Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00504

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newsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School ............................................................................Page 9A Sports ....................................................................Pages 10-11A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 15A Senior Citizens ................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B Travel .............................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Elizabeth Marie Britt Elsie M. Busen Deloris Robison Casseaux William R. Clyde Rodeheaver Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 9th Issue Thursday, Feburary 27, 2014Cole Gowdy won both Grand Champion and Reserve. Swine Show Swine ShowSee Pages 6-7BCrawfordville hair stylist wins new carAnimal lovers show support By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netRegis stylist Micah Benjamin was surprised to learn on Friday morning that she was the lucky winner of a 2014 Toyota Matrix. Benjamin has worked for Regis for 14 years. Four district managers, wearing red boas and sunglasses, showed up at the salon dancing and waving their hands. They escorted Benjamin and her co-workers to the auto repair area of the Wal-Mart where they announced that one of them had won a new car. They usually do the giveaways outside, but on this rainy morning they opted for an interior space. One of the managers, Robyn Lynem, paraded around the auto repair shop with her boa, teasing the employees. She eventually landed on Benjamin and placed the boa around her neck and yelled, Youre the winner. Benjamins co-workers looked on and cheered for her as she choked back tears. For real? she asked in disbelief. The contest was held by the salon, a nationwide chain with a location in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart, in conjunction with Matrix hair products. Six new cars were given away to professionals, and six new cars to customers as part of the promotion. The professionals names were put into the drawing for each $100 of Matrix products they sold. Benjamin sold over $700 worth of products, so she had seven entries. The other winners were from Michigan, Nevada, Missouri, Minnesota and New York. By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners voted 4-1 last week to remove the 75-foot wetlands buffer from the comp plan in favor of state protections. Some citizens at the meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 18, pleaded for the commissioners to wait until the citizens voted on the issue in November. But commissioners voting for the repeal of the wetlands setback said that it simply gives the county the ability to grant a variance. Nobody is suggesting that we ll-in wetlands, said commissioner Randy Merritt. If we dont do this, we dont have any way to get a variance. The four commissioners voting for repeal were Merritt, Richard Harden, Jerry Moore and Ralph Thomas, with Commissioner Howard Kessler casting the lone dissenting vote. At one point during the meeting, Merritt directed questions to Luis Serna, planning director. Is anybody suggesting we ll in wetlands? Merritt asked Serna. No, said Serna. Have we violated any state or federal laws? asked Merritt. No, said Serna. At one point, Commissioner Thomas got into an exchange with Ron Piasecki, resident of Shell Point and president of the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance, the group collecting petitions to put the wetlands issue before voters on the November ballot. They call us communists, socialists, said Piasecki. And they call us hypocrites. He said, They dont want you to have what they have. Thats correct. Thomas answered. No, I called you a socialist no, Im sorry, a collectivist. Thomas said. Responding to the claim that the petition drive had turned in more than 5,720 signatures for veri cation by the supervisor of elections more than the 5,550 required to get the issue on the ballot, should they be approved, Thomas said: I hear tonight that the petition count has been met, but there seems like theres no joy in that, people want to come in and sling mud. I never impugned the integrity of Shell Point. We have voted to restore property rights so people can decide, Thomas said. All Im asking for is fair and equal treatment for everybody. I have this on my blog, and on everything I have ever put out there, Remember that freedom belongs to the people and should not be infringed upon by the government, said Thomas. Commission Chairman Harden contended that Many citizens that have signed that petition have not been fully informed. After a citizen comment that no one would destroy a wetland, Commissioner Kessler responded, We all know of the destruction of wetlands. I dont think theres a commissioner sitting on this board who doesnt know about the destruction of wetlands.Turn to Page 2AJENNY ODOM JENNY ODOM JENNY ODOM Board repeals Board repeals wetlands buffer wetlands bufferMicah Benjamin sits in a new 2014 Toyota Matrix she won on Friday. Micah Benjamin and her Regis salon co-workers with her new car. Animal Control Director Ivanhoe Carroll.Commissioners vote 4-1 to repeal setback in comp planBy JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThe county commission chambers were lled with a sea of red shirts and pet lovers wearing purple ribbons who voiced their support for the Wakulla County animal shelter, and those who run it. At issue during the animal control workshop, held Tuesday, Feb. 18, was whether or not a policy change was needed to protect the county from liability and where to go from here. Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment (CHAT), the group that ran the adoption center, moved out of their building next door to the shelter last November when they could not come to terms with the county to operate the adoption center. Commissioner Howard Kessler called the workshop and stated at the beginning he was concerned that changes had taken place over the past years that have resulted in a change of policy of the commissions oversight of animal control. Kessler asked the commissioners to consider the issues: Economic impact to the countys budget Liability exposure Health and condition of animals for which the county is responsible Compliance with Florida statutes and other areas relating to animal control in the county. It would be good for all and less confusing if we were all under one roof, said Ivanhoe Carroll, animal control of cer who runs the shelter. She expressed that she was very pleased with the show of support from rescue groups and a majority of the board gave her and her employees a pat on the back. We do a lot, with very little, she said. But we couldnt do it without our volunteers.Turn to Page 2ACounty is working to re-open pet adoption center soon Bald Eagle and prey Bald Eagle and prey Local photographer Mike Carlton shared with us this recent shot of a Bald Eagle and a sh it has caught. Local photographer Mike Carlton shared with us this recent shot of a Bald Eagle and a sh it has caught.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Front PageCommissioner Moore leaned into his microphone and said, I do not. Incredible, Kessler answered. Incredible. Most citizens spoke against the repeal. Youre making a mistake, said Vic Lambou of Wakulla Wetlands Alliance. You need to listen to the citizens. This has galvanized the county to do the American thing and put this on the ballot, said citizen Dana Peck of Ochlockonee Bay, referring to a petition drive. Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells confirmed after the meeting that more than 5,720 signatures have been turned in for verification. As of Tuesday, Feb. 25, Wells said 4,008 had been verified. One citizen who spoke in favor of repeal was Robert Roddenberry of Sopchoppy: I dont know of any land owner that wants to harm a wetland. Most of us are responsible. I know on our place, we would never harm them. I think it took a lot of backbone to do this, he continued. Another resident of Sopchoppy, Sandy Tedder, countered, I think the states most valuable resource is its water. Our countys most valuable resource is our water, she said. Most communities around the country, such as south Florida, are having to spend lots of money to clean up their water. We see what (the state Department of Environmental Protection) did to protect south Florida. They didnt. DEP has said that our county ordinance protects our water better than DEP can, Tedder said. Crawfordville resident Bob Danzey contended the agency reports werent as critical of the repeal of wetlands protections as has been made out. I read the reports from state agencies, Danzey said. They werent as bad as what the publics been told. Were trying to protect wetlands, said Jack Rudloe, owner of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, who introduced himself as Chiropsella rudloei, a jellyfish that has been named after him. Another vote, scheduled for the upcoming March 3 county commission board meeting, has been placed on the agenda by commissioner Merritt. It requests board approval to direct staff to prepare a modification to the wetland ordinance that would permit a variance inside the 35 feet no touch portion of the 75 foot wetland setback. Board repeals wetlands bu er Board repeals wetlands bu er Childcare roundtable held Childcare roundtable held Animal lovers show support Animal lovers show supportFrom Front PageCarroll presented a PowerPoint to the commissioners with statistics and costs associated with animal control and adoption. She is currently working with County Administrator David Edwards on creating a Request for Proposal to advertise for a new entity to run the county adoption shelter. Since Carroll took over the shelter in 2007, the euthanasia rate has dropped from 74 percent to 22 percent. Please present a reasonable RFP to run the adoption center, said Janice Eakin, President of CHAT, as citizens took the podium and expressed support for animals. Not much money goes to animal control now, Eakin said. I urge the county commission to not let much time pass before setting a plan in action to take care of the animals when they come into the countys control. The current ordinance needs to be updated. The animal control office falls under the pubic safety banner reporting to the fire chief, and ultimately the county commission. The measurement for taking calls is different, said Carroll. One of the performance measurements for Fire and EMS is how many calls they run. The re department gets called to a re, they put out the fire and theyre done, Carroll said. Same with EMS. They take the injured person to the hospital, theyre done. With us, a call is what starts the work. People dont really understand what we do, Carroll said. Were not dog catchers and we dont run the pound. Rather, she said, Were trying to change the perception of the old dog catcher image, she said. We take wonderful care of them while we have them. She explained that she and her staff try to reunite animals with their owners. If unsuccessful, it is not necessarily a death sentence for the animal. Its a matter of changing the image, she said. But mostly, we just want people to be responsible pet owners. Since CHAT left the premises, the animal control shelter has been using the adoption facility, next door to animal control, to house any over ow of animals. They have also been using the services of Cauzican, and other rescue agencies to handle adoptions. If the outcome is for the animal control team to handle adoptions, Carroll said shell need at least one more fulltime and one more parttime employee. We do what we do because were animal lovers, she said. If we didnt do it, thered really be a problem.By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThe Early Learning Coalition, along with the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce recently hosted a roundtable discussion with the purpose of engaging small business child care owners with members of the chamber and the Economic Development Council. The event was held at TCC Wakulla on Wednesday, Feb. 12. We wanted to create an opportunity to bring them together to understand just how important child care is to a community, said Molly Lord, Community Partnerships Director for Early Learning Coalition of the Big Bend Region Inc. Information provided by the ELC states that during the last few years, many child care programs have started up and then within a year or two have had to close their doors. The strain brought about by closings is not only for the children and employees, but also for the parents who then have to nd new opportunities. When families or businesses are thinking about moving to Wakulla County they typically ask, How is your school system? can you help me nd a realtor? and I need information about your child care programs, Lord said. The Chamber is a natural partner for the child care businesses and we hope that this event allowed them to see opportunities of how they could all work together to make a positive impact in Wakulla. Rachel Sutz Pienta, an organizer of the event, serves as Advocacy Chair and representative from the Wakulla Chamber, on the Early Learning Coalition board. We wanted to highlight some of the challenges faced by early learning and child care providers in navigating the rough waters of small business ownership, she said after the event. The conversation during lunch covered a wide range of topics including permitting issues and a need for a local business to host the speci c background check process required by the state for childcare workers. The lunch event set several ideas in motion. One new development that sprang from the lunch is that the Chamber will list descriptions and testimonials about local childcare providers on its website, Pienta said. JENNY ODOMParticipants in the roundtable. Lower your monthly auto loan payments!1.49%APR*as low as36 months1.99%APR*as low as60 monthsAll rates and terms are good for new, used or renanced vehicles. View more loan options at GoGulfWinds.com.*Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 36 months and as low as 1.99% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and renances. Renances and used car purchases 2007 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. as A ll ra t for n e ve hi c op ti o REFINANCE: Did you know you can renance your auto loan? Bring us your auto loan from a bank or car dealer and let us put more money in your pockets. What are you waiting for? NEW & USED: Are you in the market for a new or used vehicle? We have many other low rates and term options to help put you in a new car. Contact us today. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op -ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2013. Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage are HMO plans with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage depends on contract renewal. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., sev en days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_DP 610 CMS Accepted 12252013 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield AssociationLive Well. Choose Well. Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd and at 5:30 p.m. on Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQA March 14 M ar ch 28 March 13 April 10 May 8 April 11 April 25 May 9 May 23

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDABONIFAY, Feb. 24 U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland had the complete attention of about 500 students at Chipley High School in the Florida Panhandle one morning last week. He quizzed them about civics and described his life as an elected official, saying hed beaten a seven-term congressman in 2010 in a district that, for generations, sent Democrats to Washington. You have to believe it in order to achieve it, Southerland assured them. What would you dream if you knew that dream would come true? A murmur swept the auditorium. The two-term Republican praised Barack Obama for an extraordinary path to the White House, while discussing his own average, normal family in nearby Panama City. He thanked the United States for being the country in which such people can be elected to high of ce. Married to a woman he met in the rst grade and running a family business, Southerland is trying to draw a line between himself and his challenger in one of the highest-profile races of 2014 Democrat Gwen Graham of Tallahassee, daughter of former Florida governor and U.S. Sen. Bob Graham. (Gwen Graham and I) will contrast very well in this election, Southerland told The News Service of Florida between campaign stops. We are polar opposites. The district includes Tallahassee and Panama City the homes of the challenger and incumbent, respectively and Washington, Bay, Jackson, Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Jefferson, Wakulla, Franklin, Taylor and part of Madison counties. Southerland swept into office in the tea-party wave of 2010, and hes known for taking conservative positions most recently for his push to add a work requirement for able-bodied adults to the food-stamp program. Hes also known for his opposition to the federal Affordable Care Act, which he ran against in his first campaign and continues to denounce. At the high school, Southerland took questions on political issues and such personal matters as fishing. Asked what he thinks of medical marijuana and gay marriage, he explained the role of states rights, allowed as how hed never burned one, and went on to earn his biggest applause of the morning when he said, I believe, personally, for me for me and my family that marriage is between one man and one woman. Southerland and his supporters say Gwen Graham is too liberal for the district, although she calls herself a moderate Democrat. And he took a dig at her work days, a practice she borrowed from her father for her rst campaign. Bob Graham put in more than 400 eight-hour work days at jobs held by ordinary Floridians. The Southerlands weve never known anything other than 60and 70-hour work weeks, the congressman said. We know all about work weeks in a work lifetime. Weve got callouses on our hands you get that from a lifetime of work. Work is important to Southerland. He told the students that his familys funeral home had never closed a day in the 60 years since it opened, and that his four daughters had parttime jobs since they were 15 years old. Work is important to the Grahams too. The day before Southerland came to Chipley High, Gwen Graham put in a work day at Bobbie and Ed Goldens 68-acre goat ranch near Monticello, in Jefferson County partly as a way of criticizing Southerland over the unnecessary six-month delay in passing a federal farm bill. It is unfortunate the sole reason the bill was delayed in the rst place was because of a manufactured crisis by Congressman Southerland who put partisan politics above farmers, the economy and his own district, Graham said in a statement. Speaking with farmers, small business owners and North Floridians from all walks of life, its become clear to me they are hungry for new leadership, a representative who will speak for them with an independent voice. Southerland served on the conference committee for the just-passed farm bill, adding a 10-state pilot program that would require work or participation in a job training program for able-bodied adults who get food stamps. His original proposal would have applied nationwide, but was criticized on the grounds that there were not enough jobs or slots in job-training programs for those who needed food stamps. Southerland warned the group that the 2nd Congressional District had been targeted by House Minority Leader and former Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California. There was one seat east of the Mississippi and south of the MasonDixon line, and that seat is ours. He said it resonates with voters that they have a representative right now who grew up among em. Florida Senate President Don Gaetz, a Niceville Republican whose district overlaps with Southerlands, praised Bob Graham, noting that Grahams family has roots in Walton County and that the former U.S. senator is well respected in the district. He also said hes watched Gwen Graham campaign and that shes a good candidate. But Gaetz predicted Southerland would win. She comes from good genes politically, Gaetz said. Gwen Grahams problem is that shes a member of a political party and part of a political coalition which I believe is out of step with the people of North Florida. Democratic political operative Kevin Cate, however, said Graham is connecting with voters over lunch-bucket issues such as raising the minimum wage. The Republicans are going to try to nationalize this campaign, saying its Obama versus the House of Representatives, Cate said. But what youll see Gwen do is take advantage of the extreme positions that the House has taken, blocking common-sense reforms, being opposed to raising the minimum wage for full-time workers issues like that, where it really connects to many people in that district.Southerland makes appeal to Panhandle conservatives WCSO/FILE PHOTOSteve Southerland and aide during a recent visit with Wakulla Sheriff Charlie Creel. LUNCH PARTNER FREE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Notice of Proposed Ordinance FEBRUARY 27, 2014 APRIL 3, 2014

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Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jenny Odom .............................................reporter@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNING NR Most popular stories online: Wakullas jail-bed revenues fluctuate with number of prisoners Underwater Wakulla February 27, 2014 Flash flood watch until 7 p.m. Wetlands petitions are coming in for verification Rick Smith to talk about his fathers Florida County commission votes to remove wetlands buffer Magician to perform at Central Baptist Church Rep. Southerland recognizes 2014 Biletnikoff Award recipients thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE:Put partnership above partisanshipGrandstanding over tragedy was shamelessWorkshop was a display of ignorance Commissioner doesnt trust citizens Good job on Norm Griggs story Follow us on Editor, The News: I have just returned home from the County Commission workshop on Animal Control. I know I should not be surprised, but what a waste of time. Most of the people in the audience did not have a clue what the workshop was about. No one ever said anything about shutting down Animal Control. Obviously, the Wakulla County Rumor Mill was in full gear. It does not appear most people investigated what the meeting was about. It seems they got an email or a Facebook posting telling them to show up, so like lemmings they did what they were told with no knowledge of why. I was shocked to hear one of the county commissioners say to the director of Animal Control, If you go left, I will back you. If you go right, I will back you. Sadly, we are paying this man to give a county employee blanket support to do whatever she wants to do regardless of its impact on the county. A woman from the audience spoke about nancial liability and insurance and four of our county commissioners never mentioned a word about it. Mine and your county commissioners have thrown us under the bus to any legal action presented to the county by anyone volunteering or rescuing animals. The scary part is some of these commissioners say they are businessmen. Makes me wonder what their books look like. Lastly, I want to apologize to Dr. (Howard) Kessler. He seems to have had the countys interest at heart, but again he was attacked. Whoever the people in the audience were who yelled at him to volunteer truly showed their lack of knowledge. Dr. Kessler has volunteered many many times for the animals in our county. He placed himself in Haiti trying to save some of the arms and legs of those suffering from the damage during their crisis. He volunteers in Tallahassee helping children. The next time some one throws stones at Dr. Kessler make sure you know what you are talking about. Dont let your ignorance shine so brightly. Barbara Mans eld-Wilson Heide Clifton Christy Noftz By STEVE SOUTHERLANDU.S. CongessmanWith partisan gridlock all too prevalent in todays Washington, I have worked hard to break through those barriers and join with Republicans and Democrats who are as interested as I am in growing jobs and restoring certainty for hardworking families. The recentlypassed Farm Bill is an example of what can be accomplished by putting partnership above partisanship. For more than a year Congress debated the latest reauthorization of the Farm Bill, which sets national agriculture and food policy for the next ve years. With Florida being a national leader in agricultural production and the second largest specialty crop-producing state in America, I was committed to doing all I could to advance a common sense Farm Bill that restored certainty for North and Northwest Florida farmers and strengthened our rural communities. I was honored to be the only Floridian in Congress appointed to the bipartisan conference committee tasked with ironing out the nal Farm Bill agreement. It was a tremendous, hard-earned victory when both parties and both chambers came together for the good of the American people and passed a ve-year Farm Bill that provides muchneeded relief to our hardworking farming families and saves taxpayers $23 billion while allowing us to nally move past the costly, big government policies passed under then-Speaker Nancy Pelosis Farm Bill six years ago. I am also pleased that Republicans and Democrats came together to support a provision in the Farm Bill I introduced to empower vulnerable families with a renewed opportunity for earned success. By including a 10-state pilot program for work, job training, and community volunteerism for healthy, working age food stamp bene ciaries, weve now put nutrition assistance on the same proven path of success that helped change a culture for the better during welfare reform in the 1990s. As the rst reforms to the food stamp program since the successful welfare reforms of 1996, the Farm Bill takes important steps to empower families in need with a renewed opportunity at earned success. Additionally, the Farm Bill includes several provisions I crafted to sustain the economies of our rural communities. The bipartisan Building Rural Communities Act ensures that small, rural areas have access to the technical assistance and training necessary to enhance vital infrastructure including police and re stations and community health clinics all at no additional cost to Americas taxpayers. Another provision I advanced strengthens our forestry communities by ensuring that wood products qualify under the USDAs Biobased Marketing Program. I also fought to guarantee the long-term viability of citrus production in Florida by helping secure $125 million to research remedies for citrus greening, a disease decimating citrus groves in Florida and nationwide. Updating the Farm Bill is never easy, but this bill represents the good that can come out of both parties and both chambers rising above politics to do what is right for the American people. Our farmers and rural families deserve real solutions not political mud ghts and this bipartisan Farm Bill is a big step in the right direction. Steve Southerland II is U.S. representative for the 2nd congressional district, which includes Wakulla.Editor, The News: Few things have the capacity to push me over the edge more than someone trying to make hay over the tragedy of others. On Saturday, Feb. 8, a Tallahassee TV helicopter crashed into trees in the dark of night for inexplicable reasons killing two and injuring another. It may be months before the FAA and NTSB determine a probable cause but one individual took it upon himself to push his personal agenda by spouting a bunch of dribble in an interview with WTXL immediately after the accident. Far from worrying about his neighbors safety as he states, James Parham took advantage of the situation to score points with the blood of others. What he does not tell you in that interview is that he (and his small group of neighbors on Surf Road) has attempted to block the kind of safety improvements that might have prevented this tragedy. Mr. Parham along with another detractor pushed to have themselves placed on the Countys Airport Advisory Committee (charged with creating a consensus on how to move forward with airport improvements) only to become the airports major detractor. In essence they joined the Advisory Committee to kill the airport from within. It ultimately became clear from their actions that they just want to see the 50 year old Wakulla County Airport closed. In the WTXL interview Mr. Parham expressed the belief that tall trees around his house were necessary to protect himself from harm. Trees to protect your house, Mr. Parham? Who thinks like that? The blood of those people could very well be tied to your opposition to safety improvements most notably required tree topping in designated safety zones called for by county zoning and the Florida Department of Transportation. For those not in the know, Wakulla County Airport has been a county-owned and run airport for many years that ultimately attracted millions of dollars of real estate development around it and also pays hundreds of thousands of dollars in county taxes because it was there and not the other way around. Wakulla County Airport has paid its way all along and everyone in the county has been a bene ciary of that ongoing tax revenue. Why does Mr. Parham want the airport closed? Thats the real question. Could it be that he wants to develop it for himself? Mr. Parham is trapped by his own logic. First, he says there is almost no traf c at the airport to deserve improvement and then he says its unsafe and he needs trees to protect his house. You can only have it one way, Mr. Parham. Please show us your true colors and stop grandstanding with a horri c situation. Its peoples lives that are at stake when we dont trim trees from time to time as required by FDOT, zoning and common sense. Allan FeiferAircraft owner and pilot at Wakulla County AirportEditor, The News: At the last BOCC meeting the Chairman exhibited a complete lack of trust in the citizens of Wakulla County. He berated our citizens who signed the petition to place an important referendum on the November ballot. His approach reminded me of one who was afraid of the commissions vote being overturned by its citizens. It also reminded me of a quote by Thomas Jefferson, When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. He considered the citizens of this County uninformed and not capable of making a rational decision, an insult to the intelligence of every petition signer. I, for one, have faith that between now and this November election the people will become even more enlightened. However, rest assured that with a builder, a developer, a realtor/ mortgage consultant, and a large family landholder, the verbiage of these commissioners will be emotionally biased and opinionated. This bias has and will become more evident. Unlike California, we are blessed with wetlands and good drinking water, but that can quickly change. South Florida would love to tap the aquifer of Wakulla County! Hundreds of people depend on our shing industry to support their families. Sport shing brings hundreds of out-ofstate shermen to our county, and with them their money. Birding is little recognized but a very popular pastime for winter visitors. Having grown up in St Petersburg and Miami, it is dif cult for me not to become emotionally passionate over the wetland issue when re ecting on the changes I have seen there, generated by greed. I have concern for what will happen if stringent safeguards are not in place and enforced by our county. Charles Hickman CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: Hello, Jenny Odom: Just saw the article on Norm Griggs interview and the photo (Griggs loves his gig, front page feature, Feb. 20 issue). Loved the write-up. You really caught his character and how terri c a story teller he was. For me as an interviewer it was just fun and easy to elicit his opinions. Thanks so much to you and The Wakulla News for your support in promoting and covering this event! Best, Betty Ann Korzenny Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 5A< STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: What was your favorite food as a kid?DANIEL MORGANResidential ElevatorsPizza! Thats what we would do for all my birthday parties. We would have 20 to 30 people sometimes. MIKE DURRANCEC & C TechMcDonalds! We would go to McDonalds after church every Sunday. Cheeseburger, fries, and a Coke! MEGAN HOLLEYTCC studentShrimp! Every year for my birthday I would ask my mom to have shrimp... My favorite is still shrimp today. Fruity Pebbles! When we are in the cereal grocery isle, my kids tell me, No, mom no Fruity Pebbles. WILLIAM T. MOORERetired attorneyDANELLE VAUGHNBig Bend HospiceMine was a meal! Lamb, rice and gravy, and butter beans that my mother would make on Sundays. Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Winner receives one meal from the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the theCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & Dogs Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand$599 Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n n s s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Myra Jeans Restaurant would like to congratulate Tony Simpson for defeating our monstrous Behemoth Cheeseburger Challenge. Tony went to Myra Jeans on February 9 to watch his brother in law attempt the challenge, said he was hungry and wanted a snack. So he too ordered a Behemoth just for the heck of it. Some 48 minutes later a champion was born when he downed the last bite. at snack was a 4-pound cheeseburger and a whole pound of fries. Tony joins the six other champions on Myra Jeans Wall of Fame. Tonys brother-in-law did not fare so well:His name will be placed on the much more crowded Wall of Shame. Better luck next time. Myra Jeans is the place to go for a Great Big Burger, a juicy steak, a hearty salad or a tasty ice cream sundae. A Wakulla County original with character and hometown atmosphere. Myra Jeans also makes champions! Great job, Tony!A new champion for Myra Jeans Behemoth Cheeseburger Challenge Tony Simpson 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Raymond Rich drawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR Keep it real or keep it to yourself Charlotte Faith to hold Holy Ghost RevivalA Holy Ghost Revival will be held at Charlotte Faith & Deliverance Temple with Apostle Tony Sanders on Feb. 26, 27, and 28 at 7:30 p.m. nightly. Bishop Alice Williams is pastor. The church is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road. Mount Olive No. 2 to celebrate anniversaryPastor Samuel Hayes of Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church No. 2 cordially invites all to the celebration of the churchs 144th anniversary. The celebration will be held on Sunday, March 2, at 11:30 a.m. Speaker will be Pastor Renita Alan-Dixon and at 3 p.m., Pastor John Fagan. The church is located at 8 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville. If you have questions, call Pastor Samuel Hayes at (850) 339-5090. Rocky Mount Church to celebrate anniversaryThe Rocky Mount Church of Christ will be celebrating its annual church anniversary on Sunday, March 2 at 11 a.m. Everyone is invited. Elder Benjamin Washington and East Spring Primitive Baptist Church of Christ will render service. Dinner will be served after. The church is located at 58 Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t. The ministry is free.Church BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDER Normally, Im not overly fussy with what people say as long as they are not trying to put something over on me. All it takes is one time of trying to put something over on me and I cross you off my Christmas card list. When someone tries to sell me something, I am assuming that somewhere in the conversation they are trying to pull the wool over my eyes. I am allergic to wool in my eyes. When they are talking to me, I am listening for a keyword in their conversation, which is simply, free. Whenever they mention that magical word, I know they are trying to put something over on me. My father used to say, Keep it real or keep it to yourself. He did not have many jewels of wisdom, but this certainly was one that has been helpful to me down through the years. I have tried to keep this in focus when talking to other people. Nothing I hate more than somebody lying to me, so turnabout is fair game. I do not want to lie to anybody myself. At least intentionally. I am a weekend sherman from Pennsylvania so the tendency is there and I have to watch myself all the time. I am the kind of person who loves to exaggerate. Sometimes my exaggeration gets the best of me but then that is why God gave us wives to help curb this tendency. She has not failed me so far. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were relaxing at home watching a little bit of television. It is hard to nd anything real on the old television set. The reality shows are everything but. We were casually listening to a talk show host who was interviewing some TV personality celebrating his 80th birthday. We were not really paying attention, you know how it is. You are watching TV, but you are talking back and forth to one another trying to catch up on the days activities. Then this TV personality made a statement that captured both of our attentions. I dont believe, this personality, who shall remain nameless, said, in the afterlife. Only foolish people believe in the afterlife. This sparked some conversation between my wife and me. The question I had was simply this how long does it take to get to this point of Superior Idiocy? What university awards an SI degree? If they did, I am sure they could never keep up with the production of such awards. Just when you think you have heard the most stupid thing in the world somebody with an SI degree opens his or her mouth. Of course, there is nothing wrong with being stupid if you keep it to yourself. When you start telling people just how stupid you really are, that is when somebody needs to object. Right after this TV personality, whose name will remain anonymous, although he thinks he is some kind of a king, said he did not believe in the afterlife said something that was contradictory. I have it ordered, he said about a seriously as any SI person could be, that when I die I will be frozen until the medical eld has discovered a cure or for what has killed me. Then I will be brought back to life with this medication. My wife and I waited for the laughter. I really thought it was a joke. I did not think anybody could be that stupid. Apparently, a great deal of people are that stupid because nobody laughed at that remark. My wife and I looked at each other and then we burst out laughing thinking it was one of those TV talk show spoofs. It turned out he was not joking. He did not believe in the afterlife, but he was making plans to come back to life after he died. I think people with the SI syndrome have one severe dysfunction between their brain and their mouth. We know from listening that their mouth is working but what we hear from their mouth more than suggest their brain is not w. I do not have any problems with people being a practicing SI as long as they keep it to themselves. There are enough idiots in the world that we do not have to have people every day coming out of the SI closet. The apostle Paul made this quite clear when he wrote, For the wages of sin is death: but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord (Romans 6:23). Only God can keep it real and thankfully He does not keep it to Himself, but shares it with those who will put their trust in Him..The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Jesus River Festival is set for March 8 in SopchoppySpecial to The NewsThe 6th annual Jesus River Festival is scheduled for Saturday, March 8 in Myron B. Hodges City Park located in Sopchoppy. The outdoor music event will start at noon and run until dark. This music festival will host a list of talented Christian musicians, speakers, dancers and performers appealing to all ages and a variety of music styles. The Jesus River Festival was started by a group of Wakulla County Christians from various churches. Their intention was to gather their families for a day of music and fellowship in a casual outdoor setting. The Sopchoppy River runs south towards the Gulf of Mexico through the citys park and makes for an ideal setting for an afternoon of relaxed music listening and worship. Planners wanted to draw from the areas local musical talent and invite committed Christians to share with the community the good news of Jesus Christs power to transform lives. This is a multi-denominational, community worship experience, and it just keeps getting better, said Nathan Lewis, a member of the planning committee. Several hundred individuals attended last years event, and we were very pleased with the turnout and support. Wave 94, a local Christian radio station and long time supporter of the festival, is expected to return to visit with fans and friends. Many churches and businesses are involved in making the festival a success. Those attending the festival will be served complimentary grilled burgers, hot dogs, chips and drinks. Groups interested in performing at this years festival are encouraged to apply online at jesusriverfest. com. Churches, ministries and civic organizations interested in setting up a table to fund raise or present informational materials can apply on-line at jesusriverfest.com.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 7AElsie M. Busen, of Brighton, Mich., died on Feb.14, 2014 in Brighton. She was born Aug. 12, 1920 in Iowa to Earl and Ann (Frana) Scheidel. Survivors include her children, Joseph (Dorothy) Busen of Trenton, Mich., Kenneth (Karen) Busen of Crawfordville, Barbara (Melvin) Shapiro of Stockbridge, Mich., Catherine (Tom) Schulz, Matthew (Claudia) Busen; a brother, Hank (Betty) Scheidel, Wyandotte, Mich.; seven grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Cletus Anthony Scoop Busen. A memorial service was held on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 from 2 to 8 p.m. at Borek Jennings Funeral Home, Hamburg Chapel. Her farewell and Mass of Christian Burial was Wednesday, February 19 at 2 p.m. at St. Patricks Catholic Church, Brighton, Father Carl Pung of ciating. Interment followed at Our Lady of Hope Cemetery in Brownstown Twp. Memorial contributions may be given to St. Patricks Catholic Church in Brighton. Please leave a message of comfort to the Busen family by calling 1-877231-7900 or sign her guestbook at www.borekjennings.com. Elizabeth Marie Britt, 80, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 in Tallahassee. She had lived in this area for 26 years coming from Plantation. She was a member of Lake Ellen Baptist Church and served with Campers on Mission. Visitation was held Friday, Feb. 21, 2014 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Services were held Friday, Feb. 21, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville. The family will have a private burial. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Florida Baptist Childrens Home, 8415 Buck Lake Road, Tallahassee FL 32317. She is survived by her husband, William Howard Britt; son, Howard Dale Britt; daughters, Susan Gail Whaley and Wendy Louise Wilson; and eight grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Deloris Robison Causseaux, 57, died Feb. 21, 2014 in Tallahassee. She was a native of Wakulla County. Visitation was held Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 from 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Debra Nell Cemetery. Graveside services were held Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Debra Nell Cemetery. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to the Childrens Lighthouse, 7771 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee FL 32309. Survivors include her husband, Paul Causseaux; sons, Bobby Robison (Heather), Jason Robison, John Robison (Lisa) and Randy Causseaux; daughters, Debbie Olah (Timmy), Carolyn Cloud (Rick), Sandy Moote and Katrina Dickson (Brent); brothers, Greg Hurley (Cassie) and Robert Hurley; sisters, Katrina Hurley (Barney), Ila Mae Gray (Mike) and Linda Beal; 14 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). William R. Clyde Rodeheaver, 74, of Wakulla County, died on Feb. 18, 2014. He was born on July, 11, 1939, and was native of Wakulla County. Survivors include his only son, William D. Callahan, and friends Kathryn Wilson and Michele Roddy.Obituaries Elizabeth Marie Britt Elsie M. Busen Deloris Robison Casseaux William R. Clyde Rodeheaver Deloris Robison Casseaux Elizabeth Marie Britt William R. Rodeheaver Elsie M. Busen By TRACY RENEE LEEGrief manifests itself in many painful facets. There is emotional pain, psychological pain, spiritual pain, the pain of loneliness, the pain of sadness and even physical pain. Physical pain is very often brought on through continued avoidance of the grief experience. Not everyone suffers the same amount or type of pain once a loved one dies. It is nearly impossible, however, to avoid a painful experience at the loss of someone with whom you shared an attachment. Of important note, the deceased need not be a loved one to feel pain at his or her passing. When I was a young woman, I joined a large corporation in a secretarial capacity. It was not long after I began working there, that one of the district managers died. Although I worked in a different of ce building, and had only seen this man at regional meetings, I was affected by his loss. My attachment to the company included this man as an integral part of my newly acquired associated network. I pondered my pain at his loss for many years, and truly did not understand it until I entered funeral service. Although I did not know him very well at all, our work overlapped. I relied on his reports to compose my own. I had an attachment to him because I had a reliance on his work. His passing created a structural defect in the security of my newly acquired income. The stress, though short lived, was very unnerving. If grief is left unresolved or ignored, it will eventually surface in ones life as physical ailments. Grief affects the body and soul the same way stress does. If you continue to ignore your grief, other conditions will develop that are avoidable by allowing the pain of grief to present itself and working through it. I hope that if you have experienced unresolved grief, you will find the courage to face it and overcome the ill effects it creates within your physical and mental health. If you can muster up the courage to do it, you will bene t immensely. Your health will be better, and your life will be better too.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushin-updaisies.blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @ PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome. com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.The pain of grief BEREAVEMENT COLUMN Special to The NewsWhen Karolyn Rogers was 5, she became one of the millions of Americans whove lost a parent to war. My father, Pfc. Tom T. Wilmeth, died in the waning days of World War II and for most of my life, I felt a haunting absence and the grief of wondering about what my life might have been like had he survived the war, says Rogers, author of the new book, When Daddy Comes Home, (http://tinyurl. com/pgdz5kb), which details her journey of healing through researching her fathers family and military experience. Ive experienced what many are now experiencing for the rst time the shocking agony of losing someone you couldnt ever imagine losing. Id like those people to know that there are people like me who have managed to overcome their sorrow and live a ful lling life. Military families tend to suffer more than others, not only when losing a member killed in action, but also when returning loved ones suffer devastating physical and mental injuries, including PTSD, she says. As I experienced with my father, families and veterans of recent wars may wonder about the life they couldve had without ravages experienced by war, says Rogers, who offers tips for achieving a sense of closure, no matter what the nature of the tragedy may be. Understand the path in front of you today. The path to healing is a lifelong process; the loss is something youll continue to palpably feel. However, you have to create closure in your life, as best you can, after the loss of a loved one who would want you to live a full and happy life. Closure has no deadline. It doesnt matter how much time has passed since your loved one passed away. The psychological effects remain with you, right below the surface, and they need to be dealt with. Dont be afraid to explore who your loved one was. Its worth the effort to make the journey to discovering who your loved one was either through going online and learning what you can, or visiting sites that were important to him or her, or doing traditional research. Know that your journey will likely help others. When I read my book to my mother in the months before her death, she would nod and say, Thats him. Thats exactly who your father was. Not only was I healing myself, I was also reliving with my mother some of her lifes best years. Whether implicitly or explicitly, do NOT follow the notalk rule. The pain of losing a precious, noble, honorable and loving family member can be so overwhelming that the bereaved often nd the prospect of speaking about the loss intimidating and overwhelming. Dont be afraid! Talking about your loved one keeps their memory alive, and discussion is healing for the bereaved. Appreciate the closure you have, at any given point in time. Theres no such thing as absolute closure, but the focus of this journey is feeling better. We can certainly nd more psychological equilibrium by pursuing the stories of our departed loved ones.Tips to help cope with the sudden loss of a loved one Sponsored by Wakulla ONE, a fellowship of multiple Christian denominations and charitable ministries laboring together to serve the Wakulla County area in the Name of Christ and according to the prayer of Jesus in John 17:22. Visit online for more info: www.wakullaone.com. PHOTO C O URTESY : Ernie Garci a Band 2013PHO TO CO U R TES Y : B a r r y McGhee 2013 BRING the kids! P A STO R P IZZ A of Sid e w alk M i ni stries wil l h os t t wo s h ow s: 1 2:30 p.m. & 2:30 p.mBRING a l awn chair. B R ING a c oole r. Enj oy an a fternoon of inspira tional music with friends and fa mi ly. No al cohol ple ase. Hot-dog and hambur ger pla t es av ai lab l e. Canned food drive f or loca l char i ties and food bank. Loc al c hur c h es, bus ine ss es and i ndividua l d o na tions ar e w elcome. 11:45 Opening Invocation 12:00Called Upon to Magnify Christ (CUMC)1:00Big Poppa & the Shuffle Brothers2:00Unchained3:00For Greater Glory4:00Audience of One (SSBC Youth)5:00I Am Sent Ministries6:00Mother Gram & Gospel Joy Singers

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Special to the NewsIts been a long and winding road for Wakulla Highs theatre teacher and thespian sponsor Susan Solburg. Solburg began her career at Wakulla High in 1985 with the same zany comedy that she will be ending her teaching career William Gleasons comedic parody The Clumsy Custard Horror Show & Ice Cream Clone Review. A parody of all-time great movies has always been a crowd favorite with its over-thetop-characters, disco knights, live sound effects, and audience participation. The latest crop of actors to take on the play are having just as much fun as the original cast from 1985 and the subsequent casts in the following years. Its just a lot of fun to direct and so many students get to participate as there are 26 characters and several of the roles are double cast. The tech crew gets to build a big castle with lots of crazy props and costumes not to mention cool sound and lighting effects. Ms. Solburg hopes that former students who are still in the area will come back to reminisce and join in the celebration The show runs March 6 8, beginning at 7:30 p.m. and March 9 at 2:30 p.m. Cost for students is $4, seniors $5, and $6 general. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityThe parents of John Edward Nunez and Samantha Nicole Pouncey would like to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children. John is a 2008 graduate of Franklin County High School and is currently employed as a Sergeant with the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. John is the son of Donnie and Meloney Chambers of Eastpoint, and John J. Nunez of South Carolina. He is the grandson of the late Cecil E. Simmons of Sopchoppy, the late Martha Braswell Glass of Eastpoint, Kelby & Sally Chambers of Eastpoint, and Ben & Rose Hurley of Tallahassee. Samantha is a 2011 graduate of Franklin County High School and is currently employed with the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. Samantha is the child of Cecil Joe Pouncey & Frances Hunnings of Carabelle and Alicia Armistead of Texas. She is the granddaughter of Melvin & the late Marilyn Armitage of Texas and the late Carolyn Sparks of Carrabelle. The wedding will be held at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola on Saturday, March 22, 2014 at 2:30 p.m. with a reception to follow at Rivercrest Lodge. All family and friends are invited to attend, no formal invitations will be sent.Trying on period clothing at The Charleston, South Carolina Museum are Stalena McMillan Teague and Mother Hazel Jean McMillan who are members of the R. Don McLeod UDC Chapter #2469 in Crawfordville upon the record of Captain Uz William Cox. Finley Lamar McMillan is a member of Finley Brigade Camp #1614 Sons of Confederate Veterans upon the record of Captain Angus M. McMillan. By the time you read this, many will have celebrated World Spay Day (February 25). What do you mean you didnt celebrate? Well, thats OK, you can celebrate with us because every day a dog or cat is spayed or neutered is a reason to celebrate and here are a few reasons why: 1. Neutering eliminates the urge to breed which can cause destructive behaviors and injure cats many times requiring medical attention for infected scratches and bites. 2. Spaying females early on reduces the risk of breast cancer and prevents uterine infections and uterine cancer. 3. Neutering males prevents testicular cancer and reduces the risk for perianal tumors. 4. It reduces the urge to roam to seek out hormonal scents.Approximately 80 percent of pets hit by cars are unneutered males. 5. It ensures a happier household for multiple pet homes. 6. In the long term, spaying/neutering saves pet parents money on vet care. 7. It reduces the burden of what to do with unwanted animals. 8. It reduces the number of unwanted animals that are put to sleep. Due to the efforts of CHAT over the past 30 years, those of other local humane groups and responsible pet parents, Wakulla is doing better than many communities with stray and unwanted animals but the numbers are still way too high. Although CHAT no longer operates the Adoption Center, we will continue with spay/neuter activities like the TNR (Trap, Spay/Neuter, Return) project. TNR focuses on controlling feral cats, which are cats who has reverted in some degree to a wild state. They originate from former domestic cats that were lost or abandoned and then learned to live outdoors. We are in the learning and planning stages and have our rst event planned soon. This rst event will help us smooth out the process and position us to solicit and train more individuals. With the communities help, our goal is to identify and care for every feral colony in Wakulla County. In recent years, some people have misguidedly blamed cats for declining bird populations and feel that feral cats should be killed, not saved. But, it isnt the relationship between cats and birds that has changedits the relationship between humans and the environment. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that every year 70 million birds die from pesticides and at least 100 million birds die from striking windows each year. If youve heard negative comments about TNR or if you would like to learn more about feral cats, please visit the website www.alleycats. org and look for the Save the Cats, Save the Birds news article and video. Misty, The One In a Million Cat is an excellent book and video to share with children. Just go to YouTube and search for Misty, The One In a Million Cat. Adults will like it, too. This weeks motto is Prevent a litter, fix your critter! Like CHAT of Wakulla on Facebook to stay informed of our activities and ways you can get involved. Meow, meow. Woof, woof! TAIL WAGGER By Janice EakinLets celebrate spaying-neutering animals UDC members visit CharlestonSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAir Force Airman Jacob B. Riley graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Riley is the son of Hank and Carrie Riley of Crawfordville. He is a 2013 graduate of Wakulla High School.Airman Jacob Riley completes basic Nunez and Pouncey to wedClumsy Custard to be Solburgs last show Edward Nunez and Samantha N. Pouncey WakullaJoin NAMI Wakulla for a Spaghetti Dinner and Silent Auction Friday, Feb. 28, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club.64 Ochlockonee StreetSpaghetti, salad, bread and desserts. $8 adults, $4 children(take out also available)Help us continue our efforts in supporting mental health in Wakulla County!NAMI Wakulla is a 501 c(3) Non-prot organization. A copy of the ofcial registration and nancial information may be obtained from the Division of Consumer Services by calling toll-free within the state, 1-800-435-7352, Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. #CH34706 is offering a seminar for parents of middle-school children with an emphases on discovering a new view and attitude regarding the traits of ADHD. Join us and learn to help your child discover how to put the brakes on his Ferrari brain. Seminar will be held every Tuesday in March beginning 3/4/14.Call Rita Haney, MSW,LCSW 850-926-2039 and/or email Catherine Harris Small, Ms.Ed.S/MSW at ms.catherapy@gmail.com 3295 Crawfordville Hwy .PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ADHDDiscovery Place$25/session 926-8886 ALL DAY 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida 2 PIECE $ 2 99 Mash Potato Roll 2 PIECE DARK LindysChicken Since19687locations State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL *Potential savings may vary based upon individual circumstances. Consult your agent for more details. Get a better ride with a better loan.And the more you save with a State Farm Bank car loan, the easier it is to get behind the wheel and just enjoy the ride. Thats borrowing better. GET TO A BETTER STATE.CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Our great rates can save y o u hundreds of dollars. 1303025 07/13 Gayla Parks, Agent State Farm Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsSuperintendent Robert Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the optimism, positive energy and compassion each of these individuals give to the children of Wakulla County and the enthusiasm they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. SUSAN TILLMAN MEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Susan Tillman, February Teacher of the Month, began her teaching career nine years ago at Medart Elementary School as a first grade teacher. Encouraged and mentored by her sister, Ginger Tillman, Susan has never regretted one second spent teaching. Tillman shares, I love that there is always a way to nd inspiration, whether from the success of a student, the enthusiasm or creativity of a colleague, or kind words from a parent. It is a job that keeps me learning and re ecting each day. Tillman, a product of the Wakulla County School system, graduated from FSU with a degree in international affairs. She worked diligently completing the alternative certi cation program to meet the FL DOE professional certication criteria. Tillman moved from rst grade to a varying exceptionalities class this year. She cites the change as challenging. Tillman adds, I have a greater appreciation of every position in the school. I believe this opportunity has helped me grow into a better teacher and colleague. Principal Sharon Kemp recognizes Ms. Tillmans team spirit. Her stamina is unsurpassed, and her devotion to the students is evident. She is an avid reader and strives to instill the love of learning in all of her students. Although she didnt start her adult life as a teacher, she followed her heart, and Medart Elementary School received the blessing. BILL PECK WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL Bill Peck, Wakulla Middle School Teacher and Coach, has been serving Wakulla students in a professional capacity since 2007. Peck served in the US Army and was an electrician prior to teaching. Determined to make a positive difference in the lives of kids, he returned to college, received his teaching credentials and changed careers. Fortunately for the Wildcats, he was hired at Wakulla Middle School in the EBD program. I enjoy providing a stable and enriching environment for each student. The daily interactions with students are enjoyable, especially as I watch them become independent and critical thinkers. Mr. Peck touts the positive rapport and camaraderie of WMS. A stranger to no one Peck contributes to that culture by doing whatever it takes, from coaching, driving buses, serving as an AVID site team member or participating in daily announcements. Originally from Waldo, Ohio, Pecks family relocated to Perry, FL where he graduated from high school. He later attended and graduated from TCC and FSU. WMS Principal Mike Barwick adds, After several years in the electrical business, Mr. Peck made the decision to become an educator. I believe hes met his calling. Mr. Peck works every day to serve our kids. Hes loved by all faculty, staff and students. Mr. Peck has in-depth knowledge on a lot of topics. Mr. Peck is an asset to our school and were proud to call him a WILDCAT. PATRICIA BAKERWAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL, FOOD SERVICEThe February Employee of the Month is the Food Service Departments Patricia Baker. Baker also started her career with the school at WMS as a food service substitute. Because she is a can-do optimistic employee, she rose quickly through the ranks to cashier to Shadeville kitchen manager and is now the District Food Service Resource Manager. When Baker was hired she brought years of food service industry experience with her from North Carolina and Germany. She attended school in Miramar, FL graduating from Miramar High School. She later attended Broward Community College earning an AA in music education and FSU where she majored in music therapy. Her love for music drove her to open her own Medart School of Music last year where she provides private music lessons. Baker shares, I love the kids. Seeing them each day and making them smile makes my day. I enjoy interacting with them and getting feedback from them regarding the food. I also enjoy cooking. As a resource manager, I have the opportunity to work in every kitchen. We have a great group of food service employees in Wakulla County. Gail Mathers, Food Service Director, shares, Ms. Baker is dependable and optimistic. These traits combined with her wealth of knowledge about food service make her an outstanding employee. While her home base is the district food service of ce, she is most often found at the school sites assisting managers, providing hands on training to personnel as well as aiding with delivery and equipment issues. Her exibility, friendly calm demeanor and ability to communicate well with people are strengths that she brings to the job. Mrs. Baker goes above and beyond to insure that the employees she works with and the students she comes in contact with have the very best. Her dedication, loyalty and commitment to the students and school system are very much appreciated. Special to The NewsFifteen band students from Wakulla Middle school performed solos at the Florida Bandmasters Solo and Ensemble Festival on February 15. All sixteen students performed very well receiving the rating of Superior or Excellent which are the two highest ratings awarded for performance at the Festival. Band director, Laura Hudson stated that the students had been practicing for several months and were very prepared. This is not a required event for students but for those who wish to go above and beyond their regular classroom music. The judges were very complimentary of our students and I was very proud of them. They are certainly a credit to our school and to their families, Hudson said. She would like to especially thank James Wilson, FAMU band intern for his assistance in preparing the students to perform at the festival. Students performing solos were Abbi McFalls, Talia Smid and Shelby Weeks on ute; Katie Hutto, Yulia Moody, Miracle Potter, Kalliope Smid and Rebecca Smith on clarinet; Nathan Cushard and Daniel Sullivan on alto saxophone; Gabrielle Boyd, Ebone Davis, and Taryn P ster on trumpet; Braxton Yates on baritone; and Zac Boone on tuba. Three of these students have also represented Wakulla Middle school for being selected by audition to perform in the District Honor Band at Chiles High School on January 25. Those students are: Yulia Moody, Daniel Sullivan and Zachary Boone. Teachers, Employee of the Month honored SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWMS band performs at Florida Bandmasters Festival Students Participate in Talquin Electric Youth TourSpecial to the NewsNineteen high school juniors from Gadsden, Leon, Liberty and Wakulla Counties were selected to participate in the Talquin Electric Youth Tour a few weeks ago at the state capitol. Students were chosen from Talquins Membership to participate in the Youth Tour based on academics, leadership, communication skills, and volunteer service in their schools and communities. Four students and four alternates were also selected from this group of outstanding student leaders to represent Talquin at the NRECA National Youth Tour in Washington, D.C. this summer. The national delegates are Brittany Fite, Godby High School; Patrick Harvey and Lydia Wiedeman, Wakulla High School; and Ryann Moore, Liberty County High School. The alternates are Heather Alvarez and Mary Eldon Greene, Wakulla High School; Edward Ellis, Godby High School; and Nickolas Bittle, East Gadsden High School. These delegates will travel to Washington, D.C. in June where they will meet with approximately 1,500 students from all over the United States. They will visit historic landmarks and continue to learn about cooperatives and government during the tour. Talquin would also like to congratulate Alexia Allen, Holli Capps, Ashley Carroll, Thomas Davis, Lauren Dunlap, Silesia Green, Nate Jackson, Morgan Kelly, and Kayla Wimberly, Wakulla High School; Leanne Duke, Godby High School; and LaRawnda Washington, East Gadsden High School, who were all selected to represent their schools in the 2014 Tallahassee Youth Tour. Front row: Alexia Allen, Ryann Moore, Silesia Green, Holli Capps, Morgan Kelly; middle row: Heather Alvarez, Nate Jackson, Lydia Wiedeman, Leanne Duke, Ashley Carroll, Lauren Dunlap; back row: Kayla Wimberly, Patrick Harvey, Mary Eldon Greene, Brittany Fite, Thomas Davis, Edward Ellis, Nickolas Bittle, LaRawnda Washington.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Susan Tillman Bill Peck Patricia Baker Save the Date!Hometown Getdownth $15 per personCall Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308 for more information or to RSVP. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304926-2200 Medicare Plans Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterNeither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent.850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsSpecial to The NewsA wrestling program for students of all ages in Wakulla County that practices on Tuesday and Thursday from 5:45 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. at Riversprings Middle School Gym starting on March 4. At these practices you will learn the basic fundamentals of wrestling and techniques that will help you in the upcoming season. As part of Team Wakulla you will practice throughout the summer and will participate in several tournaments to see your individual achievement. The practices are run by Coach Pafford (Wakulla High School Head Coach) and Coach Smith (Riversprings Middle School Head Coach). By HENRY MARINWCS Wrestling CoachWakulla Christian School will be offering the sport of wrestling for the 2014-15 school year for elementary grades (3rd 5th) and for middle school grades (6th 8th) and 9th grade. The season starts in October 2014. Until the season gets here, I highly recommend being a part of Team Wakulla, an off-season wrestling program for all ages, that starts at Riversprings Middle School on March 4. I will be at most, if not all, practices helping out. Students from Crawfordville, Medart and Riversink elementary schools can join the Wakulla Christian wrestling team. You dont have to be a student at WCS to wrestle. The WCS Wrestling Team is open to any child in Wakulla County. If you have any questions regarding the upcoming season or being part of Team Wakulla please call Henry Marin (Head Coach) at (386) 288-9442 or (850) 228-6003 or email me at coachhen55@gmail.com. By ROBERT DOUINSpecial to The NewsSeven War Eagle wrestlers traveled to Lakeland this past weekend where the team finished in 10 place out of 58 teams participating in the 1A state series. Two of the seven wrestlers that attended state made it to a podium nish. Senior James Douin nished in 5th place at 195 pounds and Senior Keith Godden nished in 4th place at 220. Competition is tough at this level and all wrestlers did well.WRESTLINGWar Eagles nish 10th at state nalsTeam Wakulla is organizing Wakulla Christian to o er wrestling PHOTOS BY ROBERT DOUIN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe War Eagle wrestling team after state nals in Lakeland. James Duoin nished fth at the nals.Keith Godden nished fourth at the nals. 000HBGR 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-7530 Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days Restaurant Restaurant Would like to thank Phillip Cooksey and the Great Crew at Kelly Sheet Metal for installing our Awesome New Cooking Line. WE LOVE IT! THANKS ALSO TOJohn and Gordon of Wakulla Gas Don and crew from Metal Building Services Heath from Anytime Electric Matt from CaptiveAir Ronnie JoynerANDThe Wakulla County Building Department for inspecting the work in a timely and most professional manner.WE DID A 7 DAY PROJECT IN 2 DAYS. WELL DONE!