p.m. at the Historic Sopchop-
py High School Auditorium. Tickets are $12. The event is
sponsored by Quigg's Tax Service. Call 962-3711 for more
information.

Monday, April 28

NAMI WAKULLA is presenting a free screening of the Life-
time original movie "Call Me Crazy" at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla
One Stop Community Center. The star-studded movie focuses
on the challenges and triumphs of living with mental illness.
Light refreshments will be served.

A BLOOD DRIVE will be from 2:30 to 7 p.m. at Walgreens,
Crawfordville. All donors will receive a $10 Walgreens gift
card and a wellness checkup including blood pressure, iron
count and cholesterol screening. Make an appointment
online at www.oneblooddonor.org and use sponsor code
#G5265.

Wednesday, April 30

A free HEALTH AND COMMUNITY PARTNER EVENT
at the Quincy Farm Share Site from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Farm
Share will be distributing food as well. The site is located a
quarter mile west of Piggly Wiggly on Highway 90. For more
information contact Sandra_Porras-Gutierrez@dcf.state.
fl.us.

Friday, May 2

The second annual BIG BEND KAYAK CLASSIC tourna-
ment will be Friday and Saturday, at Harvey Young Farm in
Crawfordville. To register, go to www.bigbendkayakclassic.com
or call 850-926-7145. Registraton is $75 for adults and $50 for
youth 17 and under. Fishing is within a 50 miles radius of Wakul-
la County. Proceeds benefit Meals on Wheels and other senior
services.

Saturday, May 3

The COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB is accepting applications
for parade entire for THE 40th ANNUAL PANACEA BLUE
CRAB FESTIVAL PARADE. Line up is at 9 a.m., parade begins
at 10 a.m. on Jer-Be-Lou Blvd. and US 98. Arts, crafts, food
vendors, mullet toss, crab picking contest, Mountain Dew Clog-
gers and music by Gypsy Darlings, Dean Newman & Friends
and many more. For parade applications, call June Vause at
545-0077 or Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480. Or e-mail: jcvause@
yahoo.corn or wversiga@yahoo.com.

AN ENCHANTED EVENING for local students with special
needs will be from 7 to 10 p.m. This event is a special needs
prom, with dinner and dancing at Wakulla Springs Baptist
Church in Crawfordville. Guests 7th grade through post-gradu-
ate students with special needs are invited to join. RSVP by April
25 at 926-5152 or 545-8262.

CHAT will host PAMPER YOUR POOCH, a dog wash


and micro chipping event at Hudson park from 9:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. All-natural dog baths, towel dry, flea and tick spray,
nail clipping, anal expression, micro chipping and pet pho-
tos. Proceeds will benefit the Seniors Pets Meals on Wheels,
TNR program and educational materials for our elementary
students.

The 21stAnnual BACONFEST "SOUTHPORK" event is
free and open to the public, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Sun-
day. Enjoy art, live music and bacon-everything. You bring
dessert. Venue is Pelican Place, 1357 Martin Luther King
Jr Memorial Road in Crawfordville. For more information call
926-6058 or visit www.pelicanplace.net.

FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK in-
vites the community to the family friendly evening for SINK-
HOLE DE MAYO. Guitarists Trio del Mar will perform, state
geologist Dr. Harley Means will lead a short program about
Cenotes, and a themed menu is being prepared by Chef
Jody Perez of the Lodge. There are a limited number of all-
inclusive advance tickets available at wakullasprings.org,
$25 adults and $13 children under 12 years old. The event
begins at 4:30 in the afternoon and ends after a boat ride,
walk, dinner and music at 8 p.m. Free park admission only
with advance ticket purchase. For additional ticket informa-
tion contact Bob Peolquin, 556-9758.

Tuesday, May 6

P.A.S.T. ARCHEOLOGY will have a meeting at 7 p.m.,
as Dr. Lou Hill presents "Less is Moore" -- a reexamination
of two Woodland occupations on the north central Florida
Gulf Coast, (the Bird Hammock and Tucker sites). Vanue is
B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Gov. Martin
House, 1001 De Soto Park Dr., Tallahassee. Call 245-6444
for details.

Sunday, May 18

The fifth annual SHARKS & CHABLIS benefit will be
from 2 to 7 p.m. at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab, 222 Clark
Drive, Panacea. Around 300 loyal patrons, community lead-
ers, government officials and nature enthusiasts enjoy fresh
local seafood, good music, wine and beer while touring
the facilities and exhibitor booths, and vie for works by ac-
claimed local artists in the silent auction. Tickets are $35. For
sponsorship information, call Michelle Gomez 766-6505 or
Cypress Rudloe 445-8618.To purchase tickets, or for more
information, visit http://www.gulfspecimen.org/sharks-and-
chablis.


Live Music

in Wakulla

Friday, April 25

*RIVERSIDE CAFE. 69
Riverside Dr. St Marks
Stranger Than Fiction, clas-
sic rock and roll through
Saturday. April 19

Sunday, April 27

OUTZ TOO OYSTER


B"R & GRILL. 7968 Hay
98. Singm'in Harpoons. 3
p mrn 6 p rn on the patio

RIVERSIDE CAFE. 69
Ri.erside Dr. St Marks
Hitro Ground Shakers rock
and roll

Friday. May 2

RIVERSIDE CaFE. 69
Riverside Dr. St Marks
Singing Harpoons blues/
rock and roll through Sun-
day


Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net


Stephen C. Smith
Memorial Regatta

Shell Point Beach
All day

Fri. & Sat.


Rock the Dock
Fishing Tournament

Rock Landing Dock
Register 4 p.m. Fri.

All Weekend


Government Meetings


Monday, April 28
THE WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISO-
RY COMMITTEE will have a public meeting at 6 p.m. at
the Wakulla County Public Library, to provide feedback to
the Board of County Commissioners, county staff and the
Parks and Recreation Director relating to the recreational
programs of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation
Department. 4330 Crawfordville Hwy.

Thursday, May 8
The Wakulla County TOURIST DEVELOPMENT
COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the
Best Western Inn & Suites at 3292 Coastal Hwy.

Thursday, April 24
The Wakulla County CHARTER REVIEW COMMIS-
SION will hold a Public Meeting at 6 p.m., at the TCC
Wakulla Center, 2932 Crawfordville Hwy.



Clubs, Groups, Regular
Meetings

Thursday, April 24
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey's Steam
Room in Panacea.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each
second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI V\Wakulla office,
2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members
and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of
charge.
VWakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be
held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The VWakulla County
One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for
class at 745-6042.
WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Cen-
ter from 2 to 4p.m.
Friday, April 25
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlock-
onee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more
information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.


BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the senior
center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30
a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill
levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.
Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for
two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville
Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Saturday, April 26
LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday
from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817
South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, educa-
tion and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune
diseases.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission
by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853
for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organ-
ic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Down-
town Sopchoppy under the giant oak.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND
ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is lo-
cated at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.

Sunday, April 27
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at
54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for
five classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30
p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Cen-
ter, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Monday, April 28
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call
545-1853.
YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior
Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath.
RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer's Project of Wakulla
at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship


Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There
is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call
Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.

Tuesday, April 29
VFW LADIESAUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post
on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more informa-
tion.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30
p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more informa-
tion, call 545-1853.
BOOK BUNCH meets in the children's room at the public li-
brary at 10:30 a.m.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI
Wakulla office.
CRAWFORDVILLE LION'S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant.
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9a.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more infor-
mation at 984-5277.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as
in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office.

Wednesday, April 30
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at
6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more in-
formation, call 545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information,
call 545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay
UMC on Surf Road at noon.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more informa-
tion.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30
a.m.
KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. For information, call 491-1684.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.
BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at
the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to
create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.
KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library.
Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to at-
tend.
MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road.
Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play.
SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m.
until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy com-
panionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.


www.thewakullanews.com






Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)


By BRANDON LARABEE
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE, April 18 -
The Capitol fell largely silent
this week, as lawmakers, lob-
byists and some reporters took
time to relax after the opening
month and a half of the leg-
islative session. The sniping
between Gov. Rick Scott and
his chief Democratic opponent,
former Gov. Charlie Crist, con-
tinued to generate emails and
tweets.
But for the most part, it
was time to reflect on where
the session's major bills stand
and where they could be going.
Here are some top issues to
watch as the final two weeks
approach.

