Wakulla news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00505

Related Items

Preceded by:
Wakulla County news


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text

PAGE 1

By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netOnce again the wetlands issue and property rights in Wakulla County took center stage at commission chambers Monday night. In a meeting that took two and a half hours the commissioners haggled over liability of the county if the wetlands ordinance passes in November. Commissioner Randy Merritt, who voted to repeal the ordinance, raised the concern that the county could be sued if the referendum passes in November. Projected on the big screen was a property outline that showed a large piece of land, with a small bit of yellow that was, under current law, highlighting the only part of that property the owner would be allowed to build. As the law stands right now, there is no variance procedure, Merritt explained. But if the repeal goes through, and then the referendum passes in November, there would be a window of about ve months without any (wetlands) buffers. He said that this window would open the county up to potential lawsuits by property owners. Merritt explained if a property is suddenly deemed unusable because of a new law the voting public would be voting to take away their own rights if the referendum passes. Ralph Thomas agreed with the concern and used the term taking of property. In legal terms, a taking refers to actions that amount to depriving an owner of the use and enjoyment of his property. In this case, the concern is that the countys wetlands ordinance could be a constructive taking in that it prevents a land owner from building on his property, or decreases the value of the land. County Attorney Heather Encinosa advised Thomas and the board to use caution in using the term taking and similiar language. Luis Serna said it was unclear to the staff that they had been directed to prepare the repeal for a public hearing. We voted to eliminate the wetlands ordinance, said Thomas, then he directed Serna to prepare and advertise for a public hearing on the repeal of the ordinance. Its clear that Commissioner Thomas wants to repeal the ordinance, but its not clear whether the board wants to proceed in light of everything thats happened since July, Serna told The News the day after the meeting. In order to proceed with the public hearing the staff would need to draft the ordinance, advertise it, create an agenda request and prepare staff recommendation for two public hearings, the planning commission, and the county commission. Turn to Page 3 By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netIf Jack Simmons doesnt have it, he makes it, or hell rig something up that will work good enough.A self-taught farmer, Simmons operates Crescent Moon Organic Farm, tucked back in the woods a few miles north of Sopchoppy. He bakes fresh bread from scratch and grows a variety of vegetables that he sells at farmers markets in Tallahassee and Apalachicola. Everywhere you look at Crescent Moon Farm there are containers. Glass jugs on a wooden shelf hold dark syrup, made from sugar cane grown on the farm. Seeds, grains, polenta and dried peppers in giant canning jars are arranged along a metal rack in the small, but ef cient, kitchen. A plethora of plastic jugs are lined up outside, full of fry oil that fuels the farms tractor and cars when its converted to biodiesel. When you sell produce to restaurants, you walk in the back door, says Simmons about his source for the used grease, and I can get all the oil I need. The patient farmer works hard and has created a simple yet time-consuming process for re ning the fry oil into the biodiesel he uses to run farm equipment, tractors and his two Volkswagens. At a workshop held at the farm by Dr. Jennifer Taylor, FAMU small farms coordinator, combined with Piedmont BioFuels out of North Carolina, he met an intern, Emily Smith. Smith ended up living and working at the farm for a period of time and helped Simmons develop the biodiesel process. Simmons, 64, grew up in Tallahassee and attended Florida High (Florida State University High School.) He attended Texas A&M University for a while to avoid the draft, he says. After his stint in college, he taught at Gilchrist County Juvenile Detention Center, working with incarcerated youth. Its the only job I ever lled out an application for, says Simmons, wearing worn annel and old Levis. One summer, he bought a 58-foot sailboat at Alligator Point that he decided to sail to the Florida Keys. At the end of the trip, he decided to stay on the boat, sailing next to the Bahamas and then to the Virgin Islands. Simmons says he found ways to make a living and landed in St. John for about 27 years. He returned to Sopchoppy around 2004 to help his mother care for her husband who was ill. He purchased the cracker-style house and property from Joe Hutto, a well-known author and naturalist, and began farming. On a recent Saturday morning the industrious Simmons prepares to butcher a hog he has purchased from his friend Andy Brown. The swine awaits in a trailer while Simmons builds a fire underneath a cast iron caldron that will feed the bath to scald the hair off the animal once shes been killed. Steam rises in the cool morning air as he tries to nd a plug for the claw foot tub raised on old blocks, pumping the water into for the dunking. A huge pulley hangs from the oak tree above with hooks that will hold the hog. As he walks off towards his workshop in order to fashion a plug to hold the water, he kindly asks his helpers to fetch some fresh pine boughs for the tub, and explains why. Turn to Page 2 newsThe WakullaPublic Notices ....................................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Street Beat .........................................................................Page 5 Church................................................................................Page 6 Obituaries ..........................................................................Page 7 Community ........................................................................Page 8 School ...............................................................................Page 9 Sports .............................................................................Page 10 Outdoors .........................................................................Page 11 Water Ways ......................................................................Page 12 Sheriffs Report ................................................................Page 13 Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 14 Red Clay Footprints .........................................................Page 15 St. Patricks Festival photos ......................................Pages 16-19 Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 21 Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 22 Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 23 Classi eds ........................................................................Page 24 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 24 Comics .............................................................................Page 27 Natural Wakulla ...............................................................Page 28INDEX OBITUARIES Vonceal Owedia Brackins One Section One Section 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 12th Issue Thursday, March 20, 2014 JENNY ODOM JENNY ODOM LYNDA KINSEY FILE PHOTOA look over the elds at Crescent Moon as seedlings are covered before a cold snap. Jack Simmons juicing carrots in the farms ef cient kitchen. The Florida Wild Mammal Association held its annual yard sale fundraiser last week. In a Letter to the Editor on Page 4, FWMA Director Chris Beatty said the event raised $2,000 for the organization.Board still wrestles with wetlands issueCounty Commissioner Randy Merritt Sopchoppys Jack Simmons builds a resourceful co-op in the woods Crescent Moon Farm Wild mammal Wild mammal yard sale yard sale St. Patricks Festival photos, Pages 16-19 St. Patricks Festival photos, Pages 16-19

PAGE 2

Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com The BUZZ T T T T T h h h h T T T T T h h h T T T T T T T T h h h h Its ALL G REEN L IVING E XPO! Vendors and Exhibitors are Invited! Saturday, April 26 Hudson Park 9 a.m. 2 p.m. If you own or operate a business or nonprot organization that offers products, services or education about sustainable living, we invite you to exhibit at the 2014 Expo! Green Flea Market participants are invited too! From Front Page The pine sap will stick to the hair and make it easier to scrape off, he says while arranging the knives on a table in what feels like an outdoor operating room. Butchering a hog this way is an old time thing, he says. You gotta have the stuff. He uses a .22 between the eyes. His helpers on this day are three of the four people who are currently living and working on the farm with Simmons. Its kind of a coop, he says. They live here and work on the farm, and I help support them. Madison and Dillon are from Indianapolis, and have worked on the farm for about two months. Sun ower and Rainey are from Tallahassee, and have been there for almost two years. Sun ower is a vegetarian, and not interested in partaking in the hog slaughter, so she has left the property to go camping. We like it here, says Madison. Feeling blessed, its like family. She cleans the small intestines and explains, well use these to make sausage. The entire hog will be used, even the fat will be rendered to make soap. The only animals raised for food at Crescent Moon are egg-laying chickens. The plan is to expand the coop, and raise more chickens, says Simmons, in his slow southern voice. Another morning, the four workers are preparing for a frost, covering seedlings in the long neat rows, while Simmons is baking about 40 loaves of bread to take to Apalachicola the next day. He shuf es around a shed that looks, from the outside, like any tool storage shed. Inside, is a compressed commercial kitchen. He begins with wheat berries he gets from New Leaf Market in Tallahassee. He puts those through a grinder fashioned with a chute to catch the fresh ground organic grain. Its rigged, but it works great, smiles Simmons. We grow everything that we can, he says. Id really like to start growing my own wheat. He takes a 50 lb. bag of washed organic carrots and puts them through a well-used juicer. The orange pulp shoots out of the machine like sausage, and the brightly colored juice collects in a industrial metal bowl. Champion juicers are the best, he claims loudly, as the machine whirs. Using as much as possible, he puts the carrot pulp back through the juicer a second time, garnering at least 2 more cups of juice. Then he says he will use the pulp to make crackers, an original recipe. We eat good, he says. We cook fabulous meals here. Simmons, moves slowly around the small kitchen, cleaning and prepping for bread making. He has been collecting appliances, stoves, ovens, refrigerators, sinks and more for his commercial kitchen for about six years. The mixer is on wheels so it can slide easily back underneath a table. Theres not an inch to spare in here, he says about his small, but ef cient kitchen. You can find Simmons at the Lake Ella Growers Market on Wednesday, and in Apalachicola in front of Tamaras Caf on Friday. He will be selling his unique avors of fresh bread and Crescent Moon Farm organic vegetables at the Worm Gruntin Festival on April 12 in Sopchoppy. Crescent Moon Farm: A resourceful co-op in the woods JENNY ODOMJack Simmons and helpers butchering a hog. 5 Mashes Sands Road850-984-5168Come & Sample our Smaller Portion ECONOMY MENUNow Open on Mondays for the Spring & Summer SeasonClosed Only on TuesdaysWhere Recipes Are Born Not Copied SEAFOOD RESTAURANTA N G E L O & S O N S HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY340 Trice Lane Public Works Annex 9:00 a.m. 1:00 p.m FOR WAKULLA COUNTY RESIDENTIAL HOUSEHOLDS AND CONDITIONALLY EXEMPT SMALL QUANTITY GENERATORS ONLY! What's under your kitchen sink, in your garage, in your bathroom, and on the shelves in your laundry room? Household cleaners -such as oven cleaners, wood and metal cleaners and polishers, toilet bowl cleaners, disinfectants, drain openers. Automotive products -such as oil and fuel additives, grease and rust solvents, carburetor and fuel injector cleaners, air conditioning refrigerants, starter fluids, body putty, antifreeze/coolant, cont aminated motor oil, gasoline, diesel and kerosene Home maintenance and improvement products -such as paint, paint thinners, paint strippers and removers, adhesives Lawn and garden products -such as herbicides, pesticides/ rodenticides, fungicides, wood preservatives *Electronics (anything that plugs into an electric outlet) -such as old computers, computer parts, televisions, DVD players, VCRs, radios, cell phones, satellite dishes, and other small appliances Miscellaneous all batteries such as lithium, alkaline, car and button batteries, fingernail polish remover, pool chemicals, photo processing chemicals, reactive material, aerosols/compressed gas, fluorescent bulbs and tubes. NO TIRES NO BIOLOGICAL WASTES SATURDAY, MARCH 22, 2014(CESQGs WILL BE CHARGED FOR DISPOSAL AND MUST REGISTER BY MARCH 20TH AT 9267616)

PAGE 3

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 3 PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netWakulla County has many miles of roads, and a lot of those roads need attention. The county commission held a workshop offering input about what to do with those roads that have passed life expectancy. Public Works Director Cleve Fleming gave a presentation during the workshop and explained that there are more projects than there is money to spend. The 2013/2014 Budget includes $300,000 for paving and $100,000 for striping. This funding is provided by the one cent sales tax, but there is another $100,000 available for paving only. Wakulla Gardens, located off Spring Creek Highway just north of Martin Luther King Memorial Boulevard, was a major part of the discussion for commissioners. It would cost over 1.5 million dollars to pave all of the roads there. I understand we never have enough money to do it all, said Ralph Thomas. Those people in Wakulla Gardens need to have their roads paved. Commissioners Howard Kessler and Jerry Moore also voiced concern that Wakulla Gardens needed the countys attention. Residents who live on Cooperwood Road, which runs between Wakulla Springs Road and Woodville Highway, showed up to voice the need to pave the cut-through dirt road. Its part of the original road that came through here, said Jasper Musgray. Everything else gets paved, but this one doesnt. We went to work to get the one cent sales tax passed and we were promised that if we got the right of way it would be paved, Musgray added. Our cars are getting banged up out there. Joel Lay, another Cooperwood resident, said that its a through road, not just for the people who live on it. Panacea Waterfront Partnership member Dave Lansford came to the meeting to voice concern over the evacuation route. He said that there is a low spot on Highway 98 between Ben Withers Construction and Tower Road that oods during large storms. Another area of concern was the safety of Smith Creek Road which runs northwest out of Sopchoppy through the Apalachicola National Forrest. Commissioner Richard Harden said that there was a direct safety concern to allow this and other county roads to remain unstriped. Id hate for an accident to happen because theres no stripes in the middle, he said. County Administrator David Edwards projected that the county would have about twice as much funding next year and the year after, $800,000 per year. He also projected that in three years the county budget should allow for almost $1 million of road improvement projects. The recommendation from Edwards and Fleming was to concentrate efforts on striping as many roads as possible and put off paving and resurfacing for the next three years. Fleming said that the county could afford to either stripe about 40 miles of roads or pave one and a half miles. Commissioner Randy Merritt suggested that the commissioners allow Flemming and the public works department to make decisions regarding setting the priority for which county roads to stripe. The commissioners all agreed. From Front Page We would recommend waiting, said Serna, until the electorate votes on the referendum. What I dont want to do is advertise it and then have them decide to exercise caution, he continued. Its a lot of work for staff. In March the board adopted the comprehensive plan change. The appeals deadline is April 8. So far, no appeals have been led. In another legal matter, the board was asked to approve legal services for the Wakulla County Charter Review Commission, setting the budget at $5,400. Commissioner Howard Kessler raised concern about using the money, especially since the county is facing a tight budget year. I havent even see their plans, said Kessler. What is their schedule of meetings? County Administrator David Edwards told the board that the committee plans are to meet twice a month for the foreseeable future. Kessler also said that Encinosa would review all recommendations by the Charter Review Commission, and contended it was a waste of taxpayer dollars. Harden stopped the boards conversation to allow citizen Bob Danzey, a member of the Charter Review Commission, to speak on the issue. Kessler asked for a point of order from Harden when it became clear the speaker card had been submitted after the motion was allowed to be discussed. It was ultimately up to chairman Harden how he conducted the meeting, and Danzey was allowed to speak. Danzey disagreed with Kessler and pointed out that the Charter Review Commission needed to have its own counsel. Harden has been consistent, allowing all who ll out cards to be heard, even if the cards are lled out after the motion is opened for discussion. The motion passed 4-1, Kessler casting the lone no vote. Pennington Law Firm was approved to represent the Charter Review Commission. In other matters before the board: The Wakulla County Community Center will get a new HVAC unit from Keith Kay Heating and Air Inc. for $33,084. Commissioners voted unanimously to raise speed limits on two roads, as recommended by the Community Traffic Safety Team. The speed limit on Emmitt Whaley Road will be changed from 25 mph to 35 mph, and Wakulla Arran Road at East Ivan Road will be changed from 35 mph to 45 mph.COUNTY COMMISSIONStriping of county roads discussed at workshopBoard still wrestles with wetlandsHazardous Waste Day is setOn Saturday, March 22, Wakulla County Public Works and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will hold an Amnesty Day for Wakulla County residential households. We cant take tires, or biological waste, said Cleve Fleming, Project manager. But we take a lot of paint and other items. Wakulla County doesnt have anywhere to dump hazardous waste, so we partner with Jefferson County to dispose of it. Last year 271 people came to drop off items they thought were hazardous, said Fleming. Fleming said the event is free, but it does cost the county to dispose of hazardous waste items. They have allotted $20,000 for disposal. The event begins at 9 a.m. and ends at 1 p.m. at the county public works department on Trice Lane. For a complete list of items that will be accepted, go to www.mywakulla.com and search hazardous waste, or call Public Works at 9267616. Jenny Odom Notice of the Availability of an Environmental Assessment A general location map of the proposal is shown below.MARCH 20, 27, 2014 will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed bids for will be received until Proposals should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Ofce, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Proposals received after the time and date specied will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Sheree T. Keeler or Katie Taff / Wakulla County BOCC Phone: 850.926.9500, FAX: 850.926.0940 E-mail: skeeler@mywakulla.com RFQ documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com on or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Ofce at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on Monday, March 17, 2014. Funds for this project are from Florida Department of Transportation, Local Area Project Agreement (LAP), for the construction and CEI of the OBBT Phase 3, to be 8-feet wide, 1.392 miles in length, multi-use trail along CR 372 SURF ROAD from Joe Drive to East of the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. The successful proposer must comply with applicable federal and state laws and LAP requirements. The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualied disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this ofce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). MARCH 20, 27, 2014 NOTICE OF INTENT FOR TRANSMITTAL OF A FUTURE LAND USE MAP AMENDMENTNOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Midway City Council at its regularly scheduled meeting on Thursday, April 3, 2014 at 7:00 p.m. intends to hear CPA-2014-02, a large scale Future Land Use Map amendment to the Midway Comprehensive Plan, to change the land use of property located at Tax Parcel ID #s 4-05-1N-2W-000000130-0000 and 4-05-1N-2W-0000-00131-0000 from Agriculture-1 (Gadsden County) to Agriculture (Midway) on the Midway Future Land Use Map. The parcels are owned by Henry B. Dover, Jr. and Karol D. Sevaggio and consist of a total of 21.93 acres. Persons wishing to review the files on the above projects may do so at Midway City Hall located at 50 Martin Luther King Boulevard, Midway, FL 32343. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing assistance in obtaining any information from the City or attending the public hearing should contact the City by calling 850-574-2355 at least 48 hours prior to the hearing. If any person decides to appeal any decision made with respect to any matter considered at such public hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be used. 000HOOM NOTICE OF AQUACULTURE LEASE PROJECTS

