Wakulla news

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Wakulla news
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George R. Langford-Ben Watkins ( Crawfordville Fla )
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LOW COUNTRY

BOIL See Page 2B

A s k


I We autla Bevis fish firy See13B
J~ UU4UI benefits senior center


Our 119th Year, 15th Issue
Thursday, April 10, 2014


Published Weekly, Read Daily
Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century


Two Sections
75 Cents


ROBERT SEIDLER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
A master shot of fishermen taken at the Panacea dock by photographer Robert Seidler will be
part of the exhibit.


WORKING


WATERFRO


TS


A photographic exhibit documenting Wakulla's

maritime industry opens next week


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

Somehow a
broiled grou-
per filet tastes
better when
you have shaken the
hand of the person who
caught it.
Organizers of the up-
coming Wakulla's Work-
ing Waterfronts exhibit
have cast a wide net in
an effort to visually con-
nect the faces of Wakul-
la County's maritime
industry with the fresh
seafood on our plates.
Families and individu-
als throughout the region
are invited to view the
free exhibit on Thursday,
April 17 from 6 to 8 p.m.
at the Wakulla One-Stop
Community Center.
Herb Donaldson, lo-
cal author and artistic
director of Palaver Tree
Theater, has organized
the Working Waterfronts
exhibit with Chuck Rob-
inson. He said the proj-
ect is two years in the
making since Sopchoppy
resident Donnie Crum
had the idea to capture
the maritime history of
Wakulla County.
Six local photogra-
phers shadowed fish-
erman, crabbers, crab
pickers, shrimpers, boat
makers, seineyard work-


ers, oyster, clam and
scallop farmers, cast net
makers, worm grunters,
captains and restaurant
owners as they worked
to capture images of
Wakulla County's oldest
industry.
Featured photogra-
phers are Mickey Cant-
ner, Katie Deal, Lynda
Kinsey, Jo Ann Palm-
er, Mark Wallheiser and
Robert Seidler. Anony-
mous judges selected 48
photos out of thousands
of submissions for the
exhibit.
Donaldson encour-
aged guests to arrive
early to purchase fresh
catches from local sea-
food restaurants and
vendors.
"It is not enough to
show pictures, or talk
about how great Wakul-
la's seafood is without
giving those who do the
work a chance to bring
it fully to the people,"
Donaldson said. "One of
Waterfronts' goals is to
make sure that our com-
munity 'taste the fruit' of
maritime labor, not just
look at it."
Besides the photo-
graphs, the exhibit will
also feature a Wakulla
maritime family tree.
"One child will be the


Working Waterfronts Photo Project will
open on Thursday, April 17, at the One-
Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville
Road, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.


crabbing industry, anoth-
er child will be boat-mak-
ing industry, one child
will be the worm grunter
and so on," Donaldson
said. "When people come
in, we can let them check
off when and how they
worked in the maritime
industry. Our goal is to
create a large map so
future generations will
know their connections
to that history."
"It's been an honor
to work with members
of the new community
center," Donaldson said.
"They are swamped with
their own grand opening
(April 11), and we are
trying to support them as
they support us."
Donaldson said some
of the photographers'
subjects had never re-
ceived special attention
for their decades of hard
work.
"This whole project
has been very interest-
ing, because a lot of the
photographers learned
that there are fishing and
crabbing families that


have never had a pho-
to taken before," Don-
aldson said. "There are
heartbreaking stories
too. When you hear that
this industry is coming
to an end, don't just let
it go in one ear and out
the other."
St. Marks photogra-
pher Mickey Cantner he
enjoyed getting to know
the fishermen and the
women who work with
them.
"Now I understand
what they go through
and I appreciate their
efforts to bring us fresh
seafood," Cantner said.
"Their dedication to the
fishing industry is re-
markable. I think about
all the hard work that
goes into bringing fresh
seafood to our tables.
They are up early and
out fishing at the break
of day. Then back to pro-
cess the day's catch and
get it on the trucks and to
the market. The grouper
fishermen go out to sea
for days at a time."
Turn to Page 15A


6 145


MICKEY CANTER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
One of the Lynn brothers of St. Marks with old stone crab traps.


Rudloes win



National



Wetlands



Award
Staff Report

The Environmental Law Institute announced
this week that Jack Rudloe and his late wife
Anne Rudloe of Gulf Specimen Marine Labora-
tories are recipients of the prestigious National
Wetlands Award for Education and Outreach.
They will be hon-
ored at a ceremony
on May 8 at U.S.
Botanic Gardens in
Washington, D.C.
for their 50 years of
service preserving
North Florida wet-
lands and promoting
the importance of
estuarine ecosys-
tems.
"My late wife Anne
would be particular- Jack Rudloe
ly honored to receive
this award," Rudloe
said. "She dedicated her life to preserving ma-
rine habitat for our children, grandchildren and
all future generations."
Turn to Page 2A


Easter egg hunt


is Saturday

The only hunting equipment area children
will need Saturday are keen eyes, quick hands
and craving forjelly beans at the annual Easter
egg hunt at Hudson Park.
Egg hunt registration will be from at 9 to
10:30 a.m. The hunt begins at 11 a.m. Age
groups are 0 to 3, r
4 to 6 and 7 tol10.
A child in each age
category will win the f c '
Easter basket draw-
ing. .. ..
Dolly Mitchellv .
of Wakulla County
Parks and Recre-aio
ation, said the event
will feature free face
painting by Rosie the
Clown, visit from fo f .
McGruff the Crime
Dog and Smokey
the Bear, and help
from the Wakulla An egg hunter in 2012.
High School ROTC.
Emergency vehicles will be parked for children
to explore.
Mitchell said the event is hosted and spon-
sored by Wakulla County Parks and Recreation,
with support from Wal-Mart and Capital City
Bank.
Mitchell invited everyone in the community
to come out and enjoy food, games and fun.
Nicole Zema

OBITUARIES
Nancy Annette Barwick
Robert Earl 'Bobby' Cameron
John 'Hondo' Hearon
Nancy Lee Taylor

INDEX

The Opinion Page ........................................................... Page 4A
Street s ......................................B............................. Page 5A
Church ................................ ................................ Page 6A
Obituaries ............................. ............................. Page 7A
Community Wakull.............................Page 8A
School ............................. ................................ Page 10A
Outdoors Boil. photos............. .............................. Page 12A
W after W ays .............................................................Page 13A
Sheriff's Reportu .............................................................Page 14A
Natural Wakulla........................................... Page 16A
G reenS ........................................Scene............................Page 6B
Low Country Boil ph oos .....................pho..................... Page 2B
Week in Wakulla............................................ Page 3B
Weekly Roundup............................................ Page 4B
Sports....................................................... Page 6B
Thinking Outside the Book................................. Page 7B
Classifieds........................................................................Page 8B
Legal Notices...................................................................Page 8B
Com ics...........................................................................Page 12B


Senior Citizen Fish Fry photos .......................................Page 13B







Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014




^1~ ~ ~~ r ri I/^ m^l^
lUREND OPINING





Speakers, Vendors, Games, Recreational

Activities, Music & More for All Ages!
Join Us for a Springtime Evening of Fun for the Whole Family.
Meet our Partners and One Stop Team. Find Out About Summer
Camps, After School Care, Community Center Activities, Programs
and Classes for Groups, Families and Individuals.

facebook.com/wakullaonestopcommunitycenter
info@wakullaonestopcommunitycenter.com


www.thewakullanews.com


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS


Bob Malone to perform


at Worm Grunters Ball


318 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville I 850-745-6042


Photo Project Exhibit


OPENING CELEBRATION



See the stunning visual history of Wakullas local fishermen,
shrimpers, crabbers, crab-pickers, oystermen, trap-makers, boat-makers
and more on display at the Wakulla One Stop Community Center
at 318 Shadeville Highway in Crawfordville.
wakullasworkingwaterfronts.com I850-879-2010

























i *
... .,..-._...'."


' I' 11 All iit ti',ir',rm I h W ullj .I timi ll jijlet lt i iiii' tl tPtiti l iii|ii |l ill ',i | wtlh ilr i wi ullj Il W i |1 L illlllll IIiiiI l I 1h h '. i lli lunll J I ii t iil IIiithm thr [llluiil DrlO i I LiiuItM I ,llm it.',


By JENNY ODOM
Special to The News

"When they asked me
to perform at the Worm
Gruntin' Festival, I was
like, I want to do it for
the T-shirt alone," says
Bob Malone, from his
home in Los Angeles.
A Jersey boy, with a
knack for tickling the
ivories, Malone will per-
form a house concert in
Sopchoppy at From The
Heart Recording Studio
on Friday, April 11, and
then again on Saturday
evening, April 12, he
will perform with The
Rick Ott Band during
the Worm Grunters Ball.
Malone, 48, has had
a steady and successful
career as a blues pianist
and singer-songwriter.
He grew up in Milton,
New Jersey and attend-
ed Jefferson Township
High School.
"I started playing at
the age of 9," he says. "I
was classically trained."
"But in high school, I
found rock and roll and
the blues and I've been
making a living off my
music since I was 18
years old."
For the last three
years Malone has played
with John Fogerty, the
Creedance Clearwater
Revival frontman. Most
recently, he played on
Fogerty's latest album,
"Wrote A Song For Ev-
eryone," and on duets
with Bob Seger, Miranda
Lambert, and Keith Ur-
ban.
He has also per-
formed with or opened
for Bruce Springsteen,
Rickie Lee Jones, The
Neville Brothers, Rev.
Al Green, Dr. John and
plays with piano legends
like Marcia Ball and
Henry Butler in New
Orleans, a regular stop
every year for the House
of Blues' Piano Night.
Considered a blues


Bob Malone will perform four shows
while in the Big Bend area:
April 10, Bradfordville Blues Club, 7152
Moses Lane, Tallahassee, FL. 8 p.m.
April 11, From The Heart Recording
Studio, 55 Rose St., Sopchoppy, FL, 7 p.m.
April 12, Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin'
Festival, Downtown Sopchoppy, 8 p.m.
April 15, Little Villlage, 2808 W. 12th
St., Panama City, FL, 6 p.m.
Listen to samples of Bob Malone's music,
read his blog and purchase CDs at www.
bobmalone.com.


artist by most, Malone
is more than that. He
says you need to add
some New Orleans rock,
a little R&B and a tiny
bit of jazz, if you want
to define his style.
"I've got my own
genre," he says. "But
it's always a bluesy kind
of thing."
"As an artist, I've al-
ways done what I want-
ed to do, and played
what I wanted to play,"
says Malone.
"The music business
has its ups and downs,"
he explains about his
three decades of being
a working musician.
"It's a lot of hard work.
There's the travel, time
spent in airports, trains
and buses."
"One year will be
great, the next year not
so much," Malone says
of the music business.
"But I've done well."
"But, to me, the front
end is the payoff," he
continues, "getting to
play the show."
Malone has record-
ed six original albums,
his latest just last year
titled, "Ain't What You
Know." The New Yorker
magazine called him
a "keyboard wizard,"
and Berklee Today says
he has "a blue-collar
organic flavor that is
still defined by working
hard."
When in the U.S.,
Malone usually tours


around the country
playing solo shows and
with other top-notch
musicians. But when
he's home, in Los Ange-
les, he mostly works in
the recording studio on
albums, and recording
his own work.
He's been seen and
heard on television and
radio, on such shows
as The Late Show with
David Letterman, The
View, Dr. Phil, The Ra-
chel Ray Show, Car Talk
and Acoustic Cafe.
He'll play four shows
in the Big Bend region
- Bradfordville Blues
Club, From the Heart
Studio, The Worm Grun-
tin' Festival and Little
Village in Panama City.
Malone plays about
100 shows a year, tour-
ing throughout the U.S.,
Europe and Austrailia.
He started touring in
Europe about seven
years ago, when he was
invited to tour Italy.
This summer he will
perform a variety of
shows in France, Bel-
gium, Germany, the
Netherlands and Swit-
zerland.
Nothing is planned
yet, but someone will
have to invite Bob
Malone back next year
for an encore perfor-
mance to hear what the
Europeans had to say
about his Worm Grun-
tin'T-shirt.


Rudloes win wetlands award


From Front Page

From Panacea, the ac-
tivist couple led the push
for legislative protections
throughout Florida when
none existed and contrib-
uted to the preservation of
more than 35,000 acres of
marine habitat, according
to the press release.
Through their nation-
ally recognized education
center and aquariam,
Gulf Specimen, the Rud-
loes have engaged more
than a quarter of a million
people including thou-
sands of school-age chil-
dren on the importance
of wetlands. The "touch-
tank" aquarium and trav-
eling SeaMobile provide
a hands-on education of
wetland animal life.
At the Wakulla coun-
ty commission meeting
on Monday, Rudloe ap-
peared at the podium to
thank commissioners for
their efforts to repeal the
local wetlands ordinance,
saying that without that
he would not have gar-


nered the attention to win
the award. He read the
press release to the board.
The Rudloes were
nominated by Dr. Thomas
Manning of Valdosta State
University. The Rudloes
work is cited in nearly
100 scholarly articles for
wetlands research.
"I know of no other
institute along the Gulfs
shores that has done
more to heighten aware-
ness, both by direct edu-
cational work and by
facilitating the instruc-
tional efforts of others,"
Dr. Manning said.
Rudloe continues to-
day to battle interests
that threaten to repeal
established protecting
wetlands, even as new
studies show the devas-
tating impact of disap-
pearing wetland habitat
throughout Florida and
nationwide.
"Florida is a trend-
setter for the rest of the
nation, which is why we
must remain vigilant and
oppose efforts to repeal


wetlands protections,"
Rudloe said.
In addition to the na-
tional award, a new spe-
cies of jellyfish was dis-
covered and named to
honor Jack Rudloe for his
dedication to the study
and protection of the ma-
rine environment and its
habitats.
Chiropsella rudloei
spawns in the wetland
habitat of mangrove
swamps. It was collected
by Jack Rudloe during
an International Indi-
an Ocean Expedition in
Madagascar in the early
1960s and only recently
catalogued through the
Smithsonian National
Museum of Natural His-
tory.
Since 1989, the Na-
tional Wetlands Awards
program has honored
individuals who have
demonstrated extraordi-
nary effort, innovation,
and excellence in wetland
conservation, research, or
education







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 3A


COUNTY COMMISSION


Board votes down proposed wetlands ordinance

Language taken from wetlands petition; action guarantees that issue will go to voters in November


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@thewakullanews.net

The wetlands protec-
tion ordinance contin-
ued to dominate pro-
ceedings at the April 7
board meeting of the
Wakulla County Com-
mission.
Many wetlands or-
dinance supporters re-
quested the board go
ahead and adopt as an
ordinance the language
that appears on the
petitions gathered by
the Wakulla Wetlands
Alliance rather than
holding a November
referendum.
Commissioners voted
4-1 not to adopt the or-
dinance. Commission-
ers Richard Harden,
Randy Merritt, Jerry
Moore and Ralph Thom-
as voted not to adopt;
Commissioner Howard
Kessler voted for adop-
tion.
Among other chang-
es, the ordinance lan-
guage presented to the
board would have re-
quired a 5-0 vote or a
referendum to repeal
the wetlands ordinance.
The Wakulla Wet-
lands Alliance collected
signatures from 30 per-
cent of county voters
- some 5,500 citizens
- in a petition to get the
ordinance on the ballot
in the general election.
The WWA organized its
petition drive because
county commissioners
did not put the wet-
lands issue on the Nov.
4 ballot.
A procedural vote will
be required to put the
ordinance on the ballot.
There will be an agen-
da request at the next
meeting for the board
to adopt a resolution
certifying the ordinance
question for the Novem-
ber ballot.


Chairman Harden
said he wanted to vote
against the wetland pro-
posal so county resi-
dents could vote on it in
November.
"These four commis-
sioners are going to vote
tonight to allow the citi-
zens to vote in Novem-
ber," Harden said. "If we
did what the wetlands
alliance wants us to
do tonight, the citizens
themselves wouldn't
vote."
Commissioner How-
ard Kessler objected to
Harden's statement as
false.
"You are not giving
the citizens the right
to vote tonight," Kes-
sler said. "If the board
had wanted citizens to
vote, the board would
have voted to put the
amendment on the bal-
lot themselves, but they
chose not to. Let's not
rewrite history."
As Kessler continued
his comments, Merritt
interrupted to call the
question and direct the
ordinance to a vote.
"We vote, that vote
passes, we move directly
to a motion on the floor,
end of debate, end of is-
sue," Merritt said. "No
offense, Howard."
"I take it, though,"
Kessler said.
There was no short-
age of commentary dur-
ing the public hearing.
Many wetlands ordi-
nance supporters want-
ed the ordinance passed
into law Monday night.
Others said if an
immediate law is not
passed, they want to see
it on the ballot.
Twenty citizens spoke
on the issue, 19 of them
wetlands supporters.
"I wish you guys
would follow the rec-
ommendation of the
county administrator


Marine advisory board

holds first meeting
By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@(thewakullanews.net

Officers were selected at the inaugural meeting
of the Wakulla County Marine Advisory Committee
at the county administration office Thursday.
County Administrator David Edwards said the
existence of the committee is necessary to fulfill a
grant requirement from the Florida Fish and Wildlife
Commission to build artificial reefs offshore.
Edwards said once the committee is established,
the county commission will also value input on the
improvement of boat ramps, dredging and channel
marking.
"In the future, you can take up other issues with
our marine industry that would help us out," Ed-
wards said. "We're progressing, but we constantly
need new ideas."
John Gunner, shellfish biologist, who works
within the division of aquaculture for the Florida
Department of Agriculture, was chosen as chairman
of the Wakulla County Marine Advisory Committee.
Cypress Rudloe, manager of the Gulf Marine Speci-
men Lab, was chosen as vice chairman. Committee
members are Jody Campbell, one of the Big Bend's
foremost fishing captains; Steve Cushman, dive
shop operator, CEO of North Florida Gulf Seafoods,
and instructor of oyster aquaculture at Wakulla
Environmental Institute; and Chuck Shields, owner
of Shields Marina in St. Marks for 62 years.
Also present at the first meeting was Capt. Tony
Murray, director of the Big Bend Coastal Conser-
vancy, who has developed "smart reefs" that can
promote marine life and prevent erosion in Wakulla
County's coastal areas. He offered his assistance
with future projects.
Committee members were sworn in and made
aware of Sunshine laws. The committee is required
to meet at least four times a year, with at least one
public-input meeting annually.
The next meeting is scheduled at the administra-
tion office Thursday, April 10, at 4 p.m.




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and the county attor-
ney when they said you
should adopt our ordi-
nance that was in the
petition," said Eugene
Watkins. "If you decide
not to follow the recom-
mendations, I wish that
you would at least keep
the ordinance in place
so we can vote on it in
November."
Victor Lambou,
chairman of the Wakul-
la Wetlands Alliance,
said the 5,500 petition
signatures prove that
people are concerned
with protecting our wet-
lands.
"The majority of our
citizens wish to main-
tain local control of
our wetlands," Lambou
said. "Adoption of this
ordinance by you will
restore some predict-
ability and confidence in
our county affairs. Even
if the county commis-
sion decides to put it on
the ballot, it's obvious it
would be approved by
citizens."
A few citizens said
commissioners should
consider what effect
repealing the ordinance
might have on their po-
litical careers, especially
on the cusp of election
season.
"This is going to fol-
low you guys right up
to the election," David
Damon said. "If you
choose to let it go to the
referendum, it will end
up a major campaign
issue. People are mad.
They are tired of not be-
ing listened to."
Dana Peck said some
of the commissioners
should search their


- mrnrE


hearts as to why the
ordinance be repealed.
"The real question at
night when you close
your eyes, is, 'Who am I
helping? Who am I ben-
efiting by taking away
the buffers to these wet-
lands?"' Peck said. "The
answer may be, some
developers. I hate to say
that, because some de-
velopers want tomorrow
to be as good as today,
and they're responsible.
But there are builders
and developers we
won't name names -
who might think it's OK
to build really close to a
wetland and endanger
all of our future pros-
perity."
James Hennessey
said he is confident the
referendum will pass
if and when the public
votes on the ordinance
in the general election.
But, he expressed hope
that the commission
would adopt the ordi-
nance.
"If you truly care
about this county, I
urge you to adopt the
ordinance as written,"
Hennessey said. "Note
that it does allow for
common sense amend-
ments if all of you could
find a way to cooperate.
And wouldn't that be
a nice novelty? Failing
that, you could still take
the compromise step
to await the citizens'
verdict."
Robert Thompson
said the possible repeal
of the ordinance boils
down to bad timing.
"Wetlands are filters
to remove pollution
from runoff entering our


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Ed Gardner, O.D.


springs, rivers, lakes,
and the Gulf of Mex-
ico," Thompson said.
"Wetlands are nursery
grounds for water life,
including fish, shell-
fish and the seafood
industry. The timing of
this repeal doesn't seem
right. We're at a time
when water is less clear,
there are unnaturally
high levels of algae, rec-
reational and commer-
cial fisheries catches
are decreasing. If these
things were stable and
increasing, then I could
see maybe you could
decrease wetlands pro-
tection. But we're in a
period of decline as far
as natural resources
are concerned. Now is
the time to protect wet-


lands."
While most in atten-
dance were in favor of
buffer-zone protection
provided by the wet-
lands ordinance, a dif-
ferent point of view was
represented as well by
Bob Danzey.
"Of all the people
who've spoken, you'd
think at least one would
be accurate," Danzey
said. "There are still
going to be buffers. All
these people want to
talk about is building
in or destroying the wet-
lands. Return the rights
to the people."
The next Board of
County Commissioners
meeting will be April 21
at 6 p.m.


Real Estate News

for Wakulla County

Hi Neighbors: I have been working on
a report of Real Estates sales using our
local Multiple Listing Service (MLS) for
2013 for the Wakulla area of homes sold
between $19,000 to $400,000 and this is
what I have come up with.
There were 277 homes sold from Janu-
ary 1 to December 31,2013 so here are the
monthly breakdowns: (a 15% increase of
homes sold in 2013 since 2012)

January 15 July 21

February 15 August 31

March 26 September 10

April 23 October 28

May 35 November 27

June 24 December 22


May and August are the most positive
months to sell your property (when school
is out and right before school starts).
Arm's Length sales were 155 sold; Short
Sale sales were 40; and 82 foreclosure
properties were sold.
As some of you may know, we now have
three types of home sales we are currently
dealing with: Arm's Length (the normal
sale), Short Sales (where you owe more
on your mortgage, but need to sell) and


Bank Foreclosures.

2013

HOMES SOLD 277


Arms Length 155 133 129

Short Sales 40 48 22

Foreclosure 82 59 80


So now is the time to dust off the old
winter blues and spruce up you home and
think about putting your property on the
market to sell.


BlueWate1r

Realty Group


Call me to

help with all your

Real Estate needs...


Buying

or

Selling.


Cheryl Swift,

Realtor,

CLG, CHP



850-766-3218l


2012

240


85o926=1 0 11
734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327


www.thewakullanews.com


2011

231








Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


The Opinion Paze


READERS WRITE:

NAMI Derby will be heldApril26


Editor, The News:

Dear Friends,

NAMI Wakulla's 4th
Annual Triple Crown
Derby is scheduled for
Saturday, April 26,
hosted by the Wakulla
County Horseman's As-
sociation at their new
facility, 1757 Lawhon
Mill Road in Medart.
Through this annual
event NAMI Wakulla
hopes to raise $15,000,
all of which will be re-
turned to the commu-
nity to improve the lives
of individuals and fami-
lies living with mental


illness.
The Derby features
an exciting horse race,
dinner, hat parade and
contest, live music pro-
vided by The Shepherd
Creek Band, our fa-
mous non-alcoholic
mint juleps and for
the first time Cowboy
Mounted Shooting.
We realize you are
asked to contribute to a
lot of community proj-
ects, and appreciate
any contribution you
can make to help with
programs, education,
advocacy and providing
hope to so many indi-
viduals and families


who struggle every day
with mental illness.
Unfortunately,
healthcare is one of
the first areas where
budget cuts take place
at both the state and
national level, please
join NAMI Wakulla and
help us bring mental
health awareness to
Wakulla County by be-
coming a proud annual
sponsor of the Triple
Crown Derby.
Sincerely,

Susan Willis
President
NAMI Wakulla Inc.


Future generations have property rights


Editor, The News:

There's been an awful lot of high-
volume squawking lately about prop-
erty rights. Fortunately, people who
like to get the facts are discovering
that the squawking is nothing more
than, well, squawking.
The main complaint seems to be
that the wetlands protection law
(signed by more than 30 percent of
Wakulla County's registered voters
to be placed on the Nov. 4 ballot) will
take away your property.
So, for you fact-lovers, here's Fact
No. 1:
The wetlands ballot proposal is
virtually the same law that has been
on the books since 2006, with an
added provision that commission-
ers can't change the law without a
unanimous vote or a vote from the
people of Wakulla County. In other
words, if no one has been able to
take away your property or prop-
erty rights since 2006, no one will
be able to take it away under the
new wetlands law. (To verify this,
check the petition at the Office of
the Supervisor of Elections, and the
current wetlands law at the Wakulla
County Administration Office).
Fact No. 2:
Wetlands laws help control floods,
and, as we know too painfully,
Wakulla County has floods. If com-
missioners keep messing with our
wetlands protection, they are mess-
ing with the county's flood control,
and, likewise, risking increases in
our flood insurance rates flood
insurance rates for every property
owner, not just people near wet-


lands.
Here's how that works. The Fed-
eral Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) has the National Flood In-
surance Program (NFIP) with mini-
mum standards to set flood insur-
ance rates. The NFIP, in turn, has
a Community Rating System (CRS),
to help communities lower their
flood insurance rates by as much
as 45 percent yes, 45 percent if
our flood management goes beyond
minimum standards.
Recently, the NFIP wrote Wakulla
County to say that we have a 15-per-
cent lowered rate for flood insur-
ance (Check FEMA's National Flood
Insurance Program Community
Rating System). Not bad, but could
be better.
So what are our commissioners
doing to help property owners get
even lower flood insurance rates? In-
explicably they're trying to scrap our
wetlands law, risking more flooding
and higher insurance rates.
Do you care? Yep, if you don't
want your neighbors flooding your
property by abusing their "property
rights"; yep, if you don't want higher
flood insurance rates; yep, if you
want to sell or buy a home with a
mortgage that will require flood in-
surance, and, yep, if you want to live
in a county that plans for the future
and the good of all its people, not
just a few people who want to use or
abuse their land without a thought
or care for our general welfare, their
neighbors, or future generations.

Dana Peck
Ochlockonee Bay


Recycling needs to be picked up regularly


Editor, The News:

Why is it the recy-
cle bins are not being
picked on a regular
basis?
At least one week
every month our con-
tainers sit on the curb
for days waiting for col-


election.
This is still occurring
after numerous phone
calls to different agen-
cies.
Our normal sched-
uled pick up is on Tues-
day. But for some rea-
son it is not happening
in a timely manner.


This discourages the
whole purpose of re-
cycling.
If they don't want
us to recycle why start
the program in the first
place?

Darryl Blackwell
Crawfordville



Most popular
stories online:

Tornado watch
extended to 11 p.m.
on Monday

Surf Road bridge
closure

Week in Wakulla
March 27-April 23

Underwater
Wakulla March 27,
2014

Underwater
Wakulla April 3,
2014

St. Marks Light-
house turned over to
refuge

Sopchoppy ap-
proves changes to
charter

thewakullanews.com


www.thewakullanews.com



readers speak out


Film screening was appreciated


Editor, The News:

Thank you Mary Cortese, Hugh
Taylor and the Wakulla County
Library for the extraordinary film
presentation and discussion with
the director held this past Sunday.
'Flash of Green' is a timeless and
quintessential Florida that everyone
who cares about Florida should see.
Following the film, director Vic-


tor Nunez talked about the cast and
the making of the film and answered
questions from the audience in the
filled-to-capacity room.
I hope we have more enriching
cultural opportunities such as this in
Wakulla County on a regular basis.

Kathryn Gibson
Crawfordville


Sportsability is coming up this weekend


Editor, The News:

If you or someone you
know has any type of
disability, they will love
SportsAbility! People of
all abilities will be expe-
riencing sit water-ski-
ing, horseback rides, ar-
chery, kayaking, sailing,
pontoon boat rides, per-
sonal watercraft rides,
swimming, music, food,
and much more all at
no cost.
SportsAbility is being
held at Ochlockonee
River State Park on Sat-
urday, April 12, from 10
a.m. to 3 p.m.
Activities that you
might not have thought
possible really are possi-
ble with the right equip-
ment. For example, a
ramp will make it pos-
sible for people who use
wheelchairs to get on
and off the horses.
SportsAbility focuses


on what people can do
in an inclusive non-
threatening environ-
ment where they can
bring their family and
friends. One of the big
benefit s of increased ac-
tive leisure is improved
health and wellness that
leads to a reduction in
secondary health is-
sues.
SportsAbility actu-
ally begins on Thurs-
day, April 10, at the
Miracle Field in Messer
Park from 6 p.m. to 8
p.m. with Miracle Sports
baseball. On Friday,
April 11, indoor activi-
ties and a Disability Re-
source Expo will be held
at Tallahassee Com-
munity College Lifetime
Sports Complex from 10
a.m. to 2 p.m. All active
leisure is free thanks to
our sponsors.
At the banquet, peo-
ple can enjoy laugh out


loud comedians/moti-
vational speakers Julie
and Derrick Tennant,
and dinner, silent and
live auction, and music.
The Active Leisure for
Life banquet will be at
the Tallahassee Com-
munity College Center
for Workforce Develop-
ment on the evening
of Friday, April 11. Ad-
vance tickets are $30
per person or $50 for
two.
Saturday has always
been my favorite day
and with it occurring
in our own backyard of
Sopchoppy there should
be no excuse why you
are not there!
For more informa-
tion, go to www.fdoa.org
or call (850) 201-2944.

Lesa Evans
Marketing Manager
Florida Disabled Outdoors
Association


Wakulla Springs shouldn't be a campground


Editor, The News:

Recent Herculean efforts were
extended by many concerned envi-
ronmentalist-citizens to stop diving
in Wakulla Springs. A group of divers
with no regard for the natural re-
sources, heritage, and archaeological
significance of Wakulla Springs were
prepared to destroy it for financial
gain. Fortunately, the rallying cry
stopped such ludicrous action!
NOW similar self serving dolts are
prepared to turn Wakulla Springs into
a campground. There are a plethora of
opportunities locally as well as region-
ally to enjoy the natural resources of


Florida in a private, state or federal
campground.
Allowing a campground at Wakulla
Springs is contrary to all environmen-
tal, and ecological concepts toward
sound stewardship. I urge all citizens
to contact the state Department of
Environmental Protection, which
manages the park, and the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service, which oversees
endangered species, to remind them
of their mission and responsibilities,
and to put a halt to these efforts!