TOP PRIORITY: BUDGET
NEGOTIATIONS BEGIN

Outside of once-a-decade
redistricting sessions, lawmak-
ers are fond of saying they have
one constitutional duty every
year: passing a balanced bud-
get. This year, with the week
of Passover and Easter falling
just two weeks before the end
of the session, hammering out
a spending plan is going to be
a sprint.
That's because House and
Senate budget writers have
a nine-day window to ham-
mer out whatever differences
might be left behind after
leaders agree on "allocations"
for different areas of the bud-
get. There could be a few side
deals (announced or not) that
would take some of the big-
ticket issues off the table. But
the budget has to be done by
sometime April 29 in order for
lawmakers to wait the required
72 hours and approve the
spending plan on May 2, the
last day of session.
The plan is likely to settle in
around $75 billion and make
room for Scott's election-year
promise of $500 million in
tax and fee cuts. The Legis-
lature has already decided
to cut nearly $400 million in
vehicle-registration fees, and
the House and Senate are now
arguing over how to divvy up
another $100 million or so in


Pondering
tax cuts, with potential breaks
on everything from back-to-
school supplies to cement
mixers.
Leaders on both sides say
the differences are small, with
the Senate being more gen-
erous to higher education,
while the House gives more to
K-12 schools and education-
construction projects. The two
also differ about how much to
spend on water projects and
what kind of projects to fund.
And there are items that ac-
count for slivers of the budget
but have drawn public atten-
tion, like $13 million set aside
in the Senate to allow Florida
State University to start its
own engineering college, in-
dependent of the program it
now shares with Florida A&M
University.
One thing that's unlikely to
happen: the House and Sen-
ate conference committees
agreeing to find a way to draw
down federal funds intended to
expand Medicaid, as House Mi-
nority Leader Perry Thurston,
D-Fort Lauderdale, asked them
to do in a letter Thursday.
"In my view, what plainly
will not be acceptable to most
Floridians is the current legis-
lative stance of 'no thank you'
to an estimated $51 billion of
available federal money over
10 years to address Florida's
health coverage crisis," Thur-
ston wrote. "Floridians expect
and deserve that their federal
tax dollars be put to work in
our state."
GOP leaders say the fed-
eral government has proven
to be an unreliable partner in
funding for joint programs like
Medicaid, and they've ruled out
any Medicaid expansion.

EDUCATION DEBATES: IM-
MIGRATION AND CHOICE

One of the most closely
watched non-budget bills of
the session has been a mea-
sure that would grant in-state
tuition rates to some illegal im-
migrants (SB 1400) and poten-
tially help the Republican Party
get a toehold in the rapidly
growing bloc of Hispanic voters.


where things stand


Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clear-
water, has led the charge to
pass the bill after the House
overwhelmingly approved a
similar measure (HB 851). Just
before the Legislature began its
break for Passover and Easter,
Latvala said enough senators
had signed on to give him a
majority that would support
the bill.
Senate President Don Gaetz,
R-Niceville, sent a letter Thurs-
day to supporters reiterating
that he would not vote for the
bill. Gaetz had suggested he
would not block the bill if it
would pass the Senate.
"Though I am likely in the
minority in the Legislature on
this matter, I cannot support
taxpayer subsidies in the form
of tuition discounts for undoc-
umented or illegal students,"
Gaetz said.
The prospects for the bill
took a nose-dive later Thurs-
day, when Senate Appropria-
tions Chairman Joe Negron,
R-Stuart, announced that he
would not put the measure on
the committee's agenda. The
bill was scheduled to make a
final stop before that panel and
then head to the floor.
Meanwhile, House Speaker
Will Weatherford, R-Wesley
Chapel, is still trying to push
through a bill that would ex-
pand eligibility for the state's de
facto school-voucher system.
But Gaetz sounded skeptical
about the measure (HB 7167).
"There is no accountability
provision in the House bill,
and I think I still want to be
faithful to the understanding
that Speaker Weatherford and
I had, when we articulated our
work plan, that we would try to
expand school choice with ac-
countability," Gaetz said.

SHOTS FIRED IN
CULTURE WAR: GUNS AND
ABORTION

With the November elec-
tions only a few months away,
Republicans are also looking
for measures that will fire up
socially conservative voters
--- such as restrictions on
abortion and bills advancing
Florida's reputation as a gun-


friendly state.
The main flashpoint on
abortion is a measure (HB
1047) that would largely bar
the procedures if doctors deter-
mine that fetuses have reached
viability. The bill passed the
House and is scheduled to be
heard Monday by the Senate
Rules Committee.
Under current law, abor-
tions in most cases are barred
during the third trimester
of pregnancy. But the bills
would require that physicians
conduct examinations before
performing abortions to de-
termine if fetuses are viable. If
viability is reached, abortions
would generally not be allowed
--- a change that the bills' sup-
porters say could prevent abor-
tions around the 20th week of
pregnancy.
It's not clear whether the
Senate companion (SB 918)
can pass the full Senate, where
moderate Republicans some-
times team with Democrats to
try to block abortion restric-
tions.
The culture wars could also
emerge over legislation that
would allow Floridians to carry
concealed weapons without
licenses during evacuations
ordered by the governor. The
House version (HB 209) has
passed that chamber, and a
counterpart (SB 296) could
soon go to the floor.
Rep. Neil Combee, R-Polk
City, said the "last thing you
need to worry about is being
charged with a crime because
you're taking maybe one of
your most valuable possession
with you" when your house is
damaged, the power lines are
down and communications
are out.
But Rep. Jose Javier Rodri-
guez, D-Miami, argued against
the bill by noting that part of
the intent of the state's con-
cealed weapons licenses is so
individuals are trained to carry.
"Perhaps we can help en-
courage people that part of
hurricane preparedness is that
if you feel the need the carry a
weapon on your person, if there
is an emergency, get a conceal
carry permit," Rodriguez said.


A PLETHORA OF OTHER
ISSUES

Lawmakers will grapple
with dozens of other bills as
they look to get out of Talla-
hassee in early May and start
campaigning for the November
elections. The issues range
from industry fights, such as
hospitals battling about new
trauma centers, to quirky bills,
such as creating the position of
state poet laureate.
But while the Capitol gets
filled with political intrigue and
lobbying battles at the end of
each session, it's important to
remember that some legislation
can have far-reaching effects.
As an example, the House
and Senate are still working on
bills that would address gaps
in Florida's child-protection
system after revelations in The
Miami Herald about the deaths
of children who had previously
come to the attention of the
state Department of Children
and Families.
And in an issue that affects
state employees and other
government workers, such as
teachers, both chambers ap-
pear to be headed toward over-
hauling the state's pension sys-
tem. Broadly, the effort seeks
to encourage more workers to
join a 401(k)-style investment
plan instead of the traditional
pension system. While em-
ployee unions have objected
to changes, Weatherford and
other lawmakers say an over-
haul is needed to ensure the
long-term financial stability of
the retirement system.

STORY OF THE WEEK:
Internet giant Amazon. com an-
nounced it will start collecting
sales taxes on purchases made
by Floridians as of May 1.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
"Indeed, the capacity to become
pregnant is one of the most
significant and obvious distinc-
tions between the female and
male sexes." Florida Supreme
Court Justice Barbara Pari-
ente, writing for the majority
in a case regarding whether
pregnancy is covered under
Florida's Civil Rights Act.


Sharing Hometown Recipes, Cooking Tips and Coupons


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S. j .us. pi ncli .comI/coTreecake
Brought to you by American Hometown Media


WHITE'S WINES


Comics, thoroughbreds


inspired by wine


By DAVID WHITE

Outside the Bay Area,
few wine enthusiasts
realize that California's
wine scene is incredibly
welcoming.
This is understand-
able; we see our favorite
winemakers on the cov-
ers of magazines and
struggle to contain our
excitement when new
wines hit the market. So
expecting to meet any big
name in the flesh seems
as fantastical as expect-
ing to meet Brad Pitt or
Angelina Jolie on a trip
to Hollywood.
But it's not. And some-
times, these encounters
are so inspirational that
lives are forever changed.
Consider my own ex-
perience.
Long before writing
about wine, I started
making regular pilgrim-
ages to Napa Valley and
Sonoma County to devel-
op my palate and expand
my knowledge.
On one early trip, I
sent an email to Thomas
Rivers Brown, one of the
nation's hottest wine-
makers. The vintner be-
hind a host of highly re-
garded labels including
Schrader, Outpost, and
Maybach made his first
big splash in 2008 when
he became the youngest
winemaker in history to
receive a 100-point score
from Robert Parker. In
2010, Brown was named
Food & Wine's "Wine-
maker of the Year."
I had been purchasing
wines from Brown's per-
sonal label, Rivers-Marie,
for a couple years so was
hopeful he'd be available
for a quick meet-and-
greet. As it turned out,
his schedule was wide
open. We hung out for


three hours.
In part, experiences
like this inspired me to
begin writing about wine.
Similar encounters mo-
tivated others to trade
their desk jobs for vine-
yard work. Others have
returned home and de-
cided to launch their own
wineries.
That's what happened
with Birk O'Halloran, a
self- described "wine geek
and a comic book nerd."
O'Halloran fell in love
with wine while studying
hotel administration at
Cornell. After graduation,
he started working in the
wine industry first as
an educator and retailer
in Colorado and New Jer-
sey and later as a sales
manager for A.I. Selec-
tions, a popular importer
in New York.
Through it all,
O'Halloran regularly
traveled to Napa Valley
and developed friend-
ships there.
In 2010, O'Halloran
casually told Steve Mat-
thiasson, a celebrated
viticulturist, that he
dreamed of making wine.
Without pausing, Matthi-
asson offered to secure
some Chardonnay.
Upon hearing this
news, Dan Petroski the
winemaker who makes
some of Napa's best reds
at Larkmead and some
of Napa's best whites
at Massican offered to
help O'Halloran figure it
all out.
So O'Halloran part-
nered with a buddy
from college, drained his
savings account, and
launched Iconic Wine.
When it came time to
figure out a wine label,
O'Halloran decided to
combine his two pas-
sions by hiring an artist


