Wakulla news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Unknown
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins ( Crawfordville Fla )
Publication Date:

Record Information

Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 401960
oclc - 33429964
System ID:
UF00028313:00509

Full Text


Hugh Taylor,
Mary Cortese:
Mastodons,
Pez, funk and
bacon P.,c. I B




1.1 i 1",..7: 1


Our 119th Year, 16th Issue
Thursday, April 17, 2014


Published Weekly, Read Daily Two Sections

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century 75 Cents


NICOLE ZEMA
Artifact collector Mike Kinsey shows Indian trading beads he found that are part of the exhibit.

The Historical Society's museum features items

salvaged from the site of the Panton, Leslie store


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net


there was a
Dollar General
or a Wal-Mart
in Wakulla Coun-
ty, goods were sold,
bought and traded at
the Panton and Leslie
Trading Post on the


The Wakulla Historical Society Museum is
open Thursdays and Fridays, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The
exhibit will be on display through May 31.


Wakulla River.
Starting in 1984, local
artist Mike Kinsey spent
his free time fanning the
silt of the Wakulla River,
training his eye to find


tiny, and sometimes
colorful, remnants of
history.
An exhibit at the
Wakulla County His-
torical Society featuring


the Panton and Leslie
Trading Post and For-
be's Purchase, will close
on May 31. Guests can
view hundreds of trading
beads, pipe bowls, bone
and metal buttons, gun-
flints and tinklers (metal
embellishments for Indi-
an clothing) much of it
washed into the Wakulla
Turn to Page 11A


Board takes


up issues


with sign


ordinance

By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

County commissioners heard about dis-
crepancies in the county's sign ordinance at a
workshop last week.
John Shuffwith the Wakulla County Cham-
ber of Commerce's Government and Commerce
Committee said he has studied the county's
sign ordinance which passed a year ago and
came up with suggestions to revamp it.
Shuff suggested the rules should hinge on
localized demographics, and that many spec-
ifications dictated by a sign ordinance should
not be broadly applied to all areas of Wakulla
County.
"The main impetus is for good sign controls
in the Our Town, Crawfordville area," Shuff
said. "There are some things in our ordinance
which may not be restrictive enough for the
Our Town area, but too restrictive for the guy
who's trying to advertise he's making sausage
on his hog farm."
Shuff, who has been involved in the Cham-
ber for 13 years and is a past president, said
"Our Town" is defined as a geographic area
of Crawfordville that has been delineated by
property appraiser Donnie Sparkman.
Turn to Page 5A


OBITUARIES
Calvin C. Cooper
Frank H. Payne
Rodney E. Revell
William 'Bill' Ted Wright II


INDEX
W orm Gruntin' photos.................................................... Page 2A
Public Notices................................................................. Page 3A
The Opinion Page........................................................... Page 4A
Street Beat...................................................................... Page 5A
Church............................................................................. Page 6A
O bituaries....................................................................... Page 7A
Com munity ................................................................. Pages 8-9A
School .......................................................................... Page 10A
O outdoors ...................................................................... Page 12A
W ater W ays................................................................... Page 13A
Sheriff's Report............................................................. Page 14A
Natural Wakulla .............................................. ..............Page 16A
Arts & Entertainment.......................................................Page 1B
Easter Egg Hunt photos.................................................... Page 2B
W eek in W akulla .............................................................. Page 3B
W eekly Roundup..............................................................Page 4B
Red Clay Footprints.......................................................... Page 5B
Sports ........................................................................ Pages 6-8B
Thinking Outside the Book..............................................Page 9B
Classifieds ....................................................................... Page 10B
Legal Notices.................................................................. Page 10B
Com ics............................................................................ Page 14B
Community Center photos.............................................Page 15B
Travel .............................................................................. Page 16B


Chris Russell will challenge for seat on school board


Staff Report

Crawfordville resi-
dent Chris Russell an-
nounced his candidacy


this week for the Wakul-
la County School Board
District 3 seat.
The seat is currently
held by 20 year incum-
bent Becky Cook.
Russell graduated
from Wakulla High
School in 1987, after
which he joined the U.S.
Navy Reserve. While in
the Reserves and at-
tending college, he was
recalled to active duty
to support the U.S. ef-
forts in Operation Des-
ert Storm.
Upon returning from
active duty, he com-
pleted his Bachelors
of Science Degree from
the University of West
Florida. He is employed
as a Federal On-Scene
Coordinator with the
U.S. Government.
Russell has been
married 18 years to Val-
erie Russell, ARNP, and
together they are the
proud parents of two
daughters AnneMarie


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Candidate Chris Russell and his family: wife Valerie, and daughters
Anne Marie and Abigail.


and Abigail, both stu-
dents at Riversprings
Middle School.
Russell said that he
was primarily entering
the race to provide a
"parental voice" on the


School Board to those
with children in the
school system.
"As a father of two
children in school,"
Russell said, "every day
I hear first-hand from


them, their classmates,
as well as their teach-
ers, the challenges af-
fecting them at school.
As such, it stands to
reason that those clos-
est to the issues our


children are facing will
be the ones most ded-
icated to addressing
those issues.
"As a parent of chil-
dren in school, I am in-
vested in ensuring that
our students and fac-
ulty have the resources
needed to succeed in
the future," he said.
Russell said he is
also concerned about
some of the recent fi-
nancial decisions made
by the School Board. He
provided the following
examples:
Citing a reduction
in funds during the pre-
vious five years, a spe-
cial election to have a
referendum asking the
taxpayers to pay more
in School Board taxes
was drafted less than
90 days after the 2012
General Election. The
School Board allocated
nearly $37,000 to hold
this election.
Turn to Page 3A


i.-





Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Photos by NICOLE ZEMA
2014 Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin' Festival, clockwise from top left: Rylee Herrin, 5, shows off worms
| -*, m she grunted. Jordan Tillman. 8, holds up worms she grunted while Ellie Nelson, 10, grunts in the
background. Guests enjoy musical guests Hot Tamales from the shade. Legion and Ronin Taylor, 7
More photos online at and 4, grunt for worms. Braeden Paul, 8, inspects a bear head at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Tent.
thewakullanews.com Maddie and Sadie Callaghan, both 7, admire merchandise at Mary's Jewelry Designs and More.
Worm Grunting King Bruce Rosier takes a look at 8-year-old Andrew Edge's worm collection.

NEW PROGRAM from

.. Al nnmi Wakulla

I I i National Alliance on Mental Illness


I
'F


"NAMI BASICS"


NAMI Basics is a Six Week Program
Completely FREE for Parents and Caregivers!
If you're a parent or caregiver who has struggled in
raising a child who has shown signs or symptoms of
possible behavioral problems, brain disorders or mental
illness this program is for you.
You are trained in preparedness and emotional
resiliency, the fundamentals of caring for self, family
and empowerment as an effective advocate!

WHEN: Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 6pm until 8:30pm
and every Tuesday through June 3rd.
WHERE: Wakulla One Stop Community Center,
WOSCC, Corner of Shadeville Highway
and Trice Lane
A LIGHT DINNER WILL BE SERVED
CONTACT: NAMI Wakulla at the WCCOSC (850) 745-6042
ENROLL IN PERSON AT WCCOSC






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 3A


Will Dance speaks at local Republican event


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

The Wakulla County
Republican Party hosted a
meet and greet event at the
senior center on Thursday,
April 10. Tallahassee radio
station Freedom 93 FM's
talk show host Will Dance,
aka "The Pirate Hunter,"
was the guest speaker.
Participants heard brief-
ly from county commis-
sioners, executive com-
mittee members, and com-
ments from state Rep.
Halsey Beshears, R-Mon-
ticello, about the current
legislative session.
"Our gun rights are
safe," Beshears said. "The
people have spoken."
Beshears also said Flo-
ridians should expect to
see marijuana legalization
initiatives on the ballot in
the fall both medical and
recreational.
Will Dance took the po-
dium and discussed his
world travels and career ex-
perience as a law enforce-
ment officer and firefighter.
He said God blessed him
with the chance to travel
the globe, where he gained
perspective on the United
States.


PHOTOS BY NICOLE ZEMA


Attendees at the Wakulla
Republican party's meet
and greet, above, held at
the senior center. Talk
radio host Will Dance,
right, was the speaker for
the event.

Dance went on to dis-
cuss our $18 trillion of
national debt.
"We've spent ourselves
to a place we cannot get
out of," Dance said. "It's
financial cancer."
Dance also touched on
topics including the NRA


and gun rights, school tu-
ition for illegal immigrants,
state pensions, the Agenda
21 initiative, domestic en-
ergy production and prop-
erty rights.
"The government is test-
ing your resolve, whether
or not you're going to put
up a fight," he said. "This
is about our flag, our con-
stitution, our God."
Dance also compared
Washington, D.C. to a gi-
ant toilet "that needs to be
flushed."
He did offer a solution
to heal a seemingly broken
government: voting and
political engagement.
"Voter turnout is 47 per-
cent, because 47 percent
don't give a damn who is
elected," Dance said. "Get
out and participate. Get
on the phone. Knock on
doors. Hand out flyers.
We're less than a quarter
tank of gas both ways to
sit face-to-face with your
elected officials (in Talla-
hassee).
"If you don't use your
ballot box, you'll be forced
to use your ammo box."
Guests won drawings
for a new, donated rifle,
shotgun, Bibles and fish-
ing poles.


Chris Russell will challengefor seat on school board


From Front Page

"If I had been on the
board and noted that
revenue was trending
down the previous five
years," Russell said, "I
would have first strived
to reduce the financial
hole that was widening
during this timeframe
and not waited until
raising taxes was the
easiest way out.
"However, if a pro-
posed tax increase ref-
erendum was the only
option I was given, I
would have placed the
referendum on the bal-
lot of the General Elec-
tion that occurred just
three months prior, as
a means to save money.
The allocating of an
amount of school funds
that is greater than the
salary of a good por-
tion of the employees
in the school system,
for a separate special
election to raise taxes,
demonstrates a lack of
financial stewardship,"
he said.
"Furthermore, as is
the case historically
with Special Elections,


the voter turnout was
extremely low. Slightly
more than just 6 percent
of the registered voters
in Wakulla County ac-
tually voted to impose
a tax on 100 percent of
the citizens. However,
the voter turnout in the
General Election just 90
days earlier was nearly
76 percent," he said.
"This further validates
that the Special Election
was not the best use of
school funds."
Another financial
decision of concern, he
said, "is the fact that at
the very next meeting af-
ter proposing the tax in-
crease, the school board
authorized spending
close to $30,000 for a
new sign. If there was a
concern about the lack
of funds that facilitated
the need to raise taxes,
then the purchase of a
$30,000 sign would not
appear to be a necessity
at that time of financial
uncertainty.
"When you couple
the sign purchase with
the funds authorized
for the special elec-
tion, nearly $70,000


was encumbered by
the School Board in
just 30 days. Ironically,
these allocations oc-
curred before the new
tax was even voted on
and while the school
board was advising that
funds were running low.
These actions seem to
demonstrate that the
school board has come
to expect that they feel
confident that they can
just tax themselves out
of a bind? How else can
you explain the fact
that they advised they
were low on funds and
needed to raise taxes,
but then spent a large
amount of money be-
fore the vote on the tax
was even held? I real-
ize that for the school
system to succeed the
taxpayers have to sup-
port the system, plain
and simple. However,
it would be great to see
the School Board find
ways to reduce our tax-
es instead of increasing
them, especially given
the fact that in plenty
of homes in Wakulla


County more than 50
percent of their prop-
erty taxes are school
related."
Russell currently
manages multi-million
dollar projects, as well
as working with private
industry and various
governments, both na-
tionally and interna-
tionally, to incorporate
strategies for success
during major catastro-
phies, counterterrorism
activities, and the de-
velopment of multi-na-
tional alliances. "These
aspects of my career
have provided financial
management, strategic
planning, and partner-
ship development skills
that will positively en-
hance the makeup of
the School Board," he
said.
Russell serves as
chairman of the coun-
ty's Charter Review
Committee, is the tax
collector's appointee to
the One Cent Sales Tax
Committee, and has
served as a Planning &
Zoning Commissioner.


Russell said his fam-
ily has a commitment to
serving as community
volunteers, noting his
father Bill is a fire chief
at the Ochlockonee Bay
VFD, his stepmother
volunteers at respite
care, and he and his
wife and daughters
volunteer and support
several local organi-
zations including Op-
eration Santa, Com-
munity Wide Thanks-
giving, CHAT (Citizens
for Humane Animal
Treatment), Wakulla
Pregnancy Center, Keep
Wakulla County Beauti-
ful's Coastal Cleanup,
and the Back To School
Health Fair where his
wife Valerie, a registered
nurse, provides free
medical physical to
students.
"My greatest labor
of love is conducting
fundraising activities
as The Pink Pirate each
October in an effort to
raise money for Breast
Cancer Research," Rus-


sell said. "Having lost
my aunt to breast can-
cer, and as a husband
to a wonderful wife,
as well as the father of
two young ladies, I feel
called to try and help
beat this deadly disease
that has impacted so
many families."
"We, as a community,
not just the school sys-
tem, must work hard
to provide the support,
direction, leadership,
and mentoring needed
to ensure that all of
our children have every
advantage possible to
succeed in school," Rus-
sell said. "The success
of our schools depends
on our collective efforts
both inside and outside
the classroom."
Russell said citizens
can contact him to dis-
cussing school board
issues at fcrussell92@
gmail.com or via his
Facebook campaign
page, facebook.com/
chrisrussellforschool-
board.


PUBLC NOICE
Fo u edr'cnei ene h aul ew0ilpoieti


Sopchpyp.ci

Saturday, April 26 7 p.m.

Historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium

SOUTH PRESENTS BAND
SOUTH BOUND BAND


WITH SPECIAL GUEST
WESTFIELD 1924


FEATURING

JEFF TILLEY & DANA CLARKE

Tickets $12 962-3711


I r FLORIDA
PUBLIC NOTICES
r Ri APUL CawCES.O


~J, "


)I


Ed Gardner. O.D.


85o926= 0 1
73 SadvileRd CaworvileFL 332


---







4!
I

I


\


0


ADVERTISEMENT TO BID WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Pre-qualified bidders are invited to bid on a General Contract for the construc-
tion of the Welding Shop at Wakulla High School in accordance with Contract
Documents. All bids must be a lump sum basis; segregated Bids will not be
accepted.
PROJECT: Welding Shop at Wakulla High School
PROJECT NO.: 13/14-09
BID DATE: May 8, 2014 TIME: 2:00 pm
A pre-bid conference will be held to review the scope of the project on May 1,
2014 at 2:00 p.m. at the site 3237 Coastal Highway, Medart, Florida 32327.
The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida will receive sealed bids until 2:00
pm local time on May 8, 2014. Bids received after this time will not be ac-
cepted. All interested parties are invited to attend the Bid Opening; Bids will be
opened publicly and read aloud at the following location:
Wakulla County School Board, Florida Administration Building (Board Room)
69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327
All materials furnished and all work performed shall be in accordance with
Drawings and Specifications. Contact MLD Architects at 211 John Knox Road,
Suite 105, Tallahassee, FL 32303, Phone (850) 385-9200 for Drawings and
Specifications Each Bid shall be addressed to:
Wakulla County School Board Administration Building
R 0. Box 100,69 Arran Road Crawfordville, FL 32327
and be marked: 1. Welding Shop at Wakulla High School
2. (Name of Bidder)
3. (Address of Bidder)
4. City, State, Zip Code)
5. OWNER'S BID NO. 13/14-09
All bids shall be delivered by a representative of the Bidder or by registered
mail with return receipt requested. Bid security in the amount of five percent
of the Bid must accompany each Bid in accordance with the Instruction to
Bidders.
In the event the Contract is awarded to the Bidder, Bidder shall, within eight
(8) Owner business days after the award by the Owner of the Contract shall
furnish the required Performance and Payment Bonds; failing to do such, Bid-
der shall forfeit their bid guarantee as liquidated damages. The Performance
and Payment Bonds shall be secured from any agency of a surety or insurance
company, which agency shall have an established place of business in the
State of Florida and be duly licensed to conduct business there.
The Owner reserves the right to waive irregularities and/or informalities in any
Bid and to reject any or all Bids in whole or part, with or without cause, and/
or accept the Bid that in its judgment will be for the best interest of the School
Board of Wakulla County, Florida.
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
POST OFFICE BOX 100 CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32326-0100
ROBERT PEARCE, SUPERINTENDENT


- BYIDe igD'TSicm


2)


^*r ^%


0]


*^


www.thewakullanews.com


I






Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


The Opinion Paze


READERS WRITE:

Low Country Boil was great event


Editor, The News:

Four times must be
the charm. The 4th
Annual Low Country
Boil continues to be a
great event and this
year's was the most
successful.
This year we are
excited to once again
thank our Premier
Sponsors: Capital City
Bank Group, Waste Pro
USA, Tallahassee Com-
munity College and
The Wakulla News.
We also thank our
Corporate Sponsors:
Centennial Bank, Com-
cast, Duke Energy,
ESG Operations, Rep.
Halsey Beshears, North
Florida Gulf Seafoods,
Refreshment Services
Pepsi, Revell Electric,
Shepard Accounting,
St. Marks Powder, Stow
Away Marine & More,
Lamar Advertising,
Wakulla Insurance and
Skip Young's 3Y Ranch
for use of the facility.
Additionally, we
thank the following for
their support of the
event: Table Sponsors:
Coldwell Banker Har-
tung and Noblin Re-
alty, Property Apprais-
er Donnie Sparkman,
Deputy Chief Prop-
erty Appraiser Brad
Harvey, Supervisor of
Elections Buddy Wells,
Tax Collector Cheryll
Olah, Cowboy Country
Church, Crawfordville
Auto & Tire, Sheriff
Charlie Creel, Frances
Casey Lowe, P.A., Bay
Leaf Market, Jo Anne
and Larry Strickland,
Keith Key Heating and
Air, the Pearce Family,
St. Marks Yacht Club,
Wakulla County Histor-
ical Society, Wal-Mart.
Ambassador Spon-
sors: Shields Marina &
Dry Storage and Hydra
Engineering.
Supporter Spon-
sors: Ace Hardware,
Ameris Bank, B&B
Dugger, Inc., Brooks
Concrete, Cook Insur-
ance Agency, Costco,
Eden Springs Nursing


Home & Rehab Facility,
Florida Environmental
& Land Services, Com-
missioner Jerry Moore,
and Talquin Electric.
We appreciate their
support of this annu-
al fundraising event
hosted by the Wakulla
County Chamber of
Commerce. This event
is the brainchild of John
Shuff, past president of
the Chamber, as a way
to generate funds to
support maintenance
and improvements to
the historic courthouse
and to provide schol-
arships for Wakulla
County students.
The Event Commit-
tee of the Chamber
begins planning in
January, securing the
location, 3Y Ranch,
selecting a band, mak-
ing sure the "cooks"
note the first Satur-
day on their calendars
and sending out let-
ters seeking sponsor-
ships and printing the
tickets. All this work
is done by volunteers,
and our office manager,
Petra Shuff.
With the threat of
bad weather predicted
for this past weekend,
the committee got busy
buying the groceries,
packing the supplies
on a trailer and making
sure as much as pos-
sible was done Friday.
Larry Strickland com-
pacted and smoothed
the arena floor in
preparation for the
event. WCSO commu-
nity service volunteers,
deputies Leif Sparby
and Maurice Herndon,
helped assemble the
dance floor, stage, and
set up tables.
At 2 p.m. Saturday
the cooks began to roll
in with their assorted
cookers, huge kettles,
stainless steel pots,
propane bottles do-
nated by Wakulla Gas,
and knives. Then they
began to put together
the 150 pounds of lo-
cal smoked sausage
from Raker's Farm, 220


pounds of fresh locally
caught wild shrimp
from Angelo Petrandis,
200 pounds of fresh
Louisiana crawfish
brought in by Colin
Irons and Steve Cush-
man, 120 pounds of
red potatoes, plus on-
ions, celery, lemons
and garlic.
The cooking crew
consisted of Paul Nich-
ols, Chris Anderson,
Nick Gray, Shane
House, Niraj Patel, Ray
Teague, John Ander-
son, Steve Cushman,
Colin Irons, Mike Bet-
tinger, and John Shuff.
At 5:45 the first
groups began to arrive
just ahead of the slow
rain that set in for the
evening.
In addition to thank-
ing our premier and
corporate sponsors, no
event gets done with-
out the help and do-
nations of businesses
and volunteers behind
the scenes. Thank you
to Richard Russell and
Wal-Mart for donating
the fresh produce and
filling in all the gaps,
Costco for the spic-
es and dry goods, the
WCSO for lighting the
parking area, and Da-
vid Damon, who with
his Boy Scout Troop,
stood in the rain direct-
ing traffic.
Thank you to Ms.
Tu of the Kast Net for
donating your surprise
filled cupcakes, thank
you to Karen Hall of
Karen's Kitchen & Bak-
ery in Crawfordville for
the delicious beignets,
fresh baked bread,
and especially for the
donation of an entire
sheet of rich chocolate
brownies.
Thank you to the
Chamber Event Com-
mittee, Sharol Brown,
Ethel Jefferson, Char-
lean Lanier, Petra Shuff
and Jo Ann Palmer.
Mark your calendars
for the first Saturday in
April 2015.

Jo Ann Palmer


Editor, The News:


I want to thank the Wakul-
la County Sheriff's Department,
Wakulla County First Responders
and the Florida Highway Patrol for
a quick response time and the pro-
fessionalism they showed me. They
made me feel at ease and calmed


me down.
My vehicle was hit at the inter-
section of Hwy. 61 and Cajer Posey
Road totaling my car. I feel that this
intersection could warrant a traffic
signal there for safety in the future.
Thanks,

Zoe A Mansfield


Most popular
stories online:

* Green Living Expo
returns on April 26

* Sheriff's vehicles
re-striped to sup-
port cure for breast
cancer

* UPDATED: Flood
warning for St.
Marks River near
Newport

* Easter egg hunt is
Saturday

* Underwater
Wakulla April 10,
2014

* Surf Road bridge
closure

* Sopchoppy ap-
proves changes to
charter

thewakullanews.com



F L .....m ..............


www.thewakullanews.com



readers speak out


Workshop set on 'Reducing Your Footprint'


Editor, The News:

Sometimes I think of my home as
a laboratory for the development of
the satisfying and sustainable way of
living. Of course, satisfaction means
different things to different people,
but for me it involves beauty in my
surroundings, an easily maintained
household, peace, quiet, and lots
of free time. Sustainability includes
affordability and minimizing one's
impact on the earth.
I was raised in a comfortable
middle-class family, by the two fru-
gal, Depression-era parents, with
the expectation that I would go to
college and have a career. I studied
for several careers (pharmacy, truck
driving, computer electronics, and ar-
chitecture) but none of them seemed
worth the tradeoff of time and peace
of mind. During this time I arranged
my life so that I needed as little money
as possible. Being handy has been
very helpful. I started taking on small
remodeling projects and learned of
my genuine interest in maintaining
a home.


What I have found interesting in
this process is that becoming more
sustainable has its own unexpected
rewards, ones that can redirect the
rest of your life. I feel such satisfac-
tion with being more creative and
building my life on my own terms.
In addition, through these small
changes I have made my life more
earth-friendly and affordable.
Now I am a professional organizer
(of stuff and space). I love setting
up functional and beautiful spaces
for other people. I see people bogged
down by their possessions. I find
financial and environmental chal-
lenges widespread and I look for
ways to meet these challenges. In my
workshop at the Green Living Expo, I
will share some of my ideas with you
- won't you join me? My workshop
is called "Reducing Your Footprint:
Little Actions Big Results" and will
be held from 1 to 1:45 p.m. at theTCC
Wakulla Center (next to Hudson Park)
on April 26.
Sincerely,

Jenny Druda


Wetlands are county's


Editor, The News:

It is unfortunate that
so much questionable
information has been
generated by our county
commissioners. They
have attempted to redi-
rect the wetland issue
to a property rights is-
sue by calling protective
setbacks and buffers a
"taking of property."
I decided to call the
state Department of En-
vironmental Protection
and discuss the issue
of wetlands and their
important function. You
too can call and ask the
Tallahassee Office, 245-
2969, they are most cor-
dial and will be happy to
answer any questions
you might have.
What I found was an
analogy of comparing
the wetlands to the hu-
man kidney. We all know
kidneys filter blood and
removes the impurities
and toxins detrimental
to your system. The
wetlands act the same
way by filtering surface
waters. You can mis-
treat your kidneys but


not for long, then you
will need to supplement
their function with di-
alysis, a very expensive
and inconvenient pro-
cess. If we abuse our
wetlands then our water
quality will suffer and
every citizen will pay the
price. When you have
water standing after a
four inch rain it does
not mean you are living
in a wetland, "it is called
a flood." Wetlands take
years to develop the mi-
cro organisms needed to
become a filter.
A basic premise since
the days of the Romans,
then in the UK and later
in the USA is that the
water belongs to the
people, not the land
owner. Range wars were
fought over this issue.
Because South Flori-
da allowed unrestricted
building and were poor
stewards of the Ever-
glades and "drained the
swamp," they now have
saltwater intrusion, pol-
lution and are running
out of drinking water.
For those property
owners who have wet-


kidneys
lands, there are poten-
tial remedies. The Tal-
lahassee Environmental
Resource Permitting
Office (ERP) of DEP pro-
vides and encourages
pre-application meet-
ings that are site and
project specific. You
may find in the case
of an existing building
your property is grand-
fathered under a previ-
ous permit. Our BOCC
would have you believe
wetland boundaries are
set in stone, but they
can be moved. The only
way to find out is to
meet with the ERP.
The BOCC also would
like you to think the
state can enforce the
wetland rules. Due to
realigning and transi-
tion of functions, as of
June 30, there will only
be four field inspectors
covering six counties
and only two assigned
to the ERP, implement-
ing five programs from
the Tallahassee Branch
office. You do the math!
Vote Yes!

Charles Hickman


Wakulla One Stop center is open


Editor, The News:


The Wakulla One Stop Commu-
nity Center is now open and serving
Wakulla citizens. The Wakulla One
Stop Community Center Staff would
like to thank everyone who came out
to our Grand Opening Event on Fri-
day, April 11. We are excited and very
pleased with the response and evi-
dence of support from the community!
The evening was filled with govern-
ment, business, and service members
speaking about what the One Stop
Community Center means to them,
door prizes, music, vendors, recre-
ational activities and fun for the entire
family.
The event gave individuals and
families an opportunity to meet the
organizations in the Wakulla Coalition
for Youth network and our Commu-
nity Center partners such as NAMI,
DISC Village, Department of Health,
Wakulla County Public Library and
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office. Our
goal of providing families informa-
tion on how they can better assist
their family's needs, become aware
of services, programs and healthy
recreational activity, was achieved.
Those who did not attend the event,
may stop by daily from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. to find out what the One Stop
can and will do for our community.
It is our hope and goal that the One
Stop Community Center becomes not
only a place for children but a place
for individuals of all ages, and families
to gather to recreate, educate, receive


connections for service and support,
hold events and more.
Our overriding mission is that by
enhancing healthy lifestyles of the
community by providing a One Stop
Center for opportunities, resources
and connections that strengthen
all citizens -youth, individual and
families.
The One Stop Center is an exten-
sion of the coalition for youth and is in
partnership with the Wakulla County
Board of County Commissioners on
behalf of citizens and funded by the
Ounce of Prevention Fund of Florida.
This legislatively appropriated
fund is funneled to a small number
of worthy community based projects
throughout Florida. Receiving funding
from the Ounce of Prevention Fund
of Florida in the form of a grant has
paved ways for the One Stop Center
to be a demonstration pilot project for
all of Florida. The Ounce of Prevention
Fund hopes to use the One Stop as an
example of what a community center
can be in rural counties like Wakulla.
We hope that the citizens of Wakul-
lajoin us on this journey and use the
One Stop Center as your connection
to all things Wakulla. Thanks again,
Wakulla County for your support and
giving us a rousing welcome!
Sincerely,

Wakulla One Stop Community
Center Staff
Ray Gray, Jocelyn Hayes, Pam
Pilkinton & Sara Daw
850-745-6042


Letters to the Editor
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. It's preferred that you email it to edi-
tor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville
FL 32326 or drop it off at The News office, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway.
Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the author's
first and last name, mailing address and telephone number for verification pur-
poses. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length
and clarity.


Thanks for help after wreck


The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at
3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
hi i 1 '... i William Snowden............................. editor@thewakullanews.net

Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net

Advertising: Lynda Kinsey....................................... lkinsey@thewakullanews.net

Advertising/reception: Denise Folh........................... denise@thewakullanews.net

Production Coordinator/IT: Eric . ..i i.,.ii.,, ii i ii ...
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo.
Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 5A


< STREET BEAT >
Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question:


What is your fondest Easter memory?

/ .


__-. .-1 r ---- .- 1. ..+ I. -
CINDY NICHOLS ANTHONY SETZER DOLLY MITCHELL MARGIE GOPE
DEPT. OF REVENUE GOLD BUYERS PARKS & REC. RETIRED


/


' "When my Grandmom
and Granddaddy were
Alive the whole fam-
ily would get together.
We still have the get
' together and' have a
/ giant Easter egg hunt."
,? -,


"I was around 9, I was
an altar boy at church. I
received this large golden
egg from my parents for
my accomplishment in
church that day. I still
have that egg."

N .% -
. ^ '^


"When all my
family was still
living and we were
all together. We
would all go to
church together."


"I remember when my
brother yanked the
bow on my dress and I
fell off of the counter
and hit my head. I
love to razz him about
that to this day."


'M ""' a. %" flh. --* .
DEE DEE PRITCHARD
GOLD BUYERS
""I remember being at
my Grandmother's
house in Jacksonville /
when I was around 3
or 4years.old and I
won an Easter purse."


-,L X-/>tV iN


Board takes up issues

with sign ordinance
From Front Page
Shuff presented an outline of the sign code to
the board, which detailed limits or designations of
sign sizes, locations, mounting and upkeep. Many
of the engineering aspects of the sign ordinance
are overkill for businesses outside of Crawfordville,
Shuff said.
"In Tallahassee, if a sign has over 100 square feet
of area, it has to be engineered," Shuff said. "That
means you have to hire a professional engineer to
provide a foundation for the sign, and attach to
the area. In Wakulla County, you have to hire an
engineer for any sign over 30 square feet. That is
onerous, and it does not telegraph the message
to businesses that we are welcoming them to our
community."
Shuff said engineering costs can run upwards
of $500. He added that the ordinance dictates an
engineer must install any wall-mounted sign over
32 square feet.
"To relate, Tallahassee doesn't require any engi-
neer for a wall sign," Shuff said.
The Rev. Kenneth Gunn, pastor of New Light
Church, installed a large road sign for his church
50 years ago. A tree recently fell and demolished the
sign, which is located on New Light Church Road.
Language in the sign ordinance might prohibit its
size, so Rev. Gunn wanted to get the board's take
on the issue.
"If it doesn't have big letters, it's sitting there in
vain," Gunn said. "A little 4-by-4 sign is not going
to do it. I don't want to put a little, old, scrubby-
something out there."
Church member Mann Roberts said the new
sign is proposed to be about 40 square feet, a little
shorter than the original sign.
Commissioner Howard Kessler said as long as
the item remains on the consent agenda, and it is
approved, keeping the big road sign shouldn't be
a problem.
"You will get your sign," Commissioner Jerry
Moore said. "Take that to the bank."
The issue was resolved on the consent agenda
at the regular meeting that followed the workshop
Shuff said the committee would also like to see
a more reasonable permit application processing
time from 30 days to 14 days, or less.
"It's just not business friendly," Shuff said. "We're
supposed to try to create jobs here."
Shuff said he is going to work with sign experts
and the committee to revamp the ordinance.
"(The board) approved, or were interested in,
moving forward on implementing some of these
things," Shuff said. "If you have a lot of people, you
need more rules. I'm going to flush out my presenta-
tion, add some detail, and come back to the board
of commissioners with it."