-MJS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 11Asports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Feb. 22, Wakulla High School track athletes joined those of seven other teams at Rickards High School for the rst annual Willie Williams Invitational Track Meet. There were numerous excellent performances by local tracksters, but the teams were led, for the boys, by Corion Knight and Bryce Cole and Haleigh Martin and Kayla Webbe for the girls. The eld events kicked off the meet and set the stage for two great performances for Knight, who was competing in his rst meet of the year after nishing basketball. Going into the meet with a preseason ranking of No. 2 in the state in class 2A in the high jump, he showed that the ranking was well deserved. He battled Kendall Randolph from Lincoln High School throughout the competition, but nally cleared a state elite height of 6 to clinch the win. While competing in the high jump, he also ran over to the long jump pit to compete. On his last jump, he leapt to a new personal best by almost two feet to win the competition with a jump of 22. Later in the meet he also ran a leg on the 2nd place 4x100 meter relay team and anchored the 4x400 meter relay team to a 6th place nish. In the middle distances, freshman Bryce Cole also had an outstanding day. He kicked the meet off with a win and new personal record (PR) of 4:50.70 in the 1600 meters (the metric equivalent of the mile) and followed with a 5th place nish in the 800 meters. Freshman Haleigh Martin set the stage for the girls by taking control of the 1600 meters early in the race and going on to win in the excellent time and new PR of 5:40.50. About an hour later, she followed that up by running another PR of 2:34.42 in the 800 meters and placing second. Senior and Palm Beach Atlantic signee Kayla Webbe also had an outstanding meet, beginning with a pivotal leg in the 4x800 meter relay which placed rst and culminating with a dominating win in the 3200 meter run in 13:11.07. Freshman Adrianna Mitchell also made her presence felt by placing 6th in the 100 meter dash in a new PR of 11.49, 3rd in the 200 meter dash, also in a new PR of 27.22 and 3rd in the long jump, with a leap of 15. Other boys who contributed to the points scored by the local team included J.P Piotrowski (3rd, 800 meters, 2:12), Alan Pearson (7th, 800 meter run, 2:16), Travis Parks (6th, 1600 meters, new PR of 5:13 & 3rd, 3200 meters, 11:49), Mitchell Atkinson (8th, 1600 meters, 5:20 & 5th, 3200 meters,12:07), Nate Jackson (8th, Discus, 103) and Tyler Westcott (6th, 3200 meters, new PR of 13:43). The boys 4x100 meter relay team (Malik Thomas, Demarcus Lindsey, Corion Knight, Kelton Donladson) stormed to a 2nd place nish in 44.20 seconds, the 4x200 relay team (Monterious Loggins, Justin Green, Tre Hester, Matt Bouyer) also placed second in 1:3.96 and the 4x400 meter relay team (Sebastion Garner, Alan Pearon, Matt Bouyer, Corion Knight) placed 6th in a season best time of 3:42.60. Others contributing points for the girls team were Lydia Wiedeman (4th, 400 meters in a new PR of 1:03.80 & anchor for the 1st place 4x800 meter relay team, Chipola College signee Marty Wiedman (3rd, 1600, 6:09.31 & lead-off leg of 4x800 relay), Connie Lewis (5th, 1600 meters, new PR of 6:15.66 & 4x800 meter relay), Shaniece Johnson (6t, long jump, 14),Shelby Alsup (4th, shotput, new PR of 30.5 & 7th, discus, 67), Allison Carr (6th, shotput, new PR of 29) and Ashley Carr (7th, shotput, new PR of 29.5 & 5th discus, also a new PR of 77). The girls also won the 4x800 meter relay (Marty Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Connie Lewis, Lydia Wiedeman) in the very solid time of 11:11. Overall, the WHS girls collected another trophy for their collection by placing second over host Rickards High School by one point, 87 to 86 points, and the boys team placed 6th overall. Both of the teams turned in solid performances, said Coach Paul Hoover. We continue to get consistent production out of our middle distance runners and Coach Gavin has done a great job with the jumpers and sprinters and the we are getting production out of our throwers, so our team balance is better than it has been for several years. Its early in the season, he said, but there are a lot of positive things going on. The rest of the season should be fun. The next competition for the local teams will be on Saturday, March 1, at the extremely competitive Jesse Forbes Meet held at Godby High School in Tallahassee, with the competition kicking off at 11 a.m. TRACKKnight, Cole, Martin and Webbe shine at Williams InvitationalBy JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netWakulla High School senior Kayla Webbe signed a scholarship to run cross country with Palm Beach Atlantic University. This is my very rst choice. Im so happy, said Webbe about the opportunity. Go sailfish! said Bobby Pearce, superintendent of schools, as he stood in the crowd that gathered in the War Eagle Cafe. Mike Smith, WHS athletic director, said of Webbe, First time I saw her I thought, Good grief, shes tall. I didnt realize then that she was an athlete. Track and cross country Coach Paul Hoover talked about the rst day of cross country practice last year, when Webbe walked toward the crowd of girls. I was standing there with some of the runners, and one of them said, She looks like one of those Chiles girls, Hoover said, referring to Webbes height and long legs. Originally from Coral Springs, Webbe transferred to WHS from Colquitt County High School in Moultrie, Ga., the summer before her junior year. One of the few regrets I have, said Hoover, is that I didnt have her all four years. The other regret is that youre gonna be so far away for me to have to drive to come see you run, he lamented. Marty and Maddie are much closer, referring to two of Webbes teammates who recently signed scholarships at schools closer to Wakulla County. Earlier in the season, Webbe had become sick with mononucleosis, which kept her out of competition throughout the beginning of the cross country season. I contacted coaches in Tallahassee, and asked around, and most said there was no way shed be able to return. They told me to just write it off, Hoover said. Only one coach had an athlete return to run after having mono. When she was able to return to practice, she had to rest a lot, Hoover said. Although knowing her, she was probably sneaking home and doing workouts I didnt know about. But she started to improve, so Hoover scrambled to get her into the regional meet. She had a personal best coming off mono, Hoover said, explaining that shed nished third on the team. Hoover spoke about Webbes impressive two year stint at WHS, her strong work ethic and her willingness to get a little silly, at times. I ask that you carry these three things with you when you go. I want you to take your work ethic and your great attitude, he said. And I want you to take Jonathan with you, he said as Webbe and her team burst into laughter. Turns out Jonathan is a golden lizard, and part of an inside joke between Hoover and Webbe, an animal lover. Each year Hoover gives out the Hoover Awards as a way to recognize individuals and their achievements. He awarded Webbe with the golden lizard as a good luck charm, stemming from an apparent prank shed played on the coach during the season. PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMKayla Webbe with family and coaches at her scholarship signing. Kayla Webbe with teammates and classmates at her signing.Kayla Webbe signs to run for Palm Beach Atlantic Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50 Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy AMANDA NALLEYFWC Guest ColumnistImagine for a minute you are out to sea, line wet, with about 150 feet of water separating boat from the bottom. You feel a tug. Instinct kicks in and you want to yank up to set the hook, but you remember that doesnt work with circle hooks, a required gear when shing for reef fish like snapper and grouper in all Gulf waters and in federal waters of the Atlantic south of 28 degrees north latitude. So you gently start reeling it in, hoping nothing eats your catch before you can get it to the boat. Alas, the sh surfaces, but it is too small to keep and it seems to be experiencing barotrauma, a condition that occurs when the gases in the swim bladder expand after being brought to the surface from depth. STOP! The choices you make from here on can greatly impact whether or not that sh you are about to release survives to be caught another day. Do you know what to do? Post-release fish survival should be important to all anglers. The more sh that survive being caught and subsequently released, the more sh there will be in general. This can eventually mean extension of open seasons, increases in bag limits and more successful fishing trips. While every situation is different, there are plenty of things you can do to help maximize the survival of fish you plan on releasing, from using wet hands when touching a fish to holding your catch horizontally. Matching your gear to the size fish you are targeting can help shorten the time it takes to get the sh to the boat, which can help a sh survive if released because it will be less exhausted. If your sh is experiencing barotrauma, time is of the essence. Barotrauma can potentially cause injury to the internal organs as they are pushed out of the body (signs of this include stomach protruding from mouth, intestines protruding from the anus, eyes bulging out and bloated belly). There are two main types of tools currently used to help relieve the effects of barotrauma. Venting tools are hollow, sharpened devices (think a syringe without the plunger) that can be used to release the expanded gases. Descending devices, which are used to send the fish back down to depth, also have promise. Until recently, it has been required to have and use venting tools when shing for reef sh in the Gulf, but this requirement was removed in federal waters last year and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission voted to remove the requirement in state waters last November. The rule change should go in effect around the end of the month. The removal of this rule will give anglers the ability to choose the best method to maximize survival of released sh. For example, on a hot summer day, using a descending device might be a better option because you are quickly returning the sh to the cooler water at the bottom. And while venting, when done correctly can help, not all sh need to be vented. Both tools have advantages and disadvantages. Hit a hot spot? It is possible to vent and release several sh in the same amount of time it would take to descend a single sh. Then again, not everyone feels con dent on when, where and how to vent. Going too deep or venting in the wrong place can cause more damage than good. But you also need to know what you are doing when using a descending device. If done incorrectly, the fish may come loose too soon. Descending devices also can require the dedication of a rod, which is used to bring the descending device down and back up again. While both devices can be homemade or purchased and while both are inexpensive, descending devices can cost, on average, slightly more than venting tools. Both devices also come in various sizes, but venting tools tend to generally be smaller than descending devices and do not take up a lot of space in an already-crowded tackle box. Either way, the choice is yours. So shop around, be sure to read the instructions thoroughly and, hopefully, take home a keeper or two. For more on how to make sure your sh survives release, visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Fish Handling.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHelping your sh survive helps youFWC proposes red snapper season Snook to reopen in Gulf state waters Pine Creek Landing boat ramp closedWhats in store for manatees? Special to The NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission proposed 2014 Gulf recreational red snapper season dates in state waters. This proposed season will be brought back before the Commission for nal approval at its April 15-17 meeting in Tallahassee. The 2014 proposed season, if approved in April, would be 52 days long, starting the Saturday before Memorial Day (May 24 this year) and remaining open through July 14, closing July 15. The Commission could choose to change the season length and dates at the April meeting. Starting the season the Saturday before Memorial Day could increase recreational shing opportunities for anglers by giving them the chance to sh for red snapper in state waters during the holiday weekend. The federal season is scheduled to be 40 days long, starting June 1 and remaining open through July 10. This season is subject to change if NOAA Fisheries data indicate that the recreational red snapper quota will be caught before or after the end of the federal season. State waters in the Gulf are from shore to 9 nautical miles. Federal waters extend from where state waters end out to about 200 nautical miles. To learn more about this agenda item, visit MyFWC.com/Commission and click on Commission Meetings. To learn more about recreational red snapper shing in the Gulf of Mexico, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Snapper.Special to The NewsThe U.S.D.A. Forest Service has temporarily closed the Pine Creek Landing boat ramp on the Apalachicola National Forest. People wishing to access the Ochlockonee River can still launch their boat at Whitehead Lake, Porter Lake, Mack Landing and Wood Lake boat ramps. Pine Creek Landing is still open to foot traf c and bank shing, but the boat ramp currently poses a safety threat to potential users due to damage caused by the owing river underneath the structure. The Forest Service took immediate action to ensure the ramp is closed until it can be repaired. For more information, contact the U.S.D.A. Forest Service Wakulla Ranger District Of ce at (850) 926-3561.By KATIE TRIPPSave the Manatee Club 2013 went down in the manatee record books as the species worst-ever year in Florida. In total, 829 deaths were confirmed of an endangered species whose last known minimum count was 4,831 in January 2014. Thats 17 percent of the known population dead in a single year. The previous record number of deaths, 766, was set in 2010 and regarded as an anomaly a rare occurrence caused by extended cold temperatures, a level of mortality not thought likely to appear again anytime soon. Until recently, weve been dealing with the usual suspects that threaten manatees: water control structures, entanglement in or ingestion of marine debris, and watercraft, with some cold stress, and mortality of very young calves mixed in. Red tide often loomed offshore of southwest Florida as a potential threat. And on the rare occasion would be the manatee that had the privilege of dying of old age a feat most in the population dont achieve due to the threats they face. In the past few years, attention has been focused on bigger, more nefarious threats that no one knows how to remedy. In the southwest, red tides are finding ample food when they blow inshore, and are persisting, killing large numbers of manatees and other marine life. For manatees, these blooms are no longer considered an unusual mortality event (UME), but an ongoing mortality event a sign of the times. On Floridas east coast, no one has a clue what in the environment killed 127 manatees, in an on-again, off-again UME, which is now on-again, already killing several manatees in 2014. Manatees, often regarded as robust for their ability to survive multiple watercraft strikes and continue to live on after losing ippers to entanglements, are no match for the strange cocktail of toxins that are plaguing their environment. So what can we do? First, we need to keep on trying to protect manatees from the usual suspects. Human-related causes of mortality remain largely preventable. In 2013, 85 fewer manatees would have died if we prevented human-related deaths. Next, we all need to work more diligently to protect the ow of our groundwater and surface waters and prevent pollutants from entering waters. One very easy thing to do is log on to www. wewantcleanwater.com and sign a petition. A coalition of Floridas environmental groups are working to send a loud and clear message to Tallahassee that we are long overdue to get serious about our states water issues. Finally, its important to realize that the next water quality crisis could be coming to your hometown. If you havent experienced such a crisis yet, count your blessings, then get on the phone to your city and county council, and your state senators and representatives, and find out what theyre doing to ensure you never do. So what can manatees expect in 2014? Thats really up to you. But one thing is for certain: they need our voices and our support now more than ever. For more information on manatees and to learn about the Clubs Adopt-A-Manatee program, go to www.savethemanatee. org or call 1-800-432JOIN (5646). Katie Tripp has been Save the Manatee Clubs Director of Science and Conservation since May of 2008. She received her Ph.D. in Veterinary Medical Sciences from the University of Florida, where she conducted research on manatee physiology. ere were record losses for the endangered species last year Special to The News The recreational harvest season for one of Floridas premier game sh, snook, reopens on March 1 in Floridas Gulf of Mexico state and adjacent federal waters, including Everglades National Park and Monroe County. The season will remain open through April 30. In the Gulf, anglers may keep one snook per day that is not less than 28 or more than 33 inches total length, which is measured from the most forward point of the head with the mouth closed to the farthest tip of the tail with the tail compressed or squeezed while the sh is lying on its side. A snook permit is required to keep snook, along with a saltwater shing license unless exempt from the license requirements. Only hook-and-line gear is allowed when targeting or harvesting snook. It is illegal to buy or sell snook. For more information visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Snook. WEEDEATER$21900SPECIAL OF THE WEEKFS56 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 13ASaturday, Feb. 22, was the Winter Meeting for Division 1. Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon and member Carolyn Treadon traveled to Milton for the event. Division 1 is one of three divisions within the 8th Coastal Region and currently has ve active Flotillas. The meeting was held at the Milton Community Center. Saturday morning was divided into several opportunities for training. Division Staff Officer for Member Training Lynn Mott held training on the life cycle for personal protective equipment such as life jackets. Participants engaged in mock scenarios and tested their knowledge. Division Staff Ofcer for Publications Ellena Rolland provided training for those involved in publications for the Auxiliary. Our Operations Training Of cer CWO3 James Todd from the DIRAUX of ce spoke on the process of material requests and the options available for the Division and Flotillas. The whole group came together again for a nal training on trailering and boat launching policies when we are going out for a safety patrol. Following a great lunch provided by otilla members, Division Commander Eric DeVuyst began the business meeting. We were joined by Commodore Larry King, Operations Training Of cer CWO3 James Todd from DIRAUX, District Captain East Mo Davis, Division Vice Commander TJ Del Bello and Division 3 Commander Jeff Davis. There is an initiative within the Auxiliary for divisions to work together to accomplish more for the promotion of recreational boating safety. Throughout the meeting, Division Staff Of cers and Flotilla Commanders discussed their progress. One common theme was repeatedly addressed recreational boating safety. OTO Todd stressed to all in attendance that the mission of the Auxiliary is to support the Coast Guard in its mission promoting recreational boating safety. All of our activities must focus on increasing awareness and promoting safety when out on the water. Several ideas were discussed to offer more opportunities for the public. The meeting concluded with several awards being presented. Four of the ve otillas in our Division (12, 14, 17 and 18) received their Silver Oar. This award signies the otilla has met the minimum goals in several program areas for the last year. Flotilla 12 and 14 also received the Betty A. Finnegan Growth Award for new membership. A very special award was presented to Lynn Mott, DO-MT for her hard work in helping to organize the District meeting in February of last year. Commodore King presented the award. Throughout the coming year, we will have many opportunities for the public to learn about safe boating. This coming weekend we will have members staf ng a booth at the Tallahassee Regional Boat Show happening at the North Florida Fairgrounds in Tallahassee. Thank you to Duane Treadon for submitting photographs. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Officer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux. net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@uscgaux. net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Safety should be your No. 1 priority! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies The Academy Pond. There is a 2.5 acre pond on the Tallahassee Community Colleges Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy property near Quincy that, from the surface, seems benign. But underwater, this karst feature is anything but friendly. I rst encountered the pond a decade ago, at the invitation of Sgt. Ken McDonnald, the Instructor for the Florida Department of Law Enforcements 40 hour Police Diving course. He had recently joined our academic group at Florida State University pursuing a re-de nition of police investigations underwater. To get rst-hand experience, he subjected us to the full FDLE underwater police course, including the Pond Experience. I know divers enter the underwater world because they want to see the many marvels contained within, but seldom do criminals dump their crime in clear water. Every window into our aquifer is a potential crime scene. Our diving police are asked to enter snagridden, zero-visibility water as a normal environmental expectation. The Academy Pond is just such a place, housing a plane, cars and a boat all strategically placed along a cave-divers line trail leading through many snares and traps along the way. Candidates are expected to not only swim the gauntlet but solve the crime. In our case there was a body located in the boat at the end of the trail. Dare I say, underwater crime scene investigators need nerves of steel to do their job! Several of my faculty were cave divers, so we were familiar with no-visibility and entanglements. As scientists we sought to investigate the anomalies reported a sinking vessel, loud voices heard somewhere in the back of the pond late at night. Many law enforcement in the past gallantly dragged on shore recovered artifacts and bodies from such conditions because it was felt nothing could be done with submerged evidence in a court of law. Not true, we argued, ngerprints and dermal tissues samples can be extracted from evidence even taken from recovered submerged artifacts. Sgt. McDonnald agreed! Would you agree to an of cer walking into a house, nding and pulling a body by the ankle and depositing it on the front lawn for the detectives to study? Of course not, but that was an accepted protocol underwater. Now fast forward a decade. I am discussing underwater courses to be offered at TCC and Florida A&M University in coming years and the Director of the Academy spoke of a problem they must soon resolve. It seems they had a close call in the Academy Pond someone got trapped in one of the obstructions and nearly drowned. They now have plans to clean up the pond and return it to its karst origins. I could not imagine how many hours and resources went into the construction of such a ne training facility, and the great loss it would represent because someone may have been lax in their safety protocols. So we will collaborate between the Wakulla Environmental Institute and the Law Enforcement Academy (both under TCC) to save the Academy Pond, use it to continue training future underwater crime scene investigators and eventually create a similar facility right here in Wakulla County. Going back to the future again. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 3.4 ft. 12:02 AM 3.6 ft. 12:57 AM 3.6 ft. 1:46 AM 3.6 ft. 2:32 AM 3.4 ft. 3:17 AM 3.1 ft. 4:00 AM 2.8 ft. 4:44 AM High -0.9 ft. 6:48 AM -0.8 ft. 7:31 AM -0.6 ft. 8:09 AM -0.3 ft. 8:44 AM 0.0 ft. 9:15 AM 0.4 ft. 9:43 AM 0.7 ft. 10:10 AM Low 3.3 ft. 1:12 PM 3.4 ft. 1:47 PM 3.5 ft. 2:20 PM 3.6 ft. 2:50 PM 3.6 ft. 3:18 PM 3.5 ft. 3:44 PM 3.4 ft. 4:09 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:53 PM 0.2 ft. 7:40 PM -0.1 ft. 8:24 PM -0.3 ft. 9:06 PM -0.4 ft. 9:48 PM -0.3 ft. 10:30 PM -0.1 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:49 AM 2.7 ft. 1:38 AM 2.7 ft. 2:24 AM 2.5 ft. 3:09 AM 2.3 ft. 3:52 AM 2.1 ft. 4:36 AM High -0.6 ft. 6:59 AM -0.6 ft. 7:42 AM -0.4 ft. 8:20 AM -0.2 ft. 8:55 AM 0.0 ft. 9:26 AM 0.3 ft. 9:54 AM 0.5 ft. 10:21 AM Low 2.5 ft. 1:04 PM 2.6 ft. 1:39 PM 2.6 ft. 2:12 PM 2.7 ft. 2:42 PM 2.7 ft. 3:10 PM 2.6 ft. 3:36 PM 2.5 ft. 4:01 PM High 0.4 ft. 7:04 PM 0.1 ft. 7:51 PM -0.1 ft. 8:35 PM -0.2 ft. 9:17 PM -0.3 ft. 9:59 PM -0.2 ft. 10:41 PM -0.1 ft. 11:27 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 12:38 AM 3.3 ft. 1:33 AM 3.4 ft. 2:22 AM 3.3 ft. 3:08 AM 3.2 ft. 3:53 AM 2.9 ft. 4:36 AM 2.6 ft. 5:20 AM High -0.8 ft. 7:52 AM -0.7 ft. 8:35 AM -0.6 ft. 9:13 AM -0.3 ft. 9:48 AM 0.0 ft. 10:19 AM 0.4 ft. 10:47 AM 0.7 ft. 11:14 AM Low 3.1 ft. 1:48 PM 3.2 ft. 2:23 PM 3.3 ft. 2:56 PM 3.3 ft. 3:26 PM 3.3 ft. 3:54 PM 3.2 ft. 4:20 PM 3.1 ft. 4:45 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:57 PM 0.1 ft. 8:44 PM -0.1 ft. 9:28 PM -0.3 ft. 10:10 PM -0.3 ft. 10:52 PM -0.3 ft. 11:34 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 2.8 ft. 12:41 AM 2.8 ft. 1:30 AM 2.8 ft. 2:16 AM 2.6 ft. 3:01 AM 2.4 ft. 3:44 AM 2.2 ft. 4:28 AM High -0.9 ft. 6:27 AM -0.8 ft. 7:10 AM -0.6 ft. 7:48 AM -0.3 ft. 8:23 AM 0.0 ft. 8:54 AM 0.4 ft. 9:22 AM 0.7 ft. 9:49 AM Low 2.6 ft. 12:56 PM 2.7 ft. 1:31 PM 2.8 ft. 2:04 PM 2.8 ft. 2:34 PM 2.8 ft. 3:02 PM 2.7 ft. 3:28 PM 2.6 ft. 3:53 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:32 PM 0.2 ft. 7:19 PM -0.1 ft. 8:03 PM -0.3 ft. 8:45 PM -0.4 ft. 9:27 PM -0.3 ft. 10:09 PM -0.1 ft. 10:55 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 3.6 ft. 12:54 AM 3.7 ft. 1:43 AM 3.7 ft. 2:29 AM 3.5 ft. 3:14 AM 3.2 ft. 3:57 AM 2.8 ft. 4:41 AM High -0.9 ft. 6:45 AM -0.9 ft. 7:28 AM -0.7 ft. 8:06 AM -0.3 ft. 8:41 AM 0.0 ft. 9:12 AM 0.4 ft. 9:40 AM 0.8 ft. 10:07 AM Low 3.4 ft. 1:09 PM 3.5 ft. 1:44 PM 3.6 ft. 2:17 PM 3.6 ft. 2:47 PM 3.6 ft. 3:15 PM 3.6 ft. 3:41 PM 3.4 ft. 4:06 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:50 PM 0.2 ft. 7:37 PM -0.1 ft. 8:21 PM -0.3 ft. 9:03 PM -0.4 ft. 9:45 PM -0.3 ft. 10:27 PM -0.1 ft. 11:13 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 12:18 AM 2.5 ft. 1:20 AM 2.5 ft. 2:17 AM 2.3 ft. 3:12 AM 2.2 ft. 4:07 AM 2.0 ft. 5:06 AM High -0.5 ft. 6:28 AM -0.3 ft. 7:09 AM -0.1 ft. 7:45 AM 0.1 ft. 8:17 AM 0.4 ft. 8:46 AM 0.6 ft. 9:12 AM 0.8 ft. 9:37 AM Low 2.0 ft. 1:53 PM 2.0 ft. 2:14 PM 2.0 ft. 2:33 PM 2.1 ft. 2:52 PM 2.2 ft. 3:12 PM 2.3 ft. 3:34 PM 2.4 ft. 4:01 PM High 0.9 ft. 6:04 PM 0.7 ft. 6:52 PM 0.4 ft. 7:38 PM 0.2 ft. 8:23 PM 0.1 ft. 9:09 PM 0.0 ft. 9:57 PM 0.0 ft. 10:52 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 27 March 5First March 8 Full March 16 Last March 24 New March 111:15 am-1:15 pm 11:43 pm-1:43 am 5:31 am-6:31 am 5:02 pm-6:02 pm 12:11 pm-2:11 pm --:-----:-6:16 am-7:16 am 6:09 pm-7:09 pm 12:39 am-2:39 am 1:06 pm-3:06 pm 7:00 am-8:00 am 7:16 pm-8:16 pm 1:32 am-3:32 am 1:55 pm-3:55 pm 7:41 am-8:41 am 8:20 pm-9:20 pm 2:25 am-4:25 am 2:51 pm-4:51 pm 8:22 am-9:22 am 9:24 pm-10:24 pm 3:17 am-5:17 am 3:42 pm-5:42 pm 9:03 am-10:03 am 10:24 pm-11:24 pm 4:08 am-6:08 am 4:33 pm-6:33 pm 9:46 am-10:46 am 11:23 pm-12:23 am Better Best Best Better Good Average Average7:05 am 6:34 pm 5:32 am 5:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:04 am 6:35 pm 6:18 am 6:10 pm 7:03 am 6:36 pm 7:01 am 7:17 pm 7:02 am 6:36 pm 7:42 am 8:21 pm 7:00 am 6:37 pm 8:23 am 9:24 pm 6:59 am 6:38 pm 9:04 am 10:25 pm 6:58 am 6:39 pm 9:46 am 11:24 pm16% 8% 0% 7% 15% 22% 29%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay Dog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDuane Treadon receiving awards for Flotilla 12.Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Sunday, Feb. 16, Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a grand theft. Deputy Scott Powell observed a suspect in a retail theft case running south from the front of the store. Off-duty Tallahassee Police Department Ofcer Travis Harts eld also saw Deputy Powell chasing a suspect and helped secure the man. A pipe used for smoking methamphetamine was allegedly discovered on the suspect and $313 worth of merchandise was recovered in the parking lot including clothing, electronics and a Blue Ray player. Shawn D. Kimmel, 34, of Boulder. Colo., and a member of the Rainbow Tribe was arrested and charged with retail theft, resisting an of cer without violence and possession of narcotics equipment. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough also investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: THURSDAY, FEB. 13 John Graham of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered unauthorized charges on his bank card. The charges were created over the Internet and totaled $1,345. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Melissa Trice of Crawfordville reported the theft of a trash barrel. The victim put her Waste Pro trash barrel out for collection and when she returned it was missing. The barrel is valued at $100. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. FRIDAY, FEB. 14 A14-year-old Wakulla Middle School student reported her cell phone as missing. Deputy Evelyn Brown determined two possible locations for the phone but it was not located. It is valued at $100. Helen Vaughn of Panacea reported the theft of a utility trailer tag. The tag was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. The tag is valued at $36. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. Raymond Hines of Crawfordville reported a structure re. Deputy Stephen Simmons arrived on scene to observe smoke coming from the front and rear doors. Wakulla Firefighters also arrived on the scene. The victims wife put food on the stove and left the residence for a short period of time. The kitchen was on re when she returned. The flames damaged the kitchen and there was signi cant smoke and water damage to other parts of the home. The re was ruled accidental and damage was estimated at more than $10,000. Sgt. Ryan Muse also investigated. Deputy Gibby Gibson was called out on a welfare check and spoke to a 21-year-old mother of a 1-year-old child. Deputy Gibson was granted permission to check on the child and when he did he observed marijuana in plain view. The mother was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Her marijuana weighed 1.9 grams. The incident was reported to the Department of Children of Families due to the presence of drugs around the child. SATURDAY, FEB. 15 Cora Hines of Sopchoppy reported the theft of motor vehicle keys from a vehicle at the Express Lane in Sopchoppy. It has not been determined who removed the keys from the vehicle. The vehicle was removed from the scene by a family member of the victim. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. During the investigation it was determined that Gillis Lee White, 53, of Sopchoppy entered the Express Lane despite having an active trespass warning at the location. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Sgt. Ryan Muse conducted a traffic stop on Highway 363 due to a vehicle tag expiration date not matching the tag sticker. During the investigation, the passenger in the vehicle allegedly would not follow the commands of Sgt. Muse. The passenger reportedly attempted to leave the vehicle and had to be brought back to the vehicle by Sgt. Muse. Aaron Michael Wiggens, 19, of Crawfordville was found to be in possession of beer. Wiggens was charged with possession of alcohol by a person under 21 years of age and disorderly intoxication. Patricia Carmichael of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of items from her rental property. The stolen property included electronics, DVDs, propane gas, doors, furniture, silverware, tools and more. The property is valued at $930. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Hellen Forehand of Tallahassee reported the theft of property from a relatives home in Crawfordville. A generator and sword, valued at $250, were removed from a shed. A person of interest was identified. Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Deputy Stephen Simmons conducted a traffic stop on Coastal Highway in Medart due to faulty equipment. Deputy Simmons reportedly smelled the strong odor of marijuana coming from inside the vehicle. Sherril Devaston Tomes, 64, of Pinetta, allegedly handed over a marijuana cigarette. The marijuana weighed .3 of a gram. He was issued a notice to appear in court. Detective Clint Beam also investigated. SUNDAY, FEB. 16 Irene Largent of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported an unauthorized withdrawal from her bank account. A Western Union transaction to Washington State for $145 was observed on the account. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported the theft of a KaZoo Stylus, valued at $15. The suspect, Robert Sean Vierkadt, 28, of Dothan, Ala., and the Florida Rainbow Tribe, was arrested for retail theft after being observed passing the last point of sale. Deputies Jeff Yarbrough and Scott Powell investigated. Cynthia Goodwin of Crawfordville reported a brush fire. The victim was attempting to burn cardboard boxes when the fire spread to a eld adjacent to her home. The re burned approximately 400 square feet of grass. There was no damage to a trailer or the residence. Wakulla Firefighters put out the blaze. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. John Harvey of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re. Deputy Gibby Gibson arrived on scene and observed a male subject attempting to put out a fire in the engine compartment with water. Deputy Gibson extinguished the blaze with his agency fire extinguisher. Wakulla Firefighters also arrived on scene and put out a re under the vehicle. The victim had reportedly poured gasoline in the carburetor in an effort to start the vehicle and it caught re. The vehicle suffered approximately $1,500 worth of damage. Melvin Harrell of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on his bank account. The charge was a $100 ATM withdrawal. Later, the victim noti ed Deputy Gibby Gibson that the withdrawal was a bank error and had been corrected. Robin Mispel of Crawfordville reported a burglary and theft. The victim noted the theft of a boat motor from his home. It was determined that someone also removed gasoline from the victims vehicle. The loss of the gasoline and boat motor together was estimated at $125. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. MONDAY, FEB. 17 Darrell Land of Crawfordville and Splash and Dash Car Wash reported a felony criminal mischief. The victim discovered parts of his car wash damaged. Some of the cleaning equipment caught on a vehicle rope inside the back of the vehicle as it was using the car wash. The motorist rapidly accelerated with the equipment stuck on the rope and damaged the cleaning machinery. Evidence was collected at the scene. Damage was estimated at $3,000. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Valerie Cathrine Bradford, 31, of Panacea was charged with disorderly conduct. A concerned citizen called law enforcement and stated that Bradford was cursing and being vulgar in public on Tully Avenue. Bradford reportedly cursed investigating deputies when they arrived and allegedly refused to calm down. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. Joey Hodges of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from his Crawfordville business. The bike was located behind Renegades of the Gulf Vape Shop and was valued at $35. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. TUESDAY, FEB. 18 A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student was issued a notice to appear in court after Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson received information about drugs on campus. A smoking pipe was allegedly found in the students book bag and the student will be required to appear in court for possession of drug paraphernalia. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 James Card of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle decal. Someone attempted to pull the decal off the tag while the victim was at WalMart. Part of the decal remained on the tag. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Betty Johnson of Panacea reported nding an abandoned bicycle while walking in her community. The bicycle belongs to a child and is valued at $100. The bike was turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Sherry Waites of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported that someone used her Social Security number to apply for unemployment bene ts. The victim led a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. Sgt. Ray Johnson recommended she contact the three credit bureaus to see if any other fraud activity has occurred. Norman Barwick of Panacea reported the theft of gasoline and two gas cans from his boat. The gas cans and gasoline taken has been valued at $110. A person of interest was identi ed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Billy Whit eld of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. An unauthorized charge was observed on the victims bank account. The charge was valued at $180 from an establishment in San Benito, Texas. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student received a civil citation after WHS Dean Susan Tillman received information that he possessed drugs. A marijuana pipe and partially burned marijuana cigarette were allegedly found in the students pocket. The civil citation was issued for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. The marijuana weighed .1 of a gram. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Shelbi Davis of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported that someone was using her Social Security number. The victim also reported the incident to the Social Security of ce. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. THURSDAY, FEB. 20 William Smith of Ben Withers Construction in Panacea reported a business burglary. The victim observed storage sheds that were open and $10,775 worth of tools missing. A forced entry was observed. Deputy Mike Zimba, Lt. Brent Sanders and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Cliffton Bass of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A firearm and holster were removed from the vehicle. The vehicle was left unsecured and the stolen property is valued at $400. The rearm was entered in the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Scott Powell and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. Tammy Hornbaker of Crawfordville reported the theft of mail from her mailbox. The victim contacted the Crawfordville Post of ce. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,067 calls for service during the past week including 13 business and residential alarms; 12 assists to other agencies; 62 citizen contacts; 18 E-911 abandoned cells calls; seven E-911 abandoned calls; 21 E-911 calls; 40 investigations; 41 medical emergencies; 29 school security checks; 375 business and residential security checks; 12 sex offender address veri cation checks; 28 special details; 14 suspicious vehicles; 51 traf c enforcements; 107 traf c stops; and 20 wanted people. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 15ABeing versatile has many advantages. The entity with this trait has an adaptable existence where one purpose supersedes another and there are competing demands for its goods, services or products. There can be, however, too much of any good thing including the excessive demands of the marketplace. This extreme condition has the potential to raise prices and exhaust a resource. This is the story of Floridas longleaf pine (Pinus palustris), sometimes known as a pitch pine or the turpentine pine. The native of Wakulla County and the Big Bend region grew wild for eons before the rapid population expansion of the 19th century. When Florida became a state in 1845 the longleaf pine was already known for its useful properties. When sawed it provided a dense, high grade lumber with excellent properties for framing and ooring. Its durable qualities and honey color made it a popular and frequently requested building material. Resistance to insects, especially termites, assured its place in many construction projects which were expected to last for decades if not centuries. Floridas position as a cargo transportation hub also place demands on the species. The longleaf pine produced strategically important naval stores, turpentine and resins. Both products were critically important assets for ship building and repair. Wooden sailing vessels of the day were the quickest and most ef cient method for reaching distant markets with raw and manufactured goods. The agriculture based economy of Floridas Big Bend region was especially dependent upon shipping from the Port of Apalachicola, once a major point of departure. Cotton, the top cash crop and foreign trade commodity, shipped to American and English textile mills. Turpentine was used as the basis for many wood preserving treatments which resisted the harsh environment created by seawater, extreme exposure to the sun and other elements. Without this protective barrier, shipsdeteriorated quicker and were less pro table. The resins or pitch were a component for sealing areas between planks and timbers. Materials which were composed of natural fibers were pounded between the board constructing the ships hull, and the resins were used to extend the life of the caulking bers. Initially considered an endless resource, time and demand took its toll on the thousands of longleaf pine acres. By the turn of the 20th Century, the longleaf pine numbers had been severely reduced. As shipping technology and methods advanced, the demand for turpentine was reduced. Changes in construction methods and the development of synthetic preservatives reduced needs further. The advent of tree farming did not return longleaf pines to their former prominence. Faster growing loblolly and slash pines replaced the much slower growing longleaf pines. With research there has been a recognition of the environmental importance of longleaf pine forest. Gopher tortoises and red cockaded woodpeckers are especially dependent on the surroundings created by these trees which may reach 100 feet in height. Federal and state authorities have established programs to encourage the planting of these trees. Land managers can currently access seedling for mass planting from several sources in North Florida. To learn more about the long leaf pine in Wakulla County, visit your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Ofce at 84 Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.The versatile longleaf pine lost its prominence Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLong leaf pine have an appearance distinct and different from other pines found in Wakulla County. The BUZZ T T T h h h e h h T T T h T T T T T h h Its ALL G REEN L IVING E XPO! Saturday, April 26