to adorn his wine with a
superhero fit for a comic
book.
Brook Smith, a busi-
ness owner in Kentucky,
has a similar story.
A passionate gour-
mand who co-owns Lou-
isville's top restaurant,
610 Magnolia, Smith has
always loved wine. That's
why, 14 years ago, he
traveled to Napa Valley
with his wife to celebrate
their 10th wedding an-
niversary.
While there, the two
linked up with Suzie and
Paul Frank, the founders
of Gemstone Vineyard.
The four formed a lifelong
friendship, so the Smiths
began visiting Napa Val-
ley with increasing fre-
quency. They quickly
connected with a host
of industry insiders and
grew especially close to
Frank and Kathy Dotzler,
the proprietors of Out-
post Wines.
The Dotzlers, in turn,
introduced Smith to their
winemaker, Thomas Riv-
ers Brown. The two men
hit it off. So in 2010,
Brown agreed to take
on another project and
helped Smith launch
Post Parade Wines. The
name celebrates the mo-
ment when thorough-
bred horses walk onto
the racetrack. It's fitting,
considering that the proj-
ect was hatched while
traveling between Napa
Valley and Kentucky.
These stories are ro-
mantic, to be sure. But
they're hardly unique..

David White is the
founder and editor of
Terroirist. corn. His col-
umns are housed at Pal-
ate Press: The Online
Wine Magazine.


Dard Juds
Scottsdale, AZ
(Pop. 217,385)


(-


JBang'n Blueberry
S Coffee Cake __


thewakullanews.com






www.thewakullanews.com




Sports


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 5B



sports news and team views


Wakulla wrestlers named to All-Big Bend Team


Staff Report

Six Wakulla wres-
tlers were named to
the first team All-Big
Bend wrestling team
last week.
120: Dy'Juan Car-
ney, junior, 39- 10, two-
time state qualifier,
3rd regional, District


Champ, 2nd Capital
City Classic, Tri-Coun-
ty Champ.
132: Bill Morgan,
senior, 28-2, three-time
state qualifier, Capital
City Classic champion,
Clash of Titans champ.
145: Cody Davis,
junior, 35-18, 4th re-
gional, District Champ,


Tri-County Champ, 4th
Clash of Titans, 5th
Clay, 3rd Panhandle.
182: Nathan Tyre,
senior, 36-11, 3rd re-
gional, District Champ,
3rd Capital City Clas-
sic, 2nd Tri-County,
5th Clay, 3rd Capital
City Classic, Panhandle
2nd place.


195: James Douin,
senior, 36-5, 5th state,
3rd regional, District
Champ, Tri-County
Champ, 4th flagler,
Clash of Titans champ,
2nd Clay.
220: Keith Godden,
senior, 44-4, 4th state,
Regional Champ, Dis-
trict Champ, Capital


City Classic Champ,
Tri-County Champ,
Clash of Titans Champ,
5th Flagler, Clay
Champ, Panhandle
Champ.
Also named to Sec-
ond Team were
113: Larry Smith,
freshman, 31-6.
126: Hunter Royce,


sophomore, 14-8.
Honorable mention
included:
106: Jonathan
Hunter, freshman.
138: Josh Douin,
junior.
152: Jacob Austin,
freshman.
170: Cody Ochat,
junior.


Worm Gruntin' 5K race results


By SUSAN BROOKS SHEARER
Race Director

A great time was had by all at the
2014 Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin' 5K
Race which was held on Saturday,
April 12, in Sopchoppy! We had a to-
tal of 160 registered runners. A most
sincere thank you to our sponsors
who helped make our event such a
success.
Our wonderful sponsors this year
included Centennial Bank, Capi-
tal Health Plan, Brooks Concrete,
Bad Bob's of Sopchoppy, City of
Sopchoppy and Blue Water Realty
Group. Additionally, we had our race
mile-marker sign sponsors EGS
(Environmental and Geotechnical
Specialists) and Sopchoppy Pizza
Company! Thank you to all of our
sponsors for your generosity and


Sopchoppy Worm Grun-
tin' 5K Race Results on
Saturday, April 12.

1 Travis Parks
2 Jeff Kuperberg
3 Riley Welch
4 William Thomas
5 Kayla Webbe
6 Melissa Luke
7 William Carter
8 Connie Lewis
9 Jim Heberll
10 David Kaminsky
11 Jonathan Clark
12 Jeremy Gray
13 Jake Vick
14 Casey Weldon
15 Jenny Early
16 Keith Rowe
17 David Savary
18 Connor Whitfield
19 Kyle Pickett
20 Betsy Bartnick
21 Kevin Wable
22 Brian Kaminsky
23 Cale Langston
24 Dalton Wood
25 Jacob Crum
26 KC Criss
27 Jill Criss
28 Michael Martin
29 Cait Snyder
30 Allen Seacrest
31 Laura Gray
32 Patty Dennison
33 Alissa Langston
34 Rob Powis
35 Nancy Lewis
36 Molly Jones
37 Steve Grimsley
38 Dave Clark Jr.
39 Ana Bartel
40 Carrie Jones
41 Leia Hutfles
42 Cary Gerrell
43 Michele Lawhon
45 Amber Stanley
46 Thomas Anderson
47 Brian Blackwell
48 Felicia Langston


support of our event. We could not
have done it without your support.
We would also like to thank the
many volunteers who so gracisously
help each year: Pollie Lawhon, Gigi
Cavallero, Lori Lawhon, Tina Flem-
ing, Lynn Sapp, Robert Strickland,
Bill Shearer, Stephanie Watson and
the WHS ROTC students.
Last but most definitely not least,
thank you to the Wakulla County
Sheriffs Office, the Wakulla County
EMS for their assistance.
To our runners, we hope you
had a great race and we hope to see
you again next year along with a
few friends! Not all runners turned
in their official time; however, the
attached listing shows the time of
140 of our 160 registered runners.
Congratulations to all of you and
we hope to see you again next year!


49 Jessica Mapes
50 Melissa Champany
51 Lisa Weldon
52 Laura Matthias
53 Austin Gray
54 Brian Dupree
55 Jim Matthias
56 Teresa Kuperburg
57 Tom Moses
58 Brittany Gray
59 Michele Blackwell
60 Jessica Weiler
61 Ruth Wiley
62 Susan Jones
63 Eli P
64 Daniel Perez
65 Jodi Osborne
66 Ralph Billings
67 Luke Stripling
68 Wendy Paton-
Beaupre
69 Brandice Mock
70 Katie Maxwell
71 Kelli Kech
72 James Parker
73 Michael Collins
74 Toni Mathers
75 Mary Carter
76 David Vick
77 Kristen Ackermann
78 Holly Gabrialon
79 Nevan Kaminski
80 Josh Gray
81 Michael Criss
82 Matthew Davis
83 Kanoa Tucker
84 Annika Matlock
85 McKenzieAnder-
son
86 Keith Anderson
87 Michelle Gray
88 Donna Hand
89 Boone Prince
90 Alyan Sheets
91 Tom Sheets
92 Michele Taylor
93 Denise Powers
94 Jennifer Coburn
95 Travis Perez
96 Stephanie Du-
pree


Farrington Law Office


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135 Sherry Venatake
136 Durene Gilbert
137 Marador Marx-
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138 Kaite Nighthorse
139 Anne Wejher
140 Doug Llyle


Lady War Eagles win district


From Page 1B

A critical moment in
the game came in the
sixth when Sarvis forced
Jordan Roberts, Su-
wannee's leading hitter
and early commit to the
University of Florida, to
fly out with a runner on
third and only one out.
The sophomore also got
Choe, another one of
the Bulldog's leading
hitters, to ground out to
end the inning. Sarvis,
overall, held Suwannee
to a team average of just
a .217 average and 5
hits, with 7 strikeouts.
Head Coach Tom
Graham stated after the
game that, in addition
to the hard work of his
players, the pitch calling
of Assistant Coach Sally
Wheeler was crucial to
the team's success.
"Coach Wheeler
knows our pitchers so
well," Graham said. "Her


in-depth game planning
gives us such an advan-
tage going into a game."
The Lady War Eagles
broke open the game in
the sixth by capitalizing
on a Bulldog throwing
error and timely hit-
ting by the later half of
the Lady Eagle batting
order.
Junior Kenzie Lee
was able to take advan-
tage of an errant throw
to first advancing to
second with one out.
Coach Graham substi-
tuted freshman speed-
ster Lauren Lewis, a
recent call-up from the
junior varsity squad, for
Lee at second.
Skylar Sullivan fol-
lowed up by earning a
walk against Choe put-
ting runners at first and
second. Senior Chris
Romanus drove home
the would-be go ahead
run with a bloop single
into right field scor-


ing Lewis. With now
runners at second and
third, Sophomore Shel-
by Harrell scorched a
line drive double down
the left field line scoring
two runs.
Sarvis padded her
own run support by
driving in Harrell with a
double of her own mak-
ing the score 4-0. Sarvis
closed out the game
by not allowing a base
runner in the seventh
and then the celebration
ensued.
The Lady War Eagles'
next game will be the
5A Regional Quarterfi-
nals against the 5A-1
district runner-up Gulf
Breeze Dolphins (14-11)
at home Thursday, April
24 at 7 p.m.
The winner of that
game will advance to
play the winner of the
Mosley-Suwannee game
that takes place also
Thursday.