Locally Owned by Charlie


We NOW
SELL -INSTALL

TIRES
rim FRE OIL CHANsf
"rHm with the purchase of 4 tires


;(a50)926-6526
Scharliegrim@ms..com Lube-Xpert.co'm
SMon.-Fri.8amn -6pmn Sat. 8amn -4prn
2219Crawfordville Hwy.,Crawfordville,FL 3232.7 .i




Your sex life and erection can now survive
FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug
companies don't want you to know!
Dr. Kevin Hornsby, MD, will mail the first 37 men that respond to this ad
a free copy of his new thirty dollar book "A Doctor's Guide to Erectile
Dysfunction." He's so sure this book will change your life he will even pay
the postage and handling. If the popular pills don't work for you, regardless
of your age or medical history, you owe it to yourself and your lady to read
this book now! Call Toll Free 800-777-1922 24-hrs. and leave your name
and address (only).


Win One Meal

from Each Listed

Restaurant

Every Month!

tWinnie &na 7 eiAtno0s awn c61m
7Talk e'"i7 'ewn 7eti
in C aMw6e;oVitt

Winner receives

one meal from each

of the following:

Coastal Restaurant fYCE
Chicken or Pork Chop Dinner

Myra Jeans -
Grilled Chicken Pita with side

Hutton's Sandwich
of your choice

Talk 0' The Town -
Sandwich & a drink

Lindy's 3 Piece Tender Dinner


OFF The Eatin' Path

SEntry Form 07

Please drop off form at
any participating Eatin'
Place for chance to win.
Name
Address


City
State ________ Zip ________
Phone
e-mail


Coastal Restaurant
KidsEat 0000
Free on Wednesday
1'uc .. & nek1 h .',, u\i
All (> -t i I 'a l .. ( l .k . e
iles. & 1 IuII. \11\H)
984-2933",,. ... ..



M^BSBS^IOpm '*^7
Ttta OY inld y7 D


Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
2669 Crawfordville Hwy- DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE






WEDNESDAYS





ALLDAY


S1926-8886
1' ~2120 Crawfordville Hwy.
Crawfordville, Florida
""-" :+" _-r,_________-'"


AnFTrc 5Jr


www.thewakullanews.com


^.0006






Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Church


BUCKHORN NEWS

Experience the living Lord
Galilee and Judea, and living Lord.

word. vice will be at Skipper
^-*HL you believe his every Easter Sunrise Ser-

The risen Lord Temple Church at 6
showed tender con- a.m. Everyone is wel-
cern for his friends come. Easter sermon
because of the pain by Evangelist Chinesta
they had endured. Smith.
Mary was grief Happy birthday to
stricken. Jesus showed Evangelist Sonia Nel-
himself alive to her son, William Johnson,
S and her grief turned Faye Williams, Travis
to joy. Williams, and Jeremy
By ETHEL SKIPPER The men on the road Williams.
to Emmaus were dis- Let us continue to
What is your expe- appointed that what pray for all the sick
rience with the risen they expected did not and shut-in, those
Christ? John 20:11. happen Jesus did not in the hospital and
But Mary stood with leave them ignorant, nursing home, prison,
out at the sepulchre he opened their minds homeless, whatever
weeping and as she and hearts, their need is. I want to
wept she stooped down Peter needed for- thank those of you who
and looked into the giveness. Jesus cared prayed for me while
sepulchre,. enough to restore him. I was in the hospi-
Imagine you were The living Lord tal. Your visits, phone
one of the disciples cares about each one calls and all you did.
who witnessed Jesus' of us too. Because May God bless you. I
time on earth. You Christ is alive, we can am home and doing
spent several years experience a personal blessed. Keep me in
following him around relationship with the your healing prayers.


Easter services


* Seafarer's Chapel at
Shell Point

Everyone is invited to the 32nd
annual Easter Sunrise Service
which will be held at Seafarers
Chapel at 7 a.m. The chapel is lo-
cated in the Coast Guard Auxiliary
building at Shell Point.
Retired Air Force Chaplain
Frank D. Metcalf will conduct the
service. The message will be
given by Rev. Eric T. Davis.
Coffee and donuts will be
served following the service.

* Community-wide service
at St. Marks

First Baptist Church of St.
Marks, Crawfordville First Bap-
tist Church, and Pioneer Bap-
tist Church of Crawfordville are
hosting a Community-wide Easter
Sunrise Service at San Marcos de
Apalachee State Park in St. Marks
on Easter Sunday at 7 a.m.
The gates to the park will open
at 6:30 a.m. The service consists
of music, the Lord's Supper and a
devotion.


Following the service, comple-
mentary doughnuts, coffee, and
orange juice will be available.
The public is cordially invited and
encouraged to attend.
If you should need additional
information, please call 850-878-
5224.

* Holy Week schedule for
Wakulla UMC

Wakulla United Methodist
Church has announced its Holy
Week Schedule:
Thursday, April 17 at 7 p.m.
"The Living Last Supper."
Friday, April 18 at 7 p.m.
Good Friday Service.
Sunday, April 20 at 7 a.m.
Easter Sunday Sunrise Service; at
8:30 a.m.,Youth Sponsored Break-
fast followed by Children's Easter
Egg Hunt; at 11 a.m., Traditional
Worship Service.
The church is located at 1584
Old Woodville Road in Wakulla
Station. For more information, call
(850) 421-5741.
Staff reports


religious views and events


OUT TO PASTOR

A pedicure cured all


By JAMES L. SNY

Since I was a y
person, I always
some pets around.
of these have been d
hunting dogs in
ticular.
In getting older, I
covered that havi
pet dog around is
of work. So I have
changed these pet
for a few pet peeves
One pet peeve of
is when a waitress
me "Sweetie." V
bothers me is the pe
who know me really
not call me "Swee
There may be some
to that.
Another pet pee
when somebody is
ing broccoli next tc
in a restaurant.
ing broccoli in pub
probably not against
law, but it should t
And many pet pe
to go along with tha
Recently a situa
developed that ca
me quite a bit of a q
dary. The gist of
quandary had to do
money, which is an
pet peeve of mine.
When I was in
school, I had sma
my right big toe. A
time, the doctor ha
remove the toenail
it took six month
my toenail to grow I
Well, it did not quit
back into shape. I
had trouble with tha
ever since.
Lately that toe
was giving me some
ficulty. It was not g
ing in the right dire
and it looked like it
rotting. I knew if I
to the doctor, it w
cost me an arm a
leg. What good is
when you lost an
and a leg? When ch
ing it out it would
cost about $200 to
doctor about this. '
out insurance, all o
would have come o
my pocket.
I put it off for a
and it seemed jus


my pet peeves
DER get worse. It got so bad hurt
that it hurt every time I Fi
oung walked. I did complain leav,
had to the Gracious Mistress the
Most of the Parsonage, but and
dogs, she only insisted that I a pec
par- go see a doctor. It is easy like
for her to say when it is had
I dis- not her $200. anyb
ng a Being a certified befo:
a lot Pennsylvania Dutch- sure
e ex- man, $200 is a lot of take
dogs money. Trying to get W
s. $200 out of a Pennsylva- disc
mine nia Dutchman is about not
calls as close to suicide as least
Vhat anybody wants to get. not.
people I tried to think of how I wart
ly do could deal with my toe ushe
etie." without going to that they
thing money hungry doctor, toes.
Several weeks ago, I I rec
we is happened to overhear beat
eat- somebody say that they your
o me had a badly infected myt,
Eat- toenail. It caught my at- job.]
)lic is tention because it was would
st the the condition of my toe toen
be. at the time. Instead of pare
eeves going to the doctor, this But
at. woman went and had very
nation a pedicure, which took care
used care of her damaged toe. W
uan- I really did not know for t
that what a pedicure was; surp
with just that it was some $20.
other kind of a woman thing. I \
As a man, I had no inter- my t
high est in involving myself in my t
shed anything that could be hood
t the classified as a woman whale
ad to thing. However, my toe I c
and would not quit hurting, of a
s for I pondered this sub- "Beti
back. ject for a couple of weeks, hum
:e get During that time, my toe lowly
have got worse and it was spoi
at toe more painful to walk. (Pro\
Of course, my wife kept S(
menail asking how my toe was spirit
e dif- and I deferred telling her heal
;row- the truth. There was no thin]
action way I was going to go to self I
Swas a doctor and hand over myse
went to him $200 of my hard-
vould earned money. T1
nd a I thought to myself, Snyc
a toe "Self, maybe you should Famr
arm try the pedicure." ship
ieck- Myself thought it was at (8
have a good idea and so I mail
see a drove over towhere they net.
Vith- did pedicures. I sat in
this my truck for a few min-
)ut of utes looking at the Nail
Salon where they did
year pedicures. While I was
st to watching, my toe kept


ing.
nally, I decided to
e my manhood in
truck, hobble in
see if they could do
dicure for someone
me. I was sure they
never dealt with
)ody quite my size
re. I was not even
That they would
a man as a client.
hen I walked in, I
wovered that they did
speak English. At
t most of them did
I inquired and was
mnly received, then
ered to a chair where
could work on my
Within 20 minutes,
eived a pedicure to
all pedicures. The
ng woman who did
oes did a marvelous
I was afraid that she
Ild try to paint my
ails and I was pre-
d for a vigorous No.
she did not and was
gracious in taking
of my wounded toe.
hen I went to pay
he pedicure, I was
prised it was only

talked painlessly to
ruck and sitting in
ruck was my man-
Swith $180. That is
t I call a good day.
wouldd not help think
verse in Proverbs,
ter it is to be of an
ible spirit with the
j, than to divide the
1 with the proud"
rerbs 16:19).
sometimes a proud
t gets in the way of
thy living. When I
I too much of my-
I have too much of
;elf to think of.

he Rev. James L.
-er is pastor of the
'fly of God Fellow-
in Ocala. Call him
566) 552-2543 or e-
jamessnyder2@a tt.



A;


I Waku ffff[Rrshl** p Centes i


I Crawfordville AreaI


I MedartArea I


Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
96"C & W-h4 Wifh UW'
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School ........................ 10 a.m .
Sunday Worship..................... 11 a.m.
Evening Worship...................6 p.m.
W wednesday Service 7................ 7p.m.
& Youth Service ........................7 p.m .
Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m .
M issionettes .............................. 7 p.m .



Coastal


Big Bend
Hospice
your hometown hospice, licensed since 1983
2889C Crawfordville Hwy
850.926.9308
bigbendhospice. org


Crawfordyille United
Methodist Church
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road "Come Grow With Us"www.crawfordville-umc.org

961/10inq~ 9, h(am^ 'D-Oaed *@ne 9tv 9lint
FREE St.iiLud ibitiui i.L i The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102


Sopchoppy


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...? p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call tor details,
962-2213


Spirit Life Church
Pentecostal
131 Rose Street Sopchoppy FL
962-9000
Schedule of Services
SUNDAY
Refreshments 930am
Sunday School 10:00am
Worship ll:00am
Prayer 6:00pm
WEDNESDAY
Supper 6:00pm
Pioneer Club:
Youth and Adult Classes 630pm
. ..... ...



li i il I Illllllll
(From Rhema Bible Training enter)
wwwochccorg

Your church ad here!



(950) 926-7102


19 Promise Land

THRIFT STORE
Open 9-5
Closed Sun. & Wed.
Mon.---- Furniture 25%
Tues.----- Seniors 25%
Fri. & Sat.- Select Items 50%

926-3281
3299 Crawfordville Hwy. -
Approx. I mile S. of County Courthouse
www.promiselandministries.org

Wakulla
Station

A Wakulla United
Methodist Church
C~rC
Sunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages -10 a.m.
Sunday Worship-I11 a.m.

1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pastor Stig Homrer

"I'm not afraid to be the pale girl in the bathing
It doesn't bother me anymore."
"I hae h tnen whtannb gbedsrheou t nthe
tIf t~themab.o.t J.,_e
J.-e w-- nh- -eQ/ 20swhen she w-s duanosd ffi


St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church
Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor
6 3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797
SundayMass 10:00am
Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm
Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs
1' Saturday of everv month:
Confessions 10:30 -l1:30 and 3:00- 4:00
Adoration Mass 10:00 am




Hwy 319 Medart,
te eEn Office 926-5265
Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
B 0 Sunday School 9:45 a.m.
91 "Morning Worship 11:00 a.m.
(aAWANA 5:00 p.m.
Ch chYouth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
operatingg like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.lakeelleabaptistchurch.org

SPTrinity
Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
II I Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Church 926-7808 Pre-School1926-5557


www.thewakullanews.com






www.thewakullanews.com


Obituaries


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 7A


Calvin C. Cooper
Calvin C. Cooper,
89, of Tallahassee died
on Thursday, April
10, 2014 after a brief
illness.
He was born on
January 16, 1925 in
Monticello, and grew
up in Wakulla County.
He was prede-
ceased by his wife,
Leola R. Cooper; and


his son, Andy Coo-
per. Survivors in-
clude his daughters,
Martha Cunningham
(Gerry), and Janice
Jones (Derrill); and
four grandchildren.
The visitation was
held at Abbey Funer-
al Home on Sunday,
April 13, 2014 from 4
to 6 p.m. The funeral
was Monday, April 14,
2014 at 11 a.m. at


Frank H. Payne
Frank H. Payne, 70, of Panacea,
died on Thursday, April 10, 2014 in
Tallahassee.
He was born in Harnett County,
N.C. and had lived in this area 20
years. He served in the U.S. Navy.
He is survived by his wife, Tok
Kon Payne.


Abbey Funeral Home,
with interment at Tal-
lahassee Memory Gar-
dens.
In lieu of flowers,
memorial donations
may be made to Big
Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Center Blvd.,
Tallahassee FL 32308.
The online guest-
book is at www.ab-
beyfh.com.


The family received friends from
10 a.m. to 11 a.m., Tuesday, April
15, 2014 at Bevis Funeral Home,
Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawford-
ville. Services followed at 11 a.m. at
the Funeral Home.
Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel of Crawfordville as-
sisted the family with arrangements
(850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).


BEREAVEMENT COLUMN

Remembering the family's


'Man of Steel'


By TRACY RENEE LEE

My first case as a
fully licensed funeral
practitioner was my
Uncle Roy Don.
As I was sitting in
church Easter Sunday,
I was reminiscing over
family gatherings and
events I had shared
with my Uncle Roy
Don. He was the stron-
gest man I had ever
known.
He could pull the en-
gine out of a car with-
out the assistance of a
lifting winch. He had
super strength he
was a "Man of Steel."
He had grown up in
a rougher time, when
people worked hard
for what they had and
fought hard to keep it.
Men would come
from far and wide to
challenge his strength.
They always left with
a new respect for his
reputation.
I had seen him do
so many things in life
that were physically
impossible for the av-
erage person. His su-
per strength is what
had kept him going af-
ter losing his beloved,
Betty Jean.
I prayed for him that
day at church. Prayed
that he would have the
strength to live another
day, so that my cous-
ins would not lose their
father on Easter.
As church was end-
ing, my cell phone
rang. I walked out
into the foyer to an-
swer it, and my cousin
informed me that her
father had just passed
away.
Now every year when
Easter comes around, I
think of my Uncle Roy
Don and the special
experiences I shared
with him when he was
living.
I see my cousins,
his daughters, either


I

Please

Recycle


around town or on so-
cial media, and every
year at Easter, they
express memories of
their late father.
When one has lost
a significant loved one
on a holiday, that holi-
day instantly changes
forever in their heart.
The primary focus
or celebration now be-
comes the marker in
one's memory, as the
day they suffered the
loss of their loved one.
The first few years,
one may be sad when
that holiday comes
around. One hopes
that the sadness of the
death experience will
eventually be replaced
with happy memories
of wonderful times
shared together.
Reality however,
works at a snail's pace,
and such a change
does not happen
quickly.
One need not lose a
loved one on a holiday
to feel an increase of
pain on holidays.
The loneliness of
loss is magnified every
holiday, as we cycle
through the first year,
and each year after a
substantial loss.
Holidays are set
aside for family and
close friend gatherings.
They are social events,
shared with those we
love most.
By disrupting our
social circles, death
disrupts our social
events.
If you know some-


one who has lost a
loved one, be mindful
that he or she might
delight in a thoughtful
card, call or visit to get
through a very painful
day.
I was so honored
that my cousins called
upon me to lay their
beloved father to rest.
It shall remain for-
ever a special memo-
ry, that they put their
trust in me to get them
through such a dread-
ful experience.
Moreover, Easter
has forever changed
for me.
The profound cel-
ebration depicting the
resurrection of our
Savior gives me hope
that one day, my dar-
ling cousins will re-
unite with their real life
superhero, their "Man
of Steel."

Tracy Renee Lee
is a funeral director,
author, and freelance
writer. It is my life's
work to comfort the be-
reaved and help them
live on.

Please follow
my blog at http://
pushin-up-daisies.
blogspot.com/ and
Twitter account @
PushnUpDaisies, visit
my website www.Que-
enCityFuneralHome.
comn or read my book
"Pushin' Up Daisies"
for additional encour-
agement and infor-
mation.


Calvin C. Cooper
Frank H. Payne
Rodney E. Revell
William 'Bill' Ted Wright II


William Ted Wright II
William "Bill" Ted
Wright II, 55, of Craw-
fordville, passed away
Monday, April 7, 2014.
Dialysis treatment
helped him extend his
life 20 years. A 34-
year Wakulla County
resident, he was a
veteran of the U.S.
Marine Corps. An "ad-
venturer," he liked
catching snakes and
spending time out-
doors, appreciating
nature. He enjoyed
hunting and fishing
and was a member
of the Buck Bottom


Rodney E. Revell
Rodney E. Revell, 59, of Craw-
fordville, went to be with the
Lord on Saturday, April 12,
2014. He is survived by his wife
of 32 years, Lisa Revell.
He is also survived by his
daughter, Samantha, son-in-
law, Justin and grandson, Ma-
son Nelson; his Dad: Hardy
Revell; sisters: Sylvia Simpson
and Patricia Politis.
Rodney was preceded in death
by his parents, Jane and Edward
Blok and Doris Revell; and sis-
ter, Teresa Myers.
Visitation was held on Tues-
day, April 15, 2014 from 6 p.m.
to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home,


Hunting Club. He
was a supporter of
the NRA, loved rid-
ing motorcycles and
spending time with
his family and friends.
He is survived by his
"beloved angel," Pol-
ly Nichols of Craw-
fordville; a longtime
friend, Pat Dunnigan;
sister-in-law, Terry
Wright of Crawford-
ville; and two nieces,
Sheena Wright and
Elisha Wright.
He was preceded
in death by his par-
ents, William Wright
Sr. and Dorothy Law-
son Wright; a brother,


Gary Wright; and spe-
cial friend, Jim Wil-
liams.
Graveside services
were held at 11 a.m.
on Saturday, April 12,
2014 at Lake Ellen
Baptist Church Cem-
etery in Crawfordville
with the Rev. David
Carraway officiating.
Arrangements are un-
der the care and direc-
tion of Forbes Funeral
Home, Lake City, 386-
752-5212. Please sign
the online guestbook
at http: / /www.forbes-
funeralhome.net..


Homecoming revival set at


Christian Worship Center
Special to The News The revival will continue Monday,
April 28, through Wednesday, April
The Christian Worship Center will 30, at 7 p.m. nightly.
host a homecoming revival on Sun- The Christian Worship Center is
day, April 27, at 11 a.m. featuring located at 3922 Coastal Highway, in
the Drummond Family. Dinner will Crawfordville.
served after the morning services. Everyone is invited.



The Nelons to perform at


Killearn UMC


Special to The News

The smooth, rich
sounds of multi-Dove
Award winning and
Grammy nominated
recording artist The
Nelons will ring loud-
ly in Tallahassee on
Thursday, April 24,
at the Killearn United
Methodist Church, lo-
cated at 2800 Sham-
rock South. This excit-
ing event will begin at
7 p.m.
For three decades,
The Nelons have been
bridging the traditional
sounds of Southern
Gospel with contem-
porary influences that
inspires listeners of
all ages. The group,
who has enjoyed much
success as a part of
the prestigious Gaither
Homecoming Tour and
Video Series, continues
to cross generational


gaps, presenting rich
harmonies that have
been embraced by au-
diences from all walks
of life.
The musical minis-
try of The Nelons was
born in the late 1970s
from a name that has
been synonymous with
Gospel Music for nearly
a century.
Having feet firmly
planted in faith and
family, while drawing
from the stream started
by the LeFevres and


carried on by Gospel
Music Hall of Fame
member, Rex Nelon, a
second and third gen-
eration of Nelon con-
tinue the rich tradition,
as Rex's daughter, Kelly
shares the stage with
her husband, Jason
and daughter, Amber,
delivering smooth vo-
cal harmonies that are
incomparable.
For more informa-
tion, call (850) 408-
2081.


Harvey-Young Chapel in Craw-
fordville.
Funeral Services will be
Wednesday, April 16, 2014 at
11 a.m. at First Baptist Church
of Crawfordville. A private fam-
ily burial will follow.
In lieu of flowers, the family
requests memorial contributions
be made to Amyloidosis Foun-
dation Inc., 7151 Main Street,
Suite 2, Clarkston, MI 48340
(amyloidosis.org) or Big Bend
Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center
Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308.
Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel in Crawfordville
is assisting the family with ar-
rangements (850-926-3333 or
bevisfh.com).


Easter Buffet

& Egg Hunt
Join us SundaV April 20th

\WAKLLA SPRINGS for our annual Easter Buffet
LODGE 10:30 am until 3 pm.

Tupelo Honey Glazed Ham, Lemon Dill Poached Cod,

Orange Rosemary Chicken, Our Famous Fried Shrimp,

Oyster Casserole, Green Bean Casserole, Plus Salads,
Rolls and more DESSERT BUFFET with our Cakes

Adult $25.95 and Chocolate Fountain

Child (3-10) $18.95 4 f .

Easter Egg hunt: r/, /
up to 8 years old 11 AM
over 8 years old 12 PMl
Bring your own bag. C)sfe '

Please call 850-421-2000 for reservations


CHRISTIAN MUSIC

FROM THE COAST

TO THE CAPITAL
WAKU 94.1 FM Listen with apps
926-8000 for iPhone, iPad
Wave94.com & Android





Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Community


www.thewakullanews.com


happenings in our community


p

I,


JiJiWJJl .a 1JJJ P2J3JJ


-, -,- . , -- .. .. _






sun's -harmful ra.. ,.,-*-^ ^ '." -^ ^ _. --L.-^ -T a ___ -:, .= __ _^ -.g-


Regattasillre Strdaye w-ifll include 1.-ri nitdt iwte udy pi 7 hnC mt Mmra eat
capamri26ands2 sat hlle Po silrs and~'I BLIg I^ patiipt in oteIcii on-PkrRn-Soe onain Inc. cotibue moreII
n ft the American Cancer..... ...







"Wegalook Offsorear toebge al ^ QQ^ Reiaiain.li pm -Autin(a.mi stag 'p-rt'h'>it Ba Yachr-'.t', C lu, thIhl
nga ns "- racer._ RdS-'wo'r*I- t:,evor -, l-u nd A eri an-
S ath a ai nc Saundayne .o it T.hl h Ia SI t 3i. tt G.Li CI Ie So e Ciit 1miL I -1
April 26 annd 27 at Shell Poirs, r a. h 1
cin Wakullat County. The evnii I act Cl ub- ,-, g ..P.ay with -... L t wi
benefit the Ameridan Canmerous L : Ao e Stephen .ith
"We look forward to sailii- r.- .e F:P :. [.e:~.:na~ e
ing and fun while fundrai- I-t.r It-,e e morial regt.t
the Am erican Cancer Societ,- _,,:,+,,!,,r. ',, irt: i!,!-_tr.,,:, tr.,:l
Marianne Gengenbach, spclt-!,r- t, .l:ntn :!-T, .:rt-e-,:t..
son "M ost of u s n ever m et t-!*,hYr- 111-1, .l n dh 1: 01-.. -: ,:,:.:r t!
C. Smith, but this event rem i i.:l- L, :e t,, e.: atef .l-
to enjoy Florida's famous SL, 1_-1111 About the Stephen C. Smith
while protecting our skin f .-.mt Vw Memorial Regatta
sun's harmful rays." the last ifn ycars, the Stc-
Near-shore races will include The public is invited to view the Sunday, April 27 phen C. Smith Memorial Regatta
catamarans, smaller day sailors and races and participate in other activi- Noon Poker Run Scorecards Foundation, Inc. contributed more
windsurfers, the most numerous ties. $5 each, for registered participants than $80,000 to the American Cancer
and most colorful participants in the Saturday, April 26 1:30 p.m. Awards Ceremony Society. The event is sponsored by the
Regatta. Off shore, the bigger sail- 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Registration. 2 p.m. Auction (at main stage Apalachee Bay Yacht Club, the Shell
boats will race. Races are held both Noon Sailboat and windsurfer on beach) Point Sailboard Club and American
Saturday and Sunday, with other races begin. 3 p.m. Boat Auction Cancer Society. Visit www.smithre-
events for sponsors, spectators, and 6 p.m. Dinner atApalachee Bay Register online at www.smithre- gatta.com and Like us on Facebook
participants on Saturday night. Yacht Club Clubhouse. gatta.com. Pay with PayPal or Credit at www.facebook.com/smithregatta.


Small claims

clinic offered
Special to The News
An informational clinic
describing the small-claims
process and the handling of
landlord and tenant issues
is scheduled from 6 to 8 p.m.
Thursday, April 17, at the Leon
County Courthouse Annex,
Courtroom 1 at 1920 Thom-
asville Road (across from ABC
Liquors).
This event is brought to the
public by the Leon County
Clerk of Courts, Legal Services
of North Florida, volunteer
attorneys from the Law Firm
of Williams, Gautier, Gwynn,
DeLoach and Sorenson, P.A.,
and Herzog Mediation is Infor-
mation about how to file and
follow through with your case
will be given at various times
by judges, attorneys, media-
tors and clerks.
April's guest judge will be
Leon County Judge Nina Ash-
enafi.
Open to the public. No cost
or registration necessary.
For questions email John
Fenno of Legal Services of
North Florida atjohn@lsnf.org.


Annual NAMI derby is April 26


Special to The News
NAMI Wakulla and the Wakulla
County Horseman's Association will
host the fourth annual Triple Crown
Derby For Mental Illness April 26, at
the new facility, 1757 Lawhon Mill
Road, Medart. Races begin at 5 p.m.
Dine on barbeque and sip on non-


alcoholic mint juleps while watching-
Wakulla County's celebrity owners'
horses race. These celebrity owners
are citizens who are involved in the
community and are committed advo-
cates for mental illness awareness.
Races begin at 5 p.m., with dinner
and awards following the grand event.
Other features at the event include


Greetings from Sydney


Special to Tile ews
Doug Jones submitted this photo of his granddaughter,
Kelsey, who is in Australia as an exchange student until June.
She is pictured in front of the Sydney Opera House, wearing a
T-shirt from the Wakulla Rotary's Valentine Festival 5K Run.


cowboy mounted shooting, live mu-
sic, celebrity emcee, and a ladies hat
contest.
A playground and face painting is
available to entertain children.
Tickets are $20 for adults, and $7
for ages 7 to 15. Ages 6 and under
are admitted free.


Network with

the Chamber

on April 23
Special to The News
The Wakulla County Chamber of Com-
merce monthly Networking Luncheon will be
Wednesday, April 23 at noon at St. Marks Yacht
Club, 36 Yacht Lane in St. Marks, at noon on
Wednesday, April 23.
RSVP to the Chamber
office at (850) 926-1848
The menu includes
grouper au gratin, .
French-style green
beans and roasted
potatoes, Romaine
salad, rolls, rum
cake, tea and water.


Thank You To Our Sponsors



SA:VVUA L OW iOUVWTIzY gOIL

1^--- f?^V IlT PIIFMm ool----


SCapital City
Bank


A
The I
Wakulla
lowilews


tO?-P OZATV ,oVoVz


St. Marks Powder
A GUNWRAL DYNAMICS COMPANY
COMCAST n
BUSINESS
myl)OObnk.co


ADVERTISING COMPANY


SHEPAR-


EFRESHMENT 4 DUKE I5 t
. ,, E WRICES EPS PM! ENERGY .M)


IS


OPI


CaingFo Or omuities


Y *A ,.,


9j )II :) f I I) I






www.thewakullanews.com


Community


FILE PHOTO
The annual Wakulla Wildlife Festival will be all day Saturday, April 19, at Wakulla Springs
State Park, featuring demonstrations, art, music, presentations and more.


Special to The News

The annual Wakulla Wildlife
Festival will be all day Saturday,
April 19, at Wakulla Springs
State Park, beginning at 8:30 a
.m. The festival is a celebration
of outdoor activities and area
heritage. Local musicians, art-
ists, and experts offer festival
participants one-of-a-kind ex-
periences, helpful advice, and
personal enrichment in a neigh-
borhood family atmosphere.
To view the full schedule,
visit www.wakullawildlifefesti-
val.com.
Art on the Terrace
Oil and watercolor paint-
ings, photo art, historic and
contemporary clay sculpture
all tempt those in attendance
to bring a piece of art capturing
the natural beauty of the area
home. The silent auction at the
Lodge is a great way to support
the Wakulla Wildlife Festival.
Bidding begins at 10 a.m. and
ends at 5:45 p.m. Winners are
welcome to claim their prizes at
the end of bidding.


Talented young student art-
ists from throughout Wakulla
County submitted artworks.
Their works will be their best ef-
forts under the theme of Wakul-
la's Wildlife Wonders. View the
display from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Living History
Demonstrations
Step back into the not so
distant past to engage the hard
working folks of the Big Bend
as they labor to live off this
bountiful land. Witness Native
American basket creation; cot-
ton, wool, and silk spun into the
yarn; a smithy hammering iron
to his whim in the blacksmith's
forge.
Music on the Green
Enjoy the bluegrass sounds
of Coon Bottom Creek, The
Bluefin Tuners, and Pickin' &
Grinnin', and the Wakulla High
School Jazz Band will play.
Music/presentations
in the Lodge
Ernest Toole is certainly an
artist steeped in the traditions
of the songs he has written ex-
panding on the colorful history


of the Big Bend. Catch up on the
mystery of the Wakulla Volcano,
the art of The Highwaymen, or
the significance of the Battle
of Natural Bridge as he, Barry
Sager and Sarah Toole bring the
rich history of the area to light.
Edutainment on the Green
Bird banding, a reptile and
amphibian show, butterfly dem-
onstration, birds of prey, oyster
culture, and an owl presentation
are just a few highlights of the
"edutainment" opportunities out
on the Green.
Food and snacks
Hamburgers, fried shrimp,
bbq sandwiches are a few eats
that will be available at the
festival. The soda fountain of-
fers snacks and lighter fare in
Lodge, including hand-dipped
ice cream and Ginger Yips.
Guests can also meet ex-
hibitors such as wildlife reha-
bilitaotrs, nature center and
museum staff, and public lands
representatives.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 9A



happenings in our community


CHAT News...