PAGE 4

Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.I got several emails, some phone calls and a couple of of ce visits plus more than one angry glare while out-andabout last week, from people upset over the headline on the front-page story about Pastor Jeff McFalls death. The headline said, Pastor Jeff McFalls of Medart is dead. People I heard from complained that the headline was blunt and insensitive. One person wrote me to say the story was great, but the headline made his blood boil. After hearing the complaints, I changed the headline on the online story to Pastor Jeff McFalls dies after lengthy illness. In the past several years, Ive used that same sort of headline on front-page stories on deaths of people in the community: Fire Chief Bill Ward is dead, Businessman Joe Barry is dead, Funnyman Jerry Kinder is dead, James Taylor, founder of local VFW, is dead, Mr. Sopchoppy Bill Stephens is dead at 72. The stories are meant to mark the passing of people who contributed to this community. Something about the McFalls headline struck a lot of people the wrong way. And I apologize for that.William Snowden is editor at The Wakulla News. readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor/manager: William Snowden .............................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jenny Odom .............................................reporter@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNING NR Most popular stories online: Everybodys waiting for the water to warm up (From the Dock) Underwater Wakulla March 20, 2014 World WAR II Dog Tags: Owner Found Week in Wakulla Underwater Wakulla March 13, 2014 Pastor Jeff McFalls dies after lengthy illness Capital Area Community Action Agency offering assistance Huge St. Joe land deal finalizedthewakullanews.com READERS WRITE:A headline last week made some people angryFWMA appreciates support ank you, Elections O ce, for e ortsListening to commissioners wordsIts up to voters to protect wetlandsSunshine Volunteers are seeking a pianoFundraiser was a successful event William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.net Follow us on Editor, The News: The Wakulla Wetlands Alliances Steering Committee wishes to publicly express their appreciation to Mr. Henry Buddy F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections, and to his staff members Joseph Morgan and Celina Greene for the ef ciency the Election Of ce displayed in tallying and verifying to the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners that the petition Ensures Local Control and Protection for Wakulla Countys Wetlands had met all required petition drive requirements as of Feb. 27, 2014. The Elections Office certified to the County Commission that we had submitted the 5,555 petitions required, i.e., the 30 percent of electors quali ed to vote in each of the ve election commission districts. We greatly appreciate the competent and totally nonpartisan manner the Election Of ce approached and completed the task. Sincerely, Victor W. Lambou Chair Wakulla Wetlands Alliance Editor, The News: Ernest Hemingway once said: When people talk, listen completely. Most people never listen. I decided to try this at the March 3 BOCC meeting with interesting results. After the meeting I found myself thinking, did the commissioners really say what I think they did? To con rm my memory I watched the video on YouTube. While much of the meeting was taken up with the controversy over the 319/98 Wakulla high school intersection, I found the discussion of Commissioner Randy Merritts agenda item to modify the current Wetland Ordinance by permitting variances within the 35 foot no touch portion of the wetland setback to be quite illuminating. Commissioner Howard Kessler provided a second and discussion ensued. Merritt attempted to explain to the other commissioners his concern that the wetlands referendum might actually pass and that a better strategy than eliminating wetland protections entirely would be to offer variances within the 35 foot buffer zone. Merritt: If we get rid of it altogether the citizens choice is going to be no county wetlands protection or this protection and I believe that is going to be a compelling case for some people to want to vote for it. Chairman Richard Harden, explaining why he would not support the motion: My biggest hang-up with this is, if someone has a 150foot lot this would help them. It would help a few people initially, but there are landowners that have large acres that have wetlands on their acres. It would leave them with no touch zones even with the variance. Merritt: My point is, the choices that the citizens are going to have when they go into that voting booth. If we repeal it altogether the choice is going to be wetlands protection or no wetlands protection. Commissioner Jerry Moore: One of the things about politicians is we run on one issue and get into of ce and change our minds. I ran on the issue of sending this wetlands issue back to Tallahassee and I stand by that. I will not change my mind. Kessler: Mr. Moore you ran on jobsI didnt see one sign that said Get rid of wetlands you ran on jobs, jobs, jobs. In the wrap-up discussion at the end of the meeting when discussion of the 319/98 intersection came up brie y, there was reference to the money ($885,000) that Moore made from the sale to the state for the property for relocating that intersection. Moore: My mother always told me that when someone offers you money, Just take it, son. And I believe she was a very wise woman. From these interchanges the following is clear: Merritt is searching for a way to derail the momentum of the referendum vote by softening the commissions all-or-nothing stance. Hardens concern for property rights extends primarily to those with the large acres like he owns. Lastly, it somehow eludes Moore that he is one of those politicians who runs on one issue and gets into of ce and change our minds, and that taking money from whomever offers it is not the best recommendation for a public servant. James Hennessey Crawfordville Editor, The News: We would like to thank everyone for coming out and supporting Florida Wild Mammal Association at our biannual yard sale. Our donors provided tons of really great items, both before and during the event. We also saw quite a few familiar faces who never miss our yard sales and stop in for a visit or to pick out some new treasures. We always look forward to seeing everyone, you make these events so much fun! Last but not least, we could not have done this without the support of our awesome volunteers who did a super job running the show. Thanks to your support we were able to raise $2,000 for the center. This will care for lots of critters! We had a wonderful time, and you all made it a fantastic event! All items that were left over from the sale were donated to Promise Land Ministries Thrift Store to bene t another good cause. Thanks again for your support! Chris Beatty FWMAEditor, The News: Speaking on behalf of The Sunshine Volunteers who perform weekly at Eden Springs Nursing Home, we would like to express a concern, which we hope can be addressed. We are and have been for years a very committed group, sharing our talents each week, and some twice a week, to the beautiful residents living there. We provide them not only with our music, but with our hearts, a hug, a smile or just a kind word means so much. We get as much from them, as they get from us. Our group consists of singers, guitars, banjo, violin, dobro and piano. However, the piano has been removed, due to damage. We are told, that the facility is unable to afford a piano. This inspired us to locate one, if possible. The elderly should not be denied anything that will add enjoyment and comfort for them. Most nursing homes provide a piano and encourage the volunteers to be a part. If they did not have the many willing and generous volunteers that provide their time each week, their energy and gas to ensure they enjoy life as much as possible, this program would not exist. We do appreciate the opportunity we have been given to share our talents each week for a very worthwhile and rewarding time with special people. Our hope and prayer is that someone will help us locate a good piano for a very worthwhile cause. Sincerely, Mary Watson 421-1948 Berney Barwick 567-6783Editor, The News: The Democratic Womens Club of Wakulla County extends a heartfelt thank you to everyone who helped make the 1st Annual Girls Nite Out Health & Wellness Fair such a successful event. As you may know, ALL proceeds from this event will be donated to Wakulla Relay for Life. We want to especially thank Body Tek in Crawfordville for the generous use of their facilities to hold this event. It was a perfect venue. We also want to thank all our vendors who attended whose products were all beautiful, healthy or educational. Without them we couldnt have done this. In addition, we want to thank the numerous businesses in the county who so generously donated gifts for the chance drawings that were held throughout the evening or other items we needed for the event. And last, but not least, we want to thank all of you who came out to support this worthy cause. Next year we will be back to do it again, bigger and better. Thank you all from the Democratic Womens Club of Wakulla County! Diane Wilson President Wakulla DWC Editor, The News: The issue of wetlands protection will be on the ballot on Nov. 4. It is up to the voters to decide if they want to continue to protect our wetlands as our local ordinance has done since 2006. Wakulla Countys natural environment is its crown jewels, its most valuable asset. It is the core of our local economy, with Wakulla Springs, shing, hunting, boating and eco-tourism bringing in the dollars that support all of us. It is what attracted most of us to call this community home. Crown jewels are highly protected by their owners. They dont let others destroy them. So it seems logical that all of us in Wakulla County should protect our wetlands. Yet there are some people who reject this protection. They say they have property rights, and they want to protect property rights. We all have indisputable property rights, and they should be respected. But our individual property rights have to be balanced against the rights of other citizens and the communitys right for general welfare.. Theodore Roosevelt, that staunch Republican known for his belief in our right to liberty and rugged individualism, had it right as far back as 1910, when he said, Every man holds his property subject to the general right of the community to regulate its use to whatever degree the public welfare may require it. Lets not be fooled into thinking we can survive as a community by allowing our environment and wetlands to be used for a political ideology or for personal pro t. Lets preserve Wakullas wetlands for future generations. Lets vote YES for wetlands protection on Nov. 4. Bill Anderson Panacea

PAGE 5

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 5< STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: What do you miss about being a kid?MIKE KINSEY Glass artistNothing really, because Im just as ornery now as I was when I was a kid! GARY DEIBLER RetiredMy childhood friends! ROY JOHNSONRest area attendantPlaying in the yard! Not having to work! You didnt have the worries. Not having to work to eat! High schoolers dont know how good they have it. TINA JOHNSON Homemaker SETH WAGNER Law enforcementSLEEP! How long ago was it that you slept like a baby? 2002? Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Winner receives one meal from each of the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN pathCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & Dogs Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand$599 Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n n s s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida By KATHRYN GIBSONSpecial to The NewsSpring Cleaning were words that I had strongly ambivalent feelings about when my mother peppered Sunday dinner with them. Much of my growing up was in New England, so the words heralded in the recognition that wed survived another winter of short days and long nights and that we could begin to shed our layers of winter wear in favor of shorts and T-shirts. It also meant that it was warm enough to open windows and doors for letting the dust out, but cool enough that black ies and mosquitoes had not yet begun their blood thirst. The yearly ritual, begun in 19th century America, demanded that every cupboard and closet be emptied, sorted through, inventoried and cleaned. Items no longer used were cleaned and boxed for my younger cousins. This was the only advantage I can remember of being the oldest. They were all boys, so the girly stuff was boxed and taken to the Salvation Army, Goodwill or the church bazaar. Before their exodus or re-entry items were beaten, scrubbed, aired and repaired. Our yard during these days was lled with multicolored ghosts uttering from every tree and clothesline. The Green Flea Market is an opportunity to recycle items from your home, garage and storage that will bring others pleasure and bring you in some cash. It is an opportunity to showcase your Shabby Chic creations, your refurbished furniture, home dcor and garden art. Flea markets should be like treasure hunts; one never knows what unique and unexpected item might show itself. They can provide chances for connections, networking and the creative exchange of ideas. How many times have you wandered through markets and thought I can do that? We invite vendors of fresh produce, fundraiser food vendors and health service providers. By having a region wide ea market as part of the Expo, we encourage people to stop and park once. There will be something for everyone: vendors, exhibitors, childrens activities and workshops, all at Hudson Park on April 26. Please sign up by April 10th. Contact apiasecki@ comcast.com for a registration form. If you have questions, please contact Kathryn Gibson at 926-9519 or topazgibson@gmail.com.Green Flea Market will be held at the Green Living Expo Wakulla signs to use WCI inmate laborWakulla Sheriff Charlie Creel and Wakulla Correctional Institution Warden James Coker recently entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to allow the WCSO to use an allotment of up to 10 WCI inmates for work crews supervised by trained sheriffs of ce personnel. Deputy Leif Sparby heads up the WCSO Work Camp Unit and attended four days of training through the Department of Corrections Supervision of Inmates program. Of cers Roy Crum, Maurice Herndon, John Metcalf and Gene Darby of the maintenance staff all received the training so they can use WCI inmates on various projects. One of the ve individuals who attended the training is responsible for picking up the inmates from the prison and delivering them back at the end of the day. Generally the prison work crew is four of ve inmates. The WCSO can work the crew from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. under direct sight supervision. The rst day working for the WCI inmates was Monday, March 3 as a crew of four assisted Of cer Roy Crum with county park maintenance, trash collection and mowing.

PAGE 6

Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com BUCKHORN NEWS Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE By ETHEL SKIPPER Christians must differentiate between the spirit of truth and the spirit of error. Beloved, believe not every spirit, but try the spirits whether they are of God, because many false prophets are gone out into the world. A believers ongoing acts of love and generosity result in a sense of belonging to God, a heart at rest, and clear conscience (1 John 3:19-21). God wants us to have a clear conscience before him. It is the enemy who wants to load us down with feelings of guilt and condemnation, so we are reluctant to come into Gods presence. When we do something we know to be wrong, we feel guilty and uncomfortable. The good thing is God is greater than our heart, and knoweth all things. He knows our motives, our thoughts, our words, and everything we say or do. God knows all of this and has given us His word to guide us. When we have troubles, when He helps us. We can have a renewed sense of con dence before Him. Believers are to know Gods word, and obey it, so they will not be deceived. They must know and hold to the truth in order to walk in truth. Happy birthday to the following people from Minister Eva M. Johnson: Jackie Grimmett, Willie B. Godbolt, Mildred Godbolt, James Green, Lora Harvey, Sirena Davis, Vertie M. Forest, Altiqua Kilpatrick and Elder Alfred Nelson. The 5th Sunday union meeting of the Tallahassee Church of Christ Written in Heaven will be held at Skipper Temple Church, 165 Surf Road on March 28-30. Nightly service at 8 p.m., Sunday School at 10:30 a.m., church service at noon. Union presider is Elder Andrew Morris. In praise of crazyFollow Gods word Meatloaf Dinner set at Ochlockonee Bay UMCHome Cookin Meatloaf Dinner will be held at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist on Friday, March 21, from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. It will be eat-in or take out. Menu includes meatloaf, green beans, mashed potatoes and gravy, green salad, bread, assorted desserts and beverage. Prices are Adults $10, Children 6-12 $5, Children 5 and under Free. Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church is located at 2780 Surf Road, Ochlockonee Bay. Join friends new and old and enjoy a great meal. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t.The ministry is free. International Womens Auxiliary Service plannedYou are invited to enjoy fellowship and fun with over 300 women in Christ from all over the U.S. and abroad beginning Thursday, March 27, to Sunday, March 30. You will be blessed with daily seminars, evening services, tours of museums and a banquet! Nightly Services will be held on Thursday, March 27, and Friday, March 28 at 8 p.m. On Saturday, March 29 we will have a special banquet which will include a Hat Fashion Show and will begin at 7:30 p.m. On Sunday, March 30, service will begin at 9 a.m. Services will be held at 1477 Capital Circle NW in Tallahassee. Registration is $150. For further information, contact Host Pastor Vickie Rutledge, (850) 504-0730; email vision5800@ yahoo.com. Church BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDERI made the mistake the other night of complaining out loud. It is one thing to complain under your breath so that nobody hears you or knows what you are complaining about. But when you complain out loud, then you run the chance of somebody hearing you. The somebody I was most concerned about was the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Some things are meant to be kept to yourself and for obvious reasons. What are you complaining about, my wife said directing the question to me. At first, I did not know what she was talking about because I did not realize that I was vocalizing my complaints. All I could say at the time was, Did I say that out loud? My wife has a delicate way of backing me in a corner where I have to say what is on my mind. Fortunately, I do not have much of a mind for anything to get on. Unfortunately, my tongue is not attached to anything and so it is loosey-goosey. What I was complaining about were all the crazy people, particularly on television. Just when you think you have seen the most crazy thing, something else or someone else takes the lead in the race to crazyville. Since my wife asked me, I let go on a very eloquent rant against crazy. At this point, I forget the exact crazy that set me off. But it does not matter. If it were not one thing, it would be another thing. I have tried throughout my life to be an equal crazy complainer. If you are crazy, you can be sure I am going to complain about you. You, in particular, my wife was directing this toward me, ought to be quite thankful about all of the crazy people in the world. That set me off on another rant. I am not thankful for the crazy people in this world. The less crazy people the better I am going to like it. And I made the mistake of telling her exactly what I thought about that. We do not need more crazy people, I argued. Someone in Congress ought to pass a law against crazy. While I said that, it occurred to me that most of the crazy people are in Congress. Really, my wife argued, you ought to be happy about all the crazy people in the world. One of the things I have learned throughout the years of marital bliss is that if you ask your wife to tell you something, she will do it. But I was desperate at this time and I needed a little bit of clari cation. She looked at me, paused as if she was collecting her thoughts and then said, You should be thankful that there are so many crazy people out in the world. The more crazy people there are, the more you are going to t in. If for some reason we could eliminate all the crazy people in the world you would be a very lonely person. She continued her explanation by saying, Every crazy person takes the focus away from you. If there were not enough crazy people out in the world people would be focusing on you and complaining about how crazy you are. You do not have to hit me over the head with a hammer. That is the thing about my wife. When she is right, she is right. At least it gave me a new perspective on the world around me. Also, a new appreciation for crazy. I began to see her point of view, as humbling as it was, and realize that crazy has a place. As I further thought about this, I began to realize that everybody is crazy only in different areas of their life. After some deep reection on the subject, I have come to the point where I want to praise crazy. I never thought of it along this line, but everybody has the right to change his or her mind about anything. Personally, I would like to change my mind for one that really works. One mans crazy is another mans delight. What is crazy to one person may be something rather important and enjoyable to another. After all, who am I to say what is crazy and what is not crazy. It is important to nd someone else with something that you can truly appreciate. I thought about that and what Solomon said, Be not wise in thine own eyes: fear the LORD, and depart from evil. It shall be health to thy navel, and marrow to thy bones (Proverbs 3:7-8). Instead of spending so much time complaining about other people, I need to exercise the ne art of appreciation and learn how to praise people on their terms.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net.

PAGE 7

Vonceal Owedia Brackins, 80, of Sopchoppy, passed away March 15, 2014 in Tallahassee. She was a Baptist and had lived in this area since 1975 coming from Quincy. She was a bookkeeper. Visitation will be Friday, March 21, 2014 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Survivors include three children, Donna Davis (Rodney) of St. Marks, Jennifer Bradley (Randy) of Sopchoppy, and Marie Rudd (Johnny) of Panama City; seven grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her husband, J.C. Brackins. Bevis Funeral Home in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 7Obituaries Vonceal Owedia Brackins Vonceal Owedia BrackinsBy TRACY RENEE LEEWhen I was a young girl, I loved scavenger hunts. At a party, I would receive a list of ordinary things to collect from neighbors homes, along with one or two not so ordinary things. The party host would divide the partygoers into small groups and off we would go on our own little treasure hunt. It was a very fun game lled with thrills of treasure seeking. As an adult, I have a daughter who loves scavenger hunts of a different nature: She is a teenage genealogist sleuth. She combs the internet, lists, books, old letters, documents and any other thing she can put her hands on, seeking information on our ancestral lineage. When she nds her treasure, she is lled with excitement and happiness. I have seen her diligently search for one bit of information for years on end, meeting one disappointment after another. When I was an intern for my professional license, I worked at a very old funeral home in Dallas. The building was huge and had those six-foot wide columns across the front porch. One day at work, I set about clearing out an old bookcase with a large collection of lovely leather bound books. I would estimate that there were at least 40 of these books on the shelves. They were very old, and some were showing signs of deterioration. I asked the Funeral Director in Charge what he would have me do with these old, dusty, musty smelling, leather bound books. He said, Just throw them away, I dont know why we have them. His remarks startled me, and I have never forgotten them. These old leather bound books dating back to the 1800s were hand written ledgers, containing the vital statistics and personal impressions of the funeral director of every person this funeral home had buried for over 100 years. Can you imagine coming across such a trove of hidden information? My mother was a genealogist. Perhaps that is where my daughter inherits such passion for her skill. I remember my mother taking trips to the Deep South to visit old cathedrals in search for lost information in her family lineage. Instead of spending our summers as our friends did, on the coast or at amusement parks, my siblings and I were packed into my mothers station wagon to visit old relatives and priests all summer. We would return to our home just in time for school to begin. While writing this, I have placed a phone call to the old funeral home in Dallas where I interned. I pray those old leather bound books lled with lost treasure have not been destroyed as the funeral director suggested. I hope to rescue them and digitize them so that if there is a genealogist out there searching for a lost member of their family, they might nd their treasure through my efforts. Before becoming a funeral practitioner, I did not know about these books. My mother would have jumped for joy if she had ever come across such a hidden treasure. I hope that if you are searching for lost genealogical records, this information might help you nd your lost loved ones. When I was a young girl, I loved scavenger hunts. Now embarking on a hunt for hidden genealogical treasure, and mortuaries are my oyster. Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushin-updaisies.blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @ PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome. com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Scavenger hunts BEREAVEMENT COLUMN Macedonia Church holds groundbreakingPastor Alfred Nelson, First Lady Sonia Nelson, former Pastor Elder Andrew Morris and Macedonia board members.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Believers: Wayne and Mary Nell Boyette and Shirley Kelley and Johnny Brantley.Special to The NewsMacedonia Community Church of Sopchoppy held its groundbreaking ceremony on Feb. 22 at the original site of the church. The land for the site of the original church was donated by the late George Washington and Mother Mary Green around 1934. The Lord blessed the event with a beautiful day and great gathering. The National Church of Christ Written in Heaven was represented by Bishop Walter Williams. Political of cials on hand included County Commissioner Richard Harden and Sopchoppy City Commissioner Nathan Lewis. There was a brief program presided over by Elder Alfred Nelson Sr. in which speakers shared Godlled messages, including presiding Elder Edward Brigham, Elder Andrew Morris, Mother Ethel Skipper, with the keynote message delivered by Bishop Williams. A ceremonial shoveling of the land upon which the new church will be constructed was represented by three shovelfuls of dirt and three doves being released in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Special thanks to all who participated and made pledges. We are soliciting any volunteer services/ donations for construction of the new sanctuary. After the ceremony, cake by Shores and punch was served. Concert by the Believers setThe Believers, a gospel group from Adel, Ga., will perform at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church, 165 Friendship Church Road in Medart, on Sunday, March 30, at 6 p.m. Bevis volunteers at last years sh fry.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBevis Funeral Home to host sh fry to bene t senior centerSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, April 5, a fish fry will be held at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel located at 3106 Crawfordville Hwy. in Crawfordville. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel has again partnered with the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council Inc. to bene t the centers Food for Life Club and Wakulla Countys senior citizens. All of the proceeds collected at Saturdays event will be given to the seniors. The menu will be fresh-caught, cleaned and cooked mullet, cheese grits, coleslaw, baked beans, hushpuppies and dessert. A day of food, fun and fellowship has been planned. Tickets are $7, tax deductible, and can be purchased in advance at Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel or at the Wakulla Senior Center. Last years event was a huge success, with more than 350 people served. LUNCH PARTNER F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER

PAGE 8

Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityLibrary News...With the Florida Legislature already in session, its that time of the year when we like to remind all of our patrons about the importance of the State Aid to Libraries program. This program, funded through the State Library of Florida, was set up to encourage local governments to increase support for their public libraries. The more that the local governments support their libraries, the more that that library can receive in State Aid. As far as WCPL is concerned, State Aid pays for the majority of library expenses with the exception of salaries, and part of our utilities. The Friends of the Library helps with our Summer Program, summer reading books, and raising money for our planned expansion. State Aid is critical to the running of WCPL so we encourage all who can to contact your Legislator and tell them how important WCPL is to you and the community and to please continue (or increase) funding the State Aid program at its current level. As always we deeply appreciate your continued support.Friday Night MovieOur next Friday Night Movie on the 21st will be the story behind Walt Disney convincing P.L Travers, the author of Mary Poppins, to allow him to make the classic lm. Starring Academy Award winners Tom Hanks as Disney and Emma Thompson as Travers, this acclaimed lm tells of the early life of Travers as well, which was the inspiration behind her writing of Mary Poppins. Costarring with Hanks and Thompson are Paul Giamatti, Colin Farrell, and may other recognizable faces. Doors open at 6:45 for the 7:00 showing of this PG-13 (thematic elements) lm and we ask that all children be accompanied by an adult.Buy a ticket win a Samsung TabletAfter being kicked off at last weekends St. Pats festival, the Friends of the Library latest membership and fundraising drive continues as they will be holding a drawing at their Friends Celebration on 4/26 for a Samsung TAB3 tablet ($300 value). Tickets can be purchased at WCPL from myself, at our April Book Extravaganza on the 5th, at the Friends tent at the Worm Gruntin festival on 4/12 or from any member of the Friends Board. Tickets are $1.00 apiece or 6 for $5.00. Please continue your great support of the Friends and WCPL and potentially win this great tablet in the process. Library Programs at the Community CenterRemember to check out our programs at the Community Center 3 Thursday afternoons out of the month! The 1st Thursday of the month is for K2nd graders, the 2nd Thursday of the month is for 3-5th grades, and the 3rd Thursday of the month is for middleschoolers. All programs begin at 4:00. Were hoping that demand warrants additional programs so please come out and help make the Community Center a success. If you have any questions about what the Community Center is currently offering please swing by the Center at the corner of Shadeville and Trice Lane or call the center at 745-6042. AARP Tax Prep at WCPLAs we head into the last month of tax season, wed like to remind you that the AARP is offering free tax preparation every Thursday and Saturday from 9-12:30 in our computer lab. This rst come rst served service is intended for low to middle income filers with special attention paid toward senior citizens. They will also be here all day on April 15. If you havent led already please take advantage of this free service!Special to the NewsMs. Susan Bistrican and Ms. Kathleen Gaylor, faculty at Wakulla High School, attended a teacher workshop about The Holocaust sponsored by the Holocaust Education Research Council (H.E.R.C. ). The goal of HERC is to educate everyone about the atrocities that occurred during Hitlers regime and the Holocaust of World War 2. Some of the education is provided through eyewitness and victims account of the events. Since all of the participants are aging, they are anxious to share their rsthand knowledge and to tell the stories of their harrowing experiences. Mrs. Ellen Peyton, who now lives in Tallahassee, is just such a survivor. She and her family survived Hitler by eeing Berlin on a boat to Shanghai, China. There they lived in a Jewish Ghetto. At that time, Shanghais immigration policy was open and many Jews were able to escape Europe and enter the city of Shanghai. Conditions in the Shanghai Ghetto were harsh, and the Jews living there suffered greatly. To add to their burden, Japan entered into a war with China. As a child Mrs. Peyton recalls the bombs falling in the streets. Mrs. Peyton has many memories, both good and bad, of that time in our history. Mrs. Peyton, and her husband Richard, traveled to Wakulla High School to share her stories with our students. The students truly appreciated the opportunity to ask questions of a person who suffered such hardships and was an eyewitness to such profound events. Mrs. Peytons parting advice to the students was to remain optimistic about life and to get as much education as possible.By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary Director An optimistic message from a Holocaust survivor Alvin Ailey will hold auditions in TallahasseeEllen Robinson Special to the NewsOn Saturday, April 5, New York Citys Of cial Ailey School grand jets into The Tallahassee Ballet studio to hold auditions. The Tallahassee Ballet will host the prestigious school of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater as they search for dancers between the ages of 11-25 to join them in their Summer Intensive program. Dancers between the ages of 11-15 will audition for the Junior Division at 1 p.m. Dancers between the ages of 16-25 will audition for the Professional Division at 3 p.m. Tyrone Brooks, Artistic Director of The Tallahassee Ballet, is excited for The Ailey School to hold auditions at The Tallahassee Ballet for the rst time. Anyone with dance training or experience may join us for the auditions, Brooks said. There are a lot of discoveries at these events. The Ailey School may see a talent that needs to be nurtured and encourage these dancers to continue to study. There is a $20 audition fee to be processed on The Ailey Schools website and a form to complete. The audition form is available on the Events page of The Tallahassee Ballet website, and this should accompany each dancer to their audition. Mr. Brooks advises dancers to come in proper dance attire and to be neat. He states that these auditions are the start of a great partnership. This is the beginning of a relationship with the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Brooks said. Were just happy to be the host. For more information visit TheAileySchool. edu/Auditions Any additional questions can be directed via email to admissions@alvinailey.org or via telephone at 212-405-9513. Students from The Ailey Fordham BFA Program.Photo by Eduardo Patino Special to the News M ERDDIE R OSIER celebrated his 70th birthday Saturday, March 15 with his wife Barber, children, many family members and friends. All enjoyed sharing the good times they had together with Merddie. He Thanks and Appreciates Everyone for All the Wonderful Love Shown to Him. MISS WAKULLA COUNTY PAGEANTor email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 12th gradeApplication deadline: April 3, 2014For more information on how to enter, please visit MissWakullaCounty.blogspot.comPagent Date: May 3, 2014

PAGE 9

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 9education news from local schools SchoolSpecial to the NewsOn Saturday, Feb. 22, Riversprings Middle Schools MATHCOUNTS Team traveled to FAMU/FSU College of Engineering to compete in the Big Bend Regional MATHCOUNTS competition. The day long event featured individual and team level competitions, as well as an entertaining ciphering round that was open to the public. MATHCOUNTS is a national middle school coaching and competitive mathematics program that promotes mathematics achievement through a series of fun and engaging contests. MATHCOUNTS is sponsored by the Big Bend Chapter of the Florida Engineering Society and numerous local and national organizations. Riversprings top scorers were eighthgrader Jared Weber, seventh-grader Giselle Almanzor, and eighthgrader Brylee Tew. Special to the NewsThe Coastal Optimist Club recently held its annual essay contest which was open to students in the 9th through 12th grades. The topic was How Dreams Lead To Success. Students were invited to write an essay of 700 to 800 words. Winning first place was Kayla Wimberly. Kayla is a senior at Wakulla High School. She received a check for $100. As the rst place winner, her essay will be competing in the North Florida District Optimist Essay Contest. The winner at that level receives a $2,500 scholarship and goes on to the International Essay Contest. The second place winning essay was written by senior Savannah Hamilton. She received a check for $75. Third place, winning $50 was senior Tamara Arnold. Tamara, Savannah and Kayla are all students in Nancy Floyd Richardsons classes. The essay contest winners, their teacher and family members attended a luncheon in their honor at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea on March 13, where they were presented with certi cates, medallions and their checks by contest chair Jo Ann Daniels and Coastal Optimist Club Vice President Bill Versiga. The judges for the event were Sally Gandy, Anthony Lariscy and Jo Ann Daniels. The entries were judged on their overall content, writing style, grammatical accuracy, neatness, organization and thoroughness in covering the topic. The Optimists next activities include the the middle school and elementary Brain Brawl competitions and the Oratorical Contest. The Coastal Optimist Club meets on Thursdays at noon at Poseys Steam Room and cordially invites anyone who enjoys helping the young people in our community to join them. Special to the NewsCrawfordville Elementary School is hosting its annual Spring Festival, now themed as a Country Fair, Saturday, April 5 from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. Things will look a little different with new activities planned to help support the Country Fair theme. Instead of our regular Spring Festival, you will see an old fashion Country Fair with all the xins plus more. The students are selling tickets that will raise money for items such as books, garden supplies, and eld trips. If the children sell enough tickets their principal gets kissed by a pig, their Dean of Students has to shave his head, and lots of slime cups will get poured on a whole row of teachers and administrators. Everyone is working hard to support the school and the efforts that go into planning and preparing for an event such as the Country Fair. You can support Crawfordville Elementary School and the students by purchasing tickets or becoming a school sponsor. Please call the school if you are interested in either. Of course, just attending the event is a great way to support our school. There will be a giant blow up obstacle course, face painting, popcorn, sno-cones, entertainment, balloons, a new type of dunk tank, an old fashioned pie baking contest, games, themed baskets, grilled food and Bingo with prizes. In fact, we have so many Bingo prizes and requests to play that we have moved Bingo into the larger music room to provide space for more participants and all of the prizes that have been donated and purchased. Be sure to stop by Crawfordville Elementary School Saturday to enjoy a safe day of family fun. You wont be disappointed!Special to The NewsSuperintendent Robert Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the optimism, positive energy and compassion each of these individuals give to the children of Wakulla County and the enthusiasm they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. ANGELA DEN BLEYKERCRAWFORDVILLE ELEMENTARY Angela Den Bleyker, March Teacher of the Month, hit the ground running when she began her teaching career seven years ago at Crawfordville Elementary School. A graduate of Flagler College, Den Bleyker sites the time she spends with the students as the most enjoyable part of her job. Originally from Tallahassee and a graduate of Lincoln High School, Den Bleyker pursued her degree, rst by attending TCC and then nished at Flagler. She earned a dual major in elementary education and exceptional student education. When the light bulb clicks and students learn something new or have mastered a new skill it becomes contagious, shares Den Bleyker. Contributing to the total school program by serving as a member of eco-ambassadors, operation brain power and the project learning tree committee demonstrates her commitment to her students even after they leave third grade. Den Bleyker notes, When a former student comes to visit and shares their accomplishments with me I feel like a proud mom. My love for my students, current and former is why I am a teacher. Crawfordville Elementary School Principal Angie Walker describes Den Bleyker as an incredible person and teacher, She is kind, generous, caring, devoted and professional in all situations. Mrs. Den Bleyker sets the bar about as high as it can go with her uncanny knack to connect with her students and parents. She makes sure that each and every child knows her expectations, models her expectations and feels a part of her class community. Her class is a phenomenal place to enter and almost impossible place to leave. She is engaging to all who cross the threshold. Mrs. Den Bleyker is a role model for all educators, and I am extremely fortunate to have her with me at Crawfordville. SHANNON SMITH RIVERSPRINGS MIDDLE SCHOOL Shannon Smith, Riversprings Middle School Teacher and Coach, has been serving Wakulla students in a professional capacity since 2005. Smith began his career teaching math at WHS and transferred one year later to Riversprings as a math and PE teacher. Growing up, I always knew I wanted to coach kids (especially wrestling). Teaching afforded me the opportunity to work with children and coach at the same time, shares Smith. Smith received his masters degree in Educational Leadership from the American Intercontinental University in 2013. He received his bachelors degree in middle grades mathematics from FSU and his AA degree from TCC. Watching students grow intellectually and interacting with students is what Smith enjoys most about his job. He adds, It is always a pleasure to keep up with my students and their accomplishments when they leave middle school. Smith has been the coach for Team Wakulla Wrestling since 2007 and an AVID teacher since 2013. Riversprings Middle School Principal Michele Baggett states, Coach Smith is an important part of the heart and soul of RMS. On any given day, he can be found on a ball eld, wrestling mat, monitoring parent drop-off, driving a school bus, teaching a class or mowing a eld. Smith is our 7th grade AVID elect teacher, PE teacher, wrestling coach, volleyball coach and athletic director. His love for the RMS Bears shines through in his actions. He is eager and ready to assume any challenges that might come his way. Coach Smith is a true asset to our school. ASHLEY WARD WAKULLA PRE-K The March Employee of the Month is the Wakulla Pre-Ks Ashley Ward. Ward has been a paraprofessional at the Pre-K since August 2008. Prior to that time she was a VPK teacher at Happy Time Day Care. Originally from Freeport, Florida, Ward attended Santa Fe Community College in Gainesville and earned an A.S. degree in Early Childhood Education. She is currently working on her B.A. degree from Vanguard University of Southern California. Ward enjoys working with children and sharing in their enthusiasm for school and learning. Pursuing her degree in Early Childhood Education is a natural t. Not only does she get pleasure from the students but she delights in working closely with her colleagues, sharing ideas and supporting one another. I appreciate the importance of involvement in our school; helping to create an overall positive morale, notes Ward. Ward notes, I love the early development of children and watching how they grow throughout the year. Being around them lifts my spirits as their perspective is delightful and usually humorous. Pre-K Principal Kim Dutton shares, Mrs. Ward is the ultimate optimist; always expecting a favorable outcome. This philosophy enables her to see the very best in each and every child in her classroom. Few things in the world are more powerful than a positive push. A you can do it when things are tough. Her expectations then become a reality for her students.Riversprings Middle School competes at MATHCOUNTS MATHCOUNTS students in the back row are Magnolia Parmer, Jared Weber, Alyssa Cacciatore, Caleb Wiedeman, Logan Hicks. In the front row Coach John Kane, Coach Kaylee Meyers, Stephanie Ball, Susie Fountain, AnneMarie Russell, Logan Branch, Brylee Tew, Giselle Almanzor, Devin Lehrmann. Angela Den Bleyker Shannon Smith Ashley WardTeachers, employee of the month namedCrawfordville Elementarys annual Spring Festival is April 5 WHS students Win Optimist Club Essay ContestKayla Wimberly, Jo Ann Daniels, Bill Versiga, Tamara Arnold, Savannah Hamilton, and Nancy Floyd Richardson.

PAGE 10

Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Tuesday, March 11, the track teams traveled to Godby High School for the rst annual Tariq Bar eld Invitational Meet. Ten teams attended the rst year event, with the WHS girls placing third overall and the boys placing fourth. The local squads were primarily represented by their junior and senior runners, as the younger runners were slated to attend the Chiles Freshmen/Sophomore Championship Meet later in the week. The competition kicked off with the eld events and WHSs duo of Corion Knight and Keith Gavin led the way with outstanding performances. In the high jump, both cleared the 1st Team US Elite Standard height of 6, with Knight winning the head-to-head competition based on fewer misses. Knight then went on to also win the long jump competition with a leap of 22, a new personal record. The running events started with the 4x800 meter relay, which was won by the WHS boys (Bryce Cole, Evan Guarino, Alan Pearson, Albert Smythe) in the excellent time of 8:45.25. Travis Parks also logged the winning time (11:47.13) in the 3200 meters, with Riley Welch (11:58.30) nailing down second place. Albert Smythe also turned in a good performance in the 1600 meters, placing second in a time of 4:58.99. Boys scoring points for the team included Evan Guarino (7th, 1600 meters, 5:20.56), J.P. Piotrowski (4th, 800 meters, 2:12.35), Malik Thomas (8th, 200 meters, 0:24.11) and the 4 x 100 relay team (4th) and the 4x400 relay team (5th). The girls were led once again by the outstanding performances of senior Madison Harris, who usually runs the 800 meters, but who dropped down in distances this week, placing second in the 400 meters in a new school record time of 0:58.77. She then followed that up with a winning effort in the 200 meters in the excellent time of 0:26.87. Kayla Webbe continued the top performances by winning the 3200 meter run (13:05.37) and placing second in the 1600 meters (6:07.19). In the 800 meters, Lydia Wiedeman turned in the winning performance, logging a time of 2:31.57, with freshman Haleigh Martin (2nd, 2:32.95) in hot pursuit. The girls relay teams also turned in top performances. The WHS girls (Haleigh Martin, Kayla Webbe, Marty Wiedeman, Lydia Wiedeman) won the 4x800 meter relay in 11:041. The team of Lydia Wiedeman, Sarah Thigpen, Adrianna Mitchell and Madison Harris turned in one of the most electrifying performances of the evening in the 4x400 meter relay, battling Lincoln and Godby throughout the race. The rst three girls kept the local team in second place, battling Godby, with Lincoln holding what appeared to be an insurmountable lead of approximately 6 seconds when Harris took the baton on the anchor leg, but one thing opponents have learned over the last four years is that no lead is necessarily secure when Harris is anchoring the team. Harris took off after the nal Lincoln runner and steadily closed the gap on the back stretch and then made a furious charge down the final straight, but ran out of track, nishing second in 4:16.80 to Lincolns 4:16.21. Other WHS girls scoring points included Adrianna Mitchell (6th, 200 meters, 0:28.08, 7th, 100 meters, 0:13.86 and 3rd, long jump, 16), Holli Capps (5th, 800 meters, 2:52.99), Commie Lewis (3rd, 1600 meters, 6:14.16), Taylor Vaughn (8th, 100 meter hurdles, 0:20.17), Mikala Gavin (8th, long jump, 14) and Shelby Alsup (6th, discus, 78). WHS GIRLS WIN AT 15TH ANNUAL CHILES FRESHMAN/ SOPHOMORE MEET On Friday, March 14, the WHS track newbies started their spring break by traveling to Chiles High School for their annual freshman/ sophomore championship meet. Eight schools elded teams for the meet and when the dust had nally settled at about 8:30 p.m., the local girls squad had secured a victory and claimed their rst trophy ever at this meet. Only nine local girls traveled to the meet, but early on they made it known that they would be a factor. The long jump was one of the rst events and the multi-talented freshman, Adrianna Mitchell, led the field winning with a leap of 16, with teammates Mikala Gavin (2nd, 15) and Shaniece Johnson (5th, 12.5) also placing in the top eight. The running events then began with the 100 meter hurdles and Johnson ran a strong race, just getting nipped at the end, but securing second place in a new personal recored (PR) of 0:20.29. The 100 meter dash followed and set the stage for a remarkable evening for Mitchell. By the time the meet was over she secured victories in the 100 meters (0:13.49), the 200 meters (0:27.60) and the 400 meters (1:03.71), to sweep all the sprint events. Gavin also performed well, garnering a 6th place (0:0:14.04) in the 100 meters and 5th (0:29.40) in the 200 meters. Dazaha Jackson also scored in the 100 meters, nabbing 8th place (0:14.06). In the 400 meters, freshman Sarah Thigpen continued to improve and secured 3rd place (1:05.84), setting a new PR by over 2 seconds. Then it was time to turn the scoring over to the middle distance girls and they continued in the same vein. In the 1600 meters Leon runner Grace Lockhart took the lead from the beginning and steadily kept building on it. WHS standout Haleigh Martin found herself steadily falling further and further behind while struggling with a severe side stitch. With 200 meters to go it look like she would have to settle for second place, but her heart kicked in at that point and she mounted a furious charge, closing the gap with each stride and ended up nipping Lockhart at the nish line. Martins time was 5:50.41 to Lockharts 5:50.62, not Martins best time, but her guttiest race to date. Sophomore Connie Lewis ran a new PR, 6:12.14, to nish in 4th place. Martin returned in the 800 meters and, minus the side stitch, dominated the field, winning in 2:36.68, almost 11 seconds ahead of the second place finisher. Freshman Emily Lawrence, competing in her rst high school meet, secured 6th place (3:02.73), claiming 3 points for the local squad. Connie Lewis, looking strong and controlled, then proceeded to win the 3200 meters in a new PR of 13:46.32. Going into the nal event of the day for the girls, it looked like with a good showing in the 4 x 400 meter relay the WHS girls could secure a second place nish. The 4 x 400 squad of Shaniece Johnson, Sarah Thigpen, Dazaha Jackson and Haleigh Martin lined up at the start committed to putting everything they had into the effort. They were running in third place behind both Port St. Joe (the meet leaders) and Leon when Martin received the baton. She started at least 6 seconds behind the Leon runner and it looked like an insurmountable de cit, but she then proceeded to pull a Madi as set off in pursuit of the Leon girl. With every stride, she closed the gap just a little bit and by the time they reached the home stretch she was in full flight and furiously trying to close the nal 2 seconds. Once again, she nipped the Leon runner at the line, securing what appeared to be second place in the race. The race winner was later moved into an open category and taken out of the scoring for the freshman/sophomore classification as they had an upper classman on the team, giving the WHS squad the win and the 10 points, which turned out to be critical in the overall team scoring. After the nal scores were tabulated, the WHS girls ended up winning the meet by 1/2 point, 121 to 120.5, over the Port St. Joe squad. In the process, the girls won every individual at track (not over hurdles) event at the meet, meaning the 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600 and 3200, plus the long jump and 4x400 relay. The boys competition for the WHS team lacked the drama of the girls competition, but the local runners still had some good performances. In the sprints, Demarcus Lindsey ran a very solid 100 meters, claiming 5th place (0:12.05) and Sebastian Garner nabbed a 4th place nish in the 400 meters (0:56.03). In the 800 meters, sophomore Albert Smythe ran a new PR, nishing second in the excellent time of 2:05.54 and Bryce Cole placed 7th in 2:16.14. In the 1600 meters, Bryce Cole ran a strong, controlled race, nishing in second place in a new PR of 4:44.74. Smythe rounded out the scoring for the local team by finishing 4th in the 3200 meters (11:06.35), literally minutes after running his 800 meter PR. Other notable PRs included Evan Gurarino (800 meters, 2:19.39 & 1600 meters, 5:13.93), William Thomas (800 meters, 2:37.34 & 1600 meters, 6:01.65), Tyler Westcott (1600 meters, 6:02.54 & 3200 meters, 13:10.23), Nick Emerson (1600 meters, 5:57.61 & 3200 meters, 13:09.94), Sebastien Garner (200 meters, 0:25.21) and Justin Green (100 meters, 0:12.47). Overall, both team performed well tonight, said Coach Paul Hoover. But the girls were outstanding. All the girls really stepped up, but we couldnt have asked for anything more from Adrianna and Haleigh. Adrianna won four events, including sweeping all of the sprints and that is just almost never done. Haleigh won two individual events, plus ran the critical anchor leg in the 4 X 400 relay. This is the rst meet since I have been at the school where the sprint girls out-pointed our middle distance runners and that is great to see, he said. The credit for that goes to the excellent work that Coach Gavin is doing with the sprinters and jumpers. The teams performance at this meet is also a tribute to the excellent middle school program run by Coach Chad Linville at Riversprings Middle School, as that is where the vast majority of our top young athletes come from. LOCAL TRACK ATHLETES RANKED NATIONALLY Three local high school track athletes have logged performances that currently rank in the top 10 in the nation: Senior Madison Harris 2:14.39 in the 800 meters is currently the 5th fastest time for a high school girl recorded this so far this season; and high jumpers senior Corion Knight and sophomore Keith Gavin, are both tied for 7th place with jumps of 6.TRACKTeams compete in two meets last week SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe WHS underclassmen girls with the trophy at the Chiles meet.Runner Cora Atkinson signs a scholarship with Life College. See Story, Page 20. WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION DEPARTMENT2014 MID SPRING SPORTS REGISTRATIONREGISTRATION DATES AND TIMES:Monday 3/17/14 to Friday 4/4/14; 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM Saturday 4/5/14; 8:00 AM to 12:00 PM REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Saturday, 4/5/14; 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: Medart Recreation Park (Off U.S. 98) There will be a 4 team minimum requirement for each division to be established.All leagues are coed. If interested in coaching any of the above sports, please contact the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department. For more information call 926-7227 or visit www.WCPRD.com. PLAYER PITCH LEAGUECOST: $45 Per Child AGES:7 & 8 Division A player must be 7 prior to 4/30/14 and can turn 9 on or after 4/30/14.Player pitch is a league that builds on previous pitching machine league experience. Although not required it is encouraged that players have experienced some type of live pitching. The league will start shortly after the pitching machine regular season. YOUTH SOCCERCOST: $40 Per Child AGES:04 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 03 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 05 on or after 9/1/14 06 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 05 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 07 on or after 9/1/14 08 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 07 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 09 on or after 9/1/14 10 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 09 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 11 on or after 9/1/14 12 & UNDER DIVISION Players must be 11 prior to 9/1/14 and may turn 13 on or after 9/1/14AGE DETERMINING DATES: September 1st, 2014 for SoccerAGE DETERMINING DATES: April 30th, 2014 for Player Pitch FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org 926-2200 Dental Plans Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Ross E. Tucker, AgentChartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwriter

PAGE 11

I went to Crawfordville the other day early. I needed to see Jenny at The Wakulla News about an article she was doing on the mural Ive recently completed (See mural story on Page 14). I knew The News ofce wasnt open at 7:30 and so I went for breakfast at Huddle House. A cup of the tasty coffee warmed my soul on this extremely rainy dawn, as overnight I had a good 5 to 6 inches of rain at our home in Smith Creek. Looking out the window, I couldnt help but notice some black vultures swooping low directly over the restaurant, tipping their heads to look (it seemed) right in at me. Dont look at me like that, I thought. I aint dead yet! Then I noted fish crows, about a dozen over the parking areas, and another blackish bird, the European starling. Laughing gulls ew up, and on the wires were some Eurasian collared doves. Neat, I thought. There is a column! As a child up in Indiana, only turkey vultures were seen there, except in the dead of winter. Now, though, they are as common as the turkey vulture, so they slowly are expanding their range northward as the worlds temperatures over the last two decades has slowly warmed. Adult turkey vultures have a reddish head, the blacks is blackish. The turkey has around a 7-foot wing span, while the Blacks is only about five. Yet the black weighs about 5 pounds, the turkey only around 2-3 pounds. The turkey has (unlike most birds) a very keen sense of smell, and often is the scavenger that detects death a meal first. They will land and start dismembering a carcass only to be spotted by the heavier black vultures, which will drive the turkey off. The black being heavier will have to ap around three or four times, then glide, then resume apping again, and again glide for a short distance, untill they gain enough elevation to soar, while the turkey may cover the same distance with out apping once! Also the turkey is so light in weight, any tiny updraft from below or change is wind speed or direction will cause it to constantly tip the wings, as if unsteady, while the black has a direct purposeful strong ight. The black holds its wings fairly at out with just a slight dihedral, but the turkey really tips its wings up, and so from a great distance these two can be separated as to species nearly instantly. The bald eagle when pausing between aps holds its wings dead at! Also blacks have a shorter tail, and have a light area out in the last half of the wings from below (in the primaries) while the turkeys wings are all uniform in color. And, there is much more, BUT lets move on to the crows. We have two distinct species of crows in our region: the American Crow and the Fish Crow. In our country we also have the Northwestern Crow, and the Tamualipas Crow found in Mexico up to extreme south Texas. And, in British Columbia, occasionally is seen the smaller Eurasian Jackdaw. Our Fish crow is smaller than the American crow and has a smaller bill as well, but separating the two by looks alone takes more skill than I have! However their calls are quite different. The drawn out caw-cawcaw of the crow found in farmland thoughout North America is replaced along our southeastern coastal regions by the Fish Crows call, a ca ha. Here in the winter months we see Fish crows in large flocks, never the American crow, as you might in Indiana or Kansas. Actually, before our present Crawfordville Winn-Dixie was built, the area where it now sits and the parking lot was a winter roost for hundreds of these crows. I was saddened to see their rookery attened. Fish crow are often literally seen on our beaches feeding on washed up marine life. And like all the birds in the raven, crow, magpie, jay family of Corvidae are very smart. In Europe they are considered the most highly developed, evolved bird because of their smarts. As an example, theyve been observed playing in the snow by landing on a bank, holding their wings in tight, and dropping to the snow and rolling down the snow bank, only to y back and do it again and again. Ive seen this documented on TV! The European starling is a scourge, an exotic that has taken over many countries like ours, displacing many of our native species. Being aggressive or pushy, they take over a birdfeeder, and force other avian species from their nests. Their generic name is Sturnus vulgaris, and indeed they are rather vulgar! Yet in East Africa alone Ive been blessed to observe some of the many 30 starling species there that are absolutely stunning in beauty, like the Golden-breasted, Red-winged, Greater Blue-eared, Ruppells Long-tailed, Magpie,and Superb Starling, all of vivid colors, and shimmering iridescence. Our native Laughing gulls are now getting their adult breeding plumage, the stunning black heads with blood red bills, and feet too. They get quite handsome this time of year, and are often seen resting in the Winn-Dixie parking lot, (along with some wintering Ring-Billed Gulls with their yellowish legs and beak with a dark ring). Often we see a pair of Laughing gulls side up to each other, stand very erect, droop their wings in a courting stance, and then pointing their heads straight up theyll alternate laughing a call that indeed does sound like a laugh hence their name. They soon will be nesting on some of our bay islands by the hundreds! About 20 years ago, possibly earlier, some doves escaped or were released in the TampaSt. Pete area. The experts identified them as Ringerd Turtle Doves, but they were Eurasian collared dove, which have the ring on the neck yes, but a different patterned tail and are darker than the Turtle dove. Soon they started spreading along the west coast, and we began to see them around our coastal towns like Panacea, St. Marks, and then inland. I knew they were expanding their range into Georgia, but on a trip out west four years ago, I was shocked to find them in the Badlands, and at Devils Tower, and now theyve expanded their range completely across the entire southern part of our country in just a few years. Amazing! Their call or song (to me) sounds as if they are repeating the phrase, Youre cuckoo, youre cuckoo, youre cuckoo. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 11outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTH From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Fishing should be good, if not for the rain Black vultures are now as common as Turkey vulturesSPECIAL TO THE NEWSA Black vulture is heavier and has a shorter tail than a Turkey vulture. YTH Tractor $1,69900 SPECIAL OF THE WEEK22V4210 YEAR DECK WARRANTY www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698Man, did we get the rain. I heard anywhere from 6 to 9 inches. Thats a lot of freshwater dumping into the bay. It was starting to clear up around Shell Point but this will de nitely change things. With the full moon the other day, shing should be really good this coming weekend unless all the rain affected them. I had a charter for last Monday but due to the fact that where I sh had been pretty slow, I asked Randy Peart to take them. He had been shing at Spring Warrior and catching plenty of sh on a Twitch N Rap and gold Rattlin Red ns but said he was gonna sh the Econ na on Sunday. He did real well on Sunday so he took them to the Econfina where they limited out on trout and caught several Spanish and some nice rockbass. He caught the trout at the mouth of a creek and the rockbass and Spanish came from about 12 feet of water. Capt. David Fife continues to catch nice strings of trout using mostly top water Mirrolures and live mud minnows. He said he was catching a few reds but not very many. Fishing down around Spring Warrior and Keaton Beach continues to be very good. Top water baits, gold Rattlin Redns, live shrimp and the Gulp are all producing nice sh. One of my neighbors said a friend of his shes out of Steinhatchee and he has been catching lots of big trout on a lure made by Live Target that looks like a menhaden. Last Tuesday I shed for about three hours on the falling tide and caught 17 trout, one ounder and one Spanish. The next day I had charter and the wind blew 20-25 mph out of the NNW. We wont talk about that day. Saturday, Mike Pearson and I went for a couple of hours and shed the same spot I did on Tuesday and every one of those places had trout on them. We also caught trout to 4 pounds on the ats. Dont forget about the Sport Fishing exhibit which started on the 14th at the Museum of Florida history, located at 500 South Bronough. The Big Bend Kayak Classic will be May 2 and 3 and benefits Meals on Wheels and other senior services in Wakulla County. Go to www.bigbendkayakclassic.com for more info. The 6th annual Rock the Dock Tournament will be April 26 and 27 at Rock Landing in Panacea. Dont forget to leave a oat plan with someone, especially if youre heading off shore. Good luck and good shing! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor

PAGE 12

Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThis week, Alexander Gulde submitted the following article: Here in Floridas Big Bend, spring has arrived and many of our friends and neighbors are ready to return to the water to sh and enjoy all that our shores and rivers have to offer. However, many also took the time to attend the Annual St. Patricks Day Festival and Parade in Crawfordville on Saturday, March 15, and members of the Coast Guard Auxiliary Flotilla 12, Apalachee Bay were there to join in the celebration and to share important knowledge about being safe on the water. Members who were able to participate were Mike Harrison, Chuck Hickman (and his facility), Robert Spraker, Jack West, and Alexander Gulde. Prospective member Ron Eudy also attended. The Flotilla participated by entering one of our member-owned facilities (boats) in the parade and by staffing a booth with some great information on safe boating, navigation rules, protecting the environment and other materials for kids and adults alike. We answered some great questions about boating and paddle sports in the area, and were able to spread the word about our upcoming boating safety course in Crawfordville on Saturday, April 12. A Coast Guard Auxiliary Boating Safety Course is a great way for new and experienced boaters alike to acquire and refresh their knowledge and the opportunity to hear from experienced Coast Guard Auxiliarists and a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Of cer about boating safety. The course also offers the opportunity to earn the FWCs Boating Safety Education ID Card, which is required for anyone born after Jan. 1, 1988 in order to operate a boat legally in Florida. Even if you are not required to complete the course, many insurance companies offer discounts on their boat insurance to those who have earned the Boating Safety Education ID Card. If you are interested in learning more about our next boating safety course, please look at our website at www.uscgaux.net. You can also contact our Staff Officer for Public Education, Alexander Gulde, at Alexanderg@uscgaux.net or by phone at (850) 583-1863. For membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Officer for Human Resources at fso-hr@ uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Safety should be your No. 1 priority!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Marine life for the diver. My lecture at TCC this week covers marine life as it relates to the diver. This is one of my favorite topics as a marine biologist, and one I get enormous satisfaction from sharing with others. Of course, my students are primarily interested in what is dangerous to them underwater such that they can avoid injury. While I can appreciate our underwater world is akin to a foreign planet, the marine life represent its rich cultural inhabitants. They each have a story to tell. With todays video technology, and research into their life histories, I nd numerous entertaining examples of animal behavior on the Internet. Most marine life can be safely handled if done gently and carefully. Those that pose a problem to us often do so in defense of boundaries we accidentally cross. There are exceptions that we cover in detail in the class such as mantis shrimp, sea cucumber, angler sh, and moray eels, just to name a few. So I began by discussing the very colorful mantis shrimp, a curious creature, many not suited for aquariums, because they are very territorial. When they see themselves in the re ection of the enclosure wall, they strike out with exing hammers and break the glass. A close relative uses the same arms but rather than hammers, they have spears. Any sh occupants in the tank soon become food for the mantis. Dont be lured into exposing a nger to inspect this critter, as it will just as likely spear you as well. They live in sand borrows underwater and are very entertaining if you nd one on the reef. They do get big enough to eat, but dont be fooled. At night they are attracted to surface light, where they go to feed. A stern light off your boat at night will attract them, where they will feed voraciously on others also attracted to your light. One night off the Dry Tortugas, a colleague decided to capture a nearly foot long one by hand, with disastrous consequences, and much hilarity by his students. A great YouTube video clip of the Mantis Shrimp can be seen at True Facts About the Mantis Shrimp. Another creature we discuss in the lecture is the sea cucumber. Contrary to the shrimp, they are very slow and undistinguished on the reef. Some call them the sea pig, as they feed on dendrites. We alert divers to not harass them because when upset, the sea cucumber eviscerates its unpleasant sticky innards all over you. Again I refer you to True Facts About the Sea Pig YouTube. Stone Fish have poisonous dorsal ns that easily puncture our skin if they get too close. Otherwise they are fascinating creatures to watch. Close relatives are called angler sh that use a lure to attract live food, then snapping them up. These sh do not otherwise move fast, and often use cryptic camou age, making detection dif cult, until you place your hand on them. For great entertainment see the YouTube True Facts About the Angler Fish. Feeding sh like the moray eel is asking for a misunderstanding. Here we have a creature that is much bigger than you think, hiding most of its body in the reef. When it clamps down on your offering, it may mistake your ngers, or other body parts, as part of the treat. Its large backward facing teeth once clamped are dif cult to disengage (much like a hawks talons). In the excitement that follows, the eel retreats into the reef taking your attached arm with it. Here is a short video clip about just such a misunderstanding. http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=ySunWYj8lWQ. Use caution when interacting with marine life. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Mar 20, 14 Fri Mar 21, 14 Sat Mar 22, 14 Sun Mar 23, 14 Mon Mar 24, 14 Tue Mar 25, 14 Wed Mar 26, 14 Date 3.2 ft. 4:13 AM 3.0 ft. 5:01 AM 2.7 ft. 6:00 AM High 0.6 ft. 9:43 AM 0.9 ft. 10:18 AM 1.2 ft. 11:02 AM -0.2 ft. 12:37 AM -0.0 ft. 1:58 AM -0.1 ft. 3:24 AM -0.1 ft. 4:36 AM Low 3.7 ft. 3:42 PM 3.6 ft. 4:15 PM 3.5 ft. 4:55 PM 2.5 ft. 7:18 AM 2.5 ft. 8:55 AM 2.7 ft. 10:18 AM 3.0 ft. 11:16 AM High -0.4 ft. 10:41 PM -0.3 ft. 11:32 PM 1.5 ft. 12:00 PM 1.7 ft. 1:27 PM 1.6 ft. 3:19 PM 1.2 ft. 4:50 PM Low 3.2 ft. 5:50 PM 3.0 ft. 7:18 PM 2.9 ft. 9:21 PM 3.1 ft. 10:54 PM High Thu Mar 20, 14 Fri Mar 21, 14 Sat Mar 22, 14 Sun Mar 23, 14 Mon Mar 24, 14 Tue Mar 25, 14 Wed Mar 26, 14 Date 2.4 ft. 4:05 AM 2.2 ft. 4:53 AM 2.0 ft. 5:52 AM High 0.4 ft. 9:54 AM 0.7 ft. 10:29 AM 0.9 ft. 11:13 AM -0.1 ft. 12:48 AM -0.0 ft. 2:09 AM -0.0 ft. 3:35 AM -0.1 ft. 4:47 AM Low 2.8 ft. 3:34 PM 2.7 ft. 4:07 PM 2.6 ft. 4:47 PM 1.9 ft. 7:10 AM 1.9 ft. 8:47 AM 2.0 ft. 10:10 AM 2.2 ft. 11:08 AM High -0.3 ft. 10:52 PM -0.2 ft. 11:43 PM 1.1 ft. 12:11 PM 1.3 ft. 1:38 PM 1.2 ft. 3:30 PM 0.9 ft. 5:01 PM Low 2.4 ft. 5:42 PM 2.2 ft. 7:10 PM 2.2 ft. 9:13 PM 2.3 ft. 10:46 PM High Thu Mar 20, 14 Fri Mar 21, 14 Sat Mar 22, 14 Sun Mar 23, 14 Mon Mar 24, 14 Tue Mar 25, 14 Wed Mar 26, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 4:49 AM 2.8 ft. 5:37 AM High 0.6 ft. 10:47 AM 0.8 ft. 11:22 AM -0.3 ft. 12:36 AM -0.1 ft. 1:41 AM -0.0 ft. 3:02 AM -0.0 ft. 4:28 AM -0.1 ft. 5:40 AM Low 3.4 ft. 4:18 PM 3.4 ft. 4:51 PM 2.5 ft. 6:36 AM 2.3 ft. 7:54 AM 2.3 ft. 9:31 AM 2.5 ft. 10:54 AM 2.8 ft. 11:52 AM High -0.4 ft. 11:45 PM 1.1 ft. 12:06 PM 1.4 ft. 1:04 PM 1.6 ft. 2:31 PM 1.5 ft. 4:23 PM 1.1 ft. 5:54 PM Low 3.2 ft. 5:31 PM 3.0 ft. 6:26 PM 2.8 ft. 7:54 PM 2.7 ft. 9:57 PM 2.9 ft. 11:30 PM High Thu Mar 20, 14 Fri Mar 21, 14 Sat Mar 22, 14 Sun Mar 23, 14 Mon Mar 24, 14 Tue Mar 25, 14 Wed Mar 26, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 3:57 AM 2.3 ft. 4:45 AM 2.1 ft. 5:44 AM High 0.6 ft. 9:22 AM 0.9 ft. 9:57 AM 1.2 ft. 10:41 AM -0.1 ft. 12:16 AM -0.0 ft. 1:37 AM -0.0 ft. 3:03 AM -0.1 ft. 4:15 AM Low 2.9 ft. 3:26 PM 2.8 ft. 3:59 PM 2.7 ft. 4:39 PM 1.9 ft. 7:02 AM 1.9 ft. 8:39 AM 2.1 ft. 10:02 AM 2.3 ft. 11:00 AM High -0.4 ft. 10:20 PM -0.3 ft. 11:11 PM 1.5 ft. 11:39 AM 1.7 ft. 1:06 PM 1.6 ft. 2:58 PM 1.2 ft. 4:29 PM Low 2.5 ft. 5:34 PM 2.3 ft. 7:02 PM 2.3 ft. 9:05 PM 2.4 ft. 10:38 PM High Thu Mar 20, 14 Fri Mar 21, 14 Sat Mar 22, 14 Sun Mar 23, 14 Mon Mar 24, 14 Tue Mar 25, 14 Wed Mar 26, 14 Date 3.2 ft. 4:10 AM 3.0 ft. 4:58 AM 2.8 ft. 5:57 AM High 0.7 ft. 9:40 AM 1.0 ft. 10:15 AM 1.3 ft. 10:59 AM -0.2 ft. 12:34 AM -0.0 ft. 1:55 AM -0.1 ft. 3:21 AM -0.1 ft. 4:33 AM Low 3.8 ft. 3:39 PM 3.7 ft. 4:12 PM 3.5 ft. 4:52 PM 2.5 ft. 7:15 AM 2.5 ft. 8:52 AM 2.7 ft. 10:15 AM 3.0 ft. 11:13 AM High -0.4 ft. 10:38 PM -0.3 ft. 11:29 PM 1.6 ft. 11:57 AM 1.9 ft. 1:24 PM 1.8 ft. 3:16 PM 1.4 ft. 4:47 PM Low 3.3 ft. 5:47 PM 3.0 ft. 7:15 PM 3.0 ft. 9:18 PM 3.2 ft. 10:51 PM High Thu Mar 20, 14 Fri Mar 21, 14 Sat Mar 22, 14 Sun Mar 23, 14 Mon Mar 24, 14 Tue Mar 25, 14 Wed Mar 26, 14 Date 2.1 ft. 4:55 AM 2.0 ft. 6:01 AM 1.9 ft. 7:21 AM High 1.1 ft. 8:57 AM 1.2 ft. 9:30 AM 1.4 ft. 10:08 AM -0.0 ft. 12:20 AM -0.0 ft. 1:52 AM -0.0 ft. 3:13 AM -0.0 ft. 4:19 AM Low 2.7 ft. 3:25 PM 2.7 ft. 4:00 PM 2.7 ft. 4:43 PM 1.9 ft. 8:57 AM 2.0 ft. 10:27 AM 2.1 ft. 11:21 AM 2.1 ft. 11:56 AM High -0.1 ft. 10:02 PM -0.1 ft. 11:01 PM 1.5 ft. 11:05 AM 1.5 ft. 12:55 PM 1.4 ft. 2:52 PM 1.2 ft. 4:12 PM Low 2.6 ft. 5:38 PM 2.5 ft. 6:52 PM 2.4 ft. 8:26 PM 2.4 ft. 10:04 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 20 March 26First April 7 Full April 15 Last March 24 New March 304:29 am-6:29 am 4:55 pm-6:55 pm 10:02 am-11:02 am 11:49 pm-12:49 am 5:21 am-7:21 am 5:48 pm-7:48 pm --:-----:-10:49 am-11:49 am 6:16 am-8:16 am 6:44 pm-8:44 pm 12:47 am-1:47 am 11:41 am-12:41 pm 7:12 am-9:12 am 7:41 pm-9:41 pm 1:46 am-2:46 am 12:37 pm-1:37 pm 8:09 am-10:09 am 8:38 pm-10:38 pm 2:41 am-3:41 am 1:37 pm-2:37 pm 9:06 am-11:06 am 9:35 pm-11:35 pm 3:34 am-4:34 am 2:40 pm-3:40 pm 10:03 am-12:03 pm 10:30 pm-12:30 am 4:22 am-5:22 am 3:45 pm-4:45 pm Average Average Average Average Average Average Average6:41 am 6:48 pm 10:49 pm 9:04 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:39 am 6:49 pm 11:48 pm 9:50 am 6:38 am 6:49 pm --:-10:42 am 6:37 am 6:50 pm 12:46 am 11:38 am 6:36 am 6:51 pm 1:42 am 12:38 pm 6:34 am 6:51 pm 2:35 am 1:41 pm 6:33 am 6:52 pm 3:24 am 2:46 pm77% 70% 63% 56% 48% 41% 34%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay Dog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliarists, above, in the Lions Clubs St. Patricks parade in Crawfordville, and talking about boating with festival-goers at the information booth. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 13On Tuesday, March 11, fast action by WCSO deputies resulted in the solving of two cases. Deputy Gibby Gibson responded to a burglary in progress on Whiddon Lake Road. A suspect was observed on a bicycle pulling a washing machine with a dolly on the road. Deputy Gibson was joined by Sgt. Eddie Wester, Detectives Derek Lawhon, Clint Beam and Cole Wells along with Sgt. Ryan Muse and Deputies Stephen Simmons and Ross Hasty. A search of the suspect, Christopher Lee Rodgers, 28, of Crawfordville, resulted in the recovery of stolen items from Wal-Mart. Rodgers was found to be in possession of Wal-Mart merchandise without a receipt or merchandise bags. He was charged with retail theft. Beer and medications were discovered in the suspects back pack. They are valued at $32. Evidence at the store helped determine that the suspect left the store without paying for the merchandise. Rodgers was arrested for burglary and grand theft in connection with the Whiddon Lake Road washing machine incident involving a vacant home. A forced entry was observed at a shed on the property and dolly marks at the scene matched Rodgers dolly. The home is owned by an individual from California. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week:WEDNESDAY, MARCH 5 Heath Clark of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left his cell phone and case in his unsecured vehicle. The stolen property is valued at $300. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated.THURSDAY, MARCH 6 Kelli Osborn of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A DVD player was stolen from the victims unsecured vehicle. A flashlight was recovered inside the vehicle that did not belong to the victim. The stolen property is valued at $50. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Neysa Brogdon of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of cigarettes from the unsecured vehicle. The stolen property is valued at $5. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Sue Davis of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of a flashlight which was later recovered in the Osborn vehicle burglary nearby. The ashlight is valued at $25. The vehicle was left unsecured. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. Robert McKenzie of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A firearm, holster and handgun magazine was reported stolen from the unsecured vehicle. The stolen property is valued at $1,110. The firearm was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Stacy Barnett of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Cigarettes were stolen from inside the unsecured vehicle. The stolen property is valued at $10. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Stephen Sims of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed four unauthorized charges on his bank card. The charges were created at Toys R Us and TJ Maxx in Las Vegas, NV and totaled $204. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. Christine Jenkins of Crawfordville reported the theft of a rearm. The pistol was stolen from the victims home and is valued at $600. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated.FRIDAY, MARCH 7 WCSO responded to a complaint on Crystal Lane in Crawfordville regarding a shooting. Someone shot a residence with a shotgun. Holes were observed on a support brace, in the vinyl and at a window. Damage was estimated at $100. There were no injuries. Deputies believe the shooting may be drug related. Lt. Mike Kemp, Detective Josh Langston, Deputy Stephen Simmons, Deputy Ross Hasty and Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. A Panacea woman reported her 15-yearold daughter received lewd images of a male on her cell phone. The complainant identified a possible suspect through the photographs. Sgt. Lorne Whaley investigated. Melinda Fewell of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A utility trailer was stolen from the victims yard. The trailer was not secured and is valued at $4,000. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Rosa Simmons of Crawfordville was involved in a single vehicle traf c crash on Coastal Highway near St. Marks. The victim was driving eastbound when a deer ran into the side of her vehicle. The deer was severely injured and needed to be humanely put down. There were no other injuries. Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Heather Williams of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to purchase merchandise over the Internet from a company that turned out to be fraudulent. The victims bank account was charged for $179. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated.SATURDAY, MARCH 8 Paul R. Stockton, 42, of Monticello was arrested for DUI following a traf c stop near Wakulla Gardens. Sgt. Ryan Muse reportedly observed the motorist fail to come to a stop at the intersection of Spring Creek Highway and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. The driver failed eld sobriety exercises and a recently opened beer was observed inside the vehicle. The driver was issued a traf c citation for running the stop sign. Sgt. Ray Johnson also investigated. Stephen Lancaster, 48, of Crawfordville was observed driving a vehicle with the incorrect tag attached. A traf c stop was conducted and it was determined that the driver had a suspended driver license and it had been suspended five times previously. Lancaster was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge and tag attached not assigned. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Marion Michael Benedict, 62, of Sopchoppy was involved in a traf c stop after being observed passing in a no passing zone in Crawfordville. The driver failed eld sobriety exercises. A Schedule 3 narcotic was discovered inside the vehicle. He received a Uniform Traf c Citation for passing in a no passing zone and a DUI citation. Deputies Matt Helms and Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Melody Reeves of Crawfordville reported the theft of her driver license. The victim reported that her wallet and license were stolen while she was dining in Panacea. The wallet was inside a purse on a chair. Florida Highway Patrol Trooper Revell found the victims wallet on the side of the road near the restaurant. However, the driver license was missing. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Stephanie Ross of Panacea reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and a television and change valued at $150, was stolen. Damage to the home was estimated at $300. Individuals of interest have been identified. Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Deputy Matt Helms investigated a reckless vehicle complaint. Deputy Helms reportedly observed the driver drive over the center line and fog line a total of eight times. Reuben D. Warner, 35, of Tallahassee stopped his vehicle and gave Deputy Helms an identi cation card. Deputy Helms was assisted by Lt. Mike Kemp who conducted a DUI investigation. The driver refused to submit to eld sobriety exercises. He was arrested for DUI and driving while license suspended or revoked. Records indicated that Warner was arrested by Sgt. Lorne Whaley for DUI and DWLSR in January 2014. Warner was also issued a Uniform Traffic Citation for failure to maintain a single lane.SUNDAY, MARCH 9 Deputy Alan Middlebrooks observed a vehicle traveling at a high rate of speed on Coastal Highway in Panacea. A traf c stop was conducted for driving 75 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone. Deputy Middlebrooks discovered that the vehicle registration expired in September 2012 and the decal belonged to another tag. The vehicle tag was stolen out of Lee County. A marijuana pipe and a small amount of marijuana were discovered inside the vehicle. The marijuana weighed .5 of a gram. Stephen Michael Davis, 46, of Fort Myers was charged with theft, tag attached not assigned, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and an expired registration of more than six months. He was also issued a traffic citation for speeding. Deputy Adam Pendris and Deputy Will Hudson also investigated. Deputy Vicki Mitchell reportedly observed a motorist fail to stop at a stop sign at Wakulla Arran Road and Old Bethel Road. Deputy Mitchell conducted a traffic stop and Joey Eugene Guinn, 19, of Crawfordville did not possess a valid driver license. The deputy smelled the odor of marijuana and discovered a bag containing marijuana inside the vehicle. Guinn was arrested for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and issued a traf c citation for failure to stop for a traf c control device. The marijuana weighed 12.2 grams.MONDAY, MARCH 10 Michael Radin of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of a wheel barrow, tool bags and hand tools, valued at $950. Damage to the home was estimated at $100. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Ronald Robenhorst of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and computer equipment, coins and a pistol were stolen. The stolen property is valued at $825 and damage to the home was valued at $100. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Detective Cole Wells conducted a trafc stop after observing a motorist cross the center line into oncoming traf c. Bianca Marie Carns, 21, of Crawfordville was unable to produce a valid driver license. Detective Wells confirmed that her driver license was suspended. She told the detective that her vehicle contained marijuana. Detective Wells also located drug paraphernalia. Carns was given a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and knowingly driving on a suspended license. The marijuana weighed 1.2 grams. Sgt. Ryan Muse made contact with WalMart staff regarding lost and found property from the store. Credit cards, identification cards and other items were turned over to Sgt. Muse to be turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. WalMart turns lost and found property in to the sheriffs of ce periodically if they are not claimed per store policy. Deputy Stephen Simmons conducted a traf c stop on a Buick that displayed a vehicle tag from a Pontiac. Claude Matas Hinson, 66, of Tallahassee did not have a valid driver license as it had been revoked. The tag displayed did not belong to the vehicle he was driving. He was charged with knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked. Sgt. Ryan Muse also investigated. Melissa Stewart of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered. A rearm, coins and jewelry were stolen from the residence. The property is valued at $3,400. Persons of interest were identi ed. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated with Detectives Cole Wells and Josh Langston. A Crawfordville man contacted Deputy Billy Metcalf in regards to his son suffering an injured wrist while in middle school. The student was allegedly grabbed by the wrist by a school staff member. The investigation was turned over to School Resource Of cer Deputy Nick Boutwell. Andrew Carter of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed three unauthorized charges on his bank account. The charges were valued at $119 at three Kroger stores in North Georgia. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated.TUESDAY, MARCH 11 William Stokley of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim lost a wallet and ashlight. The stolen items are valued at $175. Deputy Ross Hasty and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Andrew Taylor of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victim observed 16 unauthorized charges on his bank card. The charges were created at merchandise stores and restaurants and totaled $924. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. A concerned citizen discovered lost property in the Hammocks subdivision. A credit card, concealed weapon license, identi cation card and grocery store card were recovered. The victim, Daniel Willis of Crawfordville, reported that the recovered items were in his wallet which is now missing. An iPod was also reportedly stolen from his vehicle. The wallet and iPod are valued at $125. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. Deputy Evelyn Brown counseled a 15-year-old Wakulla Middle School student after recovering two counterfeit bills the student made at his home. The student made a counterfeit $100 and $5 bill. The bills were seized. Kelley Cannon of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported someone using her personal information and Social Security number to le for unemployment. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 12 John Antill of Eden Springs reported a trespass after warning. Lameka Delores Harris, 30, of Crestview was at the facility when Lt. Jimmy Sessor arrived. She had an active trespass warning at the facility. Harris was removed from the building and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Jerry Griffin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft from Griffin Auto Sales. A minivan was stolen from the property. The vehicle was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Jack Alsup of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Broken glass was observed at the home and $315 worth of items including a computer, re safe, jewelry and currency were stolen. Damage to the glass of the front door is estimated at $50. Deputy Matt Helms investigated. Bryon Pilgrim of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Two cellular telephones were stolen from the victims home. The phones are valued at $1,320. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Paula Rose of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A cosmetics case of medications was stolen from the victims unsecured vehicle. The medications are valued at $855. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Mark Whitehead of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered. The victim reported the loss of $12 worth of coins. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Teresa Brannan of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An individual applied for unemployment benefits using the victims personal information. The victim is employed. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. Tammy Vernon of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Someone removed 18 wooden fence posts from her property. The property is valued at $320. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Deputy Adam Pendris investigated a report of a reckless driver on Crawfordville Highway. Deputy Pendris conducted a traf c stop for failure to maintain a single lane and failure to signal a lane change. Cliffton Kent Marlow, 45, of Crawfordville had a suspended driver license. Field sobriety exercises were given and the subject was arrested for DUI. When Marlow arrived at the jail he had a white powdery substance in his possession. The substance tested positive for cocaine. He was arrested for possession of cocaine, smuggling contraband into a detention facility and knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended or revoked in addition to the DUI. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks, Deputy Ward Kromer and Detention Deputy Kenneth Miller also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,116 calls for service during the past week including: 25 business and residential alarms; 90 citizen contacts; 10 disturbances; 13 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 9 E-911 abandoned calls; 23 E-911 calls; 49 investigations; 46 medical emergencies 14 school security checks; 381 business and residential security checks; 34 special details; 12 subpoena services; 48 traf c enforcements; 145 traf c stops; and 22 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report

PAGE 14

Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com & By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netAt 79, George Weymouth goes where nature calls. Whether its in the woods around his home in Wakulla County or the plains of Africa, his favorite place to be is in the great outdoors. My church is the woods, if you follow me, he says. When I go out there, its where I nd God. The artist and naturalist travels the globe with his companion, Patty Murray, who is also an avid outdoors enthusiast. The two are planning a trip to Antarctica later this year. When hes not outdoors collecting ideas in his sanctuary, Weymouth works as a painter, sculptor and writer. He has been writing articles on nature and wildlife for The Wakulla News for years. Since my mid-20s, all the jobs Ive had have been nature related, Weymouth says. Ive been lucky to work at naturally wonderful places like Wakulla Springs, Florida State Museum of Natural History and Tates Hell, just to name a few. I was also a bird guide for 15 years at Sanibel Island, he says. Nelson Martin, a friend of Weymouth who has been involved in preservation efforts in Sopchoppy, wanted to dress up the small town with some murals, so he put together a proposal and presented it to the Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association (SPIA). He contacted Bad Bobs Bait and Tackle about using the front of the building to create the mural, and then he talked to Weymouth about painting it. Weymouth accepted the challenge and began to lay out an idea for the mural. This is the biggest project weve done so far, says Martin, who dedicates many hours and his own expertise to SPIA projects. Weymouths attention to detail and the critters, is why we asked him to be the artist, says Bill Lowrie, president of SPIA. SPIA has been raising money at the Worm Gruntin Festival each year to fund various projects around Sopchoppy. The completed mural is 24 feet long and 8 feet tall and spans half of the front wall of Bad Bobs Bait and Tackle, located just before the heavy curve and fork as you enter Sopchoppy on Highway 319. The community watched patiently as Weymouth nished the 4 foot panels one at a time. Ive just always been able to do things artistically, says Weymouth. People would tell me that whatever I touch turns out nice. Its an intricate painting, including a lot of detail work. The longer you look at it, the more you nd. Children of all ages are drawn to the mural. They stand, eyes searching for snakes, turtles, birds, bugs and other creatures pointing out critters as they spot them. Taxidermy helped me have insight into how things are put together, he explains. Balance, structure and composition comes pretty naturally to me. Weymouth practiced taxidermy for many years, enjoying the biology lesson with each project. Raised in Indiana, Weymouth attended Indiana University, but it wasnt schooling that worked for him. Hes just always been naturally curious about the outdoors and wildlife, he explains. Since childhood he has had a deep interest in nature and in biology. I was always outdoors sneaking around the woods bow hunting, or shing, he says. I have studied and read a lot. The owners of Bad Bobs, Robby and Lisa Porter, are thrilled with the outcome. We love it, said Lisa. I think it adds a personal touch. People are always stopping to look at it. The only problem is that with limited space in the parking lot, people tend to park their cars and trucks in front of it. George came in one day and said, Yall must not like my mural very much, you keep covering it up with cars, she laughs. Weymouth has also been commissioned to create murals along the forgotten coast in Carrabelle, at City Hall, and at Tates Hell State Forest. As well, he says hes been looking back at his past articles for the News, and hes working on a book. Im taking articles Ive written for The News and compiling them to create a book, he says. Its good for me, I like to write. Weymouth becomes sentimental as he speaks about the quickly changing state of the world. Wherever I go, there are too many people, he says. Animals are diminishing at an incredible rate. There are half as many songbirds now, and the monarch is disappearing right before my eyes, Weymouth says. In Mexico, the monarch used to migrate to three mountains, then it became three acres, and now its three trees, he says, shaking his head. The white man is causing a great extinction, and maybe his own. Weymouth shares his concern for the earth, but today is a day to celebrate as SPIA holds a dedication for the mural and the muralist. A group of volunteers pose for photographs in front of the mural. Most of all, I want to thank George for his hard work and dedication, says Lowrie. It really turned out great. George WeymouthHis new mural dresses up Sopchoppy Artists of WakullaArtists of Wakulla is a monthly feature that highlights an individual artist living and working in Wakulla County. If you are an artist, or know an artist, who is interested in being featured, please contact Jenny Odom at reporter@thewakullanews.netPHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMArtist George Weymouth, above, in front of the 24-foot mural outside Bad Bobs in Sopchoppy. Below, Weymouth and members of SPIA, Councilmember Lara Edwards and County Administrator David Edwards. Bad Bobs Bait & Tackle2146 Sopchoppy Hwy. Sopchoppy, Florida 962-1200 Open daily from 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. Worm Gruntin Festival Saturday, April 12 Downtown Sopchoppy 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. Visit the website www.wormgruntinfestival.com for complete schedule of activities. JOIN THE EMPLOYER OF CHOICE ON THE INLAND WATERWAYSWe are currently seeking: Deckhands Culinary Cooks Vessel Engineers Towboat Pilots ( Fleet & Line Haul ) Candidates must possess a minimum of a valid drivers license and high school diploma/GED. Excellent wages, bonus plan and advancement opportunities, along with a medical, life & AD&D, etc.) Interested candidates must apply online at www.ingrambarge.com. EOE, M/F/V/DIngram Barge Company has a proven track record of developing future leaders. GREEN DRINKSFRIEND-RAISERQUARTERLYPlease Join KWCB on Tuesday, March 25 at 6:30 p.m. Wakulla Springs Lodge We hope you will join us for this informative opportunity!For more information please contact helpkwcb@gmail.com or call 745-7111. The program will feature an informative presentation on our organization. Keep America Beautiful working to educate and encourage citizens to take more responsibility of our fragile environment.The Event is FREE and Open to thePublic.Refreshments will be served.