Teams set records at regional meet


From Page 1B


With Gavin and
Knight tied for the lead,
a sudden death jump-
off was held. Gavin
cleared 6'8" on his try
and Knight passed, so
Gavin won his second
consecutive Regional
Championship. Knight
finished in second place
based on fewer misses
than the Trinity Chris-
tian athlete.
In the girls 1600 me-
ters, freshman Haleigh
Martin faced a stellar
field, including a group
of Bolles girls who had
swept their district
meet. Even with the
wind, Martin ran an
excellent race, finishing
within .08 of a second of
her PR (personal record)
and finishing in 5:26.60
and in seventh place.
Next up was the girls
800 meter run, featuring
WHS's Madison Harris,
one of the top ranked
runners in the state.
Harris ran a gutsy race,
but was nipped at the
tape by Bolles' Caitlyn


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Collier, who ran a tacti-
cally perfect race. Collier
finished in 2:17.45 to
Harris' 2:17.78. Both
qualified for the State
Meet and the re-match
should prove interest-
ing!
In the boys 800 me-
ters, Bryce Cole ran
2:03.77 to finish in
10th place and Albert
Smythe finished in 11th,
in 2:05.75.
Next up were the
3200 meter runs. For
the girls, senior Kayla
Webbe ran a solid, con-
trolled race to finish in
7th place in 13:05.70
and sophomore Con-
nie Lewis ran a new
PR of 13:26.55, finish-
ing in 9th place. In the
boys race, Riley Welch
and Travis Parks ran
solid races, finishing in
11:27.26 and 11:28.49
respectively.
The final event of
the day was the 4x400
meter relay. The WHS
girls had qualified for
the event and, although
one of the top girls was
unavailable and one


was not feeling well, the
team "manned up" and
gave it their best shot.
Lydia Wiedeman led off,
followed by Haleigh Mar-
tin who was running her
third race of the meet,
who then handed off to
Adrianna Mitchell.
Mitchell moved the
team into sixth place
and anchor Madison
Harris made a charge
and moved them into
fifth place, but then ran
out of track. The fifth
place finish was only
one place out of qualify-
ing for State.
Corion Knight (long
jump, high jump), Keith
Gavin (high jump), the
girls 4x800 relay team
and Madison Harris all
qualified for the State
Meet on May 2.
This basically dupli-
cates WHS's qualifiers
from last year. How-
ever, overall, the teams
finished higher than
ever before. The boys
finished in 8th place out
of 28 teams and the girls
were 10th of 25 teams.


Locally
0I Owned and
f14 Operated
\4X Since 1991
,&





Commercial + Residential & Mobile Homes
Repairs +, Sales +, Service All Makes and Models
LIC.pRA00oo (850)926-3546




,7 -r^ mje 'Town

RJSSETTI REALTY I tO I
L .................. .... ......................................................................... .......................................... .








David Rossetti Mary Applegate Jason Rudd
850-591-6161 239-464-1732 850-241-6198


r7-Cartier
7m









Dhinkin


Inner

Ironing

Issue

Keeps

Lakes

Landed

Leaps

Leather

Legal

Loads

Masks

Media

Paint

Peculiar

Piano

Puffs


Reality

Refuse

Sandal

Scene

Serve

Shrank

Silks

Sorry

Spoil

Stern

Tables

Tones

Yellow

Yield

Yo-yos


SHRANKKYEL LOWC

NE L D E R L YG L OVE L

V P E C U L I A RHMASK

S A N D A L Y I E L D H D F

PA I NTCSORRYCFS

OH I S D H T H YG F U RR

I F L OC K E U MO P D U T

L E A T H E R N S E S D IA

OXNP I ANOC K D L T B

RC D N C R U E L E A I LL

E E E A K G I I E E F N A E

F P D B E U S N RPAGKS

UTTON E S N KS E P E L

SERVE E D U E F LATSF

E X T E N D E R I RON IN


Sby Helene
Puzzles4Kid Hovanec
RIDDLE SEARCH AIRPORTS
up, down, and diagonally, both forward and backward to find every word on the list
le each one as you find it When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters
I write them on the blanks below Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the
answer to this riddle What is the first thing an elephant does at the airport?
ARRIVE E N I Z A G A M Y P
3AGGAGE
DEPART G E G N U O L A A A
EXIT
FLIGHT A E N A L P T S W S
GATE G R I T T H S I N S
JET
LOUNGE G C R I G E R V U P
MAGAZINE
SENGERS A H X I N E A C R O
ASSPORT
PILOT B E L G V J M K S R
PLANE
RAMP I F E T D E P A R T
RUNWAY
SECURITY S R T R U T 0 L I P
VISA S E C U R I T Y N K

Riddle answer:

For more puzzle fun, go to www.www.brainzzles.com


Even Exchange by


Donna Pettman


Each numbered row contains two clues and two 6-letter answers. The two answers differ from each o
by only one letter, which has already been inserted. For example, if you exchange the A from MASTE
for an I, you get MISTER. Do not change the order of the letters.


1. Hang around
2. Pirate ship slat
3. Ordinary
4. Burr or Carter
5. Food server
6. Root for
7. Choir member
8. Large ocean fish
9. Battle
10. Enumerate


Extended
K Factory
L Mailer or Lear
Nobleman
Mr. Mitty
Transparent
G __ Transgressor
L __ Page border
S Evening
N Tennis game locale


R


2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


)U TRUST YOUR EYES? There are at least six differ-
i drawing details between top and bottom panels. How
can you find them? Check answers with those below.
"BusIUJ s! la.u!nbs "9 "6ufssu si m''s|Jl "s luajeijJp 51 de3
l e. SJBlnoou!i pauedo si laoeIr ", "jauols ss !o!I "i :saoujaiG!C




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SJIMSUe
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by Hal Kaufman
UNK-UPSI Each of the aven-eIer wordsalngnibeginarm ends w Ath UT
a mree-leeft word, anid mi ssing a Ilelte at center You are asked U
insert the su missing IkMA-up let. 2 P A R-N I P
Some random examples: 3 C U R-A I L
Three-Ietter words FAR and S DPA TAN
-IER m'y b inkedwhaT
I OmFATIER.ARandMIP-ay A R ARK
be-'inked wn an S to AIR. M R.
Sj.p.etc1,o6 RAM-AGE
How quwdy can ym make itlheigow-
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1tWOi'J C 'riubd Z VaI.Af L
WH-AT DOT? Wha'i green andi played n band Give up'
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fahninliinales'ITmebofOrcd.a."Whatmoeverytlittle tait o in
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EYE-CUE TEST
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DRAGON ALONG! WOU blow e down-chck out this
ts dragon saiL Co orcods: 1-Red. 2-Lt blue. 3-Yelk
brow. 5-Gray. 6--Ok. Gme. 7-Ok. bwm. 8-lJt. pu

SPELLBINDER
SCORE 10 points tor using all t e
letters In he word below tO form
two complete words:
DOMICILE
THEN scor 2 points each for all
words Of tour teers. or owe
found amon he letters. o
Try to swe at least 50 pokfti
L 4Jp *K100 MUM oIqod


Kids' Maze


Sri


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02014 King Features


ie following organiza-
s are proud to support
:ulla County Education
rough sponsoring the
wspaper in Education
Program.


WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOLS I C C i fn i

.A.1 D*O SUCCESS? Wakiilla Countv Coalition forYnij


yve

le

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es

-us

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dling

.rly


Enforce

Except

Extend

Finally

Flats

Flock

Fruit

Furry

Glove

Hence


ICUS-FOC


- I .






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 7B


CLASSIFI[D ADS tarting at just $12.00 a week!