By FAITH HUGHES, DVM

Imagine, your dog gets
lost on Christmas Day and
is identified by a vet two
months later in a town
that's over two hours away.
That's exactly what hap-
pened to Grayce (of Gaines-
ville) and her Chihuahua
named Sophia. Sophia
had been microchipped,
so when she went miss-
ing at Christmas, Grayce
called the microchip com-
pany and reported it. In
the meantime, Sophia wan-
dered into a nice lady's
yard and was taken care of
for a while. That nice lady
couldn't keep the little dog,
so she sent her to live with
another nice lady in Craw-
fordville. When the second
nice lady brought the dog to
me for a checkup, I scanned
her and found a microchip.
We were so excited that
we would be able to re-
unite dog and owner, but
we ran into a few snags. I
scanned the (then stray) pet
and called the microchip
company. They gave me
Grayce's (the pet's own-
er) information, but her
phone number no longer
worked. I called 411 in
Gainesville, but Grayce's
new phone number was
unlisted. I tried Google and
found some possible leads,
but none of them worked
out. Then I called Ivanhoe
Carroll at Wakulla County
Animal Control and she
contacted David Flagler at


Alachua County Animal
Control. David sent one of
his animal control officers
to Grayce's house and at
last, Grayce was found!
If only every lost pet story
could have such a happy
ending. Sophia's microchip
was the key to reuniting her
with her owner. Registering
the microchip and keeping
the microchip company
updated when you change
your phone number or ad-
dress is very important.
A microchip is a tran-
sponder half the size of a
matchstick. It is implanted
under the skin between
your pet's shoulder blades.
Each microchip has a reg-
istration number, and that
number is kept on file at the
microchip company, along
with the pet owner's ad-
dress and phone numbers.
Veterinarians and animal
control offices have hand
held scanners that read
the radio frequency of the
chip and provide us with
the registration number.
So, stray pets are scanned
and microchip companies
can be contacted.
You can have your pet-
microchipped at veterinary
hospitals. Also, I1l be mi-
crochipping pets at CHAT
of Wakulla's Pamper Your
Pooch Spa Day on Satur-
day, May 3, at Hudson Park
Pavilion in Crawfordville.
In addition to bathing, toe
nail trimming, anal gland
expression, we will also be
microchipping pets (chips
are a $25 donation). All
profits from the Pamper
Your Pooch Day will go to-
wards providing pet food for
the Pets Meals on Wheels
Project (in partnership with
Wakulla Senior Citizens
Center) and for funding
CHATnip, which is a pro-
gram to neuter and spay
feral cats in our county.


1


GREAT RATE. GET IT NOW!


1.99%*
APR/6 MONTH INTRODUCTORY RATE


4.25%
APR/CURRENT VARIABLE RATE


> Six Month Introductory APR as low as 1.99%,
and as low as 4.25% thereafter*
> No closing costs on lines up to $250,000**
> Possible tax benefitsA
> Fast, easy approval up to 100% LTV
> Interest-only payment option available
Apply for a Home Equity Line of Credit just like a loan, and once you're
approved you can access this cash up to your full available credit limit -
whenever you need it. Stop by today or apply* online at www.ccbg.com.


2592 Crawfordville Hwy. 1 926.6740
www.ccbg.com/sale


Capital City
Bank
More than your bank. Your banker.


M Member FDIC *Subject to Credit Approval. The introductory rate will be in effect for the first six (6) months after
your account is opened. Upon expiration of the introductory rate, all balances will accrue interest at the variable
standardAnnual Percentage Rate, which can range from Prime + 1% to Prime + 4.5% usingthe JP Morgan Chase Prime
(JPMCP) rate (currently an APR of 3.25%) not to exceed 18% at any time. Information accurate as of 03/10/2014. Subject
to change without notice. After the promotional period, the variable standard APR will be based on your line amount,
combined loan to value ratio, and credit rating. This offer is available to new equity line clients, and to existing equity
line clients with an increase in their existing credit line of at least $15,000, and is subject to change without notice.
Hazard insurance required and flood insurance, if applicable. Exclusions and limitations apply **No closing costs will
be assessed on lines up to $250,000, subject to the following conditions: (1) Borrower must have a Capital City Bank
deposit account; and (2) if applicable, Borrower will pay for the second and any subsequent valuations of the property.
Borrower will participate in closing costs for lines exceeding $250,000. Minimum line of $15,000 required. If you close
your Credit Line and we release our lien within three (3) years from the date of closing, you will owe a prepayment
penalty of 2% of the line amount, not to exceed $1,500. Owner-occupied property only and CCB must be in a valid
first or second lien position. Refer to HELOC application or ask your banker for complete details. This offer may be
withdrawn at any time. AConsult your tax advisor about possible tax benefits.


404


switch Your subscription to






EZP Now

REE comic umbrellaf
and get a F Ne supples I's' monthly billing

EZ Pay is sectim automatic
tor your subscrpfion to The \Nakulla Nevvs
plus, when You sgn uP onlne You'll get our


LOWEST AVAILABLE RATE!
\/st WWW.thewallullanews-cOm and Ock

the subsc6be button to get started.


OR CALL i "877,40iw6408

Secure. AutOmatic Renewal. Hassle-Free
"m 6


I


eaft Wav.,1111-





Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


6 /-

education news from local schools


Wakulla Middle students win oratorical contest


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Oratorical contest winners with pictured with Optimist members Jo Ann Daniels, Steve Pigott and Bill Versiga. At right, First place winners
were Nathan Cushard and Jillian Richardson.


Jo Ann Daniels
Special to The News
The Coastal Optimist Club held its
annual Oratorical Contest on Thurs-
day, April 10 at Posey's SteamRoom in
Panacea. Students from Coast Charter
School, Riversprings Middle School,
Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla
High School who previously won their


school level speech contest competed
against each other. The first place rib-
bon in the girls' competition went to Jil-
lian Richardson from Wakulla Middle
School. Second place went to Kaylee
Meyers from Wakulla High School. Ty-
ing for third were Stella Treadway from
Riversprings Middle and Faith Cyr from
Coast Charter School. The first place
ribbon in the boys' competition went to


Nathan Cushard from Wakulla Middle.
In second place was Christian Sat-
terfield from Coast Charter. The topic
for the speech was "How My Passions
Impact The World".
The first place winners, Jillian Rich-
ardson and Nathan Cushard, received
checks for $100 from the Coastal Op-
timist Club. Kaylee Meyers and Chris-
tian Satterfield both received $75. The


third place winners, Stella Treadway
and Faith Cyr received $50 each. All
the students received certificates which
were presented by contest chairs Steve
Pigott and Jo Ann Daniels and by club
vice-president Bill Versiga. Richardson
and Cushard will now compete at
the North Florida Optimist Regional
Competition on May 3rd in Marianna
to compete for a $2,500 scholarship.


WHS thespians perform at state


Special to The News
Wakulla High's Thespian
Troupe #5036 took 20 stu-
dents to the Florida State
Thespian Festival and Con-
ference in Tampa March 26
through 29. Students who
go to State must have scored
an overall Superior on their
performances at the District
Thespian Festival back in
January in order to perform.
All of the students who went
to the state festival knew that
they were going up against
the very best Thespians in
the state of Florida. Wakulla
High's Original One-Act play
"Portals" was chosen to go to
Tampa as one of three plays
to represent District One at
the Florida State Thespian
Festival. All the students did
an amazing job, from their
load-in to their load-out at
the beautiful Ferguson The-
atre at the Tampa Bay Per-
forming Arts Center. They im-


pressed the judges with their
original music, perfect comic
timing and great ensemble
acting and scored an overall
Excellent. In the Individual
Events: Freshman Alex Wil-
liams scored a Superior for
his wonderful Monologues
portraying two very different


characters. The Duet Musi-
cal from "Tic Tic Boom"
by senior Brianna Marin
and Desmond Maxwell, an-
other outstanding fresh-
man, scored a Superior and
left us all breathless! In the
Original Costume Construc-
tion category, senior Emily


amI "_,!
Davis also scored straight
Superiors with her incred-
ible, hand-beaded dress from
noel Coward's "Hay Fever".
The Ensemble Acting team
of sophomore Tucker Cay-
son, seniors Brett DeRoss
and Kayla Webbe scored an
Excellent for their hilarious


scene from "The Philadel-
phia". Seniors Melissa Gentry
and David Sloan also scored
an Excellent for their wacko
Duet Acting performance in
"DMV Tyrant". Senior Brian-
na Marin scored an Excellent
for her amazing Solo Musical
rendition of "Diva's Lament"
from Spamalot.
Chaperones were Susan
Bistrican, Dawn Davis, Nan-
cy Floyd-Richardson and
Nick Reed were so helpful
and nurturing to everyone;
always there to encourage
and cheer the students on.
We can't thank them enough
for going with us and expe-
riencing the magic of state.
WHS Thespians are wrapping
up their year and only have
the end-of-the-year Thespian
Banquet on May 20 before
closing out 2014.
Thanks to all of those won-
derful people who supported
these talented students this
past year.


Bank


honors /


educators

Special to The News
Capital City Bank recently honored the area's
finest educators, treating them to a well-deserved
Southern-style feast at the Wakulla County School
District Teacher of the Year Breakfast on Monday,
March 24 at Crawfordville Elementary. This is the
third year Capital City Bank has volunteered to
sponsor the breakfast and the monetary awards
presented to school- and county-level teachers of
the year.


"At Capital City Bank, we
the importance of supportir
administrators, teachers a
Capital City Bank Presiden'
Amy Geiger. "It is important
ers know the public really
accomplishments of this sch
it means to Wakulla's econor
our schools are top-notch."
In addition to sponsoring
from the Crawfordville office


Bidding Ends tuesday, May bth at Z:UU p.m.
Subject to "Dynamic Close" Auto Extend Bidding
Offered Online Exclusively @ RowellAuctions.com

11 Commercial & Residential Properties
& Acreage Tracts

A For Detailed Property Info Visit RowellAuctions.com
L Rowell Auctions, Inc. I 800-323-8388 R1 1
AUCTIONS A MarkNet Alliance Member AU-C002594 10% Buyer's Premium ROWSE
RowellAucin~o


have long believed in and Renee Millender volunteered as the decorating
ag our local schools, committee, hanging colorful pennants and signage
and students," said to help ensure teachers were met with a bright and
t of Wakulla County festive atmosphere.
to us that our teach- Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools
does understand the Bobby Pearce said, "We appreciate the support of
ool district and what Capital City Bank, especially when teachers work
nic development that so hard every day and care about their students
so much. Teachers never ask for recognition, so
the event, bankers it's gratifying when an outside entity like Capital
e Courtney Armitage City Bank honors their dedication."




Loud & Clear


and FREE

Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to
receive a free amplified phone from the non-profit
Floiida Telecommunications Relay Inc Coidless i
anid coded phones foi pei sons wiith mild to severe '0
heaiing loss aie available at 23 distribution centers
statewide Limit one pei customei U O l

CONTACTYOUR AREA CENTER FOR DETAILS B fl r


Please


Recycle


Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc.


www.thewakullanews.com


1*IMHl 14






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 11A


Artifacts from Wakulla's past


From Front Page

River from the store's
site. The exhibit also
features old photos and
maps, timelines and a
video production.
Kinsey said folks had
always talked about the
old trading post, and its
history became tangible
when he was able to
find and keep evidence
of the store.
"We found the beads
one at a time," Kin-
sey said. "We stomped
the mud and used our
hands to fan the water.
The bottom was thick
mud. These things are
hard to find, so I had to
train my eyes. If you fan
too hard, they would go
taking off. Even if you
try to pinch a bead in
the water, it would blow
it away."
Kinsey said he used
film canisters with
holes poked in the lid to
keep beads from float-
ing away.
It is believed the
beads were made in
Morono, Italy. Some
used to be silver-plat-
ed; the metal chipped
away after more than
two centuries buried
in water and mud.
Others still have vivid
black and white stripes.
Some are textured and
swirled with bright col-
ors. A few of the beads
are so tiny, it is amaz-
ing that holes could be
drilled through them.
Kinsey, with his div-
ing partner Allen Ger-
rell, had to dive accord-
ing to the tides.
"Just as the tide
started going out, there
were only so many
hours until the wind
blew it back in," Kinsey
said. "I spent quite a
few years out there -
some of the most enjoy-
able years. We hunted
for artifacts until the
early '90s, and then
other people caught


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
A map showing the location of the Panton, Leslie store on the Wakulla.


on and the Wakulla
River started to get con-
gested."
While Kinsey and
Gerrell painstakingly
collected the tiny ar-
tifacts one at a time,
once Kinsey found a
mother lode.
"One day I was on
a sandy spot between
some eel grass," Kinsey
said. "I put my tank on
and started fanning
through the sand, and
I found 70 of these
black and white trade
beads. It was the most
I'd ever found. In the
late 1700s, trade beads
would come in wooden
kegs. You could reach
in and grab a handful."
There is a big his-
tory behind the tiny
trinkets.
According to dis-


plays at the museum,
Scotsmen John Pan-
ton and John Leslie
and their company
traded goods to the
Indians for deerskins
and beaver pelts begin-
ning in 1776. Over the
years, the firm shipped
250,000 hides to Eu-
rope to make leather
products. By 1792, the
company had a mo-
nopoly on Indian trade
with the Upper and
Lower Creek, Seminole,
Chickasaw, Choctaw
and Cherokee in the
Southeast.
John Forbes, one
of the trading post's
founders, joined the
company and a junior
partner. After Panton
and Leslie died, Forbes
became the principal of
the company.


Save Egg-stra this year


with 10 Months of


sent straight to your


mailbox for Only



$20.14


Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.
Please accept my new 10 Month subscription at the price of $20.14*
Subscribe Today Name -----
& Stay Informed
About Local: Address
Marriages City -------State Zip
Anniversaries
Obituaries Phone# ( ) Cell Phone# ( ) E-mail -- -- --
Births Credit Card- -- -- Exp. VISAC [ j
School
Religion Sign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the office.
Spoiteds tVJIakuIlla jt S 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy.
Classifieds
Legal Notices P.O. Box 307 Crawfordville FL 32327 1-877-401-6408
Promo Code: HOLIDAY Expires: 04-30-14
All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my
credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $20.14. Local delivery area only.


More partners were
eventually brought into
the company, begin-
ning a series of deals
where the U.S. would
purchase Indian lands.
In 1804 Panton, Les-
lie & Company nego-
tiated with Seminole
and Creek chieftains
to transfer land that
extended from present
day Gulf County in the
west to the St. Marks
River near Tallahas-
see. Approximately 1.2
million acres of land
was sold by the Indi-
ans to Panton, Leslie &
Co. The company was
reorganized and re-
named John Forbes &
Company, and the 1.2
million acre land trans-
action was known as
the Forbes Purchase.
Some of the 50,000
pieces of merchandise
might have found its


way to the water when
William Bowles, Brit-
ish defector and self-
ascribed Director Gen-
eral of the Muskogee
Nation, sacked the old
trading post in 1792.
He was eventually cap-
tured, escaped, cap-
tured again, and died
in prison.
The animal-bone
buttons on display are
still in decent shape
for being so old. Kinsey
speculated that who-
ever made the buttons
had a special cutter to
round them out and
drive a hole trough the
middle. The buttons
materials range from
crude bone to shiny,
imprinted metal. One
button has a crown
that reads, RP, which
Kinsey thinks might
stand for "Royal Prov-
enance" from Europe.
"Look how far this
button traveled to
end up in the Wakulla
River," he said. "Some
are early military artil-
lery core buttons. This
one has canons, can-
nonballs and an eagle
perched on top. "
The old gunflints are
worn down and smooth
looking.
"I love to find the
gun flints," Kinsey said.
"You can tell they were
well-used."
The long stems of
the clay smoking pipes
haven't survived the
decades, but the bowls
still remain. One of
them is identified as an
Indian smoking pipe.
While Kinsey had
a few brushes with
wildlife, he said never
encountered any al-
ligators while artifact
hunting.
"I looked too stringy
to be tasty," Kinsey
said. But he did make
contact with other cold-
blooded creatures.
Once, while Kinsey
fanned the silt with one
hand, he felt something
wrap around his arm. It
was a water snake.


"I didn't have time to
identify if it was a good
or bad one," Kinsey
said. "So I slung it to
get the snake off- and
it wrapped around Al-
len's neck! I still have
problems with my
shoulder."
The beads on display
are strung together in
random order with six-
pound test fishing line.
While Kinsey collected
artifacts out of fasci-
nation and reverence
to history, others have
tried to make a living
from looting. Kinsey
said it is a sad thing
that looters who weren't
careful to preserve his-
torical integrity have
destroyed archaeologi-
cal sites, which led to
strict laws prohibiting
the excavation and sale
of antiquities.
"Sites were de-
stroyed, so the state
cracked down," Kin-
sey said. "It's not even
worth trying. But it's
interesting to realize
(the artifacts) haven't
seen daylight in a cou-
ple hundred years."
Cal Jamison, di-
rector of the Wakulla
County Historical So-
ciety, said looting de-
stroys provenance and
a lot of historical con-
text is lost because of it.
"But the other side is
-you've got all this cool
stuff laying down there
and no one will ever get
to see it," Jamison said.
The museum is re-
ceptive to local archae-
ological enthusiasts
like Kinsey.
"We want to try to
get folks to share their
treasures," Jamison
said.
Kinsey said he hung
up his wetsuit after
Florida artifact laws
were enforced. Now
occasionally his met-
al detector beeps and
squeaks him in the
direction of lost jewelry,
mislaid pocket change,
or just maybe our next
connection to history.


Photo Project Exhibit


OPENING CELEBRATION



See the stunning visual history of Wakulla's local fishermen,
shrimpers, crabbers, crab-pickers, oystermen, trap-makers, boat-makers
and more on display at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center
at 318 Shadeville Highway in Crawfordville.

wakullasworkingwaterfronts.com I850-879-2010

.____


www.thewakullanews.com






Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014



Outdoors


www.thewakullanews.com


outdoor sports and fishing reports


A notebook helps to record nature's events


Wteku a i




BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH


'The world is too big
and I'm too small."
That's how I feel
most of the time.
There are so many
things I wish to par-
take in going on, plac-
es to check out in our
region, books to read,
nature documentaries
to watch on TV, etc. It
is overwhelming!
Many of my sight-
ings locally, includ-
ing observations on
our property for the
last three years, I've
started recording just
so I won't forget!
For instance, my
neighbor, Charlese
Williams' (aka "Tee-
dle") fruit trees started
to bloom Feb. 8, 2012.
Then on the 10 Oth it got
down that night to 18
degrees and burned
the blossoms back a
hard freeze, but in two
days we noticed the
first redbud started to
bloom.
This year, however,
the redbud started
blooming locally the
first week of March.
I made a note of it on
March 6th.
In 2012, my dog-
wood started to bloom
the last week of Feb-
ruary. This year on
the 19th of March I
made a note that dog-
woods are starting to


bloom like the redbud
in 2012, a full two
weeks later due to our
much colder winter.
Because my Patti is
so interested in but-
terflies and moths, I
try to record when I
see the first of each
species in our yard or
in the neighborhood.
On Feb. 24, 2012,
I observed the first
Zebra and Tiger Swal-
lowtails of that year.
This year on Feb. 24,
I saw my first butterfly
in the yard a Cloud-
less Sulphur.
On the 10th Patti
identified an Eastern
Comma (the first for
our property).
On the 15th we saw
a Common Buckeye
and on the follow-
ing day, an American
Lady.
I also felt that I saw
a Black Swallowtail on
Feb. 21, 2012. This
year I didn't see this
species until March
3, again two weeks
later, possibly due to
the extraordinary cold
long winter.
We had a Giant
Swallowtail eclose
- "hatch" from its
pupa or chrysalis on
March 12 of this year.
I saw my first Pala-
medes Swallowtail on
the 14th "fluttering"


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
George Weymouth tracks the weather and wildlife sightings in his notebook.


over my yard.
I saw my first Ze-
bra Swallowtail nearly
three weeks later than
in 2012.
Other butterflies
soon followed this
spring such as the
Carolina Satyr March
17, Red-spotted Pur-
ple March 21, Pearl
Crescent March 25,
etc.
The butterflies are
back, and so are the
birds.
Starting last month,
our American Robins
left for points North
to nest, as did our
American Goldfinches
about the 20th.


On the 21st, I saw
a Common Loon fly
over the yard heading
north from our coast-
al regions, and three
days later I heard two
more calling as they
flew over our Smith
Creek area.
Neat!
On the 27th we had
our first Ruby-throat-
ed Hummingbird and
Swallowtailed Kite -
though I am certain
they had both been in
the area weeks earlier.
About the time the
pine pollen ceased to
fall, around the end
of March this year,
or the beginning of


April, the songbirds
started pouring in,
like the first Eastern
Kingbirds, and I heard
my first Parula and
Hooded Warblers too.
At the St Mark's
National Wildlife Ref-
uge on Sunday, April
6, while waiting to
attend an excellent
talk by Scott Davis on
plants of the refuge,
we heard Red-eyed
Vireos and had a great
look at a Great Horned
Owl by the visitor's
center.
Then on the 8th
near our home, Patti
saw a Spotted Sand-
piper as it was migrat-


ing through.
We had Indigo Bun-
tings at our feeder, as
well as a Cattle Egret
by our mailbox a
sure sign of spring mi-
gration starting.
This last Sunday,
April 13, while on a
field trip in the ref-
uge again with Scott
Davis (an excellent
botanist) many of us
were treated to a rare
sighting of a Limpkin
by the double dikes
just north of Stony
Bayou Pool No. 1.
It was the first I
have ever seen in the
refuge since moving to
this area in 1986.


Keep an eye out for gopher tortoises


out on a spring stroll


From FWC News

A gopher tortoise
strolling across a road
or through a backyard
or field is a common
sight during spring in
Florida.
Yet as tortoises be-
come increasingly ac-
tive this time of year,
they are vulnerable
to being struck by ve-
hicles and injured or
killed.
Don't forget to look
out for these slow-mov-
ing reptiles with their
bony-plated shells and
elephantine legs.
They leave their bur-
rows in search of green
plants to eat and a tor-
toise to become their
mate.
From now through
May, females will be
laying eggs the size of
ping-pong balls in the
sandy apron outside


their burrows.
The Florida Fish and
Wildlife Conservation
Commission encour-
ages drivers to slow
down on highways to
help protect the state's
gopher tortoises.
If a gopher tortoise
is crossing the road, it
is OK to pick it up and
move it to safety but
keep it pointed in the
direction it was head-
ing and do not put this
terrestrial animal into
the water.
People also can help
by downloading and
using a new smart-
phone app to report
to the FWC when and
where they spot go-
pher tortoises. The
free "Florida gopher
tortoise" app recently
became available on
iPhone and Android.
When users of the
app take a photograph


of a tortoise or its bur-
row, the photo and its
GPS coordinates will
be sent automatically
to the FWC.
App-generated data
collected by citizen sci-
entists will help guide
conservation of this
threatened species.
Biological information
and a quiz testing the
user's knowledge of
the only tortoise east
of the Mississippi River
also are included in
the app.
The FWC's Gopher
Tortoise Management
Plan spells out goals
and actions to protect
the tortoises, their bur-
rows sheltering hun-
dreds of other species
and their habitat.
Prescribed burning
is critical to maintain-
ing the sandy, open
fields and forests, and
the growth of soft-


stemmed plants that
tortoises need to sur-
vive.
To access the man-
agement plan, go to
MyFWC.com/Wildlife
and select "Managed
Species."
People can report
injured or dead gopher
tortoises to the FWC
by calling (850) 921-
1030 during weekdays
or by contacting the
Wildlife Alert hotline at
888-404-3922. Harm-
ing a gopher tortoise,
its burrows or eggs is
against the law.
For "A guide to living
with gopher tortoises,"
go to MyFWC.com/Go-
pherTortoise and click
on "Education Corner."
To find "Safe roads
for people and gopher
tortoises," go to My-
FWC.com/GopherTor-
toise and select: "How
you can help."


,*KE'S MARINE SUPPf

G M.'YAMAHArm-. -..mm'rF


www. mi kesmarineflorida.com
Marine Supplies & Accessories
Trained Mechanics
P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL
(850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693
Mike Falk Owner -1


I .. ^y 1v
c~t^r y21V
4^ LYIW.^^^^^
^^4R4Xs .^S
mmrnrO *-** jf ^ ^^^^^


*0

STIHL TRIMMER
$21995 Fs56
2219 ICrawodila!Bwy Caforil~le -92m3300






www.thewakullanews.com




WtVA44 W,44


Local writers share their experienrs


Coast Guard Auxiliary Reports
By Carolyn Brown Treadon


Thank you to Alex-
ander Gulde for sub-
mitting the following
report from this past
week's safe boating
class and to Duane
Treadon for the photo-
graphs.
On Saturday, April
12, 12 boaters commit-
ted to learning about
safe boating practices
and earning the cov-
eted Florida Boating
Safety Education ID
Card.
The United States
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Flotilla 12, Apalachee
Bay held its eight hour
flagship course, "About
Boating Safely" at the
Wakulla County Exten-
sion Service Office in
Crawfordville.
This course teaches
the fundamentals of
boating safely, and cov-
ers topics such as boat
terminology, opera-


tions and navigation,
and Florida-specific
legal requirements.
Completing this
course and earning the
Boating Safety Educa-
tion ID Card allows
anyone born on or after
Jan. 1, 1988 to operate
legally a motorboat of
10-horsepower or more
in Florida.
The course was co-
taught by Flotilla mem-
bers Chuck Hickman,
Duane Treadon, Alex-


Investigator Eric Johnson teaching Florida-
specific issues for the boating course.


ander Gulde, and Mark
Rosen, who also served
as Chief Instructor.
Instruction on Flori-
da-specific issues was
graciously provided by
Investigator Eric John-
ston and Officer Tyler
Harrison of the Florida
Fish and Wildlife Con-
servation Commission.
If you are interested
in learning more about
being safe this season
while out on the wa-
ter, please contact our


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 13A



a peek into life on and under the water


-- ..


Flotilla Staff Officer
for Public Education,
Alexander Gulde, at
fso-pe@uscgaux.net.
The boating season
is upon us and our
members are available
to assist area boaters
with complimentary
Vessel Examinations,
scheduled Boat Safety
Courses as well as par-
ticipating in the many
upcoming events pro-
moting Boating Safety.
If you are interested
in becoming involved
in the Auxiliary, check
out our website at www.
uscgaux.net or contact
our Flotilla Staff Officer
for Human Resources
at fso-hr@uscgaux.net
or Flotilla Commander
Duane Treadon at FC@
uscgaux.net.
As Sherrie says, Safe
Boating is no Accident
- being prepared is
your best defense!


Coast Guard Auxiliarist Mark Rosen teach-
ing part of the boating safety course.


Underwater

By Gregg StantonM )aklC/4U


"A Boating Emergencies i

Coast Guard Station
Panam a City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500
or ............................................................................ (850) 284-1166


F t&ISis


Wakulla Financial Center

2190 Crawfordville Highway

224-4960, ext. 1254 I www.fsucu.org


I U


Thursday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:08 am 10:42 pm
8:05 pm 8:47 am
Brightness- 86%
Friday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:07am 11:41pm
8:06 pm 9:38 am
Brightness- 79%
Satmurdai
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:05 am -:-
8:07 pm 10:33 am
Brightness- 72%
Sunday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:04 am 12:38 am
8:07 pm 11:33 am
Brightness- 65%
Monday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:03 am 1:32 am
8:08 pm 12:35 pm
Brightness- 58%
Tuesday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:02am 2:21 am
8:08 pm 1:38 pm
Brightness- 50%
Wednesday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:01 am 3:07 am
8:09 pm 2:42 pm
Brightness- 43%


I
First
May 7


G ulf oas W ee l Alm For tides at the following points add to
SGulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide
S- Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min.
Full Last New' April 17 April 23. Apalachicola 1Hr.,53Min. 2Hrs.,38Min.
May 14 April 22 April 29 A r.il Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min.
S' 'iiu Tde charts b LowerAnchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min.
L 1T Zihua S ftwa.e LLC West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39Min.