John Hitron, Ph.D.
Carrabelle


Jerry Moore supports senior center


Editor, The News:

I would like to send
out a special thank you
to County Commission-
er Jerry Moore and his
wife Virginia Moore for
their continued support
to the Wakulla Senior
Center.
I have been with the
Senior Center for 10
years and I have expe-
rienced such loving and
caring people through-
out these years.


Jerry and Virginia are
engaged in our commu-
nity in so many ways.
Jerry usually comes to
the Senior Center every
Friday to kick up his
heels and dance to the
music of our Pickin' 'n'
Grinnin' Band. Jerry
brings in raffle prizes
to give away to our Se-
niors. Jerry will bring
in coolers full of steaks,
rotisserie chickens, etc.
The seniors love it.
The Moores partici-


pate in all of our fund-
raising events, including
fish fries, the Kayak
Fishing Tournament,
Christmas in July, the
Sweetheart Dance, Mys-
tery Theater Dinner,
etc. You guys are such
a positive influence on
our senior citizens.
Sincerely,

Shelly Homan
Crawfordville


Keep Wakulla's wetlands ordinance


Editor, The News:

This November, Wakulla citizens
will have the opportunity to decide
whether we keep our wetland's pro-
tections or allow four of our county
commissioners to remove them.
I strongly urge my neighbors to
take the time to vote on this important
issue. This is about local control: Our
county has a right to protect its own
resources.


But it's also about the will of the
people: What right do commissioners
have to remove our wetlands protec-
tions?
We need our wetlands to protect
our fishing, tourism and drinking
water and to protect us from floods.
Unfortunately, we now need this vote
to protect us from our commissioners.

Paul Fortier
Crawfordville


Family expresses thanks for support
Editor, The News: felt thanks to Christie passing of Mrs. Taylor.
Mathison and Lewis and
The family of Nancy Bonnie McElwain for all The Family of
Lee Taylor would like of the help and support Nancy Lee Taylor
to give a special heart- during the illness and



Letters to the Editor
The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. It's preferred that you email it to edi-
tor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville
FL 32326 or drop it off at The News office, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway.
Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the author's
first and last name, mailing address and telephone number for verification pur-
poses. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length
and clarity.


jc ~afonIla A1t)'(
The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at
3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327.
Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL
32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News,
P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.
.ii ii 111.. 1'.i William Snowden............................. editor@thewakullanews.net

Reporter: Nicole Zema ...............................................nzema@thewakullanews.net

Advertising: Lynda Kinsey....................................... lkinsey@thewakullanews.net

Advertising/reception: Denise Folh........................... denise@thewakullanews.net

Production Coordinator/IT: Eric i, ...1 i ,. h i.,, ,i ii ,,,. .....
Publisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)
All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one
year from the time the subscription is purchased.
In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo.
Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 5A


< STREET BEAT >
Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question:
^ -^ -^ '.^- -' N, Ik;,"i . 1 *,* -% Is * _,^. *, '. P& %i. 1. -V~ 1s % T -^ '" X-1* *.-*" %; Y % It,;'. ",* 1 - -,. *, .,-*, .^ r "" ^ "".
Asked at the Chamber's Low Country Boil:

Seen people you haven't seen in a while?


CALVIN GRAVES
3Y EQUIPMENT
- "I have seen
people here to-
. night that I have
. not seen in 20
/ years!"

- ,.


- f h -r
TIM PEARCE
CITY OF TALLAHASSEE


"I saw a guy by the
name of Robert
Cochran, aka-Pete.
He was the first guy
I met when I moved
to Wakulla County in
1974."


MARIANNE DAZAVEDO
COLDWELL BANKER


"Betty Green is
definitely someone
I haven'tseen in
"a while. Also Gabe
Hanway and Jason
Boone. What a great
party!"


MARY KATHERINE WESTMARK JAN PEARCE
BAYLEAF MARKET TEACHER


"I have not seen Jo
Ann Strickland for a
while. She was the
first person I saw when
I walked in tonight. It
was good to see her."


J%, % 1 *^'


Grand opening

of community

center is set
By NICOLE ZEMA
nzema@(thewakullanews.net
Last week's meeting of the Wakulla County Co-
alition for Youth highlighted the upcoming grand
opening of the Wakulla One-Stop Community Cen-
ter.
The youth coalition met on Wednesday, April 2,
at the community center.
Sara Daw, community specialist with the center,
said the ribbon cutting is scheduled for 4 p.m. on
Friday, April 11. The main activity room will be lined
with tables and booths with representatives from
local organizations and nonprofits. Kids activities,
including a mini bike race, arts and crafts and more
will be available. Finger foods will be served.
Sharon Gaskin, CEO of North Florida Child De-
velopment, was welcomed to the meeting as a new
member. Gaskin described NFCD's mission as a
comprehensive service provider to children and fam-
ilies within a five-country region in North Florida.
"We serve pregnant mothers to school age chil-
dren," Gaskin said. "It's critical that children are
ready for school, but the family has to be healthy
too."
Gaskin said the organization links children and
families with resources including county health de-
partments, social services, mental health services,
dental care and more.
"We have children that have gone on to be very
successful," Gaskin said. "But it's all about that
window the early intervention of the mother and
child. We also focus on teaching parents responsibil-
ity and how to be a parent. Some of them have not
had role models. "
Gaskin said she was impressed with the atten-
dance of the coalition meeting, and the new com-
munity center as a whole.
"This is a true one-stop place," she said. "You're
not giving hand-outs, you're giving a hand-up."
In other matters:
Empty Bowls leaders asked for help firing 100
clay bowls for the annual hunger project. The Empty
Bowls event will be Nov. 15. E-mail Taylor Biro at
taylor@ccys.org to offer assistance with bowl firing.
Derrek Sims, with Capital Area Community
Action Agency, said applications for home weather-
ization are currently being accepted. Weatherization
makes homes and trailers more energy efficient,
lowering electricity and gas costs. For an application,
visit the Barry Building at 3296 Crawfordville High-
way, Suite 4. Utility assistance signups also begin
this month. Call 926-3122 for more information.
Check the Week in Wakulla calendar for new
announcement listings from local agencies and
organizations.
The next meeting of the Wakulla County Coalition
for Youth will be May 7 at 12:30 p.m. Representa-
tives from local agencies, and individuals who would
like to volunteer, are welcome to join. Meetings are
always the first Wednesday of the month.


Surf Road bridge

is closed for repair

Staff Report
The bridge at Surf Road will be closed beginning
Monday, April 7, for repairs and will be closed all
week, according to the road contractor.
The Surf Road Bridge is located 1.8 miles south
of Sopchoppy at U.S. Highway 319, and 7.2 miles
north of Highway 98 in Ochlockonee Bay.
The contractor expects intermittent closures over
the next eight weeks.
The county road project is being done to shore
up the bridge.


/ M/W&


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from Each Listed

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www.thewakullanews.com


<^2Z?(^23<2)224







Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


Church


Church Briefs


* First United Pentecostal
accepting donations

First United Pentecostal
Church of Crawfordville is accept-
ing donations of non-perishable
food, clothing, and toys to give
back for community outreach.
Items can be dropped off Sat-
urday, April 12, from 9 a.m. until
1 p.m. at the church. Distribution
day will be May 3.
The church is located across
from the courthouse in Crawford-
ville.
Please contact Ramona Bar-
wick at (850) 528-5953 regarding
donations or if you have a family
need.

- Generation Now to hold
'Open Mic' at Hudson Park

Generation NOW Ministries Inc.
is hosting its first and hopefully
annual "Open Mic in the Park" at
Hudson Park on Saturday, April
12, starting at 6 p.m.
There will be free admission
and free appetizers as well as a
silent auction.
If you're interested in perform-
ing or have questions, contact
Jocelyn Hayes atjocelynlhayes@
gmail.com or call (850) 980-2021.

* Zion Hill P.B. to hold its
Family and Friends Day

Zion Hill Primitive Baptist Church
will be celebrating its annual Fam-
ily and Friends Day on Sunday,
April 13, at 3 p.m.
Pastor Derrick Nelson and
Rocky Mount Church of Christ will
be in charge of the service.
Zion Hill is located at 942 Sop-
choppy Highway in Sopchoppy.
Church pastor is Elder Ervin Don-
aldson Jr.


You are cordially invited to come
lift up the name of Jesus with us.

* Medart Assembly hosts
Trading Closet ministry

The last Saturday of every
month at noon, Emily Sellmer of
the Medart Assembly of God hosts
a Trading Closet ministry where
families can trade clothes children
have outgrown for other families'
clothes that fit.
The ministry is free.

* Volunteers needed for
prison ministry

Caring, Christian volunteers are
needed to go to prison on Satur-
day, May 31.
The Bill Glass Prison Ministry's
"A Day of Champions" will team
athletes, entertainers, musicians
and volunteers to share their sto-
ries and their faith with inmates at
seven area correctional facilities.
If you are willing to step behind
the prison walls to share the gos-
pel with men and women eager to
turn their lives toward God, con-
tact the Bill Glass Prison Ministry
in Dallas at (972) 298-1101 or visit
the website at BillGlass.org/tal-
lahassee.
Volunteers will receive practical
information and simple evange-
listic tools to guide them on their
mission.
Over a million inmates have
been brought to Christ by every-
day, good people stepping out of
their comfort zones and reaching
out to men and women behind
bars.
Volunteer for A Day of Champi-
ons Prison Ministry on Saturday,
May 31.

Staff reports


National Volunteer Week begins April 6


From Covenant Hospice

April 6-12 is Nation-
al Volunteer Week and
during this important
time of recognition it's
fitting that we honor
our nation's 400,000
hospice volunteers for
the heroic work they
do to ensure people


with serious illnesses
find comfort, love and
respect.
At Covenant Hos-
pice more than 2,000
trained volunteers give
of themselves to sup-
port patients and fami-
lies during one of life's
most challenging expe-
riences.


Our next volunteer
training will be held
next week. Learn more
about Covenant Hos-
pice and volunteer your
time, make a dona-
tion, or help someone
who needs our care to
contact us. Please visit
www.covenanthospice.
org or call 575-4998.


religious views and events


OUT TO PASTOR

Why I am happy to pay my

taxes and other mendacities


By JAMES L. SNYDER

Last week I was get-
ting along just fine.
Things were being ac-
complished and I was
rather enjoying myself.
Dutifully, I was
checking off item after
item on my "to-do" list.
However, at the peak
of my exuberance, the
Gracious Mistress of the
Parsonage stopped me
dead in my tracks with
a query.
She is quite famous,
or is it infamous, for
pulling these kinds of
things on Yours Truly.
She has a question for
just about every event.
Most of her questions
are beyond answering,
at least for me.
For instance, when
we are traveling, she
will wait for the right
moment and then put
to me this query. "Do
you know where you're
going?"
A variety of ways to
answer that question
immediately suggests
itself, not all of which
would endear me to her.
However, to be hon-
est, the answer to that
question is usually a
mumbled "No."
Then there is the all
time favorite question.
"Does this dress make
me look fat?"
Just between you and
me, one of these times, I
am going to answer, "No,
honey, it's not the dress
making you look fat." I
am saving that one for
a deathbed confession.
However, this past
week when I was flying
high, she dropped me
dead in my tracks with
another question. "Have
you filed our income tax
yet?"
It was at that mo-
ment my whole world
came crashing down. I
had not even given it a
first thought, let alone a
second thought.
Why is it, although
income tax filing day
comes every year on


the same day I always
forget?
Of all the things I love
doing in this world, and
there are plenty, paying
my income tax each year
does not rate number
one.
Every time I have a
little extra cash in my
pocket, I always wonder
what that happy crowd
in Washington, D.C.
could do with it.
To be quite honest,
there are few things I en-
joy more than filing my
income tax each year.
One would be calling
the telephone company
to straighten out my
telephone bill. This is
good for an entire day of
delightful conversation
with idiots. Every time I
think my life cannot get
any lower and drabber
than it is, I simply pick
up the telephone and
call customer service at
my friendly telephone
company. Within three
minutes after I had
been put on hold for 27
minutes I recognize
exactly how wonderful
my life truly is.
Probably the most
magnificent thing about
calling customer service
is that you know some-
body's going to get it all
screwed up and you will
have the pleasure of do-
ing it all over again next
week.
Another activity I en-
joyed doing more than
filing my income tax is
spending five whole days
in bed with the flu.
Just think of it, five
whole days to luxuriate
in your bed and not have
to get up and do a thing.
Talk about a vacation!
What with the sneezing
and coughing, and your
nose running like the
mighty Mississippi, and
your head thumping like
an African bongo drum,
what more could a per-
son ask for?
If somebody calls for
you during that time all
your wife has to say is,
"He's in bed with the


flu." Everybody under-
stands that. Of course,
if she said you are just
in bed, people would not
accept that and think a
little poorly of you.
But if you have diar-
rhea along with the flu,
that is spectacular. Not
only do you get to lie in
bed, but also you get a
little exercise, jumping
up and running to the
bathroom every three
seconds. The side ben-
efit of this is you lose
some weight during that
week.
One more thing
slightly more exciting
than filing your income
taxes, is poking your-
self in the eye. I must
confess this a favorite
of mine because every
time I do it, I learn new
dance steps. Alas, when
the swelling dies down I
cannot remember those
dance steps.
Therefore, paying my
income tax each year is
included in some of my
favorite activities.
Even Jesus got into
the discussion of paying
taxes. When queried on
this subject he replied,
"Render to Caesar the
things that are Caesar's,
and to God the things
that are God's" (Mark
12:17).
When I think of all
the money wasted in
our country, especially
by our government, I
grieve. Someone once
said, "Money in the
hands of a fool always
goes for foolish things."
How a person spends
his or her money reveals
a lot about that person.

The Rev. James L.
Snyder is pastor of the
Family of God Fellow-
ship in Ocala. Call him
at (866) 552-2543 or e-
mail jamessnyder2@a tt.
net.


Crawfordville United
Methodist Church
Sunday School 10:00 a.m.
Worship 11:00 a.m.
Pastor Mike Shockley 926-7209
Ochlockonee & Arran Road "Come Grow With Us"www.crawfordville-umc.org

96i/1071nzq 9, 1(u14 D9attedj neW 9t v int/
FRE E S uIiidniid |itiuiL ., ii The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102


Sopchoppy


l Sopchoppy
--United
SMethodist

Church
Sunday School 9:45 a.m.

Pastor Kevin Hall
850-962-2511


Sopchoppy
Church Of Christ
Corner of Winthrop & Byrd St.
Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m.
Worship ................... 10:30 a.m.
Evening Worship ............. 5 p.m.
Wednesday: Bible Study...? p.m.
Visitors are welcome!
Home Bible Courses available...
please call for details,
962-2213


Spirit Life Church
Pentecostal
131 Rose Street Sopchoppy FL
962-9000
Schedule of Services
SUNDAY
Refreshments 930am
Sunday School 10:00am
Worship ll:00am
Prayer 6:00pm
WEDNESDAY
Supper 6:00pm
Pioneer Club:
Youth and Adult Classes 630pm
Blood Bou ,
Word Taugli 1
Spirit Wrou. I,



(From Rhema Bible Training Center)
www.ochcc.org

Your church ad here!




(950) 926-7102


El


[I Promise Land

THRIFT STORE
Open 9-5
Closed Sun. & Wed.
Mon.---- Furniture 25%
Tues.----- Seniors 25%
Fri. & Sat.- Select Items 50%

926-3281
3299 Crawfordville Hwy. -
Approx. I mile S. of County Courthouse
www.promiselandministries.org

Wakulla
Station \

Wakulla United
Methodist Church
Sunday Contemporary Servcm 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School for all ages -10 a.m.
Sunday Worship-11 a.m.
C

1584 Old Woodville Rd.
Wakulla Station
421-5741
Pator Ssie Hoaer

"I'm not afraid to be the pale girl in the bathinc
It doesn't bother me anymore."
"I hael tn h ue -o tnnng be. dsrhe utnthe
It~ff themabout J.,-e
J.-e w-- nh- -erly20, when she w-s dgnosd wth


MedartArea

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton
Catholic Church
Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor
3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797









^^"' y,,'-^ wy319Medart,

V {L! iN Early Worship 8:30 a.m.
Sunday School 9:45 a .m.






^'-"L ^ 1"- -' SMorning Worship 11:00 a.m.
pt L ^ AWANA 5:00 p.m.
*s^Vjnir~^^^ Youth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.
Evening Worship 6:00 p.m.
Wednesday &Thuednesday Services 7:00 p.m.
Our MissiMon is: Loving God and LovSping Others
1' Saturday of ever month:
q .hru;.hIn-e11 rn al in space
avial.I h, 1150509-763


~Hwy 319 Medart,

etak~~ft Office 926-5265




through Worship, Ministry and Service.m.




Iperating like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Scniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to steering you trshis Lord's Day.m.
,AWANA 5:00 P.M.





www.akeeYouth Zone Time 4:30 p.m.curch.org
Evening Wori ship 6:00 p.m
Wednesday Services 7:00 p.m.

Our Mission is: Loving God and Loving Others
through Worship, Ministry and Service.
operatingg like a family; strong in the Word of God, warm and
inviting. Powerful ministries for strengthening our families.
Reaching Children, Youth, Adults and Seniors for Jesus.
We will look forward to seeing you this Lord's Day.
www.raked-enbaptistchurch.org
~Trinity

Lutheran
Church of Wakulla County
Hwy. 98, Across from WHS
Web site:
Lutheransonl ine. com/tri nityofwakulIla
Bible Class 9:00 a.m.
Worship 10:00 a.m.
SPre-School M-F (3-5 Years)
I Pastor Vicar Bert Matlock
Chrh 926-7808 Pre-School1926-5557


I Crawfordville Area I


Ivan Assembly of God
202 Ivan Church Road
|Pastor,
Daniel Cooksey
t fl C- & Wolskl Wfik Ws"
926-IVAN(4826)
Sunday School ........................ 10 a.m .
Sunday W orship ...................... 11 a.m .
Evening W orship ....................... 6 p.m .
W wednesday Service .................. 7 p.m.
& Youth Serv ice ........................ 7 p.m .
R oyal Rangers ........................... 7 p.m .
M issionettes .............................. 7 p.m .



Coastal


rBig Bend
i6Hospice
yor hometown hospice, licensed since 1983
2889C Crawfordville Hwy
850.926.9308
bigbendhospice.org


V akull Worsrhl'* p Cen^ters ;i


www.thewakullanews.com







www.thewakullanews.com


Obituaries


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 7A


By TRACY RENEE LEE

When my daughter
was a toddler, my hus-
band served in the U.S.
Navy and we lived in a
very large coastal Cali-
fornia city.
One day my husband
and I decided to go to
a large swap meet. We
loaded up our toddler,
invited my mother and
away we went. It was a
wonderful activity, filled
with exciting things to
see and purchase. We
were having a fabulous
time.
About two hours into
our activity, I walked
over to my husband,
who was shopping a
different booth, and no-
ticed that our toddler
was not in her stroller.
I asked my husband
where she was, thinking
that my mother must
have her, and my hus-
band said, "She's in her
stroller."
Suddenly, my whole
life changed. My won-
derful day abruptly
changed into a horrid
emergency situation. I
felt as though I could
not breathe, it seemed
as if the world began to
spin a million miles per
minute.
My toddler was miss-
ing and I had no idea
where she was or what
might be happening to
her.
My husband, being
the organizer that he
is, immediately sprang
into action. He instantly
located my mother and
sent her to the business
office to alert security.
Her next task was to go
to the entry gate and
detain anyone trying to
exit with a child near the
age of our daughter.
My husband headed
toward the restrooms
to inspect them for our
daughter or signs of
foul play, and I was to
comb through the rows
and rows of shopping
booths, calling out my
daughter's name and
scanning for anyone
who might be trying to
escape with her.
I ran as fast as a
cheetah. As I rounded a
corner, I saw a woman,
tugging my daughter by
the hand. My child was
hysterical and I am sure
I looked a fright, be-
cause the woman quick-
ly threw her hands up in
the air and started yell-
ing that she had found
my daughter and was
taking her to security.
Sobbing, I fell to my
knees and held my child
tightly to my chest. My
daughter was equally
distraught she was
crying and holding onto
me just as tightly.
We left the swap meet
and went directly to a
large warehouse, where
we purchased a person-
al alarm for my daugh-
ter. She has never been
lost again.
Many times over the
years, as I have watched


Nancy Annette Barwick
Robert Earl 'Bobby' Cameron
John 'Hondo' Hearon
Nancy Lee Taylor


Nancy Annette
Barwick
Nancy Annette Bar-
wick, 72, of Panacea
passed away Satur-
day, April, 6, 2014 in
Crawfordville.
She was a lifelong
resident of Panacea,
and was a member of
First Baptist Church
of Panacea.
In lieu of flowers do-
nations may be made
to Big Bend Hospice,
1723 Mahan Center
Blvd, Tallahassee, FL
32308 or First Baptist


Church of Panacea.
The family received
friends from 10 a.m.
to 11 a.m. on Tues-
day, April 8, 2014 at
First Baptist Church
of Panacea in Panacea.
Services were held at
11 a.m. at the church.
Burial followed at Pan-
acea Cemetery.
Survivors include
her daughter, Crys-
tal Parsons (Kevin);
sisters, Dorothy Ste-
phens and Sheryl
Brown; one grandson,
Easton Dugger; two
great-grandchildren,


Corbin Dugger and
Olivia Dugger; and her
loving niece, Stepha-
nie Barwick.
She was prede-
ceased by her hus-
band, Charles Barwick
Sr.; two sons, Charles
Derrick Barwick and
Roy Lee Crum; two
sisters, Joy Carraway
and Katie Wheston.
Bevis Funeral
Home, Harvey-Young
Chapel in Crawford-
ville is assisting the
family with arrange-
ments (850-926-3333
or bevisfh.com).


her grow into a wonder-
ful woman currently ex-
pecting her own child, I
have reflected back and
thought of what could
have happened to her
that day. If my daughter
had been kidnapped
that day or killed, I do
not know that I could
have lived on without
her. The pain, anguish
and self-blame would
have been too much to
bear.
The feelings and pan-
ic I experienced that
dreadful day were real
and powerful. They pale,
however, in comparison
to those a family feels
when they have unex-
pectedly lost a loved
one. Unexpected loss
brings a multitude of
issues beyond those of
an anticipated loss.
When a loved one has
been ill, or has been
suffering severe pain
for an extended time,
although we mourn the
loss, death is some-
times a relief for those
witnessing, day in and
day out, the unrelent-
ing pain and suffering
of their family member
or close friend.
When death is un-
expected or sudden,
family and close friends
develop regrets, they are
robbed of the time they
need to prepare them-
selves psychologically,
as well as time for re-
solving any unfinished
business or issues exist-
ing between themselves
and the deceased.
Equally robbed is
their opportunity to
simply say goodbye.
This simple moment,
shared between those
we love, is immensely
important. Mourners
may carry this pain with
them for a very long
time, and some are un-
able to overcome it.
Pair with this the re-
gret of unfinished busi-
ness, the anguish of
a brutal death, or the
eternal yearning for an


unfound loved one, and
a recipe for extreme
extension with myriad
additional complica-
tions to overcome, for
the accomplishment of
grief recovery develops.
Currently in the
news, one intently fol-
lows the disappearance
of the commercial 777
jetliner. The sorrow on
the faces, and behavior
of the families suffer-
ing through this crisis,
reveal these complica-
tions. These families
need extreme support
and aggressive counsel-
ing, rather than being
abruptly escorted away
from those who should
be offering insights and
answers.
Although unlikely,
my fervent prayer is
that these unfortunate
families with loved
ones aboard the 777
jetliner would have the
same resolution of hav-
ing their loved ones re-
turned to them whole
and unharmed, as I did
with my toddler.
In that this scenario
is less and less probable
as the days painfully
pass, I pray that the
world and especially
those in authoritative
roles, will render them
the tender consideration
and extended grief care
resources, of which they
so desperately stand in
need.

Tracy Renee Lee is a
funeral director, author,
and freelance writer. It
is my life's work to com-
fort the bereaved and
help them live on.

Please follow my
blog at http://pushin-
up-daisies.blogspot.
com/ and Twitter ac-
count @PushnUpDai-
sies, visit my website
www.QueenCityFuner-
alHome.com or read
my book "Pushin' Up
Daisies" for additional
encouragement and
information.


Robert Earl Cameron
Robert Earl "Bobby" Cam-
eron, a retired diesel mechanic
from Oneco, Florida went to be
with the Lord on April 7, 2014.
He was a long time resident of
Wakulla County since 1959.
He was a veteran of the Ko-
rean War and a member of the
Florida National Guard and for
fun he loved to bass fish with
his brother Rod and his family.
Survivors include his wife
of 38 years, Catherine "Cathy"
Cameron; his daughters, Becky
Cameron Kent (Nolan), Aletha
Cameron Rowan (Ricky), and
Lisa Velez Davis (Joe); sons,
Kenneth Velez (Terri), Robert
Velez (Pam); 16 grandchildren
and 26 great-grandchildren.
The family will receive visitors


John "Hondo" Hearon
John "Hondo"
Hearon, 70 of Craw-
fordville died on Fri-
day, March 28, 2014
at Eden Springs. He
was originally from
Ironton, Ohio.
Survivors include
his wife, Peggy Hearon;
his sister Dana Mora-
go of Crawfordville;


at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel in Crawfordville
on Thursday, April 10, 2014,
from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and there
will be a graveside service at
Arran Cemetery on Arran Road
in Crawfordville on Friday, April
11, 2014, at 1 p.m. In lieu of
flowers donations may be made
to the Friends of the Wakulla
Library, 4330 Crawfordville
Highway, Crawfordville, FL
32327; Big Bend Hospice, 1723
Mahan Circle Blvd, Tallahassee,
FL 32308 or donations may be
made to the family to cover ad-
ditional expenses.
Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-
Young Chapel in Crawfordville
is assisting the family with ar-
rangements (850-926-3333 or
bevisfh.com).


two daughters, Tina
Cook of West Covi-
na, Calif., and Vickie
Goodwin of Pell City,
Ala.; one son, Travis
Labrador of Phoenix,
Ariz.; seven grandchil-
dren and one niece.
A memorial service
will be held on Sat-
urday, April 12, from
4 p.m. to 5 p.m. at
Promise Land Minis-


Nancy Lee Taylor
Nancy Lee Taylor, 69, a caregiver
for both the young and the elderly
for over 30 years, died on Monday,
April, 7, 2014 in Tallahassee, with
her family by her side.
A daughter of the late James
Paul Runion, Sr. and the late Doro-
thy Jones Runion, she was born
August 15, 1944 in Manassas, Va.
Survivors include her children,
Sandra and Dan Galamba, and
Alvin L. Taylor Jr.; eight grand-
children; two great-grandchildren;
and her siblings, Johnny Runion,
Ronnie Runion, Dena Brown,
Norma Street, Brenda Miller, Senie
Rasnick and Debbie McElwain.


tries Church at U.S.
Highways 98 and 319
with Pastor Glenn
Hamel.
He was predeceased
by his parents Harriet
Louella and Orville
Dain Hearon; broth-
er, Jim Hearon; sis-
ters, Flo Hearon, Bea
Marks, Ruth Hearon
and Juanita Hearon.


Many other children who called her
Granny also survive her.
She was predeceased by her
parents; her husband, Alvin L.
Taylor Sr.; and her brothers, Paul
Runion, Lester Runion and Ru-
dolph Runion.
The funeral will be held at 11
a.m. on Thursday, April 10, 2014
at Abbey Funeral Home, with in-
terment following at Tallahassee
Memory Gardens. The family will
receive friends from 6 p.m. until
7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 9,
2014 at Abbey Funeral Home. In
lieu of flowers, donations may be
made to Big Bend Hospice.
The online guestbook is at www.
abbeyfh.com.


v' ~' Eli
\~1I
.J.-~.- ,~


BEREAVEMENT COLUMN

The shock of unexpected loss


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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014



Community


www.thewakullanews.com


happenings in our community


Sexual abuse seminar is April 23 Library News...


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzem a@thewakullanews.net

Some stories must be told,
even if they are difficult to hear.
April is Sexual Violence Aware-
ness Month. To bring awareness
to sexual violence, Refuge House
Inc. and the Wakulla County
Domestic and Sexual Violence
Taskforce will host a seminar
on Wednesday, April 23 at noon
at First Baptist Church of Craw-
fordville. Tremayne Moore, an
author and incest survivor, will
speak on how writing saved his
life. He will also discuss his ef-
forts to educate the public about
incest and teenage suicide.
"My desire is to alarm people,
especially if one lives in a rural
area, of some of the signs to look
for when something may not
look right where you live," Moore
said. "My desire is that those
who attend will be proactive with
helping someone to heal from
abuse, and if someone there has
been abused, they can overcome
the past and create a beautiful
future."
Kathy Asbell, an advocate
at Refuge House Inc., said she


hopes at-
tendees will
leave the
s e m i n a r
knowing
how to as-
sist sexual
assault vic-
tims, and
pttget them in
Tremayne touch with
Moore helpful local
resources.
"It is difficult to understand
the pain, shame, fear and hope-
lessness that a sexual assault
victim experiences," Asbell said.
"Especially if that assault is per-
petrated by a family member."
Moore, who authored the nov-
el "Deaf, Dumb, Blind & Stupid,"
said he wants people to not only
be aware of sexual violence, but
know how to help victims too.
Moore said he wrote the book
to educate the faith community
how to be effective when relating
to people who have been wound-
ed through abuse; to make
parents and educators aware
of what signs to look for when a
child may have been abused; and
to let children know that they are


not alone.
"They have something to live
for, and they are truly loved,"
Moore said.
Readers have expressed grati-
tude for Moore's bravery in shar-
ing a story that reflects aspects
of his childhood.
"One woman (wrote) me stat-
ing that she had a suicide note
written before she read the
book," Moore said. "And after
reading it, she decided not to go
through with ending her life."
Asbell said sexual assault is
the most under-reported crime.
According to the Rape, Abuse
and Incest National Network, 60
percent of sexual assaults are
never reported to police, and 97
percent of rapists never spend a
day in jail. Approximately two-
thirds of assaults are perpetrated
by someone known to the victim.
"Victims need to know that
they will not be judged and will
be believed," Asbell said.
Lunch will be provided at
the seminar, and everyone is
welcome. The church is located
at 3086 Crawfordville Highway.
Call 926-9005 for more informa-
tion.