L k Crawfordville Two residential lots
k BRIDLE GATE on Old Bethel Road
ANNUAL 5-7 acres each.
V TYYY Tvv NEIGHBORHOOD Wooded with road
YARD SALE frontage.
ANTIQUE/ COLLECTA- Sat April 26th $6,000 per acre.
BLES Berkey & Gay bed- 8am to noon Dan Ausley
room set, French couch, Tons of good stuff! (850) 566-6761 or
Lugage trunks, Gun (850) 385-6363
Cabinet, salt & pepper


shakers, other misc.
Items contact
352-221-2836


PARKS & FACILITIES DIRECTOR
JOB ANNOUNCEMENT
The Wakulla County Board of County Commis-
sioners is seeking qualified applicants for a
full time Parks & Facilities Director. Applica-
tions and additional information relating to job
duties or qualifications for this position may
be obtained by visiting our website at www.
mywakulla.com or by contacting Human Re-
sources in the County Administrator's Office at
850.926.0919 x 707.
To apply, send a Wakulla County application to:
Human Resources, P.O. Box 1263, Crawfordville,
FL 32326. Background check and drug screen-
ing is required. Salary will be based on quali-
fications and experience. Applications must be
received by 5:00 p.m. on Friday, May 2,2014.


RE ADVERTISEMENT
Seasonal Employment
Parks & Facilities Management Dept.
The Wakulla County Board of Commissioners is
seeking qualified applicants for Beach and Park
Attendants for Summer/Seasonal part-time. Work
days and hours will vary depending on the posi-
tion.
Positions are temporary beginning late April
through the Labor Day holiday weekend. Must
have transportation and a cell phone. See www.
mywakulla.com for additional qualifications/infor-
mation.
To apply, send a Wakulla County Employment Ap-
plication to: Human Resources, P.O. Box 1263,
Crawfordville, FL 32326. Drug screening and
background checks are required. Veteran's prefer-
ence will be given to qualified applicants. Wakulla
County is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity
Employer. Minimum starting salary of $7.93 hourly.
Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Fri-
day, April 25,2014.


FOUND
Bosch Impactor
Screw Driver
Medart Area
(850) 445-4387


Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant
Hey Girls!
Here's Your Chance
Win $5,000 Cash, a
Recording Contract,
and Much More
Prizes!
18+ Only Call
(904) 246-8222
Cypress
Records.com



NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219


LPN
or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
With great interpersonal
skills for busy medical clinic
in Panacea, FL.
Clinical experience with
phlebotomy certification (for
MA) and proficient computer
skills required.
Must have valid certificate
and/or current FL LPN li-
cense.
For more information or to
apply online please visit
www.nfmc.org
or send a resume to
HRdepartment@nfmc.org
or fax to (850) 298-6054.

EOE/DFWP/M/F


Wildlife
Technician
FL Fish & Wildlife
Conservation Corn.
Aucilla Wildlife Mgt.
Area Jefferson
County
$27A482.52 Annual,
Operate Heavy
Equipment,
Perform Road and
Facility Maintenance,
Conduct Controlled
Burns and Wildlife
Surveys.
Applications must be
completed online at:
httos://iobs.mvflori-
da.com/
For additional
information contact:
Billie Clayton
850-265-3676
EEO/AA Employer
JOB CLOSES MAY 8TH


We are currently
seeking a
Sales Associate
to join our staff at our
ATV, SxS, Motorcycle,
and Golf Car
factory franchised
dealership.
This person should be
self-motivated and
family oriented with a
general understand-
ing of mechanical ve-
hicles. Must be availa-
ble full-time, Monday
- Friday: 9am 6pm.
Salary and commis-
sion TBD.
Please Submit All
Resumes IN PERSON
BELLAMY'S
2273 Crawfordvllle
Hwy. Crawfordvillle,
Fl., 32327


Wakulla Sonya
I Reatv iHalra
Realty Lic. Real Estate
D cBroker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co"

850-926-5084

RENTALS:
2 Br 1 Ba Duplex, $625 mo.
3 Br 2 Ba Hs, $1,000 mo.
3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $775 mo.
3 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $875 mo.
4 Br 2 Ba Dblwd, $900 mo.
2 Br 2 1/2 Ba Twnhs, $775 mo.
3 Br 2 Ba Hs, $1,100 mo.

COMMERCIAL
1500 sq ft $1500 mo.
Crawfordville
700 sq ft $700 mo.
Tallahassee
APPLICATION AND
SEC. DEP. REQUIRED

WAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE
AVAILABLE


ATTN: Drivers!
Bring a Rider! $$$
Up to 50 cpm $$$
BCBS + 401k + Pet
& Rider Quality
Hometime Orienta-
tion Sign On Bonus
CDL-A Req
877-258-8782
www.ad-drivers.com
Averitt Express
New Pay increase for
Reginal Drivers! 40 to
46 CPM + Fuel Bonus!
Also, Post Training
Pay increase for
Students!
(Depending on
Domocile) Get Home
EVERY Week + Ex-
cellent Benefits
CDL-A Required
888-362-8608
Apply at
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer -
Females, minorities,
protected veterans
and indivdiuals with
disabilities are
encouraged to
apply._
DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for US
Xpress! Earn $700 per
week! No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training. Job ready in
15 days!
(1-888)368-1964
Experienced OTR
Flatbed Drivers
Earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to
qualified drivers. Home
most weekends. Call:
(843)266-3731 /
www.bulldo hiwa .com
EOE

Heavy Equipment
Operator Career!
High Demand For
Certified Bulldozer,
Backhoe And Trackhoe
Operators Hands On
Training Provided.
Fantastic Earning
Potential!
Veterans With
Benefits Encouraged
To Apply.
1-866-362-6497


1BE^
Traes/~
Hiring One Ton and
3/4 Ton Pickup
trucks to deliver
RV's. 10C/mile
Sign-on Bonus,
4 Terminals & 8
Backhaul Locations.
Call 866-764-1601 or
www.foremost
transport.com




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com




Crawfordville
BRIDLE GATE
ANNUAL
NEIGHBORHOOD
YARD SALE
Sat. April 26th
8am to noon
Tons of good stuff!!

CRAWFORDVILLE
IRIS ANNE'S
SIDE WALK SALE
Sat. April 26th 9a-12N
Some store display
items, & supplies
Cash Only
1616 Crawfordville
Hwy (850) 926-6241




Stop scratching &
gnawing.
Promote healing
& hair growth.
Stamp out
ITCHAMCALLITS!
Shampoo with Happy
Jack Itch No More,
apply Skin Balm
add Tonekote to diet...
Ashley Feed
& Hardware
(850) 421-7703
www.happyjackinc.com


Looking for apartment
or small house to rent in
Wakulla County.
Minimum 2 bedrooms.
Pet friendly. Melissa
717-634-9475 (cell)



194 Carousel Circle This
lovely, very well main-
tained 2-story, 1-car gar-
age home built in 2008
features 1674 sq.ft., 3BR,
2.5 BA. Bright and open
floor plan. Spacious living
area. Kitchen with bar.
Stainless steel appli-
ances. Beautiful wood
cabinets. Inside laundry
room. Separate shower
and jetted tub in the mas-
ter bathroom. Fenced in.
Mariana D. Doseanu, Re-
altor, Keller Williams Re-
alty (850)339-5671
Two residential lots
on Old Bethel Road
5 7 acres each.
Wooded with road
frontage.
$6,000 per acre.
Dan Ausley
(850) 566-6761 or
(850) 385-6363




AUCTION
Custom Home on
145 acres and 16
Home Sites at Lake
Guntersville
Some selling Abso-
lute Scottsboro, AL
Saturday May 17th
10:00am
www.target
auction.com
800 473-3939
djacobs#5060




LOANS FOR
LANDLORDS!
We Finance From
5-500 Units
As Low As 5.5 %.
1-4 Family,
Townhome,
Condos OK.
Contact B2R:
1-855-940-0227
www.B2R
Finance.com


A-I PRESSURE
CLEANING

FREE ESTIMATES 7 7
Licensed John Farrell 926-5179 5667550


Sm Polly Nichols'
/ -'i Special Touch Cleaning Service
I 1 .:.riiruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential
PJ 519-7238
rn, i, i,'suptoGod,;,, la l, it'suptoyou" 926-3065
LICENSED AND INSURED






t9.26--:710.21


EricI's Clean Cut Svj, wC
'Licensjed & insured'
-Lawn Care -Handy-Man Tasks
-Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal


M u n g e 's T r e e S e rv ic e r .F. -. . ~ ~ mI
s 1i:9 :INU *F :Hi( I-iq F L F HAIUl lT (

FIREWOOD AVAILABLE! E H I IRCU T J s
I with the purchase of any color service ..-


I IWJ~1KThI;1U


wnen you DOOiK your appointment witn

iJESSICA OR ASHLEY! 850926-6772:
SMention this ad when you book your appointment with Jessica Hood and Ashley Braswell at
Dazzles Hair Studio 158 Ochlockonee St. (behind Hardee's) in Crawfordville.
, -I------------------J


* Tree Trimming
* Stump Grinding
* Yard Maintenance
* Flower Beds


Call PAT GREEN'S LAWN SERVICE
All Locally Owned and Operated
for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Licensed and Insured

Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461


& v %Reviee

u Weekly- Biweekl- MonathlI

tpr 1 Free Esimates Licensed & Insured


.epZ R


umet Aam
856.500.6726
M5.?45.804R


Ya^ wn Sth
uiS m2.31.9


Sffacial Waxins&" *speciait9 Cuts *fAt lTop&







F' Full Service Hair Salon-

- 850-926-6020
f Jlidqritks Cuts Color 4Feaier JI( s

.D


I

I


(but our prices are down-to-earth)!