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Kevin Vaughn, President WAKULLA INSURANCE AGENCY WERE ALL ABOUT YOU!Wakulla Insurance Agency, a division of Rogers, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance, is your team of risk reduction advisors. We provide comprehensive insurance solutions and serve as part of the WellU ACAdemy bringing together experts in health care, business and insurance to help individuals and businesses navigate the changing health care landscape and make sound, condent health care decisions. Schedule your free WellU session today at WellU@rgvi.com or call 850.926.7900. RGVI.com facebook.com/RogersGunterVaughnInsurance @RGVI 2190 Crawfordville Hwy. Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014One of the most difcult areas of being Director of the Wakulla Senior Citizens Council is to come in on Monday morning and learn of the passing of one of our senior citizens who was an employee, a volunteer, and nally, a home delivered and congregate meal client. But for most team members, she was more than that she was our friend. I want to honor Ms. Tessies life. This past weekend while at home, I was informed that Ms. Tessie Miller passed away. Ms. Tessie would greet me on her arrival with a hug and would always say, Hey baby, you are a good man and Im just an old woman. She would hug me and it wasnt a lean-into type of hug, it wasnt an approach from the side and an arm wrap around the back and connection at the hip Ms. Tessie hugged me like my mama hugged me: she pulled me and did so with other of the team members here at the center. She held us close and compassionately and lovingly hugged us and gave us words of encouragement. At one time, Ms. Tessie worked for the center in the kitchen and prepared food and packed lunches and prepared meals for deliveries and cleaned the kitchens surfaces as needed. She loved children and cared for children in our Before-and-After School program. Of late, she would come into my of ce and sit a spell wanting to know if there was any work for her to do now. I would take her in to Ms. Vicki McKenzies of ce and ask if there was anything Ms. Tessie could do as she was in a mind to work here at the center. We have a purple dusting wand and Ms. Tessie would go to dusting everything in sight: slowly, methodically, and deliberately she cleaned as if it were her own home. Once finished with the cycle of dusting and cleaning, she quietly returned to her place of beginning and repeated the process. She worked until lunch, then proceeded to the dining room and was served a hot, nutritious meal. She believed in earning her way her whole life. Ms. Tessies health was deteriorating and I could see it over the period of the past year. She was in and out of the hospital and the nursing home. I visited her and took her a ower and a hat (she loved hats and the ladies here at the center got her a brand new one). Her mind had been slipping as Alzheimers was beginning to advance and she began gradually slipping away during the course of the last year. Her family was always there and by her side and while it wasnt easy for them, they By SHERYL SMYTHE Of the Senior CenterThis January has been very cold, but our Seniors have stayed warm in the center with great food, activities and fun events. We had a Senior Class Reunion Party, crowned our Queen, and announced our Volunteer of the year. We had a lot of fun in our daily routine here at the center. Our Volunteer of the Year for 2014 is Harriet Rich, President of Advisory Council for the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida Inc. She is also a dancer with Wakulla Wigglers Dance Group. She volunteers her time serving meals at the various banquets held at the center and to our senior citizens at lunch time. She teaches a line dancing class on Monday and Wednesday. She is a talented watercolor artist and is always involved in all of the activities here at the center. She is a wonderful volunteer always willing to help out with any need here at the Center with a beautiful smile. We appreciate her so much! Juanita Jester was crowned our Queen for 2014 by last years queen Agatha Williams. She is very excited to participate in all of the local parades and the many events where the senior center is represented. Juanita has been coming to the center for years and can be found here just about every day having lunch and enjoying all the activities. She is a beautiful person inside and out and is a wonderful queen for the Senior Center. The Senior Center holds many fundraisers to bring in extra funds to support the needs of our Senior Citizens. One of the fundraisers was a raf e for 24 karat gold-plated Wakulla Winchester model 94AE .45-caliber, Long Colt ri e. The rifle was donated by Steve Brown. He and his wife are very loyal supporters of the Senior Center. The winner of the raf e was Mike Eakin, congratulations! The Senior Center made $5,400 to help with our Meals on Wheels program, this fundraiser was such a wonderful success. Thanks to everyone involved. We had lots of arts and craft classes but one sticks out because we were able to get a well known artist, Nancy Jefferson of the LeMoyne Center of Visual Arts, to teach a pottery class inspiring great pieces of art made by many of our seniors. We sure appreciate each time she volunteers and teaches a class here at the Center. We are looking forward to February here at the Senior Center and have lots of heartfelt events lined up for the month of Valentines. Please come and join us. Activities happening now in February are: Income Tax preparation by AARP volunteers every Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Please note that they will be coming thru April 15. FSU Nursing Students will be here to check blood pressures on the second and third Wednesday of the month from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. We will hold a Drumming Circle on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 10:30 a.m. with Kent Hutchinson. We hope to see you there! Senior Center wish list is dog and cat food, silk owers, wide wire ribbon. Thank you in advance if you can help supply these needs to the Senior Center. Please come and visit our center. We are open weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. We serve lunch daily at noon but you can always come earlier and enjoy our activities. Our food pantry supplied by Farm Share and Second Harvest is open for pick up on Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. If you are a senior who is 60 or older and are home bound and would like to make an appointment with our Meals on Wheels program, you may call Pat or Angel at 926-7145 ext 223. Turn to Page 3BHonoring the memory of Tessie Miller THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director Turn to Page 3B PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Senior Class Reunion Party at the Senior Center. Senior Center Director Maurice Langston with 2014 Queen Juanita Jester and Volunteer of the Year Harriet Rich and her husband.January was cold, but seniors were busy with activities at the Senior Center 1.75LSOBIESKIVODKA $ 17 99Prices Good Through February850926-32121.75LJIM BEAM $ 22 99 $ $ 1.75LSEGRAMS VO $ 21 99 S $ $ BUD OR BUD LIGHT24PKBOTT LES OR CAN SBOTTLES OR CANS 24 C AN S 24 P K B OTT L E S OR C AN S $ 19 991.75L GIFTCAPTAIN MORGAN W/2 LTR $ 22 99 9 9 C C M M M M $ $ $ $ MICHELOB PRODUCTS12PK B O $ 12 99 NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. 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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Feb. 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Feb. 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Saturday, March 1 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, or email skpsky2000@comcast. net Sunday, March 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, March 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, March 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post at 475 Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. Wednesday, March 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.Special EventsThursday, Feb. 27 WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will host Patrick Smiths Florida is A Land Remembered at 7 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Chuch, 176 Ochlockonee St. The presentation will be made by Rick Smith (in photo above), son of the author, Patrick D. Smith. Tickets are $10 donation an be purchased at www.shop.wakullahistory.com or by calling Carolyn W. Harvey at 524-5334. BIG BEND HOSPICE HOMETOWN GETDOWN will be held at The Hudson House, from 6 p.m. 9 p.m. $15 per person. Live Music by Deja Blu, Bon res, Food and fashion show. Call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 for more information. TIP A COP FUNDRAISER to bene t Wakulla Special Olympics, will be held from 4 p.m. 8 p.m. at Beef OBradys, Crawfordville. Friday, Feb. 28 NAMI WAKULLA will host a spaghetti dinner and silent auction at 4 p.m. 8 p.m. at the Wakulla Womens Club, 64 Ochlockonee St. (Take-out available.) Featuring Spaghetti, salad, bread and desserts. $8 adults and $4 for children. Early bird tickets call 926-1033. GIRLS NITE OUT, a fundraiser for Wakullas 2014 Relay for Life Campaign will be held from 4 p.m. 7 p.m. at Body Tek 24 Hour Fitness, 56 Rainbow Dr. The public is invited to attend an evening of wine, cheese, pampering and information from local providers of services for health and well-being of women. Saturday, March 1 APALACHICOLA NATIONAL FOREST CLEANUP. Starts at 8 a.m. Volunteers should meet at Forest Road 13 Dip Pond. Immediately following the cleanup there will be a volunteer luncheon hosted by KWCB for all participants at Hickory Park, behind Sonic. Contact JoAnn Palmer at 745-7111 or helpkwcb@gmail.com for information. Thursday, March 6 WHS Dramatis Personae will hold their spring production, The Clumsy Custard Horror Show & Ice Cream Clone Review, at WHS Auditorium. Evening performances will run Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., with a Sunday Matinee at 2:30 p.m. Doors open thirty minutes prior to curtain where tickets can be purchased. The cost for students is $4, Senior Citizens $5, and for Adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission.Upcoming Events Saturday, March 8 JESUS RIVER FESTIVAL a celebration of Christian music and fellowship, will be held at Myron B. Hodge City Park from noon dark. For more information call 962-4132 or go to jesusriverfest.weebly.com 8th Annual Mardi Gras Ball at St. Elizabeth Ann Setons Catholic Church, 3609 Coastal Highway will be held 7 p.m. midnight. Tickets are $20 per person, dinner included. Costumes are encouraged. Tickets can be purchased by calling 926-9750. Babysitting may be available. Call for details. Saturday, March 22 HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY starts at 9 a.m. Wakulla County Public Works, ESG Operations, Inc., 340 Trice Lane, Crawfordville. FARM SHARE will distribute free food to residents of Wakulla County at Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Rd from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Call 284-4637 or email Dawn@farmshare.org for more information. There will be several organizations providing health screenings and giving away other information. Saturday, March 29 LIFEWALK 2014, sponsored by The Wakulla Pregnancy Center, will begin at 9 a.m. at Wakulla Station Trailhead Park. For more information, call Angie Holshouser at 241-6797. Saturday, April 5 4TH ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL, a fundraiser for the Wakulla County Chamber, will be held at the 3Y Ranch, www.3yranch.com, from 6 p.m. 10 p.m. Live music by Locomotive, food, dancing. $40 per person. Tickets available by calling 926-1848. Feb 27 March 6 Government MeetingsMonday, March 3 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 6 p.m. TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center. This is a planning session for the TDC Administrative committee. Thursday, March 6 WAKULLA COUNTY CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION will hold a Public Meeting on at 5:30p.m., at the Wakulla County Public Library. Monday, March 10 WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. at the commission chambers regarding an application for Shell Point Preliminary Plat. WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Meeting will be held at 5:45 p.m., School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville. CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, regarding an amendment to its Land Development Code. Thursday, March 13 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center. While making some room on our DVD shelves behind the front desk last week, it was discovered that over 70 DVDs that cost us over $1000 are more than 90 days overdue. (See photo below.) This includes recently released DVDs for which there is high demand. While we all at WCPL know that public libraries have to expect some overdues and lost items, the sheer amount of materials missing from our collection is beginning to become overwhelming. Patrons with overdue items can put them in our drop box outside and we can work with you on the fines later. To replace all the items which we consider long overdue would cost over $90,000. Thats 3 YEARS of our books and materials budget. If you have any of our items laying around your house to please bring them back so everyone gets the same enjoyment out of what we try to provide as you do.Unshelved comes to WCPLGene Ambaum and Bill Barnes, the folks behind the Unshelved comic strip will be doing a program here as part of our annual staff day on Monday, March 3 at 10 a.m. Unshelved is a strip based in a library which is always good for a daily laugh. WCPL won a hand drawn strip based upon a story we submitted last spring at the Florida Libraries Association conference and we along with the Panhandle Libraries Access Network, and Wilderness Coast Public Libraries used that as a spring board to bring the guys across the country to our neck of the woods. This high energy humorous program is free and open to the public so we encourage anyone who enjoys a good laugh to come by and see these talented fellows.Remember our programs at Community CenterOur March cycle of Community Center programs start Thursday March 6 we will be holding our K-2 programs at the One Stop Community Center the 1st Thursday of the month at 4. 3rd-5th grade programs will be on the second Thursday, and the middle school program will be the 3rd Thursday, all at 4:00. We encourage all to not only come to our programs but come see all that the community center has to offer the citizens of Wakulla County. It needs your help and participation to grow into the active community center that this county deserves. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary Director Library News... Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Big Bend Hospice Hometown GetdownThe Hudson House 6 p.m. 9 p.m.Girls Nite Out FundraiserBody Tek 24 Hr Fitness 4 p.m.7 p.m.KWCBs National Forest Cleanup Meet at Forest Road 13 at 8 a.m.Wakulla County Commission Meeting begins at 6 p.m. in boardroom.Thursday FridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 3BFrom Page 1B cared for her in a way that seemed to look so easy. As I sit in my of ce on this foggy morning, my mind is a bit foggy too as I think about the love and laughter she shared with us. She always sported a beautiful hat and was beautifully dressed to come to the center in appropriate church attire. She was a radiantly beautiful lady and her smile brightened the center and the lives of all of us at the center. Her smile was infectious! There is a verse in the Bible in the book of Leviticus that calls for respect and honor for those who are older. It says, Rise in the presence of the aged. I pause a moment from my writing right now and will do just that. While I cannot rise in her literal presence any longer (though I always did), I rise and whisper a prayer of thanksgiving for the presence of her love and in uence. I dont think it would be inappropriate if you stopped reading long enough to pause and rise honoring the life of a good and godly lady. I want to honor Ms. Tessies faith. Church was a big part of Ms. Tessies life and she often spoke of her regular church attendance. As I read this little verse tucked into the chapter it appeared near out of place. But then I saw the rest of the verse and it said, Rise in respect for our elders and reverence for our Creator. I am the Lord. It was almost as if the little verse was saying you cannot honor a person who is aged without honoring God. That was exactly what it was saying because in doing so, it just goes hand-in-hand with the other. I read another couple of passages from my favorite book. Proverbs says, Gray hair is a crown of splendor; it is attained by a righteous life (Prov. 16:31). The glory of young men is their strength, gray hair the splendor of the old (Prov 20:29). Ms. Tessie was a beautiful lady and, as I said, always looked splendid. At times, though, she would come in to the center and have a down in the dumps day. We all have them. I woke up this morning looking and feeling like the picture of the guy on my drivers license. Well, we did our best to help cheer her up and it would not be long until her countenance was lled with laughter and joy. I stand in awe of the things she saw in her lifetime. She survived the nations wars, depressions and other changes that only a few can imagine. She lived in a time that went from Model Ts to Space Shuttles, from no phones, to party lines to smart phones. She lived in the BC era Before Computers. She came from an era of radios, and at rst, no television and certainly no remotes. She could remember life before electricity and indoor plumbing. The only running water she was once familiar with is what ran out of the bucket that she carried from the pitcher pump into the house. Ms. Tessies era and environment was lled with lead paint and leaded gasoline operating old cars without airbags and seatbelts. She grew up when prayer and paddlings were common in the schools. She worked hard in her family, and then to raise her own family she worked even harder. She lived and loved and sacri ced for the next generation of which I am a grateful part. We owe her much. Truly the Scripture is right when it tells us to Rise in the presence of the aged, show respect for the elderly... Truly gray is my favorite color! I want to honor Ms. Tessies hope and optimism: She came through a lot of dif culties in her lifetime. However, she always knew that during the toughest times, God is always greater. When others turned sour, Ms. Tessie became sweeter. Why? Because God never let her down in the past and she was sure that He would never let her down in the future. A number of times she said to me; Baby, God is good all the time. She didnt dote or dwell on her physical dif culties, though she had many. She could have stayed at home, laid in the bed and felt sorry for herself for the parts of her body that didnt work or work well any longer. However, she decided, she chose, to get out of bed every day and use the parts of her body that still remained in good working condition. Maybe more of us should do the same. Did I mention that gray is our favorite color at the center? Seniors, let me close with a special appeal directed especially to you. No matter what you may be tempted to think, God isnt nished with you yet. Your sons and daughters and grandchildren still need a thing or two from you. The rest of the folks in this county are still depending on you. We still need the same things you have always given us. We need your perseverance. We need you to encourage us to persevere. We need you to keep reminding us that we can do all things through Him who strengthens us. We still need your faith. You dont know how much it meant for me to hear from Ms. Tessie; Baby, God is still faithful. Your faith tells us that the life of faith is worth the effort and for us to keep on keeping on. I honor Ms. Tessies example: She was not able to do everything she once did. But we felt she deserved a rest. She reminded the girls in the of ce that they needed to come along and pick up the slack. She was an encourager, Yall are doing a good work was her statement on numerous occasions. It was Ms. Tessies way of giving us a pat on the back. What we needed most was her warm embrace! The greatest gift she gave us was the gift of herself and she never hesitated to make the offer. She would tell us, I am proud of you! And she didnt whisper it either. Ms. Tessie let the halls of the senior center ring with words of encouragement. I honor her labors, but in closing, I honor her rest with the One who loves her more than we all did. Seniors, we still need your example, we still need you. We know that you may not be able to do everything that you once did. A lot of you have earned a rest. So for those who cant do, rest. But for those of you who can do, do. It is your perseverance, your faith, and your example of hope and encouragement that we honor. If you can help us enable the next generation and the one after that to someday say, even if they dont know it right now, Gray is my favorite color then all will be well in this county and in this country. T.W. Maurice Langston is the director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Honoring the memory of Tessie MillerDue to lack of participation and low enrollment numbers, the Wakulla Senior Center Child Summer Program will be canceled. If you have any questions please call Ms. Debbie VanHorn at 9267145 Ext. 222 or Ms. Shelly Homan at 926-7145 Ext. 221. This Summer Program will be revisited in the future if more interest is shown, said Maurice Langston, Executive Director, Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Wakulla Senior Centers Child Summer Program Canceled From Page 1B Also you can stop by and pick up a calendar of events and join in the fun. All donations are tax deductible and go to our Meals on Wheels, and other senior programs provided through the center. There are many more activities that go on here at the center, so stop by and pick up a calendar of events. You can also nd us on Facebook at this link https://www. facebook.com/WakullaSeniorCenter, or go to your Facebook page and type in Wakulla Senior Center in the search box. Click on the like button and you will get all our post and keep up with what is going on here. Any questions please call the center at 9267145 ext. 221. You can also pick up a brochure on all the other services that are provided through the Wakulla Senior Center.January was cold, etc.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Home stretch of pre-session meetings By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 21 Before lawmakers returned to their districts for the last week before the 2014 legislative session begins, they capped off a week of discussions about living arrangements and homecomings. A rule outlining how to gure out where a legislator resides began moving through both chambers. The House tried to prod the Senate into acting on a measure giving in-state tuition to students who live in the state illegally. And Florida State University President Eric Barrons appointment at Penn State University became of cial, marking Barrons departure from one home only to return to another. Meanwhile, the prospect of overhauling the states retirement plan seemed to settle into its usual Senate neighborhood among the bills which have longer odds of passing. And the State Board of Education was strayed into hostile territory in dealing with the ery objections of activists angry about Floridas plans to move forward with education guidelines resembling the Common Core standards. RELUCTANT ON RETIREMENT When Senate Community Affairs Chairman Wilton Simpson, R-Trilby, unveiled an overhaul to the Florida Retirement System that would largely exempt law enforcement of cers and emergency workers, it was seen as a gesture to a bloc of mavericks who torpedoed a more expansive revamp of the pension plan last year. Instead, the rst of those mavericks to cast a vote on the measure in a Senate panel voted against it. Ive got more convincing to do, Simpson said after Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, opposed the bill Tuesday. Latvala, one of the leaders of last years opposition to pension changes, teamed up with the Democrats to nearly defeat the bill (SB 1114), which the committee approved with a 5-4 vote. This years Senate proposal would close the Florida Retirement Systems traditional pension plan to new employees after July 1, 2015, though those employees already in the system would remain. New hires would be required to choose between a 401(k)-style investment plan and a cash balance plan, which in some ways acts like a 401(k) but guarantees a minimum bene t. Law enforcement officers and emergency personnel who qualify for the special risk category could still sign up for the traditional pension plan. But Latvala suggested that some law-enforcement personnel arent classi ed as special risk, and he questioned moving forward with the bill before an accounting review of the proposal was nished. I really am taken aback by how you would want us to start voting on a bill where although you may understand, and you may believe in your heart, and I know you believe in your heart that this is the right thing for our future when we dont have any numbers, any actuarial study to show us that, Latvala said. DIVIDING LINE Since taking over their respective chambers in late 2012, Weatherford and Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, have gone out of their way to work together. The buddy act was one of the foundations of last years relatively peaceful legislative session, at least when it came to House-Senate relations. But, Gaetz said half-jokingly during an interview with The News Service of Florida on Friday, the two have nally found an issue on which they disagree: Allowing some undocumented students to avoid paying out-ofstate tuition rates. The bill (HB 851), strongly backed by Weatherford, won approval Wednesday from a House subcommittee. But prospects for the measure in the Senate are uncertain at best --though it seemed Friday that Gaetz was opening the door to the idea that the bill could pass. Somebody who favors providing in-state tuition to the children of undocumented, or if you wish, illegals, did a vote count and came in and talked with me about it and they said theres 18 votes to pass what the speaker is proposing. And thats before the debate even starts. I think well have a divided Senate in this issue, Gaetz said. Latvala is expected to roll out a proposal that would allow students who have attended at least three years of high school in Florida to pay cheaper, instate tuition, similar to the measure that received unanimous support in a House subcommittee this week. Latvala said he plans to release the details of his plan Wednesday at a press conference in Clearwater. HOME AWAY FROM HOME The in-state tuition rate might have had something to do with one of the high-pro le departures from Florida government this week: FSU President Eric Barron, whose hiring by Penn State became of cial during a meeting in State College, Pa., on Monday. Barron, who spent 20 years as a faculty member and administrator at Penn State beginning in 1986, is leaving Tallahassee four years after becoming president at FSU, his alma mater. In many ways I never left Penn State, said Barron, wearing a light blue shirt and dark blue tie after being introduced at a board meeting called to vote on his appointment. Pointing to his heart and then his head, Barron added: Penn State lives here, Penn State lives here, and its a great pleasure to be about to live here. Florida States board of trustees met a couple of days later to begin the process of replacing its former president, who at times seemed frustrated with Scotts efforts to hold down college tuition. The trustees want a replica of their last president to take over now. IM GOING TO MAKE THIS PLACE YOUR HOME One place that seems to be headed for easy passage is a joint House-Senate rule that would set residency standards for lawmakers, expected to be one of the first measures to pass the Legislature when the session begins March 4. The Senate Rules Committee unanimously passed the bill Wednesday after a brief discussion. The House Rules and Calendar Committee followed up Thursday in a meeting that lasted less than 10 minutes. Both chambers hope to approve the proposal on the rst day of the session and try to put the smoldering issue to rest. Latvala, whose advocacy on the issue has prompted suspicions that Senate politics are at play, is rmly on board with the new measure. I think that this will go a long way in giving some guidance to members of the Legislature on how theyre supposed to conduct themselves and where theyre supposed to live and how to determine where their real residence is, for anybody that has a hard time guring that out, he said. Anybody could very well refer to Sen. Maria Sachs, DDelray Beach, one of Latvalas top targets in his campaign to make sure lawmakers live in their districts. In the 2012 elections, Sachs defeated one of Latvalas supporters in his race for the Senate presidency. Latvala has since publicly accused Sachs of living outside her district. Sachs strenuously denies those charges and says her residency has been established by state reviews. COMMOTION CORE Away from the Capitol, the normally sedate meeting of the State Board of Education turned into a rowdy protest of the Common Core State Standards just as the panel voted to tweak, but not trash, the benchmarks for student learning. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart has argued that the changes, which include reinserting creative writing into the standards and explicitly including calculus guidelines as well as the fact that the state has science and social studies standards that arent part of the Common Core justify renaming the initiative as the Florida Standards. But largely conservative activists who have fought to get the state to drop the entire common core initiative seemed unmoved. They see the plan as a federal plot to take over education and blame it for a variety of ills. I do not want a watereddown, world-class system; I want a school system that promotes American exceptionalism, said Chris Quackenbush, a leader of the anti-Common Core movement. At one point, Quackenbush and board chairman Gary Chartrand clashed over an attempt to stop audience members from clapping during the meeting. For a while, the crowd seemed to go along, waving their hands and at least one American ag instead of applauding. Most lawmakers and Scott seem willing to try to leave the entire issue behind for now. Whether they can in the face of dogged opposition during an election year remains to be seen. STORY OF THE WEEK: Florida State University President Eric Barron is hired by Penn State University, prompting a search for his replacement. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: There is an emergent psychological pandemic taking place among children in Florida. Its called Common Core, or it used to be until it was rebranded. Our children are suffering from anxiety attacks, vomiting, emotional outbursts, headaches and even self-mutilation. Stacie Clark, a critic of Common Core, at a meeting of the State Board of Education. WHITES WINESAmericas unquenchable taste for wine, exploringBy DAVID WHITEThe wine world is a big, fabulously diverse place, and arguably the greatest pleasure that oenophilia offers is the pleasure of discovery -of nding new grapes, regions, and wines. These words appear in The Wine Savant, a new book from Michael Steinberger, the former wine writer for Slate and a current columnist for Mens Journal. Hes right. The pleasure of discovery is what drives wine enthusiasts. Those of us who obsess over wine arent just looking for something tasty; were looking for an experience. This concept is rmly taking root in Americas wine culture. And it belies the notion that Americans are intimidated by wine. Books with titles like Wine For Dummies and Great Wine Made Simple line bookstore shelves. The media perpetuates this assumption, eagerly reporting on every study that proves oenophiles are full of baloney. But the numbers tell a different story. New data from the Wine Market Council, an independent, nonprofit trade group, show that Americans are increasingly comfortable with wine. And were thirstier than ever before. Last year, the nation consumed 297 million cases of wine, a 27-percent increase from just ten years ago. From the upscale wine bar to their local 7-11, consumers can now purchase wine from more than 522,000 different outlets. Across consumer goods with more than $1 billion in annual sales, only wine, coffee, and snacks have experienced consistent growth over each of last ve years, in both dollars and volume. For more evidence of Americas wine confidence, look no further than your closest grocery store. Thirty years ago, the local market sold little more than jug wine like Gallos Hearty Burgundy -if wine was even stocked. Today, the average upscale supermarket carries 1,500 wine selections or more. The number of breakfast cereals pales in comparison. Specialty wine shops also illustrate how the wine market is changing. Across the country, boutique retailers are lling their shelves with interesting, small-production wines -and helping consumers learn. More and more wine bars are also sprouting up, providing opportunities for people to explore. High-end restaurants have responded to the nations self-confident wine culture by changing their approach entirely. Whereas sommeliers were once glori ed sales agents who intimidated guests by pushing expensive, predictable wines, todays sommeliers are wine educators, eager to share their passion and palates. The nation has clearly embraced wine. The United States is still a nation of beer drinkers, of course. Of every dollar spent on alcohol, 49 cents goes toward beer. But wine is catching up. In 2002, six in 10 alcoholic beverages consumed were beers. Today, its one in two. Unsurprisingly, a recent Gallup survey found that Americans are equally divided between beer and wine when asked which they drink most often. Even though Baby Boomers spend the most money on wine, millennials are driving the market. This generation of consumers those between 20 and 37 already makes up 30 percent of drinkers. And its participation is having a profound impact, as millennials take great pleasure in discovery. In fact, the Nielsen survey asked consumers to react to the following statement: I love to keep ahead of whats happening. I love trying new things. I often tell others about them. And more than any other generation, millennials agreed. Its no wonder that millennials frequently purchase wine over $20 per bottle and are more willing than Boomers to purchase imported wine. Todays wine drinkers are an adventurous bunch, con dent in their own palates and willing to explore the unknown. As the purchasing power of millennials increases, more and more Americans will pursue the pleasure of discovery.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 5B Able Advertisements Angry Ants Award Bangs Cats Claw Complement Cycle Deaf DiedDisappointmentDown Drew Drip Duck Earn Ears East Else Ends Estate Faced Fast Fearful Five Floats Foam Gift Glad Hats Here Idea Invaded Israel June Kids Lids Lime Maid Mess Misery Nest Note Others Pace Pain Pear Peep Penny Pioneer Raised Rate Reds Reeds Rest Rows Sandy Side Sign Snap Stamps Talk Thank Tire Very Wasnt Wine Writing The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comSWINE SHOW Grand Champion Class Winners Barbecue dinners Reserve ChampionCole Gowdy shakes hands with a representative from Grand Champion sponsor Publix with the 265-pound winner. Cole Gowdy shakes hands with a representative from Reserve Champion sponsor Centennial Bank and the 275-pound winner.2014 WinnersGrand Champion -Cole Gowdy Reserve Champion Cole Gowdy Class Winners Class #1 (190-229 lbs) Michael Jarmon Class #2 (230-245 lbs) Bethany omas Class #3 (248-265 lbs) Cole Gowdy Class #4 (270-295 lbs) Cole Gowdy Class #5 (297-309 lbs) Oliver Green Class #6 (320-350 lbs) Anna Green Showmanship Winners Ages 15 & older Kristin Chew Ages 13 & 14 Rainey Vause Ages 11 & 12 Oliver Green Ages 9 & 10 Gracie Lawhon Ages 6, 7 & 8 Anna Green Presidents Excellence Award Oliver Green Spirit Award Riley Davis Herdsman Award Chase Roberts Swine Project winners 6-8 years old 1st Justin Barnidge, 2nd Anna Green, 3rd Chase Linville, 4th Carter Christensen 9-10 years old 1st Dawson Vause 11-12 years old 1st Oliver Green, 2nd Caitlynn Linville, 3rd Spencer Christensen 15 years & older Kristin Chew Judging Contest Junior High Individual 1st Justin Barnidge, 2nd Carter Christensen, 3rd Isaac Pollard Junior High Team 1st Mason Jarmon, Kane Tucker, Kanoa Tucker, and Landon Owens; 2nd Brayden Lawhon, Parker Lawhon, Maverick Stubbs and Riley Davis; 3rd Emma Vaughn and Olivia Vaughn. Intermediate High Individual 1st Spencer Christensen, 2nd Michael Jarmon Intermediate High Team 1st Lincoln Porter and Landon Turner; 2nd Jonah Lawhon, Oliver Green, and Chase Roberts; 3rd Anna Green, Lochlyn Vause, and Bethany omas. Senior High Individual 1st Kristin Chew, 2nd Nicole Smith and Kerri Sanders. 2nd Annual Swine Show Barbecue Cooko Winner Boog-A-LousPHOTO BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENWinners Barbara Green, Michael Jarmon, Cole Gowdy, Anna Green, Bethany Thomas, Oliver Green, PJ Piland, and Master of Ceremonies Ed Brimner. Elected of cials were on hand to serve up barbecue dinners, left, including School Board Chair Ray Gray and County Commissioner Ralph Thomas as Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond looked on. Diners enjoy their meals, right.