Peter Gonzalez



graduates



..basic training

Special to The News

Air Force Airman 1st Class Peter A. Gon-
zalez graduated from basic military training
at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, San
Antonio.
The airman completed an intensive,
eight-week program that included training in
military discipline and studies, Air Force core
values, physical fitness, and basic warfare
principles and skills. Airmen who complete
basic training earn four credits toward an
associate in applied science degree through
the Community College of the Air Force.
Gonzalez is the son of Donna and Peter
Gonzalez of Crawfordville. He is a 2013
graduate of Wakulla High School.



Harper-Seals engagement announced

Special to The News

Diane Aleah Harper and
Logan Charles Seals have an-
nounced plans to marry May
3 at Wildwood Inn.
Harper graduated from
Wakulla High School, and
Seals from Laurel Hill. Harper
earned her AA from Tallahas-
see Community College.
McKenna Seals is the
daughter of the couple.
Harper's parents are Rob-
ert Harper and Diane Harper.
Grandparents are Dolores
Nichols and Sue Anchors.
Seal's parents and step par-
ents are Linda and Chauncey ,"
King, and Larry and Debi ... -.
Seals.


By SCOTT JOYNER
Library Director

Thank you for all
who came out to our
April Book Extrava-
ganza Saturday. Your
always-generous dona-
tions raised over $500
for the Friends of the
Library. And special
thanks go out to the
Friends of the Library
volunteer's who I'm told
ran a top notch fund-
raiser while I was out of
town. Thank you every-
one for your continued
support of WCPL and
keep an eye out soon
for information on the
Friends' Celebration on
Saturday, April 26.

Friday Night Movie
Our Friday Night
Movie is a star studded
Academy Award nom-
inated drama based
upon the 2008 Pulitzer
Prize winning play "Au-
gust: Osage County."
Doors open at 6:45 p.m.
for the 7 p.m. show.
Starring Meryl Streep,
Julia Roberts, Ewan
McGregor, Sam Shepa-
rd, and many more rec-
ognizable faces, this R-
rated (language, sexual
references, and drug
material) tells the story
of Violet Weston (Meryl
Streep) who has cancer
and a propensity for
pills and alcohol. She's
a difficult woman to
deal with and her hus-
band has finally had
enough. Violet's fam-
ily gathers including
youngest daughter Ivy,
middle daughter Karen
(with her new fiancee),
eldest daughter Barba-
ra (with her separated
husband and teenage
daughter), and her sis-
ter Mattie Fae (with
her husband and son
in tow). A family trag-
edy causes tensions to
run high and secrets to
come out. The Weston
women will be forced
to examine themselves
and their lives whether
they want to or not.
Because of the rating,
no minor can attend
without a supervising
adult.

Come find us at
Worm Gruntin'
The Friends of the
Library will have a tent
at the annual Worm
Gruntin' Festival this


Saturday and also will
be selling tickets for the
upcoming drawing at
the Friends' Celebra-
tion on April 26 for a
Samsung Galaxy Tab
3 tablet. Come by to
get information on all
the great programs at
WCPL, and enter to win
a great tablet while sup-
porting your library.

AARP Tax Prep
at WCPL
As we head into the
last week of tax season,
we'd like to remind you
that the AARP is offer-
ing free tax preparation
every Thursday and
Saturday from 9-12:30
in our computer lab.
This first come first
served service is intend-
ed for low to middle in-
come filers with special
attention paid toward
senior citizens. They
will also be here all
day on April 15. If you
haven't filed already
please take advantage
of this free service.

Library Programs at
Community Center
Remember to check
out our programs at
the Community Center
3 Thursday afternoons
out of the month. The
first Thursday of the
month is for K-2nd
graders, the second
Thursday of the month
is for 3-5th grades,
and the third Thurs-
day of the month is for
middleschoolers. All
programs begin at 4
p.m. We're hoping that
demand warrants ad-
ditional programs so
please come out and
help make the Commu-
nity Center a success.
Additional programs
are planned as part
of our usual Summer
Programs. If you have
any questions about
what the Community
Center is currently of-
fering please swing by
the Center at the corner
of Shadeville and Trice
Lane or call the center
at 745-6042.

Personal papers in
donated books
Recently books were
donated to the library
from the collection of
Juanita Gibson. There
were some personal
items inside one of the
books that may want to
be saved by the family.
Ms. Gibson is not in our
system and we have no
way of knowing who do-
nated these materials.
If you know Ms. Gibson
or her family, and they
would like these items
returned, please con-
tact the library.


St. George lighthouse welcomes climbers


Special to The News

Florida Lighthouse Day will be cel-
ebrated on Saturday, April 12, with
free climbing at the Cape St. George
Lighthouse on St. George Island.
The Lighthouse, Museum, and Gift
Shop will be open from 10 a.m. to 5
p.m., and there will be no charge for
climbing to the top of the Lighthouse
on Florida Lighthouse Day.
Climbers still need to get a free
ticket at the Lighthouse Gift Shop
to present to the Lighthouse Keeper
before they climb.
All climbers must be at least 40
inches tall.
Florida Lighthouse Day is celebrat-
ed annually in April to commemorate
the State's remaining lighthouses.
While there were at one time 59 light-
houses to guide mariners into the
state's ports and rivers, the Cape St.
George Light is one of only 30 cur-
rently standing in Florida.
The glass in the lantern room of
the Lighthouse has been recently
replaced, enhancing the spectacu-
lar views of the Gulf of Mexico and
Apalachicola Bay from the top of the
Lighthouse.


Visitors climb 92 wooden stairs and
an eight-rung ladder to access the
lantern room.
The Cape St. George Light is located
in St. George Lighthouse Park at the
intersection of Franklin Boulevard and
Gulf Beach Drive on St. George Island.


Parking is available in the lots on
the west and east sides of the park.
For more information, please con-
tact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at
850-927-7745 or Terry Kemp at 850-
927-2000.


Full moon climb at
Cape St. George Lighthouse

The April Full Moon Climb at the
Cape St. George Lighthouse on St.
George Island will be Monday, April
14. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will
take place from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m.
and will include light hors d'oeuvres
and a sparkling cider toast to the full
moon. Cost is $15 for the general
public and $10 for members of the St.
George Lighthouse Association.
The sun will set at 8:06 p.m. and
the moon will rise at 7:44 p.m. on April
14. After sunset, people are invited to
climb to the top of the lighthouse for
a breathtaking view of the full moon,
as space and time permit. Cost is $10
for the general public and $5 for SGLA
members.
The Cape St. George Light is located
in St. George Lighthouse Park at the
center of St. George Island, where
Island Drive (the road off the bridge)
ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is
available in lots at either side of the
park.
For reservations or more informa-
tion, please contact the Lighthouse
Gift Shop at 850-927-7745.







www.thewakullanews.com


Community


W~E~i---Now


III,;l,
FILE PHOTO
The annual Worm Gruntin' Festival in downtown Sopchoppy will
be all day Satuday, and is free and open to the public.


Worm Gruntin' Fest


set for
Special to The News

The 14th annual Worm Guntin'
Festival in downtown Sopchoppy
Saturday is free and open to the
public. The day begins with a 5K
race and doesn't stop until the Worm
Grunter's Ball, featuring live music.
The festival, within in the lovely
downtown streets of historic Sop-
choppy, promises to be the best ever.
Take a look at the program and you
will find lots of games and contests
for children and adults plus live
music by popular local bands cul-
minating with the Worm Grunters'
Ball in the evening.
The day begins at 7 a.m. with
registration for the 5K race. The race
begins at 8 a.m. and more runners
than last year are expected as this
race becomes a regular event and
has a course through scenic city
and country.
At 9 a.m. over 90 vendors of
arts, crafts, and food will open for
business with our first live music
performance of the day. Opening
ceremonies and race results are
presented at 9:30 a.m. and at 10:30
a.m. the colourful worm grunting


Saturday
demonstration by a professional bait
harvester, our own Gary Revell, and
past festival King.
The program continues with
the crowning of our King and/or
Queen, folks singled out because of
the respect they have earned in the
community. There will be a lot of live
music and a number of colourful
contests throughout the afternoon
and into the evening. The Wakulla
County Horseshoe Championship
offers a cash prize and there are tro-
phies for the bait casting and always
entertaining hula hoop contests. You
will be amazed at how much fun it is
to watch children and adults com-
peting with great concentration and
determination to keep those hoops
going around and around.
The Worm Grunters' Ball is the
culmination of a wonderful day.
This year will include over 15 musi-
cians. It attracts families with lots
of children and a few pets. We will
provide some chairs, but if you've got
a favourite bring it or your favorite
blanket along. The dancing and
music continue until 10 P.M.
A complete schedule can be seen
at www.wormgruntinfestival.com.


Special to The News

Liam Francesco Da-
vis was born March 22,
2014 at 1541 hrs at
IASO Maternity Hospi-
tal in Kifissia, Greece.


He was 8.09 pounds
and 20.5 inches long.
Father: Cameron
J. Davis son of Doug-
las (Papoose) Dixon
of Crawfordville, and
Cheryl "Davis" Dixon


of Norfolk, VA.
Mother: Gina Di
Napoli-Davis daughter
of Aldo Francesco Di
Napoli and Gudrun
Iris Schmitt of Vicenza,
Italy.


NAMI offers new program


Special to The News


A new six-week program offered
by the National Alliance of Mental
Illness, Wakulla (NAMI), is free to
parents and caregivers.
Parents and caregivers who have
struggled with raising a child who
has shown signs or symptoms of


behavioral problems are urged to
participate. Training in prepared-
ness and emotional resiliency, and
the fundamentals of caring for self
and family will be offered.
Training will begin April 29, and
every Tuesday through June 3 at the
Wakulla One-Stop Community Cen-
ter. Call 745-6042 for information.


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 9A



happenings in our community


Special Olympics



Torch Run is Friday


Special to The News

All are welcome to the Wakulla
County Courthouse at 10 a.m. Friday
for a Special Olympics Law Enforce-
ment Torch Run. Law enforcement
officers and athletes will be running
with the Torch (Flame of Hope) from
the Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
to the Courthouse. Once the runners
arrive with the Torch at the Wakulla
County Courthouse there will be a
brief ceremony.
After the ceremony at the Court-
house, the athletes and teachers will
meet at Hudson Park for lunch. Ath-
letes will be provided with a lunch. If
you have any questions or concerns


please call Sharon Scherbarth at
850-727-6067 or Patricia Bodiford at
850-727-6068.

T-Shirts available
The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office
has T-shirts for sale that will benefit
the Wakulla County Special Olympics
program. The T-shirts are $12 and are
available through Jan Sanders of the
WCSO Finance Division.
The sizes are large, extra large, 2X
and 3X although the shirts seem to run
a little smaller than their designation.
T-shirts are available to the gen-
eral public for the $12 donation. To
purchase a shirt, please contact Jan
Sanders at 745-7133.


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
The Wakulla County Sheriff's Office has T-shirts for sale to benefit the
Wakulla County Special Olympics program. The T-shirts are $12 and are
available through Jan Sanders of the WCSO Finance Division.



Friends of Library



campaign kicks off


Special to The News

The Friends of the Wakulla County
Public Library kick off their annual
membership drive with a "Buy a Ticket,
Win a Tablet" campaign.
This year, on Saturday, April 26, the
Friends will observe their 38th birthday
with a drawing and celebration at the
library at 6 p.m. Snacks will be served
before our speaker begins at 6:45 p.m.
Special speaker Betty Jean Stein-
shouer has been doing public programs
and teacher seminars for the Florida
Humanities Council since 1989 and has
toured 43 states for the National Endow-
ment for the Humanities. Steinshouer's
program "Three Views of Hemingway",
examines the author of machismo, from
a woman's point of view. Gertrude Stein,
Act One, shares memories of a young
and "impossibly handsome" reporter
who came to her door in Paris. Willa
Cather, Act Two, places Hemingway in
company with other writers such as F.
Scoot Fitzgerald, Ford Maddox Ford,
and Gertrude Stein. And finally, in Act
Three, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings talks
about "Hem," her friend and colleague at
Scribner's. She knows, better than any,
his deep affection for Florida and his
fatal flaws. This program was made pos-


sible through a grant from the Florida
Humanities Council.
The evening will finish with a draw-
ing for a Samsung Galaxy tablet worth
$300-you do not have to be present to
win.
"Buy a Ticket, Win a Tablet' is what
we are calling our celebration draw-
ing", says Sue Belford, president of the
Friends. The tickets, which sell for $1
each or six for $5 are being sold by any
active Friends member, Scott Joyner at
the library, at our booth at the Worm
Gruntin' (April 12) festival and at the
Friends Birthday Celebration on April
26th.
"We will be giving away a brand new
Samsung Galaxy Tab 3 16 GB tablet,"
says Mrs. Belford. "Tablets are similar to
smart phones without the calling feature
but with larger screens. They use wi-fi
to access the internet and there are no
additional fees. They are also e-readers;
free e-books can be checked out of the
WCPL's website (www.wakullalibrary.
org)."
Come into the library to see pictures
and buy your tickets. To get more infor-
mation on this tablet, visit http://www.
samsung.com/us/mobile/galaxy-tab/
SM-T3100ZWYXAR.


Loud & Clear



anl FREE

Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to "
receive a free amplified phone from the non-profit --
Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. Cordless
and corded phones for persons with mild to severe ON
hearing loss are available at 23 distribution centers ife L
statewide Limit one pei cuistomei .


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Davis family welcomes new baby

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014



/oo:/


education news from local schools


NICOLE ZEMA
Hundreds of students, volunteers, parents and grand-
parents visited Crawfordville Elementary School Sat-
urday for the annual spring festival "country fair." The
PTA-sponsored event was organized indoors because of
the high chance of rain. Visitors and students enjoyed
cake walks, face painting, a Pepsi challenge, burgers
and sweets, bouncy inflatables, drawings and more.
Pictured, clockwise from top left, Pre-K student Garrett
Byrne simulates milking a real cow at the CES Country
Fair. Cora Godwin focuses on her brother, first-grader
Cody Godwin, as they enjoy snowcones. Sammie Sims,
a second grader at CES, has her face painted by volun-
teer and WHS graduate Jessica Pichard. Gracie Bruce,
a sixth-grader at Riversprings Middle School, accepts a
balloon animal from grandparent-volunteer Della Hat-
tery. Fifth-grader Jarrett Jones teases his friend and
classmate Christopher Waters, who is "stuck in jail."


A few spots remain for


out-of-zone students


Special to The News

Applications for children to at-
tend a Wakulla County public
school out of the zone in which they
live were closed as of March 31, for
school year 2014-2015.
A lottery for the few open spots at
each elementary and middle school
will be Wednesday, April 16, at 4
p.m. in the School Board Room at
the District Office at 69 Arran Road.
The public is welcome to attend.
Applications will be sealed in
envelopes and drawn at random
so that parents can feel confident
in the transparency of the process.
Kindergarten, third grade, and sixth
grade are the only grades needing
the lottery. All other grades had no
more requests than there were seats
allotted.
Attendance or non-attendance
on April 16 will have no bearing on
which applications are drawn.
Parents and guardians will re-
ceive acceptance or denial letters by
the end of April, but are welcome to
call Beth O'Donnell at 926-0065 to
hear the results of grades kinder-
garten, three, or six if they want to
know sooner.
Due to school districts needing to
comply with the state's Class Size
Amendment, there are a limited
number of seats reserved at each
grade level for each school.
Schools must serve the students
who live in their school zones first
before they can take students from
other schools within the Wakulla
School District. These in-district
Student Reassignment Applications


are for students living in Wakulla
who apply to attend another elemen-
tary or middle school in Wakulla.
Students who were granted an
out of zone request for this current
school year and applied again for
2014-2015 will be grandfathered
in if their attendance, behavior
and academic effort complied with
the 2013-2014 contract signed by
parents. Those students accepted
through grandfathering are only
accepted for that same school. If
an application is submitted by the
deadline each year, these students
could be grandfathered in until they
no longer attend that school, pro-
viding they adhere to the contract
signed each year. They will not take
up lottery seats.
Siblings of students who meet
the grandfathering requirements
will also need to have an application
submitted by the deadline. Siblings
will be allowed to attend an out of
zone school if the grandfathered
sibling is still attending that school
in 2014-2015. They will not take up
lottery seats either.
It is important for parents and
guardians to check to see what
elementary or middle school their
children are zoned for by their ad-
dresses. Contact the Transportation
Department at 926-7550 if unsure.
Parents or guardians will be asked
to show two acceptable forms of
proof of residency when registering
their children. In addition, parents
and guardians are encouraged to
call their children's zoned schools
to make sure they have all the reg-
istration information that is needed
at the time of enrollment.


Kids trike for St. Jude


Special to The News
Children at Happy Time Instructional Child Care in Crawfordville
raised money for St. Jude's Children's Hospital by taking part in
a trike-a-thon on March 25. Happy Time director and owner Linda
Wicker said the fundraiser collected $1,090 at the annual bike event.
Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Deputy Mike Crum and Sgt. Mike
Helms supervised the preschoolers as they made laps to raise money,
and spoke to the children about general bike safety and the impor-
tance of wearing a helmet. During the week, the preschoolers also
learned about children with illnesses such as cancer through the story
of Bikewell Bear, and how we help by riding for a great cause.


Peanut scholarships available


Special to The News

The Florida Peanut Producers
Association announced the opening
of its 2014 Scholarship Award Pro-
gram. Two $1,200 scholarships will
be awarded to deserving high school
seniors and/or college students. The
applicant or someone in the appli-
cant's family must be an actively pro-
ducing peanut grower, not necessarily
a member of the FPPA. Recipients
must attend a Florida junior college
or four-year university.


Each winner will receive $600
when the scholarship winners are
announced. The remaining $600 will
be awarded after the completion of
one semester and documentation of
passing grades is submitted to the
FPPA Office.
For an application, contact the
FPPA office at (850) 526-2590 or print
the application off the FPPA website
www.flpeanuts.com. The scholarship
applications must be postmarked no
later than July 1.


www.thewakullanews.com






THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 11A


education news from local schools


Celebration


of the Arts


By NICOLE ZEMA
nzemagithewakullanews.net


Wakulla County's youth
showcased their talents at the
13th annual Celebration of the
Arts at Wakulla High School on
Thursday to a full auditorium.
Event tickets and a silent art
auction raised funds to provide
scholarships for graduating se-
niors pursuing a major or minor
in art, music and theatre.
Wakulla High School drama
and stagecraft instructor Su-
san Solburg was honored at
the celebration with roses and


V



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an "Oscar" for her upcoming
retirement.
"My years here have been
wonderful years," Solburg said.
Mistress and master of cer-
emonies were Brianna Marin
and Desmond Maxwell. Connie
and Walter Cooper directed the
Wakulla County Elementary
Honor Choir. Nick Hughes led
the COAST Charter School
Stingray Music Ensemble.
Alyssa Higgins sponsored the
COAST Dance Group. Alex-
andra Kauffman directed the
Wakulla Middle School Drama
Group. Director Laura Hudson


led the Wakulla Middle School
Jazz Band. Riversprings Middle
School performed a drama
under the direction of Mina
Sutton. Carmen Williams' Riv-
ingsprings Middle School Jazz
Band wowed the audience.
The WHS advanced theatre
class performed two scenes,
under Solburg's direction. The
newly-formed WHS Glee Club
shared their blend of voices,
with Susan Bistrican and Sara
Beth Boyer sponsoring. Con-
ductor Wayne Watson led the
WHS Concert Band and Wind
Ensemble.


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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


Outdoors


outdoor sports and fishing reports


Spanish mackerel have arrived in big numbers


Well, the weather-
man missed the weather
this past weekend and
plenty of folks made it
onto the water.
It's Monday morn-
ing and looks like the
got the winds right and
looks like the rain is
coming.
The temperature on
the flats was in the low
70's in the middle of
the day yesterday and
it doesn't look like the
water clarity is going to
change for a while.
Dwayne Broadway
was over at St. Joe this
past weekend and said
there were big Spanish
Mackerel everywhere.
He was also told there
were plenty of big cobia
cruising the beaches
off of Mexico Beach. It
won't be too long until
they show up around
here though they are
going to be extremely


hard to spot because of
the water clarity.
Mike Falk Jr. said
one of his friends who
fishes around Keaton
Beach caught about
20 trout and managed
to keep three. It wasn't
that the others were
too short but he doesn't
keep anything over 20
inches long. Fishing in
that area has been good
all winter.
The Spanish arrived
in big numbers and
you can catch all you
want at Dog Island Reef
and there are also some
big bull reds cruising
around.
Gag grouper fishing
opened April 1 in state
waters which is out to
9 nautical miles from
shore and plenty of folks
went out.
Jeff May and his wife
went out and came back
with several grouper


From The Dock

"' BY CAPT.JODYCAMPBELL


and a box full of big sea
bass.
The highlight of the
trip was a 46-inch red
fish which he caught
and released.
Dr. Phil Sharp went
out with some friends
and they came in with
five grouper which they
caught using LYs.
Capt. David Fife has
been extremely busy
and he's been catching
plenty of trout.
On Saturday they
had one that weighed
about 7 pounds which
they caught on a live
shrimp. Most of his fish


have been coming off
of Mirrolures or mud
minnows.
Fishing out of St
Marks is good and lots
of trout and Spanish are
being caught on both
the East and West Flats.
The Econfina flats and
flats off the Aucilla are
red hot.
I've had several char-
ters over the past few
weeks and have done
quite well.
Until Sunday I was
catching everything on
Pearl White Gulp. On
Saturday afternoon I
took Dr. Phil Sharp out


and we caught 32 trout
in a couple of hours us-
ing the Gulp.
Sunday morning I
fished with Steve Lewis,
his brother Terry, and
son Austin, a student
at FSU.
Phil went out that
morning and went back
to where we fished on
Saturday and had his
limit of five trout in
about 30 minutes. We
looked for reds and were
unsuccessful and went
to the flats. We lim-
ited out on trout but
couldn't get them to
hit anything but live
shrimp. We went look-
ing for reds again and
still nothing. We went
out and anchored off
the Shell Point reef and
caught about 15 Span-
ish.
There are plenty
of trout and Spanish
around Shell Point but


I just can't find many
reds. This time last year
they were everywhere.
The Sportfishing Ex-
hibit at the Museum of
Florida History located
at 500 South Bronough
continues until the end
of August.
The 6th annual Rock
the Dock Fishing Tour-
nament will be held
April 26 and 27 at Rock
Landing in Panacea.
For all you kayakers
out there, the Big Bend
Kayak Classic will be
May 2 and 3 and will
benefit Meals on Wheels
and other senior servic-
es in Wakulla County.
For more information
go to www.bigbendkay-
akclassic.com.
Remember to know
your limits and if head-
ing offshore leave a float
plan with someone.
Good luck and good
fishing!


HOME ON THE RANGE


Consider the grain weight of your bullets


By MARJ LAW

Not all bullets shoot
alike.
That's what several
of us found out the oth-
er day at the Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office
Range.
We purchase bullets
that fit our handguns.
For instance, a .22 will
shoot .22 bullets, and
a 9mm gun will shoot
9mm bullets.
But that's not the
end of it.


Recently, finding am-
munition for our hand-
guns has been more
difficult because sup-
plies to shops have been
limited, especially for
the .22.
However, with the
situation easing up, and
more ammunition avail-
able, we find we have a
choice. Not only do we
ask for the correct size
bullets, we also have a
choice as to the amount
of grains included in the
bullets.
Grains?
Grain refers to the
weight of the bullet.
A grain is equal to
1/7,000 of a pound.
Ammo for the 9mm
guns we were shoot-
ing comes in different
grains. For example,
you can purchase 115,
124 and 147-grain bul-
lets for the 9mm hand-
gun.
The lower the grain,
the faster the bullet


SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Different weights of 9mm bullets include 115
grain and 124 grain.


flies because it is lighter
than the others. It will
have less knockdown
power.
Higher grain bullets


are slower, but have
more knockdown power.
Guns handle differ-
ently with the different
weighted bullets.


Three of us started
out with 124-grain 9mm
ammo. We tried three
shots each. Then we
shot three more rounds
of 115-grain ammo.
The woman with a
Glock 19 looked at her
target. When she shot
the 124-grain ammo,
the holes in her target
were closer to the x-ring
than the shots from the
115-grain ammo.
"It's more accurate,"
she said. "It's easier to
shoot and didn't 'snap'
quite so much."
A woman with a
Springfield 1911 Al
found all three of her
124-grain bullets hit
the target in a tight
grouping right next to
the center.
"I felt more recoil,
and the shots were more
accurate," she decided.
We didn't have
the 147-grain ammo
to try this time, but
a woman who has a


9mm Rohrbaugh finds
it shoots with more ac-
curacy when using the
147-grain round than
the 115 or the 124-grain
rounds.
Your instruction
booklet will let you
know, or you can look
up on the internet what
grain rounds you can
fire in your handgun.
There are some guns
that cannot take every
grain size of ammo, so
please check to make
sure that you purchase
ammo specified for your
gun.
I've noticed it's a bit
more difficult to find the
124-grain ammo.
But, if you want an
impressive target, it's
worth finding!

Marj Law is the for-
mer director of Keep
Wakulla CountyBeauti-
ful who has become an
avid shooter in retire-
ment.


FWC to meet April 15-17 in Havana


From FWC News

The Florida Fish
and Wildlife Conserva-
tion Commission will
meet April 15-17 at the
Florida Public Safety
Institute, 85 Academy
Drive, Havana. The In-
stitute is west of the city
of Midway on U.S. 90.
Full-day business ses-
sions Wednesday and
Thursday start at 8:30
a.m. Tuesday's half-
day discussions session
starts at 1 p.m.
The public is invited
to all three days and will
be provided opportuni-
ties to speak.


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Highlights of the
agenda include:
Tuesday's strategic
discussions about the
future of conservation:
human-wildlife interac-
tion; connecting youths
to the outdoors; and
increasing participation
in conservation.
Commission action
Wednesday on these
marine fisheries agenda
items:
Gulf of Mexico red
snapper season modifi-


"IT1 ALL


cations.
Sea cucumber man-
agement alternatives.
Proposal for a Gulf
reef-fish data reporting
system.
A proposal to pre-
vent harmful, nonna-
tive lionfish from be-
ing introduced and to
facilitate removal of the
predatory fish.
Thursday's topics:
proposed final rule
amendments on the
deer management units


in Zone D in the western
Florida Panhandle, draft
amendments to alligator
management, and staff
reports.
For the full agen-
da, go to MyFWC.com/
Commission and select
"Commission Meetings."
Can't attend meeting
in person? Follow live
coverage on Twitter @
MyFWC and join in the
conversation by using
tag #FWC2014. https://
twitter, corn/MyFWC.


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Wtval WA^40


Local writers share their exicerieres


SCoast Guard Auxiliary Reports I-....
By Carolyn Brown Treadon A--.Wf


Our Flotilla held
its monthly meeting
this past Saturday in
Crawfordville. Flotilla
Commander Duane
Treadon sent in the
following report.
During the meet-
ing Chuck Hickman
gave a recount of the
Change of Ownership
Ceremony for the St.
Marks Lighthouse from
the Coast Guard to
the Department of the
Interior. He, and oth-
ers who were in atten-
dance, recounted to the
membership the pride
that was felt during the
ceremony. All felt that
it was a wonderful cer-
emony that celebrated
the contributions of
the Coast Guard to
our area and the Light-
house in particular and
the knowledge that its
new owners will honor
the heritage and his-
torical importance this
structure has for and
with our area.
Many thanks to the
leadership and staff of
the St. Marks Wildlife
refuge for including
our Flotilla in this his-
torical ceremony.
After being out for
several meetings, Mike
Harrison officially re-
ceived his Gilbert/
Champion award. Mike
received this honor
in December, being
selected from our flo-
tilla members as an
exemplary member,
but was not able to
attend a meeting to
be presented with the
plaque.
After the meeting
Flotilla Staff Officer
Phil Hill conducted
the annual Operations
and Team Coordina-
tion Training (TCT) for
members involved, or
interested in surface
operations.
The Operations
workshop reinforces
important aspects that
all members serving
in surface operations
need to know. This
includes personal
protective equipment
(PPE), communication,
safety equipment, pro-
cedures, and many
other operational pol-
icy points.
Members discussed
many of the items and
pointed out the impor-


tance of being safe, set-
ting the example of safe
boating, and educating
the boating public to be
better boaters.
Team Coordination
Training, much like the
Operations Workshop,
reinforces to members
the need to have a plan
of safety in the event of
an emergency. Com-
munication between
crew members was
heavily stressed dur-
ing the TCT workshop.
Knowing what is going
on and letting others
know what you are
doing is critically im-
portant.
This is a lesson
that all boaters can
learn from. Situation-


al awareness, know-
ing what is going on
around you and iden-
tifying potential haz-
ards, should be on the
mind of every boater.
Though many of the
items discussed during
both the Operations
and TCT Workshop are
common sense it is im-
portant to have these
reminders to keep it
fresh in our minds as
we start this boating
season.
If you are interested
in learning more about
being safe this season
while out on the water,
consider attending our
"About Boating Safely"
class on April 12 be-
ing offered at the 4-H


SBoating Emergencies

Coast Guard Station
Panam a City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228
Coast Guard Station
Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900
Coast Guard Auxiliary
Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500
or ............................................................................ (850) 284-1166


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 13A



a peek into life on and under the water


building in Crawford-
ville. If you would like
to attend this class or
another class some-
time in the future,
contact our Flotilla
Staff Officer for Public
Education, Alexander
Guide, at fso-pe@usc-
gaux.net.
The boating season
is upon us and our
Members are available
to assist area boaters
with complimentary
Vessel Examinations,
scheduled Boat Safety
Courses as well as par-
ticipating in the many
upcoming events pro-
moting Boating Safety.
If you are interested
in becoming involved
in the Auxiliary, check
out our website at www.
uscgaux.net or contact
our Flotilla Staff Officer
for Human Resources
at fso-hr@uscgaux.net
or Flotilla Commander
Duane Treadon at FC@
uscgaux.net.
As Sherrie says, Safe
Boating is no Accident
- Maintain situational
awareness and be pre-
pared!


PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Phil Hill teaching the Team Coordination Training, above, and Auxil-
iary members during the TCT, below.


vsmIiiiii


Thursday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:15 am 4:02pm
8:01 pm 4:20 am
Brightness- 68%
Friday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:14am 4:55pm
8:02 pm 4:55 am
Brightness- 74%

Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:13 am 5:50 pm
8:02 pm 5:29 am
Brightness- 80%
Sunday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:12 am 6:45 pm
8:03 pm 6:04 am
BriAtnesy- 87% ^^^^^^^^

So rise/set Moon rise/set
711am I 7:42pm
8:03 pm 6:40 am
Brightness- 93%
Tuesday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:10am 8:41 pm
8:04 pm 7:19 am

Wednesday
Sun rise/set Moon rise/set
7:09 am 9:41pm
8:05 pm 8:01 am
Brightness- 93%


Wakulla Financial Center

. 2190 Crawfordville Highway
224-4960, ext. 1254 I www.fsucu.org


I I


I
First
May 7


G I C W k A For tides at the following points add to
SG ulf C oast W eekly A lm anac Dog Island Listings: HighTide LowTide
Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min.
Full Last New April 10 -April 16 Apalachicola 1Hr.,53Min. 2Hrs.,38Min.
April 15 April 22 April 29 .. ..\ Cat Point 1 Hr, 13 Min. 2Hrs., 31 Min.
T* 'i Tde charts by LowerAnchorage 1 Hr, 36 Min. 2Hrs., 3Min.
\ Zihua Software, LLC West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.


St. Marks River Entrance
Date High Low High Low
Thu 0.7 ft. 2.9 ft. 1.2 ft.
Apr10, 14 6:16 AM 12:42 PM 6:33 PM
Fri 2.8 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.8 ft.
Apr 11, 14 12:33 AM 6:53 AM 1:12 PM 7:14 PM
Sat 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.4 ft.
Apr 12, 14 1:16 AM 7:24 AM 1:39 PM 7:50 PM
Sun 3.2 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.5 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr 13, 14 1:55 AM 7:52 AM 2:04 PM 8:24 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 14, 14 2:32 AM 8:20 AM 2:28 PM 8:58 PM
Tue 3.5 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.8 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 15, 14 3:09 AM 8:48 AM 2:51 PM 9:32 PM
Wed 3.5 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 16, 14 3:47 AM 9:17 AM 3:17 PM 10:08 PM
Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay
Date High Low High Low
Thu 0.5 ft. 2.2 ft. 0.8 ft.
Apr 10, 14 6:27 AM 12:34 PM 6:44 PM
Fri 2.1 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft.
Apr 11, 14 12:25 AM 7:04 AM 1:04 PM 7:25 PM
Sat 2.3 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.3 ft.
Apr 12, 14 1:08 AM 7:35 AM 1:31 PM 8:01 PM
Sun 2.4 ft. 0.4 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr 13, 14 1:47 AM 8:03 AM 1:56 PM 8:35 PM
Mon 2.5 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
Apr 14, 14 2:24 AM 8:31 AM 2:20 PM 9:09 PM
Tue 2.6 ft. 0.5 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.3 ft.
Apr 15, 14 3:01 AM 8:59 AM 2:43 PM 9:43 PM
Wed 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 16, 14 3:39 AM 9:28 AM 3:09 PM 10:19 PM


City of St. Marks
Date High Low High Low
Thu 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.7 ft. 1.1 ft.
Apr 10, 14 12:12 AM 7:20 AM 1:18 PM 7:37 PM
Fri 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. 0.7 ft.
Apr 11,14 1:09 AM 7:57 AM 1:48 PM 8:18 PM
Sat 2.8 ft. 0.5 ft. 3.1 ft. 0.4 ft.
Apr 12, 14 1:52 AM 8:28 AM 2:15 PM 8:54 PM
Sun 3.0 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.3 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr 13, 14 2:31 AM 8:56 AM 2:40 PM 9:28 PM
Mon 3.1 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.4 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 14, 14 3:08 AM 9:24 AM 3:04 PM 10:02 PM
Tue 3.2 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.5 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 15, 14 3:45 AM 9:52 AM 3:27 PM 10:36 PM
Wed 3.3 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.6 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 16, 14 4:23 AM 10:21 AM 3:53 PM 11:12 PM
St. Teresa, Turkey Pt.
Date High Low High Low
Thu 0.7 ft. 2.3 ft. 1.1 ft.
Apr 10, 14 5:55 AM 12:26 PM 6:12 PM
Fri 2.2 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.8 ft.
Apr 11, 14 12:17 AM 6:32 AM 12:56 PM 6:53 PM
Sat 2.3 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.4 ft.
Apr 12,14 1:00 AM 7:03 AM 1:23 PM 7:29 PM
Sun 2.5 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.7 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr 13, 14 1:39 AM 7:31 AM 1:48 PM 8:03 PM
Mon 2.6 ft. 0.6 ft. 2.9 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 14, 14 2:16 AM 7:59 AM 2:12 PM 8:37 PM
Tue 2.7 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.4 ft.
Apr 15, 14 2:53 AM 8:27AM 2:35 PM 9:11 PM
Wed 2.7 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.0 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr16, 14 3:31 AM 8:56 AM 3:01 PM 9:47 PM


Shell Point, Spring Creek
DNte I-Hiqh L L'.v I-tih .
T iju : 1 II : : II I II
, :,.l ,4, I : 1r l 1 2 'M r ,F :,, 1 : 'r1 I
Fri 2.9 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.2 ft. 0.8 ft.
Apr 11,14 12:30 AM 6:50 AM 1:09 PM 7:11 PM
Sat 3.1 ft. 0.6 ft. 3.4 ft. 0.4 ft.
Apr 12, 14 1:13 AM 7:21 AM 1:36 PM 7:47 PM
Sun 3.3 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.6 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr 13, 14 1:52 AM 7:49 AM 2:01 PM 8:21 PM
Mon 3.4 ft. 0.7 ft. 3.7 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 14, 14 2:29 AM 8:17 AM 2:25 PM 8:55 PM
Tue 3.5 ft. 0.8 ft. 3.9 ft. -0.5 ft.
Apr 15, 14 3:06 AM 8:45 AM 2:48 PM 9:29 PM
Wed 3.6 ft. 0.9 ft. 4.0 ft. -0.6 ft.
Apr 16, 14 3:44 AM 9:14 AM 3:14 PM 10:05 PM
Dog Island West End
Date High Low High Low High
Thu 0.5 ft. 2.3 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.1 ft.
Apr 10, 14 5:19 AM 12:19 PM 5:46 PM 11:56 PM
Fri 0.6 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.6 ft.
Apr 11, 14 6:02 AM 12:45 PM 6:31 PM
Sat 2.2 ft. 0.7 ft. 2.4 ft. 0.4 ft.
Apr 12, 14 1:02AM 6:38 AM 1:07 PM 7:10 PM
Sun 2.3 ft. 0.9 ft. 2.5 ft. 0.2 ft.
Apr 13, 14 1:58AM 7:10 AM 1:27 PM 7:45 PM
Mon 2.4 ft. 1.0 ft. 2.6 ft. 0.1 ft.
Apr 14, 14 2:49AM 7:39 AM 1:47 PM 8:18 PM
Tue 2.4 ft. 1.2 ft. 2.7 ft. -0.1 ft.
Apr 15, 14 3:38 AM 8:07 AM 2:10 PM 8:51 PM
Wed 2.4 ft. 1.3 ft. 2.8 ft. -0.2 ft.
Apr 16, 14 4:28 AM 8:35 AM 2:36 PM 9:26 PM


I I


Thursday
MajorTimes Minor Times
1009a ml-1209pm 419 am-519 m
1031pm-1231am1 401pmo-501pm
Average
Friday
MajorTimes MinorTimes
1053 m-1253pm n 4 54 n-5 54m
1115 ptn-115m 454 pt-5 54pan

Saturday
Major Times MinorTimes
........-- 5 28mn -628 m
113 7mn-137pan 5 49 pf-6 49pan
Good
Sunday
Major Times MinorTimes
....- 603 an-703 am
1222pm-222pm 644pm-744pm
Better
Monday
MajorTimes MinorTimes
12453m-2453 m 639an-7391m
108 pm-308pm 742p-842pm
Best
Tuesday
Major Times MinorTimes
133 m-333 m I 718 m-818 m
I157ptn-3 57ptn 840ptn-940ptn
Best
Wednesday
MajorTimes MInorTimes
223=m423 m 7 59an-8 59 m
249pm449pm 941pm-1041pm
Better


'Underwater

By Gregg StantonlW lku l a/u_

I hope you had a chance to attend Dr. Sylvia Earl's
presentation last week at FSU's Ruby Diamond
Auditorium.
Her presentation was sponsored by the FSU
Marine Lab, located down here on our coast in
Franklin County.
The place was packed with students mostly, who
were kept transfixed by her message and pictures of
a past ocean now changing dramatically. Her mes-
sage was simple: You have the power to change the
deterioration of our oceans to what otherwise will
leave your children a world's ocean unrecognizable
by her generation.
She mixed humor with frightening statistics, of
coral loss worldwide to the significance of a single
celled ocean resident alga. She made her point.
Dr. Earl is homegrown, attending FSU as an un-
dergraduate student in the early 1950s and diving at
our FSU Marine Lab. Her introduction and training
on scuba was simple: don't hold your breath. That
pretty much summed it up!
A decade later, things had changed a lot. I was
trained in 1964 by UDT soldiers returning from
Vietnam, expecting me to complete a 60-hour rigor-
ous course.
She is obviously a quick learner. She went on to
complete her masters and PhD at Duke University
as a Botanist.
After her degree at Duke, she became a research
fellow at Harvard for a year before returning to Flor-
ida to become the Director of the Cape Haze Marine
Lab. During this journey she also served on an all
female saturation team for the NASA Habitat called
The Tektite, located in St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Our
own Dr. William Herrnkind (FSU retired) also attend
the Tektite Project and became my mentor during
the Scientists In The Sea Program in the Hydro-Lab
Habitat. In 1976, I presented the research I began
with Dr. Hernnkind in the Hydro-Lab at the Inter-
national Coral Reef Conference in Miami. As it was,
my paper was the last on the docket and chaired by
Dr. Earl. How many ways can our paths can cross?
Dr. Earl has more than an interest in plants. In
1979 she dove the JIM suit in Hawaii, becoming the
deepest (1,250 feet) diving female at the time. She
also began her tenure as the Curator of Phycology
(the study of algae) at the California Academy of
Sciences, where she served until 1986. During this
time period she, with husband and engineer Graham
Hawkes, also founded Deep Ocean Engineering,
built Deep Rover, a research submersible that dove
to over 3,000 feet in the ocean. In 1990 she became
the Chief Scientist for NOAA, the first woman to ever
hold that position. Not satisfied, she founded Deep
Ocean Exploration and Research, which is now run
by her daughter Elizabeth, who designs, builds and
operates equipment for deep-ocean environments.
Between 1998 and 2002 she became a National
Geographic explorer-in-residence, and led the Sus-
tainable Seas Expeditions on their behalf to study
the United States National Marine Sanctuary. And
the list just keeps going.
Last week, her message was aimed squarely at
the upcoming generations that must engage in the
restoration of our oceans. The tools are there, the
need is obvious, and the time is neigh. Her mission is
motivation and she obviously does not give up easily.
Now if I could just remember that most common
algae species she asked us to get to know better....

"People ask: Why should I care about the ocean?
Because the ocean is the cornerstone of earth's life
support system, it shapes climate and weather. It
holds most of life on earth. Ninety-seven percent
of earth's water is there. It's the blue heart of the
planet we should take care of our heart. It's what
makes life possible for us. We still have a really
good chance to make things better than they are.
They won't get better unless we take the action
and inspire others to do the same thing. No one is
without power. Everybody has the capacity to do
something." Sylvia Earl.


11111








Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


Law Enforcement and Courts


reports


Sheriff's Report


On Tuesday, April
1, Deputy Will Hudson
investigated a suspi-
cious vehicle on Violet
Lane in Crawfordville
and two subjects were
unable to give a rea-
son for being there.
The subjects were re-
quested to get out of
the vehicle and Dep-
uty Hudson observed
narcotics and drug
paraphernalia inside
the vehicle. Deputies
Ashley McAlister and
Anthony Paul arrived
at the scene.
During the search of
the vehicle the depu-
ties located individu-
ally packaged bags of
marijuana, smoking
pipes and a grinder.
The marijuana weighed
5.9 grams.
Methamphetamine
weighing one gram was
also discovered. A fire-
arm, jewelry and coins
were located in the
vehicle. Jimmy Wayne
Johnson, 43, of Craw-
fordville and Harley
William Leamon, 29,
of Tallahassee were
charged with posses-
sion of methamphet-
amine, possession of
marijuana with intent
to distribute and pos-
session of drug para-
phernalia. Detective
Derek Lawhon also
investigated.
In other activity this
week:

THURSDAY,
MARCH 27

Raymond Spohn
of Crawfordville and
Stone Creek Pizza re-
ported the theft of a
bank deposit. A $125
deposit was scheduled
to be made at a local
bank but the bank did
not have any record
of the deposit being
made. A suspect has
been identified. Deputy
Matt Helms investi-
gated.
Deputy Alan Mid-
dlebrooks investigated
a two vehicle traffic
crash at U.S. Highway
319 and Highway 267.
Louanne Carter's car
ran into the back of
Jonathon White's car.
Carter's vehicle suf-
fered $2,000 worth
of damage while the
White vehicle suffered
$500 worth of damage.
Both vehicles left the
scene under their own
power and no injuries


were reported.

FRIDAY, MARCH 28

Jaimie Thornton of
Crawfordville report-
ed a vehicle burglary.
Someone entered the
victim's unsecured ve-
hicle and stole medi-
cations, cash and a
walkie-talkie, valued
at $141. Sgt. Ryan
Muse, Lt. Mike Kemp,
Deputy Gibby Gibson
and Detective Clint
Beam investigated.
James Vernon of
Crawfordville reported
a fraud. The victim's
Social Security num-
ber was used by some-
one to file a tax return.
Sgt. Ray Johnson in-
vestigated.

SATURDAY,
MARCH 29

William Christie
of Crawfordville re-
ported a credit card
offense. Someone used
the victim's bank card
to create $645 worth
of charges at Wal-Mart
online. The charge was
unauthorized. Deputy
Ross Hasty investi-
gated.
Charles Bertram
of Crawfordville re-
ported a fraud. Four
unauthorized charges
were discovered on the
victim's bank card. The
charges were created
in Midway and Del-
tona and were valued
at $2,932. Sgt. Ryan
Muse and Detective
Randy Phillips inves-
tigated.
Wal-Mart Asset
Protection Staff ob-
served a subject drink-
ing beer inside the
store. The suspect,
Johnie Solonano, 47,
of Crawfordville was
observed picking up
a beer and drinking it
and leaving the empty
can behind. The beer
is valued at $2 and
the subject was ar-
rested for retail theft
and transported to the
Wakulla County Jail.
Deputy Jeff Yarbrough
investigated.
Scott Allan Miller,
48, of Crawfordville
was stopped for speed-
ing in Crawfordville.
The subject was trav-
eling 60 mph in a 45
mph zone. Open beer
bottles were report-
edly observed by Sgt.
Jeremy Johnston as


he conducted a traf-
fic stop. Miller was
arrested for DUI and
issued citations for
driving while license
is suspended or re-
voked, speeding and
possession of an open
container. Lt. Jimmy
Sessor and Deputy
Scott Powell also in-
vestigated.

SUNDAY, MARCH 30

Deputy Jeff Yar-
brough made contact
with some pedestrians
on the side of Dr. Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. Me-
morial Road and Revell
Road at 4:01 a.m. A
16-year-old male gave
the deputy a name,
and when it came back
that he had active war-
rants for his arrest
and was informed he
was being arrested,
the juvenile admitted
to using a false name.
He was issued a juve-
nile civil citation for
obstruction by a dis-
guised person. The
male and two female
juveniles were turned
over to legal guardians.
Christopher Lee
Hodges, 30, of Craw-
fordville was involved
in a traffic stop at
Crawfordville Highway
and Shadeville Road
after being observed
and reported by an off-
duty Tallahassee Police
Department officer as a
reckless driver. Deputy
Stephen Simmons ob-
served the driver cross
the fog line and near-
ly leave the roadway.
Hodges did not have
a valid driver license
as it has been perma-
nently revoked as a ha-
bitual traffic offender.
Six grams of marijuana
was discovered inside
the vehicle. Hodges
was arrested on a fel-
ony charge of DWSLR
habitual offender, plus
misdemeanor charges
of possession of less
than 20 grams of mari-
juana and possession
of drug paraphernalia.
Deputy Ross Hasty and
Deputy Gibby Gibson
also investigated.

MONDAY, MARCH 31

Rachel Hutto of
Crawfordville report-
ed finding property at
Burger King. Several
lost credit/debit cards
were turned into the


sheriff's office. Deputy
Matt Helms attempted
to contact the indi-
viduals who owned
the cards. Some of the
cards were turned into
the issuing banks while
others were turned
into the Property and
Evidence Division.
Jessica Bowen of
Crawfordville reported
a fraud. The victim at-
tempted to have Conm-
cast connect cable to
her home but Comcast
informed the victim
that she had an out-
standing balance of
$219. The victim has
never had Comcast
cable service before.
Sgt. Ray Johnson in-
vestigated.
Deputy Will Hud-
son was investigating
a traffic crash and was
speaking to a male and
female subject at a
Mulberry Circle home
in Crawfordville. When
Deputy Ward Kromer
was speaking to the fe-
male in the front yard,
several marijuana
plants were observed
growing in containers
in plain view.
The male and fe-
male subjects had re-
cently moved into the
home and a previous
resident had recently
moved out.
No charges were
filed and the six pot
plants were seized for
disposal. The plants
were valued at $600.
Sgt. Lorne Whaley and
Lt. Sherrell Morrison
investigated.
On March 31, Mary
Stafford of Crawford-
ville reported the theft
of medications from
her home. The med-
ication is valued at
$150. Persons of in-
terest were identified.
Deputy Ward Kromer
investigated.

TUESDAY, APRIL 1

Deputy Alan Mid-
dlebrooks conducted a
traffic stop on a speed-
ing vehicle on Craw-
fordville Highway and
Lonnie Raker Lane.
Deputy Middlebrooks
reportedly smelled the
strong odor of mari-
juana coming from the
vehicle.
Sgt. Lorne Whaley
stood by three individ-
uals from the vehicle
while Deputy Middle-
brooks was searching


the vehicle for con-
traband. Sgt. Whaley
allegedly observed The-
resa A. Roberts, 38, of
Crawfordville attempt
to discard a baggie of
marijuana. Roberts
was arrested for pos-
session of less than
20 grams of marijuana
and possession of drug
paraphernalia. The
marijuana weighed 4.6
grams and a smoking
pipe was also seized.
The two other indi-
viduals in the vehicle
were not charged. Lt.
Sherrell Morrison also
investigated.

WEDNESDAY,
APRIL 2

Rachel Hardwick
of Crawfordville report-
ed a vehicle burglary.
The victim reported
the theft of $58 worth
of property from her
purse. Deputy Gibby
Gibson investigated.
Bryon Smith of
Crawfordville report-
ed a vehicle burglary.
Three firearms were
stolen out of the vic-
tim's vehicle. The fire-
arms and cartridges
are valued at $1,185.
Deputy Gibby Gibson
investigated.
Martha Evans of
Sopchoppy reported
a credit card offense.
The victim reported
someone using her
personal information
to obtain credit cards.
Seven credit cards
were opened using her
personal information
and several contained
fraudulent charges.
The charges were cre-
ated in South Florida.
Deputy Gibby Gibson
investigated.
Elizabeth Beau-
champ of Crawford-
ville reported a vehicle
burglary. The victim
noticed that items were
tampered with inside
her vehicle but nothing
was reported missing.
The vehicle was left
unsecured. Lt. Mike
Kemp investigated.
Stephen Lewis of
Panacea reported the
theft of fuel. A Ben
Withers company trac-
tor was out of diesel
when checked in the
morning. The 25 gal-
lons are valued at
$100. Deputy Ross
Hasty investigated.
Cheryl Riggles
of Crawfordville re-


ported a vehicle bur-
glary. Items inside the
vehicle were shuffled
around. Nothing was
reported missing. Dep-
uty Stephen Simmons
investigated.
Haley Harris of
Crawfordville reported
a vehicle theft. The ve-
hicle was taken from
the victim's home.
The victim reported
the loss of $63 worth
of personal property
from inside the vehicle.
Deputy Gibby Gibson
investigated.
Susan Hauvers-
burk of Crawfordville
reported a vehicle bur-
glary. Someone went
through the vehicle but
nothing was reported
missing. The vehicle
was left unsecured.
Deputy Gibby Gibson
investigated.
Genja Cornwell of
Crawfordville reported
a vehicle burglary. The
vehicle was left unse-
cured and currency,
soda, cigarettes, pots
and pans and other
personal items, valued
at $515, were reported
missing. Deputy Ross
Hasty investigated.
Herbert Hawkins
of Crawfordville report-
ed a fraud. The victim's
personal information
was used to open a Pay
Pal account. The victim
discovered he had an
outstanding balance
of $920 with Pay Pal.
Lt. Mike Kemp inves-
tigated.
Cynthia Yomes
of Crawfordville re-
covered a purse from
around her mailbox.
There were a few items
within the purse but
no identification was
found. The purse was
turned into the prop-
erty and Evidence Divi-
sion. Deputy Stephen
Simmons investigated.
Jack Letchworth
of Monticello reported
a residential burglary
in Crawfordville. A
mobile home and two
campers were rum-
maged through and
$200 worth of property
was taken. A stove and
iron grill were stolen.
Deputy Gibby Gibson
investigated.

The Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office received
1,192 calls for service
during the past week.


Special to The News

Since the downturn
in the economy in 2008,
the Wakulla County
Sheriff's Office has at-
tempted to cut costs
to save the money of
Wakulla County tax-
payers whenever pos-
sible.

FURNITURE AND
EQUIPMENT

Wakulla County has
been building a new
annex building for the
WCSO between the
Health Department and
Wakulla Jail facility.
But taxpayers will not
be asked to pay for the
furniture that will soon
be filling the facility.
The Florida Depart-
ment of Law Enforce-
ment awarded the
Edward Byrne Memo-
rial Justice Assistance
Grant (JAG) to the
WCSO with a value of
$4,590.
When the sheriff's
office budget was cut,
plans to purchase office
furniture and equip-
ment with departmental


funds were eliminated.
The WCSO was forced
to continue to use fur-
niture and equipment
that is well beyond its
service life.
The JAG funds will
be used to purchase
seven desks and 12
chairs for the annex.

LAW ENFORCEMENT
WEAPONS

Sheriff Charlie Creel
has maintained a simi-
lar plan for weapons.
The WCSO participates
in the U.S. Department
of Defense (DoD) Excess
Property Program.
Any state or local
law enforcement agency
may participate in the
DoD program and Sher-
iff Creel has authorized
the agency to acquire
long guns for sworn law
enforcement personnel
in the agency.
The WCSO recently
acquired six rifles for
deputies that cost the
agency only $100 per
weapon. The federal
government offers the
weapons to law en-
forcement officials at


a greatly reduced price
because the property
may have been lightly
used or is no longer
wanted by the federal
government. The only
requirement is that the
sheriff's office provides
an annual report of
where the firearm is so
the federal government
can keep track.
Two other long guns
have been acquired for
$1,000 each but the
retail value of the weap-
ons is approximately
$15,000 each if they
were available to the
general public.

ROAD PATROL
VEHICLES

The WCSO also puts
a great deal of care into
the acquisition of road
patrol vehicles. The
agency staff compared
the cost of a Chevro-
let Caprice with a Po-
lice Package against a
Chevrolet Silverado half
ton truck.
The WCSO saved
more than $2,000 per
truck by selecting the
Silverado for road pa-


trol over the Caprice.
The trucks also offer
road patrol deputies
more flexibility when
responding to tropical
storm weather condi-
tions and more room to
work out of their office
on wheels. The trucks
cost $29,489 per ve-
hicle to put into duty
while the Caprice is
$31,526. The Silverado
is also safer for depu-
ties who face a much
greater chance of being
killed or injured in traf-
fic crashes than they do
being shot in the line
of duty.
The nine trucks were
purchased using One
Cent Sales Tax funding.
The trucks are expected
to remain on the road
longer and save in over-
all maintenance cost.
WCSO has 60 vehicles
in the road patrol divi-
sion, school resource
officer program, crimi-
nal investigations, civil
processor, emergency
management, litter con-
trol, corrections trans-
port and court security.

LITTER CONTROL

The WCSO Litter
Control Unit collect-


ed 136,450 pounds of
trash in 2013 which
includes a contract
for picking up litter on
state roads and also
allows for work crews
to pick up on county
roads.
The total for 2012
was 213,680 pounds
while 196,420 pounds


of trash was picked up
in 2011.
Sheriff Creel entered
into an agreement with
the Wakulla Correc-
tional Institution to bor-
row 10 Department of
Corrections inmates
to assist with the litter
collections and county
parks maintenance.


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 15A


Tallahassee woman charged


with drug possession

First drew attention to herself by cutting in

front of a deputy at a fast food restaurant


Special to The News

A 28-year-old Tal-
lahassee woman was
arrested for a variety of
drug charges on April 5
at 11:37 p.m. after she
cut in front of a Wakulla
County Sheriff's Office
Road Patrol lieutenant
at a Crawfordville fast
food restaurant and
failed to maintain a
single lane, according
to Sheriff Charlie Creel.
Kristina Nicole Jen-
kins was charged with
two counts of posses-
sion of a controlled
substance, one count
of trafficking in a con-
trolled substance, one
count of possession of
methamphetamines,
one count of possession
of less than 20 grams
of marijuana and five
counts of possession of
drug paraphernalia.
Lt. Sherrell Morrison


Kristina N. Jenkins

observed Jenkins fail to
maintain a single lane
as she drove on Wakulla
Arran Road. A traffic
stop was conducted and
Lt. Morrison smelled
marijuana and observed
a clear plastic bag con-
taining marijuana in-
side the vehicle.
A search of the vehi-
cle recovered five glass
smoking pipes and $219
of rolled up currency
which was discovered


in Jenkins' bra. Two
containers were dis-
covered that contained
a powder that tested
positive for the presence
of methamphamines. In
addition, an assortment
of 33 prescription pills
was found. A digital
scale, butane lighter
and marijuana grinder
were also discovered.
Deputies recovered
7.13 grams of amphet-
amines and 2.4 grams
of methamphetamines.
A passenger in the ve-
hicle was detained but
not charged. The vehicle
Jenkins was driving was
impounded. Sgt. Lorne
Whaley and Deputy Will
Hudson also investi-
gated.
Jenkins was trans-
ported to the Wakul-
la County Jail where
she remains under an
$83,000 bond.


wcso


LYNDA KINSEY


Maritime families gathered for a photograph.

Working Waterfronts


From Front Page

Photographer Jo
Ann Palmer said par-
ticipating in the project
was significant because
photography can be an
invaluable connection
to the past.
"Not having a his-
tory of my own family
in photos, I recognize
how important it is to
have this evidence of
history," Palmer said.
"We hope that citizens
see how hard it is to not
be changed by realizing
the lives that these
fishermen live. And
when you have seafood
on your plate, not to
take for granted where
it came from."
Documentary pho-
tographer Mark Wall-
heiser said the images
make accessible the
lives of those who per-
petually work under
the radar.
"Showing the public
the inside workings or
lifestyles of the often
under-served, counter-
cultures, or less fortu-
nate, helps the general
public see and under-
stand more about the
world around them,"
Wallheiser said. Pho-
tographer Lynda Kin-


sey said her subjects
were generous with
their time and patience
in the months the pho-
tographers spent work-
ing with them.
"This is a project for
posterity to preserve
and remember these
folks, their talents,
and their lives," Kinsey
said. "To contribute to
a project that would
document these people
and their role during
this period of time for
historical purposes, I
felt that it was such a
worthwhile project and
just one of those expe-
riences of a lifetime."
The exhibit is
brought to the commu-
nity by Wakulla County
Coalition for Youth, on
behalf of the Healing
Arts of Wakulla Coun-
ty. A $25,000 grant
from the Department of
State, Division of Cul-
tural Affairs, compen-
sated photographers
for each winning pho-
to; covered the cost of
high-quality printing,
matting and framing
of the photos; and the
extensive marketing
which includes a video
program, newspaper
ads, the website, and
radio time.


Faculty and stu-
dents at Lively Vo-Tech
printed the photos with
archival ink, applied
matting and also con-
structed the frames
with non-glare glass.
The exhibit will stay
at Wakulla One-Stop
for two weeks before
moving to the Wakul-
la Welcome Center in
Panacea for the Blue
Crab Festival. Then
the photos will be dis-
played at Lively Vo-
Tech in June, followed
by an exhibition at Tal-
lahassee Community
College, and end up at
the Tallahassee Airport
gallery.
To see more photos,
articles and updates,
visit www.wakullas-
workingwaterfronts.
corn or like the Face-
book page. Vendors
who would like to sell
fresh or prepared sea-
food at the event may
call Jocelyn Hayes at
(850) 745-6042. No
special permit or fees
are required for ven-
dors.
The Wakulla One-
Stop Community Cen-
ter is located at 318
Shadeville Highway, at
Trice Lane.


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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


Swarming bees go in search of a new home


Moving to a new lo-
cation offers many ben-
efits, but challenges
too.
The big question is
where is a suitable re-
location site which will
offer all the amenities
needed with the pros-
pects of improving one's
situation?
Shelter from the ele-
ments is always on the
top of the list. While
it may be sunny and
pleasant today, there
will be rainy and cold
days to come.
Access to food and
water is another im-
portant issue. A safe
and consistent supply
of both is part of the
decision process.
Selecting neighbors
is important too. It is
essential to fit in to the
new area and not have
to worry about what
the neighbors will think
or do.
This is a relatively
simple list for a family
which is still fraught
with problems and
many unforeseen hitch-
es. Think about moving
half of Crawfordville
or Sopchoppy and the
problems compound.
This is what success-
ful honeybee colonies,
both domestic and wild,
will do every spring.
They have the instinct
to knowwhen their cur-
rent housing space has
reached its maximum
capacity and it is time
for a newly hatched
queen to lead a swarm


By Les Harrison
By Les Harrison


of worker bees to a new
location.
The initial foray to a
new home begins with
the departing honey-
bees collecting near the
hive. Conveniently lo-
cated tree branches are
a common collection
site, but these social
insects may assemble
their colonizing swarm
on structures such as
roof peaks.
The sight of a buzz-
ing bundle of insects
sometimes causes con-
cern from the property
owner who is inexperi-
ence with the honey-
bee's objective. Con-
trary to Hollywood's
portrayal of these polli-
nators, honeybees have
no plan to evict people
from their homes.
Once all the relocat-
ing honeybees have
emerged from the hive,
they cluster around the
new queen at their tem-
porary site. Soon scout
worker honeybees be-
gin exploring for a new
nesting location.
As the scouts return
to the temporary swarm
location they report on
their exploratory efforts
by doing what has been
described as a dance.
It is thought the
dance signals the di-
rection and distance to
the proposed location
for the new nest.
The more animated
and excited the work-
er's dance, the more
likely she will convince
other scouting workers


.' ... -. S B
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PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEW
When the honeybees decide their home is too small, a group will be led away by a new queen
to find better quarters.


to follow her back to the
possible new home site
for further assessment.
All the scout worker
honeybees are female.
Depending on the
number of favorable
reports back to the
swarm, the process of
elimination for a new
home may take up to
several days to com-
plete.
If the swarm is at-
tacked at the temporary


site, they will move to
a new and safer site
while their exploration
continues.
Once the new hive
site has been selected,
all the honeybees will
vacate the temporary
site.
Wakulla County's
beekeepers do their
best keep to their hives
from swarming to new
locations. They do this
by moving some of the


worker honeybees to
empty hive boxes and
install a new queen.
The labor intensive
process takes several
days to be assured the
workers accept the new
queen, and their new
home.
Still in most cases,
it is less of a hassle for
the honeybees to accept
a new hive box and stay
in the old neighbor-
hood.