i lCall Jerry Payne Today!
MO&850-528-5603 850-926-5611

HLowest Rates in the Area

A/C parts replacement and Service A/C Rebuilding
A/C Compressors and Evaporator '
Coil Cleaning/Replacement
A/C Leak check
Indoor/Outdoor fan motors S

EPA Certified Licensed & Insured


I


www.thewakullanews.com







Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


thewakullanews.com


LOANS FOR
LANDLORDS!
We Finance From
5-500 Units
As Low As 5.5 %.
1-4 Family,
Townhome,
Condos OK.
Contact B2R:
1-855-940-0227
www.B2R
Finance.com




BAYSIDE MARINA
PANACEA
2014 Slip Rental Option
6 Month @ $100 Month
Due in Full
1 Month @ $150 Month
2273 Surf Rd Panacea
Info 850-222-5865
bavsideslias
@_amail.com


WINTON'S POOL
SERVICES
"LET US HELP TAKE
THE HASSLE OUT OF
YOUR SUMMER FUN"
Certified & Reliable
Tony 850-284-2205


Fictitious

5034-0424 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Last Man Standing
Clam Company
located at 2350
Sopchoppy Hwy.,
Sopchoppy, FL 32358, in
the County of Wakulla, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporations of the Flor-
ida Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Sopchoppy,
FL, this 14 day of April,
2014.
/s/ Clayton Lewis
Owner
Published April 24, 2014.


5038-0501 TWN
vs. Kane, Georgia L. 13000236CAAXMX Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 13000236CAAXMX
CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2,
Plaintiff,
vs.
GEORGIA L. KANE, et al.
Defendant(s)
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment dated April 8, 2014, en-
tered in Civil Case Number 13000236CAAXMX, in the Circuit Court for Wakulla,
Florida, wherein CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST
2006-AR2 is the Plaintiff, and GEORGIA L. KANE, et al, are the Defendants, Wakulla
County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Wakulla Florida, described as:
THE FOLLOWING REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF WAKULLA, STATE OF
FLORIDA: LOT 5, BLOCK "A", HAMMOCK WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy,
Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM. on the 15th day of May, 2014. Any person claim-
ing an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of
the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale.
Dated: April 9,2014.
Wakulla County Clerk of Court
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of
certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)
577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Talla-
hassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to ap-
pear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC
4855 Technology Way, Suite 500, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (727) 446-4826
April 24 & May 1,2014. CA 13-02556/DB


5037-0501 TWN
vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Beverage License) 2012-CA-000409 Notice of Foreclosure
Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern
Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville,
Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes of-
fer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following
described Beverage License situated in Wakulla County, Florida:
Beverage License:
Alcoholic Beverage License Number #BEV7500231
(the "Beverage License")
More particularly described in UCC financing statement filed with the Florida Secured
Transaction Registry, at filing number 200901465958.
pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbear-
ance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is
CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; TRIPLETAIL INVESTMENTS, INC., a Florida
corporation, d/b/a WAKULLA DISCOUNT LIQUORS; RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWN-
ERS' ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT
OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
AND TOBACCO; and THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE,
Defendants.
and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000409.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim
with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of
Feb., 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL OF THE COURT)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
April 24 & May 1,2014.

5036-0501 TWN
vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Parcel 2) 2012-CA-000409 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern
Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville,
Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes of-
fer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following
described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida:
Parcel 2: 1384 Coastal Hiahwav. Panacea. Florida
Lot 7, Block "A" of the Town of Panacea as shown per plat thereof of record on Page 7
of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla, County, Florida.
Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and
gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to
crop produces, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and re-
placements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate de-
scribed above (all referred to as "Property"). The Term Property also includes, but is
not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and
dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the
Property, however established.
pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbear-
ance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is
CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN; TRIPLETAIL INVESTMENTS, INC., a Florida


corporation, d/b/a WAKULLA DISCOUNT LIQUORS; RIVERWALK CONDOMINIUM OWN-
ERS' ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida corporation; THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT
OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION, DIVISION OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
AND TOBACCO; and THE STATE OF FLORIDA, DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE,
Defendants.
and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-000409.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim
with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of
Feb., 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL OF THE COURT)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
April 24 & May 1,2014.

5035-0501 TWN
vs. Killeen, Paige F. (Lot 29) 2012-CA-000411 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE
SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT
Notice ishereby given that the undersigned, BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on May 15, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. East-
ern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville,
Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes of-
fer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following
described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida:
Real Property
Lot 29, and the East 1/2 of Lot 30, Section B of Ochlockonee shores, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 16 of the Public Records of Wakulla
County, Florida.
pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure After Default Under Forbear-
ance Agreement in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is
CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
PAIGE F. KILLEEN a/k/a SUSAN PAIGE KILLEEN;
Defendants.
and the docket number of which is 2012-CA-00041 1.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any. other
than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim
with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact Evelyn Evans, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0330 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12th day of
Feb., 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
(SEAL OF THE COURT)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
April 24 & May 1,2014.

5033-0424 TWN
vs. Gustafson, Sandra 65-2013-CA-000019 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000019 DIVISION
PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO NATIONAL CITY
MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRA GUSTAFSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
April 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000019 of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PNC Bank, Na-
tional Association, successor in interest to National City Mortgage, a Division of Na-
tional City Bank, is the Plaintiff and Sandra Gustafson also known as Sandra I. Gus-
tafson a/k/a Sandra J. GustafsonTenant # 1, Tenant # 2, The Unknown Spouse of
Sandra Gustafson also known as Sandra I. Gustafson a/k/a Sandra J. Gustafson, are
defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM
EST on the 22nd day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOT 1, BLOCK D, JOSEPH LEE ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 69 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIX-
TURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS VIN NO. HMLCP24010414181A / TI-
TLE NO. 1147556386 AND VIN NO. HMLCP24010414181B / TITLE NO. 0050948976
A/K/A 2 GENEVA AVE PANACEA FL 32346-2224
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days at-


Selling


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ter the sale.


(COURT SEAL)


Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk


Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743
(813) 221-9171 facsimile E-Serve: servealaw~albertellilaw.com
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.
April 17 & 24, 2014. 001649F01

5032-0424 TWN
vs. Hughes, Jimmy W. 2013 CA 000020 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2013 CA 000020
SRMOF II 2012-1 TRUST, U.S. BANK TRUST NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS
INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,
v.
JIMMY W. HUGHES, et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Fore-
closure entered on April 7, 2014 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash on May 8, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at Lobby of the Wakulla
County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327:
SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT "A"
Property Address: 126 Leslie Circle, Crawfordville, FL 32327
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated: April 9, 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND Wakulla County, Clerk of Court
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO
YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT: DANNY DAVIS,
COURT TECHNOLOGY OFFICE, OFFICE OF COURT ADMINISTRATION, 301 S MONROE ST,
RM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, AT LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR
SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL 711.
EXHIBIT "A"
Lot 20, RUSTLING PINES, and more particularly described as follows: Begin at a con-
crete monument and lightwood post marking the Southwest corner of Lot 36 of the
Hartafield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, HFlorida and thence run N 7110' E along
the South boundary of said Lot 36, a distance of 334.02 feet, thence run N 11 05' W
368.01 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement, said point lying on a
curve concave to the Northeasterly, thence run Northwesterly along said centerline
and along said curve with a radius of 74.84 feet thru a central angle of 2157'05" for
an arc distance of 28.67 feet, the chord of said arc being N 6241'59" W 28.50 feet,
thence run S 2432'17" W 529.91 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Subject to a roadway and utility easement over and across the Northeasterly 30.00
feet thereof.
TOGETHER WITH that certain 2001 THE NATIONAL PIONEER HOUSING Mobile Home,
ID#PH1124GA18226A/B.
April 17 & 24, 2014. 69617

5031-0424 TWN
vs. Harper, Jane D. 13-CA-315 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 13-CA-315
AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank,
201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA 39828,
Plaintiff,
v.
JANE D. HARPER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANE D. HARPER, CAPITAL ONE BANK
(USA), N.A., etal.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff's Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Re-Establishment of Lost Note entered in the above-captioned
action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as fol-
lows, to wit:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD NO: 365, WITH THE EAST BOUNDARY OF LOT NO: 65 OF THE HARTSFIELD
SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 65 A DISTANCE
OF 444.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN
SOUTH 71 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 209.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 104.50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES
27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 209.00 FEET TO THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT NO:
65, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST
BOUNDARY 104.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.50 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS.
SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 20 FOOT EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EAST-
ERLY PORTION OF SUBJECT PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
A 20.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:


Ochlockonee Bay


Rentals &


Property Mgmt.





850926-8777

www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com



RENTALS

S43 Squaw 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit.