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 7BSWINE SHOW Showing the di erent classes Pig Scramble Alumni showPHOTOS BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENPast participants in the Swine Show got a chance to show off their skills, including Tom Richardson, center.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.com Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Todays New Ads Class B with AirbrakesDrivers NeededMust have CDL license and experience required Apply W ithin Brooks Concrete,1532 Coastal Hwy. 98 Panacea(850) 984-5279 CRAWFORDVILLE2 Bedroom 2 Bath upstairs apartment for lease 1st month $300.00,$674.00 Per month after that.(Bridlewood Apartments) must complete Bridlewood application and meet Bridlewood requirements. 850-363-5132 CRAWFORDVILLEBradley Court, Mill Hollow Subdivision, Saturday, March 1st. Multifamily yard sale. Household items, tools, furniture, clothes, to much to list PILLOW TOPMATTRESS AND BOX SET BRAND NEW, NEVER BEEN USED, STILLIN BAG. $195 OBO 850 727 0390 LOST CHIHUAHUA light gray, approx 2 lbs, female, 12 yrs old lost in the vicinity of Azalea Park $100 REWARD pls call (850) 661-7979 or contact Animal Control Wildlife Technician OPSFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Tates Hell Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $27,487.20 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Send electronic resumes to: Billie.Clayton @MyFWC.com For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer CDL-A Team Owner Operators:$2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipartners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Now Hiring: OTR CDLA DriversNew Pay Package and $2500 Sign -On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out. Full benefits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-378-9691 or www.heyl.net Class B with AirbrakesDrivers NeededMust have CDL license and experience required Apply W ithin Brooks Concrete,1532 Coastal Hwy. 98 Panacea(850) 984-5279 DRIVERS:Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. CALL: 888-880-5911 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 877-741-9260 www .fixjet s.com Heating And Air Conditioning Technician Training! Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/ month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 QUEEN PILLOW TOP MATTRESS & BOX SET BRAND NEW, NEVER BEEN USED, STILLIN BAG. $195 OBO 850 727 0390 -Twin Bed with frame (Headboard, Footboard), mattress, and drawers. Excellent condition. $200 -Pool table with accessories, good condition. Needs new pockets. $500 or best offer. -License plates, sporting or misc. $5 -$10 each. -Zenith TV, $30 Call 850.294.8829 RIDING LAWN MOWER John Deer 42 riding lawn mower.17hp $500 352 613 5522 CRAWFORDVILLEBradley Court, Mill Hollow Subdivision, Saturday, March 1st. Multifamily yard sale. Household items, tools, furniture, clothes, to much to list GUN SHOW MARCH 1-2 SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-5 ATLANTAEXPO CENTER (3650 JONESBORO RD SE) BUY-SELLTRADE. INFO: (563) 927-8176 Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing (subject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 VMFhomes.com CRAWFORDVILLE2 Bedroom 2 Bath upstairs apartment for lease 1st month $300.00,$674.00 Per month after that.(Bridlewood Apartments) must complete Bridlewood application and meet Bridlewood requirements. 850-363-5132 Commercial Building for Rent61 Rose Street Historical Downtown\ Sopchoppy Florida(850)962-4226 17 Acres with fish pond Rehwinkel Rd 5 miles outside of Crawfordville additional info call (850) 926-7756 New Log Home* on 10+ acres only $89,900 3 Bed, 2 bath log home with direct river access. Convenient to downtown Jacksonville. Excellent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x.19 *Constructed weather-tight log home shell. EHO 2000 Holiday Rambler Camper, 26, 5th wheel, has slide out $5500 (229) 317-0166 5052-0227 TWN Public Notice Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitiou s Name Law, pursuant t o Section 865.09, Florid a Statutes. NOTICE I S HEREBY GIVEN that th e undersigned, desiring t o engage in business unde r the fictitious name of: PIRATES LANDING BAR & GRILL located at 785 POR T LEON DRIVE, ST. MARKS FLORIDA 32355, in th e County of Wakulla, in tends to register the sai d name with the Division o f Corporations of the Flor ida Department of State Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Tallahassee Florida, this 19th day o f February, 2014. By: /s/ Michael W. Pag e Owne r Published one (1) time i n Wakulla County: Februar y 27, 2014 5028-0227 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION, Petitioner, vs. DANIEL R. HEZLEP, Case #35654 Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DANIEL R. HEZLEP, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before March 30, 2014. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: January 30, 2014 Susan Benton, Chair CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION By: -s-Kandace Zachary, Division Representative Feb. 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2014. 5046-0227 TWN 3/08 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 08, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouses containing personal property of: DANNY KELLY DUSTIN SMITH WILLIAM COTTON Before the sale date of March 08, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. February 20 & 27, 2014. Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a ve A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l the M M o o o o d d e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m ent to He C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED JESUSHARDWOOD FLOORS TILE PAINTING CARPENTRYLic. #7827 Licensed & Insured ( 850 ) 570Interior & Exterior FREE Estimates COASTWISE IS THRILLED TO WELCOME! Coastwise Realty,Inc.(850) 926 ~ (850) 926 fax 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Visit him at the Coastwise ~Log Cabin~ for All Your Real Estate Needs. WALLY DODSON 850-508-2295 or email him at Tues-Sat576-3105Tues-Sat545-2905Thurs-Sat926-6020&, Tues-Sat TuesSat 576-3105 Tues-Sat TuesSat 545-2905 Thurs-Sat ThursSat 926-6020 & STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-6020 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES LIBRARY ASSISTANT I Circulation Division of Library Services 3Br 2Ba DWMH start at $850 3Br 2Ba Twnhs start at $875 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs start at $1,100 3Br 2Ba Hs start at $1300APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIRED RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. 8AM 2PM NO EARLY BIRDS!SPRINGTIMEYARD SALEFERUARY 28th MARCH 1stSAVINGS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 9B5047-0227 TWN Lamendola, Mark G. 652010CA000442 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 652010CA000442 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE HOME EQUITY ASSET TRUST 2007-3 HOME EQUITY PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-3, Plaintiff, VS. MARK LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK G. LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK GREGORY LAMENDOLA; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORCLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on in Civil Case No. 652010CA000442, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE HOME EQUITY ASSET TRUST 2007-3 HOME EQUITY PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-3 is the Plaintiff, MARK LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK G LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK GREGORY LAMENDOLA; CHERYL LAMENDOLA; FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARK LAMENDOLA A/K/A; FIA CARD SERVICES, 5048-0227 TWN Bailey, Sandra 13000201CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 13000201CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA BAILEY; LEON BAILEY; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 06, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000201CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SANDRA BAILEY, LEON BAILEY and UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE in WAKULLA County, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 6th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 32 MINUTES WEST 2,822.25 FEET, TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 369, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 13 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1,438.62 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 32 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 50.00 FEET ROADWAY, 824.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 32 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 200 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 MINUTES WEST 200.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 21 MINUTES EAST 485.60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 2,822.25 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD NUMBER 369; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY NORTH 14 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1,438.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF DOLLY DRIVE; THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 89 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 824.33 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN NORTH 00 29 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 296.81 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 89 29 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 180.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 30 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 188.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 29 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 199.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 00 29 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 484.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1988 TITA MOBILE HOME WITH VIN #538195T4503A AND #538195T4503B AND TITLE #45159877 AND #44843413, PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE LAND. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 06th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services) Kahane & Associates, P.A., 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com February 20 & 27, 2014 13-00573 BOA 5049-0227 TWN Eddens, Rae Anna 65-2010-CA-000169 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY, 5050-0227 TWN McClellan, Danny R. 65-2010-CA-000082CA Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 65-2010-CA-000082CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. DANNY R. MCCLELLAN A/K/A DAN R. MCCLELLAN; et. al., Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 30th day of January, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000082CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC is the Plaintiff and DANNY R. MCCLELLAN A/K/A DAN R. MCCLELLAN; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) N/K/A ANDRE GREEN IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 13th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 1, BLOCK D, OF MAGNOLIA GARDENS, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 10th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com February 20 & 27, 2014. 10-08896 5051-0306 TWN Wilson, Lynda C. 13197CA Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 13197CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. LYNDA C WILSON A/K/A LYNDA CATHERINE WILSON; BRIDLE GATE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; JOHN R WILSON; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment fo Foreclosure dated the 6th day of February, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13197CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and LYNDA C WILSON A/K/A LYNDA CATHERINE WILSON BRIDLE GATE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. JOHN R WILSON UNKNOWN TENANT; and IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 6th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 38, BRIDLE GATE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 57 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com February 27 & March 06, 2014. 12-04002 5054-0306 TWN Delong, Shawn D. 13000227CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 13000227CAAXMX 5055-0306 TWN vs. Strickland, Somer S. Case 2012-FC-000216 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-FC-000216 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SOMER S. STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STOKES STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STRICKLAND; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SOMER S. STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STOKES STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STRICKLAND; RICHARD R. STRICKLAND, II AKA RICHARD RAY STRICKLAND II AKA RICHARD R. STRICKLAND AKA RICHARD STRICKLAND; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 20th day of March, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 42, of Block 21, of WAKULLA GARDENS, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accomodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 22 day of November, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BRENT X. THURMOND (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) /s/ Tiffany Deschner Deputy Clerk of Courts Attorney for Plaintiff: Amanda Renee Murphy Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E, Orlando, Florida 32812, (407)381-5200 February 27 & March 06, 2014 B&H 288251 5056-0306 TWN Kent, Charles M. Jr. 2010-CA-000170 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2010-CA-000170 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FF15, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES M. KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES MITCHELL KENT; KAREN KENT, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES M. KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES MITCHELL KENT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KAREN KENT; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment fo Foreclosure dated the 21st day of November, 2013, and entered in, WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FF15 is the Plaintiff and CHARLES KENT JR., and KAREN KENT are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 3 AND 4, BLOCK P MAGNOLIA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. The Property address is 12 Ted Lott Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com February 27 & March 06, 2014. 1043244.1 5057-0306 TWN vs. Norton, Jerry L. 12000149CAAXMX Re-Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 12000149CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. JERRY L. NORTON A/K/A JERRY LEE NORTON, SR., et al Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE RE-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale filed February 10, 2014, and entered in Case No. 12000149CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is Plaintiff, and JERRY L. NORTON A/K/A JERRY LEE NORTON, SR., et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 13th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: Lot 5, Block D, LAKE ELLEN SHORES, (PHASE TWO), according to plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 67, of the Public Records of WAKULLA County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: February 21, 2014 Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Tel: 954-462-7000 Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Heather Griffiths Phelan Hallinan, PLC Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303. 850-577-4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 February 27 & March 06, 2014 PH # 49561 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SHAWN D. DELONG; GRACE E. DELONG; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 16, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000227CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and SHAWN D. DELONG; GRACE E. DELONG; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE in WAKULLA County, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF LOT 6, OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 6, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 72 16 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 6 OF SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY A DISTANCE OF 2001.56 FEET TO AN OLD 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 13 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 929.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 17 13 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 101.96 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 25 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 461.25 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE SOUTHWESTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY OF TRIPLETT ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 35 13 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY 98.15 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN SOUTH 73 33 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 430.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16th day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services) Kahane & Associates, P.A., 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com February 27 & March 06, 2014 13-01626 FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000169 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE OF J.P. MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-S4, Plaintiff, v. RAE ANNA EDDENS, ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 08, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on March 06, 2014 at 11:00 A.M., at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 32 MINUTES WEST 4088.28 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF OCHLOCKONEE BAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 00 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 100.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 17 MINUTES WEST 351.03 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 42 MINUTES EAST 101.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 05 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 349.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LEGAL DESCRIPTION (EASMENT) (BASED ON SURVEY) COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH 00 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 3449.62 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-372, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 331.13 FEET TOTHE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY NORTH 84 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 15.09 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 08 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 414.49 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 45 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 15.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 08 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 408.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 2171 Surf Road, Panacea, Florida 32346 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: February 11, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Attorney for Plaintiff: Amal Laassel, Esq. Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A. 225 South Orange Avenue, Suite 900, Orlando, FL 32801 February 20 & 27, 2014. 62639 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit. 3/2, $850 mo., $850 Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has 25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated communi2BR/2BA Marina Village 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 112 Captain James St Wakulla Station Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyEE TO RET YOUR HOUE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.com N.A., F/K/A BANK OF AMERICA; AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION; are defendants. The clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 AM at the front door of the Wakulla County courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, March 6, 2014 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A GOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 00 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 2483.28 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD, MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 19 AND EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 149.90 FEET TO A 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE WEST QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 19, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 292.06 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 00MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 149.54 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 17 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 292.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 33 SAM MARKS RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accomodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 11, 2014 BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk Aldridge/Connors, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 7000 West Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL 33433 Phone: 561.392.6391, Fax: 561.392.6965 February 20 & 27, 2014. 1012-059 5041-0227 TWN vs. Walker-Smith, Leila M. Case No. 652011CA000372CAAXMX NOFS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652011CA000372CAAXMX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-31CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-31CB Plaintiff, vs. LEILA M. WALKER-SMITH A/K/A LEILA WALKER-SMITH, ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of October, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652011CA000372CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 A.M on the 6th day of March, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 81, OF THE HAMMOCKS, PHASE 1 A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 44 & 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 4th day of November, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk & Comptroller, Wakulla County, Florida [CIRCUIT COURT SEAL] By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Giuseppe Cataudella, Esq.Florida Bar#: 14236 Connolly, Geaney, Ablitt & Willard, PC. The Blackstone Building,100 South Dixie Hwy, Ste. 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Primary E-mail: pleadings@acdlaw.com, Secondary E-mail: mbruning@acdlaw.com Toll Free: (561) 422-4668,Facsimile: (561) 249-0721 Counsel for Plaintiff February 20 & 27, 2014 File#: C60.6518 5042-0227 TWN Richardson, Thomas A. 65 2009 CA 000428 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65 2009 CA 000428 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS A. RICHARDSON; DONNA M. RICHARDSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TALLAHASSEE-LEON EMPLOYEES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION A/K/A TALLAHASSEE LEON FCU, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 21, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65 2009 CA 000428 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 20th day of March, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statues, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: TRACT 22, CASORA ESTATES, UNIT NO. 2, (UNRECORDED): COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 90, HARTSFIELD SURVEY, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (ALSO A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MARKED BY A U.S. FORESTRY DEPARTMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT); THENCE RUN NORTH 72 33 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 90, 165.80 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CASORA DRIVE; THENCE RUN ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CASORA DRIVE AS FOLLOWS, SOUTH 47 43 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 335.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; SOUTH 50 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 755.74 FEETTO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; SOUTH 46 19 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 277.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; SOUTH 50 56 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 192.80 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT HEREIN CONVEYED; FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 29 15 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST, 518.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 43 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST, 297.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 34 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE LANDS OF HARVIE STOKELY, 363.80 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF CASORA DRIVE; THENCE RUN NORTH 45 45 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF CASORA DRIVE, 164.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF CASORA DRIVE, NORTH 50 56 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 53.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 90, HARTSFIELD SURVEY, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 5043-0227 TWN Tucker, Kimberly D. 65-2010-CA-000199 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2010-CA-000199 DIVISION U.S. BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY D. TUCKER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 15th, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Kimberly D. Tucker, Todd W. Tucker, Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lendingtree Loans, a California Corporation, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 37, BLOCK A, OF MAGNOLIA RIDGE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 55 THROUGH 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 204 MAGNOLIA RIDGE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 17th day of January, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. February 20 & 27, 2014. WB-10-38222 5044-0227 TWN Lehman, Nerissa P. 2012-CA-000030 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000030 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000030 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on March 6, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 38, BLOCK OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO (2), AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) 5045-0227 TWN Jones, Billy Lee 2013-CA-000015 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 2013-CA-000015 Division CENTRAL MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. BILLY LEE JONES, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BILLY LEE JONES, JOHN DOE, JANE DOE, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on February 06, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 46 AND 47, BLOCK 52, OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, AT PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 68 JR MILTON ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on March 06, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 6th day of February, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Alicia R. Whiting-Bozich, (813) 229-0900 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800, ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com February 20 & 27, 2014. 327446/1338493/abf Dated at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida this 22nd day of November, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk February 20 & 27, 2014. FL-97008058-10-FLS 5040-0227 TWN Veldkamp, Jans Hendrik 14-6-CP NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 14-6-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JANS HENDRIK VELDKAMP, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JANS HENDRIK VELDKAMP, deceased, whose date of death was December 16, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 14-6-CP, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be serve must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE RO THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: 02/20/2014 Personal Representative: RIANNE SHANABARGER 2607 116th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Attorney for Personal Representative: AARON R. HOLLOWAY, Florida Bar No. 0096426 Ausley & McMullen P.O. Box 391, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 (850)224-9115, Email: aholloway@ausley.com, spelham@ausley.com February 20 & 27, 2014. 5032-0306 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 016 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 369 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 05-5S-02W-000-02611-002 Description of property: 5-5S-2W P-7-2-M-32 N 1/2 OF A 208.25 x 416.50 AS DESC. IN OR 44 P 76 OR 64 P 841 & OR 81 P 792 Name in which assessed JAMES W GREEN JR Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on March 19, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: February 3, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published Feb. 13, 20, 27 and March 6, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700, (561) 998-6707 February 20 & 27, 2014. 11-237156 FC01 CHE Brain Teaser 1234 5678 9101112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 2021 22232425 26 27 282930 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 4748 49 50 51 5253 54555657 58 59 60 61 62 63 Across 1 Turn toward 5 A goatee covers it 9 Random guess 13 "American ___" 14 Call up 15 "The Way We ___" 16 Where players drive and putt 18 Boleyn or Tyler 19 Slimy veggie 20 Yogurt brand 22 Some infielders 26 Hawaiian necklace 27 Stated to be true 28 Become unified 33 Basmati and jasmine 34 Chewing gum, chocolate bars, etc. 35 "___-ching!" 36 Apple computers 37 Extra feature 38 Dress up like (for Halloween) 39 Devoured 40 Songs for one 41 Not beating around the bush 42 Soft piece of sports equipment 44 Journalist's secret 45 Little white lie 46 Weightlifter's helper 47 Nike rival 50 Store 51 One of many in a strawberry 52 Where players check and deke 58 Starbucks size 59 Host 60 Swedish furniture chain 61 Word in cutesy store names 62 Speaker's platform 63 Moisture covered, as a meadow Down 1 ___ Newtons 2 "Much ___ About Nothing" 3 Rank below gen. 4 Will Ferrell Christmas movie 5 Make butter 6 Circular dance 7 Plug-___ 8 Require 9 "Way down upon the ___ River..." 10 Where players lob and volley 11 Florence's river 12 "Where have you ? 14 Nudged with a stick 17 Shows up 21 No enemy 22 Server of beers 23 Take to the skies 24 Where players dribble and shoot 25 Female sheep 28 Panama or Erie 29 Burden 30 Super Bowl highlights? 31 One of three spaces on a Monopoly board 32 Holiday with eggs 34 Cobra's shape 37 Sports ___ 38 Oversupply 40 Swedish group that did Fernando 41 Pirate's treasure 43 Violin's cousin 44 Shopping ___ 46 "___ alive!" 47 Concerning 48 "Let's Make a ___" 49 Structure for storing tools 50 1221, in Roman numerals 53 Grandma, in Germany 54 (Free) of 55 Pres. Eisenhower 56 ___ Mexico 57 Letter after "jay"Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 23 456 34578 8 93 6713 274 395 47 873 61 2 00 9 HometownContent 159 7823 6 4 748356219 263419578 584 931627 627548193 931627845 395 264781 412875936 876193452 FACE CHIN STAB IDOL PHONE WERE GOLFCOURSE ANNE OKRA DANNON BASEMEN LEI AVOWED COALESCE RICES CANDY CHA MACS BONUS GOAS ATE ARIAS BLUNT NERFBALL SOURCE FIB SPOTTER ADIDAS MART SEED HOCKEYRINK TALL EMCEE IKEA OLDE DAIS DEWY

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 11B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the Blarney Stone located? 2. TELEVISION: Who was executive producer of the Animaniacs television cartoon show? 3. MOVIES: What Jon Voight/Dustin Hoffman film won the Academy Awards Best Picture in 1970? 4. MUSIC: Which Pink Floyd song featured the lyrics, All in all youre just another brick in the wall? 5. GAMES: How many dominoes are in a standard set? 6. POLITICS: In what year did a Republican run for president on the slogan, A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage. 7. FAMOUS QUOTES: What ancient philosopher said, The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet. 8. MYTHOLOGY: According to some popular accounts, what was the last name of the legendary King Arthur? 9. COMPUTERS: What does the acronym JPEG stand for? 10. LITERATURE: In which novel does the character of Madame Therese Defarge appear? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Blarney Castle, Cork, Ireland 2. Steven Spielberg 3. Midnight Cowboy 4. Another Brick in the Wall Part 2 5. 28 pieces 6. 1928, Herbert Hoover 7. Aristotle 8. Pendragon 9. Joint Photographic Experts Group 10. A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy LINDA CARTER Special to The News Our visit to Vienna coincided with the largest Austrian National Holiday that commemorates the countrys regaining their independent nation status and permanently declaring their neutrality is celebrated annually on Oct. 26. Festivals abound, and most businesses are closed, there is a military ceremony, and open houses at The Austrian National Parliament; the State House of the Austrian National Library; and at the Federal Chancellery of the Republic of Austria. Many museums offer free or reduced entry as well. An incredibly busy downtown; expect it to be busier as most Austrians are given the day off as well. Like so many other fortified towns, a wall once surrounded Vienna. Today the wall is gone and a ring road circles historic Vienna. During the 1600s and 1700s the government sold off parcels of land to fund construction. Many of the buildings are still in use today. Due to the larger size of Vienna, our tour began with a bus overview of the area, followed by a walking tour of the downtown. Famous for the Giant Ferris Wheel, constructed in 1897, the worlds tallest as recently as 1985. Once there were 30 gondolas, damaged during World War II, now only 15 remain. At 212 feet tall you can view the whole city from this sky-high perch, or rent a gondola for a private occasion. Only kings once used the Hapsburgs many palaces and gardens. Today they have become public parks and museums. The bus passes centuries of architecture. The baroque Church of St. Charles is from 1715. Flanked by columns that appear as if they came straight from Egypt, entry is only 4,50 euro. Nearby, two prefabricated Art Nouveau buildings, by Otto Wagner from 1900, are constructed of metal frames and solid marble slid in to each section, one a train station the other a caf. Another, the Secession Building, is topped with an open weave golden ball that resembles flowers, built as an exhibition space for artists in 1897. It was not popular at the time but is an extraordinary stop today. The Rathaus, or city hall, was located outside the original city walls. On Oct. 26, live music lls the air, children squeal in delight as rides spin and people nosh on fair food. The Opera a famous cultural landmark, is beautiful by day, and the scene of endless entertainment by night. Our circle complete, we tour through the historic core. In the center of town, a UNESCO world heritage site, Gothic St. Stephens Church steeples rise 450 feet and were originally used as watchtowers to check for res in the city. The church sports four gothic towers. As styles changed, the last incomplete tower was topped in the later style Renaissance fashion. During World War II, the church was not bombed, but a re next door caused the church roof to burn. The conflagration resulted in all the majolica tiles cascading to the oor. The interior was saved because it was already bricked up to prevent damage. The new metal roof is covered with majolica tile, still displaying the original coats of arms. Modern day pollution leaves soot stains on the church, requiring a year round cleaning operation. In the historic core only one modern structure creates discord. Built before the entire downtown was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the mirrored structure re ects back the surrounding buildings. Windows so delicious you want to lick the glass front the famous Demel Chocolate Confectionary & Bakery. In a city famous for chocolate and tortes, there are many competing shops, all awaiting you to sample their delicacies. The Hofberg palace and Spanish Riding Stables famous for the internationally known Lipizzaner stallions is packed with spectators on this particular day, as speeches are given and awards presented. Located close to the metro station, it is a quick trip downtown to continue exploring once the river cruise tour is complete. With an abundance of history, music, and chocolate, it would be easy to spend days here exploring all that Vienna has to offer.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 2904058 or www.luxurycruise-travel.com.Vienna has days of exploring to offer travelers PHOTOS BY LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL The Vienna cityscape from horse-drawn carriage. The Church of St. Charles in Vienna. Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. D ed i cated to t h e r escue & r e h ab ili tat i o n o f in ju r ed a n d o r p h a n ed wil d m a mm a l s a n d b ir ds GIANT YARD SALE Thurs Mar 13th 8am 3pm (Set Up) Fri Mar 14th 4 8am 3pm Sat Mar 15th 4 8am 1pm At Townsend's Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit A32 or brought to the Yard Sale (before Friday afternoon) For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.fwma.org 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission KWCB Seas to TreesPick-It-Up2014 Apalachicola National Forest8:00 a.m. Meet at Forest Road 13 Dip Pond (Dir: Turn West off of Hwy 319 at the corner of Arran (Courthouse traffic signal) continue to the pavement ends Noon to 1:00 p.m. HICKORY PARK (BEHIND SONIC) Minors must be accompanied by an adult PLEASE WEAR CLOSED TOED SHOES, BRING HEAVY DUTY GLOVES AND OTHER PERSONAL PROTECTION GEAR YOU MIGHT NEED. LIMITED SUPPLIES MAY BE AVAILABLE ONSITE.