To learn more about
honeybees in Wakulla
County contact the UF/
IFAS Wakulla County
Extension Office at 850-
926-3931 or http://
wakulla.ifas.ufl.edu/.

Les Harrison is the
Wakulla County Exten-
sion Director. He can
be reached by email at
harrisog@ufl.edu or at
(850) 926-3931.


t'sA- ,. L
The- ;- it's ALL
--- BUZZ- The_
-BUZZ


2014 GREEN LIVING EXPO

Mfrroon lan MiAraro,


I lall IlMl.


JO IN US I 1 1 U

SATURDAY, APRIL 26 AT


HWDSON PARK9A.M. 2 F


*1 > 1


Ochlockonee St.


Bike Events


Hudson Park


Exhibitors
& Vendors


Iki/~ Ij~/


Exhibitors & Vendors


Green Flea Market


Entertainment


( DUKE
E ENERGY.


- IATEP


Capital
Bank


UNIVERSITYsof
IE !JJ UFFLORIDA
3W STUDIOS IFAS Extension


[ I hjii Frnils
S& Exotics
850 92-5644


Wakulla
County
Historical
Society
Fish Fry


PR ilioi
" ilhi


f'l^E- -A^Ct~aktlla
WAKULLAI grfi
^' *r imlT


MARPAN
RECYCLING


SBHBS


www.thewakullanews.com


Exhibitor Forms 850-926-5049 apiasecki@comcast.net Questions? Kathryn Gibson 926-9519 topazgibson@gmaii.com
Visit us on facebook or www.sustainablebigbend.org








Section B


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


GREEN




SCENE


Green Living Expo


returns on


April 26


GREEN LIVING

By SHELLEY SWENSON
Wakulla Extension Service


The Green Living Expo will be held on Sat-
urday, April 26th, at TCC Wakulla and Hudson
Park from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
I trust you have protected the date and have
made plans to attend the 2014 Green Living
Expo.
Sustainable Big Bend Board of Directors and
others have worked to bring a quality educa-
tional event to the area and I know if you attend,
you will enjoy every moment.
There are so many things offered for par-
ticipants of all ages but my favorite part is the
workshops that will be held at TCC, Wakulla and
at Hudson Park.
People wishing to inspire others on some
aspect of sustainable living will share their
expertise.
The entire event is coordinated to bring like-
minded persons together to share and learn
together on ways to save the environment, save
money and save additional, related resources.
Please plan your day around the events as
listed in The Wakulla News in the next few weeks,
go to the website www.sustinablebigbend.org or
call the Extension Office for information on all
aspects of the planned activities.
I hope you will find your way to some of the
educational workshops offered.
They include:
Why Wildflowers Matter
Water Conservation when Landscaping
Using Green Infrastructure to Address En-
vironmental Challenges
Yards that Encourage Butterflies
Landscaping on the Edge (the coastal edge)
Be the Solution to Pointless Personal Pol-
lution
Soil Solarization for Disease Control
Reducing Your Footprints: Little Actions -
Big Results
Growing and Feasting on Salads
Wild Game and Fish Cookery
Beekeeping Basics for Everyone
Calculate Your Carbon and Eco Footprint
(Drop in throughout the day)
Container Gardening: Veggies in Re-pur-
posed Containers
How to Make and Use a Rain Barrel
Have these titles caught your interest? Call
me for times and workshop details.
While you are at the event, engage your
children in a bicycle rodeo, set up a booth to
sell gently used items, eat a delicious meal in
support of a community enhancement project,
make sure your children participants in the eco-
friendly arts and crafts activities and visit the
booths of those who have sustainable products
or want you to know about up-coming commu-
nity events.

Shelley Swenson is Wakulla County UF/IFAS
FCS Agent HI. She can be reached a t 926-3931.

For more on the Green Living Expo, see
stories on Page 5B.


Si -I .


LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS
Chives (foreground) and peppermint (background) grow well together in the UF/IFAS Wakulla
County Extension Demonstration Garden.

Herbs are easy to grow, add flavor, and are healthy


By LES HARRISON
and SHELLEY SWENSON

Spring is really here, and
most Wakulla County vegetable
gardens have been planted.
Those tending these gardens are
awaiting the arrival of summer's
bountiful supply of vegetables.
While all the local vegetables
are tasty, many residents like
to tweak the flavor to suit their
personal preference. The prefer-
ences may be based on a variety
of reasons, but everyone should
have the opportunity to make
their veggies, and other dishes,
be the taste of perfection.
Herbs growing in Wakulla
County gardens are a simple,
easy to grow and inexpensive
way to accomplish flavor im-
provement. Additionally, they
are a healthy alternative to
some other approaches.
Herbs, by definition, are the
leafy green parts of the plant
and differ from spices. Spices
are the dried roots, seed, bark,
berries or fruit of a plant.
Many herbs are associated
with ethnic cuisine. A majority
of these dishes were developed
centuries ago using the herbs
close at hand during a period of
history when rapid transit was
not available.
Most annual and biannual
herbs are simple to grow from
seed. They require moderately


rich, well-drained soil, water
and sunshine.
Herbs adapt well to being
grown in pots and may be used
as ornamental shrubs while
producing flavorful leaves. They
are a popular year around crop
in raised bed gardens.
Perennial herbs such as rose-
mary can be shaped into hedges
while producing distinctly fla-
vored leaves. Rosemary is popu-
lar on grilled vegetables, poultry
and fish.
In addition to seeds, live
plants of the more popular
herbs are available from nurs-
ery centers. Transplanting to
the garden, larger pot, or raised
bed is all that is needed to grow
a flavor enhancer.
There are heirloom herb seed
available for sale through a
variety of catalogs and internet
sites. While some may grow
well in Wakulla County, other
may perform poorly because
some environmental conditions
differ radically from the herbs
home range.
Some gardeners collect and
trade herb seed on a regular
basis. The practice provides
the gardeners an inexpensive
means to try a wide variety of
herb and exchange growing
techniques.
In health conscience 21st
century America, herb use has
increased dramatically as a


substitute for salt as a food ad-
ditive. Excessive salt intake has
had numerous negative health
effects attributed to it, but most
American still consume about
30 percent over the recom-
mended daily allowance.
Herbs will season a wide va-
riety of foods and contain a tiny
fraction of the sodium which is
in table salt. Recipes and diet
recommendations are available
through the UF/IFAS Wakulla
Extension Office.
Herbs can be used fresh or
dried. To preserve a bountiful
harvest, use a food dryer and
then place the herbs in an air
tight container.
To see some of the herbs
which are currently growing in
Wakulla County, stop by the
UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of-
fice and tour the demonstration
garden. Peppermint, chives,
dill, rosemary, parsley and oth-
ers are under cultivation in the
raised beds.
To learn more about grow-
ing herbs in Wakulla County
contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla
County Extension Office at 850-
926-3931 or http://wakulla.
ifas.ufl.edu.

Les Harrison is UF/IFAS
Wakulla County Extension Di-
rector and Shelley Swenson
isUF/IFAS Wakulla County FCS
Agent.


FIRE RESCUE Saturday April 26 10a.m. to 2 p.m.

SOPCHOPPY CITY PARK
awd Enter for a challenge on 99)


& wcau


a series of obstacle trails
stretched over a 2 mile course


OP)I AGES 5-10 ...1 MILE LITTLE MUDDER COURSE
rTO AGES 11+ ...2 MILE ADULT COURSE

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INDIVIDUAL I)ONATIONS $25.
SPONSORSIlIPS AVAIlABLE T-SHIRTS FOR PARTICIPANTS
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To Register or sponsor 850-962-4611 Info: 650-566-2634 or 850-545-0398 or sopchoppymudrun. corn
Directions: From Hwy, 319 turn onto Sheldon St. by Post Office, then left on Park Ave.for 1/2 mi.
All proceeds Wakulla County Fire Explorer Program


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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


cou


TRY BOIL


Photos by LYNDA KINSEY, WILLIAM SNOWDEN AND NICOLE
01----- < -- ^ E

GUILDAYAS
~AW ^
gjuae9alzy -Safww, =2fiiomy ^1IVB^
9 uidly, ^Jwaitz s (nh~aWeit,
A #a a~& LPoa7E, Pj
Estate Planning, Probate
SBusiness Planning & Incorporations
7jmnaud COalz -f.outz, 9?,=7T.
Real Estate Transactions
Title Insurance
850-926-8245
Crawfordville IT'l.'l,,ldmcc
3042 CrawfordvilleHighway 1983 Centre Pom i I .1 I ,
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c:::'-It alwau i, a ui cE id oul Uft&. l i l
FU -5 ULL Lt


SFP W4 B


* Shrimp
* Crickets
* Worms


^ to 3026 Coastal
Angi's Highway,
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(850) 926-3114
M arine (800) 726-3104
Supply Bait Shop
supply (850) 926-1162


IN-SHORE FISHING Is HOT
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More photos online at
thewakullanews.com


.8th Annual Rose Sale


Saturday, April 12
Sunday, April 13


9:30- 2:00
1:00 4:00


382 Crawfordvfile Hwy. Crawfordville, FL

Mark your calendar for the much anticipated sale
of Heide Clifton's heirloom roses. Proceeds support
the various programs sponsored by CHAT.
Just Fruitstwill be
joining us and
donating profits
to CHAT.
Three gallon
containers -
$8.00 each or
three for
Remembehr to stop ancl srne/ tlhe roses. three00o
S21.00.


Event sponsored by:
CHAT of Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326 www.chatofwakulla.orq
Phone: (850) 778-5967 Facebook: CHAT of Wakulla
A copy of the official registration CH-13163 and financial information may be obtained from the FL Division of
Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State.


thewakullanews.com








THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 3B


JIptlQ10 -




J ptiQ 26


Upcoming Events

Thursday, April 10

*THE WAKULLA COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY
is hosting a meet and greet at6 p.m., atthe R.H. Cart-
er Senior Complex on Michael Drive in Crawfordville.
The event will feature Freedom 93.3 Radio Talk Show
Host Will Dance, aka "The Pirate Hunter." Admission
is free and all are welcome. Light refreshments will be
served.

Friday, April 11

The annual SPECIAL OLYMPICS TORCH RUN will
begin at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office parking lot at
10 a.m. and travel to the courthouse. The public is wel-
come. Ceremony concludes at the courthouse.

COVENANT HOSPICE is hosting A CHOCOLATE
AFFAIR from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Tallahassee Antique
Car Museum at 6800 Mahan Drive. Enjoy signature
desserts from area bakeries and restaurants, then
vote for your favorite sweet treat. The event will also
include dinner, music, a cash bar and silent auction.
For tickets and information, visit: eventsatcovenant.
org/chocolateaffair. For questions or sponsorship in-
formation, contact Donna Boyle at 850-575-4998 or
donna.boyle@covenanthospice.org.

Saturday, April 12

ANNUAL WORM GRUNTIN' FESTIVAL in down-
town SOPCHOPPY is free and open to the public. Ven-
dors and food sold throughout the festival. The day be-
gins at 8 a.m. with a 5K race and doesn't stop until the
Worm Grunter's Ball, featuring live music. There will be


Thursday, April 10
Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance
class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session
class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community
Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at
745-6042.


horseshoe, hula hoop, bait casting and worm gruntin'
contests. A complete schedule can be seen at www.
wormgruntinfestival.com.

THE ANNUAL EASTER EGG HUNT will be
at Hudson Park, with registration beginning at 9
a.m. 10:30 a.m. The hunt begins at 11 a.m. Age
groups are 0-3, 4-6 and 7-10. A drawing from each
age group will be held, and the winner will receive an
Easter basket.

HISTORIC SOPCHOPPY HIGH SCHOOL RE-
UNION will begin at 1 p.m. at the school. A brief pro-
gram will begin at 3:30 p.m., followed by a seafood
dinner. Margo Anderson with the Purvis Brothers and
Encore will perform at 7 p.m. The public is welcome.

GENERATION NOW MINISTRIES will host
OPEN MIC IN THE PARK at 6 p.m. This mix and
mingle event at Hudson Park is free -- including ap-
petizers and a silent auction. Anyone interested in
performing should call 980-2021.

THE TALLAHASSEE ORCHID SOCIETY will
host its 48th annual orchid show and sale at the Doyle
Conner Agricultural Center from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and
noon until 5 p.m. Sunday, April 13. The Ag Center is at
3125 Conner Blvd. Admission is free.

WAKULLA CAREGIVER SUPPORT will have a
roundtable discussion and sharing time at 9 a.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant in Crawfordville.

There will be a COMMUNITY BLOOD DRIVE at
Walgreens from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. All donors will receive
a $10 Walgreens gift card.

Tuesday, April 15

The Sarracenia Chapter of the FLORIDA NATIVE
PLANT SOCIETY will meet at 6:30 p.m. at Wakulla
Public Library. Sarracenia's guest, Dan Miller, owner of
Tallahassee's Trillium Nurseries, will give the feature pre-
sentation, his topic is propagation of native wildflowers.
Social time, with refreshments for all, will precede the
6:30 meeting.

Thursday, April 17

THE WAKULLA COUNTY CATTLEMAN'S ASSO-
CIATION will hold their quarterly meeting at 7 p.m. at the
UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office. All members
and prospective members are invited to attend this meet-
ing. A $10 steak dinner will be served to those attend-
ing who have signed up in advance. Contact Jane Ellen
Strickland at tandjfarml@gmail.com or 926-6339 no
later than April 14 to guarantee a steak dinner.

Friday, April 18
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY is
hosting its third annual cemetery tour, this year tour-


Friday, April 11
The official grand opening of the One-Stop cen-
ter will begin at 4 p.m. Come enjoy refreshments, fel-
lowship and learn more about services offered by the
center.


ing cemeteries in the Sopchoppy area with guide Betty
Green. Cemeteries on the tour are Simmons, Grimes,
Oak Park, Revell and West Sopchoppy. Betty will talk
about the history of these cemeteries and tell stories
about some of the people buried there. We will have a
van for transportation. A $5 donation is suggested, but
donations of any amount are welcome. To reserve a spot
on this tour, please call Arlene Vause at 926-1110.

TALLAHASSEE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL WAKUL-
LAwill host a BLOOD DRIVE from 8 to 11 a.m. To make
an appointment call Lori 431-8720. Donors who donate
twice between now and August will receive two free mov-
ie tickets and a free steak dinner from Outback. Blood
drive location is 15 Council Moore Road.

Saturday, April 19,2014

WAKULLAWILDLIFE FESTIVAL is a celebration of
outdoor activities and area heritage. Local musicians, art-
ists, and experts offer festival participants one-of-a-kind
experiences, helpful advice, and personal enrichment in
a neighborhood family atmosphere. At Wakulla Springs
Park, from 8:30 a.m. until 7p.m. Sign up for special tours
and see a schedule at www.wakullawildlifefestival.com.

Wednesday, April 23

THE WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC AND SEX-
UAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE and REFUGE HOUSE,
INC. Introduces Tremayne Moore, author and incest
survivor. Moore will be speaking on how writing saved his
life, and his efforts to educate the public about incest and
teenage suicide. The event will be at noon at First Baptist
Church of Crawfordville. Lunch is provided.

Friday, April 25

THE 41 STANNUAL STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMO-
RIAL REGATTA will be held at Shell Point Beach. This
year's event is scheduled for April 25-27. Pre-register at
www.smithregatta.com.

Saturday, April 26

2014 GREEN LIVING EXPO AND GREEN FLEA
MARKET presented by Sustainable Big Bend, Inc. and
to be at the TCC Wakulla Center and Hudson Park in
Crawfordville from 9 a.m.- 2 p.m. The event is free.

6th ANNUAL ROCK THE DOCK FISHING
TOURNAMENTwill be held at Rock Landing Dock in
Panacea. Captain's Meeting on Friday, April 25 begin-
ning at 6 p.m.; Registration begins at 4 p.m. Entertain-
ment by Tobacco Rd Band, 7 p.m. 10 p.m. For more
information go to www.panacearockthedock.com.

WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY
will host a fish fry to raise funds for the Heritage Vil-
lage Park, which will be the featured food entr6ee for
the Green Expo being held in Hudson Park.


Monday, April 14
Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will
be from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. (Another class is April 21.)
Register for classes at 745-6042.


Live Music

in Wakulla

Friday, April 11

FROM THE HEART
OF SOPCHOPPY will
host Los Angeles-based
BOB MALONE, solo artist
and keyboardest for rock
legend John Fogerty. His
sound is a one-of-a-kind
hybrid of blues, rock, and
New Orleans R&B, deliv-
ered with high-energy pia-
no virtuosity and a unique
voice.
Doors open at 7 p.m.
Performance is 7:30 to
10 p.m. Tickets are $15
and seating is limited. To
reserve tickets, e-mail
fromtheheartrecording-
studio@gmail.com or call
850-962-5282.
A $1.50 convenience
fee will be incurred.
BYOB. Snacks will be
served. The venue is lo-
cated at 55 Rose Street in
Sopchoppy.

Saturday, April 12

RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69
Riverside Dr., St. Marks.
Rogue Orchestra, classic
rock and roll throughout the
weekend.

Sunday, April 13

OUTZ TOO OYSTER
BAR & GRILL, 7968 Hwy.
98, Creature of Habit, 3
p.m. -6 p.m. on the patio.

Friday, April 18

RIVERSIDE CAFE,
69 Riverside Dr., St.
Marks. Stranger Than Fic-
tion, classic rock and roll
through Saturday.

Sunday, April 20

OUTZ TOO OYSTER
BAR & GRILL, 7968 Hwy.
98, Local Motion, 3 p.m. -6
p.m. on the patio.

RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69
Riverside Dr., St. Marks.
Deuce is Wild, classic rock
and roll.


Email your community events to nzema@thewakullanews.net


Worm Gruntin'
Festival

Sopchoppy
All day

Saturday


Sopchoppy High
School Reunion

School
1 to 9 p.m.

Saturday


Government Meetings


Thursday, April 10
THE WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOP-
MENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m.
at the Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites at 3292
Coastal Highway, Crawfordville. Call 984-3966 for more
information.
THE WAKULLA COUNTY MARINE ADVISORY
COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. at the
Wakulla County Administration Building.

Tuesday, April 15
THE WAKULLA COUNTY CHARTER REVIEW
COMMISSION will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m., at the
TCC Wakulla Center.

Tuesday, April 22
THE WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COM-
MITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. at the Wakulla
County BOCC Administration Building.


Clubs, Groups, Regular
Meetings

Thursday, April 10
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey's Steam
Room in Panacea.
ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each
second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI WVakulla office,
2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members
and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of
charge.
WVakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be
held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The WVakulla County
One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for
class at 745-6042.
WAKULLA CONNECTION CAFE is at the Wakulla Senior Cen-
ter from 2 to 4 p.m.
Friday, April 11
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlock-
onee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more
information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.


BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa's Episcopal
Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.
PICKIN' 'N' GRINNIN' JAM SESSION will be held at the senior
center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be
open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive,
Crawfordville.
QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30
a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill
levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.
Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for
two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m.
by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville
Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Saturday, April 12
LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday
from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817
South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, educa-
tion and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune
diseases.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission
by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853
for more information.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organ-
ic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Down-
town Sopchoppy under the giant oak.
WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND
ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is lo-
cated at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.

Sunday, April 13
*ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at
54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for
five classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30
p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The WVakulla County One Stop Community Cen-
ter, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.

Monday, April 14
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker
Street, Panacea.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call
545-1853.
YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior
Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on breath.
RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer's Project of Wakulla
at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship


Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There
is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call
Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.

Tuesday, April 15
VFW LADIESAUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post
on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more informa-
tion.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30
p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more informa-
tion, call 545-1853.
BOOK BUNCH meets in the children's room at the public li-
brary at 10:30 a.m.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI
Wakulla office.
CRAWFORDVILLE LION'S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant.
CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9a.m. at Myra
Jean's Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more infor-
mation at 984-5277.
NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed
with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as
in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla office.

Wednesday, April 16
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at
6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more in-
formation, call 545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m.
at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information,
call 545-1853.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay
UMC on Surf Road at noon.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station
House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more informa-
tion.
BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30
a.m.
KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6
p.m. For information, call 491-1684.
LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.
BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at
the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to
create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.
KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library.
Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to at-
tend.
MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m.
to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road.
Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play.
SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m.
until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy com-
panionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriff's
Office Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.


Wakulla One Stop Community Center Classes


www.thewakullanews.com








Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)


Winners, losers and the waiting game


By DARA KAM
THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDA

TALLAHASSEE, April 4 -
With the 2014 session past the
halfway mark, work for some
Capitol insiders has only just
begun.
It won't be long before the
pizza boxes start piling up
outside offices where legislative
budget writers and their staff
-- and the lobbyists looking to
slip line items into the state's
$75 billion spending plan --- are
soon to be holed up as they iron
out differences between the two
chambers' proposals.
But the budget won't be the
only focus during the second
half of the session. It's also "Hail
Mary" time for players whose
proposals are still in limbo.
The lights haven't gone out
yet on House Speaker Will
Weatherford's high-priority
bill already approved by his
chamber that would allow
illegal immigrants who have at-
tended at least four consecutive
years of Florida schooling to pay
in-state tuition rates at colleges
and universities, up to four
times cheaper than the rates
most pay now. The Senate ver-
sion (SB 1400) will get another
committee hearing next week.
And parents of children with
a severe form of epilepsy are
keeping their fingers crossed
while House and Senate lead-
ers work out a deal regarding a
strain of marijuana that doesn't
get users high but is believed to
put an end to life-threatening
seizures.
Others are already celebrat-
ing at the midway mark. Gov.
Rick Scott spent three days
signing into law election-year
measures that would help mili-
tary veterans, cut costs for driv-
ers and crack down on sexually
violent predators.
Meanwhile, the gambling in-
dustry may be holding a wake.
Despite some high-pressure
lobbying, hefty campaign con-
tributions and a big chunk of
taxpayer change spent on a
gambling study, Senate Gam-
ing Committee Chairman Gar-
rett Richter announced on the
Senate floor Thursday that a


sweeping gambling bill "isn't in
the cards" this year.
But for the vast majority
of those whose issues remain
unresolved, game on.

SENATE FOLDS ON
GAMBLING OVERHAUL

It wasn't much of a surprise
when Richter told the Senate he
lacked the votes to advance a
"big, huge proposed committee
bill" that would have authorized
two casino hotels in South
Florida.
But Richter's announcement
on the floor officially confirmed
weeks-long speculation that any
gambling overhaul was dead
this year.
"It has become increasingly
apparent to me that, even on
our committee, reaching con-
sensus on a 400-page gaming
reform bill just is not in the
cards," Richter, R-Naples, said.
"We don't have a consensus in
the committee."
Richter's efforts became
nearly Herculean after Weath-
erford laid out two require-
ments a sealed deal between
Scott and the Seminole Tribe
of Florida and a constitutional
amendment giving voters future
say over gambling expansion
- for passage of any gambling
legislation.
Now, Scott holds the cards
for any expansion as he renego-
tiates a $1 billion, five-year deal
with the Seminoles set to expire
in mid-2015.
The elements of any new deal
hinge on the tribe's exclusive
rights to have certain games
at its casinos, even if only in
specific geographic areas, and
revenue paid to the state. Fed-
eral law requires any revenue-
sharing agreement with the
state to include something of
value for the tribe, and the feds
have to sign off on any compact
struck between Florida and the
Seminoles. The state Legislature
has to authorize the deal as well.

HOUSE, SENATE READY
FOR BUDGET TALKS

The chambers on Thursday
approved plans to spend about


$75 billion in the budget year
that begins July 1, setting up
negotiations between the two
sides over how much to de-
vote to priorities ranging from
education to child welfare to the
environment.
"The differences aren't as
extraordinary as they have been
in some years, so I don't think
we should have much difficulty
getting to allocations relatively
quickly," said House Appropria-
tions Chairman Seth McKeel,
R-Lakeland.
Despite squabbling on both
sides of the Capitol about ele-
ments of each proposal, the
measures passed by lopsided
margins. The House approved
its $75.3 billion blueprint on a
100-16 vote, with most Demo-
crats joining the Republican
majority in voting for the bill.
The Senate followed that up by
almost unanimously passing
its $74.9 billion budget, with
the biggest dust-up centered
on an effort to split up the joint
College of Engineering operated
by Florida A&M University and
Florida State University.
The Senate budget already
included $10 million for FSU
to begin the planning and con-
struction of an on-campus,
stand-alone engineering school.
An amendment authored by
Sen. John Thrasher a St.
Augustine Republican widely
believed to be a front-runner to
become FSU's next president-
also put $3 million in operating
funds behind the idea.
But black lawmakers said
the proposal evoked memories
of a painful time when the law
school at historically black
Florida A&M was shuttered in
favor of a similar school at FSU.
"The fear of the (alumni) of
Florida A&M University and
many others in this state, par-
ticularly those of color, is that
this is the beginning of the end
of our institution," said Sen.
Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, one
of the last graduates of the origi-
nal FAMU law school. "I want
to know that the lights won't
be dimmed and the door closed
on the FAMU-FSU College of
Engineering."
Thrasher, who helped reopen


the FAMU law school in 2000,
said he hoped the proposal
would strengthen FAMU's pro-
gram, in part by getting rid of
a requirement that students
at the school meet the same
admissions requirements.

SCOTT SIGNS
HIGH-PROFILE BILLS

Scott signed three sets of
bills this week, extending olive
branches to at least two sets
of constituents as he seeks re-
election.
Flanked by military veterans
in Panama City on Monday,
Scott signed the "Florida GI
Bill," modeled after the World
War II-era program and in-
tended to make Florida the
most military-friendly state in
the nation.
The wide-ranging measure
(HB 7015), rushed through the
Legislature the first week of ses-
sion as a priority of Weatherford
and Gaetz, provides university
tuition waivers for veterans,
pays for military and guard base
improvements, is aimed at in-
creasing employment opportu-
nities for veterans and allocates
$1 million a year to market the
Sunshine State to vets.
During a ceremony Tues-
day in the Capitol's Cabinet
meeting room that included
sheriffs, prosecutors, lawmak-
ers, sexual-assault victims and
victims' family members, Scott
signed into law a suite of mea-
sures (SB 522, SB 524, SB 526
and SB 528) aimed at cracking
down on sexually violent preda-
tors. Scott and other speakers
said the bills will make Florida's
children safer.
Supporters hope the legis-
lation will address problems
raised in an investigative report
by the South Florida Sun Sen-
tinel. The newspaper reported
that the commitment of sexu-
ally violent predators under the
state's Jimmy Ryce Act had
slowed to a crawl. Also, it found
that since 1999, nearly 600 sex-
ual predators had been released
only to be convicted of new sex
offenses including more than
460 child molestation, 121
rapes and 14 murders.


The bills make numerous
changes to the state's criminal
and civil-commitment laws. As
an example, SB 526 would lead
to mandatory minimum sen-
tences of 50 years in prison for
what are known as dangerous
sexual felony offenders.
Scott capped the bill sign-
ings Wednesday with a politi-
cally-charged ceremony in the
Capitol that had the tone of a
campaign event even though it
was on government property.
Scott gave final approval to a
measure (SB 156) that will roll
back vehicle-registration fees
that were increased in 2009
amid state budget woes.
Scott repeatedly noted that
the unpopular fee increases
were enacted under former Gov.
Charlie Crist, who is seeking to
unseat Scott during this Novem-
ber's election.
"Everyone knows that Char-
lie Crist signed one of the largest
tax cuts (a property tax cut) in
the history of Florida and was
also forced to make tough de-
cisions to prevent devastating
blows to teachers, students,
first responders, and our most
vulnerable Floridians," said
Kevin Cate, a spokesman for
Crist's campaign, in an email
response.

STORY OF THE WEEK:
Senate Gaming Committee
Chairman Garrett Richter told
the chamber he lacks the votes
to get a comprehensive gam-
bling package out of his com-
mittee and will not present the
bill next week.

QUOTE OF THE WEEK:
"The conference should be
fantastic. It will either be really
short or long and awesome, and
I'm hoping for long and awe-
some. Both Hukill and I have
the same machismo for the
tasks we've had ahead of us this
year, which was to cut taxes, so
it ought to be fun either way, be-
cause the end result either way
is a tax cut." House Finance
& Tax Chairman Ritch Work-
man, R-Melbourne, on pending
talks with Senate counterpart
Dorothy Hukill, R-Port Orange.


Sharing Hometown Recipes, Cooking Tips and Coupons


Make Room on Your Menu for Stuffed Leg of Lamb


"I hope you
enjoy this a "
recipe!"


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describe Stephanie Morris' Stufed Leg of Lamb
recipe. This is a hearty feast fit for a king and would make
a wonderful centerpiece at your holiday meal. Make sure
you use the butcher's twine-it really holds the meat and
stuffing together.
See step-by-step photos of Stephanie's recipe plus
thousands more from home cooks nationwide at:
www.justapinch.com/lamb
You'll also find a meal planner, coupons and chances to
win! Enjoy and remember, use "just a pinch"...