St. Marks River Entrance
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.5 ft. 0.9 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 17, 144:27 AM 9:49 AM 3:45 PM 10:47 PM
Fri 3.3 ft. 1.1 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 18, 14 5:10 AM 10:24 AM 4:17 PM 11:30 PM
Sat 3.2 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.9 ft.
Apr 19, 145:58 AM 11:03 AM 4:55 PM
Sun -0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.7 ft.
Apr 20, 14 12:20 AM 6:53 AM 11:50 AM 5:40 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.3 ft.
Apr 21, 14 1:19 AM 8:01 AM 12:53 PM 6:39 PM
Tue 0.1 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.7 ft. 3.0 ft.
Apr 22, 14 2:30 AM 9:20 AM 2:23 PM 8:12 PM
Wed 0.3 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.9 ft.
Apr 23, 141 3:47 AM 10:36 AM 4:12 PM 10:16 PM
Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.6 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 17, 14 4:19 AM 10:00 AM 3:37 PM 10:58 PM
Fri 2.5 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 18, 14 5:02 AM 10:35 AM 4:09 PM 11:41 PM
Sat 2.4 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.9 ft.
Apr 19, 14 5:50 AM 11:14 AM 4:47 PM.
Sun -0.3 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.7 ft.
Apr 20, 14 12:31 AM 6:45 AM 12:01 PM 5:32 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.5 ft.
Apr 21,14 1:30 AM 7:53 AM 1:04 PM 6:31 PM
Tue 0.1 ft. 2.1 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.2 ft.
Apr 22,14 2:41 AM 9:12 AM 2:34 PM 8:04 PM
Wed 0.2 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.1 ft. 2.2 ft.
Apr 23, 141 3:58 AM 10:28 AM 4:23 PM 10:08 PM


City of St. Marks
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 3.2 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 17, 145:03 AM 10:53 AM 4:21 PM 11:51 PM
Fri 3.1 ft. 1.0 ft. 3.7 ft.
Apr 18, 145:46 AM 11:28 AM 4:53 PM
Sat -0.5 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.6 ft.
Apr 19, 14 ___ 12:34 AM 6:34 AM 12:07 PM 5:31 PM
Sun -0.3 ft. 2.8 ft. 1.3 ft. 3.4 ft.
Apr 20, 14 1:24 AM 7:29 AM 12:54 PM 6:16 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.5 ft. 3.1 ft.
Apr 21,14 ___ 2:23 AM 8:37 AM 1:57 PM 7:15 PM
Tue 0.1 ft. 2.6 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.8 ft.
Apr 22, 14 ___ 3:34 AM 9:56 AM 3:27 PM 8:48 PM
Wed 0.3 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.7 ft.
Apr 23,14 1 4:51 AM 11:12 AM 5:16 PM 10:52 PM
St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.7 ft. 0.9 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 17, 144:11 AM 9:28 AM 3:29 PM 10:26 PM
Fn 2.6 ft. 1.1 ft. 3.1 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 18, 144:54 AM 10:03 AM 4:01 PM 11:09 PM
Sat 2.5 ft. 1.2 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 19, 145:42 AM 10:42 AM 4:39 PM 11:59 PM
Sun 2.3 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.9 ft.
Apr 20, 146:37 AM 11:29 AM 5:24 PM
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.6 ft.
Apr 21, 14 ___ 12:58 AM 7:45 AM 12:32 PM 6:23 PM
Tue 0.1 ft. 2.2 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.3 ft.
Apr 22, 14 ___ 2:09 AM 9:04 AM 2:02 PM 7:56 PM
Wed 0.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.3 ft.
Apr 23, 14 3:26 AM 10:20 AM 3:51 PM 10:00 PM


Shell Point, Spring Creek
Date High Low High Low High


inu 3.5 t. n .u tn.
ADr17. 14 4:24 AM 9:46 AM


4.1 ft. -U.7 ft.
3:42 PM 10:44 PM


Thursday
MajorTimes MnorTimeh
316m-516m 846m-946 m
343pm-5 43pm 1041pm-1141pm
Goo
Friday
Major Times MnorTimcs
411m-611 m I 937am-1037m
4 39 pm-6 39 pm 1141 pm-12 41 m
Average
Saturday


, i. .1 I . .I 11 I .. -I- .
Fri 3.4 ft. 1.2 ft. 4.1 ft. -0.6 ft. MaorTim 1morfim
Apr 18, 14 5:07 AM 10:21 AM 4:14 PM 11:27 PM 507m-707 ..
Sat 3.2 ft. 1.4 ft. 4.0 ft.5 m
Apr 19, 145:55 AM 11:00 AM 4:52 PMl I
Sun -0.4 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.6 ft. 3.7 ft. Aerge
Apr 20, 14 12:17 AM 6:50 AM 11:47 AM 5:37 PM Sunday
Mon -0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.8 ft. 3.4 ft.
Apr 21, 14 1:16 AM 7:58 AM 12:50 PM 6:36 PM MaiorTim miorTe
Tue 0.1 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.9 ft. 3.1 ft. 605m-805m 1237 m-137 m
Apr 22, 14 2:27 AM 9:17 AM 2:20 PM 8:09 PM 634p11834p1 1132 m-1232pm
Wed 0.3 ft. 3.0 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.9 ft. Aerge
Apr 23, 14 3:45 AM 10:33 AM 4:09 PM 10:13 PLM


Dog Island WVest End
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 2.4 ft. 1.4 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 17, 145:20 AM 9:06 AM 3:07 PM 10:06 PM
Fri 2.4 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 18, 146:16 AM 9:41 AM 3:44 PM 10:54 PM
Sat 2.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.1 ft.
Apr 19, 147:17 AM 10:23 AM 4:27 PM 11:52 PM
Sun 2.3 ft. 1.7 ft. 2.8 ft.
Apr 20, 148:24 AM 11:20 AM 5:19 PM___
Mon -0.0 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.6 ft. 2.6 ft.
Apr 21, 14 1:01 AM 9:30 AM 12:45 PM 6:25 PM
Tue 0.1 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.5 ft. 2.4 ft.
Apr 22, 14 2:18 AM 10:26 AM 2:32 PM 7:51 PM
Wed 0.3 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.2 ft.
Apr 23, 14 3:31 AM 11:09 AM 4:03 PM 9:38 PM


MajorTms M aorTms
7 1m-9 02 m 131 m-2 31 a
7 30pm-9 30pm 12 33 pm-1 33 pm
Average
Tuesday
Major Times MinorTimes
758 m-958 m I 220om-320om
8 25 pt-10 25 pm 137 pm-2 37 pm
Average
Wednesday
MajorTimes MinorTime
852m-1052am 306am406am
918pm-1118pm 240pm-340pm
Average


The Instructor.

In a world of instant gratification, what with
rapid electronic communications, online purchas-
ing, and Zero to Hero qualifications, it is difficult
to find seasoned service at virtually any level.
We suffer these problems in our diving world
as well.
I fear the consequence will be the departure of
the bricks-and-mortar store in favor of the "Click
Store" in much the same way as academia is head-
ed with in-class training verses online training.
Already Tallahassee is down to one fading
brick dive shop, now more an archery shop and
for good reason.
Try filling your scuba cylinder on-line!
Where are we going?
I have always felt the success of any activity is
predicated upon the quality of the service. And
quality is not something that is acquired quickly.
I have also felt that a person's success is often
based upon his or her training. The better the
training, the better the experience, the better the
outcome of the effort, the better the reward.
That is why our facility has always been train-
ing- centric. Our facility is made of metal and
brick, and revolves around training at all levels.
The store, like the repair and the blending sta-
tion, are conveniences in support of the training.
We have embarked upon a long range training
mission with the colleges and universities in Tal-
lahassee to train future divers in this area.
Over a decade ago, I supervised a half dozen
instructors teaching up to 100 students each
semester, in the art of underwater activities. And
that was at just one of the universities in Tallahas-
see. We are in concert with Bob Ballard of TCC's
Wakulla Environmental Institute to eventually
form a department of diving, teaching diving at
all levels. But this will take time and cooperation.
With the Introduction to Professional Diving
class drawing to a close and the next class form-
ing for the fall semester, increased momentum
can be seen everywhere.
Dr. Olaves, Director of Aquatics at FAMU, is
training up himself to become an Instructor for
the fall class.
Dr. Kepper, M.D., is hosting the class this week
on a hyperbaric chamber dive at Capital Regional
Medical Center.
Dr. Hess is reviewing options with for future
UCSI training at the Institute.
Summer interns are lining up to take the Dive
Technologist course at Wakulla Diving Center.
And David Young just became our facility Store
Manager, in concert with Travis Kersting.
These folks are all experienced and dedicated
Instructors, at various levels in diving, contribut-
ing to an exciting, refreshing new momentum in
our county.
David is the newest recruit, a retired pilot and
experienced (20 year) NAUI Instructor working
at a dive center along the eastern seaboard. He
brings a seasoned professional perspective to our
college and recreational classes.
Like so many of our instructors, he is also
multi-talented. I am a Marine Biologist, Dr. Olaves
is a swim coach, Dr. Hess is an engineer, Dr.
Kepper is a physician, and Travis and David are
experienced Dive Technologists.
We all teach because we love the share our
passion for the profession. Watch closely as our
county's environmental institute grows with in-
creasing momentum.






Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Law Enforcement and Courts


Sheriff's Report


On Sunday, April 6,
Samuel Crawford Ru-
nyan, 56, of Panacea
was arrested for dis-
orderly intoxication
after driving up and
down his street yell-
ing obscenities at his
neighbors and mak-
ing threats. Deputy
Alan Middlebrooks
and Deputy David Pi-
enta investigated.
In other activity re-
ported by the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Of-
fice this week:

THURSDAY, APRIL 3

James Hodges
of Crawfordville re-
ported a fraud. The
victim observed $510
worth of unauthor-
ized charges on his
bank card. Two of
three charges were
created online with
a company in Poland
and the third charge
originated in Ohio.
Deputy Stephen Sim-
mons and Detective
Randy Phillips inves-
tigated.
Virgil Homan of
Panacea reported the
loss of a vehicle tag.
The victim said the
tag was stolen off of
his truck. It had been
stolen while the vehi-
cle was waiting for re-
pairs at a local busi-
ness. The tag was en-
tered into the NCIC/
FCIC data base as
stolen. Deputy Gibby
Gibson investigated.
Robyn Scott of
Crawfordville report-
ed the theft of DVDs
and coins from her
home. The stolen
property is valued at
$145 and a suspect
has been identified.
Deputy Mike Zimba
investigated.

FRIDAY, APRIL 4

John Brown of
Crawfordville report-
ed a residential bur-
glary in Sopchoppy.
Fishing equipment
and tools, valued at
$1,225, were reported
stolen from the vic-
tim's shed. Sgt. Mike
Helms investigated.
On April 4, Jeana
Brandt and Nancy El-
lenburg of Crawford-
ville were involved in
a minor traffic crash
at the intersection of
U.S. Highway 319 and
Mimosa Street. There
were no injuries. Dep-
uty Matt Helms and
Sgt. Mike Helms in-
vestigated.
Gerri Nazworth
Armstrong of Craw-
fnr ,qr-l 1 e r nnrtc- q


criminal mischief to
her home. A rock was
thrown through the
victim's glass back
door. Damage was
estimated at $250.
Deputy Matt Helms
investigated.
Eddie Wilson of
Tallahassee reported
a vehicle fire. Deputy
Ashley McAlister re-
sponded to Old Wood-
ville Highway and ob-
served a vehicle fully
engulfed in flames.
Tallahassee Fire De-
partment responded
as mutual aid and
put out the fire. The
victim reported that
the vehicle began to
act strangely as he
was crossing the bike
trail. The vehicle was
a total loss as dam-
age was estimated
at $4,000. Property
in the vehicle was
also damaged as $500
worth of appliances
and miscellaneous
items were destroyed.
Fred Rowe of
Crawfordville report-
ed a structure fire
caused by a garage
door opener. The vic-
tim turned off the
power and used a
garden hose to extin-
guish the door opener.
Smoke damage was
observed to the ceil-
ing of the garage and
other miscellaneous
items were damaged
under the door open-
er. Damage was esti-
mated at $13,000 and
Wakulla Firefighters
investigated. Deputy
Alan Middlebrooks
also investigated.
Louise Prance of
Crawfordville report-
ed a criminal mis-
chief. A grass fire was
threatening a resi-
dence on Rochelsie
Road in Crawford-
ville. The complain-
ant stopped at the
unoccupied home and
found a hose to fight
the fire. Wakulla Fire-
fighters arrived at the
scene and took over
the firefighting duties.
The origin of the fire
has not been deter-
mined but it did not
damage the home of
Joseph Torie. Deputy
Vicki Mitchell inves-
tigated.
Wal-Mart Asset
Protection staff re-
ported a retail theft.
Two male suspects
stole beer and energy
drinks and left the
store without paying
for them. The men
got into a Chevrolet
Tahoe and fled south
on U.S. Highway 319.
Tb-, Q stnlm Q items ar,


valued at $30. Sgt.
Lorne Whaley inves-
tigated.
Melissa Marie
Turnbow, 40, of Craw-
fordville was charged
with knowingly op-
erating a motor ve-
hicle while license
suspended or revoked
with knowledge and
possession of a con-
trolled substance.
Deputy Alan Mid-
dlebrooks and Dep-
uty Matt Hedges
turned onto Skipper
Bay Road in Panacea
and Turnbow turned
on the same road in
front of the deputies.
Approximately 100
yards down the road,
Turnbow stopped her
vehicle in the middle
of the road.
Deputy Middle-
brooks checked on
her welfare and dis-
covered that her
driver license was
suspended. Five con-
trolled substance pills
were discovered in the
vehicle and in a bottle
without a label. She
was transported to
the Wakulla County
Jail without incident
and the vehicle was
towed from the scene.
Stacey Larman
of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of a
garbage bin. The bin
was removed from
the home by a pickup
truck and is valued
at $100. The sub-
ject removed the vic-
tim's trash from the
can before stealing it.
Deputy Ward Kromer
investigated.

SATURDAY, APRIL 5

Anthony Lariscy
of Coastal Corner in
Ochlockonee Bay re-
ported a retail theft.
Two male juveniles
left the store with two
pair of swim goggles
valued at $10. Road
Patrol deputies found
the juveniles on Craw-
fordville Highway and
arrangements were
made to pay for the
stolen items. Depu-
ty Matt Helms and
Deputy Vicki Mitchell
investigated.

SUNDAY, APRIL 6

Deputy Anthony
Paul responded to the
400 block of Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr.
Memorial Road and
recovered a bicycle.
The bike was found
in the ditch. The bi-
cycle was taken to
the Property and Evi-
ri Di vs V tr-ci stin-ce,


FIREE RESCUE Saturday April 26 10a.m. to 2 p.m.

SOPCHlOPPY CITY PARK
lao' Enter for a challenge on g


a a series of obstacle trails
& WN stretched over a 2 mile course


OPEN AGES 5-10 ...1 MILE LITTLE MUDDER COURSE
TO AGES 11+ ... 2 MILE ADULT COURSE

MINIMUM TEAM PLEDGE, IJP TO 5 PERSONS $100.
INDIVIDUAL I)ONATIONS $25.
SPONSOlSIuIPS AVAILABLE T-SHlIKR'TS FOl PARTICIPANTS
AWARDS FOK TOP FINISIHEIKS ANI) COSTUMES
To Register or sponsor 850-962-4611 Info: 650-566-2634 or 850-545-0398 or sopchoppymudrun.com
Directions: From Hwy, 319 turn onto Sheldon St. by Post Office, then left on ParkAve.for 1/2 mi.
All proceeds Wakulla County Fire Explorer Program


nobody had reported
it missing.
Debra Sparks of
Tallahassee report-
ed a trespass after
warning at her Riv-
ersink property. Ran-
dy Kevin Basore, 54,
of Crawfordville was
observed on the vic-
tim's posted property.
Basore was asked to
leave the property.
Deputy Ashley McAli-
ster observed Basore
on the property and
he was arrested for
trespassing-failure to
leave upon the own-
er's request.
Florida Highway
Patrol Trooper Stone
turned a wallet over
to Deputy Anthony
Paul. The wallet was
located in the Wakulla
County Courthouse
parking lot. Deputy
Paul attempted to
contact the owner of
the wallet, Roger D.
Ward of Crawford-
ville, without suc-
cess. The wallet and
contents was turned
into the Property and
Evidence Division.
Jessica Bennett of
Crawfordville report-
ed a vehicle burglary.
The victim left her
vehicle at the South-
ern Spirits Lounge
and discovered items
missing when she left.
The vehicle was left
unsecured. A wallet,
books and a com-
puter were stolen.
The items are valued
at $696. Deputy Vicki
Mitchell investigated.
James Edward
Winfield, 20, of Apala-
chicola was given a
notice to appear in
court for possession
of less than 20 grams
of marijuana.
Winfield was re-
portedly observed
failing to obey a traf-
fic light at Crawford-
ville Highway and Ar-
ran Road. The strong
smell of marijuana
was detected from
inside the vehicle and
1.8 grams of mari-
juana was discovered.
He was also issued a
traffic citation for fail-
ing to obey a traffic
signal. Deputy Ward
Kromer and Deputy
Vicki Mitchell inves-
tigated.
Nathan Joseph
Metzler, 34, of Craw-
fordville was arrest-
ed for possession of
less than 20 grams of
marijuana and pos-
session of narcotics
equipment following
a traffic stop.
Metzler was report-
edly observed with a
non-functioning tail


light. There was a
strong odor of mari-
juana allegedly com-
ing from the vehi-
cle. The marijuana
weighed 3.7 grams.
Deputy Alan Middle-
brooks and Deputy
Matt Hedges investi-
gated.

MONDAY, APRIL 7

April Hollis of Mid-
way reported the theft
of medications and
a backpack from the
St. Marks Lighthouse
boat ramp area. The
backpack contained
the victim's medica-
tions. The value of the
stolen property was
estimated at $40. Sgt.
Ray Johnson investi-
gated.

TUESDAY, APRIL 8

Wayne Barrow of
Crawfordville report-
ed the theft of a bi-
cycle. Detective Clint
Beam investigated
a suspicious person
call and discovered a
bicycle on the side of
East Ivan Road. The
bike had a flat tire
and is valued at $75.
The bike was deter-
mined to be owned by
the victim.
Sgt. Billy Jones ob-
served a male suspect
walking down a drive-
way in the area. When
the subject observed
Sgt. Jones he ran into
the woods and at-
tempted to conceal
himself. Kenneth E.
Heirs, 46, of Craw-
fordville was charged
with trespassing and
petit theft of the bi-
cycle. Deputy Billy
Metcalf also investi-
gated.
Edward Jones
of Crawfordville re-
ported the theft of a
safe from his home.
The safe is valued
at $450. Sgt. Danny
Harrell investigated.
Danette Freeman
of Crawfordville re-
ported a credit card
offense. Five unau-
thorized charges were
observed on the vic-
tim's bank card. The
charges totaled $95
in San Francisco and
West Virginia. Deputy
Ross Hasty and De-
tective Randy Phillips
investigated.
Raymond Spohn
of Crawfordville re-
ported a vehicle bur-
glary. A wallet was
taken from the un-
secured vehicle. The
victim reported the
loss of $410 from his
wallet. Deputy Ste-
phen Simmons inves-


Your sex life and erection can now survive
FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug
companies don't want you to know!
Dr. Kevin Hornsby, MD, will mail the first 37 men that respond to this ad
a free copy of his new thirty dollar book "A Doctor's Guide to Erectile
Dysfunction." He's so sure this book will change your life he will even pay
the postage and handling. If the popular pills don't work for you, regardless
of your age or medical history, you owe it to yourself and your lady to read
this book now! Call ll l Free 800-777-1922 24-hrs. and leave your name
and address (only).


tigated.
A 33-year-old
Crawfordville woman
reported a trespass
and criminal mischief
at her home. The vic-
tim discovered that
someone wrote on her
bathroom mirror with
lipstick. The victim
left her home unse-
cured at the time of
the incident. Deputy
Jeff Yarbrough inves-
tigated.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL
9

SDeputy Nick
Boutwell investigated
a report of a 13-year-
old male possess-
ing a knife while at
Riversprings Middle
School.
The knife was dis-
covered in the stu-
dent's backpack by a
teacher and Principal
Michele Baggett. The
9-inch long knife con-
tained a 5-inch blade.
Deputy Boutwell is-
sued the student a
Juvenile Civil Citation
and school adminis-
trators suspended the
student from school.
Detective Clint
Beam was driving on
High Drive toward
Fulton Harvey Road
when he observed a
vehicle approaching
his unmarked agency
vehicle at an unsafe
speed.
The vehicle drove
past the detective at
more than 65 mph in
a 25 mph zone. Detec-
tive Beam conducted
a traffic stop and ob-
served the strong odor
of marijuana emitting
from the vehicle.
A search of the
vehicle revealed two
grams of marijuana
inside a pill contain-
er as well as drug
paraphernalia. Two
17-year-olds were is-
sued notices to ap-
pear in court for pos-
session of less than
20 grams of marijua-
na and possession of
narcotics equipment.
The driver was also
issued a traffic cita-
tion for careless driv-
ing. Detective Derek
Lawhon also investi-
gated.

The Wakulla Coun-
ty Sheriff's Office re-
ceived 1,223 calls for
service during the
past week including
101 citizen contacts;
74 investigations; 36
medical emergencies;
13 suspicious peo-
ple; 14 suspicious
vehicles; 50 traffic
enforcement; 185
traffic stops; 14 reck-
less vehicles; and 12
wanted people.



Life

Insurance


Tucker
Life-Health
Insurance, Inc.
Ross E. Tucker, CLU
Registered Health Underwriter


mmI


926-2200


FSL&

Iesllt ill

850.224.4960

www.fsucu.org


reports


www.thewakullanews.com





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 15A


Couple faces multiple


drug and weapon charges


after fleeing
Special to The News

Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
deputies arrested a Mississippi couple
in Crawfordville on April 12 after the
couple fled Mississippi prior to being
sentenced to prison, according to
Sheriff Charlie Creel.
Deputy Alan Middlebrooks was on
routine patrol when he became suspi-
cious of a vehicle with a Mississippi
tag stopping at a church on Greenlin
Villa Road at a time when church was
not in session.
Jerry Jackie Kitchens, 39, of Semi-
nary, Miss., provided Deputy Middle-
brooks with a driver's license from
another individual. When the image
on the license did not match Kitch-
ens', Deputy Middlebrooks expanded
his investigation.
Deputy Middlebrooks arrested
Kitchens for driving while license
suspended or revoked with knowledge
and resisting an officer obstruction
by a disguised person.
Deputy Middlebrooks was granted
permission to search the vehicle
which contained many bags of lug-
gage and camping equipment. He
also discovered prescription pills and
narcotic patches in a clear plastic bag.
Continuing the search, the deputy
discovered a black box that contained
two handguns and multiple boxes


Mississippi
of ammunition as well as multiple
knives that turned out to be stolen
from Mississippi. Deputy Middle-
brooks also discovered an envelope
containing $5,000 in $100 bills.
Kitchens and Heather Eileen Jor-
dan, 31, of Hattiesburg, Miss., were
charged with four felonies including
possession of a weapon by a convicted
felon; possession of stolen property;
possession of Schedule IV narcot-
ics; and possession of Schedule II
narcotics.
The vehicle, weapons and narcotics
were seized by the WCSO and contact
with the Forrest County Sheriffs Of-
fice in Hattiesburg confirmed that
the knives and guns were stolen
from Jordan's mother, Janette Arre-
dondo. Other items seized included
40 knives, a police scanner, military
fatigues, gloves, multiple food items,
clothing and a ghillie suit.
The couple was transported to the
Wakulla County Jail without incident
and they remain in jail. Kitchens re-
mains under a $102,000 bond and
Jordan remains behind bars with a
$100,000 bond.
Additional charges against the
couple are pending in Hattiesburg.
Deputy Billy Metcalf, Lt. Mike Kemp,
Deputy Gibby Gibson and Deputy
Jeff Yarborough assisted with the
investigation.


PHOTOS BY WCSO
Participants in the Special Olympics Torch Run, above, and Special
Olympics athletes at Azalea Park, below.


Special Olympics


Torch Run is held


Special to The News

Representatives
from the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Of-
fice, Wakulla Cor-
rectional Institution,
Florida Department of
Law Enforcement and
the Florida Highway
Patrol took part in
the annual Law En-
forcement Torch Run
for Special Olympics
Friday, April 11 in
Crawfordville.
The runners and


walkers took the torch
1.5 miles from the
WCSO parking area
to the Wakulla Coun-
ty Courthouse where
they were greeted by
dozens of supporters.
Sheriff Charlie Creel
and Superintendent of
Schools Bobby Pearce
spoke to the gathering
at the courthouse.
The Special Olym-
pic athletes followed
the Torch Run by en-
joying a luncheon at
Hudson Park. The ath-


letes participated in
the Wakulla County
Games on March 7
and the Area Games
at Lincoln High School
on April 5 and will
hold their awards ban-
quet on May 2.
On May 16 to May
18, Wakulla athletes
and Special Olympic
athletes from all over
Florida will take part
in the Florida Spe-
cial Olympic Games
at ESPN Wide World
of Sports in Orlando.


Specializing in:

Routine physical exams

Treatment of high blood pressure
and diabetes


Treatment of colds and sore throats


Treatment of minor injuries


Flu and pneumonia vaccination


Annual pap smears


Specialist referrals available









CAPITAL REGIONAL

MEDICAL GROUP

CRAWFORDVILLE

(850) 926-6363

Office Hours: Monday Friday, 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Capital Regional Medical Group accepts Capital Health Plan
and most all other insurance carriers.


2382 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite C, Crawfordville, FL 32308


Jerry Jackie Kitchens Heather Eileen Jordan


www.thewakullanews.com


CapitalRegionalMedicalGroup.com





Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Rust disease is fungus that attacks pine, oaks


By Les Harrison
By Les Harrison


Spring is known as a
time of color. It bursts
from trees, plants and
wildflowers in rainbow
hues.
Animals shed their
winter coats and dis-
play their short, slick
warm-season attire.
Robins, waxwings and
other colorful bird ap-
pear with ajoyous cho-
rus to cheer the winter
weary.
The colors are a vi-
sual indicator of activ-
ity and progress. It is
time to grow, produce
and populate new areas
with a renewed vigor af-
ter the seasonal repose.
Sometimes the col-
ors are an indication
of problems to come.
These bright and cheer-
ful tints are, in reality, a
harbinger of a growing
disease issues.
Rust diseases of
pines and oaks are one
such problem in Wakul-
la County. Normally,
these diseases are more
of a cosmetic issue, but
extreme situations can
cause significant losses.
Rust diseases are
caused by a fungal
pathogen. These mi-
croorganisms are native
to the area and difficult,
if not impossible to con-
trol, but there are some
practices which will
reduce the potential for
infection of trees.
Fusiform rust is easi-
ly identified on southern
pines by the disfiguring
and commonly swollen
cankers which display
orange reproductive
spores in the spring.
Fortunately, humans,
pets and livestock are


not subject to infections
of this fungus.
This fungi attacks
and kills stem and
branch tissues, espe-
cially in slash and lob-
lolly pines. The infected
limbs become weak-
ened and are easily bro-
ken by strong breezes
and winds, which may
fatally damage the ef-
fected tree or a tree
struck by the falling
branch.
After the orange
spores disappear, the
cankers have a signifi-
cant resin or sap flow.
These pitch cankers
continue the damage
to the tree and attract
other pest and prob-
lems.
Red oaks, especially
water oaks, are an al-
ternate host for this
disease. In areas where
fires and controlled
burns are rare, the oaks
flourish, and by default,
so does fusiform rust.
Pruning and remov-
ing cankers will mini-
mize the potential for
spread of this disease.
In areas of heavy infes-
tation it may be nec-
essary to remove the
pines, execute a con-
trolled burn and then
replant the pines.
Even the pine nee-
dles can be affected by
fusiform rust and show
damage. However, dam-
age to the needles may
be the result of a differ-
ent fungus.
Pine needle rust
is not as potentially
damaging and costly
as fusiform rust. It too
uses local oaks as an
alternative host and


PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Pine needle rust has made an appearance in Wakulla County this spring. This disease is typi-
fied by white sporulating structures on the needles.


makes a somewhat less
colorful appearance in
spring.
The needles of pines
infected with pine nee-
dle rust display dis-
tinctive white pustules
which erupt and permit
the spores to be carried
on the spring breezes to
uninfected oaks. These
pustules or sporulating
structures may also
appear on the affected
pines woody stem tis-
sue.
The initial symptom
in the pines is pur-
ple spots followed by
yellowing. Outbreaks
of this condition have
been relatively small in
recent years.


Plant

SBillion


Il roees


S Join The Nature
Conservancy to plant
a billion trees, one
tree at a time, in the
fight to end climate
change at
plantabillion.org
TheNature
Conservancy
Protecting nature. Preserving life-


The prevailing winds
and other environmen-
tal conditions influence
where this disease will
make it next appear-
ance. The cycle repeats
with pines and oak
swapping spores and
disease which produce


unwelcomed springtime
colors.
To learn more about
pine and oak diseases
in Wakulla County, visit
your UF/IFAS Wakulla
County Extension Of-
fice at 84 Cedar Avenue
in Crawfordville or call


(850) 926-3931.
Les Harrison is the
Wakulla County Exten-
sion Director. He can
be reached by email at
harrisoggufl.edu or at
(850) 926-3931.


Free


J1 Checking

with Interest...


.500
051WAPY'


,, ,,i i, ,,,i 1 ,1 ,1 , , ,,, h, h 11., ,,, 1 ,, ,i I I ...11 , ,I ,, I'' II 1 ,I h ,,, I II I ,, I
" 1 ,1 4,, I ,'' I , I~,, ,h ,, 11,, 1 ,I ,, ,, I 1 I,1 I ,,II,,, I,, I, ,, I ,I ,,
I .1.11I ., 1.................I 1 1,.1 "d
d .1 ..11 .1 .. , I,.,, ,,I , I ,I 1 ,, ,I
,, I .1 , ,,, ,, II 11,1


...... ...., .. .. .t . . ...: .


Tlivl Omixvu UItillty Lka^ U~it HhiLL
At their new facility,
j ^ 1757 Lawhon Mill Road, Medart, Florida


brity DnRaces begin at 5:00p.m.
i Dine on B-B-Q and sip on Non Alcoholic Mint Juleps
0 0 0, while watching Wakulla County's
11usic' 11'- Celebrity Owners Horses Race


**-RRNW
"0000000 ^


Coastal
Restaurant i
Ilonicm u iu'I411- 1-( ni- i1I .Sct/(P m ( Iutclwn
Thursday Mornings
Look for Your Complimentary
copy of Ije r aliulla IleWtu
( free \\ith any full Break fast Order)

Hungry Man Breakfast $529

Breakfast Platter $y29
$14 Breakfast Special

Kids Eat AUCE
Free 984-29:33 Chicken Tues.
on Wed. & Thurs.
1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea 0


sWith Any Order Wi-Fi!








Receive a
Complimentary Copy of

ThWakutia 11t6.5

FRESH MADE TO ORDER
HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES
SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILI
PARTY PLATTERS
926-3500 *Fax orders 926-3501
2500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville


www.thewakullanews.com





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


By JENNY ODOM
Special to the News
Most who travel
Martin Luther King
Memorial Boulevard
want to know what's
up with the house with
the mastodon in the
yard, but just like the
elephant in the room,
they don't want to ask.
The house is painted
bright pink with bright
green trim. There is art-
work, sculpture, signs
and fountains in the
yard and throughout
the refurbished cottage.
There is also a large
wooden barn that holds
an art gallery the new
Pelican Place and a
yellow lab named Billie
greets visitors.
The colorful abode is
owned by Hugh Taylor
and Mary Cortese.
The house once be-
longed to Lutty and
Charlie Parramore,
who ran the TV repair
shop in Crawfordville
for years.
The Parramores en-
joyed making signs that
mostly touted religious


themes, and putting
them in their yard and
on fences. Many of the
signs are still in the
yard today. "Isn't it
amazing what God can
do" reads one.
With a tightly pulled
ponytail covered by a
baseball hat, Taylor
explains how he met
Mrs. Parramore.
"One time the Para-
mores won a contest for
weirdest mailbox, held
by a local newspaper,"
he says.
When Taylor stopped
to take a few Polaroid
photos of the mailbox,
he turned the camera
on some of the signs in
the yard.
"She came out of the
house and started yell-
ing at me," says Tay-
lor, laughing. He says
he just started talking
calmly with her and she
softened. They eventu-
ally became friends.
Today, the yard is
scattered with art, signs
and colorful sculptures
either collected by or
made by the owners.
Taylor built the giant


Artists of Wakulla
Artists of Wakulla is a monthly feature
that highlights an individual artist living
and working in Wakulla County. If you are
an artist, or know an artist, who is interest-
ed in being featured, please contact Jenny
Odom at jenny@iggyart.com.


Mary Cortese and Hugh Taylor in their fron
mastadon sculpture made out of rebar, The W
special paint.


Mastodons, Pez,


funk and bacon


Can't


access



Wakulla



online
content?


Subscribe
today and
get full
access!

SJust $34 per year
in Wakulla County
$46 per year
in Florida
$49 per year
out of state
Please Go To
www.thewakullanews.com
and click on subscribe
or
Call
877-401-6408


WWS! 1o '-^' 3026 Coastal
Highway,
.- rAngies Medart
SShlrimp (850) 926-3114
CShrip inarine (800)726.3104
C r ic k e ts _' 1 .
SWor s Suppy b Bait Shop
*" Worms LUppy P (850) 926-1162

IN-SHORE FISHING Is HOT
AND So Is THEn WEATiHER
HOOK UP YOUR BOAT
See us for Al your boating supplies!