PAGE 15

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 15I want to tell you all the story of some very rare squirrels three of us boys killed while hunting way back in 1958 in the swamps of the Wakulla River. We have never seen such squirrels before or since, and we routinely hunted in the same vicinity lots of times. They turned out to be so rare that Id challenge any of you reading this to have ever seen them either. If you head upriver from where the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers join at Fort San Marcos de Apalache, by boat, about a mile or so upriver on the left, you could see the fence line marking the boundary of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. If going in by boat, we would pull in a hundred yards or so past that boundary fence and enter there. If by vehicle, we would cross over the Lower Bridge on Highway 98 and turn left after about a half a mile onto a dirt road and then left again on another dirt road which paralleled the Refuge fence line. On this particular hunting trip we drove in and parked near the fence line. This was another of those trips young boys like us loved to take where we took in a few supplies and hunted and camped for a day or two. My hunting partners were good buddies Van Page and Lane Eaton. Another fellow joined us about suppertime, Edward Kerce, the brother of another of our friends, Jim Kerce. Ed was a game warden and spotted my car while on his patrol. From there he saw our camp re where we were preparing our supper and came over and joined us. More about that later. Van and I featured ourselves as men (we were actually just boys) who could live off the land as long as we had our rearms and a few basic supplies like grease and a frying pan. Folks like Daniel Boone and Davey Crockett were our heroes. Now Lane, having better sense, prepared much better (or his mom probably did) and he came with all kinds of good things to eat such as potato chips, sandwiches, soft drinks, and sweets such as small cakes and candy bars. We got our camp set up and were ready to kill some squirrels for our supper, about 1 p.m. So we all split up and went into different parts of the woods bordering the Wakulla River. I hunted hard but only killed a couple of small squirrels. I knew Van and Lane werent doing very well either as I heard their guns re only two or three times each all afternoon. So I knew things were going to be tough at suppertime that night. We would have enough to survive, but theres not a whole lot of meat on a small squirrel, and we would de nitely go to bed hungry unless we could kill some more. And hunting them is not that easy. You cover a lot of ground and work up a good appetite. Daniel Boone and Davey Crockett would never be so weak and wimpy as to search out a grocery store to supplement their hunting skills, and neither would we. As the afternoon wore on and my hunger increased, I began to think longingly of Lanes great store of goodies back at the camp. I rationalized that, of course, since we were friends, he wouldnt mind a bit if I sampled just a small portion of what his mom had packed for him. Maybe just a sandwich and a piece of cake. Why, since we were such good friends, Lane would not only be happy to share with me, but he would expect me to help myself, even without asking him. So I quietly made my way back to camp. As I approached the camp, I detected movement! Someone in our camp stealing our supplies? To his complete surprise, who did I nd in our camp? My old buddy, Van Page. Van had been there a while and was well into Lanes food supply when I showed up. We could hear the report of Lanes gun way down in the swamp every once in a while, so felt free to safely dip into some of his food. I went ahead and ate just one sandwich and one piece of cake. Van had already had his ll, but there was still a little bit left for Lane as we dared not clean him out since he would be returning to camp and could be armed and dangerous if he nds out we ate all his food. Thankfully, it turned out that Lane, being the good-natured fellow he had always been, was not too angry with us, especially since Van and I had been kind enough to leave him enough for one good meal. After Lane nished the remainder of his food, we sat around the re, talking and having a good time. We spent too much time as we were not all that hungry, and let the sun get way down in the sky. We had only killed about five squirrels and still had to clean and cook them. It was decided that I would be the cook and Van and Lane would take the squirrels down to a nearby spring fed creek where they cleaned them very well. It was pitch dark by now, and everything we did required use of a flashlight. When they got back, I had the frying pan and grease good and hot. It was at this time that Ed Kerce, the game warden, showed up and joined us by the fire. We invited him to share the squirrels with us, but he declined. If youve ever tried to cook anything over a bright camp re in the dead of night using a flashlight to see how it was going, youll know it doesnt work that well. The re will blind you so that it is dif cult to see anything in the pan. So I was cooking by dead reckoning. It was about this time that we discovered how rare those squirrels were. Now when I say rare, I dont mean like the kind of rare where something is an endangered species, I mean rare like, How would you like your steak cooked? that kind of rare. After all these years, I have never forgotten. As I cooked the squirrels and set them aside on a tin plate to cool, Lane and Van began to eat them. They complimented me on how good they were, saying they had never had such tender and juicy squirrel meat. I finished cooking my last squirrel and as I put it on the tin plate, in the periphery of the light from my flashlight, I noticed something strange about Vans face, and shined the light directly on him. I swear, he looked like one of those characters in a Dracula movie, as small streams of squirrel blood were running down from his mouth as he gnawed on a squirrel bone! There was blood around Lanes mouth too! No matter how hard they tried to vomit up the squirrel meat, both were unable to do so. They found a little relief by drinking lots of water. I thought Ed Kerce would die laughing at them. Van and Lane both survived and are still alive today. Its been a long time ago, but Id bet if you asked them if they remember eating those juicy, rare squirrels down on the Wakulla River, youll see them swallow hard and turn pale. And you know, although we camped and hunted together a few times after that, I cant recall them ever again asking me to cook for them. I wonder why?Hunting some very rare squirrels Red Clay Footprints By John Roberts newsThe Wakulla Choose The Wakulla news as your News Source for Everything Local! $ 20.14FOR 10 MONTHS Promo Code: LUCKY Expires: 03-31-14 Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:1-877-401-6408 Please accept my new 10 Month subscription at the price of $20.14* Savings apply to new local delivery area subscriptions only.www.TheWakullaNews.comAll information must be completed to receive this special offer *YES! I authorize The Wakulla News to instruct my credit/debit card company to debit my credit/debit card account $20.14. Local delivery area only.The Wakulla newsSign up online, mail in complete coupon, call or stop by the ofce. Name ______________________________________________________________________ Address ____________________________________________________________________ City _________________________________________State ___Zip ________________ Phone# ( ) _______Cell Phone# ( ) ________E-mail _______________________ Credit Card _________-_________-_________-_________ Exp. _______3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. Men: Bell Ezee Flow Tea #4A is nature's nutritional support for urinary comfort, balance and ease. Helps maintain urinary flow, frequency and comfort, with a good nights sleep.Guaranteed to make urine flow easier again.* Relief from dribbling, discomfort, burning, urgency, poor flow.*Formulated using many herbs, such as chamomile, cranberry, willow flower, saw palmetto and many more.We have had thousands of satisfied repeat customers. Tastes great hot or cold! I feel like another person with no more frustrations! It is phenomenal! Its unbelievable. I'd like to thank Bell. I will get other Bell products. Thank you again! Richard Dorvilus, 55, Elmont, NY. Ezee Flow tea gave back good sleep and health! I feel like I'm 30 years old. During the night I hardly have to go to the toilet anymore. What a feeling. Because I sleep well, I'm not tired anymore during the day. "Old age" was bearing down on me. Now I feel great again and healthy. Jerry H. Cole, 73, Lansing, IL.Frequent Bathroom Trips?Bell uses the power of nature to help put life back into your lifestyle These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. 1-800-333-7995www.BellLifestyle.com Satisfaction guaranteed (see box) for incontinence and control.* This inexpensive, pleasant tasting herbal combination tea is safe and effective. Put an end to embarrasments and discomfort. Support the bladder and urinary tract with these all natural ingredients. Tastes great hot or cold!* I wish I had found this tea sooner! A family member told me that she used the Bell Tea for Women #4b with positive results. What a wonderful product. It also worked for me. Australia P. Rodriguez, Rego Park, NY.* Plan to keep taking it as long as I live! One of the clerks in my local health food store recommended the Bladder Control Tea #4b. I was very skeptical. What a surprise it worked! 5 days after starting the tea I noticed a major improvement and it is continually getting better each day. I plan to keep taking it for as long as I live. Thank you! Frances Baird, 87, Venice, FL.* Bell Bladder Control Tea for Women #4b Loud & Clearand FREE Florida residents with a hearing loss are eligible to receive a free amplied phone from the non-prot Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. Cordless and corded phones for persons with mild to severe hearing loss are available at 23 distribution centers statewide. Limit one per customer.CONTACT YOUR AREA CENTER FOR DETAILS Florida Telecommunications Relay, Inc. 1820 E. P ark Avenue, Suite 101 Tallahassee, FL 32301 800-222-3448 (v) 888-447-5620 (tty)Current FTRI clients: If your phone isnt working properly or your hearing has changed, or should you no longer need your phone or are moving out of Florida, call FTRI at 888-554-1151 for assistance.

PAGE 16

Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comCrawfordville Lions Club PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.comThe Crawfordville Lions Club St. Patricks Day Festival was held Saturday, March 15.

PAGE 17

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 17 St. Patricks Day Festival PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com

PAGE 18

Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Crawfordville Lions Club PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

PAGE 19

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 19 St. Patricks Day Festival PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewakullanews.com Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-13903

PAGE 20

Page 20 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com switch your subscription toEZ P a y i s s e c ure a u t o m a t i c m o n t h ly bill in g f or y o u r s u bs c r i p tio n t o T h e Wakulla N e w s. Pl us, w hen y o u si g n u p o n li n e y o ul l g et o u rLO WE ST A VAIL A BLE RA TE!Visit ww w. t h ewakullan ews c o m an d cl i ck the s u bs c r i be b u t t o n t o g et s t a r te d EZ PAY A us t 1 1 201 0 Se cur e A ut o m a ti c R en e wa l H a s s l e -F r eeOR CALL 1-877-401-6408*while supplies lasta n d ge t a F R E E c o m i c umb re ll a !* ++anytime. any device. with to Your Subscription Just Got Beter ALL ACCESSavailable to all subscribers in one convenient subscriptionprint digital mobile1 G o to thewak u llanews.com an d click s ub scri b e2 Click activate existing accoun t 3 S earch f or your account and thats it! Its easy to act i vate your subscr i pt i on f or FREE ACCESS today! Need help reg i ster i ng? Call us at 850-926-7102Not a subs c riber? Visit thewakullanews. c om and c li c k the subs c ribe button Make the switch to EZ Pay for the lowest rate! NOW MOBILE anytime. any device. anywhere. anywhere. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachFormer Wakulla High School runner, Cora Atkinson, recently signed a scholarship to run cross country and track for Life University in Marietta, Ga. Atkinson, who graduated from WHS in 2012, was an outstanding cross country and track running for four years during her high school career, earning varsity letters in both sports all four years, as well as being part of the rst WHS cross country team to qualify for the State Meet. She currently holds the school record in the 3200 meters on the track. During the 2012-13 academic year she ran on the Striders Team at FSU, but decided not to run with FSU this year to save a year of eligibility. She has continued to run and those efforts were rewarded on Tuesday, March 11, when she signed with Life University to continue her education as well as her athletic career. Atkinson plans to dually enroll at Life in both the Undergraduate Program to finish her Bachelors degree in Biology and the Doctor of Chiropractic program. It will be a challenge to pursue both degrees and also compete in athletics, but should not be a problem for Atkinson. While in high school, she took and passed seven AP classes her senior year and still found time to compete at a high level in cross country and track. While taking a full load of classes this year at FSU, Atkinson has also found the time to give back to the sport she loves by returning to WHS as a volunteer in both cross country and track and has become an integral part of the WHS coaching team. At the signing ceremony, Life coach Dr. Catherine Foust said: I am very excited for Cora to join our group. Immediately, shes going to be a signi cant factor and contributor to our team. Cora has a great work ethic, and it takes a special breed to be able to handle the workload of both an intercollegiate cross country schedule and the dual enrollment in Undergrad and Doctor of Chiropractic courses. High school coach Paul Hoover said of Atkinson: Cora is a really special person and athlete. During her four years with us, I have seen her grow and mature into such a fine young woman, as well as an outstanding athlete. She is not necessarily one of the most gifted runners weve had in the program, but she is one of the hardest working and most dedicated, and I am so glad her efforts have culminated in a college scholarship. I absolutely couldnt be prouder of her. Atkinson becomes the fourth current or former WHS runner to sign a collegiate scholarship to run during the next academic year. She joins current WHS signees Madison Harris (FSU), Marty Wiedeman (Chipola College) and Kayla Webbe (Palm Beach Atlantic University) as they pursue college running careers.TRACKCora Atkinson signs to run with Life University SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFormer WHS runner Cora Atkinson at the signing. Every time history repeats itself, the price goes upAuthor Unknown 2/2 cabin in the woods on 9.42 acres MLS #242313 SALE PRICE $134,900 Wakulla Beach Cute 3/1 cottage on Acre surrounded by large acreage St. Joe PropertyMLS #241517 JUST REDUCED $33,900 Shadeville Hwy. Built in 2005, 4/3 with spacious sun room and screened porch on 1.87 AcresMLS #241265 $230,000 Dogwood Forest Rd. Beautiful views Home on piling 3/3 with boat lift in canal out back. 5 Minutes to GULF!MLS #241519 $250,000 Blue Heron WaySandy LottRealtor (850) 926-1010Sandy@SandyLott.com MAR LU PROPERTIES, INC.

PAGE 21

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 21Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, March 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla ofce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Wakulla One Stop CPR/AED Choking Assistance class will be held from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. (1 session class) by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for class at 745-6042.Friday, March 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Wakulla One Stop Baby Basics Cycle classes will be held for two classes March 17 and March 24 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Saturday, March 22 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET features fresh local organic and sustainably-grown produce. Saturdays 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown Sopchoppy under the giant oak. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, March 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Wakulla One Stop Childbirth Education classes will be held for ve classes March 18, March 25, April 1, April 8, April 15 from 6:30 p.m. 8:30 p.m. by The Wakulla County One Stop Community Center, 318 Shadeville Highway. Register for classes at 745-6042.Monday, March 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, March 24 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.Tuesday, March 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and en-Special EventsSaturday, March 22 ANNUAL WIND CEREMONY at Shell Point Beach begins at 6:30 p.m. with music by Swami and the Festoons. A pot luck begins at 5:30 p.m. Registration begins at 3 p.m. and is $20, and includes a t-shirt and meal ticket. The concert is free. HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY starts at 9 a.m. Wakulla County Public Works, ESG Operations, Inc., 340 Trice Lane, Crawfordville. FARM SHARE will distribute free food to families in need at Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Rd from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Call 2844637 or email Dawn@farmshare.org for more information. There will be several organizations providing health screenings and giving away other information. Monday, March 24 ONE BLOOD DONOR BLOOD DRIVE will be held in the WalMart parking lot from 12 p.m. 6 p.m. All donors will receive a $10 WalMart gift card and a wellness checkup including cholesterol screening. For more information go to www. oneblooddonor.org. 1.800.68.BLOOD. A photo I.D. is required Upcoming Events Saturday, March 29 LIFEWALK 2014, sponsored by The Wakulla Pregnancy Center, will begin at 9 a.m. at Wakulla Station Trailhead Park. For more information, call Angie Holshouser at 241-6797. SOPCHOPPY OPRY hosts Rick Weathersby and The Boys of Rock at 7 p.m. They perform Bluegrass and Gospel music. Arrive early and eat dinner at the Opry Cafe. Call 962-3711 for tickets. Go to www.sopchoppyopry.com for more information. Sunday, March 30 THE 1984 MOVIE, FLASH OF GREEN, will be shown for free at the Wakulla County Public Library from 2 p.m. 5 p.m. Director Victor Nunez will be present for the showing. Thursday, April 3 13th ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF THE ARTS 2014 will be held at Wakulla High School beginning at 5:30 p.m. with a silent art auction. An art show with work by elementary, middle and high school age students. Bidding will end at 7:30 p.m. At 6:30, performances will commence with the Elementary Honors Chorus, followed by musical performances, dance and skits from C.O.A.S.T., Wakulla Middle, Riversprings Middle and Wakulla High Schools. Student tickets are $2 and adults are $5. Door prizes will be announced intermittently throughout the event. Saturday, April 5 4TH ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL, a fundraiser for the Wakulla County Chamber, will be held at the 3Y Ranch, www.3yranch.com, from 6 p.m. 10 p.m. Live music by Locomotive, food, dancing. $40 per person. Tickets available by calling 9261848. THE 2ND ANNUAL BEVIS HARVEY-YOUNG COMMUNITY FISH FRY will be held from 11 a.m. 2 p.m. at the Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel. Tickets are $7 per plate. The Menu includes Mullet, cheese grits, coleslaw, baked beans, hush puppies, pickles, tea, coffee, water & desert. April 12, 2014 ANNUAL WORM GRUNTIN FESTIVAL in downtown SOPCHOPPY is free and open to the public. Vendors and food sold throughout the festival. The day begins at 8 a.m. with a 5K race and doesnt stop until the Worm Grunters Ball, featuring live music. There will be horseshoe, hula hoop, bait casting and worm gruntin contests. A complete schedule can be seen at www.wormgruntinfestival. com. THE ANNUAL EASTER EGG HUNT will be held at Hudson Park, with registration beginning at 9 a.m. 10:30 a.m. The hunt begins at 11 a.m. Age groups are 0-3, 4-6 and 7-10. A drawing from each age group will be held, and the winner will receive an Easter Basket. April 19, 2014 WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL is a celebration of outdoor activities and area heritage. Local musicians, artists, and experts offer festival participants one-of-a-kind experiences, helpful advice, and personal enrichment in a neighborhood family atmosphere. At Wakulla Springs Park, from 8:30 a.m. until 7 p.m. Sign up for special tours and see a full schedule at www.wakullawildlifefestival.com. April 25, 2014 THE 41ST ANNUAL STEPHEN C. SMITH MEMORIAL REGATTA will be held at Shell Point Beach. This years event is scheduled for April 25-27. Pre-register at www.smithregatta.com. April 26, 2014 2014 GREEN LIVING EXPO AND GREEN FLEA MARKET presented by Sustainable Big Bend, Inc. and to be held at the TCC Wakulla Center and Hudson Park in Crawfordville from 9 a.m.2 p.m. The event is free. Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Annual Wind CeremonyShell Point Beach 5:30 p.m.Hazardous Waste DayESG Operations 9 a.m. 1 p.m.Swinging Harpoons Riverside Cafe 5 p.m. 9 p.m. Blood Drive WalMart noon 6 p.m.SaturdaySaturday SundayMonday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akullaLive Music in WakullaFriday, March 21 RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69 Riverside Dr., St. Marks. Stranger than Fiction, Classic Rock and Roll, 8 p.m. midnight. DUX LOUNGE, 3332 Crawfordville Hwy. Rock, 9 p.m. 1:30 a.m. $5 cover. Saturday, March 22 RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69 Riverside Dr., St. Marks. Stranger than Fiction, Classic Rock and Roll, 8 p.m. midnight. SOPCHOPPY PIZZA COMPANY, 106 Municipal Ave., Brandon Strickland, classic rock, country. 7 p.m. 9 p.m. ouside on the patio. Sunday, March 23 OUTZ TOO OYSTER BAR & GRILL, Swingin Harpoons, classic rock, 3 p.m. 6 p.m. on the patio. RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69 Riverside Dr., St. Marks. Swinging Harpoons, Blues/ Rock and Roll, 5 p.m. 9 p.m. Friday, March 28 RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69 Riverside Dr., St. Marks. Swinging Harpoons, Blues/ Rock and Roll, 8 p.m. midnight. DUX LOUNGE, 3332 Crawfordville Hwy. Rock, 9 p.m. 1:30 a.m. $5 cover. Saturday, March 29 RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69 Riverside Dr., St. Marks. Swinging Harpoons, Blues/ Rock and Roll, 8 p.m. midnight. SOPCHOPPY PIZZA COMPANY, 106 Municipal Ave., Brandon Strickland, classic rock, country. 7 p.m. 9 p.m. ouside on the patio. Sunday, March 30 OUTZ TOO OYSTER BAR & GRILL, Lunar Urdde, classic rock, 3 p.m. 6 p.m. on the patio. RIVERSIDE CAFE, 69 Riverside Dr., St. Marks. Swinging Harpoons, Blues/ Rock and Roll, 5 p.m. 9 p.m. March 20March 27 Denise FolhWindsurfers line the shore along Shell Point Beach.