-_faer


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Submitted by: Stephanie Morris. Lancaster. CA (Pop. 156.653)

Brought to you by American Hometown Media


WHITE'S WINES


Trading a desk job for


one in the vineyards


By DAVID WHITE

Finding Shane Finley
was easy.
Via email, we planned
to meet for lunch at
Bourbon Steak in Wash-
ington, D.C., a restau-
rant that's housed at
the Four Seasons.
While the steakhouse
is known for having one
of the best wine lists in
the city, it's typically
filled with teetotaling
lobbyists and power
brokers during the day.
So when I spotted a
redheaded thirty-some-
thing with unkempt
hair wearing jeans and
an untucked flannel, I
figured it was Shane.
I was right.
Finley stopped wear-
ing suits in 2001. That
summer, he quit his job
as an insurance under-
writer in Manhattan to
make wine.
Both his parents
thought the move was
a bit nuts, as his career
was progressing nicely.
They hoped that after
a few months on the
edge of bankruptcy,
he'd get the wine bug
out of his system. But
after interning during
harvest in Sonoma, Fin-
ley was hooked.
So he headed off to
Australia to work an-
other harvest and then
to France's Rhone Val-
ley. When he returned
to the United States
in 2003, there was no
turning back. He quick-
ly built an impressive
resume, and in 2006,
he launched his own
label with the release
of three distinct Syra-
hs. He called it Shane,


naturally.
Finley's decision was
certainly gutsy. But in
wine, this career trajec-
tory is hardly unique.
Consider another
California vintner, Wil-
liam Allen.
Allen first discovered
wine two decades ago.
At first, it was simply a
hobby he made wine
at home and traveled
to Napa, Sonoma, and
other wine destinations
regularly. Eventually,
though, the hobby be-
came an obsession. So
in the summer of 2009,
he moved to Sonoma
during a sabbatical
from his techjob, plant-
ed a vineyard, launched
a wine blog, and helped
three different wineries
with harvest.
The next year, Allen
sourced enough fruit
to make 175 cases of
wine. He named the
winery Two Shepherds
and it has grown larg-
er each year. In 2013,
Wine Business Month-
ly, a trade publication,
named Two Shepherds
one of the 10 hottest
brands in the country.
Or look at Hardy Wal-
lace.
After getting laid off
by Kodak in 2009, Wal-
lace landed a one-year
social media gig with a
large winery in Sonoma.
When that job ended,
he dove in full throttle,
working in the cellar,
running a tasting room,
helping with sales and
marketing, and offering
assistance wherever it
was needed. Simultane-
ously, Wallace launched
Dirty and Rowdy Family
Wines. Today, he can't


produce enough wine to
keep up with demand.
The list goes on.
There's Dan Petroski,
who makes some of
Napa Valley's best Cab-
ernet Sauvignon at
Larkmead and small
batches of bright, stun-
ning whites under his
personal label, Mas-
sican. In 2005, Dan
dropped everything to
work in wine after nine
years in magazine pub-
lishing.
There's Mike Smith,
who makes rich-yet-
graceful wines under
several labels in Napa
Valley, including Myriad
and Quivet. In 2001,
while living in Oregon,
Mike started traveling to
Napa on the weekends
to help Thomas Brown,
a world-famous wine-
maker, for free. Three
years later, Mike and
his family moved to
wine country.
Virtually every wine-
maker is an evange-
list. But few can match
the passion of those
who pack up their pos-
sessions, mid-career,
to produce wine. With
these vintners and oth-
ers like them, their fer-
vor for wine is infec-
tious.
Trading a desk job
for one in the vineyards
may seem foolhardy.
But for wine geeks,
sometimes, there just
isn't a choice.

David White is the
founder and editor of
Terroirist.com. His col-
umns are housed at
Palate Press: The Online
Wine Magazine.


nie Morris
aster, CA
156,653)


Stephar
Lanca
(Pop.1



It- /


JStuffed Leg of
S Lamb . . .


thewakullanews.com


I







THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 5B


COMING UP AT THE GREEN LIVING EXPO


Cycling events will be part of activities


By LEAH BOWMAN
Special to The News

Cycling as a means to living
green will be one focus of the
Green Living Expo on Saturday,
April 26 at Hudson Park and the
adjacent TCC Building in Craw-
fordville.
From 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., activi-
ties and workshops on cycling for
children and adults will be of-
fered at the south end of Hudson
Park.
For youngsters (ages 7 through
12), look for the Wakulla County
Sheriffs Office decorative cycling
trailer. Starting on the hour from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Sgt. William
Jones and Deputy Mike Crum
will fit helmets and will provide
a free helmet for each participat-
ing child.
They will then hold a bicycle
rodeo to teach rules of the road
and safe riding. The trailer car-
ries about a dozen bikes that the
kids can ride for the rodeo.


Kids, you won't want to miss
this workshop. Besides the free,
properly fitted helmet and the
bicycle rodeo, you will get a ticket
for a drawing to take place at the
end of the day. The prize will be
a brand new Mongoose bicycle!
For adults, hourly workshops
will include helmet fitting, a free
helmet plus other terrific cycling
accessories.
Sarita Taylor, from the Florida
Department of Transportation,
will be encouraging bicycle safe-
ty, minor maintenance, commut-
ing, and using bikes as a way to
get around for green living. Her
double tent location will be near
the sheriffs trailer.
In addition to the above hourly
workshops, you can bring your
own bicycle to the third workshop
in the same area any time be-
tween 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. From the
non-profit Bicycle House in Tal-
lahassee, Scot Benton will be on
the grounds with his equipment
to give you a Free Bicycle Safety


Check. He'll share information
about his Tallahassee shop on
Jackson Bluff Road.
For a donation to his shop,
he may be able to repair a bike
problem you are experiencing.
Scot wants you to enjoy cy-
cling because it's good for your
health, good for planet earth,
and can save you big money! So
bring your bike to the Bicycle
House tent.
One more stop you can't miss
at the Expo is the Capital Region
Transportation Planning Agency/
Kimley-Horn tent. Kate Widness,
as representative, will share in-
formation with you about multi-
purpose trails that currently exist
and are proposed for our area of
Florida.
There's a lot going on in the
120-mile loop trail project called
Capital City to the Sea that you
will want to know about.
Don't miss the exciting cycling
events at the Green Living Expo
on April 26!


By MADELEINE H. CARR
Special to The News

What does living
green actually mean?
Changing lightbulbs
to save energy? Using
fewer paper towels? Yes,
and no.
Admittedly, the whole
subject of beginning
your path to a sustain-
able living style, or a
green living style, can be
complicated. You'd have
to bypass some grocery
store lanes altogether
and opt to use different
cleaning supplies.
That is just an ex-
ample.
Above all, the effort
to be more conscious


of your place on earth
is fun.
There are many ways
to Live Green. Sustain-
able Big Bend organiz-
ers are organizing the
next Green Living Expo
on Saturday, April 26
in the center of Craw-
fordville. While you are
getting reacquainted
with your bike, your
husband and kids might
want to take note of
workshops that benefit
your entire family.
The workshops are
held at the TCC En-
vironmental Institute
just south of Hudson
Park. The list of top-
ics is impressive. Some
workshops are inside.


Others are outdoors.
Some will teach you how
to cook that deer your
son or daughter brought
home, or that mess of
fish your wife caught
one weekend.
Get acquainted with
keeping bees and look
forward to fewer aller-
gies as you eat local (or
your own) honey. From
honey to stopping point-
less personal pollution;
from the purpose of
wildflowers to how to
use a green infrastruc-
ture to address environ-
mental challenges; from
controlling diseased soil
with the sun to growing
and feasting on salads
the Expo has a work-


shop for all of us.
Please visit www.sus-
tainablebigbend.org to
select which workshop
you will suggest for your
family. And stop by the
TCC computer lab. It
will be 10 minutes of fun
as you calculate your
carbon and ecological
footprint.
So next time someone
wants to know what
your carbon footprint
is, you will know not to
look at your shoes that
just kicked that last
bonfire.
The full workshop
schedule is available
online or in The Wakulla
News.


Calculate your


carbon footprint

By LYNN ARTZ
Special to The News

What is your carbon footprint? How sustain-
able is your lifestyle?
Find out at the Green Living Expo on Saturday,
April 26. Just drop in and spend 10 minutes in
the computer lab at the TCC Wakulla Center (next
to Hudson Park) between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. You
and your children can use the online calculators
in the computer lab to estimate your carbon and
ecological footprints.
What exactly is a "carbon footprint?" It is a
measure of the carbon emissions that you con-
tribute to earth's atmosphere in one year.
The average carbon footprint of a U.S. house-
hold is about 50 tons of carbon dioxide (C02)
equivalents per year.
When you calculate your carbon footprint at
the Green Living Expo, you will answer questions
about your home size, transportation choices,
diet, recreational activities, and use of electricity.
The online calculator will compute your carbon
footprint based on your answers.
In the U.S., we account for less than 5 percent
of the world's population, yet we are responsible
for 20 percent of global carbon emissions.
These emissions are warming and acidifying
our oceans, melting glaciers and polar ice, rais-
ing sea level, disrupting weather patterns, and
accelerating plant and animal extinctions.
An ecological footprint, on the other hand,
gauges your use of earth's resources. It is basi-
cally an accounting system that tracks how much
biocapacity (nature's supply) there is, and how
much biocapacity people use (take from nature).
In 2007, the average world citizen had an eco-
footprint of about 2.7 hectares while there were
only 2.1 hectares of bioproductive land and water
per person on earth.
Put another way, humanity's total ecological
footprint was estimated at 1.5 planet Earths. In
the U.S., ecological footprints are even higher.
Humanity would need 5-10 Earths to support
the world's population if everyone consumed
resources at the rate that Americans do.
Calculate your carbon and ecological foot-
prints at the Green Living Expo. Both footprints
will show how your choices may be harming our
planet.
The footprint calculators also will show you
ways to reduce your impact on the earth, and
often save money.


Dear EarthTalk:

What's going on with
Earth Day this year and
how can I get involved?

Christine B.
Boston, MA

This coming April 22
will mark the 44th an-
nual celebration of Earth
Day, and the focus this
year will be green cities.
"As the world's popu-
lation migrates to cit-
ies, and as the bleak
reality of climate change
becomes increasingly
clear, the need to create
sustainable communi-
ties is more important
than ever," reports Earth
Day Network, the Se-
attle-based non-profit
that helps coordinate
Earth Day celebrations
and serves as a clearing-
house for related infor-
mation and resources.
The group hopes to
galvanize the support
of more than a billion
people across 192 coun-
tries this Earth Day for
increasing the sustain-
ability and reducing the
carbon footprints of ur-
ban areas everywhere.
By focusing on build-
ings, energy and trans-
portation issues in cities
this year, Earth Day


Network hopes to raise
awareness about the
importance of making
improvements in effi-
ciency, investments in
renewable technology
and regulation reform in
the urban areas where
half the world's popu-
lation lives today. By
2050, three quarters
of us will live in cities,
making it more impor-
tant than ever to adapt
and adopt policies that
take into account how to
support larger numbers
of people with less envi-
ronmental impact.
Earth Day Network
has already mobilized a
network of partners on
the ground in strategi-
cally placed cities and
towns around the world
to organize grassroots
efforts to improve lo-
cal codes, ordinances
and policies that will
help cities become mod-
els for sustainability,
but participation of the
wider public is crucial
to making the Green Cit-
ies campaign a success.
The Green Cities section
of Earth Day Network's
website features a se-
ries of in-depth tool kits
designed to educate the
public about key ele-
ments of the campaign
and serves as the locus


With more of the
world's population mi-
grating to cities, it's
important to adopt
policies to take into
account how to sup-
port larger number of
people with less envi-
ronmental impact.

of organizing around
Earth Day 2014. By
making such resources
freely available, Earth
Day Network hopes to
spur individuals to take
civic action by signing
petitions, sending let-
ters to policymakers and
organizing more events.
Some of the ways to
get involved and raise
awareness in your lo-
cal community about
Earth Day itself and the
need to green our cities
include: hosting a talk
for co-workers or com-
munity members on the


EAI





TAL

Questions

About Our
topic of local sustain-
ability initiatives; start-
ing a farmers' market;
organizing a day of tree
planting, park or beach
clean-up, or an eco-fair;
and leading a recycling
drive to collect as much
metal, plastic and glass
as possible. Schools can
register with Earth Day
Network and get access


EARTHTALK/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS





FTH







& Answers

Environment
to many student-friendly
resources, including an
interactive Ecological
Footprint Quiz and envi-
ronmentally-themed les-
son plans tailored to the
needs of different grade
levels from kindergarten
through high school.
College students can
work with dining servic-
es to start a composting


Earth Day Network
hopes to galvanize sup-
port of a billion people
across 192 nations to
focus on reducing the
carbon footprint of
urban areas.


program or switch over
to reusable plates and
flatware or start a com-
petition between classes
or residence halls to
reduce waste and elec-
tricity use.
Those looking to ini-
tiate just participate
in an Earth Day event
need look no further
than Earth Day Net-
work's website, where a
comprehensive database
of Earth Day events
around the world is up-
dated daily. Even better,
keep in mind that every
day is Earth Day and the
planet and generations
to come will benefit
from every positive ac-
tion you take.

GOT AN ENVIRON-
MENTAL QUESTION?
Send it to EarthTalk,
c/o E/The Environ-
mental Magazine,
P.O. Box 5098, West-
port CT 06881 USA;
or e-mail earthtalk@
emagazine.com.

EarthTalk is written
and edited by Roddy
Scheer and Doug Moss
and is a registered
trademark of E The
Environmental Maga-
zine (www.emagazine.
corn).


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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


Sports


sports news and team views


TRACK


Athletes attend three meets


Harris adds school records, Florida Relays title; Cole also sets new school record


By PAUL HOOVER
WHS Track Coach

The local track teams were
busy last week, as they at-
tended three meets. There
were several highlights from
the week's events, with the
most notable being Madison
Harris adding an 800 meter
championship at the huge
and ultra-competitive Florida
Relays on Thursday to her
already impressive resume.
Her time of 2:13.33 is a
new school record and the
leading time in the state
this year. In her heat, the
first four girls ran the four
fastest times recorded so far
this year in the event. Then
at the Capital City Track &
Field Classic at Chiles High
School on Saturday, she took
a break from the 800 meters
to compete in the 400 meters
and ran to a new PR (personal
record) time of 0:57.87, also
setting a new school record.
High jump aces Corion
Knight and Keith Gavin also
traveled to Gainesville on
Friday for the Florida Relays,
and though they didn't jump
quite up to their expectations,


Madison Harris out in front on a record-setting run.


they still made their presence
known, with both clearing a
height of 6'4" and placing 3rd
and 5th respectively.
On Tuesday at the Loretta
Smith Freshman/Sopho-
more Meet at Rickards High
School, freshman middle dis-
tance ace, Bryce Cole ran in
the open 800 meters for only
the second time this season
and didn't waste the opportu-
nity. Leading from the begin-
ning, he continued to build
on his lead and finished in a
new PR and school record of
2:03.47.


Not to be outdone, sopho-
more Keith Gavin, one of
the best high jumpers in the
state, showed that he can
do more than just the high
jump. He won the high jump
(6'2") and the long jump
(21 '04") and also placed third
in the 100 meter (11.26) and
200 meter (23.24) sprints and
ran on the 4x100 meter relay
team that also placed third.
On the girls side, Adrianna
Mitchell once again showed
her athleticism and versatil-
ity by winning the long jump
(17'00"), placing 4th in the


100 meters (13.17) and 6th
in the 200 meters (28.12).
Others who won their events
at this meet included: Haleigh
Martin (800 meters, 2:47.6),
Albert Smythe (1600 meters,
4:56.01) and Evan Guarino
(3200 meters, 12:02.46).
On Saturday, the teams
traveled to Chiles High School
for the Capital City Track &
Field Classic. This meet is the
last regular season meet be-
fore the teams enter the post-
season competition at the
District Meet on Thursday,
so some athletes were rested
and some ran an abridged
schedule.
The first event of the day
was the girls 4x800 meter
relay and the local squad of
Margaret Wiedeman, Kayla
Webbe, Haleigh Martin and
Lydia Wiedeman ran a new
season best time of 10:29.29,
finishing comfortably ahead
of runner-ups Valdosta High
and Thomasville High School.
One of the other highlights
of the meet was the girls
4x400 meter relay. The team
of Lydia Wiedeman, Haleigh
Martin, Adrianna Mitchell
and Madison Harris fought


hard throughout the race and
kept trading places with the
runners from FAMU High and
Thomasville High in a hard
fought battle. Valdosta High
had an insurmountable lead
when anchor Harris received
the baton, but it was essen-
tially over for Valdosta and
Thomasville, as Harris ran
one of her patented efforts
and brought the WHS team
home with a 5-second lead
over FAMU and a 6-second
lead over Thomasville, to fin-
ish as the runner-up team in
the excellent time of 4:16.39.
Others scoring points in
the meet included Harris
(5th, 200 meters), Mitchell
(5th, 500 meters), Martin
(5th, 800 meters), M. Wiede-
man (6th, 1600 meters), Kay-
la Webbe (2nd, 3200 meters),
Shelby Alsup (7th, discus),
boys 4x400 meter relay (7th),
boys 4x800 meter relay (7th).
The teams will begin post-
season competition on Thurs-
day, April 10, with the Dis-
trict Meet that will be held
at Florida High School, with
field events and preliminaries
beginning at 1 p.m. and finals
at 6 p.m.


By PAUL HOOVER
WHS Track Coach

When WHS distance
runner Stanley Linton
graduated in 2012 he
had a dream to contin-
ue his running career
into college.
In high school he
had won Distict and
Regional Champion-
ships and, his senior
year had placed eighth
in the state in cross
country and seventh in
the 3200 at the State
Meet and had come
within one second of
Tyler Price's school re-
cord time in the 5K, so
he had the credentials
to attract some college
interest.
However, Linton was
the recipient of the
major ROTC scholar-
ship and he was slat-
ed to attend Florida
State University. FSU
has one of the most
elite cross country and
track programs in the
nation and Linton's
times did not meet
their scholarship or
walk-on standards. So
Head Coach Bob Bra-
man had to tell him,
"Sorry, but you are not
fast enough to run at
FSU."
While many athletes
would have given up on
their dreams, Linton
just went to work. For
the next year he upped
his weekly mileage and
raced almost every
weekend. By the end


FILE PHOTO
Stanley Linton in
2012.

of 2013 he had won 27
road races, completed
two marathons, was
the Gulf Winds Track
club Grand Prix win-
ner, with a new all-time
points total, and was
named the Gulf Winds
Male Runner of the
Year.
Although being told
from numerous sourc-
es that he was racing
too much, Linton had
a plan. Unfortunately,
after another time trial
with FSU in August
2013, he was once
again told, "You are
still not fast enough."
Not to be deterred,
Linton just upped his
training once again.
This time he cut down
on his racing and start-
ed running 70-80 miles
a week, with one goal
in mind.
On March 21, Linton
found himself standing
on the starting line at


Mike Long Track on the
FSU campus preparing
to run the track 5K at
the FSU Relays as an
"unattached" athlete.
Fifteen minutes and
four seconds later he
crossed the finish line
in sixth place in the
collegiate race. As he
exited the track, Coach
Braman approached
him and asked if he
was ready to give up
the road races. When
Linton indicated he
was, Braman said,
"Come see me on Mon-
day."
After their meeting
on Monday, March
24, Linton left Coach
Braman's office as the
newest Seminole track
athlete. He was finally,
"fast enough" and his
dream had come true.
It has often been
said that the true test
of a man is how they
deal with adversity and
Linton had proven his
character. He had a
dream and he was go-
ing to do whatever it
took to achieve it. He
never got discouraged,
he just worked harder
each time he heard
that he "wasn't fast
enough."
Well, now he is fast
enough and his future
is ahead of him with
the elite FSU program
and, if the past is any
indication, don't bet
against him being suc-
cessful at that elite
level.


BASEBALL

Little League night is rescheduled

StaffReport School baseball's day, March 28, w
Little League night, postponed because
Wakulla High originally set for Fri- weather. It has bee


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as
of
en


re-set for Tuesday,
April 15 at 6 p.m.
when the War Eagles
host Taylor County.
Little League play-
ers who wear their
team shirt will get free
admission, hot dog
and drink, and run
the bases after the
game.


.4


This year's Wakulla War Eagle boys varsity soccer team.

SOCCER


Boys celebrate successful


season at banquet


By DON GREGG
Assistant Coach

The final meeting of
the WHS Boys Soccer
was held March 31, at
the War Eagle Cafe.
The season-ending
banquet for both the
Varsity and Junior Var-
sity squads began with a
meal and then presenta-
tion of awards.
The coaching staff
would like to thank all of
the parents and fans for
supporting the teams
during a very successful
season.
Special thanks goes
out to the Boosters Club


and all of those involved.
Thanks also goes out
to the WHS Administra-
tion and staff.
Awards for the Junior
Varsity were presented
by the coaches:
Best Offensive Play-
er Brandon Bennett.
Best Defensive Play-
er Albert Smythe.
MVP Overall Isaiah
Capel.
Awards for the Var-
sity were presented by
the coaches:
MVP Overall Jacob
Martinez.
MVP Offense- Mi-
cah Gray and Josh Vick
(Josh was also the top


scorer goals and points).
MVP Defense -E. J.
Yeboah.
Unsung Hero Jon-
athan Phillips and Jor-
dan Vaughan.
The 2014-15 Season
will commence in the
middle of this coming
October (just about six
months to go).
The future team has
great potential and
should do well next sea-
son. Preparation is the
key to success.
See Coach Wallace
for further information
when school starts in
August.


FOOTBALL

Gridiron Club ready for season


Special to The News


The Wakulla Grid-
iron Club is gearing up
for the 2014 football
season!
We have been over-
whelmed by the support
of the community as
our Wakulla Gridiron
reserved seating section
almost sold out last year
and we currently have a
waiting list for this year.
Wakulla Gridiron Club
members enjoy the ben-
efit of having parking up
front that is patrolled by
security, entrance to all
JV and Varsity regular
season football games,
reserved seating and
free admission to the


Football Banquet. We
would like to remind all
current Wakulla Grid-
iron Club members that
they must renew their
membership in order
to keep their same re-
served seats by May 30.
Spring football kicks
off on April 24, and fin-
ishes with the annual
Blue and Red Game on
May 23 and a spring
game on May 30 right
here on Reynolds Field
at J.D. Jones Stadium.
Tickets for a fried
chicken dinner and ad-
mission to the Blue and
Red Game will be sold
for $10. Tickets should
be purchased in ad-
vance from any football


player or by contacting
a Wakulla Gridiron Club
member. Admittance to
the game will be $3.
Several different
business advertising
packages are available,
so check our website
at www.wakullagrid-
ironclub.com or contact
Ginger Franks (850-
980-4202), Larry Goldin
(850-591-9107) or Caro-
lyn Hurst (850-566-
1523).
The next Wakulla
Gridiron Club meeting
will be held on Tuesday,
May 6 at 6:30 p.m. in
the Wakulla High School
Football Field House.
Come out and join us!


TRACK


Former WHS star


Linton to run for FSU


thewakullanews.com







www.thewakullanews.com





Thinking

AA mL m


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 7B


Cover

Current

Democracy

Docks

Drink

Enjoys

Error

Expense

Forth

Irish


Kings

Loser

Motor

Nosey

Olive

Ovens

Parachutes

Picnic

Places

Plate

Rhyme

Robot

Shirt

Smells

Smoke

Smoothly


Sound

Spite

Spray

Steps

Stops

Strip

Swords

Talked

Touches

Uncomfort-

able

Upright

Victim

Wagon

Window


S S J V I C T I M B


STEP


Even Exchange by DonnaPettman
Each numbered row contains two clues and two 6-letter answers. The two answers differ from each other
by only one letter, which has already been inserted. For example, if you exchange the A from MASTER
for an I, you get MISTER. Do not change the order of the letters.


1. Third-place medal
2. Hooded jacket
3. Hammerhead, e.g.
4. Bring into existence
5. Observe
6. Mildewed
7. Bird abode
8. Expunge
9. Potter or Houdini
10. Concoct


Z Charlotte, Emily, Anne
A Commons
R Rundown hovel
T Pleat
A Glinda or Hazel I _
M Corroded R
V Beehive P
G __ Handbag
A Rush U _
_ V Goal or purpose T


T _
S


S _


2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


BY
HENRY BOLTINOFF


CAN YOU TRUST YOUR EYES? There are at least six differ.
ences in drawing details between top and bottom panels. How
quickly can you find them9 Check answers with those below.
J3oUleWS S! UodV' G '6UISs'UJ S 01!i S 16! S "*OllesS S! SSeI| *'
"BUISSiw si HOG " "U ussiw Si IsodpaGZ" "z S uss i SpueqpeoH L as0ou9JaJiO


IuaUIl '1UOAUI "0[ LIO!M 'qOIeM S
AJJnH 'AJJBH *6 eseeJo 'eleeJo "t'
asJnd 'abJnd 9 oeqsS 'iJeqs
Ajeidv '/ JIelAV 7' slJed 'e)Jed 'Z
Aisny 'AjsnN -9 euoJg 'ezuoJs 1
SJOMSUE
si amisue
9SueqLXl UOAI


The following organiza-
tions are proud to support
Wakulla County Education
through sponsoring the
Newspaper in Education
Program.


by Hal Kaufman -
COIN TOSS! Ask someone to flip a random number of coins into a hat. f
Askanother person to count the coins in the hat to see ifthenumberisodd '
or even without telling you.
Nowannouncethatyouwilltoss *
\ O N some more oins into the hatso
that if the original total was odd,
2 TOIN the new total will be even, and if
2 -T the original total was even, the
3- TO N new total will be odd.
3- _T Secret: Simply add an odd
4 _TON number and you cannot fail.
5 _T AL FRESCO! These three pals named A] have names that are
S_ ivN_ anagrams of theirfavorite sports: 1. AI Blesab. 2. Ad Flobot. 3.
S. ..TO Ad Blisird. How quickly can you arrange letters to make their
6 .. .TON games?
j.-x-~i ospreiiii " "lnedOO4 *z "lleqasea "*i
WEIGHTY WORDS
TO PONDER
LETrS seeifyou cancarry
a heavy weight on your
shoulders specifically in
TONS. Shown above are
six stepped-offTONtens,
which you are asked to /i&/^(^ f/~
identify in accord with defi-
flitiQfl$.
1. Haircuts, for in-
stance.
2. Cave Man's era (two
words).
3. Set off a blast.
4.lIdealistictypeoflove /(^ v}^/f
relationship.
5. Male voice between
tenor and bass.
. 6. Bare-bones frame-
work, man or beast.
Afterwardstymakingup
a new set of TON words. _____________ 9
"UOaI^s "auoIeo FIND TWINS! Challenge: Find Claw Guy and his twin brother
QauOis Z "sjnsuo i Lamong the nine figures above. Study all details carefully.


31Vld S 31dVS
3sund d U3ddns
SdUVM I MVSdIU
SHVld H 3SVHHd
SiUVd S SdVUS
ISV38 a G 3iSV8
a3dVl N G3INVd
SiUOd V uOiSVd
a30VU H 03HOUV
SdV3H S S3dVHS
dAVHI I IHVdVI
SIMV3H A S3lAVHd
JMlSUV
SPDIAwssizznd


SEE DOG! Fido's on the lookout perhaps for other lookouts.
Apply colors by number: I1- Red. 2-Lt blue. 3-Yellow. 4-Lt
brown. 5-Flesh tones. 6-Green. 7--Dk. brown. 8-LtL purple.


Kids' Maze


2014 Kng Features Synd, Inc


1VWASUC S Wakulla Count Coalition orYo

CSUWakulla County Coalition for Youth


Account

After

Amuse

Armor

Began

Chart

Cigar

Claim

Cloud

Coats


by Helene
Puzzles4Kid Hovane
WORD FUN
Study the two words on each line to find the ONE letter in the left
column that is NOT in the word in the right column. Write the extra
letter on the blank space. Then read DOWN to answer this riddle:
WHAT DO SEA MONSTERS EAT FOR LUNCH?
FRAMES REAMS STRAPS PARTS
IMPART TRAMP PHRASE PEARS
SHAPES HEAPS RIPSAW WARPS
ARCHED RACED SUPPER PURSE
STAPLE PLATE
PASTOR PORTS
PANTED TAPED
BASTED BEAST
For more puzzle fun, go to www.www.brainzzles.com


SPELLBINDER
SCORE 10 points for using all the
letters in the word below to form
two complete words
HESITANT
THEN score 2 points each for all
words of four letters or more
found among the letters.
Try to score at least 50 points.
"eS 'WIH :aUJOSOM1 aqiSSOd


Im Hasa-IS I


Am








Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


CLASSIFIE [D A D martin g at just $12.00 a week!


Crawfordville
April 11 & 128a-2p k4 Ik
Furniture, household
items, china, garden Spacious 4BR/2BA
tools, rods & clubs. 2087 SF, 2 car
More! garage on one acre.
23 Sarah Court Living room has
(Mill Hollow vaulted ceilings and
Subdivision) wood burning FP.


Selling
Something?
Advertise with a
Classified Ad



For As little As
$12 A Week
. 877676-1403


IVlUOI I D UlUUIII I IUOb
walk-in jetted tub
and separate tiled
shower. Private back-
yard, $184,900 (Price
includes new roof.)
Call Wakulla Realty
Susie Tooks
(850) 545-6956


I(Imd6
\^{ PEOPLE
9ME VMlllllll~o


Wakulla |Sonva
Realty L Hal
Lic. Real Estate
\ JBroker
"Specializing in Wakulla Co"

850-926-5084


RENTALS:

2 Br 1 Ba Duplex $625 mo.

2Bd 1 Ba Hs $650 mo.

3Br 2 Ba Hs $950 mo.

4 Bd 2 Ba Hs. $1,300 mo.


COMMERCIAL
1500 sq ft $1500 mo.
Crawfordville

700 sq ft $700 mo.
Tallahassee

APPLICATION AND
SEC. DEP. REQUIRED

WAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE
AVAILABLE


We are currently
seeking a
Sales Associate
to join our staff at our
ATV, SxS, Motorcycle,
and Golf Car
factory franchised
dealership.
This person should be
self-motivated and
family oriented with a
general understand-
ing of mechanical ve-
hicles. Must be availa-
ble full-time, Monday
- Friday: 9am 6pm.
Salary and commis-
sion TBD.
Please Submit All
Resumes IN PERSON
BELLAMY'S
2273 Crawfordville
Hwy. Crawfordville,
Fl., 32327


ETraes/
SkfllsI


\ATTN: Drivers!
S Bring a Rider! $$$
Up to 50 cpm $$$
S BCBS + 401k + Pet
1 & Rider Quality
Hometime Orienta-
tion Sign On Bonus
CDL-A Req
877-258-8782
www.ad-drivers.com

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
Maintenance Worker
Parks & Facilities Management
The Wakulla County Board of County Commission-
ers is seeking qualified applicants for a full-time,
benefitted position of Maintenance Worker in the
Parks & Facilities Management Division. Ability to
operate light equipment and lift 40 Ibs are required.
Some weekend and holiday work is required. See
www.mywakulla.com for additional qualifications
and requirements.
Starting salary is $8.50 an hour. To apply, send a
Wakulla County employment application to Human
Resources, P.O. Box 1263, Crawfordville, FL
32326. Questions should be directed to Deborah
DuBose at 850.926.9500. Drug screening is re-
quired. Veteran's preference will be given to quali-
fied applicants. Wakulla County is an Affirmative
Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Applications
must be received on or before 5 p.m. on Thursday,
April 17, 2014.