14 Liberty Road 3/2, $975. mo., $975. Deposit. Available May 1.

2086 Spring Creek Hwy. 3/2, $750. mo., $750 Deposit. Pets w/ approval.

68 Lance Lane 3/2 $875, No Pets, no Smoking.

14 Liberty Road 3/2, ,$975. mo., $975. Deposit.

43 Squaw Rd. 3/2, $750.mo., $800. Deposit.

68 Lance Lane 3/2, $900. mo., $900. Deposit.


Foreclosure Salle
s
Action Notice I


Foreclosure Salle'',
s
Action Notice I


Foreclosure Salle'',
s
Action Notice I


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Foelsr ae


Foreclosure Sale/
Action Notices I







www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 9B


BEGIN AT A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CYPRESS POST LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 65 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA (AS MONUMENTED) WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
OF STATE ROAD NO. 365. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES
32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 65 (AS
MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 549.30 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 589.72 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE WEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 365, SAID POINT LYING ON A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF
7779.72 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 52 SECONDS
FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 45.17 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 07 DEGREES
53 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 45.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID EASE-
MENT.
Commonly known as: 3054 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordvile, Florida 32327, at
public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash on May 8, 2014, at 11:00 a.m.
EST, or as soon thereafter as the sole may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located
at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL,
32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes.
If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the
sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale.
If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds.
Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court
Administrator's office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
April 17 & 24, 2014.


5030-0424 TWN
vs. Cummings, John T. 65-2013-CA-000131 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 65-2013-CA-000131 Division
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN T. CUMMINGS TINA M. CUMMINGS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A., AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on April 7, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:
ALL OF LOT 1 AND A PORTION OF LOT 2, TUPELO RIDGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 55, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT
5 OF TUPELO RIDGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 55 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID SUBDIVISION 921.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED
#2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CON-
TINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WEST BOUND-
ARY 474.86 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY EASEMENT,
THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 51 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46
SECONDS EAST 172.91 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN SOUTH-
EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 231.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 213.45
FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 24 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 01 SECONDS
EAST 205.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST
186.02 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 16
SECONDS WEST 229.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 2.00 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
and commonly known as: 75 TUPELO DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327; including the
building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Court-
house, on May 8, 2014 at 11am.
Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated this 9th day of April, 2014.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk


Lindsay M. Alvarez (813) 229-0900 Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureService kasslaw.com
April 17 & 24, 2014. 286750/1024408/anp


5029-0424 TWN
5/2 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is given pursuant
to Florida Self-Storage Fa-
cility Act, Florida Statutes,
Chapter 83, Part IV that
Seminole Self Storage will
hold a sale by sealed bid
May 2, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.


at 2314 Crawfordville
Hwy, Crawfordville, Flor-
ida 32327, of the contents
of Mini- Warehouse con-
taining personal property
of:
COURTNEY GIRARD
LOUIS CANNON
Before the sale date of
May 2, 2014. The Owners


may redeem their prop-
erty by payment of the
Outstanding Balance
a n d
cost by mailing it to 2314
Crawfordville Hwy, Craw-
fordville, Florida, 32327 or
Paying in person at the
warehouse location.
April 17& 24, 2014.


5014-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 021
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that USAmeriBank the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 93 Date of Issuance May 27th, 2010
Parcel # 25-2S-02W-000-01423-006
Description of property:
25-2S-2W P-5-6-M-45 COMM. AT THE NE COR. OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC.
25 PARCEL CONT. .55 ACRE M/L OR 242 P 475 OR 365 P 437
Name in which assessed Neal & Tracv White
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

5013-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 020
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US Bank the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate #2104 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 00-00-077-000-10322-003
Description of property:
LOT 77 HS P-33-3-M-21B IN NW 1/4 OF LOT 77 HS OR66 P 174 &OR 72 P315 OR 102 P
22 & 23
Name in which assessed G & S Inc. of Tallahassee
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Carla M. Ziemer, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

5012-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 019
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EMILE JUSTIN MEYER the holder of the following certif-
icate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:
Certificate #981 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 09-6S-01W-000-04864-003
Description of property:
9-6S-1W P-1-3-M-60-1 LYING IN SEC 9-6S-1W OR 77 P624
Name in which assessed SYCAMORE CREEK INC
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.


-D


5011-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 018
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate # 942 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 07-6S-01W-026-04663-000
Description of property:
OCHLOCKNEE SHORES SECTION B LOT 12 DB 52 P 117 & OR 99 P 937 OR 169 P 855 OR
290 P 850 OR 601 P380
Name in which assessed MARTHA S & HAROLD A HALL JR
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

5010-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 017
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate # 1015 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 30-2S-01 E-000-04952-002
Description of property:
30-2S-1E P-5-2-M-70 PARCEL CONTAINING 1 ACRE OR 74 P 54 & OR 96 P 484 OR 150 P
143
Name in which assessed SAMUEL LEE SCOTT JR & PATRICIA ANN SCOTT
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.


Di solutioinOf
Mari~ageNoice


I i s lu i


5006-0424 TWN
Greta Melinia Rodriguez & Mario Rodriguez Castillo 14-DR-96 Diss. of Marriage
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 14-DR-96 Division: Family Law
GRETA MELINIA RODRIGUEZ,
Petitioner,
and
MARIO RODRIGUEZ CASTILLO,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT)
TO: MARIO RODRIGUEZ CASTILLO
(Last Known Address): 7225 EAST MAIN STREET, SOUTH SOLON, OHIO, 43153
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage has been filed against
you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on GRETA MELINIA RODRIGUEZ, whose address is 137 TAFFLINGER ROAD, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 on or before May 3, 2014, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, before
service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property
should be divided: NONE
Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: March 24, 2014.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Gail Smith, Deputy Clerk
Published April 3,10, 17 and 24, 2014.


Brain


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horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.


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1 Macho guy
6 Puts gas in the tank,
e.g.
11 Bad, in France
14 Clear, as a disk
15 Bring a new child
into your family,
maybe
16 we having fun
yet?"
17 Minnie's guy
19 Fib
20 "Understand?"
21 Electric __ (fish)
22 Stuff out of the
faucet
24 Hardly any
26 Just
27 Nail hitter
30 __ oneself on (was
pleased about)
32 Very angry
33 Money with interest
34 In the center of
37 Ma'am's
counterpart
38 Popular cat food
41 Wedding day
words
42 who?"
44 Big streets: abbr.
45 Tosses the dice
47 Very good chess
player
49 Store
50 Position
52 Hands over the
money
53 "No men allowed"
place, in a Turkish
palace
54 Website for bidders
56 "Look here!"
59 Computer key
60 Indian healer
64 1051, inRoman
numerals
65 Online party note


66 Give a speech 23 Length times width, 49 Permission-asking


67 Nine-digit info
68 Sees romantically
69 Goods

Down
1 Does some
tailoring
2 Cleveland's lake
3 Defensive spray
4 "Don't 1!"
5 Born, in wedding
announcements
6 Well-known
7 "American
(singing show)
8 Rawls and Gehrig
9 Records, for short
10 Got madder and
madder
11 Soda shop buy
12 Disney mermaid
13 Apprehensive
18 Twelve months


for a rectangle
24 Invoice abbr.
25 Overflow (with)
26 Small
27 Angry cat's sound
28 Opera song for one
29 "Peter Pan" actress
30 Strength
31 St. Louis football
team
33 Valentine's Day
word
35 Doing nothing
36 "Methinks thou
protest too much!"
39 Devours
40 Doctor's scan
43 Make happy
46 Surgery sites, for
short
48 up
(encapsulated)


phrase
50 Pillow covers
51 Starbucks sizes
52 Rates of speed
54 Make changes to an
article
55 Nibble
56 Actor Sharif
57 Despise
58 Bills with
Washington on
them
61 Actress __ Marie
Saint
62 Right this instant
63 Victorian, for one


Foreclosure Salei"
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Foreclosure Sale,.'
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Out on a Limb


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by Mike Mariand


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thewakullanews.com

King Crossword ___


ACROSS
1 United
nations
5 Half (Pref.)
9 TV overseer
(Abbr.)
12 Pearl
Harbor site
13 Former
mates
14 Carte
lead-in
15 Honesty of
purpose
17 Charged bit
18 Sudden
rush of
wind
19 Glossy
alternative
21 Earth tone
24 Apiece
25 Hammer's
target
26 As one
30 Web address
31 Melodic
32 Anger
33 Individuality
35 Error
36 Very dry, as
champagne
37 Cock and
bull
38 Figure of
speech
40 Suitor
42 canto
43 Nightstick
48 Ailing
49 Love god


50 Facility
51 Crafty
52 Info on a
notarized
document
53 Oodle?

DOWN
1 Cranberry
territory
2 "7 Faces of
Dr. -"
3 Discoverer's
cry
4 Bat
5 Vast areas
6 Way out
7 Encountered
8 "Moby-Dick"
narrator
2014 King Fea


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country
singer
10 Coagulate
11 Walking stick
16 Bear hair
20 Performance
21 Burden
22 Give a darn
23 Backwoods
dweller
24 "Zounds!"
26 Hit the horn
27 Yoko of
music
28 Great Lake
29 Agents, for
short
31 Hitched a
ride
tures Synd., Inc.