-OPEN- Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 ,
Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 JIM V, '




SGUILDAY
X-AW
g7wza&d. CaSiEu cOM -affOV
OuZ~ay, Sofuvwatz, Sbnmokz Q44W,
Aatgi & _owzPf4.
Estate Planning, Probale
Business Planning & Incorporalions
57JW2 (Cam I ,W Ez .
Real Estate Transactions
Title Insurance

850-926-8245
Crawfordville TIll I.'Mcc
3042 CrawfordvilleHighway 1983 Centre Poimn i ,I ',,,
Crawfordville, FL 32327 Tallah.. .. ii 2",
\tt J zi't t/ ~ai ~~i wa i oaz. a~uruai /Yzoziu tt l|
'L4- c

WMay 2nd & 3rd 2014

Tournament at the 3Y Ranch
195 Harvey Young Farm in Crawfordville, florida
Camping Available Contact: Skip@3yranch.com
Registration Fee $75.00 Adults & $50.00 Youth 17 a& under

Fishing within 50 Mile Radius Of Wakulla County


Grand Prize Slam: Hobie Outback Kayak

Prizes includes Kayaks $1,000 *$500 *$250
First 25 Registrants will receive a special prize
First 100 Registrants will receive Classic T-Shirt & Bag
ALL Registered Anglers will receive a Iyear digital subscription
to Kayak Angler Magazine


Youth Division
X Ages 17 & Under
Fish by Length


Freshwater Division F
Large Mouth Bass i -
ONLY! _.____


Saltwater Division
Red Fish &
Trout


For Registration go to: www.bigbendkayakclassic.com or
Call 850-926-7145
Proceeds Benefit Meals on Wheels & Other Senior Services


The colorful world

of Hugh Taylor

and Mary Cortese

21st Annual
BaconFest,
"SouthPork"
Open to the public,
no admission, on
May 3 and 4, from
I1I a.m. to 3 p.m.

both days. Live mu-
sic.

Pelican Place
1357 Martin Luther
King Jr Memorial
Road in Crawford-
vyIle. (850) 926-
6058.Visit www.
pelicanplace.net

mastodon, along with
some other sculptures
donning the yard.
"We're just continu-
ing the tradition of art
they started 30 years
ago," Taylor says about
the Parramores.
Taylor, who is a Tal-
lahassee native and
graduated Leon High
School "a while ago,"
shares the eclectic
home with his wife of
13 years, Mary Cor-
tese. Cortese is from
Waterbury, Conn., and
works full time as an
administrator for the
Florida Department
of Law Enforcement's
DNA Database used to
JENNY ODOM/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS link criminals through
Lt yard with their giant their DNA.
ffakulla News and lots of Turn to Page 5B


NOW OPEN

10AM 7PM Mon-Fri
Badcock 9AM 4PM Sat

HOME FUFRNoTU RR mEAore0
2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL
Badcock.com 850926-2281


I





Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


20/4 Easter


Hun faf Hudson Park


2014 GREEN LIVING EXPO


a Green Flea Market


9 a.m.- 2 p.m. AT HUDSON PARK & TCC WAKULLA CENTER

Workshops at TCC Wakulla Center


Outdoor
Time Room A Room B Kitchen Computer Lab Outdoor Workshops Educational
Stations
Landscaping on Calculate Your Container Gardening: Eco-Kids Activities
10:00- Why Wildflowers Matter the Edge Carbonla Eco Veggies in Re- Eco-Kids Activities
10:45 Eleanor Dietrich Scott Jackson Growing and aon & Eco Purposed Containers Enviro-Scape
UF-IFAS Growing and Footprint Jeannie Brodhead Enviro-Scape
Feasting on Salads Pollution Demo
Trevor Hylton &
Shelley Swenson Waterways
Water Conservation Be the Solution to helley UF-IFAS How to ake Ecologics
11:00- When Landscaping Pointless Personal UFIFAS Drop In for 10 RainHow to Make Ecologsls
11:45 Les Harrison Pollution Minutes Jeannie Brodhead Compressed
UF-IFAS Eric Livingston Natural Gas Cars
Using Green Soil Solarizaton for Wild Game & Fish Local Bike Trails
12:00- Infrastructure to Disease Control Cookery How to Lower Your
12:45 Address Environmental Trevor Hylton Andrea Carter & Electric Bills
Dr. Jennifer Cherrier UF-IFAS Robert Roddenberry

Reducing Your Beekeeping Basics
1:001:45A Yard for Butterflies Footprint: Little for Everyone Stop By Anytime
1:00-1:45 Jeannie Brodhead Actions-Big Results Sherri Kraeft
Jenny Druda


3W STUDIOS


0Capital City
Bank
UNIVERSITY of
UF FLORIDA
AS Exte5mion
IFAS Extension I_


F
I.hJ.il Fruils
S& Exotics
0 926-5644


ExhbiorFoms85-96-049apasck cmcstne *Quetins* KthynGiso 96-919toazi* ong*i *o
I0Viit s o fae 0ok o wwwsusainbleigbnd0rg0


Mr "I'Ci


' -7--- ---
'FuWASTE PRO I
1--


thewakullanews.com


I --- I


I


I






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 3B


JIpt[Q 17 -




Qjuay 2


Upcoming Events

Thursday, April 17

WORKING WATERFRONTS, an exhibit featuring
the maritime industry of Wakulla County, will open at the
display at the Wakulla One-Stop Community center fro,
6 to 8 p.m. Enjoy photography, fresh seafood, and meet
local maritime workers.

THE WAKULLA COUNTY CATTLEMAN'S ASSO-
CIATION will hold their quarterly meeting at 7 p.m. at
the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office. All mem-
bers and prospective members are invited to attend this
meeting. A $10 steak dinner will be served to those at-
tending who have signed up in advance. Contact Jane
Ellen Strickland at tandjfarml@gmail.com or 926-6339
no later than April 14 to guarantee a steak dinner.

Friday, April 18

WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY is
hosting its third annual cemetery tour, this year tour-
ing cemeteries in the Sopchoppy area with guide Betty
Green. Cemeteries on the tour are Simmons, Grimes,
Oak Park, Revell and West Sopchoppy Betty will talk
about the history of these cemeteries and tell stories


about some of the people buried there. We will have
a van for transportation. A $5 donation is suggested,
but donations of any amount are welcome. To re-
serve a spot on this tour, please call Arlene Vause
at 926-1110. RSVP is required for a seat on the van
leaving from the Wakulla County Historical Society
at 10 a.m.

TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
WAKULLA will host a BLOOD DRIVE from 8 to 11
a.m. To make an appointment call Lori 431-8720.
Donors who donate twice between now and Au-
gust will receive two free movie tickets and a free
steak dinner from Outback. Blood drive location is 15
Council Moore Road.

Saturday, April 19, 2014

WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL is a celebra-
tion of outdoor activities and area heritage. Local
musicians, artists, and experts offer festival par-
ticipants one-of-a-kind experiences, helpful advice,
and personal enrichment in a neighborhood family
atmosphere. At Wakulla Springs Park, from 8:30
a.m. until 7 p.m. Sign up for special tours and see a
schedule at www.wakullawildlifefestival.com.

Wednesday, April 23

STHE WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC AND
SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE and REFUGE
HOUSE, INC. Introduces Tremayne Moore, author and
incest survivor. Moore will be speaking on how writing
saved his life, and his efforts to educate the public about
incest and teenage suicide. The event will be at noon at
First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Lunch is provided.

Friday, April 25

THE 41 STANNUAL STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMO-
RIAL REGATTA will be held at Shell Point Beach. This
year's event is scheduled forApril 25-27. Pre-register at
www.smithregatta.com.

Saturday, April 26

2014 GREEN LIVING EXPO AND GREEN FLEA
MARKET presented by Sustainable Big Bend, Inc. and
to be at the TCC Wakulla Center and Hudson Park in
Crawfordville from 9 a.m.- 2 p.m. The event is free.


6th ANNUAL ROCK THE DOCK FISHING
TOURNAMENT will be held at Rock Landing Dock
in Panacea. Captain's Meeting on Friday, April 25 be-
ginning at 6 p.m.; Registration begins at 4 p.m. Enter-
tainment by Tobacco Rd Band, 7 p.m. 10 p.m. For
more information go to www.panacearockthedock.
com.

WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
will host a fish fry to raise funds for the Heritage Vil-
lage Park, which will be the featured food entree for
the Green Expo being held in Hudson Park and TCC
facilities.

The 4th annual NAMI TRIPLE CROWN DERBY
FOR MENTAL ILLNESS will be at the Wakulla Coun-
ty Horseman's Association located at 1757 Lawhon
Mill Road in Medart. Races begin at 5 p.m. Dinner
and awards will follow the event. Tickets are $20 for
adults and $7 for ages 7 through 15. Ages 6 and un-
der get in free. Children's entertainment, celebrity em-
cee and live music.

FRIENDS OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY PUB-
LIC LIBRARY kick off their annual membership
drive with a "Buy a Ticket, Win a Tablet" campaign.
The drawing and celebration at the library at 6 p.m.
Snacks will be served before our speaker begins at
6:45. Special speaker is Betty Jean Steinshouer.

DESCENDANTS OF EPHRIAM AND MARGA-
RET REVELLVause will be at 10:30 a.m. at Pee Wee
Vause Farm. For more information call Claxton Vause
at 962-2371.

Wednesday, April 30

A free HEALTH AND COMMUNITY PARTNER
EVENT at the Quincy Farm Share Site from 10 a.m.
to 2 p.m. Farm Share will be distributing food as well.
The site is located a quarter mile west of Piggly Wig-
gly on Highway 90. For more information contact
Sandra_Porras-Gutierrez@dcf.state.fl.us.

Saturday, May 3

The COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB is accepting ap-
plications for parade entire for THE BLUE CRAB FES-
TIVAL PARADE. For applications, call June Vause at
545-0077 or Bill Versiga at 850-294-8480. Or e-mail:
jcvause@yahoo.com or wversiga@yahoo.com.


Live Music

in Wakulla

Friday, April 18

RIVERSIDE CAFE,
69 Riverside Dr., St.
Marks. Stranger Than Fic-
tion, classic rock and roll
through Saturday, April 19.

Sunday, April 20

OUTZ TOO OYSTER
BAR & GRILL, 7968 Hwy.
98, Local Motion, 3 p.m. -6
p.m. on the patio.

RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69
Riverside Dr., St. Marks.
Deuce is Wild, classic rock
and roll.

Friday, April 25

RIVERSIDE CAFE,
69 Riverside Dr., St.
Marks. Stranger Than Fic-
tion, classic rock and roll
through Saturday, April 19.

Sunday, April 27

OUTZ TOO OYSTER
BAR & GRILL, 7968 Hwy.
98, Swingin' Harpoons, 3
p.m. -6 p.m. on the patio.

RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69
Riverside Dr., St. Marks.
Nitro Ground Shakers, rock
and roll.

Friday, May 2

RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69
Riverside Dr., St. Marks.
Swinging Harpoons, blues/
rock and roll through Sun-
day.


2014 Green Living Expo Schedule, Saturday, April 26
STCC Wakulla Center and Hudson Park


Room A

Why Wildflowers Matter
10-10:45 a.m.
Landscaping Water
Conservation 11-11:45 a.m.
Green Infrastructure
Noon-12:45 p.m.
Yard for Butterflies
1-1:45 p.m.


Room B

* Landscaping on the Edge
10-10:45 a.m.
Pollution Solution
11-11:45 a.m.
Soil Solarization
Noon-12:45 p.m.
Reduce Your Footprint
1-1:45 p.m.


Kitchen

* Growing and Feating
on Salads
10-11:45 a.m.
Wild Game & Fish
Cookery
Noon-12:45 p.m.
Beekeeping Basics
1-1:45 p.m.


Computer Lab

Calculate Your
Carbon Footprint
Drop in for 10 minutes
anytime throughout
the event


Outdoor Workshops

Container Garden; Veggies in
Repurposed Containers
10-10:45 a.m.

Rain Barrels
11-11:45 a.m.


Outdoor Stations

Enviroscape Pollution
Demonstration

Beekeeping

Wetlands


Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net


Working Waterfronts
Photo Exhibit

One-Stop Center
6-8 p.m.

Thursday


Wakulla Wildlife
Festival

Wakulla Springs
All day

Saturday


Government Meetings


Monday, April 21
THE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY
COMMISSIONERS will hold a regual public meeting at 6
p.m. at the commission chambers.

Tuesday, April 22
THE WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COM-
MITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla
County BOCC Administration Building.

Monday, April 28
THE WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISO-
RY COMMITTEE will have a public meeting at 6 p.m. at
the Wakulla County Public Library, to provide feedback to
the Board of County Commissioners, county staff and the
Parks and Recreation Director relating to the recreational
programs of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation
Department. 4330 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL.,
(850) 926-7415.


Clubs, Groups, Regular
Meetings

Thursday, April 10
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey's Steam
Room in Panacea.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each
second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office,
2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members
and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of
charge.
Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be
held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County
One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for
class at 745-6042.
WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Cen-
ter from 2 to 4p.m.
Friday, April 11
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlock-
onee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more
information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.


BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the senior
center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30
a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill
levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.
Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for
two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville
Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Saturday, April 12
LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday
from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817
South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, educa-
tion and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune
diseases.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission
by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853
for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organ-
ic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Down-
town Sopchoppy under the giant oak.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND
ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is lo-
cated at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.

Sunday, April 13
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at
54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for
five classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30
p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The WVakulla County One Stop Community Cen-
ter, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Monday, April 14
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call
545-1853.
YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior
Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath.
RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer's Project of Wakulla
at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship


Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There
is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call
Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.

Tuesday, April 15
VFW LADIESAUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post
on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more informa-
tion.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30
p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more informa-
tion, call 545-1853.
BOOK BUNCH meets in the children's room at the public li-
brary at 10:30 a.m.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI
Wakulla office.
CRAWFORDVILLE LION'S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant.
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9a.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more infor-
mation at 984-5277.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as
in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office.

Wednesday, April 16
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at
6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more in-
formation, call 545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information,
call 545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay
UMC on Surf Road at noon.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more informa-
tion.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30
a.m.
KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. For information, call 491-1684.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.
BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at
the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to
create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.
KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library.
Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to at-
tend.
MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road.
Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play.
SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m.
until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy com-
panionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.


www.thewakullanews.com






Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)


Lights out on gambling, temporarily on session


By DARA KAM
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE, April 11 -
Lawmakers are turning out the
lights in the Capitol next week
while some celebrate Easter,
others observe Passover and,
with any luck, all get some R
and R as the clock winds down
on the 2014 legislative session.
Although House floor action
dragged on past 4:30 p.m. Fri-
day in advance of the week-long
respite, an empty fourth floor ro-
tunda was eerily quiet. Perhaps
the lobbyists and hangers-on
were getting an early jump on
the weekend, or plotting their
strategies for the brief two weeks
that will remain in the session
when House and Senate mem-
bers return April 21.
Gambling lobbyists may have
already rolled up their tents
earlier in the week after House
Speaker Will Weatherford de-
clared the issue dead for the rest
of the session.
The Republican-dominat-
ed Legislature closed out the
week with the House passing
red-meat legislation dealing
with guns, abortion and school
vouchers on Friday, sending the
items to the typically more mod-
erate Senate with plenty of time
for horse-trading on the issues
before the session ends May 2.
In other bartering business,
the two chambers teed up the
remainder of Gov. Rick Scott's
election-year pledge to cut $500
million in taxes and fees. Dis-
parities in the House and Senate
tax break proposals are eliciting
little more than a yawn from
some old-schoolers, including
Weatherford, who called the
variations typical of the "postur-
ing" during the latter part of the
session.
One major question remained
unresolved Friday evening -
which legislators would attend
the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin'
Festival? Curiosity seekers may
want to do a little research on
the annual event, where sirens
deploying the right equipment
coax the creatures out of their
underground hiding places. Any
relationship to activities around
the Capitol environs is left to the


imagination of the reader.

GAMBLING REALLY,
REALLY DEAD

Several weeks ago, Weather-
ford warned that the lights were
dimming on prospects for any
gambling legislation this year.
This week, the speaker ham-
mered the proverbial nail into
the issue.
"I would say at this point the
lights are out," Weatherford, R-
Wesley Chapel, told The News
Service of Florida in a telephone
call during a break in House
floor activities Wednesday.
Weatherford's announce-
ment didn't come as much of a
surprise to gambling lobbyists
and insiders, who read the tea
leaves when he laid out two very
high bars a successful deal
between Scott and the Seminole
Tribe of Florida and a constitu-
tional amendment earlier in
the session.
But Weatherford's timing
may have been a little pointed.
His comments came the day af-
ter Senate President Don Gaetz
was involved in some heated
sidebar huddles over a proposal
that would eventually do away
with greyhound racing. Gaetz,
R-Niceville, dropped in on the
debate at the Senate Gaming
Committee on Tuesday, with
his wife, Vicky, joining other
animal rights supporters in the
audience. Their son, Rep. Matt
Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach,
was also present for much of the
hour-long discussion.
Before Tuesday's meeting,
with "Johnny Depp," "Twiggy"
and "Whisper" by her side, the
Senate's first lady could not hold
back the tears when asked why
she was participating in a press
conference about the perils of
greyhound racing.
"I'm so passionate about it
that I can hardly speak about
it," Vicky Gaetz said. "It's just an
issue I'm very passionate about,
anything involving animals or
children who are neglected or
abused."
The Senate Gaming Commit-
tee was giving Sen. Maria Sachs,
D-Delray Beach, another shot
at her perennial effort to "de-


couple" greyhound racing from
other gambling activities. Sachs,
Grey2K and Matt Gaetz are
among those who believe that
greyhound racing is a thing of
the past, costs the state money
and has led to cruel treatment of
the racing dogs by some opera-
tors who only use the dogs as a
means to operate more lucrative
poker rooms. The pari-mutuel
permits allow the racetrack op-
erators to operate card rooms
and, in Miami-Dade and Bro-
ward counties, slot machines.
But despite pressure from
the Senate's "first family," the
committee stopped short of
trying to eliminate greyhound
racing and instead approved a
measure (SB 742) that would
force tracks to report injuries
and deaths to the state.
The next day, Weatherford
announced that even that pro-
posal was a bust this session.
The Senate president had no
comment.
The death knell for gambling
came after the Legislature spent
$400,000 for a study, the Senate
held a series of public work-
shops across the state on the
issue and gambling interests on
all sides contributed millions of
dollars to campaigns.
A variety of groups includ-
ing out-of-state gambling opera-
tors and the Florida Panthers
hockey organization have
intensified their demands for
Florida to approve Las Vegas-
style casinos this session after
lawmakers rejected the idea two
years ago. At the same time, the
state's pari-mutuels, Disney
World and its affiliates and the
Seminole Tribe have balked at
the proposal. Gambling-related
groups on both sides of the issue
have contributed over $4.6 mil-
lion to lawmakers, candidates
and political parties since the
2012 elections. Disney and its
associated enterprises have con-
tributed more than $2.2 million
during the same time period.

ABORTION BILLS STIR EMO-
TIONS

The House passed two abor-
tion-related bills Friday, eliciting
impassioned but cool-headed


debate on the floor. In keeping
with protocol established by
previous leaders, Weatherford
ordered young House messen-
gers out of the chamber before
the debate on the two proposals
began.
One measure (HB 1047)
would place additional restric-
tions on abortions, largely bar-
ring the procedures if doctors
determine that fetuses have
reached viability. The Senate
Judiciary Committee heatedly
debated a similar measure (SB
918) before approving it with
a party-line vote earlier in the
week.
Under current law, abor-
tions in most cases are barred
during the third trimester of
pregnancy. But the bills would
require that physicians conduct
examinations before performing
abortions to determine if fetuses
are viable. If viability is reached,
abortions would generally not be
allowed a change that the bills'
supporters say could prevent
abortions around the 20th week
of pregnancy.
Rep. Janet Adkins, R-Fer-
nandina Beach, the sponsor
of the bill, said the measure
defines viability as the stage of
fetal development when the life
of a fetus is sustainable outside
the womb through standard
medical measures.
"This bill does nothing to
take away a woman's choice
pre-viability," Adkins said. "The
courts have decided Florida has
the right to protect life at the
point of viability."
But Democrats argued the
proposed change doesn't pro-
vide protections for women or
physicians when a woman's life
is at risk, and that the measure
imposes religious beliefs on
people who don't hold the same
convictions.
Rep. Janet Cruz, D-Tampa,
objected that the proposal "puts
women's lives and health in
jeopardy" and "makes it much
more difficult for a doctor to in-
tervene and save a woman's life."
Four Republicans joined a
majority of Democrats who lined
up against the proposal, which
passed by a 70-45 vote.


SNIP, SNIP, SNIPPING AT
TAX CUTS

The House and Senate ad-
vanced divergent roadmaps
that both would lead to $500
million in tax and fee breaks for
Floridians and a boost for Scott,
whose popularity remains low as
he vies for a second term in the
governor's mansion.
The Senate's plan would give
Floridians a single sales-tax
holiday during the next year -
rather than four proposed by
the House and would include
money for improvements at
Daytona International Speed-
way, a bit of home cooking
pushed by Senate Finance
and Tax Chairwoman Dorothy
Hukill, R-Port Orange.
The Senate Appropriations
Committee on Thursday backed
an amendment to replace what
has been billed as the House's
"patchwork of awesomeness"
tax package (HB 5601) with
the Senate's "broad-based"
measures, as lawmakers work
to reach the half-billion dollar,
election-year benchmark set
by Scott.
The committee didn't vote on
the bill. Instead the proposed
changes to the House-approved
measure put on a unique Sen-
ate committee journey this week
- will be returned to the lower
chamber, where members are
not expected to fully welcome
the changes.

STORY OF THE WEEK:
House Speaker Will Weath-
erford, R-Wesley Chapel, an-
nounces that "the lights are out"
on any gambling legislation this
session.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
"It's not bread and water, but
it's pretty close. A steady diet
of peanut butter, cabbage and
sardines is not very appealing
to anyone." Florida Justice In-
stitute Executive Director Ran-
dall Berg on the Department of
Corrections' kosher meal plan,
comprised mainly of peanut
butter, cabbage and sardines,
served cold seven days a week.


Sharing Hometown Recipes, Cooking Tips and Coupons


Sweeten Up Spring's Arrival with Easter Knot Cookies

"We make
these
delicious
cookies
every
Easter!"


Easter is only a few weeks away. Looking to serve
a new dessert to family and friends this year? Try
baking up Lisa Cancilla's Easter Knot Cookies. With a light,
sweet anise flavor, these cookies are delicious and perfect
for Spring.
See step-by-step photos of Lisa's recipe plus thousands
more from home cooks nationwide at:
www.justapinch.com/easterknot
You'll also find a meal planner, coupons and chances to
win! Enjoy and remember, use "just a pinch"...

-_faer


jEaster Knot
Cookies --


l)ireclilhl%
-* nioeIl hui Ai il
*'us.' i.
* Addll c'',. n-ilk. nilm'e
,Ill \ nilllI.
* Co'bllIllle [lie 'illled
li bll. baking p bl dei
a.1td 'Ill.. Aid1 I'Io I% %I i
[lhe \%et 1IlllllMle.
* Gie'e cookie 'heel,'.
Roll dOl'li InIlh 1 2'"
lhi it l li. i ni

* Bake l 41111 iF loi S
i* Lunk I ILin n I,.
" D LIIK inii h.'ll midlldlet


* Jo Inke I'Illei IClin'.
LI bli iIine c- onlel ioinbli
C*11I'ji kl hiill c-ih Ai i.1
',Lh.ll.0dI',lldlItlel. Add
iu, l. Slo\l, \ ji.dd nilk
I de'lledC LI011I',I'IcL\.
A.dd.1 lib0b. Lb."bich ,ill
\ 0lb l CIiiCe'.


*d by: Lisa Cancilla. Parlin. NJ (Pop. 95.832)
% .j Iustapiinch.comi/easterkinol


Whal iou Need
1/2 I1 1I'tiiel. b01lelled
1 1 2 c 'Il.ca
6 egg,
2 iI"pl iilk
1 I'p ,1111i'e em\Lllt'
1 I'p piie alillli

8 c.. ddlled lltll
6 I',p |ain plllo bldei
1 I'p 'all

BMIIle Icillc Recipe
3/4 hlo\ LbllI IIcb i'l

1 'ickI 'i el
1 I'p a llle em\IJlIa
Food L 'Iblb iInc
M ilk .,,
Submitte

\'I I


Brought to you by American Hometown Media


HOME COUNTRY


A focus group gathered


to talk manure, worms


By SLIM RANDLES

Emily led the
group of five into the
Mule Barn, through
the coffee shop it-
self, and into what is
known locally as "the
banquet room" when
it isn't being used for
storage. Fraternal
groups representing
several animals used
it monthly, and the
Rotarians and Ki-
wanians weren't un-
known there either.
But this was dif-
ferent. As Emily led
them into the room
and told them to
please sit together
at the one long table,
they could see that
Dewey was already
here, standing at the
head of the table and
greeting each with
a handshake and a
grin.
The favored few
included Doc, Mrs.
Doc, Anita Campbell,


Steve the cowboy,
and Delbert McLain,
our Chamber of
Commerce. Loretta
came in with menus.
Her mouth dropped
open when she saw
Dewey was wearing
a necktie.
"I'm so glad you
could make it," Dew-
ey said. "You order
whatever you like for
lunch while we talk
about manure and
worms."
His girlfriend, Em-
ily Stickles, stood up
quickly from her seat
at the other end of
the table.
"Thank you, Dew-
ey, hon. Maybe I
should explain." She
motioned for him to
sit down. He did.
"This," she said,
brightly, spreading
her arms out to en-
compass all five of
their friends at once,
"is a focus group. You
were hand-picked
by me and Dewey
to help us with the
spring campaign."
'You're running for
office?" asked Steve.
"Of course not,"
she laughed. "The
spring advertising
campaign. For Dew-
ey's business. The
soil amendment divi-


sion."
She looked down
at the puzzled look
on Delbert's face,
"That's the fertiliz-
er, Delbert. It seems
plants just need it
in order to do their
best. But one of our
new divisions needs
some help. Some ad-
vice. That would be
the vermiculture di-
vision ... worms, Del-
bert. Red wigglers.
Fishing worms.
"And we've asked
you to share your
lunch hour with us
to get your ideas on
how we can sell more
worms. So just enjoy
your lunch and then
we'll talk worms af-
terward, okay?"
Dewey looked
through his friends,
over his necktie,
down the table, all
the way to the wom-
an of his dreams, the
one with the unbe-
lievable cheekbones.
Emily, he thought,
I couldn't raise a
worm without you.

Brought to you by
the new CD "Having
Fun in New Mexi-
co," Fifteen stories
by Slim Randles.
www.slimrandles.
corn.


Lisa Cancilla
Parlin, NJ
(Pop. 95,832)


( '


MiBEHIIURSOIERS


thewakullanews.com






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 5B


Memories of turtling on the Jenny Lee


There was a time
many years ago that
when you went out
for a nice seafood din-
ner, many restaurants
served fried turtle meat.
Like beef cattle, the
turtle of choice, the
Green turtle, is a veg-
etarian, and the meat,
cut into small "steaks"
and fried, is delicious.
Because people were
taking eggs from their
nests on our beaches,
and also, possibly, be-
cause of harvesting the
turtles themselves, they
have become an endan-
gered species and are
now protected from the
gathering of their eggs
or harvesting and sell-
ing the turtles for hu-
man consumption.
When I was a boy of
about 13 years old, I
began working for John
Tooke ("Mr. John") as a
helper on his boat, the
Jenny Lee.
The majority of the
work on the Jenny Lee
was deep sea fishing,
but on two separate oc-
casions, I went "down
east" from the St. Marks
Lighthouse to help him
catch Green turtles.
Because very few
men caught the turtles,
I will try my best to tell
you all how Mr. John
and I went about it. I
will begin to tell you that
I've worked some hard,
manual labor-type jobs
in my life, and I'd have
to rate this at the top of
the list as far as hard
work goes.
Some of you may cor-
rect me on this since
I was just a boy and
didn't know if this is a
fact or not, but I believe


Mr. John may have been
the only man in Wakul-
la County who knew
how to turtle and had
the equipment to catch
them. I never saw or
heard anyone else talk
about it and never saw
any familiar boats out
where we turtled.
His brother, whose
name I do not recall,
from Cedar Key, also
knew how to turtle and
did so. I know this be-
cause on one of our
trips, Mr. John's brother
came over on his boat
to see us and he was
turtling too.
Now, let me get back
to what I remember. We
would head out from
the St. Marks Light-
house, turn left (east)
at the "Fairway" buoy,
and head down the 3
mile limit stakes until
we were generally in
the area off the mouth
of the Econfina (we
pronounced it "Econ-
feenee") River.
I remember at night
you could see the lights
of a town Perry, I be-
lieve in the sky. We
would pull behind the
Jenny Lee a small cy-
press skiff boat with a
heavy turtle net on it.
Mr. John would anchor
about 2 miles offshore
and we'd get in the skiff
and row maybe a hun-
dred yards or so from
the Jenny Lee. I would
row the boat while Mr.
John would stand in
the bow, studying the
contour of the bottom.
The water was clear
and relatively shallow,
maybe about 12 to 15
feet deep in the area we
refer to as the "flats."


Ried cLay


Footprints


By John Roberts


The bottom, except
for occasional patches
of sand, is completely
covered with aquatic
grass. This is the grass
the turtles feed on, and
Mr. John would be look-
ing for a "hill" on the
bottom. This would be
an area where the water
is a little bit shallower
than the surrounding
area, and he could see
small "channels" in the
grassy bottom where the
turtles would approach
and depart the hill while
feeding. They would be-
gin to arrive as the tide
came in and depart as it
began to fall. Mr. John
was very good at locat-
ing these areas.
The idea then was to
set your net along the
middle to lower end of
the hill so that turtles
approaching the hill as
the tide rose, or turtles
leaving the hill on a fall-
ing tide, would strike
your net. The net would
ideally cover several of
the channels on the hill.
I don't remember
how long the net was,
I would guess maybe
50 yards. That's a wild
guess from having to
work so hard with it as I
will explain shortly.
Where I got my "work-
out" was by pulling on
the net each time the
tide began to change.
The way we had to do


this is Mr. John would
stand in the stern of the
boat holding onto the
net, and I would pull
on the oars with all my
might, not going any-
where, mind you, just
trying to pull that net so
it would "bow or billow"
in the right direction,
which was the direction
the tide was running.
So as I was pull-
ing on the oars, Mr.
John would hold that
heavy net until it was
stretched, working his
way down the entire
length of the net. If I, as
the oarsman, slacked
up even a little bit, the
net would just hang
straight down or bow in
the wrong direction.
Mr. John called me
"John Henry," and I can
hear him now, "Pull,
John Henry, pull, pull!"
Even wearing gloves,
I'd get some nice sized
blisters on my hands.
I hope you can picture
what I'm trying to say.
It's as if the net was a
curtain, hanging down
in the water, and you
have to make it bend
one way or the other...
that's what we had to
do.
The tide turns about
once every six hours,
so we had to repeat the
process regularly, day
and night. I remember
rowing out to the net at


all hours of the night,
and occasionally being
amazed at how bright
the phosphorous in the
water glowed with every
stroke of the oars.
Now and then we
would hear what Mr.
John called "Whiperees"
making loud sounds
like the cracking of a
whip, somewhere off in
the darkness. Mr. John
told me they were actu-
ally Manta Rays which
would jump out of the
water while feeding.
Another part of my
job was to keep a keen
lookout on the net dur-
ing the day for any tur-
tles that might strike
the net. Mr. John would
usually take naps in
the day while I watched
since he was usually up
most of the night listen-
ing for the strikes.
When a turtle hit the
net, we would imme-
diately take to the row
boat and pull it out as
we did not want the
turtle to drown. I know
it's hard to believe, but
a turtle really makes a
lot of noise when it hits
a net, splashing and
almost jumping all the
way up out of the water
in an effort to escape the
net. Mr. John, therefore
could not see them at
night, but could hear
them.
We would stay out for
two or three days and
the best I remember,
caught between eight to
10 turtles on a trip.
They were very large
turtles, weighing on av-
erage between 75 to 100
pounds. We would keep
them alive by laying
them on their backs on


the deck, punch holes in
their flippers and tie the
front flipper to the back
one. We would then
periodically wet them
down with a bucket
of water to keep them
alive.
The Jenny Lee had a
nice galley in it and Mr.
John was a good cook.
At least once during a
trip, he'd butcher one of
the turtles and we'd eat
the meat. I always felt
kind of uncomfortable
eating turtle meat while
all his cousins were lay-
ing there on the deck
watching me!
It always happened
that when Mr. John
would butcher a turtle
and throw the blood
and intestines left in
the shell over the side,
it would attract several
sharks. They would go
into a feeding frenzy
next to the boat fighting
over it. I threw a paper
sack over once and they
attacked it too.
It was hard work, but
Mr. John made a good
profit selling the meat
when we got back.
It was very much
more expensive than
fish since it was such
a delicacy. I think the
Green and other sea
turtles are making a
comeback with all our
efforts at conservation,
but harvesting them the
way we did may be a
thing of the past.
The Green turtle is a
beautiful, gentle crea-
ture, and there's a part
of me that hopes we just
leave them alone.