PAGE 22

Page 22 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)History intrudes on legislative session By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 14 Despite all the action underway during the legislative session over the last week, the Capitol seemed like a place stuck in past decades. The death of former Gov. Reubin Askew, one of the most important figures in Florida history, triggered nostalgia for the days when the teetotaling chief executive worked to safeguard the environment, repair scandal-tarnished courts and open government business to the public. Askew passed away on the same day that the Florida Supreme Court threw out a medical malpractice law approved by the Legislature 11 years ago and subject to controversy ever since. Both events came a couple of days after former Chief Financial Of cer Alex Sink, who rst ran for statewide of ce in 2006, once again stood before voters, this time in a special congressional election that was instead won by Republican lobbyist David Jolly. And while the Legislature spent the week on present and future concerns, GOP lawmakers devoted much of their time to discussing one of the partys golden oldie issues: Tax cuts. The legislative session isnt history yet not even close but the week was a reminder that even once it has ended, its effects can be felt for years.ONE OF THE GREAT LEADERSWith the exception of the late Gov. LeRoy Collins, Askew is seen as perhaps the most in uential politician in Florida history. The prim, almost prudish Democrat was rst elected in 1970, defeating incumbent Republican Claude Kirk, the rst GOP governor in the modern era. Askew won again in 1974, becoming the rst governor in Florida history to be elected to successive four-year terms. (Many, though not all, earlier governors were barred from running for more than one term, or could only run for two-year terms, depending on the Constitution at the time.) Florida was in the midst of a population and development boom when Askew took over as chief executive. The state was still grappling with racial tensions prompted by the U.S. Supreme Court decision that put an end to school segregation. The devoutly religious Askew, born in Muskogee, Okla., was on the opposite side of many other Southern politicians, as well as many of his Pensacola constituents, in his call for racial reconciliation. Askew clashed with conservatives over a straw poll opposing school busing, offering his own proposal asking voters if they wanted to keep schools integrated. Neither was binding, and both were approved. The governor led a drive to reform the states judicial system after two state Supreme Court justices were forced out of of ce. He successfully pushed for a constitutional amendment requiring public of cials to disclose information about their financial affairs and forcing government records into the sunshine. On the environment, Askew backed legislation creating water management districts and requiring local comprehensive planning. He was a visionary. He saw issues, whether they were in areas of racial fairness or educational opportunities or environmental protection, in a generational perspective, not just whats going to be the best position for the next election. He led by his personal example and by the wisdom of his ideas and the strength of his passions, said former U.S. Sen. Bob Graham, a Democrat who also served as governor. Jeb Bush, Floridas first Republican governor elected to successive four-year terms, also praised Askew in a statement. Florida has lost one of the great leaders who played a pivotal role in shaping the trajectory of our state during a time of substantial growth and change, Bush said. He led on contentious issues, fought for equality and did what he believed was in the best interests of Florida families. Governor Askew always put principle before politics, and I was fortunate to know him, seek counsel from him and learn from his years of service.DISAPPOINTING, AS USUAL RULING ON MED MAL LAWAfter more than a decade of legislative and legal battles, the Florida Supreme Court had the nal say on a 2003 law limiting damages in medicalmalpractice lawsuits. It was unconstitutional, the justices said in a 5-2 ruling. The court sided with the family of a Panhandle woman who died of complications after giving birth. In doing so, justices also sided indirectly with plaintiffs lawyers who have ercely opposed limits on so-called non-economic damages. Physicians and insurance companies, who have made a priority of reining in medicalmalpractice lawsuits, came out the losers. At the present time, the cap on non-economic damages serves no purpose other than to arbitrarily punish the most grievously injured or their surviving family members, Justice R. Fred Lewis wrote. The two most conservative justices dissented. This court has previously recognized the existence of a medical malpractice insurance crisis as a legitimate state interest, Chief Justice Ricky Polston wrote. Further, it is undisputed that increasing the quality, availability, and affordability of health care for Floridians is a legitimate state interest. And the Legislatures policy choice of enacting a cap on non-economic damages in medical malpractice cases is rationally related to these state interests. The ruling stemmed from the February 2006 death of 20-year-old Michelle McCall, who gave birth to a son at Fort Walton Beach Medical Center but died days later because of complications from severe bleeding. Republicans, who have often warred with the trial bar over the years and pushed the caps through the Legislature in 2003, were predictably upset by Thursdays decision. Disappointing, as usual, from them, Senate Rules Chairman John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, said when asked about the justices ruling. But well see what we have to do to address it. It wasnt clear whether or how lawmakers would attempt to overturn the courts decision through legislation during the current session. But no one was ruling it out yet.JOLLY IS JOLLY AS SINK SINKSWhile much of the states political and business establishment had been focused on the legislative session underway in Tallahassee, the national media and a handful of bigmoney groups were zeroing in on another corner of the state: Pinellas County, where Sink was attempting a comeback and Jolly was looking to move from K Street to the U.S. Capitol. In the end, Jolly won the contentious and expensive special election on Tuesday to replace his former boss, the late Republican Congressman C.W. Bill Young. The swingy district, which Young and President Barack Obama both won in 2008 and 2012, was monitored by strategists and analysts looking for tea leaves about the November elections that will decide who controls Congress during Obamas last two years in of ce.MO MONEY, MO TAX CUTSAt a Wednesday meeting in an obscure corner of the Knott Building, state economists huddled and predicted that the state would take in about $150 million more over the next 16 months than current estimates called for. It didnt take long for House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, to decide where the money would go. Obviously, a lot of its going to be spent on tax cuts, he told reporters. Lawmakers had already set a goal of $500 million in reductions in taxes and fees, following a benchmark set by Gov. Rick Scott last year. That overall number isnt likely to change even with the new revenue gures, but it does give lawmakers more wiggle room. On Thursday, the Senate Appropriations Committee unanimously amended a proposal (SB 156) by Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, to reduce the vehicle registration fees. Under the revised proposal, motorists would potentially save between $20 and $25 per vehicle registration, depending on the size of the vehicle. The reduction would collectively save motorists about $309 million during the upcoming 2014-15 budget year, with the new rates going into effect Sept. 1, and about $395 million the following scal year, when they would be in effect for the full 12 months starting July 1. A similar House proposal (PCB 14-04) was unanimously backed Thursday by the House Finance and Tax Subcommittee, even as Democrats complained the reduction was more about getting Scott re-elected than scal policy. STORY OF THE WEEK: Former Gov. Reubin Askew, one of the most important gures in state history, died at the age of 85. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im waiting on the day when somebody gets indicted on the Thursday before the election, and they get elected because everybodys already voted and they cant get their ballot back. Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, on the dangers of voting by mail. HOME COUNTRYThe Shakespeare of ODontal Dental -Janet By SLIM RANDLESHerb walked into ODontal Dental the other day, holding his hand against a swollen face. He hadnt even made an appointment to see Perry rst, and it became obvious why he hadnt. Good morning, Herb, said Andrea, the receptionist. What can we do for you today? Mmfft Crullit! Certainly. Have a seat and Ill let Perry know youre here. In less than a minute, Dr. ODontal had Herb seated, numbed, and ready for work. Herbs labored breathing had returned to normal, even if his speech patterns hadnt. At what o the clock did the in iction attack, good sirrah? Lfftent mmst, said Herb. You shouldve used the phone to let me know, Herb. Oh, thats right. What was I thinking? Well, youre here now, lets see what we can do. Wonk oo. Youre welcome. Open wide. Little more. Cast open the gates, Leander! Let us gaze upon the source of woe! Perry worked his way through dental school as a Shakespearean actor, and didnt make it out of there unfazed. Aha, brothers of mine on this eld of battle today, I glimpse with fearful eye the seat of our alarm. Its a tooth, by Cuspid! Perry dove into the fray with drill and pick. Snicker-snick! GRRRR and ll. Rinse and spit. And so, Leander, take these, the pills that weave up the raveled sleeve of pain. Do so in remembrance of this day, this meeting, this sceptered isle of dental chair. Those who werent here with us this day will forever cast envious eyes upon us, for they will say this was our nest hour, the culmination of drill and yawn the grinding and lling of fang for fun and profit. Arise, sweet prince, and ful ll your destiny! Its almost worth getting a toothache. Brought to you by Home Country (the book). See it at HYPERLINK http:// www.nmsantos.com www.nmsantos.com. The Wakul la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

PAGE 23

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 23 Actors All Ancient Ant Arc Ask Atom Bad Base Beg Bricks Cages Cakes Case Cast Cheap Club Coal Coil Costs Cry Disappeared Dotted Dream Drop Else Fears Fit Got Here Hide His Hut Ill Incomplete Index Inks Jerked Key Lace Lad Lame Leg Less Mat Mists Need Net None Nor Not Oar Odd Old Pie Pin Pop Ran Run Say Sea See Sew She Sir Skiing Skunk Slip Spy Stop Tag Tapped Ten Thy Toe Total Trout Van Week Wet White Wire Won Work Zigzag Zip Zoo The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

PAGE 24

Page 24 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED ~Lawn Care ~Handy-Man Tasks ~Certified in Nuisance Animal Removal FREE ESTIMATES* KEEP IT LOCAL*ERICSCLEANCUTSERVICES.COM 850-210-9419 850-210-9419 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC Call Jerry Payne Today! Lowest Rates in the Area A/C Compressors and Evaporator A/C Leak check Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f l l l f f d d Call Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and InsuredTree Trimming Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED Tues-Sat576-3105Tues-Sat545-2905Thurs-Sat926-6020&, Tues-Sat TuesSat 576-3105 Tues-Sat TuesSat 545-2905 Thurs-Sat ThursSat 926-60 20 & STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-6020 HOME IMPROVEMENTS, LLC JESUSTim Houcks Lic. #7827Licensed & ( 850 ) 570 Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLESinglewide 2 Bed, 1 Bath $450. mo, $450. dep. 3476 Spring Creek Hwy 850-926-5192. FISHING SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT: Rods, reels, nets, rod holders, portable bait well, downrigger supplies, minnow bucket, line, lures, sinkers, jigs, etc. Prices range $1 to $20. (850)227-8338. Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. Ace Hardware (850-926-3141) www. happyjackinc.com NURSING CAREERSbegin here -Get trained in months, not years. Small classes, no waiting list. Financial aid for qualified students. Apply now at Centura Institute Orlando (888)220-3219 COMMUNITY RELATIONS COORDINATORThe Community Relations Coordinator is responsible for developing public awareness about Big Bend Hospice in Wakulla and Franklin County. The ideal candidate must have a strong proficiency in public speaking, knowledge of fundraising skills, be highly organized and able to manage multiple tasks simultaneously. This position requires excellent Interpersonal skills and the ability to work effectively with volunteers, staff and the public. This is a full time position that requires a Bachelors degree in public relations, communications or a related field and/or a minimum of 2 years of experience in marketing, public relations or a related field; preferably in healthcare. Preference will be given to qualified applicants who are residents of Wakulla or Franklin County with strong community connections. Interested candidates can fax their resume to: (850)325-6290 or email to: beckym@bigbend hospice.or g. EOE RN On Call for Wakulla CountyThis RN position will provide evening and weekend On Call coverage primarily for Wakulla County and occasionally for Franklin County. The ideal candidate will be able to provide On Call coverage for 2 weeks per month. Must have a current Florida RN license. An Associates Degree in Nursing is required, a BSN is preferred. Qualified candidates will have a minimum of 3 years nursing experience preferably in Hospice or Home Health. Interested candidates can fax their resume to (850)325-6290 or email to: grace@ bigbendhospice.or g EOE CDL-ATeam Owner Operators: $2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfip artners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Class B with AirbrakesDrivers NeededMust have CDL license and experience required Apply W ithin Brooks Concrete,1532 Coastal Hwy. 98 Panacea(850) 984-5279 DRIVERS:Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. CALL: 888-880-5911 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 877-741-9260 www .fixjet s.com QUEEN PILLOW TOP MATTRESS & BOX SET BRAND NEW, NEVER BEEN USED, STILLIN BAG. $195 OBO 850 727 0390 FISHING SUPPLIES AND EQUIPMENT: Rods, reels, nets, rod holders, portable bait well, downrigger supplies, minnow bucket, line, lures, sinkers, jigs, etc. Prices range $1 to $20. (850)227-8338. Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. Ace Hardware (850-926-3141) www. happyjackinc.com CRAWFORDVILLESinglewide 2 Bed, 1 Bath $450. mo, $450. dep. 3476 Spring Creek Hwy 850-926-5192. CRAWFORDVILLERoom For Rent Includes 1 BED, 1 BATH Non Smoker Non Drinker Call (850) 926-3220 Blue Ridge Mountain Log Cabin Sale! Only $84,900. New 1200sf ready to finish log cabin on 1+ acres with spectacular views and private access to US National Forest. Excellent financing. Call now 1866-952-5303, Ext 201 Up to 9 acres from $14,900. Mountain cabin only $89,900. Access to lake and trout stream. Views of the Atlanta skyline. 45 minutes from Northern Atlanta. Priced below developer cost! Call 866-950-5263 Ext. 17. Spacious 4BR/2BA 2087 SF, 2 car garage on one acre. Living room has vaulted ceilings and wood burning FP. Master Bedroom has walk-in jetted tub and seperate tiled shower. Private backyard, $184,900 (Price includes new r oof.) Call Wakulla Realty Susie Tooks (850) 545-6956 Wintons Pool Services Let us help take the hassle out of your summer fun! Green Pool Clean Up Water Balancing Scheduled Cleanings Pressure Washing and thats just a start. S pring S pecial Pool deck pressure washed Pool Cleaned and Water Balanced Starting at $150.00 Tony 850-284-2205 g Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Call today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netSPECIALTY ERVICES Interior / Exterior painting, driveways, docks, decks Furniture painting or renishing Pressure washing homes, buildings, driveways Reliable, honest and reasonableCall Today for a FREE estimate.850-363-1237 or 850-926-4399 BAXLEY PAINTING APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIREDWAREHOUSE STORAGE SPACE AVAILABLE2 Br 1 Ba Duplex $625 mo. 2 Br 2 1/2 Ba Twnhs $775 mo 3 Br 2 Ba 1440 Sq. Ft. $875 mo. 1500 sq ft $1500 mo Crawfordville 700 sq ft $700 mo Tallahassee RENTALS: COMMERCIAL Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Years of Excellent ServiceCongratulations LYNN COLE-EDDINGERTOP PRODUCERFEBRUARY 2014 WWW.MYWAKULLAHOMES.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 850 545-8284lynncole5228@msn.com Classified Ads For As Little As $12 A Week1-877-401-6408 Classified Ads For As Little As $12 A Week1-877-401-6408 Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 The Wakulla news The Wakulla news

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 25 5077-0320 TWN 4/7 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Vehicle will be sold for towing and storage. Charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78 Sale: 04/07/2014, 9:00 AM at 1502 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville, FL 1995 Mercury Vin# 1MELM62W2SH609583 Hobbys Towing & Recovery reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 1502 Shadeville Rd Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-7698 Pub.: March 20, 2014. 5078-0320 TWN 4/1 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction, for towing and storage, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at: 2770 Crawfordville Hwy., Lot 1, on 04/01/2014 at 9:00 a.m. on the following vehicle(s): 2004 Ford VIN# 1FTPW14574KB92813 Pub.: March 20, 2014. 5079-0320 TWN 4/10 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction, for towing and storage, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at: 2683 Lot 2, Coastal Hwy., on 04/10/2014 at 9:00 a.m. on the following vehicle(s): 2002 Subarue VIN# JF1SF65572H709484 Pub.: March 20, 2014. 5062-0327 TWN Adoption of Trent Lee Hollinsworth 13-DR-428 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FL Family Law Division Case No: 13-DR-428 IN RE: The Adoption of TRENT LEE HOLLINSWORTH Minor Child. NOTICE OF LEGAL PROCEEDING TO: KRISTINA LEE HOLLINSWORTH 2333 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Memorial Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (Last Known Address) YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that a Petition for Termination of Parental Rights was filed in the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, Wakulla County, Florida, on or about October 08, 2013, by TERRY L. HOLLINSWORTH, and THERESA M. HOLLINSWORTH, his wife, regarding TRENT LEE HOLLINSWORTH, born August 18, 2003. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any to the pleadings, on the petitioners attorney, whose name and address is Scott W. Smiley, Thompson, Crawford & Smiley, 1330 Thomasville Road, Tallahassee, Florida 32303, and file the original with the clerk of the above-styled court on or before Friday, March 14, 2014, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on February 14th, 2014. WAKULLA COUNTY Clerk of Circuit Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Gail Smith, Deputy Clerk March 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2014. 5081-0327 TWN vs. Norman, Thomas R. 2012-CA-000282 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-CA-000282 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS R. NORMAN; NAOMI G. NORMAN; UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT II; and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 10th day of April, 2014, at 11:00 AM at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situ5082-0327TWN vs. Hoover, Regina65-2013-CA-000135-CAAX-MXNotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY.CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000135-CAAX-MXDivision: Civil Division GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, Plaintiff, vs. REGINA HOOVER, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled case, I will sell the property situate in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: Parcel C Begin a concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 2, Township 4 South, Range 1 East, Wakulla County, Florida and run South 00 West along the Westerly boundary of said Section 2 (as monumented) a distance of 329.38 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Easterly right-of-way boundary of the Tallahassee -St. Marks Bike Trail (Old St. Marks-Tallahassee Railroad), thence run South 19 East along said right-of-way boundary 93.96 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 81 East 38.42 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 08 West 172.32 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 81 East 156.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #7160), thence run North 08 West 230.54 feet lying on the Northerly boundary of said Section 2 (as monumented) a distance of 163.91 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 34 Fire Escape Rd., Saint Marks, FL 32355 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at IN THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 oclock A.M. on April 10, 2014.. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 6th day ofMarch, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 20 & 27, 2014.126874/llh 5083-0327 TWN vs. Reilly, Kristin 65-2013-CA-000084-CAAX-MX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000084-CAAX-MX Division: Civil Division JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL, Plaintiff, vs. KRISTIN REILLY, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled case, I will sell the property situate in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: Lot 37, Block 15, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. A/K/A 100 Choctaw Rd, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, by electronic sale at IN THE LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 oclock A.M. on April 10, 2014.. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4th day of March, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 20 & 27, 2014. 142619 /llh 5084-0327 TWN vs. Killeen, Paige F. 13-000308-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-000308-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 3811 Frederica Rd., St. Simons Island, GA 31522, Plaintiff, v. PAIGE F. KILLEEN and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF PAIGE F. KILLEEN Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: LOT 30, SILVER GLEN, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 2 THROUGH 5 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash on April 10th, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. ATTN: B.C. Smith 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL 32312 March 20 & 27, 2014. 5085-0327 TWN vs. Clark, Thomas E. 65-2012-CA-000325 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000325 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, VS. THOMAS E. CLARK A/K/A THOMAS ERIC CLARK; LISA M. CLARK A/K/A LISA CLARK A/K/A LISA A. CLARK; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on November 21, 2013 in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000325 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, WELLS FARGO BANK, NA is the Plaintiff, and THOMAS E. CLARK A/K/A THOMAS ERIC CLARK; LISA M. CLARK A/K/A LISA CLARK A/K/A LISA A. CLARK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF THOMAS E. CLARK A/K/A THOMAS ERIC CLARK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LISA M. CLARK A/K/A LISA CLARK A/K/A LISA A. CLARK ; AND ANY UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, are Defendants. The clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 AM at the front door of the Wakulla County courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, on April 10, 2014 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOTS 7 AND 8, BLOCK H, PANACEA PARK, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 14, PAGE 191, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 103 CENTER ST., PANACEA, FL 32346 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on January 27, 2014 CLERK OF THE COURT Brent X. Thurmond, CPA (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accomodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Aldridge/Connors, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 7000 West Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL 33433 Phone: 561-392-6391, Fax: 561-392-6965 March 20 & 27, 2014. 1113-601085 5086-0327 TWN vs. Ard Sr., Aubry J. 13-31-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 13000031CAAXMX DIVISION JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. AUBRY J. ARD, SR., et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 15, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000031CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and Aubry J. Ard, Sr. also known as Aubrey J. Ard also known as Aubry J. Arda, Jennifer M. And Tina M. Ard, Janet M. Ard, Tenant #1, Tenant #2, The Unknown Spouse of Aubry J. Ard, Sr. also known as Aubrey J. Ard also known as Aubry J. Arda, The Unknown Spouse of Jennifer M. And, The Unknown Spouse of Tina M. Ard, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 17th day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 10, OF MILLWOOD ACRES, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 23, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 53 GREENLEAF LN CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327-5779 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 17th day of January, 2014. Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. March 13 & 20, 2014. WB-002247F01 5087-0327 TWN vs. Cotton, Alzada 65-2008-CA-000269 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2008-CA-000269 DIVISION: CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ALZADA COTTON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 15, 2014 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000269 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC (1), is the Plaintiff and ALZADA COTTON; THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 17th day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: (1) Plaintiff name has changed pursuant to order previously entered. LOT 42, THE FARM, PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 48, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 80 CHURCHILL DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 323270000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MY HAND and the seal of this Court on January 16, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. March 20 & 27, 2014. F 08109025 5088-0327 TWN vs. Waltman, Mary 13-216-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-216-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA 39828, Plaintiff, v. MARY WALTMAN A/K/A MARY W. WALTMAN, RANDAL L. WALTMAN A/K/A RANDAL L. WALTMAN, SR. A/K/A RANDY WALTMAN, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Lot 8, Shadeville North, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page(s) 20, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; together with that certain 1999 Fleetwood Mobile Home, Serial Number GAFLW75A69434CD21 and GAFLW75B69434CD21 Commonly known as: 91 DIXIE DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash on April 10, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, 32327, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds 5089-0327 TWN vs. Rentz, Timothy E. 65-2013-CA-000221 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2013-CA-000221 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY E. RENTZ A/K/A TIMOTHY ERIC RENTZ, MELANIE I. RENTZ A/K/A MELANIE RENTZ, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure filed March 5, 2014 entered in Civil Case No. 65-2013-CA-000221 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 10 day of April, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 27, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 27, A DISTANCE OF 667.27 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTHERLY ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF THE EAST HALF OF THE EAST HALF OF THE WEST HALF OF SAID SECTION 27, A DISTANCE OF 1199.56 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 368, THENCE RUN NORTH 69 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 720.45 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 1172.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 472.69 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 87 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 474.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 459.74 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 459.85 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE WESTERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH A 1991 HOMETTE DOUBLE-WIDE MOBILE HOME VIN #HMLCP28362856857A/B, TITLE #61497649 AND 61497652 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 5 day of March, 2014. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301, (407) 674-1850 MRSERVICE@MCCALLARAYMER.COM If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page March 20 & 27, 2014. 13-05705 Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk March 20 & 27, 2014. 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit. 3/2, $850 mo., $850 Deposit. 3/2, $850 mo., $850 Deposit. Pets w/ approval and $250 pet fee. 3/2, $950 mo., $950 Deposit. No Smoking, Pets w/ approvaal Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., mo. No smoking, No pets.25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated comSmoking, No Pets. 2BR/2BA Marina Village No pets. 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/ No smoking, No pets. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEE TO RENT YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