34 To and -
35 Pasta
toppings
37 Has
permission
38 Sacred
Egyptian
bird
39 Farmer's
home?
40 Rorschach
picture
41 Differently
44 401(k)
alternative
45 Fond du -,
Wis.
46 G8 member
47 Foundation


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BY
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CAN YOU TRUST YOUR EYES' There are at least six differ-
ences in drawing details between top and bottom panels. How
quickly can you find them? Check answers with those below.
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1. MYTHOLOGY: In Norse mythol-
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god who likes to play tricks?
2. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the island
nation of Nauru located?
3. CHEMISTRY: What is the symbol
for the element sulfur?
4. TRANSPORTATION: What is the
name of France's high-speed rail ser-
vice?
5. LITERATURE: Who wrote the Hol-
lywood-based novel "The Day of the
Locust"?
6. GEOLOGY: What kind of rock is
marble?
7. ART: What outdoor school of paint-
ing was led by artists such as Rousseau,
Corot, Millet and Daubigny?
8. MOVIES: Which U.S. state was the
setting for the 1971 film "The Last Pic-
ture Show"?
9. TELEVISION: What was Radar
O'Reilly's mom's name on the TV show
"M*A*S*H"?


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Page O10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014

FITS FINAtLL se& 0014 MAYE s ItO Wu. IN THE YOU (NOW WE COwo ALWAYS
OUT WHATT SHOLb W W O MU FOR A WHILE, EAT S9*E 5' MIX T"ONS .. WE =OUiD EAT WAO
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2 7 6
8 6 2 9
5 4 2
7 9 5 1
9 5 3
3 6 7
1 2 3
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that each row across, each column down and
each small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.


Moderate * Challenging
*** HOO BOY!
2014 King Features Synd, Inc


SCRAMBLERS
Unscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words. Then
rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!
Measure E ]~
WHIGE -
Create ] l
SIGNED
Glide -- --
FALTO
Move
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"That's the trouble with hiring an idea
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AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two O's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words are all
hints. Each week the code letters are different.
ZSHDEIHH DH WDGI ODCDEP

Y ZDAXAWI IDLVIO XMS

GIIR FMBDEP MO XMS TYWW

CMQE. HMSOAI SEGEMQE

2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


m m 114111.9 ME





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014 Page 11B


WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL


The weather was a little drizzly and cool on Saturday, but peo-
ple still turned out for the annual Wakulla Wildlife Festival
at Wakulla Springs to learn about wildlife with displays, ex-
hibits and tours, see some student art, visit arts and crafts
vendors, and listen to music.


ASPIRING ARTISTS: Winners of the young artists included, for primary
class: Ellie Hazen, first place, of Crawfordville; Lillian Waters, second place,
Riversink; Abigail Lawhon, third, Medart; intermediate: Kristen Walker, first
place, Crawfordville; Aden McClintock, second, Riversink; and Payton Mose-
ley, third place, Shadeville; middle school: Brandon Peavy, first place, WMS;
Jycti Whitehurst, second, WMS; Kenja Williams, third, RMS; and high school:
Chulin Chen, first place; Maurice Hummel, second; and Jodi Yates, third.


Steve Hein of the Center for Wildlife Education at Georgia Southern
University shows off a bald eagle during the Birds of Prey Show.


A visitor talking with military re-enactors, above, as another exhibitor
shows off a whiskey-making still, below.


PHOTOS BY
WILLIAM SNOWDEN


More photos online at
thewakullanews.net


... .. ... ... ... ... .. V :.. .


At their new facility,
A ^ 1757 Lawhon Mill Road, Medart, Florida
4 .,ul'lilLy, I /4 iil 2 Z QL,

brity DnRaces begin at 5:00p.m.
C Dine on B-B-Q and sip on Non Alcoholic Mint Juleps
C 0 while watching Wakulla County's
flUsicW4f"'0 Celebrity Owners Horses Race


/-WIW


Smk~olI
SinkH e1 1& Saturday
a ,s ,ra ]L"May'3
t D fJ j 4:30 8 p.

WWI LLOSMayW3


,n
.na.


Trio Del Mar Specialty Menu
Boat Ride Program
One Price: $25 Children under 12: $13
Limit 100 people Tickets: WakullaSprings.org


I FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK


IN-SHORE FISHING Is HOT
AND So Is THE WEATHER
HOOK UP YOUR BOAT
See us for All your boating supplies!
I.EWW,


Students and teachers from Riversink Elementary gave a presentation
on their planned radio conversation with astronauts aboard the Inter-
national Space Station through the local amateur radio club.


www.thewakullanews.com


J






Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 24, 2014


Time stands still in Bamber


By LINDA CARTER
Special to The News

Pinch yourself; it's
hard to remember this
is the 21st century.
Find yourself in the
center of this medieval
town in the north of
Bavaria, and you will
believe that time has
stood still. A UNESCO
world heritage site;
since the 1950s Bam-
berg has undergone a
continuous program
of restoration of its
historic properties.
Amazingly around 93
percent of the original
buildings remain.
What makes Barn-
berg unique according
to UNESCO is that
"it covers the three
centres of settlement:
The Bergstadt, with
the cathedral, the for-
mer Prince-Bishop's
Residence, the Parish
Church of Our Lady
and the former vint-


ners' settlement; the
Inselstadt, between the
two-arms of the Reg-
nitz River, which was
founded in the 12th
century with a mar-
ket; and the Theuer-
Sstadt, a late medieval
area of market gardens
with scattered houses
and large open spaces,
which has retained
this character to the
present day."
Start your explora-
tion at the unusual
town hall. Created
when wood beams
were driven into the
riverbed for the foun-
dation, it is part of a
bridge on the Regenitz
River.
To this day the
building seems to
perch precariously on
edge, ready to drop in
at any time. Once com-
pletely encased in plas-
ter, one section fell off
when a bridge nearby
was bombed during
World War II, and has
remained naked. The
remainder whimsically
painted, includes a
plaster leg that sticks
out of an imaginary
hole at the base of the
building
Along the confluence
of Regenitz and Acmy


LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL


Tantalizing desserts in Bamberg.


Rivers many buildings
abut the water.
Called little Venice,
while the buildings
are not as grand as
those in Venice, they
are quintessentially
German. Boats moored
nearby bob in the cur-
rent and rowboats are
tied up at tiny docks
behind wood timber
and plaster houses.
Many original struc-
tures were covered over
with plaster or stone to
prevent fire. Restora-
tions reveal the origi-
nal timber and stucco
buildings hidden be-
hind the facades.
Wander the maze of
streets, and revel in
the massive size of this
historic community.
Climb the steep
steps to the Prince
Bishop's Palace and
the massive Church of
Our Lady. Home to the
most northerly buried
pope, he died after a
very short time in of-
fice and under myste-
rious circumstances,
likely poisoned. He
died in Rome and was
brought to Bamberg
at a time when such
distant burials were
unheard of.
In the basilica you
can view the carved
likenesses on the mas-
sive tomb of King Hen-
ry of Germany and
Canonized Queen Cu-
nigunde who advanced
cause of Christianity in
Germany.
After all the sight-
seeing a snack is in
order. Stop at one of
the amazing pastry
shops that serve des-
sert to perfection. Win-
dows are chock-full
of tantalizing dessert
selections, macaroons,
tarts, cookies, choco-


Bamberg is called little Venice because of buildings along the rivers.


lates, and elaborately
decorated cakes. Your
order comes wrapped
like a present in deco-
rative paper and is
graciously presented.
A tantalizing flavor,
a lightly sweet, flaky
pate sucree crust is
covered with a perfect-
ly proportioned layer
of honey nougat, then
smothered with a layer
of roasted hazelnuts,
that glisten with a light
sugar glaze. Almost
too beautiful to eat,


and yet consumed in-
stantly.
Local resident Wil-
ly Messerschmitt de-
signed the M 17 sports
plane in1925. He won
many competitions
with this plane, allow-
ing him to build the
first Messerschmitt
factory.
Thankfully for Bam-
berg, he located the
Messerschmitt plane
factory in nearby Re-
gensburg preventing
excessive damage dur-


ing the war. The re-
sult is nothing short
of amazing with so
many authentic histor-
ic buildings you could
easily forget what cen-
tury you are in.

Linda Carter is
the owner of Luxury
Cruise & Travel Inc.
in Crawfordville. She
can be reached at (850)
290-4058 or www.lux-
urycruise- travel, corn.


/j 'ank DUKE


MMail 1711 G ENERGY.

V MARPAN

$1 ebj9;'r RECYCLING E


Ehirom 8 96 09 - -*QeisK hyG s 969 9 * *

I0Viit s o fae0ok o wwwsusainbleigbnd0rg0


thewakullanews.com


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