Mastodons, Pez,funk and bacon: Hugh Taylor, Mary Cortese


From Page 1B

When they merged
lives and things, they
both had extensive art
collections, but with
different tastes, they
had to figure out how
to make it all work to-
gether.
In their collection
is a mix of paintings,
drawings, etchings,
along with wood, found
object, wire and paint-
ed stuffed sculptures.
They have an assort-
ment of original Pez
dispensers that define
hilarity.
Almost every inch
of the interior of their
home is filled with a
piece of artwork, some
tucked into the book-
shelves, housing their
extensive local and
regional literature col-
lection.
Art works in their
combined collections
include that of Co-
lumbus McGriff, O.L.
Samuels, Butch An-
thony, Sam Ezell, John
Roberge, Jim Shores,
JoEllen Rackleff, John
Wilson, Will Luck, Lin-
da Davis, Wallace Nut-
ting, Sal Guastella,
Carolyn Flowers, Von
Tipton.
Roseanne Dunkel-
burger wrote about the
couple in the Tallahas-
see magazine and they
were featured in the
Limelight throughout
the years.
Taylor and Cortese
like music, too. They
travel around the re-
gion to attend music
festivals where they
meet artists and musi-
cians. They met Steve
White, the maker of the
unique Pez Dispensers
at Folkfest in Atlanta,
and have collected his
work ever since.
Hugh had lung sur-
gery in May 2013 and
he is happy to be final-
ly able to travel again
after a time-consuming
recovery. They enjoyed
the French Quarter


One of the original signs produced by the Parramores.


Festival in April in New
Orleans, his first trip
since his surgery.
Besides a love of
art and music, Taylor
and Cortese enjoy a
good laugh. They have
a large contingent of
creative friends and
followers who show up
to their festival each
year, Baconfest.
In its 21st year, the
quirky festival began
at Shell Point, when
Hugh used to live
there. This year they
will hold Baconfest at
their house and their
newly opened gallery
and event space, lo-
cated on MLK Memo-
rial Boulevard, where
the mastodon lives.
"Everybody loves
bacon, right? So, we
said, let's have a Bacon


Festival," says Taylor
about the inception
of Baconfest, over two
decades ago.
During Baconfest
XXI "SouthPork",
there will be plenty
of bacon, and things
made with bacon. Let's
just say, it's a lot of
bacon.
The event Facebook
page explains Bacon-
fest like this:
"BACON!
"A whole weekend of
bacon!
"Saturday, May 3,
and Sunday, May 4.
"Bacon while it lasts.
Bacon, Squishy white
bread, Mayo, whole
milk and a lot more!
"We'll do the bacon.
You bring the pie."
The event is free and
open to the public.


dessert to share.
Now, about that
mastodon. The concept
was drawn out by art-
ist John Wilson of 621
Gallery in Tallahassee,
an old friend of Taylor.
"He did a sketch, it
was kind of a joke,"
says Taylor.
It's formed under
the influence of the
mastodon at the R.A.
Gray building, which
houses the Museum of
Florida History in Tal-
lahassee.
"All the bones were
found in Wakulla
Springs," says Taylor.
"This is Wakulla's new
mastodon, because the
state of Florida stole
our old one."
The 14x20-foot
frame of the sculpture
in the front yard is
constructed of rebar,
and then covered with
paper mache (mostly
using newspapers) and
then covered in a tough
acrylic paint called
elastomeric paint, that
seals the moisture out.
"It's made out of
stucco lath and The
Wakulla News, because
that paper is a thicker
paper," says Taylor. It


took him about a year
Attendees are encour- to build the mastodon,
aged to bring pie or a finishing in 2008.


"It's the biggest pa-
per mache sculpture
in Wakulla County,"
he adds.
They once owned
and operated Pelican
Place, an art gallery on
Gaines Street in Tal-
lahassee. When they
closed their shop and
relocated to Wakul-
la County they had
to have someplace to
keep all of the artwork,
and their pole barn
on the property was
converted to hold the
overflow of items. They
have plans to reopen
as a gallery beginning
at Baconfest, and will
feature a different art-
ist every month in the
new Pelican Place.
Taylor and Cortese
like to poke fun at
their quirky lifestyle.
It is clear they are not
finished collecting,
or making, anything,
just yet. If you want
to know, just ask, or
stop by.
On the bottom of
their website for Pel-
ican Place it reads,
"Mary and Hugh and
BillieTheDog lower-
ing property values
in Wakulla County for
over 10 years."


Uniquely designed Pez dispensers by Albuquerque artist Steve White.


www.thewakullanews.com






Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Sports


sports news and team views


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
The Lady War Eagle tennis team is district champion.

GIRLS TENNIS


Lady War Eagles



win District Title


By NOREEN BRITT
Girls Tennis Coach

The Wakulla High School Girls
Tennis Team won the District Cham-
pionship on Wednesday, April 2.
The district tournament started
on Monday, March 31, it was a close
competition. At the end of the first
day, the team was tied with Florida
High with 7 points each, Rickards
was right behind us with 6 points
and Suwannee had 5 to name the
top four schools in the point stand-
ings.
Day two we broke the tie ending
the day with 12 points to Florida
High's 11, but we were heading into
the championship round with play-
ers in 6 of 7 championship matches
and Florida High was in 5 of 7 and
we were playing each other in 4 of
those so we needed to win some of
those matches.
Number one player Logan Kelley
was the No. 2 seed in the district
and defeated Baker High, then Tay-
lor High to face Kelly McCarthy of
Florida High for the finals. It was a
great match but Florida High won
that title.
Then number two player Marlee
Kelley was also the No. 2 seed and
had wins against Godby and Suwan-
nee to face Florida High's Taylor
Snipes in the finals and Marlee won
that match.
Number three player is Christina


BOYS TENNIS


Damon,


Carter


district


runners


up

By JOANNA COLVIN
Special to The News

The Wakulla High
tennis team played
their annual district
tournament Monday,
March 31, through
Wednesday, April 2.
The boys competed
against seven other
district teams including
rivals Rickards, Florida
High and Godby.
No. 2 seed Gil Da-
mon defeated Godby
and Baker to come in
district runner up for


Evans, she went into the tourna-
ment as the No. 2 seed and she de-
feated Suwannee and then Rickards
to face Florida High for the finals and
Christina won the match.
Our number four player is Marina
Petrandis she went into the tourna-
ment undefeated as the No. 1 seed
in her bracket and then she defeated
Rickards and Florida High to face
Suwannee in the finals and Marina
won the match.
The number five player is Alyssa
Schubert she started the tourna-
ment as the No. 2 seed. She faced
a tough Florida High opponent and
lost the close match in three sets.
The number one doubles team of
Logan and Marlee Kelley were the
No. 2 seed in the tournament they
first defeated Taylor and then Baker
to face Florida High for the finals.
The match went to three sets but
Florida High won the match.
The number two doubles team
of Christina Evans and Marina Pe-
trandis went into the tournament
as the No. 2 seed. Their first match
they defeated Baker then Madison
and then they defeated Suwannee
for the district title.
All totaling the girls ended with
four District individual champion-
ship and two runner ups and the
Team District Championship. The
girls will host in the first round of
regionals to be held on Tuesday,
April 8.


I


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Gil Damon and Marc Carter.


his seed in the tourna-
ment. Damon lost in
the finals to Rickards.
No. 5 seed Marc
Carter defeated Baker
and Suwannee to come
in district runner up for
his seed. Carter also
lost to Rickards in the
finals.
Carter and Damon
both have a 10-3 record


for the season.
The boys' tourna-
ment was won by Rick-
ards with Baker coming
in runner up.
The other members
of the boy tennis team
are Oakley Ward, Alex
Ross, Tyler Martin,
Mitch Parker, Scott
Edge, Jacen Jones and
Blake Bolten.


TRACK


Girls sweep middle distances;


jumpers have great meet


By PAUL HOOVER
WHS Track Coach

On Thursday, April
10, the Wakulla High
School track teams
competed in the 2014
District Track meet
hosted by Florida High
School.
Going in, the local
girls looked to be strong
in the middle distance
events and they did
not disappoint as they
won all of the middle
distance events, which
included the 4x800 re-
lay, the 800 meters,
1600 meters and 3200
meters.
As expected, the WHS
male jumpers also had
an outstanding day,
placing first and second
in the high jump and
second and third in the
long jump.
The day kicked off
with the 4x800 meter
relays and the field
events. Margaret Wi-
edeman led off for the
girls in an initially close
contest with the Florida
High girls. It remained
an extremely close con-
test through the next
legs, run by Kayla Web-
be and Lydia Wiede-
man, and then Madison
Harris took over on the
anchor leg. Although
Harris ran a very con-
servative leg, she still
opened up a 12 second
gap on the Florida High
anchor, securing a 14
second victory for the
local squad.
The boys were up
next and went into the
race ranked fourth and
fighting for a spot in
the upcoming Regionals
(the top four individuals
and relay teams ad-
vance). From the begin-
ning it was apparent
that it would be a three
way race with Rickards
and Godby, but the boys
fought the whole way,
with J.P. Piotrowski,
Evan Guarino and Alan
Pearson keeping it close
for anchor Bryce Cole,
who ran an excellent
final leg to secure a one
second victory for the
local squad. This is the
first time the boys have
ever won a 4x800 relay
at Districts.
While the relays were
going on, jumpers Co-
rion Knight and Keith
Gavin were exerting
their dominance in the
jumps. Both cleared a
height of 6'6" in the high
jump, with Knight be-
ing awarded the victory
based on fewer misses.
Their closest competitor
jumped 5'10". As soon
as the high jump was
over, they hustled over
to the long jump pit to
continue their competi-
tion. Knight turned in
another great perfor-
mance, jumping 23'01",
placing second. Gavin
was not far behind with
an excellent jump of
22'01", placing third.
Both secured their spots
in the regional meet in
both jumps.
In the girls field
events, Adrianna Mitch-
ell had another good
day, placing fourth in
the long jump (16'07.5")
and qualifying for Re-
gionals. Shelby Alsup,
fifth in shotput, and


Ashley Carr, fifth in
discus, also had good
performances and just
missed qualifying by
one place.
At 6 p.m. the finals
in all races began and
so did the outstanding
performances of the
local runners. First up
was the 1600 meters.
In the girls race,
freshman Haleigh Mar-
tin ran off Florida High's
Langley Toothman's
shoulder and covered
all her moves and surg-
es until the final lap,
when Martin started
her kick. Toothman
responded and fought
down the backstretch,
but was unable to stay
with Martin over the
last 200 meters. Martin
opened a 7 second gap
and won in the excellent
time of 5:26.52.
Senior Margaret Wi-
edeman ran strong also,
finishing in third place
in 5:57.14.
In the boys 1600 me-
ters, freshman Bryce
Cole ran a conservative
race, content to run in
third place for most of
the race until the final
lap, when he took over
the race, winning in a
time of 4:48.65.
Next up were the
800 meter races. As ex-
pected, Madison Harris
once again showed why
she is considered one
of the best 800 meter
runners in the country.
She took the lead at the
gun and never looked
back, winning in a time
of 2:19.76, over 11 sec-
onds ahead of runner-
up and teammate Lyd-
ia Wiedeman who had
battled Florida High's
Toothman the whole
race until her strength
prevailed in the last 200
meters. For Harris, this
was her fourth consecu-
tive 800 meters District
Championship.
For the boys, sopho-
more Albert Smythe
ran aggressively from
the front for most of the
race, but was nipped
in the final few meters.
Finishing second in
2:06.27, 0.22 of a sec-
ond behind the leader.
Teammate Cole, who
was fifth coming off the
last curve, put on a
great final surge to move
into third place, fin-
ishing in 2:06.53, only
0.25 of a second behind
Smythe.
The final middle dis-
tance race of the day
was the 3200 meters.
For the girls, senior
Kayla Webbe entered
ranked second in the
District, but was com-
mitted to winning the
race. She ran just off the
shoulder of the leader,
Florida High's Summer
Williams, for the first
six laps, then started
her 800 meter push
to the finish. Williams
hung on gamely, but
was unable to stay with
Webbe over the final
stretch, who won in a
new PR (personal re-
cord) of 12:49.96.
Teammate Connie
Lewis also ran to a new
PR of 13.28.53, finish-
ing in third place.
In the boys race, Ri-
ley Welch, Mitchell At-
kinson and Travis Parks


ran in the lead pack for
almost the whole race.
The pack stayed togeth-
er until the final 800
meters, when the real
race began. Two Rick-
ards runners took the
lead with the WHS boys
in hot pursuit. Atkin-
son was the first to drop
off and Parks looked
like he was in trouble,
but Welch was right
behind them and looked
comfortable. Coming
around the final turn,
it looked like the finish-
ing order was set, with
Welch in third place, but
Parks mounted a furi-
ous charge and passed
Welch a few meters
from the finish. Parks
was third in 11:17.55
and Welch fourth in
11:18.51, setting a new
PR in the process.
The 400 meter run
was sandwiched in be-
tween the middle dis-
tance races and, for the
boys, was somewhat
of a coming out party
for Sean Hill. Hill has
run well all year, gener-
ally running 54 to 57
seconds for the 400
meters. However, in the
preliminaries of this
meet, he ran an excel-
lent 52.04, then in the
finals he lowered his
time to 51.90, finishing
in fifth place and just
missing qualifying for
Regionals.
The 4x400 meter re-
lay was the last event
on the schedule and
provide another excit-
ing event, especially for
the girls, who entered
the event ranked third,
behind Florida High and
Rickards. Florida High
quickly built an insur-
mountable lead and it
was left to Rickards and
WHS to duke it out and
that they did. Through
the first three legs (Lyd-
ia Wiedeman, Haleigh
Martin, Adrianna Mitch-
ell) WHS stayed close to
Rickards, but couldn't
quite close the gap, but
then Madison Harris
once again took the ba-
ton, but this time only
about 4 seconds behind
the Rickards anchor. In
most cases four seconds
is a comfortable lead,
but with Harris running
the anchor leg, four sec-
onds is not enough. She
ran one of her patented
legs and steadily closed
the distance and finally
overtook the Rickards'
girl on the final turn
and powered to a sec-
ond place finish for the
team. The WHS girls ran
4:13.16, two seconds
ahead of Rickards and
only .01 of a second off
the school record.
Others earning
points for the WHS team
included Holli Capps
(6th, 800 meters), Alli-
son Carr (8th, shotput),
J.P. Piotrowski (6th, 800
meters), Evan Gauri-
no (5th, 1600 meters),
Mitchell Atkinson (7th,
3200 meters) and the
boys 4x400 relay team
(5th, Sean Hill, Evan
Guarino, Bryce Cole,
Alan Pearson).
The Regional Meet
will be held at Bolles
High School in Jack-
sonville on Thursday,
April 17.


Your sex life and erection can now survive
FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug
companies don't want you to know!
Dr. Kevin Hornsby, MD, will mail the first 37 men that respond to this ad
a free copy of his new thirty dollar book "A Doctor's Guide to Erectile
Dysfunction." He's so sure this book will change your life he will even pay
the postage and handling. If the popular pills don't work foryou, regardless
of your age or medical history, you owe it to yourself and your lady to read
this book now! Call Toll Free 800-777-1922 24-hrs. and leave your name
and address (only).


Maximum strength
analgesic creme for
temporary relief from:
Joint iii:v Muscle

Arthritis
Back -,:1,-:


I -- -


thewakullanews.com


1,0im






www.thewakullanews.com



Sports


SOFTBALL


Lady War Eagles to play


for district championship


By DAVID MONTEZ
Special to The News

The Wakulla Lady War Eagles
found redemption this past Friday
night defeating the Chiles Lady Tim-
berwolves 6-5.
The hard fought win for the Lady
War Eagles was not only revenge for
a 3-1 loss earlier in the season it also
ended a seven-game losing streak
for the team.
The Senior Night win at home
capped the regular season for the
team that statistically has had its
ups and downs.
The team's overall record of 8-15
is misleading. Despite their current
record, the Lady War Eagles have
remained extremely competitive
throughout the season.
Head Coach Tom Graham laid
out a rough road for the Lady War
Eagles to travel this season schedul-
ing top-ranked opponents and highly
competitive tournaments.
For Coach Graham, the hard
fought wins and losses of this season
is what has lead the Lady War Eagles
to their defeat of the 11th ranked
(7A) Lady T-Wolves and the No.1
seed (3-1) heading into the District
5A-2 playoffs, ahead of the Suwan-
nee Lady Bulldogs (ranked 12th in
the state in the 5A classification) and
the Rickards Lady Raiders.
In a recent interview, Coach
Graham described the mid-season
Doc4Life Tournament in Ocala as
crucial for the Lady War Eagles real-
izing that they could compete with
any team in the state. During the
tournament the team's opposition
included three Top 10 6A teams.
Graham described how his team
could have easily given up on the
season after falling to these oppo-
nents but decided to learn from the
experience and work together as a
team.
Statistically, it is easy to see how
the Lady War Eagles have been able
to compete with their high-ranking
opponents. Senior pitcher Michael
Cooper, who recently signed a schol-
arship with Thomas University,
possesses an ERA of 2.05 and a
.329 batting average. According to
Graham, crucial to Cooper's success
this season has been the refinement
of her change-up, one of five pitches
in her repertoire. "Michael's hard
work and energy is what the team
feeds off of each game".
Sophomore Meaghan Sarvis
shares in the rotation duties with
Cooper with no less spectacular


numbers. Sarvis's "bulldog" men-
tality on the mound has served her
well earning an ERA of 1.96 in 9
appearances Gaining considerable
experience have been two freshman
pitchers, Brianna Prichard and Sky-
lar Sullivan, with Prichard getting a
start in the Doc4Life Tournament.
Prichard has also contributed
considerably to the offense batting
.351 in 17 games after starting out
the season in Head Coach Briana
Holley's junior varsity squad.
The Lady War Eagles perspective
at the plate and on the base paths
is one of aggression, describes
Graham. The team has the ability
to exhibit great speed on the bases
capitalizing on slap hits and the oc-
casional lazy throw from the catcher
to the pitcher, which they expertly
exploited during the Doc4Life Tour-
nament.
The team overall is 27 of 27 on
steal attempts.
Junior lead-off hitter Amber Win-
kler shares the team lead in steals
at five with senior Shelby Harrell
and junior Kayla Hussey. Winkler's
"all-in" attitude has her also leading
the team in runs (19) and third in
on-based percentage at .393.
Kenzie Lee, a junior, has been a
"model of consistency" at the plate
this season, according to Graham,
leading the team in batting average
at .364, followed by Hussey at .339,
as well as hits (24).
The difference maker between
winning and losing for the Lady
War Eagles, according to Graham,
has been whether they can take
full advantage of situational plays,
catching a break or just getting that
"hit at the right time."
For Wakulla, Friday night they got
those important plays in the field
and at the plate from seniors Amber
Bryant and Chris Romanus.
Key to the Lady War Eagles future
success is continuing to capitalize on
such opportunities.
The next chance Wakulla fans
have to catch the Lady War Eagles
is at the District 5A-2 championship
on Thursday at 7 p.m. at home. They
will face the winner of the Tuesday
night Suwannee-Rickards semi-final
game also at Wakulla High School.
As the top-seed in the district
playoffs the Lady War Eagles will
automatically advance the regional
quarterfinals. The quarterfinals will
take place April 24 with the time
and place contingent on the results
of Thursday's game.


BASEBALLNI,0 VSO

RMS isINGU

count 'r;,
c-ounty ,aH E


champs


again

Special to The News

In two back-to-back
ace performances by
pitcher Chase Grubbs,
the Riversprings Middle
School Bears handily
defeated their archrival
Wakulla Middle School
Wildcats 9-0 and 12-2
in the final games of the
season to, once again,
earn the title of county
champs!
RMS has won the
county championship
11 straight times.
In both games, the
Bears refused to re-
linquish the lead after
grabbing it in the first
inning.
In the final game of
the season at WHS, the
Bears scored six runs


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
The county champion RMS Bears.


in the three innings,
four of those coming in
the first inning powered
by Kody Zanco's triple,
followed by another tri-
ple with RBI by Caleb
Carter, and RBI single
by Jared Weber, and a
two-run single by Bailey
Fagan.
In the final game,
Grubbs allowed just
three hits, no earned


runs, walked no one,
and struck out four!

A big shout-out from
the "seniors" on the
team to their stellar, and
much-loved coaching
staff: Darrin McGlamry,
Gregg Boutwell, Jimbo
Rozar and Tyler Jarvis.
We couldn't have
done it without y'all!


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 7B



sports news and team views



BASEBALL


War Eagles overcome



early season stumbles


By DAVID MONTEZ
Special to The News

Seven games into
the Wakulla War Eagles
baseball season found
itself 1-6 (1-4 at home).
With its first 5A-2 dis-
trict game against Rick-
ards looming on Feb.
28, Head Coach Mike
Gauger turned to his
senior players to pro-
vide his team with some
much-needed leader-
ship and focus.
In a recent interview
with Coach Gauger, he
explained how early in
the season the team was
"unsure of themselves"
and "could have easily
chosen to jump ship."
The early stumbles by
the team were "a clear
test of character for the
team."
The 2013 War Eagle
baseball team reached
the Regional Semi-finals
was loaded with ex-
perienced senior class
talent. In contrast, the
2014 squad is introduc-
ing a number of first-
year starters into the
line-up. With an influx
of new players rising
from the ranks of the
junior varsity squad and
previous bench play-
ers now in the starting
line-up it was critical for
Coach Gauger's senior
class to lead the team by
example in practice and
in games, especially his
four seniors James Es-
tes, Micah Gray, Bryan
Nichols and Kaleb At-
kins. These young men
have proven to be up to
the task.
The team overall has
been playing inspired
baseball since winning
7-2 in that first district
win over Rickards. The
War Eagles have ripped
off two seven-game win-
ning streaks since that
win. Gauger puts this
crucial turning point in
the season: "The team's
ability to put aside its
early season difficulties
and focus on correcting
its previous mistakes in
practice has allowed the
team to become closer
together and perform to
their potential."
Wakulla's only blem-
ish since their win
against Rickards was a
loss to the Lincoln Tro-
jans in the first game
of a double-header on
April 18. The War Eagles
will take that second
seven-game winning
streak into its final
home game Tuesday,
April 12 against Taylor
County.
The War Eagles come
into the last few games


rariarR


of the regular season
sitting atop the 5A-2
district standings and
wielding a highly po-
tent offense lead by its
seniors. James Estes
one of the area's most
efficient hitters, who in
March signed a letter or
intent to play at Chipola
Junior College, leads the
team and the district,
through this past week-
end, in batting average
(.443), along with hits
(27) and runs (31) for
the team.
Teammate Bryan
Nichols is not far behind
statistically sporting an
impressive average of
.391 and leading the
team in RBI (17), along
with three home runs.
Senior Micah Gray
has been a potent offen-
sive weapon on the base
paths with 12 stolen
bases. Coach Gauger
has instilled an overall
aggressive base-running
mentality on the team,
which has been more
than efficient nabbing
52 of 61 stolen base at-
tempts.
Another piece to
the puzzle for solving
Wakulla's early season
woes was the return of
junior infielder Bailey
Metcalf. Metcalf provid-
ed a shot in the arm to
the team offensively af-
ter missing the first sev-
en games of the season
from a broken foot going
2 of 3 against Rickards.
While the injury has
somewhat limited his
speed on the bases and
pitching opportunities,
Metcalf ranks second
in batting average (.413)
on the team and has
shown power belting
three home runs in 16
games.
The War Eagles' pitch-
ing staff, as a whole, has
exhibited considerable
consistency producing a
team ERA of 2.51.
Coach Gauger has
had the fortune of be-
ing able to call upon not
only his senior leader
Kaleb Atkins, but also
junior starting pitcher
Reid Strickland and a
stable of stout relief
pitchers. The February
district game against
Rickards also acted as a
wake up call for the War
Eagle pitching staff.
Senior Kaleb Atkins
while struggling in his


first two starts of the
season found his rhythm
holding Rickards to just
one earned run and four
hits through six innings
of work. This was an
important turn around
for the senior as he was
transitioning from a
pitcher used largely in
relief in 2013 to one
of the team's two pri-
mary starters. The ex-
perience of starting and
dominating the team's
first district game of the
season has emboldened
Atkins, according to
Gauger. Since that first
win for Atkins he has yet
give up more than two
earned runs in each of
his starts.
Junior Reid Strick-
land is the second of the
War Eagles two-headed
pitching monster. In
Strickland's first season
with the varsity squad,
he has yet to suffer a
loss and is currently
leading the team in ERA
(3.24) among pitchers
with at least two starts,
and in innings pitched.
Both Strickland and
Atkins lead the team
with four wins each.
Coach Gauger has also
had the luxury of be-
ing able to call upon a
strong bullpen, made up
of Metcalf, junior Brian
Edge, junior Brandon
Geiger and sophomore
Greyson Rudd who can
close out a game or pro-
vide a fill-in start when
needed. Each pitcher
sports an ERA of 2.00
or below with at least 10
innings pitched.
The War Eagles' com-
bination of potent of-
fense and solid consis-
tent pitching has set
themselves up for run
in the regional playoffs.
By going undefeated
in district play the team
has earn the top seed in
the 5A-2 district stand-
ings and a ticket to the
regional quarterfinals,
regardless of how they
perform in the regu-
lar season's final two
games.
Their opponent for
the district champion-
ship game (Thursday,
April 24 at 7 p.m.) will
be determined by a
play-in game between
Suwannee and Rick-
ards High School taking
place Tuesday, April 22,
at Rickards.


I Farrington Law Office

Deil(ie A. E ainngton. Esq.
I ii '\. \ \


Em.N pc I i----I~~ d I i i I PoaeI.

Serving r.wordil
and allaasse fo ovr 8 ear

850-9I6-iii
IatdJutN. .'ofteortos
www~arrngto-la~com- V irdeqSAigtn a~o


Locally
0 n gi Owned and
Operated
Since 1991





Commercial + Residential & Mobile Homes
Repairs + Sales + Service All Makes and Models
LIc. #RA0062516 (850) 926-3546 =


i/,, In
N! IME Repair & Servic

ELE TRI Residential &
Commercial

MARK OLIVER Homes &
(850) 421-3012 Mobile Homes
24-Hour Service ER0015233


I


De


5






Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Sports


sports news and team views


More Wakulla athletes sign scholarships


Taylor Vaughan: soccer


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

Wakulla High School senior Taylor
Vaughan received well wishes from
coaches, teammates and family
last week as she signed a letter or
commitment to continue her soccer
career at Randolph Macon College in
Ashland, Va. this fall.
While Randolph Macon is a small
college with less than 1,000 stu-
dents, assistant soccer coach Rachel
Armstrong said the school is known
for a premier soccer program.
"It's a close-knit, family-style
school," Armstrong said. "It's an out-
standing soccer program, and she'll
fit in fine. She worked hard for it."
Armstrong, a Randolph Macon
alumna and athlete herself, admitted
that she pushed Taylor on the field.
"I thought immediately that she
had a lot of college athlete poten-
tial, and I didn't think she saw it
yet," Armstrong said. "So I pushed.
I called the coach (at Randolph Ma-
con) and told him there is a player he
would be interested in. She started
working really hard toward that
goal, and we are thrilled that she
achieved it, and that she'll be play-
ing at Macon for four years. So, go
Yellow Jackets!"
Head Soccer Coach Nick Reed
said he has seen plenty of growth in
Vaughan's ability.
"I had the opportunity to coach
JV her first year, and so I've seen
leaps and bounds from her," Reed


said. "I couldn't be more excited to
see Taylor go and play at the col-
legiate level."
Vaughan was recently given the
Captain's Award at the WHS sports
banquet.
Taylor's dad, Mike Vaughan, said
he could not be more proud, espe-
cially after helping to coach her since
she was only 6.
"No one has been harder on her
than I have," Mike said. "We're proud
to see her achieve what she's strived
for. We're so happy. I don't know if
we're happy that she's going so far
away, we won't be able to see her
much, but that's part of the deal. It's
the school she really wanted."
Vaughan said her feelings about
college are a mix of nervousness and
excitement.
"I visited and it was amazing,"
Vaughan said. "I am excited to go to
college, experience it, be indepen-
dent and do everything on my own.
But it's also kind of nerve-wracking
because I'm going to be so far away
from home, and it's cold. I'll need
some boots."
Vaughan said she loves her Lady
War Eagles team.
"It's become a big part of my life,"
Vaughan said. "So to be able to go
to a team where I am now the baby,
instead of one of the big ones, and
to get that whole feeling that I give
the freshmen, it's exciting to think
about."
Vaughan said she wants to major
in biology for the pre-med track.


Shannon Wood: volleyball


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

Senior Shannon Wood was the
woman of the hour Friday at the
Wakulla High School War Eagle Cafe,
as she signed a letter of commitment
to play volleyball for St. John's Col-
lege, a two-year school in Palatka.
Wakulla High School Athletic Di-
rector Mike Smith said Wood is an
outstanding player. "I'm happy to
see her go away- to college," Smith
joked. "I've enjoyed watching Shan-
non play the last four years. I'm very
proud of her, and I know her parents
are too."
Volleyball Coach Elizabeth Potts
said Shannon is a triple threat of
tenacity, intelligence and skill.
"If there is any player who's de-
serving, it's Shannon," Potts said.
"She works hard, she's smart, she's
talented. I don't know if Ill ever get
another one like her."
St. John's volleyball coach Matt
Cohen said at the first tryout, he told
the athletes no one would be signing
on the first day.
"Shannon made me eat my words
a little bit," Cohen said.
Cohen said he inherited a volley-


ball program that has not seen a lot
of success over the decade.
"But last year, we were able to
win more than we won in quite some
time," Cohen said. "We're definitely
moving in the right direction. Shan-
non was one of the first recruits we
got, and she will be an asset to our
team."
Marsha Woods, Shannon's moth-
er, said her daughter has been play-
ing volleyball since middle school,
and was put on the varsity team her
freshman year.
"She's worked very hard, always
had good grades, and is very conten-
tious," Marsha said. "I know she's
going to do good things. She's got
gumption."
Woods said a word that sums up
how she feels is "honored."
"Honestly, I am so excited for
what's to come," Woods said. "I'm
looking forward to being indepen-
dent, and meeting new people."
Woods still has time to choose a
course of study, but she is leaning
towards hospitality management
right now.
"I still have time to figure it out,"
she said.