PAGE 26

Page 26 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com ate in Wakulla County, Florida: TOGETHER WITH 1987 SUMM MOBILE HOME, VIN H45319GR AND H45319GL, TITLE NOS. 45058612 AND 45050602. COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 43 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY (MARKED BY AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT) THENCE RUN N. 73 04 01 E. ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT NO. 43 1250.0 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF TRACT HEREIN DESCRIBED; FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN N. 16 39 06 W. 410.38 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF-WAY OF TENNESSEE WALKER ROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG THE SOUTH RIGHT-OF WAY OF TENNESSEE WALKER ROAD; ALONG A CURVE TO THE LEFT IN A NORTHEASTERLY DIRECTION WITH AN INTERIOR ANGLE OF 55 28 30 AND A RADIUS OF 297.71 FEET FOR A DISTANCE OF 288.25 FEET (LONG CHORD N. 43 05 30 E. 260.56 FEET), TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF TANGENCY; THENCE RUN N. 17 08 35 E ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF TENNESSEE WALKER ROAD 92.26 FEET TO POINT OF CURVATURE; THENCE ALONG A CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH INTERIOR ANGLE OF 78 56 05 RADIUS OF 97.84 FEET FOR A DISTANCE OF 134.79 FEET (LONG CHORD N. 56 36 37 E. 124.38 FEET) TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND POINT OF TANGENCY THENCE RUN S. 05 30 20 E. 665.40 FEET TO A 5/8 REBAR THENCE RUN S 73 04 01 W. ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF LOT NO. 43 266.87 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING AND BEING SITUATE IN THE WEST HALF OF LOT NO. 43 OF HARTSFIELD SURVEY AND CONTAINING 3.81 ACRES MORE OR LESS, AND BEING OTHERWISE DESCRIBED AS TRACT 29A OF THE UNRECORDED PLAT OF RAKIRK RANCHETTES. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 4 day of November, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk March 20 & 27, 2014. B&H# 306361 5069-0320 TWN vs. Wilson, Ruby heirs 13000400CAAXMX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 13000400CAAXMX Nationwide Advantage Mortgage Company Plaintiff, -vs.Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Ruby Wilson, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant(s); et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Unknown Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, Assignees, Creditors, Lienors, and Trustees of Ruby Wilson, Deceased, and All Other Persons Claiming by and Through, Under, Against The Named Defendant(s); CURRENT ADDRESS UNKNOWN UNTIL GUARDIAN AD LITEM IS APPOINTED Residence unknown, if living, including any unknown spouse of the said Defendants, if either has remarried and if either or both of said Defendants are dead, their respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant(s); and the aforementioned named Defendant(s) and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendants as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action has been commenced to foreclose a mortgage on the following real property, lying and being and situated in Wakulla County, Florida, more particularly described as follows: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 5 OF SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY, 116.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST, 256.31 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST, 120.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST, 453.32 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST, ALONG A FENCE LINE, 141.33 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST, 655.84 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 5, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 12 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID EAST BOUNDARY, 256.52 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT 5, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN MANUFACTURED HOME, YEAR: 1999, MAKE: FLEETWOOD, VIN# GAFLW34A289230K21 AND VIN#: GAFLW34B289230K21. more commonly known as 70 Mother Natures Place, Crawfordville, FL 32327. This action has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, upon SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is 4630 Woodland Corporate Blvd., Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33614, within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately there after; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 4th day of March, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Circuit and County Courts (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 13 & 20, 2014. 13-266821 FC01 ALL 5070-0320 TWN vs. Morris, Charles Wayne 652013CA000252CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652013CA000252CAAXMX NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES WAYNE MORRIS; DEBRA ELAINE MORRIS A/K/A DEBRA MORRIS, ET AL. Defendants 5071-0320 TWN vs. Knox, Angelique D. 65-2012-CA-000144 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2012-CA-000144 DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ANGELIQUE D. KNOX, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000144 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Angelique D. Knox, Tenant #1, Tenant #2, The Unknown Spouse of Angelique D. Knox also known as John Hutchinson, Villas at Covington Park Homeowners Association, Inc., Wakulla County, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 4, VILLAS AT COVINGTON PARK A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDEDIN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 13 OF PUBLIC RECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 98 COVINGTON CIR CRAWFORDVILLE FL 32327-8028 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 3rd day of March, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. March 13 & 20, 2014. AB-002742F01 5072-0320 TWN vs. Gustafson, Sandra 65-2013-CA-000019 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2013-CA-000019 DIVISION PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO NATIONAL CITY MORTGAGE, A DIVISION OF NATIONAL CITY BANK, Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA GUSTAFSON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2013-CA-000019 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PNC Bank, National Association, successor in interest to National City Mortgage, a Division of National City Bank, is the Plaintiff and Sandra Gustafson also known as Sandra J. Gustafson a/k/a Sandra J. Gustafson, Tenant #1, Tenant #2, The Unknown Spouse of Sandra Gustafson also known as Sandra J. Gustafson a/k/a Sandra J. Gustafson, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 1, BLOCK D, JOSEPH LEE ESTATES, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 69 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OFWAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH A MOBILE HOME LOCATED THEREON AS A PERMANENT FIXTURE AND APPURTENANCE THERETO, DESCRIBED AS VIN NO. HMLCP24010414181A / TITLE NO. 1147556386 AND VIN NO. HMLCP24010414181B / TITLE NO. 0050948976 A/K/A 2 GENEVA AVE PANACEA FL 32346-2224 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 3rd day of March, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. March 13 & 20, 2014. AB-001649F01 5073-0320 TWN vs. Sherrell, C.C. 2009-CA-000143 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-CA-000143 VERICREST FINANCIAL, INC., Plaintiff, vs. C.C. SHERRELL A/K/A C. CAROLYN SHERRELL, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF C.C. SHERRELL A/K/A C. CAROLYN SHERRELL, JANE DOE, JOHN DOE, Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered July 19, 2013 in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000143 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein VERICREST FINANCIAL, INC. is Plaintiff and C.C. SHERRELL A/K/A C. CAROLYN 5074-0320 TWN Vs. Sudeall, Joyce 2010-CA-000102 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2010-CA-000102 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., PLAINTIFF, VS. JOYCE SUDEALL, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 20, 2013, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on March 27, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for the following described property: LOT 13 OF THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISIONS AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: February 27, 2014 [COURT SEAL] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of the Court Gladstone Law Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 March 13 & 20, 2014. 13-002723 5075-0320 TWN Vs. Kocher, Royston 13000355CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13000355CAAXMX RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS, INC., PLAINTIFF, VS. ROYSTON KOCHER, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on April 10, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for the following described property: A part of Lots 23 and 24, Block E, Greenlea, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 66, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the Southwest corner of said Lot 23, Block E, Greenlea Subdivision, thence North 89 degrees 48 minutes 52 seconds East 394.15 feet to the center of a 60 foot roadway and utility Easement, thence North 00 degrees 11 minutes 08 seconds West 209.20 feet to the Southeast corner of the aforementioned Lot 24, thence North 44 degrees 56 minutes 23 seconds West along the centerline of said 60 foot roadway and utility easement a distance of 114.48 feet, thence South 59 degrees 05 minutes 25 seconds West 363.70 feet to the Westerly boundary of said Lot 23, thence South 00 degrees 18 minutes 23 seconds West 104.68 feet to the Point of Beginning, more or less, the Easterly and Northerly 30.00 feet thereof being subject to a roadway and utility easement. Together with a 2004 ENTER mobile home with Vehicle Identification Number FLFL370A30646CY21 and FLFL370B30646CY21 Title Number 89895360 and RP # 12166116. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: March 4, 2014 [COURT SEAL] By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk of the Court Gladstone Law Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 March 13 & 20, 2014. 13-000881 5076-0320 TWN Reed, Walton Samuel 2013CP112 Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 2013CP112 Division Probate IN RE: ESTATE OF WALTON SAMUEL REED Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Walton Samuel Reed, deceased, whose date of death was September 2, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 13, 2014. Personal Representative: Frances j. Reed 7 Allen Road, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358 Attorney for Personal Representative: Martez Gordon, Attorney for Frances j. Reed Florida Bar Number: 96362 P.O. Box 140581, Gainesville, Florida 32614 Telephone: (818) 510-2876 Fax: (352) 377-2667 E-Mail: mgordonlaw@aol.com March 13 & 20, 2014. 5080-0327 TWN 4/4 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, April 4, 2014 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self-Storage Unit containing household items of: Gavin L. Brandon Heather Simmons Before the sale date of April 4, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 March 20 & 27, 2014. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 3, 2014, and entered in Case No. 652013CA000252CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC (hereafter Plaintiff), is Plaintiff and CHARLES WAYNE MORRIS; DEBRA ELAINE MORRIS A/K/A DEBRA MORRIS; THE GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE I PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCITION, INC., are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONT DOOR of the Courthouse; 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, at 11:00 a.m., on the 3rd day of April, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 58, BLOCK A OF GARDENS OF SARALAN, PHASE I, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 77-78 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 Dated this 3rd day of March, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) BY:/s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk Van Ness Law Firm, PLC 1239 E. Newport Center Drive Suite #110, Deerfield Beach, Florida 33442 Phone: (954) 571-2031 Fax: (954) 571-2033, Pleadings@vanlawfl.com Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. March 13 & 20, 2014. NS2659-13/ee SHERRELL, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF C.C. SHERRELL A/K/A C. CAROLYN SHERRELL, JANE DOE, JOHN DOE, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 27th day of March, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot Number 89 (Eight-Nine), in Block 4 (Four), of Wakulla Gardens, as shown on the plat of said subdivision of record on Page 39, of Plat Book No. 1 (One) of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing was: Mailed this 27th day of Feb., 2014, to all parties on the attached service list. Dated this 27th day of Feb., 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301, (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page March 13 & 20, 2014. 10-01921-4 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. 00 9 HometownContent 1 234 5162 73468 71 92 63 61 589 2897 8415 Solutions 2009 HometownContent 168 2379 5 4 459186327 273954618 532 798146 984615732 716423589 641 572893 325869471 897341265 DENIM BASTE JEB ERIKA ASHEN ERE JANERUSSELL LIE ASA OMITS IDLER POPS ISAY CAJUNS DIRTYRAT EXAMS DUCKS OLA LIMP WAVES SLIM LOA GATED HULCE SMILEDAT KAISER CATS HINT PRADA YIELD NAH AIR JUMPINGROPE YOU OSCAR UTTER ATM BEADS NEEDS 12345 678910 111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 2223 24 25 262728 2930 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 4243 44 45 46 4748 4950 515253 54 5556 57 58 59 60 61 62 63Across 1 Jeans material 6 Work on the turkey 11 One of the Bushes 14 Actress Christensen 15 Pale 16 Before, in poems 17 Hollywood starlet of the 1940s and 1950s 19 Falsehood 20 Solid ___ rock 21 Leaves out 22 Lazy person 24 Balloon sounds 25 My goodness! 26 Some Louisianans 29 Scoundrel 33 School tests 34 Quackers35 Ending for Cray or pay36 Not rm 37 Greets from a distance 38 Slender 39 Mauna ___, Hawaii 40 Having a protective barrier 41 Tom of Amadeus 42 Gave a grin to 44 Kind of roll 45 Meowing pets 46 Clue 47 The Devil Wears ___ 49 Triangular road sign 51 I dont think so 54 Hot ___ (empty talk) 55 Sidewalk activity 58 Not me 59 Academy Award 60 Say under your breath 61 Bank convenience 62 Necklace components 63 Requires Down 1 ___ vu 2 Historical times 3 One of Columbuss ships 4 Pres. Eisenhower 5 Strands on an island 6 Foundation 7 Helper: abbr. 8 ___ the One (Bruce Springsteen song) 9 ___ no. 10 Joins the military 11 Bakery buys 12 One of the Great Lakes 13 Schlitz or Heineken 18 Baseball strike callers, for short 23 One-seventh of a week 24 Gas station feature 25 Bothers 26 Microscopic units 27 Saying 28 Alcohol from the Caribbean 29 Comfy blanket 30 ___ coffee 31 Wonderland girl 32 Lion ___ 34 Facts 37 Handfuls of cash 38 Hearts or spades 40 Find work 41 Most police of cers carry one 43 Young fellow 44 Oven for potters 46 Names mentioned in a will 47 ___ steep price 48 Civil disturbance 49 Gym type 50 Apple tablet 51 Short letter 52 Mimicked 53 His and ___ 56 Whats the ___? 57 Highway: abbr.

PAGE 27

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 Page 27 1. LITERATURE: Who wrote the poem The Charge of the Light Brigade? 2. TELEVISION: What was the skippers real name on Gilligans Island? 3. ADVERTISEMENTS: What product is advertised as the The Breakfast of Champions? 4. U.S. STATES: What time zone is the state of Oklahoma in? 5. LANGUAGE: What day of the week was named after the Roman god Jupiter? 6. SCIENCE: What does the symbol c stand for in physics? 7. GAMES: What is the length of a standard tennis court? 8. HISTORY: When did Yuri Gagarin become the first human to orbit the Earth? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What does the Fujita Scale measure? 10. ETIQUETTE: When is it appropriate to fly the U.S. flag upside down? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Lord Alfred Tennyson 2. Jonas Grumby 3. Wheaties cereal 4. Central 5. Thursday (Dies Jovis or Jupiter) 6. Speed of light (for celeritas, the Latin word for speed) 7. 78 feet 8. 1961 9. Tornado intensity 10. As a distress sign Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

PAGE 28

The cold winter of 2013-14 aside, Wakulla Countys newest invasive pest is already emerging from its winter nap. The kudzu bug is currently active near concentrations of the invasive weed kudzu where it overwinters. This pest was initially found in the Sopchoppy area in May 2013 populating a citrus tree. It was the first documented occurrence of this nuisance insect in Wakulla County. Kudzu bugs are native to East Asia and were rst detected in northeastern Georgia in October 2009. They eat kudzu and a number of other plants, especially legumes like peas, beans, and clover. Individually this destructive invader is easy to overlook as they are about the size of a ladybug. Unlike ladybugs they often appear in swarms of 1,000 or more, many times on the exterior of light colored structures during early daylight hours. They gather in the shaded portion of structures regardless of color later in the day. The kudzu bug is a stinkbug which secretes a foul odor and is capable of staining a variety of surfaces. If they enter a home the upholstery, carpets and drapes may be marred by this pest. The defensive chemical these insects use is capable of staining the natural or treated surface of the houses and buildings, and will even mar vehicle nishes. Their olive green to brownish color helps individuals blend into any native landscape. They are excellent hitchhikers which will cling to people and vehicles moving through an infested area. They are also good fliers and can travel long distances. Research has indicated its introduction into the United States occurred from a single female lineage originating in Japan. They have quickly established reproducing populations and spread throughout Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina, and moved into Alabama, Tennessee, Florida, Mississippi and Virginia. In addition to legumes, they are attracted to a host of ornamental shrubs and native plants. With no known predators in the north Florida, the potential impact on native plants is in question. There is also serious concern these exotic pest will be one more recently imported impediment to production of cotton and soybean in the Big Bend Region. They are particularly active in the spring when exploring the variety of emerging plants before kudzu leafs out. They are also seen in swarms during autumn eating their last meal before overwintering. In late autumn, with cooler temperatures, they migrate from their host plants to overwinter in kudzu leaf litter, underneath tree bark and in other protected locations. In its native habitat, there are up to three generations of these pests per year. In the warmer latitudes of Wakulla County, the reproduction rate may exceed the recorded rate in Asia. Any pyrethroid based insecticide applied directly to the bugs will kill them. Also, liquid Sevin (carbaryl), which has a longer residual effect, will also work at controlling the population. Unfortunately, the bugs mobility and their overwhelming numbers make them dif cult to control. To learn more about kudzu bugs in Wakulla County contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Ofce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas. u .edu/. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931. Page 28 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 20, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Kudzu bugs are a new pest to Wakulla Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA magni ed image of a kudzu bug. *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 36 months and as low as 1.99% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and renances. Renances and used car purchases 2007 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. You Deserve Better Banking new, used, and renance View more loan options at GoGulfWinds.com.1.99%APR*as low as60 months1.49%APR*as low as36 months p As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $34 per year in Wakulla County $46 per year in Florida $49 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408