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newsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School ............................................................................Page 9A Sports ....................................................................Pages 10-11A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 15A Senior Citizens ................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B Travel .............................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Elizabeth Marie Britt Elsie M. Busen Deloris Robison Casseaux William R. Clyde Rodeheaver Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 9th Issue Thursday, Feburary 27, 2014Cole Gowdy won both Grand Champion and Reserve. Swine Show Swine ShowSee Pages 6-7BCrawfordville hair stylist wins new carAnimal lovers show support By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netRegis stylist Micah Benjamin was surprised to learn on Friday morning that she was the lucky winner of a 2014 Toyota Matrix. Benjamin has worked for Regis for 14 years. Four district managers, wearing red boas and sunglasses, showed up at the salon dancing and waving their hands. They escorted Benjamin and her co-workers to the auto repair area of the Wal-Mart where they announced that one of them had won a new car. They usually do the giveaways outside, but on this rainy morning they opted for an interior space. One of the managers, Robyn Lynem, paraded around the auto repair shop with her boa, teasing the employees. She eventually landed on Benjamin and placed the boa around her neck and yelled, Youre the winner. Benjamins co-workers looked on and cheered for her as she choked back tears. For real? she asked in disbelief. The contest was held by the salon, a nationwide chain with a location in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart, in conjunction with Matrix hair products. Six new cars were given away to professionals, and six new cars to customers as part of the promotion. The professionals names were put into the drawing for each $100 of Matrix products they sold. Benjamin sold over $700 worth of products, so she had seven entries. The other winners were from Michigan, Nevada, Missouri, Minnesota and New York. By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netCounty commissioners voted 4-1 last week to remove the 75-foot wetlands buffer from the comp plan in favor of state protections. Some citizens at the meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 18, pleaded for the commissioners to wait until the citizens voted on the issue in November. But commissioners voting for the repeal of the wetlands setback said that it simply gives the county the ability to grant a variance. Nobody is suggesting that we ll-in wetlands, said commissioner Randy Merritt. If we dont do this, we dont have any way to get a variance. The four commissioners voting for repeal were Merritt, Richard Harden, Jerry Moore and Ralph Thomas, with Commissioner Howard Kessler casting the lone dissenting vote. At one point during the meeting, Merritt directed questions to Luis Serna, planning director. Is anybody suggesting we ll in wetlands? Merritt asked Serna. No, said Serna. Have we violated any state or federal laws? asked Merritt. No, said Serna. At one point, Commissioner Thomas got into an exchange with Ron Piasecki, resident of Shell Point and president of the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance, the group collecting petitions to put the wetlands issue before voters on the November ballot. They call us communists, socialists, said Piasecki. And they call us hypocrites. He said, They dont want you to have what they have. Thats correct. Thomas answered. No, I called you a socialist no, Im sorry, a collectivist. Thomas said. Responding to the claim that the petition drive had turned in more than 5,720 signatures for veri cation by the supervisor of elections more than the 5,550 required to get the issue on the ballot, should they be approved, Thomas said: I hear tonight that the petition count has been met, but there seems like theres no joy in that, people want to come in and sling mud. I never impugned the integrity of Shell Point. We have voted to restore property rights so people can decide, Thomas said. All Im asking for is fair and equal treatment for everybody. I have this on my blog, and on everything I have ever put out there, Remember that freedom belongs to the people and should not be infringed upon by the government, said Thomas. Commission Chairman Harden contended that Many citizens that have signed that petition have not been fully informed. After a citizen comment that no one would destroy a wetland, Commissioner Kessler responded, We all know of the destruction of wetlands. I dont think theres a commissioner sitting on this board who doesnt know about the destruction of wetlands.Turn to Page 2AJENNY ODOM JENNY ODOM JENNY ODOM Board repeals Board repeals wetlands buffer wetlands bufferMicah Benjamin sits in a new 2014 Toyota Matrix she won on Friday. Micah Benjamin and her Regis salon co-workers with her new car. Animal Control Director Ivanhoe Carroll.Commissioners vote 4-1 to repeal setback in comp planBy JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThe county commission chambers were lled with a sea of red shirts and pet lovers wearing purple ribbons who voiced their support for the Wakulla County animal shelter, and those who run it. At issue during the animal control workshop, held Tuesday, Feb. 18, was whether or not a policy change was needed to protect the county from liability and where to go from here. Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment (CHAT), the group that ran the adoption center, moved out of their building next door to the shelter last November when they could not come to terms with the county to operate the adoption center. Commissioner Howard Kessler called the workshop and stated at the beginning he was concerned that changes had taken place over the past years that have resulted in a change of policy of the commissions oversight of animal control. Kessler asked the commissioners to consider the issues: Economic impact to the countys budget Liability exposure Health and condition of animals for which the county is responsible Compliance with Florida statutes and other areas relating to animal control in the county. It would be good for all and less confusing if we were all under one roof, said Ivanhoe Carroll, animal control of cer who runs the shelter. She expressed that she was very pleased with the show of support from rescue groups and a majority of the board gave her and her employees a pat on the back. We do a lot, with very little, she said. But we couldnt do it without our volunteers.Turn to Page 2ACounty is working to re-open pet adoption center soon Bald Eagle and prey Bald Eagle and prey Local photographer Mike Carlton shared with us this recent shot of a Bald Eagle and a sh it has caught. Local photographer Mike Carlton shared with us this recent shot of a Bald Eagle and a sh it has caught.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Front PageCommissioner Moore leaned into his microphone and said, I do not. Incredible, Kessler answered. Incredible. Most citizens spoke against the repeal. Youre making a mistake, said Vic Lambou of Wakulla Wetlands Alliance. You need to listen to the citizens. This has galvanized the county to do the American thing and put this on the ballot, said citizen Dana Peck of Ochlockonee Bay, referring to a petition drive. Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells confirmed after the meeting that more than 5,720 signatures have been turned in for verification. As of Tuesday, Feb. 25, Wells said 4,008 had been verified. One citizen who spoke in favor of repeal was Robert Roddenberry of Sopchoppy: I dont know of any land owner that wants to harm a wetland. Most of us are responsible. I know on our place, we would never harm them. I think it took a lot of backbone to do this, he continued. Another resident of Sopchoppy, Sandy Tedder, countered, I think the states most valuable resource is its water. Our countys most valuable resource is our water, she said. Most communities around the country, such as south Florida, are having to spend lots of money to clean up their water. We see what (the state Department of Environmental Protection) did to protect south Florida. They didnt. DEP has said that our county ordinance protects our water better than DEP can, Tedder said. Crawfordville resident Bob Danzey contended the agency reports werent as critical of the repeal of wetlands protections as has been made out. I read the reports from state agencies, Danzey said. They werent as bad as what the publics been told. Were trying to protect wetlands, said Jack Rudloe, owner of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea, who introduced himself as Chiropsella rudloei, a jellyfish that has been named after him. Another vote, scheduled for the upcoming March 3 county commission board meeting, has been placed on the agenda by commissioner Merritt. It requests board approval to direct staff to prepare a modification to the wetland ordinance that would permit a variance inside the 35 feet no touch portion of the 75 foot wetland setback. Board repeals wetlands bu er Board repeals wetlands bu er Childcare roundtable held Childcare roundtable held Animal lovers show support Animal lovers show supportFrom Front PageCarroll presented a PowerPoint to the commissioners with statistics and costs associated with animal control and adoption. She is currently working with County Administrator David Edwards on creating a Request for Proposal to advertise for a new entity to run the county adoption shelter. Since Carroll took over the shelter in 2007, the euthanasia rate has dropped from 74 percent to 22 percent. Please present a reasonable RFP to run the adoption center, said Janice Eakin, President of CHAT, as citizens took the podium and expressed support for animals. Not much money goes to animal control now, Eakin said. I urge the county commission to not let much time pass before setting a plan in action to take care of the animals when they come into the countys control. The current ordinance needs to be updated. The animal control office falls under the pubic safety banner reporting to the fire chief, and ultimately the county commission. The measurement for taking calls is different, said Carroll. One of the performance measurements for Fire and EMS is how many calls they run. The re department gets called to a re, they put out the fire and theyre done, Carroll said. Same with EMS. They take the injured person to the hospital, theyre done. With us, a call is what starts the work. People dont really understand what we do, Carroll said. Were not dog catchers and we dont run the pound. Rather, she said, Were trying to change the perception of the old dog catcher image, she said. We take wonderful care of them while we have them. She explained that she and her staff try to reunite animals with their owners. If unsuccessful, it is not necessarily a death sentence for the animal. Its a matter of changing the image, she said. But mostly, we just want people to be responsible pet owners. Since CHAT left the premises, the animal control shelter has been using the adoption facility, next door to animal control, to house any over ow of animals. They have also been using the services of Cauzican, and other rescue agencies to handle adoptions. If the outcome is for the animal control team to handle adoptions, Carroll said shell need at least one more fulltime and one more parttime employee. We do what we do because were animal lovers, she said. If we didnt do it, thered really be a problem.By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThe Early Learning Coalition, along with the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce recently hosted a roundtable discussion with the purpose of engaging small business child care owners with members of the chamber and the Economic Development Council. The event was held at TCC Wakulla on Wednesday, Feb. 12. We wanted to create an opportunity to bring them together to understand just how important child care is to a community, said Molly Lord, Community Partnerships Director for Early Learning Coalition of the Big Bend Region Inc. Information provided by the ELC states that during the last few years, many child care programs have started up and then within a year or two have had to close their doors. The strain brought about by closings is not only for the children and employees, but also for the parents who then have to nd new opportunities. When families or businesses are thinking about moving to Wakulla County they typically ask, How is your school system? can you help me nd a realtor? and I need information about your child care programs, Lord said. The Chamber is a natural partner for the child care businesses and we hope that this event allowed them to see opportunities of how they could all work together to make a positive impact in Wakulla. Rachel Sutz Pienta, an organizer of the event, serves as Advocacy Chair and representative from the Wakulla Chamber, on the Early Learning Coalition board. We wanted to highlight some of the challenges faced by early learning and child care providers in navigating the rough waters of small business ownership, she said after the event. The conversation during lunch covered a wide range of topics including permitting issues and a need for a local business to host the speci c background check process required by the state for childcare workers. The lunch event set several ideas in motion. One new development that sprang from the lunch is that the Chamber will list descriptions and testimonials about local childcare providers on its website, Pienta said. JENNY ODOMParticipants in the roundtable. Lower your monthly auto loan payments!1.49%APR*as low as36 months1.99%APR*as low as60 monthsAll rates and terms are good for new, used or renanced vehicles. View more loan options at GoGulfWinds.com.*Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 36 months and as low as 1.99% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and renances. Renances and used car purchases 2007 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. as A ll ra t for n e ve hi c op ti o REFINANCE: Did you know you can renance your auto loan? Bring us your auto loan from a bank or car dealer and let us put more money in your pockets. What are you waiting for? 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By MARGIE MENZELTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDABONIFAY, Feb. 24 U.S. Rep. Steve Southerland had the complete attention of about 500 students at Chipley High School in the Florida Panhandle one morning last week. He quizzed them about civics and described his life as an elected official, saying hed beaten a seven-term congressman in 2010 in a district that, for generations, sent Democrats to Washington. You have to believe it in order to achieve it, Southerland assured them. What would you dream if you knew that dream would come true? A murmur swept the auditorium. The two-term Republican praised Barack Obama for an extraordinary path to the White House, while discussing his own average, normal family in nearby Panama City. He thanked the United States for being the country in which such people can be elected to high of ce. Married to a woman he met in the rst grade and running a family business, Southerland is trying to draw a line between himself and his challenger in one of the highest-profile races of 2014 Democrat Gwen Graham of Tallahassee, daughter of former Florida governor and U.S. Sen. Bob Graham. (Gwen Graham and I) will contrast very well in this election, Southerland told The News Service of Florida between campaign stops. We are polar opposites. The district includes Tallahassee and Panama City the homes of the challenger and incumbent, respectively and Washington, Bay, Jackson, Gulf, Calhoun, Liberty, Gadsden, Leon, Jefferson, Wakulla, Franklin, Taylor and part of Madison counties. Southerland swept into office in the tea-party wave of 2010, and hes known for taking conservative positions most recently for his push to add a work requirement for able-bodied adults to the food-stamp program. Hes also known for his opposition to the federal Affordable Care Act, which he ran against in his first campaign and continues to denounce. At the high school, Southerland took questions on political issues and such personal matters as fishing. Asked what he thinks of medical marijuana and gay marriage, he explained the role of states rights, allowed as how hed never burned one, and went on to earn his biggest applause of the morning when he said, I believe, personally, for me for me and my family that marriage is between one man and one woman. Southerland and his supporters say Gwen Graham is too liberal for the district, although she calls herself a moderate Democrat. And he took a dig at her work days, a practice she borrowed from her father for her rst campaign. Bob Graham put in more than 400 eight-hour work days at jobs held by ordinary Floridians. The Southerlands weve never known anything other than 60and 70-hour work weeks, the congressman said. We know all about work weeks in a work lifetime. Weve got callouses on our hands you get that from a lifetime of work. Work is important to Southerland. He told the students that his familys funeral home had never closed a day in the 60 years since it opened, and that his four daughters had parttime jobs since they were 15 years old. Work is important to the Grahams too. The day before Southerland came to Chipley High, Gwen Graham put in a work day at Bobbie and Ed Goldens 68-acre goat ranch near Monticello, in Jefferson County partly as a way of criticizing Southerland over the unnecessary six-month delay in passing a federal farm bill. It is unfortunate the sole reason the bill was delayed in the rst place was because of a manufactured crisis by Congressman Southerland who put partisan politics above farmers, the economy and his own district, Graham said in a statement. Speaking with farmers, small business owners and North Floridians from all walks of life, its become clear to me they are hungry for new leadership, a representative who will speak for them with an independent voice. Southerland served on the conference committee for the just-passed farm bill, adding a 10-state pilot program that would require work or participation in a job training program for able-bodied adults who get food stamps. His original proposal would have applied nationwide, but was criticized on the grounds that there were not enough jobs or slots in job-training programs for those who needed food stamps. Southerland warned the group that the 2nd Congressional District had been targeted by House Minority Leader and former Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California. There was one seat east of the Mississippi and south of the MasonDixon line, and that seat is ours. He said it resonates with voters that they have a representative right now who grew up among em. Florida Senate President Don Gaetz, a Niceville Republican whose district overlaps with Southerlands, praised Bob Graham, noting that Grahams family has roots in Walton County and that the former U.S. senator is well respected in the district. He also said hes watched Gwen Graham campaign and that shes a good candidate. But Gaetz predicted Southerland would win. She comes from good genes politically, Gaetz said. Gwen Grahams problem is that shes a member of a political party and part of a political coalition which I believe is out of step with the people of North Florida. Democratic political operative Kevin Cate, however, said Graham is connecting with voters over lunch-bucket issues such as raising the minimum wage. The Republicans are going to try to nationalize this campaign, saying its Obama versus the House of Representatives, Cate said. But what youll see Gwen do is take advantage of the extreme positions that the House has taken, blocking common-sense reforms, being opposed to raising the minimum wage for full-time workers issues like that, where it really connects to many people in that district.Southerland makes appeal to Panhandle conservatives WCSO/FILE PHOTOSteve Southerland and aide during a recent visit with Wakulla Sheriff Charlie Creel. LUNCH PARTNER FREE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Notice of Proposed Ordinance FEBRUARY 27, 2014 APRIL 3, 2014

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Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jenny Odom .............................................reporter@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNING NR Most popular stories online: Wakullas jail-bed revenues fluctuate with number of prisoners Underwater Wakulla February 27, 2014 Flash flood watch until 7 p.m. Wetlands petitions are coming in for verification Rick Smith to talk about his fathers Florida County commission votes to remove wetlands buffer Magician to perform at Central Baptist Church Rep. Southerland recognizes 2014 Biletnikoff Award recipients thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE:Put partnership above partisanshipGrandstanding over tragedy was shamelessWorkshop was a display of ignorance Commissioner doesnt trust citizens Good job on Norm Griggs story Follow us on Editor, The News: I have just returned home from the County Commission workshop on Animal Control. I know I should not be surprised, but what a waste of time. Most of the people in the audience did not have a clue what the workshop was about. No one ever said anything about shutting down Animal Control. Obviously, the Wakulla County Rumor Mill was in full gear. It does not appear most people investigated what the meeting was about. It seems they got an email or a Facebook posting telling them to show up, so like lemmings they did what they were told with no knowledge of why. I was shocked to hear one of the county commissioners say to the director of Animal Control, If you go left, I will back you. If you go right, I will back you. Sadly, we are paying this man to give a county employee blanket support to do whatever she wants to do regardless of its impact on the county. A woman from the audience spoke about nancial liability and insurance and four of our county commissioners never mentioned a word about it. Mine and your county commissioners have thrown us under the bus to any legal action presented to the county by anyone volunteering or rescuing animals. The scary part is some of these commissioners say they are businessmen. Makes me wonder what their books look like. Lastly, I want to apologize to Dr. (Howard) Kessler. He seems to have had the countys interest at heart, but again he was attacked. Whoever the people in the audience were who yelled at him to volunteer truly showed their lack of knowledge. Dr. Kessler has volunteered many many times for the animals in our county. He placed himself in Haiti trying to save some of the arms and legs of those suffering from the damage during their crisis. He volunteers in Tallahassee helping children. The next time some one throws stones at Dr. Kessler make sure you know what you are talking about. Dont let your ignorance shine so brightly. Barbara Mans eld-Wilson Heide Clifton Christy Noftz By STEVE SOUTHERLANDU.S. CongessmanWith partisan gridlock all too prevalent in todays Washington, I have worked hard to break through those barriers and join with Republicans and Democrats who are as interested as I am in growing jobs and restoring certainty for hardworking families. The recentlypassed Farm Bill is an example of what can be accomplished by putting partnership above partisanship. For more than a year Congress debated the latest reauthorization of the Farm Bill, which sets national agriculture and food policy for the next ve years. With Florida being a national leader in agricultural production and the second largest specialty crop-producing state in America, I was committed to doing all I could to advance a common sense Farm Bill that restored certainty for North and Northwest Florida farmers and strengthened our rural communities. I was honored to be the only Floridian in Congress appointed to the bipartisan conference committee tasked with ironing out the nal Farm Bill agreement. It was a tremendous, hard-earned victory when both parties and both chambers came together for the good of the American people and passed a ve-year Farm Bill that provides muchneeded relief to our hardworking farming families and saves taxpayers $23 billion while allowing us to nally move past the costly, big government policies passed under then-Speaker Nancy Pelosis Farm Bill six years ago. I am also pleased that Republicans and Democrats came together to support a provision in the Farm Bill I introduced to empower vulnerable families with a renewed opportunity for earned success. By including a 10-state pilot program for work, job training, and community volunteerism for healthy, working age food stamp bene ciaries, weve now put nutrition assistance on the same proven path of success that helped change a culture for the better during welfare reform in the 1990s. As the rst reforms to the food stamp program since the successful welfare reforms of 1996, the Farm Bill takes important steps to empower families in need with a renewed opportunity at earned success. Additionally, the Farm Bill includes several provisions I crafted to sustain the economies of our rural communities. The bipartisan Building Rural Communities Act ensures that small, rural areas have access to the technical assistance and training necessary to enhance vital infrastructure including police and re stations and community health clinics all at no additional cost to Americas taxpayers. Another provision I advanced strengthens our forestry communities by ensuring that wood products qualify under the USDAs Biobased Marketing Program. I also fought to guarantee the long-term viability of citrus production in Florida by helping secure $125 million to research remedies for citrus greening, a disease decimating citrus groves in Florida and nationwide. Updating the Farm Bill is never easy, but this bill represents the good that can come out of both parties and both chambers rising above politics to do what is right for the American people. Our farmers and rural families deserve real solutions not political mud ghts and this bipartisan Farm Bill is a big step in the right direction. Steve Southerland II is U.S. representative for the 2nd congressional district, which includes Wakulla.Editor, The News: Few things have the capacity to push me over the edge more than someone trying to make hay over the tragedy of others. On Saturday, Feb. 8, a Tallahassee TV helicopter crashed into trees in the dark of night for inexplicable reasons killing two and injuring another. It may be months before the FAA and NTSB determine a probable cause but one individual took it upon himself to push his personal agenda by spouting a bunch of dribble in an interview with WTXL immediately after the accident. Far from worrying about his neighbors safety as he states, James Parham took advantage of the situation to score points with the blood of others. What he does not tell you in that interview is that he (and his small group of neighbors on Surf Road) has attempted to block the kind of safety improvements that might have prevented this tragedy. Mr. Parham along with another detractor pushed to have themselves placed on the Countys Airport Advisory Committee (charged with creating a consensus on how to move forward with airport improvements) only to become the airports major detractor. In essence they joined the Advisory Committee to kill the airport from within. It ultimately became clear from their actions that they just want to see the 50 year old Wakulla County Airport closed. In the WTXL interview Mr. Parham expressed the belief that tall trees around his house were necessary to protect himself from harm. Trees to protect your house, Mr. Parham? Who thinks like that? The blood of those people could very well be tied to your opposition to safety improvements most notably required tree topping in designated safety zones called for by county zoning and the Florida Department of Transportation. For those not in the know, Wakulla County Airport has been a county-owned and run airport for many years that ultimately attracted millions of dollars of real estate development around it and also pays hundreds of thousands of dollars in county taxes because it was there and not the other way around. Wakulla County Airport has paid its way all along and everyone in the county has been a bene ciary of that ongoing tax revenue. Why does Mr. Parham want the airport closed? Thats the real question. Could it be that he wants to develop it for himself? Mr. Parham is trapped by his own logic. First, he says there is almost no traf c at the airport to deserve improvement and then he says its unsafe and he needs trees to protect his house. You can only have it one way, Mr. Parham. Please show us your true colors and stop grandstanding with a horri c situation. Its peoples lives that are at stake when we dont trim trees from time to time as required by FDOT, zoning and common sense. Allan FeiferAircraft owner and pilot at Wakulla County AirportEditor, The News: At the last BOCC meeting the Chairman exhibited a complete lack of trust in the citizens of Wakulla County. He berated our citizens who signed the petition to place an important referendum on the November ballot. His approach reminded me of one who was afraid of the commissions vote being overturned by its citizens. It also reminded me of a quote by Thomas Jefferson, When government fears the people, there is liberty. When the people fear the government, there is tyranny. He considered the citizens of this County uninformed and not capable of making a rational decision, an insult to the intelligence of every petition signer. I, for one, have faith that between now and this November election the people will become even more enlightened. However, rest assured that with a builder, a developer, a realtor/ mortgage consultant, and a large family landholder, the verbiage of these commissioners will be emotionally biased and opinionated. This bias has and will become more evident. Unlike California, we are blessed with wetlands and good drinking water, but that can quickly change. South Florida would love to tap the aquifer of Wakulla County! Hundreds of people depend on our shing industry to support their families. Sport shing brings hundreds of out-ofstate shermen to our county, and with them their money. Birding is little recognized but a very popular pastime for winter visitors. Having grown up in St Petersburg and Miami, it is dif cult for me not to become emotionally passionate over the wetland issue when re ecting on the changes I have seen there, generated by greed. I have concern for what will happen if stringent safeguards are not in place and enforced by our county. Charles Hickman CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: Hello, Jenny Odom: Just saw the article on Norm Griggs interview and the photo (Griggs loves his gig, front page feature, Feb. 20 issue). Loved the write-up. You really caught his character and how terri c a story teller he was. For me as an interviewer it was just fun and easy to elicit his opinions. Thanks so much to you and The Wakulla News for your support in promoting and covering this event! Best, Betty Ann Korzenny Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 5A< STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: What was your favorite food as a kid?DANIEL MORGANResidential ElevatorsPizza! Thats what we would do for all my birthday parties. We would have 20 to 30 people sometimes. MIKE DURRANCEC & C TechMcDonalds! We would go to McDonalds after church every Sunday. Cheeseburger, fries, and a Coke! MEGAN HOLLEYTCC studentShrimp! Every year for my birthday I would ask my mom to have shrimp... My favorite is still shrimp today. Fruity Pebbles! When we are in the cereal grocery isle, my kids tell me, No, mom no Fruity Pebbles. WILLIAM T. MOORERetired attorneyDANELLE VAUGHNBig Bend HospiceMine was a meal! Lamb, rice and gravy, and butter beans that my mother would make on Sundays. Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Come by to see Our Daily Specials!THE RODEOHam, Turkey, Bacon, Munster Cheese, Lettuce & Tomato Mayo & BBQ sauce$795 926-3500Choice of Bread Winner receives one meal from the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the theCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink Lindys 3 Piece Tender Dinner Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & Dogs Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand$599 Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n n s s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant Myra Jeans Restaurant would like to congratulate Tony Simpson for defeating our monstrous Behemoth Cheeseburger Challenge. Tony went to Myra Jeans on February 9 to watch his brother in law attempt the challenge, said he was hungry and wanted a snack. So he too ordered a Behemoth just for the heck of it. Some 48 minutes later a champion was born when he downed the last bite. at snack was a 4-pound cheeseburger and a whole pound of fries. Tony joins the six other champions on Myra Jeans Wall of Fame. Tonys brother-in-law did not fare so well:His name will be placed on the much more crowded Wall of Shame. Better luck next time. Myra Jeans is the place to go for a Great Big Burger, a juicy steak, a hearty salad or a tasty ice cream sundae. A Wakulla County original with character and hometown atmosphere. Myra Jeans also makes champions! Great job, Tony!A new champion for Myra Jeans Behemoth Cheeseburger Challenge Tony Simpson 926-8886 ALL DAY LindysChicken Since19687locations 50 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida Winner Raymond Rich drawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR Keep it real or keep it to yourself Charlotte Faith to hold Holy Ghost RevivalA Holy Ghost Revival will be held at Charlotte Faith & Deliverance Temple with Apostle Tony Sanders on Feb. 26, 27, and 28 at 7:30 p.m. nightly. Bishop Alice Williams is pastor. The church is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road. Mount Olive No. 2 to celebrate anniversaryPastor Samuel Hayes of Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church No. 2 cordially invites all to the celebration of the churchs 144th anniversary. The celebration will be held on Sunday, March 2, at 11:30 a.m. Speaker will be Pastor Renita Alan-Dixon and at 3 p.m., Pastor John Fagan. The church is located at 8 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville. If you have questions, call Pastor Samuel Hayes at (850) 339-5090. Rocky Mount Church to celebrate anniversaryThe Rocky Mount Church of Christ will be celebrating its annual church anniversary on Sunday, March 2 at 11 a.m. Everyone is invited. Elder Benjamin Washington and East Spring Primitive Baptist Church of Christ will render service. Dinner will be served after. The church is located at 58 Dogwood Drive in Crawfordville. Medart Assembly hosts Trading Closet ministryThe last Saturday of every month at noon, Emily Sellmer of the Medart Assembly of God hosts a Trading Closet ministry where families can trade clothes children have outgrown for other families clothes that t. The ministry is free.Church BriefsBy JAMES L. SNYDER Normally, Im not overly fussy with what people say as long as they are not trying to put something over on me. All it takes is one time of trying to put something over on me and I cross you off my Christmas card list. When someone tries to sell me something, I am assuming that somewhere in the conversation they are trying to pull the wool over my eyes. I am allergic to wool in my eyes. When they are talking to me, I am listening for a keyword in their conversation, which is simply, free. Whenever they mention that magical word, I know they are trying to put something over on me. My father used to say, Keep it real or keep it to yourself. He did not have many jewels of wisdom, but this certainly was one that has been helpful to me down through the years. I have tried to keep this in focus when talking to other people. Nothing I hate more than somebody lying to me, so turnabout is fair game. I do not want to lie to anybody myself. At least intentionally. I am a weekend sherman from Pennsylvania so the tendency is there and I have to watch myself all the time. I am the kind of person who loves to exaggerate. Sometimes my exaggeration gets the best of me but then that is why God gave us wives to help curb this tendency. She has not failed me so far. The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were relaxing at home watching a little bit of television. It is hard to nd anything real on the old television set. The reality shows are everything but. We were casually listening to a talk show host who was interviewing some TV personality celebrating his 80th birthday. We were not really paying attention, you know how it is. You are watching TV, but you are talking back and forth to one another trying to catch up on the days activities. Then this TV personality made a statement that captured both of our attentions. I dont believe, this personality, who shall remain nameless, said, in the afterlife. Only foolish people believe in the afterlife. This sparked some conversation between my wife and me. The question I had was simply this how long does it take to get to this point of Superior Idiocy? What university awards an SI degree? If they did, I am sure they could never keep up with the production of such awards. Just when you think you have heard the most stupid thing in the world somebody with an SI degree opens his or her mouth. Of course, there is nothing wrong with being stupid if you keep it to yourself. When you start telling people just how stupid you really are, that is when somebody needs to object. Right after this TV personality, whose name will remain anonymous, although he thinks he is some kind of a king, said he did not believe in the afterlife said something that was contradictory. I have it ordered, he said about a seriously as any SI person could be, that when I die I will be frozen until the medical eld has discovered a cure or for what has killed me. Then I will be brought back to life with this medication. My wife and I waited for the laughter. I really thought it was a joke. I did not think anybody could be that stupid. Apparently, a great deal of people are that stupid because nobody laughed at that remark. My wife and I looked at each other and then we burst out laughing thinking it was one of those TV talk show spoofs. It turned out he was not joking. He did not believe in the afterlife, but he was making plans to come back to life after he died. I think people with the SI syndrome have one severe dysfunction between their brain and their mouth. We know from listening that their mouth is working but what we hear from their mouth more than suggest their brain is not w. I do not have any problems with people being a practicing SI as long as they keep it to themselves. There are enough idiots in the world that we do not have to have people every day coming out of the SI closet. The apostle Paul made this quite clear when he wrote, For the wages of sin is death: but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our Lord (Romans 6:23). Only God can keep it real and thankfully He does not keep it to Himself, but shares it with those who will put their trust in Him..The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Jesus River Festival is set for March 8 in SopchoppySpecial to The NewsThe 6th annual Jesus River Festival is scheduled for Saturday, March 8 in Myron B. Hodges City Park located in Sopchoppy. The outdoor music event will start at noon and run until dark. This music festival will host a list of talented Christian musicians, speakers, dancers and performers appealing to all ages and a variety of music styles. The Jesus River Festival was started by a group of Wakulla County Christians from various churches. Their intention was to gather their families for a day of music and fellowship in a casual outdoor setting. The Sopchoppy River runs south towards the Gulf of Mexico through the citys park and makes for an ideal setting for an afternoon of relaxed music listening and worship. Planners wanted to draw from the areas local musical talent and invite committed Christians to share with the community the good news of Jesus Christs power to transform lives. This is a multi-denominational, community worship experience, and it just keeps getting better, said Nathan Lewis, a member of the planning committee. Several hundred individuals attended last years event, and we were very pleased with the turnout and support. Wave 94, a local Christian radio station and long time supporter of the festival, is expected to return to visit with fans and friends. Many churches and businesses are involved in making the festival a success. Those attending the festival will be served complimentary grilled burgers, hot dogs, chips and drinks. Groups interested in performing at this years festival are encouraged to apply online at jesusriverfest. com. Churches, ministries and civic organizations interested in setting up a table to fund raise or present informational materials can apply on-line at jesusriverfest.com.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 7AElsie M. Busen, of Brighton, Mich., died on Feb.14, 2014 in Brighton. She was born Aug. 12, 1920 in Iowa to Earl and Ann (Frana) Scheidel. Survivors include her children, Joseph (Dorothy) Busen of Trenton, Mich., Kenneth (Karen) Busen of Crawfordville, Barbara (Melvin) Shapiro of Stockbridge, Mich., Catherine (Tom) Schulz, Matthew (Claudia) Busen; a brother, Hank (Betty) Scheidel, Wyandotte, Mich.; seven grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Cletus Anthony Scoop Busen. A memorial service was held on Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 from 2 to 8 p.m. at Borek Jennings Funeral Home, Hamburg Chapel. Her farewell and Mass of Christian Burial was Wednesday, February 19 at 2 p.m. at St. Patricks Catholic Church, Brighton, Father Carl Pung of ciating. Interment followed at Our Lady of Hope Cemetery in Brownstown Twp. Memorial contributions may be given to St. Patricks Catholic Church in Brighton. Please leave a message of comfort to the Busen family by calling 1-877231-7900 or sign her guestbook at www.borekjennings.com. Elizabeth Marie Britt, 80, passed away Tuesday, Feb. 18, 2014 in Tallahassee. She had lived in this area for 26 years coming from Plantation. She was a member of Lake Ellen Baptist Church and served with Campers on Mission. Visitation was held Friday, Feb. 21, 2014 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Services were held Friday, Feb. 21, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville. The family will have a private burial. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Florida Baptist Childrens Home, 8415 Buck Lake Road, Tallahassee FL 32317. She is survived by her husband, William Howard Britt; son, Howard Dale Britt; daughters, Susan Gail Whaley and Wendy Louise Wilson; and eight grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Deloris Robison Causseaux, 57, died Feb. 21, 2014 in Tallahassee. She was a native of Wakulla County. Visitation was held Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 from 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Debra Nell Cemetery. Graveside services were held Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Debra Nell Cemetery. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to the Childrens Lighthouse, 7771 Mahan Drive, Tallahassee FL 32309. Survivors include her husband, Paul Causseaux; sons, Bobby Robison (Heather), Jason Robison, John Robison (Lisa) and Randy Causseaux; daughters, Debbie Olah (Timmy), Carolyn Cloud (Rick), Sandy Moote and Katrina Dickson (Brent); brothers, Greg Hurley (Cassie) and Robert Hurley; sisters, Katrina Hurley (Barney), Ila Mae Gray (Mike) and Linda Beal; 14 grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). William R. Clyde Rodeheaver, 74, of Wakulla County, died on Feb. 18, 2014. He was born on July, 11, 1939, and was native of Wakulla County. Survivors include his only son, William D. Callahan, and friends Kathryn Wilson and Michele Roddy.Obituaries Elizabeth Marie Britt Elsie M. Busen Deloris Robison Casseaux William R. Clyde Rodeheaver Deloris Robison Casseaux Elizabeth Marie Britt William R. Rodeheaver Elsie M. Busen By TRACY RENEE LEEGrief manifests itself in many painful facets. There is emotional pain, psychological pain, spiritual pain, the pain of loneliness, the pain of sadness and even physical pain. Physical pain is very often brought on through continued avoidance of the grief experience. Not everyone suffers the same amount or type of pain once a loved one dies. It is nearly impossible, however, to avoid a painful experience at the loss of someone with whom you shared an attachment. Of important note, the deceased need not be a loved one to feel pain at his or her passing. When I was a young woman, I joined a large corporation in a secretarial capacity. It was not long after I began working there, that one of the district managers died. Although I worked in a different of ce building, and had only seen this man at regional meetings, I was affected by his loss. My attachment to the company included this man as an integral part of my newly acquired associated network. I pondered my pain at his loss for many years, and truly did not understand it until I entered funeral service. Although I did not know him very well at all, our work overlapped. I relied on his reports to compose my own. I had an attachment to him because I had a reliance on his work. His passing created a structural defect in the security of my newly acquired income. The stress, though short lived, was very unnerving. If grief is left unresolved or ignored, it will eventually surface in ones life as physical ailments. Grief affects the body and soul the same way stress does. If you continue to ignore your grief, other conditions will develop that are avoidable by allowing the pain of grief to present itself and working through it. I hope that if you have experienced unresolved grief, you will find the courage to face it and overcome the ill effects it creates within your physical and mental health. If you can muster up the courage to do it, you will bene t immensely. Your health will be better, and your life will be better too.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushin-updaisies.blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @ PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome. com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.The pain of grief BEREAVEMENT COLUMN Special to The NewsWhen Karolyn Rogers was 5, she became one of the millions of Americans whove lost a parent to war. My father, Pfc. Tom T. Wilmeth, died in the waning days of World War II and for most of my life, I felt a haunting absence and the grief of wondering about what my life might have been like had he survived the war, says Rogers, author of the new book, When Daddy Comes Home, (http://tinyurl. com/pgdz5kb), which details her journey of healing through researching her fathers family and military experience. Ive experienced what many are now experiencing for the rst time the shocking agony of losing someone you couldnt ever imagine losing. Id like those people to know that there are people like me who have managed to overcome their sorrow and live a ful lling life. Military families tend to suffer more than others, not only when losing a member killed in action, but also when returning loved ones suffer devastating physical and mental injuries, including PTSD, she says. As I experienced with my father, families and veterans of recent wars may wonder about the life they couldve had without ravages experienced by war, says Rogers, who offers tips for achieving a sense of closure, no matter what the nature of the tragedy may be. Understand the path in front of you today. The path to healing is a lifelong process; the loss is something youll continue to palpably feel. However, you have to create closure in your life, as best you can, after the loss of a loved one who would want you to live a full and happy life. Closure has no deadline. It doesnt matter how much time has passed since your loved one passed away. The psychological effects remain with you, right below the surface, and they need to be dealt with. Dont be afraid to explore who your loved one was. Its worth the effort to make the journey to discovering who your loved one was either through going online and learning what you can, or visiting sites that were important to him or her, or doing traditional research. Know that your journey will likely help others. When I read my book to my mother in the months before her death, she would nod and say, Thats him. Thats exactly who your father was. Not only was I healing myself, I was also reliving with my mother some of her lifes best years. Whether implicitly or explicitly, do NOT follow the notalk rule. The pain of losing a precious, noble, honorable and loving family member can be so overwhelming that the bereaved often nd the prospect of speaking about the loss intimidating and overwhelming. Dont be afraid! Talking about your loved one keeps their memory alive, and discussion is healing for the bereaved. Appreciate the closure you have, at any given point in time. Theres no such thing as absolute closure, but the focus of this journey is feeling better. We can certainly nd more psychological equilibrium by pursuing the stories of our departed loved ones.Tips to help cope with the sudden loss of a loved one Sponsored by Wakulla ONE, a fellowship of multiple Christian denominations and charitable ministries laboring together to serve the Wakulla County area in the Name of Christ and according to the prayer of Jesus in John 17:22. Visit online for more info: www.wakullaone.com. PHOTO C O UR TESY : Ernie Garci a Band 2013PH O TO C O U R TES Y : B a r r y McGhee 201 3 B RI NG the kid s! P A S T O R P IZZ A of Sid e w alk M i ni st ries wil l h o s t t w o s h ow s: 1 2 :30 p.m. & 2 : 3 0 p.mB R ING a l a wn chai r B R ING a c oole r E nj o y a n a f t e rn oon of inspi r a tional music with friends and f a mi l y No al c oho l p l e a s e. H ot-dog a nd ha mb ur g er pla t es a v ai l ab l e. Canned f ood d ri ve f o r l o c a l c h a r i ties a nd f ood ban k Loc al c h u r c h es, bus i ne s s es a nd i ndivi dua l d o na tio ns a r e w e l c o me. 11:45 Opening Invocation 12:0 0Called Upon to Magnify Christ (CUMC)1:0 0Big Poppa & the Shuffle Brothers2:0 0Unchained3:0 0For Greater Glory4:0 0Audience of One (SSBC Youth)5:0 0I Am Sent Ministries6:0 0Mother Gram & Gospel Joy Singers

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Special to the NewsIts been a long and winding road for Wakulla Highs theatre teacher and thespian sponsor Susan Solburg. Solburg began her career at Wakulla High in 1985 with the same zany comedy that she will be ending her teaching career William Gleasons comedic parody The Clumsy Custard Horror Show & Ice Cream Clone Review. A parody of all-time great movies has always been a crowd favorite with its over-thetop-characters, disco knights, live sound effects, and audience participation. The latest crop of actors to take on the play are having just as much fun as the original cast from 1985 and the subsequent casts in the following years. Its just a lot of fun to direct and so many students get to participate as there are 26 characters and several of the roles are double cast. The tech crew gets to build a big castle with lots of crazy props and costumes not to mention cool sound and lighting effects. Ms. Solburg hopes that former students who are still in the area will come back to reminisce and join in the celebration The show runs March 6 8, beginning at 7:30 p.m. and March 9 at 2:30 p.m. Cost for students is $4, seniors $5, and $6 general. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityThe parents of John Edward Nunez and Samantha Nicole Pouncey would like to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their children. John is a 2008 graduate of Franklin County High School and is currently employed as a Sergeant with the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. John is the son of Donnie and Meloney Chambers of Eastpoint, and John J. Nunez of South Carolina. He is the grandson of the late Cecil E. Simmons of Sopchoppy, the late Martha Braswell Glass of Eastpoint, Kelby & Sally Chambers of Eastpoint, and Ben & Rose Hurley of Tallahassee. Samantha is a 2011 graduate of Franklin County High School and is currently employed with the Florida Department of Corrections at Franklin C.I. Samantha is the child of Cecil Joe Pouncey & Frances Hunnings of Carabelle and Alicia Armistead of Texas. She is the granddaughter of Melvin & the late Marilyn Armitage of Texas and the late Carolyn Sparks of Carrabelle. The wedding will be held at Lafayette Park in Apalachicola on Saturday, March 22, 2014 at 2:30 p.m. with a reception to follow at Rivercrest Lodge. All family and friends are invited to attend, no formal invitations will be sent.Trying on period clothing at The Charleston, South Carolina Museum are Stalena McMillan Teague and Mother Hazel Jean McMillan who are members of the R. Don McLeod UDC Chapter #2469 in Crawfordville upon the record of Captain Uz William Cox. Finley Lamar McMillan is a member of Finley Brigade Camp #1614 Sons of Confederate Veterans upon the record of Captain Angus M. McMillan. By the time you read this, many will have celebrated World Spay Day (February 25). What do you mean you didnt celebrate? Well, thats OK, you can celebrate with us because every day a dog or cat is spayed or neutered is a reason to celebrate and here are a few reasons why: 1. Neutering eliminates the urge to breed which can cause destructive behaviors and injure cats many times requiring medical attention for infected scratches and bites. 2. Spaying females early on reduces the risk of breast cancer and prevents uterine infections and uterine cancer. 3. Neutering males prevents testicular cancer and reduces the risk for perianal tumors. 4. It reduces the urge to roam to seek out hormonal scents.Approximately 80 percent of pets hit by cars are unneutered males. 5. It ensures a happier household for multiple pet homes. 6. In the long term, spaying/neutering saves pet parents money on vet care. 7. It reduces the burden of what to do with unwanted animals. 8. It reduces the number of unwanted animals that are put to sleep. Due to the efforts of CHAT over the past 30 years, those of other local humane groups and responsible pet parents, Wakulla is doing better than many communities with stray and unwanted animals but the numbers are still way too high. Although CHAT no longer operates the Adoption Center, we will continue with spay/neuter activities like the TNR (Trap, Spay/Neuter, Return) project. TNR focuses on controlling feral cats, which are cats who has reverted in some degree to a wild state. They originate from former domestic cats that were lost or abandoned and then learned to live outdoors. We are in the learning and planning stages and have our rst event planned soon. This rst event will help us smooth out the process and position us to solicit and train more individuals. With the communities help, our goal is to identify and care for every feral colony in Wakulla County. In recent years, some people have misguidedly blamed cats for declining bird populations and feel that feral cats should be killed, not saved. But, it isnt the relationship between cats and birds that has changedits the relationship between humans and the environment. The U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates that every year 70 million birds die from pesticides and at least 100 million birds die from striking windows each year. If youve heard negative comments about TNR or if you would like to learn more about feral cats, please visit the website www.alleycats. org and look for the Save the Cats, Save the Birds news article and video. Misty, The One In a Million Cat is an excellent book and video to share with children. Just go to YouTube and search for Misty, The One In a Million Cat. Adults will like it, too. This weeks motto is Prevent a litter, fix your critter! Like CHAT of Wakulla on Facebook to stay informed of our activities and ways you can get involved. Meow, meow. Woof, woof! TAIL WAGGER By Janice EakinLets celebrate spaying-neutering animals UDC members visit CharlestonSPECIAL TO THE NEWSAir Force Airman Jacob B. Riley graduated from basic military training at Joint Base San AntonioLackland, San Antonio, Texas. The airman completed an intensive, eight-week program that included training in military discipline and studies, Air Force core values, physical tness, and basic warfare principles and skills. Airmen who complete basic training earn four credits toward an associate in applied science degree through the Community College of the Air Force. Riley is the son of Hank and Carrie Riley of Crawfordville. He is a 2013 graduate of Wakulla High School.Airman Jacob Riley completes basic Nunez and Pouncey to wedClumsy Custard to be Solburgs last show Edward Nunez and Samantha N. Pouncey WakullaJoin NAMI Wakulla for a Spaghetti Dinner and Silent Auction Friday, Feb. 28, 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Crawfordville Womans Club.64 Ochlockonee StreetSpaghetti, salad, bread and desserts. $8 adults, $4 children(take out also available)Help us continue our efforts in supporting mental health in Wakulla County!NAMI Wakulla is a 501 c(3) Non-prot organization. A copy of the ofcial registration and nancial information may be obtained from the Division of Consumer Services by calling toll-free within the state, 1-800-435-7352, Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. #CH34706 is offering a seminar for parents of middle-school children with an emphases on discovering a new view and attitude regarding the traits of ADHD. Join us and learn to help your child discover how to put the brakes on his Ferrari brain. Seminar will be held every Tuesday in March beginning 3/4/14.Call Rita Haney, MSW,LCSW 850-926-2039 and/or email Catherine Harris Small, Ms.Ed.S/MSW at ms.catherapy@gmail.com 3295 Crawfor dville Hwy.PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ADHDDiscovery Place$25/session 926-8886 ALL DAY 2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, Florida 2 PIECE $ 2 99 Mash Potato Roll 2 PIECE DARK LindysChicken Since19687locations State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL *Potential savings may vary based upon individual circumstances. Consult your agent for more details. Get a better ride with a better loan.And the more you save with a State Farm Bank car loan, the easier it is to get behind the wheel and just enjoy the ride. Thats borrowing better. GET TO A BETTER STATE.CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Our great rates can save y ou hundreds of dollars. 1303025 07/13 Gayla Parks, Agent State Farm Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsSuperintendent Robert Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the optimism, positive energy and compassion each of these individuals give to the children of Wakulla County and the enthusiasm they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. SUSAN TILLMAN MEDART ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Susan Tillman, February Teacher of the Month, began her teaching career nine years ago at Medart Elementary School as a first grade teacher. Encouraged and mentored by her sister, Ginger Tillman, Susan has never regretted one second spent teaching. Tillman shares, I love that there is always a way to nd inspiration, whether from the success of a student, the enthusiasm or creativity of a colleague, or kind words from a parent. It is a job that keeps me learning and re ecting each day. Tillman, a product of the Wakulla County School system, graduated from FSU with a degree in international affairs. She worked diligently completing the alternative certi cation program to meet the FL DOE professional certication criteria. Tillman moved from rst grade to a varying exceptionalities class this year. She cites the change as challenging. Tillman adds, I have a greater appreciation of every position in the school. I believe this opportunity has helped me grow into a better teacher and colleague. Principal Sharon Kemp recognizes Ms. Tillmans team spirit. Her stamina is unsurpassed, and her devotion to the students is evident. She is an avid reader and strives to instill the love of learning in all of her students. Although she didnt start her adult life as a teacher, she followed her heart, and Medart Elementary School received the blessing. BILL PECK WAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL Bill Peck, Wakulla Middle School Teacher and Coach, has been serving Wakulla students in a professional capacity since 2007. Peck served in the US Army and was an electrician prior to teaching. Determined to make a positive difference in the lives of kids, he returned to college, received his teaching credentials and changed careers. Fortunately for the Wildcats, he was hired at Wakulla Middle School in the EBD program. I enjoy providing a stable and enriching environment for each student. The daily interactions with students are enjoyable, especially as I watch them become independent and critical thinkers. Mr. Peck touts the positive rapport and camaraderie of WMS. A stranger to no one Peck contributes to that culture by doing whatever it takes, from coaching, driving buses, serving as an AVID site team member or participating in daily announcements. Originally from Waldo, Ohio, Pecks family relocated to Perry, FL where he graduated from high school. He later attended and graduated from TCC and FSU. WMS Principal Mike Barwick adds, After several years in the electrical business, Mr. Peck made the decision to become an educator. I believe hes met his calling. Mr. Peck works every day to serve our kids. Hes loved by all faculty, staff and students. Mr. Peck has in-depth knowledge on a lot of topics. Mr. Peck is an asset to our school and were proud to call him a WILDCAT. PATRICIA BAKERWAKULLA MIDDLE SCHOOL, FOOD SERVICEThe February Employee of the Month is the Food Service Departments Patricia Baker. Baker also started her career with the school at WMS as a food service substitute. Because she is a can-do optimistic employee, she rose quickly through the ranks to cashier to Shadeville kitchen manager and is now the District Food Service Resource Manager. When Baker was hired she brought years of food service industry experience with her from North Carolina and Germany. She attended school in Miramar, FL graduating from Miramar High School. She later attended Broward Community College earning an AA in music education and FSU where she majored in music therapy. Her love for music drove her to open her own Medart School of Music last year where she provides private music lessons. Baker shares, I love the kids. Seeing them each day and making them smile makes my day. I enjoy interacting with them and getting feedback from them regarding the food. I also enjoy cooking. As a resource manager, I have the opportunity to work in every kitchen. We have a great group of food service employees in Wakulla County. Gail Mathers, Food Service Director, shares, Ms. Baker is dependable and optimistic. These traits combined with her wealth of knowledge about food service make her an outstanding employee. While her home base is the district food service of ce, she is most often found at the school sites assisting managers, providing hands on training to personnel as well as aiding with delivery and equipment issues. Her exibility, friendly calm demeanor and ability to communicate well with people are strengths that she brings to the job. Mrs. Baker goes above and beyond to insure that the employees she works with and the students she comes in contact with have the very best. Her dedication, loyalty and commitment to the students and school system are very much appreciated. Special to The NewsFifteen band students from Wakulla Middle school performed solos at the Florida Bandmasters Solo and Ensemble Festival on February 15. All sixteen students performed very well receiving the rating of Superior or Excellent which are the two highest ratings awarded for performance at the Festival. Band director, Laura Hudson stated that the students had been practicing for several months and were very prepared. This is not a required event for students but for those who wish to go above and beyond their regular classroom music. The judges were very complimentary of our students and I was very proud of them. They are certainly a credit to our school and to their families, Hudson said. She would like to especially thank James Wilson, FAMU band intern for his assistance in preparing the students to perform at the festival. Students performing solos were Abbi McFalls, Talia Smid and Shelby Weeks on ute; Katie Hutto, Yulia Moody, Miracle Potter, Kalliope Smid and Rebecca Smith on clarinet; Nathan Cushard and Daniel Sullivan on alto saxophone; Gabrielle Boyd, Ebone Davis, and Taryn P ster on trumpet; Braxton Yates on baritone; and Zac Boone on tuba. Three of these students have also represented Wakulla Middle school for being selected by audition to perform in the District Honor Band at Chiles High School on January 25. Those students are: Yulia Moody, Daniel Sullivan and Zachary Boone. Teachers, Employee of the Month honored SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWMS band performs at Florida Bandmasters Festival Students Participate in Talquin Electric Youth TourSpecial to the NewsNineteen high school juniors from Gadsden, Leon, Liberty and Wakulla Counties were selected to participate in the Talquin Electric Youth Tour a few weeks ago at the state capitol. Students were chosen from Talquins Membership to participate in the Youth Tour based on academics, leadership, communication skills, and volunteer service in their schools and communities. Four students and four alternates were also selected from this group of outstanding student leaders to represent Talquin at the NRECA National Youth Tour in Washington, D.C. this summer. The national delegates are Brittany Fite, Godby High School; Patrick Harvey and Lydia Wiedeman, Wakulla High School; and Ryann Moore, Liberty County High School. The alternates are Heather Alvarez and Mary Eldon Greene, Wakulla High School; Edward Ellis, Godby High School; and Nickolas Bittle, East Gadsden High School. These delegates will travel to Washington, D.C. in June where they will meet with approximately 1,500 students from all over the United States. They will visit historic landmarks and continue to learn about cooperatives and government during the tour. Talquin would also like to congratulate Alexia Allen, Holli Capps, Ashley Carroll, Thomas Davis, Lauren Dunlap, Silesia Green, Nate Jackson, Morgan Kelly, and Kayla Wimberly, Wakulla High School; Leanne Duke, Godby High School; and LaRawnda Washington, East Gadsden High School, who were all selected to represent their schools in the 2014 Tallahassee Youth Tour. Front row: Alexia Allen, Ryann Moore, Silesia Green, Holli Capps, Morgan Kelly; middle row: Heather Alvarez, Nate Jackson, Lydia Wiedeman, Leanne Duke, Ashley Carroll, Lauren Dunlap; back row: Kayla Wimberly, Patrick Harvey, Mary Eldon Greene, Brittany Fite, Thomas Davis, Edward Ellis, Nickolas Bittle, LaRawnda Washington.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Susan Tillman Bill Peck Patricia Baker Save the Date!Hometown Getdownth $15 per personCall Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308 for more information or to RSVP. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304926-2200 Medicare Plans Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterNeither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent.850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsSpecial to The NewsA wrestling program for students of all ages in Wakulla County that practices on Tuesday and Thursday from 5:45 p.m. to 7:15 p.m. at Riversprings Middle School Gym starting on March 4. At these practices you will learn the basic fundamentals of wrestling and techniques that will help you in the upcoming season. As part of Team Wakulla you will practice throughout the summer and will participate in several tournaments to see your individual achievement. The practices are run by Coach Pafford (Wakulla High School Head Coach) and Coach Smith (Riversprings Middle School Head Coach). By HENRY MARINWCS Wrestling CoachWakulla Christian School will be offering the sport of wrestling for the 2014-15 school year for elementary grades (3rd 5th) and for middle school grades (6th 8th) and 9th grade. The season starts in October 2014. Until the season gets here, I highly recommend being a part of Team Wakulla, an off-season wrestling program for all ages, that starts at Riversprings Middle School on March 4. I will be at most, if not all, practices helping out. Students from Crawfordville, Medart and Riversink elementary schools can join the Wakulla Christian wrestling team. You dont have to be a student at WCS to wrestle. The WCS Wrestling Team is open to any child in Wakulla County. If you have any questions regarding the upcoming season or being part of Team Wakulla please call Henry Marin (Head Coach) at (386) 288-9442 or (850) 228-6003 or email me at coachhen55@gmail.com. By ROBERT DOUINSpecial to The NewsSeven War Eagle wrestlers traveled to Lakeland this past weekend where the team finished in 10 place out of 58 teams participating in the 1A state series. Two of the seven wrestlers that attended state made it to a podium nish. Senior James Douin nished in 5th place at 195 pounds and Senior Keith Godden nished in 4th place at 220. Competition is tough at this level and all wrestlers did well.WRESTLINGWar Eagles nish 10th at state nalsTeam Wakulla is organizing Wakulla Christian to o er wrestling PHOTOS BY ROBERT DOUIN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe War Eagle wrestling team after state nals in Lakeland. James Duoin nished fth at the nals.Keith Godden nished fourth at the nals. 000HBGR 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-7530 Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days Restaurant Restaurant Would like to thank Phillip Cooksey and the Great Crew at Kelly Sheet Metal for installing our Awesome New Cooking Line. WE LOVE IT! THANKS ALSO TOJohn and Gordon of Wakulla Gas Don and crew from Metal Building Services Heath from Anytime Electric Matt from CaptiveAir Ronnie JoynerANDThe Wakulla County Building Department for inspecting the work in a timely and most professional manner.WE DID A 7 DAY PROJECT IN 2 DAYS. WELL DONE!-MJS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 11Asports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachOn Saturday, Feb. 22, Wakulla High School track athletes joined those of seven other teams at Rickards High School for the rst annual Willie Williams Invitational Track Meet. There were numerous excellent performances by local tracksters, but the teams were led, for the boys, by Corion Knight and Bryce Cole and Haleigh Martin and Kayla Webbe for the girls. The eld events kicked off the meet and set the stage for two great performances for Knight, who was competing in his rst meet of the year after nishing basketball. Going into the meet with a preseason ranking of No. 2 in the state in class 2A in the high jump, he showed that the ranking was well deserved. He battled Kendall Randolph from Lincoln High School throughout the competition, but nally cleared a state elite height of 6 to clinch the win. While competing in the high jump, he also ran over to the long jump pit to compete. On his last jump, he leapt to a new personal best by almost two feet to win the competition with a jump of 22. Later in the meet he also ran a leg on the 2nd place 4x100 meter relay team and anchored the 4x400 meter relay team to a 6th place nish. In the middle distances, freshman Bryce Cole also had an outstanding day. He kicked the meet off with a win and new personal record (PR) of 4:50.70 in the 1600 meters (the metric equivalent of the mile) and followed with a 5th place nish in the 800 meters. Freshman Haleigh Martin set the stage for the girls by taking control of the 1600 meters early in the race and going on to win in the excellent time and new PR of 5:40.50. About an hour later, she followed that up by running another PR of 2:34.42 in the 800 meters and placing second. Senior and Palm Beach Atlantic signee Kayla Webbe also had an outstanding meet, beginning with a pivotal leg in the 4x800 meter relay which placed rst and culminating with a dominating win in the 3200 meter run in 13:11.07. Freshman Adrianna Mitchell also made her presence felt by placing 6th in the 100 meter dash in a new PR of 11.49, 3rd in the 200 meter dash, also in a new PR of 27.22 and 3rd in the long jump, with a leap of 15. Other boys who contributed to the points scored by the local team included J.P Piotrowski (3rd, 800 meters, 2:12), Alan Pearson (7th, 800 meter run, 2:16), Travis Parks (6th, 1600 meters, new PR of 5:13 & 3rd, 3200 meters, 11:49), Mitchell Atkinson (8th, 1600 meters, 5:20 & 5th, 3200 meters,12:07), Nate Jackson (8th, Discus, 103) and Tyler Westcott (6th, 3200 meters, new PR of 13:43). The boys 4x100 meter relay team (Malik Thomas, Demarcus Lindsey, Corion Knight, Kelton Donladson) stormed to a 2nd place nish in 44.20 seconds, the 4x200 relay team (Monterious Loggins, Justin Green, Tre Hester, Matt Bouyer) also placed second in 1:3.96 and the 4x400 meter relay team (Sebastion Garner, Alan Pearon, Matt Bouyer, Corion Knight) placed 6th in a season best time of 3:42.60. Others contributing points for the girls team were Lydia Wiedeman (4th, 400 meters in a new PR of 1:03.80 & anchor for the 1st place 4x800 meter relay team, Chipola College signee Marty Wiedman (3rd, 1600, 6:09.31 & lead-off leg of 4x800 relay), Connie Lewis (5th, 1600 meters, new PR of 6:15.66 & 4x800 meter relay), Shaniece Johnson (6t, long jump, 14),Shelby Alsup (4th, shotput, new PR of 30.5 & 7th, discus, 67), Allison Carr (6th, shotput, new PR of 29) and Ashley Carr (7th, shotput, new PR of 29.5 & 5th discus, also a new PR of 77). The girls also won the 4x800 meter relay (Marty Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe, Connie Lewis, Lydia Wiedeman) in the very solid time of 11:11. Overall, the WHS girls collected another trophy for their collection by placing second over host Rickards High School by one point, 87 to 86 points, and the boys team placed 6th overall. Both of the teams turned in solid performances, said Coach Paul Hoover. We continue to get consistent production out of our middle distance runners and Coach Gavin has done a great job with the jumpers and sprinters and the we are getting production out of our throwers, so our team balance is better than it has been for several years. Its early in the season, he said, but there are a lot of positive things going on. The rest of the season should be fun. The next competition for the local teams will be on Saturday, March 1, at the extremely competitive Jesse Forbes Meet held at Godby High School in Tallahassee, with the competition kicking off at 11 a.m. TRACKKnight, Cole, Martin and Webbe shine at Williams InvitationalBy JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netWakulla High School senior Kayla Webbe signed a scholarship to run cross country with Palm Beach Atlantic University. This is my very rst choice. Im so happy, said Webbe about the opportunity. Go sailfish! said Bobby Pearce, superintendent of schools, as he stood in the crowd that gathered in the War Eagle Cafe. Mike Smith, WHS athletic director, said of Webbe, First time I saw her I thought, Good grief, shes tall. I didnt realize then that she was an athlete. Track and cross country Coach Paul Hoover talked about the rst day of cross country practice last year, when Webbe walked toward the crowd of girls. I was standing there with some of the runners, and one of them said, She looks like one of those Chiles girls, Hoover said, referring to Webbes height and long legs. Originally from Coral Springs, Webbe transferred to WHS from Colquitt County High School in Moultrie, Ga., the summer before her junior year. One of the few regrets I have, said Hoover, is that I didnt have her all four years. The other regret is that youre gonna be so far away for me to have to drive to come see you run, he lamented. Marty and Maddie are much closer, referring to two of Webbes teammates who recently signed scholarships at schools closer to Wakulla County. Earlier in the season, Webbe had become sick with mononucleosis, which kept her out of competition throughout the beginning of the cross country season. I contacted coaches in Tallahassee, and asked around, and most said there was no way shed be able to return. They told me to just write it off, Hoover said. Only one coach had an athlete return to run after having mono. When she was able to return to practice, she had to rest a lot, Hoover said. Although knowing her, she was probably sneaking home and doing workouts I didnt know about. But she started to improve, so Hoover scrambled to get her into the regional meet. She had a personal best coming off mono, Hoover said, explaining that shed nished third on the team. Hoover spoke about Webbes impressive two year stint at WHS, her strong work ethic and her willingness to get a little silly, at times. I ask that you carry these three things with you when you go. I want you to take your work ethic and your great attitude, he said. And I want you to take Jonathan with you, he said as Webbe and her team burst into laughter. Turns out Jonathan is a golden lizard, and part of an inside joke between Hoover and Webbe, an animal lover. Each year Hoover gives out the Hoover Awards as a way to recognize individuals and their achievements. He awarded Webbe with the golden lizard as a good luck charm, stemming from an apparent prank shed played on the coach during the season. PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMKayla Webbe with family and coaches at her scholarship signing. Kayla Webbe with teammates and classmates at her signing.Kayla Webbe signs to run for Palm Beach Atlantic Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50 Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBy AMANDA NALLEYFWC Guest ColumnistImagine for a minute you are out to sea, line wet, with about 150 feet of water separating boat from the bottom. You feel a tug. Instinct kicks in and you want to yank up to set the hook, but you remember that doesnt work with circle hooks, a required gear when shing for reef fish like snapper and grouper in all Gulf waters and in federal waters of the Atlantic south of 28 degrees north latitude. So you gently start reeling it in, hoping nothing eats your catch before you can get it to the boat. Alas, the sh surfaces, but it is too small to keep and it seems to be experiencing barotrauma, a condition that occurs when the gases in the swim bladder expand after being brought to the surface from depth. STOP! The choices you make from here on can greatly impact whether or not that sh you are about to release survives to be caught another day. Do you know what to do? Post-release fish survival should be important to all anglers. The more sh that survive being caught and subsequently released, the more sh there will be in general. This can eventually mean extension of open seasons, increases in bag limits and more successful fishing trips. While every situation is different, there are plenty of things you can do to help maximize the survival of fish you plan on releasing, from using wet hands when touching a fish to holding your catch horizontally. Matching your gear to the size fish you are targeting can help shorten the time it takes to get the sh to the boat, which can help a sh survive if released because it will be less exhausted. If your sh is experiencing barotrauma, time is of the essence. Barotrauma can potentially cause injury to the internal organs as they are pushed out of the body (signs of this include stomach protruding from mouth, intestines protruding from the anus, eyes bulging out and bloated belly). There are two main types of tools currently used to help relieve the effects of barotrauma. Venting tools are hollow, sharpened devices (think a syringe without the plunger) that can be used to release the expanded gases. Descending devices, which are used to send the fish back down to depth, also have promise. Until recently, it has been required to have and use venting tools when shing for reef sh in the Gulf, but this requirement was removed in federal waters last year and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission voted to remove the requirement in state waters last November. The rule change should go in effect around the end of the month. The removal of this rule will give anglers the ability to choose the best method to maximize survival of released sh. For example, on a hot summer day, using a descending device might be a better option because you are quickly returning the sh to the cooler water at the bottom. And while venting, when done correctly can help, not all sh need to be vented. Both tools have advantages and disadvantages. Hit a hot spot? It is possible to vent and release several sh in the same amount of time it would take to descend a single sh. Then again, not everyone feels con dent on when, where and how to vent. Going too deep or venting in the wrong place can cause more damage than good. But you also need to know what you are doing when using a descending device. If done incorrectly, the fish may come loose too soon. Descending devices also can require the dedication of a rod, which is used to bring the descending device down and back up again. While both devices can be homemade or purchased and while both are inexpensive, descending devices can cost, on average, slightly more than venting tools. Both devices also come in various sizes, but venting tools tend to generally be smaller than descending devices and do not take up a lot of space in an already-crowded tackle box. Either way, the choice is yours. So shop around, be sure to read the instructions thoroughly and, hopefully, take home a keeper or two. For more on how to make sure your sh survives release, visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Fish Handling.