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

Two Wakulla High
School football players
signed letters of intent
at the War Eagle Cafe
Monday to play football
at the collegiate level.
Markell Rawls and
Daniel Sanders both re-
ceived football scholar-
ships, and will go on to
play for their new teams
in the fall.
At Rawls' scholarship
signing, the Wakulla
High School senior and
football player wore
braids that matched
the colors of his future
alma mater red, for
LaGrange College in
Georgia.
Head Football Coach
Scott Klees heaped
praise on the athlete,
who was surrounded by
teammates and family
at the signing.
"He's always focused,
always where he was
supposed to be," Klees
said. "Great grades, a
phenomenal person, a
great young man. He's
dealt with a lot of ad-
versity too. Markell lost
his brother, Marquis.
He had to deal with that
and be the man of the
house. He overcame a
lot in his childhood and
continued to grow as a
person. We're extremely
proud to have him to
represent our school.
We expect very great
things from him in the
future."
Rawls' uncle, Jessie
Ransom, was beaming
at the signing.
"It's a great day and
I am extremely proud,"
Ransom said. "Origi-
nally I trained him to


be a quarterback, and I
also taught him how to
play chess."
Rawls' grandmother,
Debra McRoy, said her
grandson was always
able to strike a balance
between sports and aca-
demics. She said the
legacy and memory of
Rawls' brother also mo-
tivates the athlete.
"He always kept mov-
ing, because his brother
was so proud of him,"
McRoy said. "We were
able to keep reminding
him, 'Marquis wanted
you to keep playing ball.'
And that's what he does.
I'm just so proud of
him!"
Rawls is poised to ex-
pand his horizons.
"I'm looking forward
to just getting out and
seeing the world," Rawls
said.
Rawls said he plans
to major in architecture,
or art and design.
Daniel Sanders also
signed his commit-
ment to play football for
Southeastern University
in Lakeland. The stakes
are high for Sanders
because he is not on his
own. He has a young
daughter to lead by ex-
ample.
"He played lineback-
er for us this year, and
was second or third
on the team for tack-
les overall," Klees said.
"He's had a great year,
and he's a very physical,
very determined football
player. He's led our team
on the defensive side for
most of the year."
Klees said Sanders'
personality stands out
too.
"He probably has
one of the most unique


personalities on the
team," Klees said. "He's
very outgoing and very
much a man's man.
Daniel's had some ups
and downs. But he's
phenomenal for us."
Sanders said he will
work toward a degree
in criminology with his
four-year scholarship,
and wants to work for
Florida Fish and Wild-
life.
"Ever since I was lit-
tle, I liked riding around
on the water and being
in the woods," Sanders
said. "I'm ready to get
an education. I have a
daughter, and I have to
get our life set up."
Athletic Director
Mike Smith said every
year he must report the
number of people who
play sports, boys and
girls, for the Florida
High School Athletic As-
sociation.
"We have about 560
student athletes at this
school," Smith said.
"That's pushing half-
that's a lot."
Smith said district
administrators recently
asked him how he han-
dled disciplinary prob-
lems among athletes.
"I told them we really
don't have discipline
problems with our stu-
dent athletes," Smith
said. "That's because
the teachers, coach-
es and administration
work together to do
what's best for our kids.
But the main thing is we
have great student ath-
letes. You guys are re-
spectful, you're diligent
in your work, and you
do what you're asked to
do," Smith said.


Markell Rawls with family at his signing.


Markell Rawls,



Daniel Sanders sign



to play football


thewakullanews.com





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 9B


SThinkin

Thin-kin,


Accomplishments


Adjectives

Basis

Canal

Chewed

Circles

Clues

Cools

Curly


Dashed

Drama

Evidence

Faded

Handy

Ideas

Injury

Journey


Leaving

Lions

Myths

Noise

No-one

Outfit

Owned

Palms

Playtime

Rates

Rather

React

Recipe

Reduce

Reins

Report


Rider

Round

Scale

Shark

Shelf

Sleep

Snail

State

Stern

Trader

Triumph

Unable

Union

Unseen

Voted

Voting


Even Exchange


by Donna Pettman


Each numbered row contains two clues and two 6-letter answers. The two answers differ from each other
by only one letter, which has already been inserted. For example, if you exchange the A from MASTER
for an 1, you get MISTER. Do not change the order of the letters.


1."_ May" by Rod Stewart
2. Endowment
3. Widen
4. Lackluster
5. Regional
6. Greek philosopher
7. Earlier
8. Oddity
9. Law and __
10. Gracefulness


R







R


S G __ __ Noisy black & white bird
S - Goliath, e.g.
S A _Pay out
R TV Dr. Mc
C Faithful, like a dog
A _ Mickey's dog
S M _ Signature falsifier
S R Very fast
S - More peculiar
I Sheriff's crew


P

E


S


2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


CAN YOU TRUST YOUR EYES? There are at least six differ-
ences in drawing details between top and bottom panels. How
quickly can you find them? Check answers with those below.
"Buiss!iiW si Lsn "9 'PQAOW SI IGA0os 'S "1UISSIw si osnoIpjig -t, 6uisstw
OJe Sjaiod '6UISSIw si ueo Buueie/v Z6uiss! U si Builie6 i ;:soouajaojIi


S uoijnlos ezew SP!I


uew p|eq v
ZjeMOqs eLqi uI JEM J!ieq S!q sie6 JeaAau OLqM
JaMSUV
sp!)WIlZZnd


The following organiza-
tions are proud to support
Wakulla County Education
through sponsoring the
Newspaper in Education
Program.


by Hal Kaufman
SQUARE DEALI Object ofthis magic number square (see right)is to fill 1
in the numbers from 1 to 5 so that each five-number row- across, down I 1
Sand diagonally-addsuptol15.
-v Each of the five numbers is to
/ appear just once in each row.
V Five of the numbers are already 2
~~inplace.
R member, each of the five-
Wnumber rows is to total 15. How
,, ?' '/ V I_ quickly can you meet the chal- 4
^^'- t^-... t 8 l t lenge? Time limit: 5 min. -
p AP '9 SiZtL m J wofoq w c IZ o -1
iXGU \ MO] Uci :MoJ lxJu 7SCI.Z ojU IXsu'i tge ssoIoe Moj0dOl
\ MIXED NUTSI Find an edible nut among consecutive letters in
S' ( eachsentence: 1 I'll see A Monday. 2An antelope can run fast
k/]7,- ir 3r '.' Sam said that after the fracas he .went home. Time: 2
i/Ml.\ 4A\ I minutes. "Aauseno *C 'ueond -Z"puouv 'L
RHYME&REASON
PU22LEMENT
READ this poem, then
see if you can do what's
asked. That is to say,
puzzle outa word in accord
with directions.
With my first before
your eyes,
You may seek to gain
the prize.
But you must find my
second out,
Before you begin to 3 rllI
shout.
You then ('tis quite a1,0 Z
feat),
May read without
complete.
Remember, the poem
directs the readerto puzzle
out a certain word.
What word is it?
'(a;GldUJoo) znoqU t-,
.(puooas) no :('.u) L4M MATCH POINT! Our tennis friend, bottom left, can win this match
JnOHUlM si PJOM, G4 with a drive to point X Can you help her?


assod 'aS!Od '0. leAoi 'Ieoo g
Jeppo 'JepJo '6 uAweej 'AjeeJQ t,
o!no '1J!no 8 pudxq pudxpuedx
J96JO-O 'JWJOO- L 1UIE!9 ueJQ) E
Olnld 'oeld 9 e !d6eA,'!6 6ei *
SJ@MSUE
a3ueLxN U A3


kNCY THAT! Hey there, mother-to-be, you're looking at a mon
thabuilt-in carseatCode: 1-Red.2-Dk. green.3-Yellow.4-
. brown. 5-Flesh tones. 6-U. green. 7--Ok. brown.


SPELLBINDER
SCORE 10 points for using all the
letters in the word below to form
two complete words:
MISSTATE
THEN score 2 points each for all
words of four letters or more
found among the letters.
Try to score at least 50 points.
0'Is 'seI :WuOSOMW alq!ssod


Kids' Maze


L t -KII

I.iLi7F>iZ


C2014 King Features Synd., Inc








WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOLS f Y

VOMMIT.T06 u Es Wakulla County Coalition for Youth


S H A R K T N C I R C L E S I

H N H ECCROU N D LOCS

E I ACOAL IO N S V U M B

LUN I O N S S U N A B L E A

F N D P L AYT I M E A E L S

WSYE S L P EAYPCARI

REPORTRRD T L HV I S

R E D U C E D N J H E E I DP

ANCAHGTRESOWNED

TQ E T N I E S CA L EGRA

E R A I F D I L T B I D E A S

SRTTAOQE I N J U RYH

JO U R N E Y E V I D E N C E

VOT E D F B P E P F ADDED

ACCOMPL I SHM E N T S


d by Helene
Puzzles4Kid Hovanec
CODED RIDDLE
Change each letter to the one that comes immediately
BEFORE it in the alphabet to find a riddle and its answer.
Here's a copy of the alphabet to guide you:
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

XIP OFWFS HFUT IJT IBJS

XFU JO UIF TIPXFS?

B CBME NBO.

For more puzzle fun, go to www.www brainzzles.com


I OCSa OCUS Is


www.thewakullanews.com






Page O10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


CIASSIFIEID AD tartinq g at just $12.00 a week!


New 3BR/2BA Lake
Cottage on 2+
acres with lake
access only $99,900.
Ready for finishing
touches! City water/
sewer, gated, 2
private recreational
lakes. Convenient to
town. Prime South
Florida location. Call
now 1-866-352-2249.
NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219


Classified Ads For
As Little As $12 A Week


LPN
or MEDICAL
ASSISTANT
With great interpersonal
skills for busy medical clinic
in Panacea, FL.
Clinical experience with
phlebotomy certification (for
MA) and proficient computer
skills required.
Must have valid certificate
and/or current FL LPN li-
cense.
For more information or to
apply online please visit
www.nfmc.org
or send a resume to
HRdepartment@nfmc.org
or fax to (850) 298-6054.
EOE/DFWP/M/F


Averitt Express has DRIVER
New Dedicated CDL-A TRAINEES
Driver
Opportunities w/ Ex- NEEDED NOW!
cellent Benefits &
Regular Hometime. Learn to drive for US
855-430-8869 Xpress! Earn $700 per
AverittCareers.com week! No experience
Equal Opportunity needed! Local CDL
Employer Training. Job ready in
Females, minorities, 15 days!
protected veterans (1-888)368-1964
and indivdiuals with
disabilities are
encouraged to Selling
apply. Something?
Experienced OTR Advertise with a
Flatbed Drivers W .1
Earn 50 up to 55 cpm 2
loaded. $1000 sign on to i .
qualified drivers. Home
most weekends. Call: For As Little As
(843)266-3731 / $12 A Week
www.bulldoghiwav.com 1 A Wek
EOE 77676-140

Wakulla jSon a
Realty Hal1
\Li. Real Estate
\ JBroker
eal a t"Spe cializing in Wakulla Co:'
850-926-5084

RENTALS:
2 Br 1 Ba Duplex $625 mo.
2Bd 1 Ba Hs $650 mo.
3Br 2 Ba Hs $950 mo.
4 Bd 2 Ba Hs. $1,300 mo.

COMMERCIAL
1500 sq ft $1500 mo.
Crawfordville
700 sq ft $700 mo.
Tallahassee

APPLICATION AND
SEC. DEP. REQUIRED
WAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE
AVAILABLE


AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com


QUEEN PILLOW TOP
MATTRESS AND BOX
SET NEW, STILL IN
FACTORY PLASTIC
$195. OBO
1-850-596-6437


CRAWFORDVILLE
Friday & Saturday 8-12
Three Family Sale
Furniture, construction,
tools, books, cookware,
dishes, household items
and clothes
121 Purify Bay Rd


Stop scratching &
gnawing.
Promote healing
& hair growth.
Stamp out
ITCHAMCALLITS!
Shampoo with Happy
Jack Itch No More,
apply Skin Balm
add Tonekote to diet...
Ashley Feed
& Hardware
(850) 421-7703
www.happyjackinc.com


3j;Coo~twu& kea4, bc^.
S 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL
www.MYWAKULLAHOMES.COM





T7eEsA 81PDLER


Top

PRODUCER

MARC-I

2014


850-519-3766
www.yourflrealestate.com

Yew of Eesitebuie


Looking for apartment
or small house to rent in
Wakulla County.
Minimum 2 bedrooms.
Pet friendly. Melissa
717-634-9475 (cell)

4M,


to


a Billion
Tees



J'- Naturer
:, -, : ,- '. ir ^


WINTON'S POOL
SERVICES
"LET US HELP TAKE
THE HASSLE OUT OF
YOUR SUMMER FUN"
Certified & Reliable
Tony 850-284-2205


FOUND
Bosch Impactor
Screw Driver
Medart Area
(850) 445-4387


ILF7 Polly Nichols'
1I',, -'i Special Touch Cleaning Service
:'ri;iruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential
519-7238
p',n Il it's up to God, 'i. /iW. it's up to you" 926-3065
LICENSEDAND INSURED

LMunge's Tree Service


FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!


A


ELCRCLSRI CE:Fn, Lghinirngfo
Elcrcl Phns0 TCmptr&0on

Loctedin raworvile. 50-26-79
Doug Shery Quigg onrs i. # :sEC3081CC8


A PRESSURE
I CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550




IF9,~~II;~


t & v egviceq
Peep Clean -pri Clean- Clean6 Out
J1= WeeKld9- Biweekl- Momthll
lfNee Eifei Licensed & Insured


# ep
4vienI,


Facial Waxings specialty Cuts fIA lToPS





| Full Service Hair Salon k

I 850-926-6020
f Jlid[,ritks 0 Cuts Color Ac^e IriL(s


( p 9_,, ($ % r a Tree Trimming
49Stump Grinding
sp Yard Maintenance
(but our prices are down-to-earth) Flower Beds

Call PAT GREEN'S LAWN SERVICE
All Locally Owned and Operated
for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Licensed and Insured

Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461


I Q, Call Jerry Payne Today!
I Ha~ 850-528-5603 850-926-5611


west Rates in the Area


A/C parts replacement and Service A/C Rebuilding
A/C Compressors and Evaporator ,
Coil Cleaning/Replacement ce'
A/C Leak check
Indoor/Outdoor fan motors

EPA Certified Licensed & Insured /


gric 'a Clean Cut Svs, 1.1.
'Licensed & Insured'
-lawn Care -Handy-Man Tasks
-Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal


'FREE HAIRCUT b/1e
I with the purchase of any color service
When you book your appointment with

i JESSICA OR ASHLEY! 850926-6772
I Mention this ad when you book your appointment with Jessica Hood and Ashley Braswell at
Dazzles Hair Studio 158 Ochlockonee St. (behind Hardee's) in Crawfordville.
-. -- -- -- -- -- -- -- - - -


The Panacea Area Water System, Inc. is
seeking a motivated, self starter for a part
time position. Applicant must possess a
valid Florida Drivers License, High School
Diploma or GED and be willing to take a pre-
employment Drug Test. Scope of work to in-
clude meter reading, water line locating, dig-
ging up water meters, repairing water leaks,
property maintenance and customer service
skills. Applications are available at Panacea
Area Water System, Inc. 1445 Coastal Hwy
Panacea, FL between 9:00am 3:00pm M-F
or Fax resume to 850-984-2917.
EQUAL OPPORTUNITYEMPLOYER

RE ADVERTISEMENT
Seasonal Employment
Parks & Facilities Management Dept.
The Wakulla County Board of Commissioners is
seeking qualified applicants for Beach and Park
Attendants for Summer/Seasonal part-time. Work
days and hours will vary depending on the posi-
tion.
Positions are temporary beginning late April
through the Labor Day holiday weekend. Must
have transportation and a cell phone. See www.
mywakulla.com for additional qualifications/infor-
mation.
To apply, send a Wakulla County Employment Ap-
plication to: Human Resources, P.O. Box 1263,
Crawfordville, FL 32326. Drug screening and
background checks are required. Veteran's prefer-
ence will be given to qualified applicants. Wakulla
County is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity
Employer. Minimum starting salary of $7.93 hourly.
Applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on Fri-
day, April 25, 2014.


VaOi? e V iess mith
VOW% CAh-W9


ue Morse
W-W5O.4m
85.45.801W


I T-4-- / -"I


I


I T-4-- / I


thewakullanews.com







www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 11B


194 Carousel Circle This
lovely, very well main-
tained 2-story, 1-car gar-
age home built in 2008
features 1674 sq.ft., 3BR,
2.5 BA. Bright and open
floor plan. Spacious living
area. Kitchen with bar.
Stainless steel appli-
ances. Beautiful wood
cabinets. Inside laundry
room. Separate shower
and jetted tub in the mas-
ter bathroom. Fenced in.
Mariana D. Doseanu, Re-
altor, Keller Williams Re-
alty (850)339-5671




Spacious 4BR/2BA
2087 SF, 2 car
garage on one acre.
Living room has
vaulted ceilings and
wood burning FP.
Master Bedroom has
walk-in jetted tub
and separate tiled
shower. Private back-
yard, $184,900 (Price
includes new roof.)
Call Wakulla Realty
Susie Tooks
(850) 545-6956

Fictitious


5025-0417 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to




5028-0417 TWN
4/30, 5/8 & 5/16 sales
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Vehicle will be sold for
towing and storage.
Charges pursuant to F.S.
713.78 at 1502 Shadeville
Rd., Crawfordville, FL


Misc. Notice


BAYSIDE MARINA
PANACEA
2014 Slip Rental Option
6 Month @ $100 Month
Due in Full
1 Month @ $150 Month
2273 Surf Rd Panacea
Info 850-222-5865
baysideslips
gamail.com




BUY OR SELL AN RV
ONLINE
Best Deals and
Selection
Visit RVT.com
Classifieds
Thousands of RVs for
Sale by Owner and
Dealer Listings
www.RVT.com
888-771-8430


engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Creative Solutions
located at 94 Windsong
Cir. S., Crawfordville, FL
32327, in the County of
Wakulla, intends to regis-
ter the said name with
the Division of Corpora-




Sale date 4/30/2014. 9AM
2009 Kawasaki motorcy-
cle Vin#
JKAEMJ129DA41958
Sale Date 5/08/2014. 9AM
2003 Ford Vin#
1FMZU67E53UC41383
Sale Date 5/16/214. 9AM
2003 Buick Vin#


WINTON'S POOL
SERVICES

"LET US HELP TAKE
THE HASSLE OUT OF
YOUR SUMMER FUN"

Certified & Reliable
Tony 850-284-2205


tions of the Florida De-
partment of State, Talla-
hassee, FL.
Dated at Crawfordville,
FL, this 8th day of April,
2014.
/s/ Joey DeMello
Owner
Published April 17, 2014.




2GAWB52K331149457
Hobby's Towing &
Recovery reserves the
right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1502 Shadeville Rd
Crawfordville, FL 32327
850-926-7698
Pub.: April 17, 2014.


Misc. Notice


5067-0417 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
**OFFICIAL**
AVISO DE ELECCIONES GENERALS
Yo, Ken Detzner, Secretario de Estado del Estado de la Florida, por el present noti-
fico que se Ilevaran a cabo ELECCIONES GENERALES en el Condado de WAKULLA,
Estado de la Florida, el dia CUATRO de NOVIEMBRE de 2014 d. C., para determinar
la ocupacion o la retencion de los siguientes cargos:
Representante ante el Congreso: distrito 2
Gabinete de a Florida Gobernador
Gabinete de la Florida -Vicegobernador
Gabinete de la Florida -Procurador General
Gabinete de la Florida -Funcionario Principal de Finanzas
Gabinete de la Florida Comisionado de Agricultura
Representante Estatal: distrito 7
Tribunal de Apelaciones del 1 .er Distrito: retencion de 6 jueces
Juez del Circuito, 2. Circuito Judicial: grupos 4,6, 7, 8, 10, 13 y 16
Junta Escolar: distritos 1,3 y 5
Comisionado del Condado: distritos 2 y 4
Distrito de Conservacion de Tierra y Agua deWakulla: grupos 1, 2 y 4
Published in The Wakulla News, April 3 & 17, 2014.

5066-0417 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
**OFFICIAL**
NOTICE OF GENERAL ELECTION
I, Ken Detzner Secretary of State of the State of Florida, do hereby give notice that
a GENERAL ELECTION will be held in WAKULLA County, State of Florida, on the
FOURTH day of NOVEMBER, 2014, A.D., to fill or retain the following offices:
Representative in Congress: District 2
Florida Cabinet Governor
Florida Cabinet Lieutenant Governor
Florida Cabinet Attorney General
Florida Cabinet Chief Financial Officer
Florida Cabinet Commissioner of Agriculture
State Representative: District 7
First District Court of Appeal: Retention of Six Judges
Circuit Judge, Second Judicial Circuit: Groups 4, 6, 7, 8, 10, 13 and 16
School Board: Districts 1, 3 and 5
County Commissioner: Districts 2 and 4
Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation District: Groups 1, 2 and 4
Published in The Wakulla News, April 3 & 17, 2014.

5027-0417 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE
Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida Statutes, notice is given to the following
persons) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter:
Joseph E. Owens, JR
27 Kay Street, Crawfordville, FL 32327
The above individuals) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not
be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this
published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elec-
tions and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For fur-
ther information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850)
926-7575.
Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections
P. 0. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326
April 17, 2014.

5007-0417 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA MECKLENBURG COUNTY
In the District Court
Claudia R. Folts v. Jerry M. Hawkins
Mecklenburg County Case No. 14-CVD-4087
Dear Mr. Hawkins:
Take notice that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the
above-entitled action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows:
Equitable Distribution; and
Absolute Divorce.
You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than May 13, 2014,
and upon your failure to do so the party seeking service against you will apply to the
court for the relief sought.
This, the 3rd day of April, 2014
JAMES, McELROY & DIEHL, P.A.
Beth T. Hondros
600 South College Street, Charlotte, North Carolina 28202
Telephone: (704) 372-9870 Attorneys for Claudia R. Folts
April 3, 10 & 17, 2014.

5026-0417 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
THE SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING:
EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting


DATE:
TIME:
PLACE:
PURPOSE:


P.O. Bc
April 17, 2014.


Monday, April 21,2014
Regular Meeting 5:45 p.m.
School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida
Regular School Board Meeting
For further information please contact:
Superintendent's Office, Wakulla County School
x 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL 32326 850-926-0065


5033-0424 TWN
vs. Gustafson, Sandra 65-2013-CA-000019 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000019 DIVISION
PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO NATIONAL CITY
MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRA GUSTAFSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
April 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000019 of the Circuit Court of the
Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PNC Bank, Na-
tional Association, successor in interest to National City Mortgage, a Division of Na-
tional City Bank, is the Plaintiff and Sandra Gustafson also known as Sandra I. Gus-
tafson a/k/a Sandra J. GustafsonjTenant # 1, Tenant # 2, The Unknown Spouse of
Sandra Gustafson also known as Sandra I. Gustafson a/k/a Sandra J. Gustafson, are
defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM
EST on the 22nd day of May, 2014, the following described property as set forth in
said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOT 1, BLOCK D, JOSEPH LEE ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAITHEREOF RE-
CORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 69 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIX-
TURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS VIN NO. HMLCP24010414181A / TI-
TLE NO. 1147556386 AND VIN NO. HMLCP24010414181B / TITLE NO. 0050948976
A/K/A 2 GENEVA AVE PANACEA FL 32346-2224
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.


(COURT SEAL)


Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk


Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743
(813) 221-9171 facsimile E-Serve: servealaw@albertellilaw.com
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.
April 17 & 24, 2014. 001649F01

5032-0424 TWN
vs. Hughes, Jimmy W. 2013 CA 000020 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 2013 CA 000020
SRMOF II 2012-1 TRUST, U.S. BANK TRUST NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, NOT IN ITS
INDIVIDUAL CAPACITY BUT SOLELY AS TRUSTEE,
Plaintiff,
v.
JIMMYW. HUGHES, etal.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiff's Final Judgment of Fore-
closure entered on April 7, 2014 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest
and best bidder for cash on May 8, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at Lobby of the Wakulla
County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327:
SEE LEGAL DESCRIPTION ATTACHED AS EXHIBIT "A"
Property Address: 126 Leslie Circle, Crawfordville, FL 32327
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
Dated: April 9, 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND Wakulla County, Clerk of Court
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN OR-
DER TO PARTICIPATE IN A COURT PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO
YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT: DANNY DAVIS,
COURT TECHNOLOGY OFFICE, OFFICE OF COURT ADMINISTRATION, 301 S MONROE ST,
RM 225, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, AT LEAST 7 DAYS BEFORE YOUR
SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN 7 DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IM-
PAIRED, CALL 711.
EXHIBIT "A"
Lot 20, RUSTLING PINES, and more particularly described as follows: Begin at a con-
crete monument and lightwood post marking the Southwest corner of Lot 36 of the
Hartafield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and thence run N 7110' E along
the South boundary of said Lot 36, a distance of 334.02 feet, thence run N 11 05' W
368.01 feet to the centerline of a 60.00 foot roadway easement, said point lying on a
curve concave to the Northeasterly, thence run Northwesterly along said centerline
and along said curve with a radius of 74.84 feet thru a central angle of 2157'05" for
an arc distance of 28.67 feet, the chord of said arc being N 6241'59" W 28.50 feet,
thence run S 2432'17" W 529.91 feet to the Point of Beginning.
Subject to a roadway and utility easement over and across the Northeasterly 30.00
feet thereof.
TOGETHER WITH that certain 2001 THE NATIONAL PIONEER HOUSING Mobile Home,
ID#PH1124GA18226A/B.
April 17 & 24, 2014. 69617

5031-0424 TWN
vs. Harper, Jane D. 13-CA-315 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 13-CA-315
AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank,
201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA 39828,
Plaintiff,
v.
JANE D. HARPER, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANE D. HARPER, CAPITAL ONE BANK
(USA), N.A., et al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiff's Final Summary Judgment of
Foreclosure and for Re-Establishment of Lost Note entered in the above-captioned
action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as fol-
lows, to wit:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD NO: 365, WITH THE EAST BOUNDARY OF LOT NO: 65 OF THE HARTSFIELD
SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES 32
MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 65 A DISTANCE
OF 444.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN
SOUTH 71 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 209.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 18
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 104.50 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES
27 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 209.00 FEET TO THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT NO:
65, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EAST
BOUNDARY 104.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 0.50 ACRES, MORE
OR LESS.
SUBJECT TO AND TOGETHER WITH A 20 FOOT EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EAST-
ERLY PORTION OF SUBJECT PROPERTY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
A 20.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DE-
SCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:


Foelsr ae


.BRG T




Rentals &


Property Mgmt.




850926-8777


www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com




RENTALS


S43 Squaw 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit.

14 Liberty Road 3/2, $975. mo., $975. Deposit. Available May 1.

2086 Spring Creek Hwy. 3/2, $750. mo., $750 Deposit.

Pets w/ approval.

68 Lance Lane 3/2 $875, No Pets, no Smoking.


Ochlockonee Bay














Realty


I PolSevi


I Misc. Not


Foelsr ae


Foreclosue Sle
B~ufl^^aas


I Misc. Nti


I Misc. Not


Foreclosure Salle
s
Action Notice I


Foreclosure Sale
s
Action Notice I


FrmlSae,5
ActQion otce


BEGIN AT A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CYPRESS POST LYING ON THE INTERSECTION OF THE
EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 65 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA (AS MONUMENTED) WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY
OF STATE ROAD NO. 365. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 18 DEGREES
32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 65 (AS
MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 549.30 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DE-
GREES 26 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 20.00 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18
DEGREES 32 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 589.72 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE WEST-
ERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 365, SAID POINT LYING ON A
CURVE CONCAVE TO THE NORTHWESTERLY, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF
7779.72 FEET THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 52 SECONDS
FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 45.17 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 07 DEGREES
53 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 45.15 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID EASE-
MENT.
Commonly known as: 3054 Spring Creek Highway, Crawfordvile, Florida 32327, at
public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash on May 8, 2014, at 11:00 a.m.
EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located
at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL,
32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes.
If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the
sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale.
If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds.
Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs
any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at
no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court
Administrator's office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
April 17 & 24, 2014.

5030-0424 TWN
vs. Cummings, John T. 65-2013-CA-000131 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 65-2013-CA-000131 Division
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING,
LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOHN T. CUMMINGS, TINA M. CUMMINGS, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION
SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR COUNTRYWIDE BANK, N.A., AND UNKNOWN
TENANTS/OWNERS
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff en-
tered in this cause on April 7, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I
will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as:
ALL OF LOT 1 AND A PORTION OF LOT 2, TUPELO RIDGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR
PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 55, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOL-
LOWS:
COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT
5 OF TUPELO RIDGE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT
BOOK 2, PAGE 55 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND
THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST
BOUNDARY OF SAID SUBDIVISION 921.51 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED
#2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CON-
TINUE NORTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID WEST BOUND-
ARY 474.86 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT WIDE ROADWAY EASEMENT,
THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 51 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 46
SECONDS EAST 172.91 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN SOUTH-
EASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 231.37 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL
ANGLE OF 52 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 30 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 213.45
FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 24 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 01 SECONDS
EAST 205.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST
186.02 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 88 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 16
SECONDS WEST 229.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 2.00 ACRES,
MORE OR LESS. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 69 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
and commonly known as: 75 TUPELO DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327; including the
building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest
and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Court-
house, on May 8, 2014 at 11am.
Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated this 9th day of April, 2014.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
Lindsay M. Alvarez (813) 229-0900 Kass Shuler, P.A.
P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureServicetkasslaw.com
April 17 & 24, 2014. 286750/1024408/anp

5024-0417 TWN
vs. Martin, Delinda P. 2013-CA-014422-0 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 2013-CA-014422-O
21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
PLAINTIFF,
vs.
DELINDA P. MARTIN AKA DELINDA P. THOMAS AKA PERIANN HARRELL, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
(Constructive Service Property)
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LEGATEES,
LIENHOLDERS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SUCESSORS IN INTEREST OR OTHERWISE ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY AND THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
JOHN M. MARTIN.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a residential mortgage on the
following real property, lying and being and situated in WAKULLA County, Florida,
more particularly described as follows:
LOT 15, WOODLAND HERITAGE, PHASE 2 (UNRECORDED). COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE I WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 9, A DISTANCE OF 1275.62 FEET TO THE CEN-
TERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT (LIMESTONE LANE), THENCE RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 1635.29 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 561.88 FEET TO THE
CENTER POINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS, THENCE RUN SOUTH
89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 399.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 561.27 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST
399.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER
AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT
OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF.
TO INCLUDE 1997 MERRITT MOBILE HOME; ID NUMBERS FLHMLCP53717043B AND
FLHMLCP53717043A; AND TITLE NUMBERS 73253994 AND 73253992.
COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 263 Limestone Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Busch, Slipakoff & Schuh, LLP, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose ad-
dress is 225 Water Street, Suite 1290, Jacksonville, Florida 32202, within thirty (30) days
of the first publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in THE
WAKULLA NEWS.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at, __, Florida, on the 3rd day of April,
2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court
Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
Andrea Edwards Martin Florida Bar 805181
Busch, Slipakoff & Schuh, LLP.
225 Water Street, Suite 1290, Jacksonville, FL 32202-5175
Telephone: (770) 790-3550 Facsimile: (770) 790-3520
April 10 & 17, 2014.