Averitt Express has
New Dedicated
CDL-A Driver
Opportunities w/
Excellent Benefits &
Regular Hometime.
855-430-8869
AverittCareers.com
Equal Opportunity
Employer -
Females, minorities,
protected veterans
and indivdiuals with
disabilities are
encouraged to
apply.

CDL-A Team
Owner Operators:
$2,500 Lease
Incentive! Team
Dedicated Routes.
Great Revenue &
Regular Weekly
Home Time!
888-486-5946
NFI Industries
nfipartners.com


DRIVER
TRAINEES
NEEDED NOW!
Learn to drive for US
Xpress! Earn $700 per
week! No experience
needed! Local CDL
Training. Job ready in
15 days!
(1-888)368-1964



Experienced OTR
Flatbed Drivers
Earn 50 up to 55 cpm
loaded. $1000 sign on to
qualified drivers. Home
most weekends. Call:
(843)266-3731 /
www.bulldoghiway.com
EOE


DRIVERS:
Home EVERY
Weekend, Dedicated
Southern Lanes &
OTR!
All Miles PAID
(Loaded & Empty)!
Or Walk Away Lease:
NO Money Down,
NO Credit Check!.
CALL: 888-880-5911




AIRLINE
CAREERS
begin here Get FAA
approved Aviation
Maintenance Techni-
cian training. Housing
and Financial aid for
qualified students. Job
placement assistance.
Call AIM
877-741-9260
www.fixiets.com





QUEEN PILLOW TOP
MATTRESS AND BOX
SET NEW, STILL IN
FACTORY PLASTIC
$195. OBO
1-850-596-6437





CRAWFORDVILLE
Saturday 8a-1 p
Indoor moving sale.
Some furniture,
household items
Good Stuff!
89 Jenny Lynn Rd


Crawfordville
April 11 & 12 8a-2p
Furniture, household
items, china, garden
tools, rods & clubs.
More!
23 Sarah Court
(Mill Hollow
Subdivision)





Happy Jack
Liquivic
Recognized safe &
effective against
hook & roundworms
by US Center for
Veterinary Medicine.
Ace Hardware
(850-926-3141) www.
haDpviackinc.com

Stop scratching &
gnawing.
Promote healing
& hair growth.
Stamp out
ITCHAMCALLITS!
Shampoo with Happy
Jack Itch No More,
apply Skin Balm
add Tonekote to diet...
Ashley Feed
& Hardware
(850) 421-7703
www.happyjackinc.com





NEAR BOONE, NC
2+/-ac. tract 350ft of
rushing streams
3000ft elevation pri-
vate and secluded
underground utilities
and paved roads
from only $9900. Call
1-877-717-5273ext91


Spring yard aleJ!

FRIDAY, APRIL 11 and
SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 7am-until
MUST NOT MISS! household items, dishes,
small kitchen appliances, clothes, books, tapes,
lots of new & used items. Something for everyone!
First Baptist Church of Wakulla Station 945 Woodville Hwy.


L; k
Spacious 4BR/2BA
2087 SF, 2 car
garage on one acre.
Living room has
vaulted ceilings and
wood burning FP.
Master Bedroom has
walk-in jetted tub
and separate tiled
shower. Private back-
yard, $184,900 (Price
includes new roof.)
Call Wakulla Realty
Susie Tooks
(850) 545-6956
Tennessee Log
Home Sale!
Saturday April 12th
Only. New 1200sf
ready to finish
log cabin on 10
acres with FREE Boat
Slip on 160,000 acre
recreational lake.
Only $89,900.
Excellent financing.
Call now
877-888-0267, x76
Two residential lots
on Old Bethel Road
5-7 acres each.
Wooded with road
frontage.
$6,000 per acre.
Dan Ausley
(850) 566-6761 or
(850) 385-6363



Absolute Auction-
Black Warrior River,
creek, Us Hwy
78,Walker County,
Alabama parcels,
Jasper residential
lots,
April 17,1:00 pm
Details:
Gtauctions.com
205.326.0833-
Granger, Thagard &
Assoc, Inc,
JackIF Granger #873


Fictitious

5023-0410 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
Fictitious Name
Notice under Fictitious
Name Law. pursuant to
Section 865.09, Florida
Statutes. NOTICE IS
HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under
the fictitious name of:
Lawhon Farms
located at 179 Sanders
Cemetary Road,
Sopchoppy, FL 32358, in
the County of Wakulla, in-
tends to register the said
name with the Division of
Corporations of the Flor-
ida Department of State,
Tallahassee, FL.
Dated at Sopchoppy,
FL, this 2 day of April,
2014.
/s/ Krissia Lawhon
President
Published April 10, 2014.



5015-0410 TWN
4/24 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE
Vehicle will be sold for
towing and storage.
Charges pursuant to F.S.
713.78
Sale: 04/24/2014, 9:00 AM
at 1502 Shadeville Rd.,
Crawfordville, FL
2000 Mitsubishi Vin#
JA4LS21HOYP025274
Hobby's Towing &
Recovery reserves the
right to accept or reject
any and/or all bids.
1502 Shadeville Rd
Crawfordville, FL 32327
850-926-7698
Pub.: April 10, 2014.

Selling
Something?
Advertise
with a
Classified
Ad




For
As Little
As $12
A Week
,877676-1403


A-I PRESSURE
CLEANING
FREE ESTIMATES
Licensed John Farrell 926-5179 566-7550



JV PollyNichols'
., Special Touch Cleaning Service
A .:riiruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential
) 519-7238
p',n I,4- it's uptoGod, 'I.l i /i, it's uptoyou" 926-3065
LICENSEDAND INSURED


AMunge's Tree Service



I^ FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!






CETA HETN &. AIR: Sales, nsalaio Sevc
ELCRIA SERVICES..,ns, ighing iin o


Eric's Clean Cut S vs, u.C
'Licensed & Insuremd'
-lawn Care -Handy-Man Tasks
-Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal


Facial Waxinqs speciaiht Cuts flat Top&




hA, !/O / Ce^r/


| >Full Service Hair Salone


850-926-6020
J liqMriai es Cut Cut ,olor yeatier Jc.( s a


F REE HAIRC U TT


with the purchase of any color service IA
when you book your appointment with


JESSICA ORASHLEY! 850926-6772
* Mention this ad when you book your appointment with Jessica Hood and Ashley Braswell at
'I. Dazzles Hair Studio 158 Ochlockonee St. (behind Hardee's) in Crawfordville.
h &. -- -- -- --- -- -- - -- -


Call Jerry Payne Today!
850-528-5603 850-926-5611


) Lowest Rates in the Area

A/C parts replacement and Service A/C Rebuilding
A/C Compressors and Evaporator f
Coil Cleaning/Replacement
A/C Leak check
Indoor/Outdoor fan motors

EPA Certified Licensed & Insured i .


* Interior / Exterior painting, driveways, docks, decks
* Furniture painting or refinishing
* Pressure washing homes, buildings, driveways
* Reliable, honest and reasonable

Call Today for a FREE estimate.

850-363-1237 or 850-926-4399


Miss Sunshine Pop
Star Music Pageant
Hey Girls!
Here's Your Chance
Win $5,000 Cash, a
Recording Contract,
and Much More
Prizes!
18+ Only Call
(904) 246-8222
Cypress
Records.com



NURSING
CAREERS
begin here Get
trained in months, not
years. Small classes,
no waiting list.
Financial aid for
qualified students.
Apply now at
Centura Institute
Orlando
(888)220-3219


R & v eRvidee
Peep Clean4prHi9 fCleew- Cle8a uS
j = WeeKlI- Biweekll- MaflhIl
F' ee E6thae6 ULicensed & Insured



^.Qa Yat. C tM85.458Mor.
'^SS3 ^ 85O.745.8O4W


(4p a ( a J -Tree Trimming

mg &m : Stump Grinding
332.. Yard Maintenance
(but our prices are down-to-earth)! Flower Beds



call//PAT GREEN'S LAWN SERVICE
All Locally Owned and Operated
for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! LLicensed and Insured

Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461


IlL


thewakullanews.com









www.thewakullanews.com


THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 9B


5007-0417 TWN
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION
STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA MECKLENBURG COUNTY
In the District Court
Claudia R. Folts v. Jerry M. Hawkins
Mecklenburg County Case No. 14-CVD-4087
Dear Mr. Hawkins:
Take notice that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the
above-entitled action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows:
Equitable Distribution; and
Absolute Divorce.
You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than May 13,2014,
and upon your failure to do so the party seeking service against you will apply to the
court for the relief sought.
This, the 3 rd day of April, 2014
JAMES, McELROY & DIEHL, PA.
Beth T. Hondros
600 South College Street, Charlotte, North Carolina 28202
Telephone: (704) 372-9870 Attorneys for Claudia R. Folts
April 3, 10 & 17, 2014.


F Se


F u ,


5099-0410 TWN
vs. Langley, Jerry T. Jr. 65-2012-CA-000120 Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000120 DIVISION:
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JERRY T. LANGLEY, JR., et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale
dated January 6, 2014 and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000120 of the Circuit
Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and JERRY T LANGLEY, JR.; JERRY T LANGLEY,
SR.; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JERRY T. LANGLEY, SR. N/K/A MARGARET LANGLEY; SU-
SAN DIANE LANGLEY; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the high-
est and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURT-
HOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 8th day of May, 2014, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment:
COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB WHICH IS THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE
NORTHWEST QUARTER (NORTHWEST 1/4) OF LOT NUMBER 35, HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF
LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES EAST
FOR 1,978.47 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST FOR
905.2 FEET TO AN IRON PIN ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE
ROAD NO. 365, THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 365 FOR 568.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINN-
ING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTHERLY ALONG SAID WESTERLY
RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY FOR 75.06 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 11 MIN-
UTES 50 SECONDS WEST FOR 348.6 FEET, TO A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF STEVE
REVELL AND LOUISE M. REVELL PROPERTY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 19 DEGREES 25 MINUTES
EAST FOR 70 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 50 SECONDS FOR
312.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LYING IN THE NORTHWEST QUARTER
(NORTHWEST 1/4) OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY LOT NO. 35, COUNTY OF WAKULLA, STATE OF
FLORIDA.
TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2005 CAVALIER MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A
FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO: VIN: BL05GA0212948A AND BL05GA0212948B.
A/K/A 1628 SPRING CREEK HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2606
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60)
days after the sale.
WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 7, 2014.
Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk
Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L.,
P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018
**See Americans with Disabilities Act
Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call
Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905.
April 03 & 10, 2014. F 12004113

5098-0410 TWN
vs. Myers, Amber G. 2013-CA-000145 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 2013-CA-000145
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association
Plaintiff,
-vs.-
Amber Gail Myers; Uknown Spouse of Amber Gail Myers; Unknown Parties in Posses-
sion #I, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the
above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said
Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other
Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claim-
ing by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not
known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as
Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Order dated March 13, 2014, entered in Civil
Case No. 2013-CA-000145 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for
Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plain-
tiff and Amber Gail Myers are defendantss, I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will
sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA
COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on April 24, 2014, the following described prop-
erty as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit:
LOTS FORTY-EIGHT (48) AND FORTH-NINE (49), BLOCK "P", MAGNOLIA GARDENS, AS
PER PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC
RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court ap-
pearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.
Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT,
Wakulla County, Florida
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT
ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF:
SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHI, LLP
2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431
(561)998-6700, (561)998-6707
April 3 & 10, 2014. 12-251208 FC03 CHE

5097-0410 TWN
Smith, Michael J. 65-2010-CA-000149 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 65-2010-CA-000149
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MICHAEL J. SMITH A/K/A MICHAEL JAMES SMITH; et.al.,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated
the 13th day of March, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000149, of the
Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein
WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and MICHAEL J. SMITH A/K/A MICHAEL JAMES
SMITH R.H. DONNELLEY PUBLISHING & ADVERTISING, INC., A DISSOLVED CORPORA-
TION C/O BEDNARZ, GEORGE F. DIRECTOR OF A DISSOLVED CORPORATION, A REGIS-


s,"I
Foreclosure Salle:
Action Notices


F Sa


TERED AGENT BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. F/K/A COUNTRY WIDE BANK, N.A. C/O CT
CORPORATION SYSTEM (FL), R.A. UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL J. SMITH A/K/A MI-
CHAEL JAMES SMITH N/K/A ANGELA SMITH JUSTINE H. SMITH A/K/A JUSTINE HARDY
SMITH A/K/A JUSTINE HARDEE SMITH; and UNKNOWN TENANTS) N/K/A REBECCA
SMITH IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this
Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF
WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE,
FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 24th day of April, 2014, the following described property
as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:
SEE EXH A.
ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE.
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe
Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled
court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before
the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired,
call 711.
Dated this 14th day of March, 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
Submitted by:
Choice Legal Group, P.A.
1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309
Telephone: (954)453-0365, Facsimile: (954)771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438
DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516
eservice@clegalgroup.com
EXHIBIT "A"
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD NO.369 WITH THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 74 OF THE HARTSFIELD
SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 05
MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 67.52 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 43
SECONDS EAST, 321.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 77 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 32 SECONDS
EAST 171.84 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING
CONTINUE NORTH 77 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 367.72 FEET, THENCE RUN
SOUTH 04 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 20 SECONDS EAST 255.38 FEET, TEHNCE RUN SOUTH 77
DEGREES 17 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 99.91 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 79 DEGREES 26
MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 61.35 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 13
SECONDS EAST 44.43 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 76 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 08 SECONDS
WEST 150.32 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST
295.68 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
TOGETHER WITH A 20.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT BEING MORE
PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THEEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD NO. 369 WITH THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 74 OF THE HARTSFIELD
SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 05
MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 67.52 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 43
SECONDS EAST 321.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 77 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 33 SECONDS
EAST 539.56 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 77 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 33 SEC-
ONDS EAST 247.16 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT. THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES
39 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 6.74 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 47 DEGREES 53 MINUTES
50 SECONDS EAST 215.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 21 SEC-
ONDS EAST 8.90 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE LYING ON THE WESTERLY MAINTAINED
RIGHT-OF-WAY OF MCCALLISTER ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 17 MINUTES
11 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY 17.99 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED
RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN SOUTH 47 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 224.28 FEET TO
A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 04 SECONDS
EAST 4.92 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 251.84
FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 04 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 20.20 FEET TO THE
POINT OF BEGINNING.
AND ALSO TOGETHER WITH A 25.00 FOOT WIDE INGRESS AND EGRESS EASEMENT, BE-
ING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS:
COMMENCE AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF
STATE ROAD NO: 369, WITH THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY OF LOT 74 OF THE HARTSFIELD
SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 05
MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 67.52 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 43
SECONDS EAST 321.06 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 77 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 33 SECONDS
EAST 32.73 FEET TO THE EASTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY OF BENTON ROAD FOR
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 06 DEGREES
22 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY 25.17 FEET,
THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN NORTH 77 DEGREES 02 MIN-
UTES 33 SECONDS EAST 143.67 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 43
SECONDS WEST 25.06 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 33 SECONDS
WEST 139.11 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING.
April 03 & 10, 2014. 10-16963

5096-0410 TWN
Eglton, Antonio M., Sr. 65-2009-CA-000515 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA.
CASE No. 65-2009-CA-000515
CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EGLTON, SR. ANTONIO M., et. al,
Defendants.
RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment entered in Case
No. 65-2009-CA-000515 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for
WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE MAN-
HATIAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, and, EGLTON, SR. ANTONIO M., et. al.,
are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash at, the
FRONT DOOR of the Courthouse 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL
32327, at the hour of 11:00 AM, on the 24th day of April, 2014, the following de-
scribed property:
Lot 1, WAKULLA FARM ESTATES UNIT 3, a subdivision as per Map or Plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 3, Page 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida.
Also a portion of Lot 2, Wakulla Farms Estates, Unit 3, as per the Map or Plat thereof re-
corded in Plat Book 3, Page 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and
being more particularly described as follows: Begin at the Northwest corner of said
Lot 2, and run thence South 74 degrees 48 minutes, 40 seconds East a distance of
216.30 feet; thence North 89 degress 18 minutes 16 seconds East a distance of 193.38
feet to a concrete monument (broken) marking the Northeast corner of said Lot 2,
also said concrete monument lying on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of Mount
Zion Road (a County Maintained road); thence leaving said Westerly right-of-way


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RENTALS


S43 Squaw 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit.

14 Liberty Road 3/2, $975. mo., $975. Deposit. Available May 1.

2086 Spring Creek Hwy. 3/2, $750. mo., $750 Deposit.
Pets w/ approval.

68 Lance Lane 3/2 $875, No Pets, no Smoking.


S28 Endeavour Drive -3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft.,
has hardwood floors, 4 car carport, boat slip, community club house and pool. $2,000
mo. No smoking, No pets.
25 E George's Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated com-
munity w/pool. 2BR/2BA Condo, hardwood floors, washer & Dryer. $950. mo. No
SSmoking, No Pets.
2BR/2BA Marina Village Mashes Sand Rd. 2 Story Condo # B5. Fully Fur-
nished, washer/Dryer, Community Pool, Boat Slip w/ Lift. $1,200 mo. No smoking,
No pets.
695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/
L Dryer, Pool, Boat Slips. No Smoking, No Pets! $1,100. mo. No smoking, No
Dets.


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Foreclosure Sale
Action Notices
1 11


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boundary of Mount Zion road and run North 82 degrees 18 minutes 22 seconds West
along the North boundary of said Lot 2, a distance of 405.76 feet to the Point of Begin-
ning. Together with a 2002 Craftmade Valumade Mobile Home, bearing Vin #
C02447AGA and C02447BGA.
Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.
DATED this 19th day of March, 2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Circuit Court
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
GREENSPOON MARDER, P.A.,
Trade Centre South, Ste 700,
100 West Cypress Creek Road,
Ft Lauderdale, FL 33309
**IMPORTANT**
If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the Clerk of the Court's disability coordinator at 3056
Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days
before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notifi-
cation if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are
hearing or voice impaired, call 711.
April 03 & 10, 2014. 234720554

5024-0417 TWN
vs. Martin, Delinda P. 2013-CA-014422-0 Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO: 2013-CA-014422-O
21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
PLAINTIFF,
vs.
DELINDA P. MARTIN AKA DELINDA P. THOMAS AKA PERIANN HARRELL, ET AL.,
DEFENDANTSS.
NOTICE OF ACTION
(Constructive Service Property)
TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LEGATEES,
LIENHOLDERS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SUCESSORS IN INTEREST OR OTHERWISE ALL
OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING BY AND THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF
JOHN M. MARTIN.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a residential mortgage on the
following real property, lying and being and situated in WAKULLA County, Florida,
more particularly described as follows:
LOT 15, WOODLAND HERITAGE, PHASE 2 (UNRECORDED). COMMENCE AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE I WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST ALONG
THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 9, A DISTANCE OF 1275.62 FEET TO THE CEN-
TERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT (LIMESTONE LANE), THENCE RUN SOUTH
00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 1635.29 FEET TO
THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DE-
GREES 23 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 561.88 FEET TO THE
CENTER POINT OF A CUL-DE-SAC HAVING A 50.00 FOOT RADIUS, THENCE RUN SOUTH
89 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 399.47 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT,
THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 561.27 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 21 SECONDS WEST
399.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER
AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY30.00 FEET THEREOF. SUBJECT TO A CUL-DE-SAC EASEMENT
OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER THEREOF.
TO INCLUDE 1997 MERRITT MOBILE HOME; ID NUMBERS FLHMLCP53717043B AND
FLHMLCP53717043A; AND TITLE NUMBERS 73253994 AND 73253992.
COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 263 Limestone Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327
has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Busch, Slipakoff & Schuh, LLP, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose ad-
dress is 225 Water Street, Suite 1290, Jacksonville, Florida 32202, within thirty (30) days
of the first publication, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before
service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint.
This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in THE
WAKULLA NEWS.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court at, __, Florida, on the 3rd day of April,
2014.
BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court
Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
Andrea Edwards Martin Florida Bar 805181
Busch, Slipakoff & Schuh, LLP.
225 Water Streetm, Suite 1290, Jacksonville, FL 32202-5175
Telephone: (770) 790-3550 Facsimile: (770) 790-3520
April 10 & 17, 2014.

5021-0417 TWN
vs. Nelson, Craig 65-2013-CA-000032 Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000032 DIVISION
US BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN
TRUST INC., MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-WF1,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CRAIG NELSON, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated Jan. 6,
2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000032 of the Circuit Court of the Second
Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which US Bank National Associa-
tion, as Trustee for Cifigroup Mortgage Loan Trust Inc., Mortgage Pass-Through Certifi-
cates, Series 2006-WF1, is the Plaintiff and Craig Nelson, Tenant #1, Tenant #2, The Un-
known Spouse of Craig Nelson, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the










Page O10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


thewakullanews.com


FoelsreSl,


Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327,
Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 8th day of May, 2014, the following
described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

TRACT 75, BLOCK 'C, SOPCHOPPY RIVER ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 62, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 163 PERSIMMON RD SOPCHOPPY FL 32358-0714

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.

Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 6 day of January, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk

Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743
(813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.

April 10 &17, 2014. WB -013665F01


5020-0417 TWN
vs. Lischalk, Alan B. 10-00340 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 10-00340 DIVISION

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ALAN B. LISCHALK, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
March 24, 2014, and entered in Case No. 10-00340 of the Circuit Court of the Sec-
ond Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Cor-
poration, is the Plaintiff and Alan B. Uischalk, Bunting Neighborhood Property Owners
Association, Inc, Estelle F. Lischalk, Songbird Subdivision Property Owners Association,
Inc., are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida
at 11:00 AM EST on the 1st day of May, 2014, the following described property as set
forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

LOT 17, BLOCK B OF SONGBIRD PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT
THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 88, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULA
COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 7 BUNTING DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.

Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 24 day of March, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.

April 10 &17, 2014. 11-92083


5018-0417 TWN
vs. Chaaban, Patty 2013-CA-000213 Clerk's Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 2013-CA-000213

LAVERNE FRANZEN, and EDITH FRANZEN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PATTY CHAABAN, DIANE NICHOLS, AND CENTENNIAL BANK,
Defendants,
CLERK'S NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Summary Final Judgment of Fore-
closure dated March 4, 2014, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and
best bidder for cash, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville High-
way, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on April 24, 2014, the following described
property:
SEE EXHIBIT A

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after
the sale.

Dated: April 2nd, 2014
BRENT X. THURMOND Clerk of Court
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

EXHIBIT A
Lot 7, Block "B" Otter Lake Road Estate, a subdivision recorded in Plat Book 2, Page
54, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida.

Together with that certain 1983 "MANA" Single Wide Mobile Home, ID #063827S7512,
Title #20145927.

April 10 & 17, 2014.

5019-0417 TWN
vs. Tucker, Kimberly D. 65-2010-CA-000199 Notice of Rescheduled Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO:65-2010-CA-000199 DIVISION

U.S. BANK, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
KIMBERLY D. TUCKER, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated
March 20, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of
the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank,
N.A., is the Plaintiff and Kimberly D. Tucker, Todd W. Tucker, Magnolia Ridge North
Homeowners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as
nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lendingtree Loans, a California Corpora-
tion, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida
at 11:00 AM EST on the 24th day of April, 2014, the following described property as
set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure:

LOT 37, BLOCK "A", OF MAGNOLIA RIDGE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF,
AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 55 THROUGH 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 204 MAGNOLIA RIDGE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.

Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 19 day of March, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813)221-4743

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accomodalon to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator
not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901.

April 10 &17, 2014. 10-38222

5017-0417 TWN
vs. Wilson, Ruby heirs 13000400CAAXMX Notice of Action
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION
Case #: 13000400CAAXMX

Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Company
Plaintiff,
-vs. -
Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of
Ruby Wilson, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under,
Against The Named Defendant(s); et al.
Defendantss.
NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY

TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees
of Ruby Wilson, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through,
Under, Against The Named Defendant(s); CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN UNTIL
GUARDIAN AD LITEM IS APPOINTED

Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defend-
ants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their
respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and
trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named
Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the
aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown


Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris.

YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a
mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Wakulla
County, Florida, more particularly described as follows:

COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY
OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST
CORNER OF LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLOR-
IDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE
EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 5 OF SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY, 116.52 FEET TO A CON-
CRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING,
THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST, 256.31 FEET TO A
CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS
WEST, 120.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 45
MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST, 435.32 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN
NORTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST, ALONG A FENCE LINE, 141.33 FEET
TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 47 SEC-
ONDS EAST, 655.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID
LOT 5, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID
EAST BOUNDARY, 256.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING
IN LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.

TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, YEAR: 1999, MAKE: FLEET-


WOOD, VIN#: GAFLW34A289230K21 AND VIN#: GAFLW34B289230K21.

more commonly known as 70 Mother Natures Place, Crawfordville, FL 32327.

This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of
your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for
Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL
33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiff's attorney or immedi-
ately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.

WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 4th day of March, 2014.
Brent X. Thurmond, Circuit and County Courts
(COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to par-
ticipate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer-
tain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Talla-
hassee, Florida 32301; (950) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court
appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the
scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call
711.

April 10 & 17, 2014. 13-266821 FC01 ALL


5002-0410 TWN
vs. Shell Point Sanctuary, L.LC. 12-215-CA Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY,
FLORIDA
CASE NO. 12-215-CA

CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company,
Plaintiff,
v.
SHELL POINT SANCTUARY, LL.C., et. al.,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Consent Final Judgment of Foreclosure
dated the 18th day of March 2014 and entered in Case No. 12-215-CA of the Circuit
Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein
CADC/RADC Venture 2011-1, LLC is Plaintiff, and Shell Point Sanctuary, LLC, et. al.
are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at
the courthouse located at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 am on the 24th day of April, 2014,
the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit:

SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT "A"

A PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER
THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM
WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE.

BECKER & POLIAKOFF, P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff
Alhambra Towers, 121 Alhambra Plaza, 10th Floor, Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Phone: (305) 262-4433; Fax: (305) 442-2232
By: /s/ Adam Cervera, Esq. Florida Bar #81679

EXHIBIT "A"

PARCEL 1:

Begin at the Northeast corner of Snug Harbor, a subdivision as per map or plat
thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County,
Florida, and thence run North 39 degrees 25 minutes 02 seconds East 48.23 feet to a
point of curve to the left; thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a radius of
3206.82 feet thru a central angle of 00 degrees 42 minutes 44 seconds for an arc dis-
tance of 39.86 feet; the chord of said arc being North 39 degrees 03 minutes 40 sec-
onds East 39.86 feet; thence run North 40 degrees 07 minutes 46 seconds East 122.99
feet to a point of curve to the right; thence run Northeasterly along said curve with a
radius of 24.60 feet thru a central angle of 53 degrees 39 minutes 54 seconds for an
arc distance of 23.04 feet; the chord of said arc being North 66 degrees 57 minutes
43 seconds East 22.21 feet; thence run South 86 degrees 12 minutes 29 seconds
East 149.91 feet; thence run South 78 degrees 17 minutes 07 seconds East 42.61
feet; thence run South 35 degrees 12 minutes 56 seconds West 52.65 feet; thence run
South 04 degrees 37 minutes 14 seconds West 43.40 feet; thence run South 88 de-
grees 18 minutes 28 seconds East 36.15 feet; thence run North 37 degrees 50 minutes
38 seconds East 27.70 feet; thence run North 81 degrees 23 minutes 08 seconds East
104.25 feet; thence run North 53 degrees 56 minutes 44 seconds East 82.27 feet;
thence run North 18 degrees 03 minutes 52 seconds West 51.00 feet; thence run North
80 degrees 31 minutes 44 seconds East 76.65 feet; thence run North 30 degrees 15
minutes 38 seconds East 64.75 feet; thence run North 25 degrees 52 minutes 46 sec-
onds West 70.63 feet; thence run North 53 degrees 46 minutes 10 seconds West 58.45
feet; thence run North 73 degrees 12 minutes 04 seconds West 54.50 feet; thence run
North 12 degrees 51 minutes 16 seconds West 58.37 feet; thence run North 02 de-
grees 54 minutes 38 seconds East 155.12 feet; thence run North 76 degrees 57 min-
utes 08 seconds East 192.32 feet; thence run North 05 degrees 08 minutes 23 seconds
East 110.22 feet; thence run South 77 degrees 06 minutes 12 seconds West 229.21
feet; thence run North 57 degrees 33 minutes 31 seconds West 153.77 feet; thence
run South 16 degrees 11 minutes 05 seconds West 125.30 feet; thence run South 00
degrees 08 minutes 20 seconds East 261.35 feet; thence run South 40 degrees 31
minutes 46 seconds West 43.30 feet; thence run South 60 degrees 03 minutes 34 sec-
onds West 4.25 feet; thence run North 31 degrees 04 minutes 55 seconds West 33.00
feet; thence run South 60 degrees 05 minutes 34 seconds West 26.01 feet; thence run
South 31 degrees 04 minutes 55 seconds East 33.00 feet; thence run South 60 degrees
05 minutes 34 seconds West 23.06 feet; thence run South 70 degrees 35 minutes 52
seconds West 41.32 feet; thence run South 75 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds West
123.10 feet; thence run South 51 degrees 41 minutes 46 seconds West 189.76 feet;
thence run South 44 degrees 13 minutes 40 seconds West 76.20 feet; thence run
South 70 degrees 28 minutes 22 seconds West 103.33 feet; thence run North 82 de-
grees 24 minutes 50 seconds West 39.54 feet; thence run South 28 degrees 32 min-
utes 33 seconds West 114.65 feet; thence run South 88 degrees 18 minutes 40 sec-
onds West 276.31 feet to a rod and Cap; thence run North 00 degrees 24 minutes 58
seconds West 97.20 feet to a rod and cap; thence run North 89 degrees 49 minutes
58 seconds West 90.97 feet to a rod and cap; thence run North 00 degrees 00 min-
utes 32 seconds West 495.01 feet to a concrete monument; thence run South 80 de-
grees 14 minutes 51 seconds West 388.44 feet to a point on the Easterly right-of-way
boundary of State Road No. S-367, said point lying on a curve concave to the South-
westerly, thence run Northwesterly along said right-of-way boundary and along said
curve with a radius of 1179.28 feet thru a central angle of 02 degrees 55 minutes 27
seconds for an arc distance of 60.18 feet, the chord of said arc being North 10 de-
grees 29 minutes 29 seconds West 60.18 feet to a concrete monument; thence run
North 80 degrees 13 minutes 22 seconds East 2390.66 feet to a rod and cap; thence
run South 06 degrees 50 minutes 11 seconds East 508.01 feet to a rod and cap;
thence run South 06 degrees 50 minutes 42 seconds East 288.48 feet; thence run
South 69 degrees 51 minutes 46 seconds West 341.52 feet; thence run South 86 de-
grees 24 minutes 34 seconds West 1047.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING.

PARCEL 2:

Lot 1, Block "B", A REPLAT OF LOTS 16 THRU 36, OF SNUG HARBOR, a subdivi-
sion as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 117, of the Public Rec-
ords of Wakulla County, Florida.

LESS AND EXCEPT any lots or parcels of land described In Exhibit "A" hereinabove,
previously released by the Mortgagee, including, but not limited to the lots or parcels
of land described In the following Instruments: Partial Release of Mortgage recorded
In Official Records Book 564, Page 163, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Offi-
cial Records Book 561, Page 599, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official
Records Book 562, Page 608, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Rec-
ords Book 657, Page 825, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records
Book 562, Page 325, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book
563, Page 79, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded in Official Records Book 562,
Page 368, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book 562, Page
369, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book 582, Page 498,
Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book 589, Page 518, Partial
Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book 562, Page 609, Partial Re-
lease of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book 562, Page 610, Partial Release
of Mortgage recorded in Official Records Book 561, Page 598, Partial Release of
Mortgage recorded in Official Records Book 582, Page 499, Partial Release of Mort-
gage recorded In Official Records Book 592, Page 318, Partial Release of Mortgage
recorded in Official Records Book 568, Page 829, Partial Release of mortgage re-
corded In Official Records Book 816, Page 873, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded
In Official Records Book 563, Page 78, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Offi-
cial Records Book 562, Page 448, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded in Official
Records Book 808, Page 730, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded in Official Rec-
ords Book 562, Page 367, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded in Official Records
Book 532, Page 808, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book
552, Page 543, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded in Official Records Book 572,
Page 814, Partial Release of Mortgage recorded In Official Records Book 617, Page
780, all of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida.

April 3 & 10, 2014. S17444/331199

5001-0410 TWN
Vs. Sheppard, Norman D. & Mildred C. 2009-446-CA Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter
45
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2009-446-CA
CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, as succes-
sor in interest to Wakulla Bank,
Plaintiff,
vs.
NORMAN D. SHEPPARD and MILDRED C. SHEPPARD, husband and wife, AND ALL
UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN
NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE,
WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES,
HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 18, 2014, in
Case No 2009-446-CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for
Wakulla County, Florida, in which CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC is the Plaintiff and
NORMAN D SHEPPARD and MILDRED C SHEPPARD are the Defendants, I will sell to the
highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor front lobby of the Wakulla County Court-
house, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida 32327 at 11:00
a.m. on April 24, 2014, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and
more particularly described as follows'
See Attached Exhibit "A"

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property
owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale
DATED' March 18, 2014
BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court
[CIRCUIT COURT SEAL]
BY'/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk

Garvin B Bowden, Esq
Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden,
Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A.
1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308

EXHIBIT "A"
Commence at the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West,
Wakulla County, Florida; thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds West
585.44 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF
BEGINNING; thence run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 678.63 feet to
a rod and cap; thence South 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 127.99 feet to a
rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds East 100.00 feet to a
rod and cap; thence South 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds West 231.05 feet to a
rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds East 564.24 feet, thence


South 89 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds East 358.76 feet to the POINT OF BEGINN-
ING, containing 5.00 acres more or less

And
Commence at a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 3 South,
Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes
43 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 457.55
feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89
degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds West 127.89 feet, thence run North 00 degrees 03 min-
utes 26 seconds West 678.63 feet, thence run North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 sec-
onds East 127.99 feet, thence run South 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds East
683.76 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 2.00 acres, more or less.

And
Commence at a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 3 South,
Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes
43 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 7 a distance of 37.55 feet
to an iron pipe on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. 369 for the
POINT OF BEGINNING From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 89 degrees
59 minutes 43 seconds West along said South boundary 420.00 feet to a re-rod,
thence run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 227.92 feet, thence run
North 89 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds East 420.03 feet to the Westerly right-of-way
boundary of said State Road No. 369, thence run South 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 sec-
onds East along said right-of-way boundary 233.53 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING


containing 2.224 acres, more or less.

And
Commence at a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 3 South,
Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes
43 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 37.55 feet
to an iron pipe on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. 369, thence
run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary
467.06 feet to a re-rod for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
thence run South 88 degrees 28 minutes 26 seconds West 420.14 feet to a re-rod,
thence run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 227.92 feet to a re-rod,
thence run North 87 degrees 42 minutes 29 seconds East 420.32 feet to a re-rod on the
Westerly right-of-way boundary of said State Road No. 369, thence run South 00 de-
grees 03 minutes 26 seconds East along said right-of- way boundary 233.54 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING containing 2.224 acres, more or less.

And
Commence at a re-bar marking the Southeast corner of Section 7, Township 3 South,
Range 1 West, Wakulla County Florida, and thence run North 89 degrees 59 minutes
43 seconds West along the South boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 37.55 feet
to an iron pipe on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of State Road No. 369, thence
run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary
233.53 feet to a re-rod for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING
thence run South 89 degrees 14 minutes 20 seconds West 420.03 feet to a re-rod,
thence run North 00 degrees 03 minutes 26 seconds West 227.92 feet to a re-rod,
thence run North 88 degrees 28 minutes 26 seconds East 420.14 feet to a re-rod on the
Westerly right-of-way boundary of said State Road No. 369, thence run South 00 de-
grees 03 minutes 26 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 233.53 feet to the
POINT OF BEGINNING containing 2.224 acres, more or less.

Published in THE WAKULLA NEWS: April 03 & 10, 2014


5000-0410 TWN
vs. Ard Sr., Aubry J. 652010CA000320CAXXXX Notice of Sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION
CASE NO: 652010CA000320CAXXXX DIVISION

PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SHERYL P. JONES, et al,
Defendant(s).
NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuantto a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January
24, 2014, and entered in Case No. 652010CA000320CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of
the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PHH Mort-
gage Corporation, is the Plaintiff and Sheryl P. Jones, are defendants, the Wakulla
County Clerk of Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on
the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway,
Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 24th day of
April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of
Foreclosure:

LOT 12, BLOCK B, WILDWOOD ACRES, UNIT NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION ACCORDING TO THE
PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF
WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.

A/K/A 97 JEAN DR, CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327

Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the
property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days af-
ter the sale.

Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 27th day of January, 2014.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Wakulla County, Florida
(CICUIT COURT SEAL)
By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Plaintiff:
Albertelli Law
P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623
(813)221-4743, (813)221-9171 facsimile, eService: servealawtalbertellilaw.com

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special
accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina-
tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla
County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone:
(850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv-
ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw-
fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850)926-0905; Fax: (850)926-0901.

April 03 & 10, 2014. WB- 11-92078


NoiceoCrdtr


mii I


5016-0417 TWN
Murray, Lacy Albert 14-33-CP Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
File No. 14-33-CP Division Probate
IN RE: ESTATE OF LACY ALBERT MURRAY,
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of LACY ALBERT MURRAY, deceased, whose date
of death was January 27, 2014, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and
the Personal Representative's attorney are set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served
must file their claims with this courtWITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A
COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS
AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702
OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2)
YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENT'S DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April 10, 2014.
Personal Representative:
/s/ KATHRYN ROBERTS MURRAY
1145 Rawls Road, Cairo, GA 39828
Attorney for Personal Representative:
/s/ MARION D. LAMB, III Florida Bar No.: 0500951
217 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 (850) 385-0501
April 10 & 17, 2014.

5009-0410 TWN
Tillman, Marianne C. 14000026CP Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
CASE No., 14000026CP PROBATE DIVISION
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARIANNE C. TILLMAN
Deceased.
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the estate of Marianne C. Tillman, deceased, File
14000026CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida
32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal
representative's attorney is set forth below.
All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims,
on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this
court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON
THEM.
All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands
against decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims
must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
This date of the first publication of this notice is April 3, 2014
Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives:
Frances Casey Lowe, Esq., Florida Bar No. 521450
Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A
3042 Crawfordville HighwayCrawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245
Co-Personal Representatives:
Suzanne Strauss
8202 Glen Court, Jessup, MD 20794
James P. White
100 N. 31st Avenue, Hollywood, FL 33021
April 3 & 10, 2014.

5003-0410 TWN
Walsh, Mary Joyce 14-29-CP Notice to Creditors
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO.: 14-29-CP
IN RE: ESTATE OF MARY JOYCE WALSH a/k/a, JOYCE C. WALSH,
Deceased
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
The administration of the Estate of MARY JOYCE WALSH A/K/A JOYCE C. WALSH,
deceased, Case No. 14-29-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County,
Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville,
Florida 32327.
The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Rep-
resentative's Attorney are set forth below. All creditors of decedent and other per-
sons having claims or demands against decedent's estate, including unmatured,
contingent, or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is served must file
their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE SERVICE OF A COPY
OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of decedent and persons having claims
or demands against the decedent's estate, including unmatured, contingent, or un-
liquidated claims, must file their claims with this Court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS
SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED
TWO YEARS OR MORE AFTER DECEDENT'S DEATH IS BARRED.
The date of first publication of this notice is April 3, 2014.
Personal Representative:
DAVID P. WALSH a/k/a DAVID P. WALSH, SR.
301 Hitichi Ridge Road, Juliette, Georgia 31046
c/o RHIANNON L. BRUSCO, Hoffman & Associates, Attorneys at Law, L.LC.
6100 Lake Forrest Drive, Suite 300, Atlanta, GA 30328
Florida Bar No. 969327 Attorney for Personal Representative 404-255-7400
April 3 & 10, 2014.


5005-0410 TWN
4/14 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant
to Florida Self-Storage Fa-
cility Act, Florida Statutes,
Chapter 83, Part IV that
Wakulla Realty will hold a
sale by sealed bid on
Monday, April 14, 2014 at
10:00 a.m. at 2655-B
Crawfordville Hwy. of the
contents of Mini- ware-
house containing per-
sonal property of:
Mitzi Durbin
Caryl Harrell
Before the sale date of
April 14, 2014, the owner


may redeem their prop-
erty by payment of the
outstanding balance and
cost by mailing it to Post
Office Box 464, Craw-
fordville, Florida 32326 or
by paying in person at
2655 U.S. Highway 319,
Crawfordville, Florida.
Publish: April 3 & 10, 2014.

5022-0417 TWN
4/26 sale
PUBLIC NOTICE
NOTICE OF SALE
Notice is given pursuant
to Florida Self-Storage Fa-
cility Act, Florida Statues,
Chapter 83, Part IV that


Crawfordville Self Storage
will hold a sale by sealed
bid on Saturday, April
26th, 2014, at 10:00 a.m.
at 3291 Crawfordville
Hwy. of the contents of
Mini-Warehouses contain-
ing personal property of:
JOHN JOHNSON
JENNIFER PITTS
Before the sale date of
April 26th, 2014, the own-
ers may redeem their
property by a payment of
the outstanding balance
and cost by paying in
person at 3291 Craw-
fordville Hwy., before
10:00 a.m.
April 10 & 17, 2014.


5014-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014TXD 021
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that USAmeriBank the holder of the following certificate


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THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014 Page 11B


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has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number
and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was
assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 93 Date of Issuance May 27th, 2010
Parcel # 25-2S-02W-000-01423-006
Description of property:
25-2S-2W P-5-6-M-45 COMM. AT THE NE COR. OF THE NW 1/4 OF THE NE 1/4 OF SEC.
25 PARCEL CONT. .55 ACRE M/L OR 242 P 475 OR 365 P 437
Name in which assessed Neal & Tracv White
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1,2014.

5013-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 020
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US Bank the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate #2104 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 00-00-077-000-10322-003
Description of property:
LOT 77 HS P-33-3-M-21B IN NW 1/4 OF LOT 77 HS OR66 P 174 &OR 72 P315 OR 102 P
22 & 23
Name in which assessed G & S Inc. of Tallahassee
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: Carla M. Ziemer, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

5012-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 019
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that EMILE JUSTIN MEYER the holder of the following certif-
icate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate
number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in
which it was assessed are as follows:
Certificate # 981 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 09-6S-01W-000-04864-003
Description of property:
9-6S-1W P-1-3-M-60-1 LYING IN SEC 9-6S-1W OR 77 P624


-D


-D


Name in which assessed SYCAMORE CREEK INC
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1,2014.

5011-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 018
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate # 942 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel # 07-6S-01W-026-04663-000
Description of property:
OCHLOCKNEE SHORES SECTION B LOT 12 DB 52 P 117 & OR 99 P 937 OR 169 P 855 OR
290 P850 OR601 P380
Name in which assessed MARTHA S & HAROLD A HALL JR
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk
Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.

5010-0501 TWN
NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED
TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 017
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK the holder of the following certificate has
filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and
year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was as-
sessed are as follows:
Certificate # 1015 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011
Parcel #30-2S-01E-000-04952-002
Description of property:
30-2S-1E P-5-2-M-70 PARCEL CONTAINING 1 ACRE OR 74 P 54 & OR 96 P 484 OR 150 P
143
Name in which assessed SAMUEL LEE SCOTT JR & PATRICIA ANN SCOTT
Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate
shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall
be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on May 14, 2014 at 10:00 A.M.
Dated: March 12, 2014
Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk
By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk


-D


-D


Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida
Published April 10, 17, 24 and May 1, 2014.


Dis


Di i I


ITa De I

Noie


5006-0424 TWN
Greta Melinia Rodriguez & Mario Rodriguez Castillo 14-DR-96 Diss. of Marriage
PUBLIC NOTICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA
COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No.: 14-DR-96 Division: Family Law
GRETA MELINIA RODRIGUEZ,
Petitioner,
and
MARIO RODRIGUEZ CASTILLO,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE
(NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT)
TO: MARIO RODRIGUEZ CASTILLO
(Last Known Address): 7225 EAST MAIN STREET, SOUTH SOLON, OHIO, 43153
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for dissolution of marriage has been filed against
you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it
on GRETA MELINIA RODRIGUEZ, whose address is 137 TAFFLINGER ROAD, CRAW-
FORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 on or before May 3, 2014, and file the original with the
clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, before
service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be
entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition.
The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property
should be divided: NONE
Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the
Clerk of the Circuit Court's office. You may review these documents upon request.
You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court's office notified of your current
address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved
Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on
record at the clerk's office.
WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain
automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in
sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.
Dated: March 24, 2014.
CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT
(COURT SEAL)
By: /s/ Gail Smith, Deputy Clerk
Published April 3,10, 17 and 24, 2014.


Brain


Teaser


1 _2 3 4


4 5 6 7


8 9 6 3


2 4 1


3 9


9 5 8


9 1 24


1 6 8 5


7 619 3

Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section
has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with
numbers 1Ito 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one
of the nine sections that you've already used elsewhere in that
section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each
horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of
nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly fill
every square.


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1 Sheep sounds
5 Robert Frost work
9 video (Internet
sensation)
14 Singer Fitzgerald
15 Not pro-
16 Pleasant smell
17 Another person
19 John and Jane and Jim
and Janet
20 Anger
21 Dir. away from SSW
22 "I don't think so"
24 Tiny crawler
25 Gin and
27 Pitching great
Ryan
29 Roasted garlic has it
35 Eminem songs
38 Church seat
39 Kind of resin
40 Individual
41 He has a carrot nose
and coal eyes
44 Golfer's peg
45 Swipe
47 Possesses
48 Writing instruments
for brave crossword
solvers
49 Kind of bee
53 Perspiration
54 Bowling alley parts
58 Charlotte of "The
Facts of Life"
61 and flow
62 Wal-Mart founder
Walton
64 "Bravo!"
65 Deodorant brand
67 Shout in a deep voice
70 Japanese 5-Across
71 Section
72 "The King "
73 Expensive


74 Half of checkers
pieces
75 Spotted

Down


1 Suit
2 Oldsmobile model
3 Director Woody
4 Actor Mineo
5 Chess piece that can
become a queen
6 "This one's 1!"
7 Greek letter
8 Tiny fish
9 "Jump" rock group
10 Nest egg money
11 Tomato named for ar


Italian city
"I agree!"
Final
", upon a time..."
TV alien


26 Types to online, for
short
27 "Where do we go
from here?"
28 Snooze
30 Medical professional,
for short
31 Actor DiCaprio, or a
zodiac sign
32 Mark a ballot
33 Beasts of burden
34 Bread choices
35 Optimistic, like an
outlook
36 Money before a poker
hand
37 Lemon or orange
covering
41 Reduced the progress


50 Spider's home
51 NBA great Kareem
Abdul-
52 "Tickled" doll of the
1990s
55 Not a soul
56 Keep away from
57 stone
(unchangeable)
58 Crowd cheers
59 "I smell 1!"
60 One of the Great
Lakes
62 Wintertime fun
63 "Poor me!"
66 Pres. Eisenhower
68 Before
69 Used to be


and cheese
Inquire
Roker and Michaels


SCRAMBLERS
SIUnscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words. Then
I rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!


Snag

I \ MENTAL E:1


Swoop

GULPEN

Pop

TURBS

Caution

HORTEX


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to be here


seven years!"


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TODAY'S WORD


HTaxDeed


HTaxDeed


TbelVakulla Like us on





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www.thewakullanews.com


11








Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014
SWOW. YOA MA6*nNE SAYS HATYOU N T y W HAVE TO RE VrEB l 6OK00 YO vT HISTORY
I EE THAT THIS ACTOR I5 J THAT YOU CAOT ALWAYS 981EVE I HOMEWORK YOU STILL HAVE
SE ~iM Y A emgwiMw SPY EAr$J HD* THAT yoU ssD A LOT OF IEA 01)40TO BO.l
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thewakullanews.com

King Crossword ___


by Gary Kopervas


OIL PAIN-'IN





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by Mike Marland


ACROSS
1 Ringer
5 Radiate
9 Morning
moisture
12 Met melody
13 Zilch
14 Leading
lady
15 Chew away
at
16 Initial stake
17 Wrong
(Pref.)
18 Belgrade
native
19 Farm sound
20 Leave at
the altar
21 Sturgeon
product
23 Airport org.
25 "Really?!"
28 Forth
32 Mountain
nymph
33 West-minster
or Downtown
34 "The Jazz
Singer,"
notably
36 Illusion
37 Moray or
conger
38 Hearty brew
39 Cherished
42 Spring mo.
44 Helps
48 Scull tool
49 Lovers'
quarrel
50 Recognize


51 "Guinness 8 Ball-bearing
Book" suffix gizmo
52 Catch sight 9 Ms. Moore
of 10 Malefic
53 Sicilian 11 Opposite of
volcano 40-Down
54 Pigpen 20 Really hard
55 Sport candy
56 Optimistic 22 Nostalgia-
inducing
DOWN song
1 Supermarket 24 Symbol of
supply slowness
2 Sea eagle 25 Speck
3 Perjurer 26 pro nobis
4 Criminal 27 Aviv
5 Dental coat preceder
6 It preceded 29 Lawyers'
stereo org.
7 Entirely 30 U.S. Pat.
( 2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


Off.
31 Coloring
agent
35 Pass by
36 Constant
sufferer
39 Serves the
purpose
40 Opposite of
11-Down
41 Bohemian
43 One of the
Three Bears
45 Grooving on
46 Puts on
47 Vacillate
49 Stitch


Just Like Cats & Doqs


by I ,nT. Phk


(WOW! HONEY, THAT SUIT LOOKS REALLY SHARP -
ON YOU! IF I DZ&NT KNOW BETTER I WOULD
THINK YOU WERE SOMEONE IMPORTANT.



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8 5 2. MEDICAL TERMS: What is a ster-
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4 3. MOVIES: What movie featured the
5 tagline, "Eight legs, two fangs and an
attitude"?
8 4. LITERATURE: Which one of
Shakespeare's plays features the charac-
4 6 terofTitania?
5. WEIGHTS AND MEASURES: If a
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1n many quarters would it take to equal 1
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tains all of the logical process that formed the Grand
nine. Canyon?
7. EXPLORERS: Who was the first
European explorer to travel the length of
the Mississippi River in 1682?
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a newspaper?
9. TELEVISION: What was the names
of the Elly May's chimpanzees on "The
BY Beverly Hillbillies"?
HENRY BOLTINOFF
HENRY BOLTI 10. MUSIC: What kind of instrument
is a euphonium?
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County &Beautiful


R.F.D.


by Linda This

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8 2 6
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7 6
9 3
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3 9
1 5 7
9 8
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each small 9-box square cont
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CryptoQuip
This is a simple substitution cipher in which each letter used stands
for another If you think that X equals 0 it will equal 0 throughout
the puzzle Solution is accomplished by trial and error
Clue. Z equals T
XSQPBLS GH KBLXPCJ VENN
MCNH ECYSLZ EC LZMQRL, E
LBDDMLS GECS EL P NMYS ZKPZ
RCMVL CM XMCJL.
2014 King Features Synd Inc. .


SCRAMBLERS
Unscramble the letters within each rectangle to form four ordinary words. Then
rearrange the boxed letters to form the mystery word, which will complete the gag!
Snag
0 GENTAL
swoop G D-1 E--
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for the three L's, X for the two 0's, etc. Single letters,
apostrophes, the length and formation of the words are all
hints. Each week the code letters are different.
UMEYUCZ GPPS; YUM PUVZ.

DMCX VRP YUM DG

EMVPCCPTV AMDBZ RDB VD

PUV. HQECCUV-ZUJUQEM

@2014 King Features Synd., Inc.


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Volunteers who helped put on the fish fry at Bevis Funeral Home's Harvey-Young Chapel.


Bevis fish fry benefits senior center


Bevis Funeral Home hosted a fish fry on including volunteers to set up for event,
Saturday, April 6, at Harvey-Young Chapel and all proceeds went to the senior center.
to benefit the senior center's Meals-on- It was estimated that 350 meals were
Wheels program, served and more than $1,500 was raised
Despite the threat of rain there was by the event.
some drizzle in the morning, but people Fisherman Clark Nichols caught,
still came out for the fish fry. cleaned and cooked the 400 pounds of
The funeral home donated everything, mullet served at the fundraiser.
PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN
More photos online at
thewakullanews.com
Clockwise from right: Rocky Bevis and his
family enjoy lunch; senior center's Shelly
Homan nibbles on a hush puppy; funeral direc-
tor Elizabeth Chambers fries mullet under the E.
watchful eyes of fisherman Clark Nichols; and
diners enjoying a fish dinner.


A I '


Save Egg-stra this year

with 10 Months of


sent straight to your

mailbox for Only

$20.14

Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.
Please accept my new 10 Month subscription at the price of $20.14*
Subscribe Today Name -----
& Stay Informed
About Local: Address
SMarriages City ---------State Zip
SAnniversaries
SObituaries Phone# ( ) Cell Phone# ( ) E-mail -- -- --
SBirths Credit Card Exp. 4 -I -SAC
SSchool
SReligion Sign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the office.
SSports J 1h ) [akhula j]t O I ;u, 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy.
* Classileds
SLegal Notices P.O. Box 307 Crawfordville FL 32327 1-877-401-6408
Promo Code: HOLIDAY Expires: 04-30-14
All information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my
crri/rti hit rrirt rcom nv tarny hit mv or rthitty r.rrt drroi c nr f Sac o 1 I $r2 01lil/odiv o area nly


NEW PROGRAM from


i nfinmieWakulla
National Alliance on Mental Illness

P\ *


IJI


"NAMI BASICS"


NAMI Basics is a Six Week Program
Completely FREE for Parents and Caregivers!
If you're a parent or caregiver who has struggled in
raising a child who has shown signs or symptoms of
possible behavioral problems, brain disorders or mental
illness this program is for you.
You are trained in preparedness and emotional
resiliency, the fundamentals of caring for self, family
and empowerment as an effective advocate!

WHEN: Tuesday, April 29, 2014, 6pm until 8:30pm
and every Tuesday through June 3rd.


WHERE:


Wakulla One Stop Community Center,
WOSCC, Corner of Shadeville Highway
and Trice Lane


A LIGHT DINNER WILL BE SERVED
CONTACT: NAMI Wakulla at the WCCOSC (850) 745-6042

ENROLL IN PERSON AT WCCOSC







Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 10, 2014


LYNN ARTZ/SPEl
Rain lilies, a threatened flower, along the roadway in Wakulla County.


Wakulla wildflower watch


By LYNN ARTZ
Special to The News

Yesterday I noticed
a car parked along
Coastal Highway 98
and saw its driver
nearby aiming his
camera at a colorful
cluster of coreopsis
blossoms.
I smiled because I,
too, had a camera in
my car to photograph
the beautiful, native
rain lilies that I knew
I would find along the
roadsides further east.


Sure enough, scat-
tered in the damp
swales along 98 from
Spring Creek Highway
eastward to the Jeffer-
son County line were
numerous Atamasco
lilies or Zephyr lilies
(Zephyranthes ata-
masca).
Commonly called
rain lilies, these plants
flower several days
after rainfall.
Some of the larg-
est stands were along
98 between 363 and
267 and also on 363


heading northward
from 98.
We are so fortunate
to have this beautiful,
threatened flower in
our county.
Please just admire
and take photos of
wildflowers. Never dig
up or pick native wild-
flowers as this reduces
their population size
in the future.
Doing so with state-
threatened species
such as this lily is il-
legal (see Florida Stat-
ute 581.185).


So "Click it, don't
pick it" and let others
enjoy the beauty.
If you spot beauti-
ful wildflowers in your
travels around Wakul-
la County, please
share this information
by sending a photo
and location informa-
tion to The Wakulla
News.
Please also post the
information and photo
on the Florida Pan-
handle Wildflower Al-
liance Facebook page.


Clean up your

weight for spring


GET FIT
By
PAMELA
CHICHESTER


One of our Yoga and Fitness Instructors, Mary
Tollefsen, MPH, RN, Certified Group Instructor-
Cycle/Yoga, explains why it is essential to get
going for spring:
For years we have known that we need 20-
30 minutes of sustained aerobic (we often call
it cardio) exercise at least three times a week.
Various types of exercise activities increase your
breathing and heart rate such as; brisk walking
or jogging, yard work (mowing, raking, digging),
dancing, swimming, biking, climbing stairs or
hills, and playing tennis. All of these will help
keep your heart, lungs, and circulatory system
healthy and improve your overall fitness.
Exercise and physical activity are grouped into
four basic categories endurance, strength, bal-
ance, and flexibility. Most people tend to focus on
one activity or type of exercise and think they're
doing enough. Each type is different, though.
Doing them all will give you more benefits
But still most of us who have made it a part
of our life, are quick to point out the satisfaction
we get from our workouts and the joy we get
from being actively involved. Studies also sug-
gest that regular exercise might improve quality
of life; reduce stress; lower heart rate and blood
pressure; help relieve anxiety, depression, and
insomnia; and improve overall physical fitness,
strength, and flexibility.
Let's face it our beloved county is getting big-
ger both by population and unfortunately bigger
in size. So why not start now and recommit to a
healthy lifestyle! Get rid of the winter weight and
get back in shape for spring!
Pamela Chichester, CFT, SPN is manager at
Body-Tek24 Hour Gym in Crawfordville. She can
be reached at (850) 926-2348.



NOW OPEN

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Illinini olw'M All-lli In l-,l .M.,/ifnn t- ( Im'l, c

Thursday Mornings
Look for Your Complimentary
copy of ir )alkiulla litMs
(free with any full Breakfast Order)

Hungry Man Breakfast $529
Breakfast Platter $29
$14 PBreakfast Special

Kids Eat P) AUCE
Free 984-29:. 33Chicken ue.
on Wed. & Thurs.
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HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES
SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILI
PARTY PLATTERS
926-3500 *Fax orders 926-3501
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dA


Saturday, Apri( 1-2

The Worms Are Coming to Downtown Sopchoppqj

Sopchoppy Worm arunti' Festival



FREE OUTDOOR PARTY
Some chairs available V 5 o
or bring a blanket ^1 1.^^

K pRace.
Live CoS test
Hula op Contest


oo Crowning shep


morsesho a Registration fo od.



H IV nSIC fly ire od u",o'
Worm CG rntf0f a ~' hats, and Oe
10 edor's Ofjnarts'oQueer,

e 2014 Fe Worm Crunters
Crowning of the W





7aa5K Race Registrationt
8am 5K RaceIOf
qam5 Vendors open for sales
LIVE MUSIC by Hot Tamale J od
q7:30am ~Opening cerem~onies
5K Race Results
:-O:1-Sam Worm C runtii' Pemonstration with ciary Revell, professional bait harvester
1-O:3Oam Worm Cruntin' Contest (Children 1-2 or under) CASH PRIZES
Noon Crowning of the Worm G1runters' Queen and/or King
82:3p0Pm LIVE MUSIC by Frank Lindamwood
-pm Registration for Horseshoe Championship
Spwm LIVE MUSIC by Cree Wood
2pm Worm Glrunters' Horseshoe Championship CASH PRIZES
2:-30pm LIVE MUSIC bg Pimp Lightning
Bait Casting Contest
_3:30pmW Hula Hoop Contest
Spm LIVE MUSIC by Brett Wellman and the Stone Cold Blues Band
WORM CtRUNTERS' BALL 6:30 w.-pmvn
6:30 PM LIVE MUSIC by Sammy Tedder and the Jazz Hounds
8:00 PM LIVE MUSIC by The Rick Ott Band with Bob Malone and Special Gtuests

Sponsored by Sopchoppy Preservatfon & Improvement Assofatifon
AL www.Facebook.com/ SopchoppyWorwcruntinFestiva(
www.wormgruntinFestival.com


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