5021-0417 TWN
vs. Nelson, Craig 65-2013-CA-000032 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION







Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


thewakullanews.com


CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000032 DIVISION
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC., MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WF1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CRAIG NELSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Jan. 6,
2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000032 of the Circuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which US Bank National Associa-
tion, as Trustee for Citigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc., Mortgage Pass-Through Certifi-
cates, Series 2006-WF1, is the Plaintiff and Craig Nelson, Tenant #1, Tenant #2, The Un-
known Spouse of Craig Nelson, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the
Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327,
Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 8th day of May, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
TRACT 75, BLOCK 'C, SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 163 PERSIMMON RD SOPCHOPPY FL 32358-0714
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.
Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 6 day of January, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743
(813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw&albertellilaw.com
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.
April 10 &17, 2014. WB -013665F01


5020-0417 TWN
vs. Lischalk, Alan B. 10-00340 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 10-00340 DIVISION
PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALAN B. LISCHALK, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
March 24, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10-00340 of the Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Cor-
poration, is the Plaintiff and Alan B. Lischalk, Bunting Neighborhood Property Owners
Association, Inc, Estelle F. Lischalk, Songbird Subdivision Property Owners Association,
Inc., are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida
at 11:00 AM EST on the 1st day of May, 2014, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOT 17, BLOCK B OF SONGBIRD PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 88, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 7 BUNTING DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.
Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 24 day of March, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.

April 10 &17, 2014. 11-92083


5019-0417 TWN
vs. Tucker, Kimberly D. 65-2010-CA-000199 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 65-2010-CA-000199 DIVISION
U.S. BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KIMBERLY D. TUCKER, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
March 20, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of
the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank,
N.A., is the Plaintiff and Kimberly D. Tucker, Todd W. Tucker, Magnolia Ridge North
Homeowners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as
nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lendingtree Loans, a California Corpora-
tion, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida
at 11:00 AM EST on the 24th day of April, 2014, the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:
LOT 37, BLOCK "A", OF MAGNOLIA RIDGE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 55 THROUGH 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
A/K/A 204 MAGNOLIA RIDGE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.
Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 19 day of March, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accomodafion to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator
not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.
April 10 &17, 2014. 10-38222


5018-0417 TWN
vs. Chaaban, Patty 2013-CA-000213 Clerk's Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2013-CA-000213
LAVERNE FRANZEN, and EDITH FRANZEN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATTY CHAABAN, DIANE NICHOLS, AND CENTENNIAL BANK,
Defendants,
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated March 4, 2014, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and


best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on April 24, 2014, the following described
property:
SEE EXHIBIT A
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.
Dated: April 2nd, 2014
BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Court
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
EXHIBIT A
Lot 7, Block "B" Otter Lake Road Estate, a subdivision recorded in Plat Book 2, Page
54, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida.
Together with that certain 1983 "MANA" Single Wide Mobile Home, ID #063827S7512,
Title #20145927.
April 10 & 17, 2014.


5017-0417 TWN
vs. Wilson, Ruby heirs 13000400CAAXMX Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 13000400CAAXMX
Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Company
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of
Ruby Wilson, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under,
Against The Named Defendant(s); et al.
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY
TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees
of Ruby Wilson, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through,
Under, Against The Named Defendant(s); CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN UNTIL
GUARDIAN AD LITEM IS APPOINTED
Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defend-
ants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the
aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown
Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Wakulla
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:
COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY
OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 5 OF SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY, 116.52 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST, 256.31 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS
WEST, 120.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 45
MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST, 435.32 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN
NORTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST, ALONG A FENCE LINE, 141.33 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 655.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID
LOT 5, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
EAST BOUNDARY, 256.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING
IN LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, YEAR: 1999, MAKE: FLEET-
WOOD, VIN#: GAFLW34A289230K21 AND VIN#: GAFLW34B289230K21.
more commonly known as 70 Mother Natures Place, Crawfordville, FL 32327.
This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL
33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 4th day of March, 2014.
Brent X. Thurmond, Circuit and County Courts
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32301; (950) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
April 10 & 17, 2014. 13-266821 FC01 ALL


5029-0424 TWN
5/2 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice is given pursuant
to Florida Self-Storage Fa-
cility Act, Florida Statutes,
Chapter 83, Part IV that
Seminole Self Storage will
hold a sale by sealed bid
May 2, 2014 at 11:00 a.m.






5022-0417 TWN
4/26 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant
to Florida Self-Storage Fa-
cility Act, Florida Statues,
Chapter 83, Part IV that
Crawfordville Self Storage
will hold a sale by sealed


at 2314 Crawfordville
Hwy, Crawfordville, Flor-
ida 32327, of the contents
of Mini- Warehouse con-
taining personal property
of:
COURTNEY GIRARD
LOUIS CANNON
Before the sale date of
May 2, 2014. The Owners







bid on Saturday, April
26th, 2014, at 10:00 a.m.
at 3291 Crawfordville
Hwy. of the contents of
Mini-Warehouses contain-
ing personal property of:
JOHN JOHNSON
JENNIFER PITTS
Before the sale date of




I *I IS^^
II m~jIiy


may redeem their prop-
erty by payment of the
Outstanding Balance
and cost by mailing it to
2314 Crawfordville Hwy,
Crawfordville, Florida,
32327 or
Paying in person at the
warehouse location.
April 17& 24, 2014.







April 26th, 2014, the own-
ers may redeem their
property by a payment of
the outstanding balance
and cost by paying in
person at 3291 Craw-
fordville Hwy., before
10:00 a.m.
April 10& 17, 2014.


5016-0417 TWN
Murray, Lacy Albert 14-33-CP Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 14-33-CP Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF LACY ALBERT MURRAY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LACY ALBERT MURRAY, deceased, whose date
of death was January 27, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April 10, 2014.
Personal Representative:


Noe


/s/ KATHRYN ROBERTS MURRAY
1145 Rawls Road, Cairo, GA 39828
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ MARION D. LAMB, III Florida Bar No.: 0500951
217 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 (850) 385-0501
April 10 & 17, 2014.


-U


5014-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 021
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that USAmeriBank the holder of the following certificate
has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 93 Date of Issuance May 27th, 2010
Parcel # 25-2S-02W-000-01423-006
Description of property:
25-2S-2W P-5-6-M-45 COMM. AT THE NE COR. OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC.
25 PARCEL CONT. .55 ACRE M/L OR 242 P 475 OR 365 P 437
Name in which assessed Neal & Tracv White
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.


5013-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 020
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US Bank the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate #2104 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 00-00-077-000-10322-003
Description of property:
LOT 77 HS P-33-3-M-21B IN NW 1/4 OF LOT 77 HS OR66 P 174 &OR 72 P315 OR 102 P
22 & 23
Name in which assessed G & S Inc. of Tallahassee
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Carla M. Ziemer, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.


5012-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 019
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EMILE JUSTIN MEYER the holder of the following certif-
icate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 981 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 09-6S-01W-000-04864-003
Description of property:
9-6S-1W P-1-3-M-60-1 LYING IN SEC 9-6S-1W OR 77 P624
Name in which assessed SYCAMORE CREEK INC
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

5011-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 018
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate # 942 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 07-6S-01W-026-04663-000
Description of property:
OCHLOCKNEE SHORES SECTION B LOT 12 DB 52 P 117 & OR 99 P 937 OR 169 P 855 OR
290 P 850 OR 601 P380
Name in which assessed MARTHA S & HAROLD A HALL JR
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

5010-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 017
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate # 1015 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel #30-2S-01E-000-04952-002
Description of property:
30-2S-1E P-5-2-M-70 PARCEL CONTAINING 1 ACRE OR 74 P 54 & OR 96 P 484 OR 150 P
143
Name in which assessed SAMUEL LEE SCOTT JR & PATRICIA ANN SCOTT
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.


Di souionOf
MasriaE Noic


a isouo


D isslu io


5006-0424 TWN
Greta Melinia Rodriguez & Mario Rodriguez Castillo 14-DR-96 Diss. of Marriage
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 14-DR-96 Division: Family Law
GRETA MELINIA RODRIGUEZ,
Petitioner,
and
MARIO RODRIGUEZ CASTILLO,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT)
TO: MARIO RODRIGUEZ CASTILLO
(Last Known Address): 7225 EAST MAIN STREET, SOUTH SOLON, OHIO, 43153
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage has been filed against
you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on GRETA MELINIA RODRIGUEZ, whose address is 137 TAFFLINGER ROAD, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 on or before May 3, 2014, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, before
service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property
should be divided: NONE
Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: March 24, 2014.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Gail Smith, Deputy Clerk

Published April 3,10, 17 and 24, 2014.


Confirm Your



TheWakullaNews.com


Snd your 4-digit Account Today!
N ew sp a per A cct. ID .i...............................................


* on the address imprint i.ilJ
from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your
address. Also, be sure to note how your street
address is printed.


2 Go to http://www.TheWakuIllaNews.com
Click onn
"Sign up"as .. .
shown below. ..........


Type the 4-digit
Newspaper Acct. ID in the
box as shown. Now, type in
your street address exactly
as shown on your paper
and click"Continue".


IfR,,,,- n -s rh e s in s
he Wakull News en simply nnd /f. a unt

o _n_____apsas on yir p tiong la .


4


















5


Fill out the information
requested in the
registration form. Don't
forget to enter email
address and password
twice for confirmation.
Also, don't forget to
check the box next to the
user agreement. Click
"Continue".


Congratulations! You've successfully registered your
thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any
problems, please call (877) 401-6408.


3


*Email adlress: [jpublicijigm al -corn ]____




*Last Name. LFubfic |

-Addr ~. i3 119A Crawfordvllle Rd i


-ZPcoB [32327
.p~d


Foelsr ae


I I


FOyeloureSa
Action Notic


Foreclosure Salle,.`
s
Action Notice I


Foelsr ae


elosure Sal
Action Notic


0


Foreclosure Salle,.`
s
Action Notice I


Notices to Credituirs '
Administration I


NoiestCrdts"


Ta De


Ta De






www.thewakullanews.com


Brain


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 13B





Teaser


1 23


3 4


5367 4 8

1_ 3 _


59 _228


4 7 6


2 8 7963


7 5

86 3


Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one
of the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.


9 L C 98 6
Z 89t'6CL9

C96L 89tVZ
C96L9t'Z8
L89 9t69C
t'698C8 9L

6t'99 8CZ 9

99C8 8L6t'
6L Vi _L 9 C _8
191L1IZIBJ^L AI_ V


uoilnIos
deW JeiS


NOOVIgINlM3>lEoiOIC
1S i N IE G 0 SGINVNI

I MEIII1 nl^ o l I Il
IIs v oI l V s o d oI0 I1d I
A I s s'lN d n r LH'rnv
||I |N S|So0 V0 MION S


1 1A o sl3 d nl3 lslv
0 AEl S s V0 N
G s 1 dsnd d|N V3


suo!lnlIos


t3NNIM
:PJOM SJopoL
puaj"] '7 IJAO3
'pJIaM 'OD Ue~d *"L
uo!jn/os
Sl 3'11WAIVUH)S


By Linda
Thistle


Draw a star in exactly 10 of the empty squares
in the diagram below so that each numbered
square accurately indicates how many immedi-
ately adjacent squares (horizontally, vertically or
diagonally) contain a star.

1 1

3 0

1 3

1 3 1

2 1

2

2 2 1


*Easy **Moderate ***YOWZA!
2014 King Features Synd. Inc.


Across
1 State whose capital is
Boise
6 Social slight
10 Latest crazes
14 Scary creature
15 South American
nation whose capital
is Lima
16 One of the Great
Lakes
17 They're dyed in the
springtime
19 Bird that's a symbol
of peace
20 -cones
21 Down in the dumps
22 Pushed (aside)
24 Pig's place
25 Put on TV
26 Totally crushed
34 Person who goes on
yelp.com, e.g.


35 Tempts
36 Actress
Saint


Marie


38 From the top
39 Military clothes, for
short
40 Use scissors
41 Greek letter
42 Leaps
43 Flair
44 "Let's raise our
glasses..."
47 Computer key
48 Attorney's field
49 Winning game after
game
53 Quick punch
54 -mo camera
57 Inflict upon
58 Actor with a "six
degrees" game named
for him
61 Office
(president's
workplace)
62 Dutch cheese


63 Use one end of a
pencil
64 Politician Paul
65 Not daughters
66 Car body flaws

Down
1 "Beware the of
March"
2 James of "Rebel
Without a Cause"
3 "Are not!" retort
4 Burning
5 Not very good, like a
movie or hotel
6 Went quickly
7 Positive's opposite:
abbr.
8 Desire
9 Parts of some city
roads
10 Indiana Jones's hat


11 Three in
12 Go headfirst into the
water
13 Future flower
18 Sunbeams
23 Some pens or lighters


24
26
27


Gumbo or goulash
College org.
Porch, like the one on
"The Golden Girls"


28 Devoured
29 San Antonio's most
famous building
30 Gas station features
31 Came up
32 African nation whose
capital is Nairobi
33 Bad things
37 In (sulking)
39 Treats with icing
40 Store (away)


42 "No way, !"
43 Pierced
45 Said again, like a
story
46 Actor Thicke
49 Scent
50 Astronomical wonder
51 impasse (not
moving)
52 Try again with
53 Slim
54 Look over quickly
55 Show set on an island
56 Small bills
59 President Martin
Buren
60 "We Family"


s x Si sJMS1a.lOLq0
JOMSUV SJe|e)p11S


~SCRAMBLERS
(J ^ ^ Unscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words. Then
l11 I rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!


Strut

CARPEN


Strange

WIRED -


Secret

VECTOR

Shield

FENDED


Dl


D


__~ LI


"You must be mistaken-I just can't
imagine a million-dollar lottery

being unloved!"


Star*Map


Below is a 61 x 69 unit rectangle

made up of squares.

What is the size of square "A"?


2014 King Features Syndicate


0 iiiiiiq


---I


__j






Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Out on a Limb



A tN lONV
AVT J CNT;NN
AT WL (CYW


ACROSS
1 Pickle
flavor
5 Collection
8 Lingerie
items
12 Fragrant
climbing
plant
14 40-Across
part
15 Outing for
Neil
Armstrong
16 Addict
17 Little louse
18 Mistakes in
print
20 Confuse
23 Ignore
24 Not closed
25 Under-the-
table
flirtation
28 Golfer
Michelle
29 A deadly sin
30 Wet dirt
32 Weather
conditions
34 Challenge
35 Downs or
Grant
36 Devilish sort
37 Armadas
40 Listener
41 Small bit
42 Henry
Hudson's
ship
47 Tea hour


by Jeff Picketing
3:" ALWAYS LiKO "N






yo6OTACRET o,"^






Seyes.r~^


48 Natural
aptitude
49 Oklahoma
city
50 Bakery buy
51 Third son

DOWN
1 Brit. mil.
award
2 Jima
3 Zodiac feline
4 One of the
Beatles
5 Argument
6 Conger, for
one
7 Pay heed
8 Book jacket


quotes
9 Passenger
Parks
10 Help a crook
11 Will be (Sp.)
13 Tiny branch
19 "The Sultan
of Swat"
20 Arrow
launcher
21 Grand-scale
tale
22 Sense
23 Reality,
old-style
25 Largest store
in a chain
26 Mosque VIP
27 Continental


2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


Just Lke Cats & Dogs


BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


by Psw T. PNpp.


* You miw&N? HER i THotJGnw e TH WAS sow
NATIONAL TRAGEDY. ALL THIS BECAUSE YOUR
L FAVORITE PICK 60T BOOTED OFF AMERICAN ZbOLj

r^-N_ IJ


a~jxtt


I LAFF-A-DAY I


"Funny thing, how It sounded so much louder
downstairs!"


CAN YOU TRUST YOUR EYES? There are at least six differ
ences in drawing details between top and bottom panels. How
quickly can you find themt' Check answers witth those below
twissi sC usn -9 pAOueo si ISOxoS "S "USSI si asnoqpu, e -,Ussiw
SJi SsiOOad ""* h lb U U issu~u si .MAueaa Bla us m siou tjaW e



CryptoQuip
This is a simple substitution cipher in which each letter used stands
for another If you think that X equals 0, it will equal 0 throughout
the puzzle Solution is accomplished by trial and error
Clue' Z equals A
VLMRLJPU ZS Z NZWS-NVVM
BJPMVB, SDRH ZWGRM SDR
NLVU "BVOYM HVO YJGR NYJRW
BJSD SDZS?"
D 2014 King Features Synd Inc.


I3NNIM
*pJoM s,/opoli
PUJa9 '1 :7JaAO3 "
'PJ!aM'Z .'a)ueJd'L
uo!,nlos
S M 3'1 W VH)v S


Trivia
Te
p test wfe
^----Rodrguez
1. SCIENCE: What is another word for
molten rock below the Earth's surface?
2. ANIMAL KINGDOM: How many
toes does a hippopotamus have?
3. MEASUREMENTS: How many
miles are run in a 5K (kilometer) foot-
race?
4. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the Ionian
Sea?
5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: How
many colleges are housed at Oxford
University?
6. ASTROLOGY: What is the symbol
of the Gemini sign?
7. LITERATURE: Who wrote the nov-
el "Humboldt's Gift"?
8. MUSIC: In what year did singer
Kelly Clarkson win the "American Idol"
competition?
9. MOVIES: What Chevy Chase mov-
ie featured the tagline yulee crack up"?
10. ENTERTAINERS: What band is
Ozzie Osbourne associated with?
2014 King Features Synd, Inc


qltqquS jotlg "0I
.u0!L35A s1uwsuqD,, 6
WOOW *8
Z00 "8
M0119 lnS L'L
suIMj qL .9

ooooio pu Xpl, i mtuqpnos uooxlog *i
SOlUm IF
jooj qous uo .jnoj Z
ums s I
sa;)MsuV JSs)JL !A!a&L


"su!i wL :awil uoflnios
SJ8MSuV
- poIQMSSO BU.I -


6 V 9 C Z L 8 L
I. Z 8 LV 6 9 9 C
C Z 6 L 8 9 6 t Z
Z 8 6 9 C L 17 L. 9
9 9 t Z L 8 C Z 6
L I. L 6 9 V Z 9 8
9 6 Z 8 L L 9 C
8 9 L 17 6 L Z Z 9
1 ZL 9 Z S 8 6 L
lGmsuv
JfOMSUVAeM
-- n~ioans ^IpteaM --


,,Jeqj ql!AM
1sag ao!I noA plnoM,, bo04
iql pae|se Aaql 'mopu!m
pooln-se e IE buuapio
jaumsus
SdntoJdXJaJ


Leave Wo+hing


But Your Foot+print+


jaolin |lanues -
'ajoq oIq ueqy
alq!ldLualuoo JOLU ue9A9
si pajoq eq lasUiq
stO| OLIM uEw OLiI
slamoq/v\Msuem aq
Gon0SUdAj
9jonbojdA~J:


Keep Wakultla


County Beautiful


thewakullanews.com

King Crossword ___


coin
Pornography
Lair
"- It
Through the
Grapevine"
Skin
Crazy
Mini-flute?
Exemplar of
craziness
Needle case
Otherwise
Blackbird
Individual
Autumn mo.
To the
- degree


by Linda Thistle

1 5 7 4
7 9 8
3 8 9
2 4 1
7 1 6
6 5 9
4 9 8 3
5 7 2
7 2 6
Place a number in the empty boxes in such a way
that each row across, each column down and
each small 9-box square contains all of the
numbers from one to nine.
IFFCUTYTHSa, WEEK:
Moderate ** Challenging
** HOO BOY!
2014 King Fea.tures Synd, Inc


SCRAMBLERS
Unscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words. Then
rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!
Strut
CARPEN
Strange
WIRED F = = _
Secret
VECTOR
Shield
FENDED E


"You must be mistaken-I just can't
imagine a million-dollar lottery
being unloved!"


SCryptoQuote

AXYDLBAAXR
is LONGFELLOW
One letter stands for another. In this sample, A is used
for the three L's, X for the two 0's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words are all
hints. Each week the code letters are different.
CEG VLB AEN XGCD

EOVDGXU WG WNFGR OD

GZGB VNFG

QNBCGVMCOWXG CELB CEG

WNFG. DLVPGX WPCXGF

2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


m I aelall]


I


tf^ ^WAtT "Tin. L
Fww IX





THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014 Page 15B


gill] 1111,


V -


Sg liF p I i -I i 'f w "
d"'--* a-l A AT TTrV W7P w f-%l-r%


AUMVMVIUN.11Y UJ1N Ifl K | to everyone who came out

Thank you to our Door Prize Contributors and enjoyed the Grand Opening of the


and Sponsors:
103.1 The Wolf, RedHills Broadcasting
2T's & Me Monogram Boutique
3Y Outdoor Equipment
Front Porch Creations Florist
Gulf Coast Lumber & Supply
Hamaknockers BBQ
Medart Elementary School
Purple Martin Nurseries
Root 319 Cuts & Color
Stacie Kirkland of Stacie Renee Cakes
Splash & Dash Car Wash & Window Tinting
Super Lube
Winn-Dixie
Wal-Mart
White Elephant & Friends
Wakulla County Coalition for Youth
Wakulla High School Culinary Operations Program

BWOW- Business Woman ofWakulla:
Gena Green, Thirty-One & Origami Owl Consultant
Annabums
Cyndi McKhen, BeautiControl Consultant
Julie Neet, Thirty One Gifts Consultant
Kim McMillian, Thirty One Gifts Consultant
Pamela Moss, Bramazing Consultant
& Melaleuca The Wellness Company
Sabrina Ha, Shakeology
Sue Morgan, Precious Charms
We Can, We Jam, Salsa
Whaley Photography


Wakulla One Stop Community Center!!

We also wish to thank all of our contributors, sponsors,
service and program providers, and volunteers

Thank You to All Our Participants:


A Time To Change
Apalachee Center
Big Bend Rural Health
Boy Scouts of America Troop #8
Career Source Capital Region
Camp Indian Springs
Capital Area Community Action Agency
Capital Area Healthy Start
Champions
CHAT of Wakulla County
Children's Home Society
Department of Health Wakulla County
Debbie Urling, Congestive Heart Failure Class
DISC Village
Harvest Fellowship / Gospel Food Ministries
Keep Wakulla County Beautful
MADD Northwest Florida
Music Lessons Express
NAMI of Wakulla County

Thank you to all our Volunteers


North Florida Child Development /
Wakulla County Head Start
Operation Santa
Refuge House, Inc.
Ty's US Tai Karate
The Early Learning Coaliton of The Big Bend
Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners
Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce
Wakulla County Extension / Green Living Expo
Wakulla County Public Library
& Friends of the Library
Wakulla County Recreation Division
Wakulla County School District
Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
Wakulla Medical Center
Wakulla Pregnancy Center
Wakulla Senior Citizens Center and the Before
& Afterschool Program
Wakulla Working Waterfronts


Especially those who went above & beyond:


Brooke Glover
Emily & Noah Pilkinton
Gwen Williams
Janice Eakin
Leigh & Samantha Key
Melanie Worley of the Early Learning Coalition


Ramon Medina
Virgina Moore
The Mission Church
WHS NJROTC
WHS Interact Club
Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Members


Thank you to Pickin' & Grinnin' Band for
providing us with non stop music!!


<.


www.thewakullanews.com






Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 17, 2014


Nuremberg, a name that means history


By LINDA CARTER
Special to The News

Bombed heavily
during World War II,
Nuremberg is one of
the largest remaining
walled cities.
Long sections of its
walls remain inter-
spersed with imposing
entry towers.
During the war, even
the churches suffered
heavy damage. How-
ever, unlike many of its
counterparts, Nurem-
berg was not rebuilt in
the original style after
the war, consequently
many of the buildings
are modern.
The result is pockets


of charming historic
buildings, surrounded
by a more modern city.
With a population
of 500,000, it is less
a tourist destination,
and more a thriving
community.
World War II history
buffs will have much to
discover. Located just
outside the city lies the
ruins of the Nazi Party
Rally Grounds.
Spend a day explor-
ing the exhibits, and
imagine what it would
have been like at its
peak.
Visit the Memorium
Nuremberg Trials.
This museum,
opened in 2010, is
located in the venue
where the Nazi trails
took place.
Visit the actual
courtroom, when court
is not in session.
Shopping is plenti-
ful. In the main square
a tempting produce
market sets up daily.
Ogle the beautiful
flowers, fresh fruits


LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL
The streets of Nuremberg.


and vegetables, with
local mushrooms the
size of your hand,
straight out of the Han-
sel and Gretel story.
The smell of home-
made breads and pas-
try, and sizzling sau-
sages tempt passersby
to sample the smor-
gasbord of fresh baked
goods.
Home of Germany's
largest Christmas Mar-
ket, by early November
the feel of the holidays
are in the air.
Rustic booths,
draped with glowing
lights, and bedecked
with carnival-like
lighted signs proclaim-
ing their wares.
The streets are
chockful of tempting
treats. Choose from
lebkucken, German
gingerbread, German
mulled wine, savory
local sausages, or
steamy crepes served
with your choice of
toppings.
My personal favorite
is banana with Nutella,
a mouthwatering choc-
olate hazelnut spread.
www.christkindles-
markt.de.
In the historic cen-
ter, the main square
steals the show. The
face of the Church of
Our Lady, while still in
the traditional Gothic
style, houses a giant
mechanical clock. Like
a traditional German
cuckoo clock, every
day at noon the prince
electors circle the
Holy Roman Emperor
Charles IV, minstrels
lift their horns and
ring their bells, while
the clock booms out
the time.
From the square the
historic gothic church-
es of St. Lorenz and St.
Sebald, and the Old
Town are all within an
easy stroll.
The highlight of the
main square is the


Schoner Bunnen, or
beautiful fountain.
Surrounded by
wrought iron grill-
work, legend has it if
you turn the gold ring
three times your wish
will come true. The
current fountain was
erected here around
1385, while remnants
of the original sand-
stone fountain can be
seen at the German
National Museum.
"The fountain soars
63 feet upward and
features 40 sculptured
figures which reflect
the world-view of the
Holy Roman Empire:
the pool is decorated


with figures represent-
ing philosophy and
the seven liberal arts
and above them are
the four Evangelists
and the four Church
Fathers.
"In the middle are
the Seven Electors
and Nine Worthies
and above them Moses
and Seven Prophets."
www.travelsignposts.
com
Towering above the
city is the Kaiserburg,
or Imperial Castle.
An occasional resi-
dence of the Emper-
ors of the Holy Roman
Empire between 1050
and 1571, much of the


palace was destroyed
during the war.
It was rebuilt not
back to its previous
Gothic state, but to
an ideal intended to
resemble the original
construction.
A thriving metropo-
lis, history buffs, and
holiday shoppers, will
enjoy all that Nurem-
burg has to offer.

Linda Carter is
the owner of Luxury
Cruise & Travel Inc.
in Crawfordville. She
can be reached at (850)
290-4058 or www.lux-
urycruise- travel, corn.


To


ILBRATJ Wakulla Senior


CitiZens Center


2014 VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR


HARRIET RICH

A volunteer is that rare person not only willing to give of their time, but of their heart.
One person can make a difference, improving lives and communities.

If you are interested in volunteering opportunities at the Wakulla Senior Center,
please call Pat at (850) 926-7145 ext #230


To all of our wonderful volunteers...


Thank You!


Rebecca Addison
EdnaAdkins
Tom Ahlfeld
Don Allen
Pat Allen
Ruby Allen
Shirley Anne
Gordon C. Anthony
Pat Ashley
Robert Baker
Virginia Barnes
Katie Barrett
Dick Bickford
Lorraine Bickford
Becky Black
Greg Blakney
Linda Boles
Jeannie Brodhead
Kathie Brown
Peggy Bump
James Burke


Harold Burse Jr.
Carol Campbell
Jack Campbell
Juanita Cantrell
Donna Card
Marc Antoni Carter
Mark Carter
R. H. Carter
Ann Casseaux
Merline Castor
Judy Cerwin
David Chapman
Cynthia Christen
Dee Clayton
Judy Collomy
Billie Davis
Cathy Davis
Virginia Davis
Eileen Debish
Tim Devlin
Fred Dockham


Andrew Dowden
Hunter Dowden
Diane Dyal
Annie Edwards
Neil Eichholz
Dottie Fletcher
Paula Fluty
Geri Furdock
Kristine Galloway
Linda Gilmore
Bobbie Glover
Carolyn Grubbs
Joey Grubbs
Mary Hampton
Theresa Harrell
Hoot Harrison
Faye Harrod
Brad Harvey
Rhonda Harvey
Robin Hawkins
Charlotte Hayes
Jean Heaton
Jack Henderson
Viola Henderson


Katherine Hertz
Guy Hogan
Ronald Huddleston
Ann Hughes
Terri Humphries
Michelle Hunter
Doug Jones
Jane Jones
Susan Jones
Mary Kelly
Mike Kemp
Eiko Kerns
Norma Kirby
Kathy LaMarsh
Carolyn Lambert
Judy Langston
Eric Livingston
Toni Livingston
Dorothy Lutz
Peggy Mackin
Annette Malik
Greg Mathers
Floria Mathis
Sheryl Mattison


Carol McAliley
Ron McAliley
Earl McCalvin
Sharon McClendon
Peggy McLaurin
Margaret McMullen
Mike McNamara
Diana McPherson
Connie Menard
Betty Messer
Danny Metcalf
Jerrell Metcalf
Belinda Miller
Mark Mitchell
Dick Moore
Ida Moore
Virginia Moore
Frank Newman
Donna Newman
Willie Mae Norton
Cheryl Olah
Ami Osborne
Joanne Palmer
Dorothy Pate


Susan Payne Turner
Norman Peak
Bobby Pearce
Jerry Peck
Ester Pelt
Bill Petty
Sherry Potter
Bobby Porter
Rita Powell
Linda Price
Ellen Pruitt
Glenda Pruitt
Mr. James Revell
Mrs. James Revell
Harriet Rich
Mel Ringelberg
Barb Ringelberg
Tony Rizzo
Dora Rosier
Jessica Scarborough
Joanie Sharman
John Shuff
Charlie Slaughter
Jay Sloan


Linda Sloan
Charles Smith
Joan Smith
Donnie Sparkman
Kim Spear
Alice Stokely
Kitty Strickland
Jeff Suber
Julia Thornton
Ginger Tillman
Rick Tittle
Diane Tompson
Charles Tully
Mary Updegraff
Joan Vaillancourt
Roger Walton
Mary Ward
Elaine Webb
Buddy Wells
Agatha Williams
Lassie Williams
Mattie Williams
Ruth Williams
Louis Williford
Jason Winn
Sharon Wolfe
Brittany Woodward


A colorful flower stall in Nuremberg in the shadow of a cathedral.


10 roo aw ^ L^


thewakullanews.com