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsHelping your sh survive helps youFWC proposes red snapper season Snook to reopen in Gulf state waters Pine Creek Landing boat ramp closedWhats in store for manatees? Special to The NewsThe Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission proposed 2014 Gulf recreational red snapper season dates in state waters. This proposed season will be brought back before the Commission for nal approval at its April 15-17 meeting in Tallahassee. The 2014 proposed season, if approved in April, would be 52 days long, starting the Saturday before Memorial Day (May 24 this year) and remaining open through July 14, closing July 15. The Commission could choose to change the season length and dates at the April meeting. Starting the season the Saturday before Memorial Day could increase recreational shing opportunities for anglers by giving them the chance to sh for red snapper in state waters during the holiday weekend. The federal season is scheduled to be 40 days long, starting June 1 and remaining open through July 10. This season is subject to change if NOAA Fisheries data indicate that the recreational red snapper quota will be caught before or after the end of the federal season. State waters in the Gulf are from shore to 9 nautical miles. Federal waters extend from where state waters end out to about 200 nautical miles. To learn more about this agenda item, visit MyFWC.com/Commission and click on Commission Meetings. To learn more about recreational red snapper shing in the Gulf of Mexico, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Snapper.Special to The NewsThe U.S.D.A. Forest Service has temporarily closed the Pine Creek Landing boat ramp on the Apalachicola National Forest. People wishing to access the Ochlockonee River can still launch their boat at Whitehead Lake, Porter Lake, Mack Landing and Wood Lake boat ramps. Pine Creek Landing is still open to foot traf c and bank shing, but the boat ramp currently poses a safety threat to potential users due to damage caused by the owing river underneath the structure. The Forest Service took immediate action to ensure the ramp is closed until it can be repaired. For more information, contact the U.S.D.A. Forest Service Wakulla Ranger District Of ce at (850) 926-3561.By KATIE TRIPPSave the Manatee Club 2013 went down in the manatee record books as the species worst-ever year in Florida. In total, 829 deaths were confirmed of an endangered species whose last known minimum count was 4,831 in January 2014. Thats 17 percent of the known population dead in a single year. The previous record number of deaths, 766, was set in 2010 and regarded as an anomaly a rare occurrence caused by extended cold temperatures, a level of mortality not thought likely to appear again anytime soon. Until recently, weve been dealing with the usual suspects that threaten manatees: water control structures, entanglement in or ingestion of marine debris, and watercraft, with some cold stress, and mortality of very young calves mixed in. Red tide often loomed offshore of southwest Florida as a potential threat. And on the rare occasion would be the manatee that had the privilege of dying of old age a feat most in the population dont achieve due to the threats they face. In the past few years, attention has been focused on bigger, more nefarious threats that no one knows how to remedy. In the southwest, red tides are finding ample food when they blow inshore, and are persisting, killing large numbers of manatees and other marine life. For manatees, these blooms are no longer considered an unusual mortality event (UME), but an ongoing mortality event a sign of the times. On Floridas east coast, no one has a clue what in the environment killed 127 manatees, in an on-again, off-again UME, which is now on-again, already killing several manatees in 2014. Manatees, often regarded as robust for their ability to survive multiple watercraft strikes and continue to live on after losing ippers to entanglements, are no match for the strange cocktail of toxins that are plaguing their environment. So what can we do? First, we need to keep on trying to protect manatees from the usual suspects. Human-related causes of mortality remain largely preventable. In 2013, 85 fewer manatees would have died if we prevented human-related deaths. Next, we all need to work more diligently to protect the ow of our groundwater and surface waters and prevent pollutants from entering waters. One very easy thing to do is log on to www. wewantcleanwater.com and sign a petition. A coalition of Floridas environmental groups are working to send a loud and clear message to Tallahassee that we are long overdue to get serious about our states water issues. Finally, its important to realize that the next water quality crisis could be coming to your hometown. If you havent experienced such a crisis yet, count your blessings, then get on the phone to your city and county council, and your state senators and representatives, and find out what theyre doing to ensure you never do. So what can manatees expect in 2014? Thats really up to you. But one thing is for certain: they need our voices and our support now more than ever. For more information on manatees and to learn about the Clubs Adopt-A-Manatee program, go to www.savethemanatee. org or call 1-800-432JOIN (5646). Katie Tripp has been Save the Manatee Clubs Director of Science and Conservation since May of 2008. She received her Ph.D. in Veterinary Medical Sciences from the University of Florida, where she conducted research on manatee physiology. ere were record losses for the endangered species last year Special to The News The recreational harvest season for one of Floridas premier game sh, snook, reopens on March 1 in Floridas Gulf of Mexico state and adjacent federal waters, including Everglades National Park and Monroe County. The season will remain open through April 30. In the Gulf, anglers may keep one snook per day that is not less than 28 or more than 33 inches total length, which is measured from the most forward point of the head with the mouth closed to the farthest tip of the tail with the tail compressed or squeezed while the sh is lying on its side. A snook permit is required to keep snook, along with a saltwater shing license unless exempt from the license requirements. Only hook-and-line gear is allowed when targeting or harvesting snook. It is illegal to buy or sell snook. For more information visit MyFWC.com/ Fishing and click on Saltwater, Recreational Regulations and Snook. WEEDEATER$21900SPECIAL OF THE WEEKFS56 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 13ASaturday, Feb. 22, was the Winter Meeting for Division 1. Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon and member Carolyn Treadon traveled to Milton for the event. Division 1 is one of three divisions within the 8th Coastal Region and currently has ve active Flotillas. The meeting was held at the Milton Community Center. Saturday morning was divided into several opportunities for training. Division Staff Officer for Member Training Lynn Mott held training on the life cycle for personal protective equipment such as life jackets. Participants engaged in mock scenarios and tested their knowledge. Division Staff Ofcer for Publications Ellena Rolland provided training for those involved in publications for the Auxiliary. Our Operations Training Of cer CWO3 James Todd from the DIRAUX of ce spoke on the process of material requests and the options available for the Division and Flotillas. The whole group came together again for a nal training on trailering and boat launching policies when we are going out for a safety patrol. Following a great lunch provided by otilla members, Division Commander Eric DeVuyst began the business meeting. We were joined by Commodore Larry King, Operations Training Of cer CWO3 James Todd from DIRAUX, District Captain East Mo Davis, Division Vice Commander TJ Del Bello and Division 3 Commander Jeff Davis. There is an initiative within the Auxiliary for divisions to work together to accomplish more for the promotion of recreational boating safety. Throughout the meeting, Division Staff Of cers and Flotilla Commanders discussed their progress. One common theme was repeatedly addressed recreational boating safety. OTO Todd stressed to all in attendance that the mission of the Auxiliary is to support the Coast Guard in its mission promoting recreational boating safety. All of our activities must focus on increasing awareness and promoting safety when out on the water. Several ideas were discussed to offer more opportunities for the public. The meeting concluded with several awards being presented. Four of the ve otillas in our Division (12, 14, 17 and 18) received their Silver Oar. This award signies the otilla has met the minimum goals in several program areas for the last year. Flotilla 12 and 14 also received the Betty A. Finnegan Growth Award for new membership. A very special award was presented to Lynn Mott, DO-MT for her hard work in helping to organize the District meeting in February of last year. Commodore King presented the award. Throughout the coming year, we will have many opportunities for the public to learn about safe boating. This coming weekend we will have members staf ng a booth at the Tallahassee Regional Boat Show happening at the North Florida Fairgrounds in Tallahassee. Thank you to Duane Treadon for submitting photographs. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Officer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux. net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@uscgaux. net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Safety should be your No. 1 priority! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies The Academy Pond. There is a 2.5 acre pond on the Tallahassee Community Colleges Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy property near Quincy that, from the surface, seems benign. But underwater, this karst feature is anything but friendly. I rst encountered the pond a decade ago, at the invitation of Sgt. Ken McDonnald, the Instructor for the Florida Department of Law Enforcements 40 hour Police Diving course. He had recently joined our academic group at Florida State University pursuing a re-de nition of police investigations underwater. To get rst-hand experience, he subjected us to the full FDLE underwater police course, including the Pond Experience. I know divers enter the underwater world because they want to see the many marvels contained within, but seldom do criminals dump their crime in clear water. Every window into our aquifer is a potential crime scene. Our diving police are asked to enter snagridden, zero-visibility water as a normal environmental expectation. The Academy Pond is just such a place, housing a plane, cars and a boat all strategically placed along a cave-divers line trail leading through many snares and traps along the way. Candidates are expected to not only swim the gauntlet but solve the crime. In our case there was a body located in the boat at the end of the trail. Dare I say, underwater crime scene investigators need nerves of steel to do their job! Several of my faculty were cave divers, so we were familiar with no-visibility and entanglements. As scientists we sought to investigate the anomalies reported a sinking vessel, loud voices heard somewhere in the back of the pond late at night. Many law enforcement in the past gallantly dragged on shore recovered artifacts and bodies from such conditions because it was felt nothing could be done with submerged evidence in a court of law. Not true, we argued, ngerprints and dermal tissues samples can be extracted from evidence even taken from recovered submerged artifacts. Sgt. McDonnald agreed! Would you agree to an of cer walking into a house, nding and pulling a body by the ankle and depositing it on the front lawn for the detectives to study? Of course not, but that was an accepted protocol underwater. Now fast forward a decade. I am discussing underwater courses to be offered at TCC and Florida A&M University in coming years and the Director of the Academy spoke of a problem they must soon resolve. It seems they had a close call in the Academy Pond someone got trapped in one of the obstructions and nearly drowned. They now have plans to clean up the pond and return it to its karst origins. I could not imagine how many hours and resources went into the construction of such a ne training facility, and the great loss it would represent because someone may have been lax in their safety protocols. So we will collaborate between the Wakulla Environmental Institute and the Law Enforcement Academy (both under TCC) to save the Academy Pond, use it to continue training future underwater crime scene investigators and eventually create a similar facility right here in Wakulla County. Going back to the future again. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 3.4 ft. 12:02 AM 3.6 ft. 12:57 AM 3.6 ft. 1:46 AM 3.6 ft. 2:32 AM 3.4 ft. 3:17 AM 3.1 ft. 4:00 AM 2.8 ft. 4:44 AM High -0.9 ft. 6:48 AM -0.8 ft. 7:31 AM -0.6 ft. 8:09 AM -0.3 ft. 8:44 AM 0.0 ft. 9:15 AM 0.4 ft. 9:43 AM 0.7 ft. 10:10 AM Low 3.3 ft. 1:12 PM 3.4 ft. 1:47 PM 3.5 ft. 2:20 PM 3.6 ft. 2:50 PM 3.6 ft. 3:18 PM 3.5 ft. 3:44 PM 3.4 ft. 4:09 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:53 PM 0.2 ft. 7:40 PM -0.1 ft. 8:24 PM -0.3 ft. 9:06 PM -0.4 ft. 9:48 PM -0.3 ft. 10:30 PM -0.1 ft. 11:16 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:49 AM 2.7 ft. 1:38 AM 2.7 ft. 2:24 AM 2.5 ft. 3:09 AM 2.3 ft. 3:52 AM 2.1 ft. 4:36 AM High -0.6 ft. 6:59 AM -0.6 ft. 7:42 AM -0.4 ft. 8:20 AM -0.2 ft. 8:55 AM 0.0 ft. 9:26 AM 0.3 ft. 9:54 AM 0.5 ft. 10:21 AM Low 2.5 ft. 1:04 PM 2.6 ft. 1:39 PM 2.6 ft. 2:12 PM 2.7 ft. 2:42 PM 2.7 ft. 3:10 PM 2.6 ft. 3:36 PM 2.5 ft. 4:01 PM High 0.4 ft. 7:04 PM 0.1 ft. 7:51 PM -0.1 ft. 8:35 PM -0.2 ft. 9:17 PM -0.3 ft. 9:59 PM -0.2 ft. 10:41 PM -0.1 ft. 11:27 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 12:38 AM 3.3 ft. 1:33 AM 3.4 ft. 2:22 AM 3.3 ft. 3:08 AM 3.2 ft. 3:53 AM 2.9 ft. 4:36 AM 2.6 ft. 5:20 AM High -0.8 ft. 7:52 AM -0.7 ft. 8:35 AM -0.6 ft. 9:13 AM -0.3 ft. 9:48 AM 0.0 ft. 10:19 AM 0.4 ft. 10:47 AM 0.7 ft. 11:14 AM Low 3.1 ft. 1:48 PM 3.2 ft. 2:23 PM 3.3 ft. 2:56 PM 3.3 ft. 3:26 PM 3.3 ft. 3:54 PM 3.2 ft. 4:20 PM 3.1 ft. 4:45 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:57 PM 0.1 ft. 8:44 PM -0.1 ft. 9:28 PM -0.3 ft. 10:10 PM -0.3 ft. 10:52 PM -0.3 ft. 11:34 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 2.8 ft. 12:41 AM 2.8 ft. 1:30 AM 2.8 ft. 2:16 AM 2.6 ft. 3:01 AM 2.4 ft. 3:44 AM 2.2 ft. 4:28 AM High -0.9 ft. 6:27 AM -0.8 ft. 7:10 AM -0.6 ft. 7:48 AM -0.3 ft. 8:23 AM 0.0 ft. 8:54 AM 0.4 ft. 9:22 AM 0.7 ft. 9:49 AM Low 2.6 ft. 12:56 PM 2.7 ft. 1:31 PM 2.8 ft. 2:04 PM 2.8 ft. 2:34 PM 2.8 ft. 3:02 PM 2.7 ft. 3:28 PM 2.6 ft. 3:53 PM High 0.5 ft. 6:32 PM 0.2 ft. 7:19 PM -0.1 ft. 8:03 PM -0.3 ft. 8:45 PM -0.4 ft. 9:27 PM -0.3 ft. 10:09 PM -0.1 ft. 10:55 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 3.6 ft. 12:54 AM 3.7 ft. 1:43 AM 3.7 ft. 2:29 AM 3.5 ft. 3:14 AM 3.2 ft. 3:57 AM 2.8 ft. 4:41 AM High -0.9 ft. 6:45 AM -0.9 ft. 7:28 AM -0.7 ft. 8:06 AM -0.3 ft. 8:41 AM 0.0 ft. 9:12 AM 0.4 ft. 9:40 AM 0.8 ft. 10:07 AM Low 3.4 ft. 1:09 PM 3.5 ft. 1:44 PM 3.6 ft. 2:17 PM 3.6 ft. 2:47 PM 3.6 ft. 3:15 PM 3.6 ft. 3:41 PM 3.4 ft. 4:06 PM High 0.6 ft. 6:50 PM 0.2 ft. 7:37 PM -0.1 ft. 8:21 PM -0.3 ft. 9:03 PM -0.4 ft. 9:45 PM -0.3 ft. 10:27 PM -0.1 ft. 11:13 PM Low Thu Feb 27, 14 Fri Feb 28, 14 Sat Mar 1, 14 Sun Mar 2, 14 Mon Mar 3, 14 Tue Mar 4, 14 Wed Mar 5, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 12:18 AM 2.5 ft. 1:20 AM 2.5 ft. 2:17 AM 2.3 ft. 3:12 AM 2.2 ft. 4:07 AM 2.0 ft. 5:06 AM High -0.5 ft. 6:28 AM -0.3 ft. 7:09 AM -0.1 ft. 7:45 AM 0.1 ft. 8:17 AM 0.4 ft. 8:46 AM 0.6 ft. 9:12 AM 0.8 ft. 9:37 AM Low 2.0 ft. 1:53 PM 2.0 ft. 2:14 PM 2.0 ft. 2:33 PM 2.1 ft. 2:52 PM 2.2 ft. 3:12 PM 2.3 ft. 3:34 PM 2.4 ft. 4:01 PM High 0.9 ft. 6:04 PM 0.7 ft. 6:52 PM 0.4 ft. 7:38 PM 0.2 ft. 8:23 PM 0.1 ft. 9:09 PM 0.0 ft. 9:57 PM 0.0 ft. 10:52 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 27 March 5First March 8 Full March 16 Last March 24 New March 111:15 am-1:15 pm 11:43 pm-1:43 am 5:31 am-6:31 am 5:02 pm-6:02 pm 12:11 pm-2:11 pm --:-----:-6:16 am-7:16 am 6:09 pm-7:09 pm 12:39 am-2:39 am 1:06 pm-3:06 pm 7:00 am-8:00 am 7:16 pm-8:16 pm 1:32 am-3:32 am 1:55 pm-3:55 pm 7:41 am-8:41 am 8:20 pm-9:20 pm 2:25 am-4:25 am 2:51 pm-4:51 pm 8:22 am-9:22 am 9:24 pm-10:24 pm 3:17 am-5:17 am 3:42 pm-5:42 pm 9:03 am-10:03 am 10:24 pm-11:24 pm 4:08 am-6:08 am 4:33 pm-6:33 pm 9:46 am-10:46 am 11:23 pm-12:23 am Better Best Best Better Good Average Average7:05 am 6:34 pm 5:32 am 5:03 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:04 am 6:35 pm 6:18 am 6:10 pm 7:03 am 6:36 pm 7:01 am 7:17 pm 7:02 am 6:36 pm 7:42 am 8:21 pm 7:00 am 6:37 pm 8:23 am 9:24 pm 6:59 am 6:38 pm 9:04 am 10:25 pm 6:58 am 6:39 pm 9:46 am 11:24 pm16% 8% 0% 7% 15% 22% 29%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee Bay Dog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSDuane Treadon receiving awards for Flotilla 12.Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Sunday, Feb. 16, Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a grand theft. Deputy Scott Powell observed a suspect in a retail theft case running south from the front of the store. Off-duty Tallahassee Police Department Ofcer Travis Harts eld also saw Deputy Powell chasing a suspect and helped secure the man. A pipe used for smoking methamphetamine was allegedly discovered on the suspect and $313 worth of merchandise was recovered in the parking lot including clothing, electronics and a Blue Ray player. Shawn D. Kimmel, 34, of Boulder. Colo., and a member of the Rainbow Tribe was arrested and charged with retail theft, resisting an of cer without violence and possession of narcotics equipment. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough also investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: THURSDAY, FEB. 13 John Graham of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered unauthorized charges on his bank card. The charges were created over the Internet and totaled $1,345. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Melissa Trice of Crawfordville reported the theft of a trash barrel. The victim put her Waste Pro trash barrel out for collection and when she returned it was missing. The barrel is valued at $100. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. FRIDAY, FEB. 14 A14-year-old Wakulla Middle School student reported her cell phone as missing. Deputy Evelyn Brown determined two possible locations for the phone but it was not located. It is valued at $100. Helen Vaughn of Panacea reported the theft of a utility trailer tag. The tag was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. The tag is valued at $36. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. Raymond Hines of Crawfordville reported a structure re. Deputy Stephen Simmons arrived on scene to observe smoke coming from the front and rear doors. Wakulla Firefighters also arrived on the scene. The victims wife put food on the stove and left the residence for a short period of time. The kitchen was on re when she returned. The flames damaged the kitchen and there was signi cant smoke and water damage to other parts of the home. The re was ruled accidental and damage was estimated at more than $10,000. Sgt. Ryan Muse also investigated. Deputy Gibby Gibson was called out on a welfare check and spoke to a 21-year-old mother of a 1-year-old child. Deputy Gibson was granted permission to check on the child and when he did he observed marijuana in plain view. The mother was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Her marijuana weighed 1.9 grams. The incident was reported to the Department of Children of Families due to the presence of drugs around the child. SATURDAY, FEB. 15 Cora Hines of Sopchoppy reported the theft of motor vehicle keys from a vehicle at the Express Lane in Sopchoppy. It has not been determined who removed the keys from the vehicle. The vehicle was removed from the scene by a family member of the victim. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. During the investigation it was determined that Gillis Lee White, 53, of Sopchoppy entered the Express Lane despite having an active trespass warning at the location. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Sgt. Ryan Muse conducted a traffic stop on Highway 363 due to a vehicle tag expiration date not matching the tag sticker. During the investigation, the passenger in the vehicle allegedly would not follow the commands of Sgt. Muse. The passenger reportedly attempted to leave the vehicle and had to be brought back to the vehicle by Sgt. Muse. Aaron Michael Wiggens, 19, of Crawfordville was found to be in possession of beer. Wiggens was charged with possession of alcohol by a person under 21 years of age and disorderly intoxication. Patricia Carmichael of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of items from her rental property. The stolen property included electronics, DVDs, propane gas, doors, furniture, silverware, tools and more. The property is valued at $930. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Hellen Forehand of Tallahassee reported the theft of property from a relatives home in Crawfordville. A generator and sword, valued at $250, were removed from a shed. A person of interest was identified. Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Deputy Stephen Simmons conducted a traffic stop on Coastal Highway in Medart due to faulty equipment. Deputy Simmons reportedly smelled the strong odor of marijuana coming from inside the vehicle. Sherril Devaston Tomes, 64, of Pinetta, allegedly handed over a marijuana cigarette. The marijuana weighed .3 of a gram. He was issued a notice to appear in court. Detective Clint Beam also investigated. SUNDAY, FEB. 16 Irene Largent of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported an unauthorized withdrawal from her bank account. A Western Union transaction to Washington State for $145 was observed on the account. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported the theft of a KaZoo Stylus, valued at $15. The suspect, Robert Sean Vierkadt, 28, of Dothan, Ala., and the Florida Rainbow Tribe, was arrested for retail theft after being observed passing the last point of sale. Deputies Jeff Yarbrough and Scott Powell investigated. Cynthia Goodwin of Crawfordville reported a brush fire. The victim was attempting to burn cardboard boxes when the fire spread to a eld adjacent to her home. The re burned approximately 400 square feet of grass. There was no damage to a trailer or the residence. Wakulla Firefighters put out the blaze. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. John Harvey of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re. Deputy Gibby Gibson arrived on scene and observed a male subject attempting to put out a fire in the engine compartment with water. Deputy Gibson extinguished the blaze with his agency fire extinguisher. Wakulla Firefighters also arrived on scene and put out a re under the vehicle. The victim had reportedly poured gasoline in the carburetor in an effort to start the vehicle and it caught re. The vehicle suffered approximately $1,500 worth of damage. Melvin Harrell of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on his bank account. The charge was a $100 ATM withdrawal. Later, the victim noti ed Deputy Gibby Gibson that the withdrawal was a bank error and had been corrected. Robin Mispel of Crawfordville reported a burglary and theft. The victim noted the theft of a boat motor from his home. It was determined that someone also removed gasoline from the victims vehicle. The loss of the gasoline and boat motor together was estimated at $125. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. MONDAY, FEB. 17 Darrell Land of Crawfordville and Splash and Dash Car Wash reported a felony criminal mischief. The victim discovered parts of his car wash damaged. Some of the cleaning equipment caught on a vehicle rope inside the back of the vehicle as it was using the car wash. The motorist rapidly accelerated with the equipment stuck on the rope and damaged the cleaning machinery. Evidence was collected at the scene. Damage was estimated at $3,000. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Valerie Cathrine Bradford, 31, of Panacea was charged with disorderly conduct. A concerned citizen called law enforcement and stated that Bradford was cursing and being vulgar in public on Tully Avenue. Bradford reportedly cursed investigating deputies when they arrived and allegedly refused to calm down. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy Adam Pendris investigated. Joey Hodges of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from his Crawfordville business. The bike was located behind Renegades of the Gulf Vape Shop and was valued at $35. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. TUESDAY, FEB. 18 A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student was issued a notice to appear in court after Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson received information about drugs on campus. A smoking pipe was allegedly found in the students book bag and the student will be required to appear in court for possession of drug paraphernalia. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 James Card of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle decal. Someone attempted to pull the decal off the tag while the victim was at WalMart. Part of the decal remained on the tag. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Betty Johnson of Panacea reported nding an abandoned bicycle while walking in her community. The bicycle belongs to a child and is valued at $100. The bike was turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Sherry Waites of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported that someone used her Social Security number to apply for unemployment bene ts. The victim led a complaint with the Federal Trade Commission. Sgt. Ray Johnson recommended she contact the three credit bureaus to see if any other fraud activity has occurred. Norman Barwick of Panacea reported the theft of gasoline and two gas cans from his boat. The gas cans and gasoline taken has been valued at $110. A person of interest was identi ed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Billy Whit eld of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. An unauthorized charge was observed on the victims bank account. The charge was valued at $180 from an establishment in San Benito, Texas. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student received a civil citation after WHS Dean Susan Tillman received information that he possessed drugs. A marijuana pipe and partially burned marijuana cigarette were allegedly found in the students pocket. The civil citation was issued for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. The marijuana weighed .1 of a gram. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Shelbi Davis of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported that someone was using her Social Security number. The victim also reported the incident to the Social Security of ce. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. THURSDAY, FEB. 20 William Smith of Ben Withers Construction in Panacea reported a business burglary. The victim observed storage sheds that were open and $10,775 worth of tools missing. A forced entry was observed. Deputy Mike Zimba, Lt. Brent Sanders and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Cliffton Bass of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A firearm and holster were removed from the vehicle. The vehicle was left unsecured and the stolen property is valued at $400. The rearm was entered in the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Scott Powell and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. Tammy Hornbaker of Crawfordville reported the theft of mail from her mailbox. The victim contacted the Crawfordville Post of ce. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,067 calls for service during the past week including 13 business and residential alarms; 12 assists to other agencies; 62 citizen contacts; 18 E-911 abandoned cells calls; seven E-911 abandoned calls; 21 E-911 calls; 40 investigations; 41 medical emergencies; 29 school security checks; 375 business and residential security checks; 12 sex offender address veri cation checks; 28 special details; 14 suspicious vehicles; 51 traf c enforcements; 107 traf c stops; and 20 wanted people. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 15ABeing versatile has many advantages. The entity with this trait has an adaptable existence where one purpose supersedes another and there are competing demands for its goods, services or products. There can be, however, too much of any good thing including the excessive demands of the marketplace. This extreme condition has the potential to raise prices and exhaust a resource. This is the story of Floridas longleaf pine (Pinus palustris), sometimes known as a pitch pine or the turpentine pine. The native of Wakulla County and the Big Bend region grew wild for eons before the rapid population expansion of the 19th century. When Florida became a state in 1845 the longleaf pine was already known for its useful properties. When sawed it provided a dense, high grade lumber with excellent properties for framing and ooring. Its durable qualities and honey color made it a popular and frequently requested building material. Resistance to insects, especially termites, assured its place in many construction projects which were expected to last for decades if not centuries. Floridas position as a cargo transportation hub also place demands on the species. The longleaf pine produced strategically important naval stores, turpentine and resins. Both products were critically important assets for ship building and repair. Wooden sailing vessels of the day were the quickest and most ef cient method for reaching distant markets with raw and manufactured goods. The agriculture based economy of Floridas Big Bend region was especially dependent upon shipping from the Port of Apalachicola, once a major point of departure. Cotton, the top cash crop and foreign trade commodity, shipped to American and English textile mills. Turpentine was used as the basis for many wood preserving treatments which resisted the harsh environment created by seawater, extreme exposure to the sun and other elements. Without this protective barrier, shipsdeteriorated quicker and were less pro table. The resins or pitch were a component for sealing areas between planks and timbers. Materials which were composed of natural fibers were pounded between the board constructing the ships hull, and the resins were used to extend the life of the caulking bers. Initially considered an endless resource, time and demand took its toll on the thousands of longleaf pine acres. By the turn of the 20th Century, the longleaf pine numbers had been severely reduced. As shipping technology and methods advanced, the demand for turpentine was reduced. Changes in construction methods and the development of synthetic preservatives reduced needs further. The advent of tree farming did not return longleaf pines to their former prominence. Faster growing loblolly and slash pines replaced the much slower growing longleaf pines. With research there has been a recognition of the environmental importance of longleaf pine forest. Gopher tortoises and red cockaded woodpeckers are especially dependent on the surroundings created by these trees which may reach 100 feet in height. Federal and state authorities have established programs to encourage the planting of these trees. Land managers can currently access seedling for mass planting from several sources in North Florida. To learn more about the long leaf pine in Wakulla County, visit your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Ofce at 84 Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.The versatile longleaf pine lost its prominence Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLong leaf pine have an appearance distinct and different from other pines found in Wakulla County. The BUZZ T T T h h h e h h T T T h T T T T T h h Its ALL G REEN L IVING E XPO! Saturday, April 26

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Kevin Vaughn, President WAKULLA INSURANCE AGENCY WERE ALL ABOUT YOU!Wakulla Insurance Agency, a division of Rogers, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance, is your team of risk reduction advisors. We provide comprehensive insurance solutions and serve as part of the WellU ACAdemy bringing together experts in health care, business and insurance to help individuals and businesses navigate the changing health care landscape and make sound, condent health care decisions. Schedule your free WellU session today at WellU@rgvi.com or call 850.926.7900. RGVI.com facebook.com/RogersGunterVaughnInsurance @RGVI 2190 Crawfordville Hwy. Open Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014One of the most difcult areas of being Director of the Wakulla Senior Citizens Council is to come in on Monday morning and learn of the passing of one of our senior citizens who was an employee, a volunteer, and nally, a home delivered and congregate meal client. But for most team members, she was more than that she was our friend. I want to honor Ms. Tessies life. This past weekend while at home, I was informed that Ms. Tessie Miller passed away. Ms. Tessie would greet me on her arrival with a hug and would always say, Hey baby, you are a good man and Im just an old woman. She would hug me and it wasnt a lean-into type of hug, it wasnt an approach from the side and an arm wrap around the back and connection at the hip Ms. Tessie hugged me like my mama hugged me: she pulled me and did so with other of the team members here at the center. She held us close and compassionately and lovingly hugged us and gave us words of encouragement. At one time, Ms. Tessie worked for the center in the kitchen and prepared food and packed lunches and prepared meals for deliveries and cleaned the kitchens surfaces as needed. She loved children and cared for children in our Before-and-After School program. Of late, she would come into my of ce and sit a spell wanting to know if there was any work for her to do now. I would take her in to Ms. Vicki McKenzies of ce and ask if there was anything Ms. Tessie could do as she was in a mind to work here at the center. We have a purple dusting wand and Ms. Tessie would go to dusting everything in sight: slowly, methodically, and deliberately she cleaned as if it were her own home. Once finished with the cycle of dusting and cleaning, she quietly returned to her place of beginning and repeated the process. She worked until lunch, then proceeded to the dining room and was served a hot, nutritious meal. She believed in earning her way her whole life. Ms. Tessies health was deteriorating and I could see it over the period of the past year. She was in and out of the hospital and the nursing home. I visited her and took her a ower and a hat (she loved hats and the ladies here at the center got her a brand new one). Her mind had been slipping as Alzheimers was beginning to advance and she began gradually slipping away during the course of the last year. Her family was always there and by her side and while it wasnt easy for them, they By SHERYL SMYTHE Of the Senior CenterThis January has been very cold, but our Seniors have stayed warm in the center with great food, activities and fun events. We had a Senior Class Reunion Party, crowned our Queen, and announced our Volunteer of the year. We had a lot of fun in our daily routine here at the center. Our Volunteer of the Year for 2014 is Harriet Rich, President of Advisory Council for the Area Agency on Aging for North Florida Inc. She is also a dancer with Wakulla Wigglers Dance Group. She volunteers her time serving meals at the various banquets held at the center and to our senior citizens at lunch time. She teaches a line dancing class on Monday and Wednesday. She is a talented watercolor artist and is always involved in all of the activities here at the center. She is a wonderful volunteer always willing to help out with any need here at the Center with a beautiful smile. We appreciate her so much! Juanita Jester was crowned our Queen for 2014 by last years queen Agatha Williams. She is very excited to participate in all of the local parades and the many events where the senior center is represented. Juanita has been coming to the center for years and can be found here just about every day having lunch and enjoying all the activities. She is a beautiful person inside and out and is a wonderful queen for the Senior Center. The Senior Center holds many fundraisers to bring in extra funds to support the needs of our Senior Citizens. One of the fundraisers was a raf e for 24 karat gold-plated Wakulla Winchester model 94AE .45-caliber, Long Colt ri e. The rifle was donated by Steve Brown. He and his wife are very loyal supporters of the Senior Center. The winner of the raf e was Mike Eakin, congratulations! The Senior Center made $5,400 to help with our Meals on Wheels program, this fundraiser was such a wonderful success. Thanks to everyone involved. We had lots of arts and craft classes but one sticks out because we were able to get a well known artist, Nancy Jefferson of the LeMoyne Center of Visual Arts, to teach a pottery class inspiring great pieces of art made by many of our seniors. We sure appreciate each time she volunteers and teaches a class here at the Center. We are looking forward to February here at the Senior Center and have lots of heartfelt events lined up for the month of Valentines. Please come and join us. Activities happening now in February are: Income Tax preparation by AARP volunteers every Wednesday from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Please note that they will be coming thru April 15. FSU Nursing Students will be here to check blood pressures on the second and third Wednesday of the month from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. We will hold a Drumming Circle on Wednesday, Feb. 27 at 10:30 a.m. with Kent Hutchinson. We hope to see you there! Senior Center wish list is dog and cat food, silk owers, wide wire ribbon. Thank you in advance if you can help supply these needs to the Senior Center. Please come and visit our center. We are open weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. We serve lunch daily at noon but you can always come earlier and enjoy our activities. Our food pantry supplied by Farm Share and Second Harvest is open for pick up on Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. If you are a senior who is 60 or older and are home bound and would like to make an appointment with our Meals on Wheels program, you may call Pat or Angel at 926-7145 ext 223. Turn to Page 3BHonoring the memory of Tessie Miller THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director Turn to Page 3B PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Senior Class Reunion Party at the Senior Center. Senior Center Director Maurice Langston with 2014 Queen Juanita Jester and Volunteer of the Year Harriet Rich and her husband.January was cold, but seniors were busy with activities at the Senior Center 1.75LSOBIESKIVODKA $ 17 99Prices Good Through February850926-32121.75LJIM BEAM $ 22 99 $ $ 1.75LSEGRAMS VO $ 21 99 S $ $ BUD OR BUD LIGHT24PKBOTT LES OR CAN SBOTTLES OR CANS 24 C AN S 24 P K B OTT L E S OR C AN S $ 19 991.75L GIFTCAPTAIN MORGAN W/2 LTR $ 22 99 9 9 C C M M M M $ $ $ $ MICHELOB PRODUCTS12PK B O $ 12 99 NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. 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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Feb. 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Feb. 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions. Saturday, March 1 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe at 11 a.m. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812, or email skpsky2000@comcast. net Sunday, March 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, March 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, March 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post at 475 Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. Wednesday, March 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.Special EventsThursday, Feb. 27 WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will host Patrick Smiths Florida is A Land Remembered at 7 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Chuch, 176 Ochlockonee St. The presentation will be made by Rick Smith (in photo above), son of the author, Patrick D. Smith. Tickets are $10 donation an be purchased at www.shop.wakullahistory.com or by calling Carolyn W. Harvey at 524-5334. BIG BEND HOSPICE HOMETOWN GETDOWN will be held at The Hudson House, from 6 p.m. 9 p.m. $15 per person. Live Music by Deja Blu, Bon res, Food and fashion show. Call Pam Allbritton at 926-9308 for more information. TIP A COP FUNDRAISER to bene t Wakulla Special Olympics, will be held from 4 p.m. 8 p.m. at Beef OBradys, Crawfordville. Friday, Feb. 28 NAMI WAKULLA will host a spaghetti dinner and silent auction at 4 p.m. 8 p.m. at the Wakulla Womens Club, 64 Ochlockonee St. (Take-out available.) Featuring Spaghetti, salad, bread and desserts. $8 adults and $4 for children. Early bird tickets call 926-1033. GIRLS NITE OUT, a fundraiser for Wakullas 2014 Relay for Life Campaign will be held from 4 p.m. 7 p.m. at Body Tek 24 Hour Fitness, 56 Rainbow Dr. The public is invited to attend an evening of wine, cheese, pampering and information from local providers of services for health and well-being of women. Saturday, March 1 APALACHICOLA NATIONAL FOREST CLEANUP. Starts at 8 a.m. Volunteers should meet at Forest Road 13 Dip Pond. Immediately following the cleanup there will be a volunteer luncheon hosted by KWCB for all participants at Hickory Park, behind Sonic. Contact JoAnn Palmer at 745-7111 or helpkwcb@gmail.com for information. Thursday, March 6 WHS Dramatis Personae will hold their spring production, The Clumsy Custard Horror Show & Ice Cream Clone Review, at WHS Auditorium. Evening performances will run Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., with a Sunday Matinee at 2:30 p.m. Doors open thirty minutes prior to curtain where tickets can be purchased. The cost for students is $4, Senior Citizens $5, and for Adults $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission.Upcoming Events Saturday, March 8 JESUS RIVER FESTIVAL a celebration of Christian music and fellowship, will be held at Myron B. Hodge City Park from noon dark. For more information call 962-4132 or go to jesusriverfest.weebly.com 8th Annual Mardi Gras Ball at St. Elizabeth Ann Setons Catholic Church, 3609 Coastal Highway will be held 7 p.m. midnight. Tickets are $20 per person, dinner included. Costumes are encouraged. Tickets can be purchased by calling 926-9750. Babysitting may be available. Call for details. Saturday, March 22 HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTE DAY starts at 9 a.m. Wakulla County Public Works, ESG Operations, Inc., 340 Trice Lane, Crawfordville. FARM SHARE will distribute free food to residents of Wakulla County at Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Rd from 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Call 284-4637 or email Dawn@farmshare.org for more information. There will be several organizations providing health screenings and giving away other information. Saturday, March 29 LIFEWALK 2014, sponsored by The Wakulla Pregnancy Center, will begin at 9 a.m. at Wakulla Station Trailhead Park. For more information, call Angie Holshouser at 241-6797. Saturday, April 5 4TH ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL, a fundraiser for the Wakulla County Chamber, will be held at the 3Y Ranch, www.3yranch.com, from 6 p.m. 10 p.m. Live music by Locomotive, food, dancing. $40 per person. Tickets available by calling 926-1848. Feb 27 March 6 Government MeetingsMonday, March 3 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 6 p.m. TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center. This is a planning session for the TDC Administrative committee. Thursday, March 6 WAKULLA COUNTY CHARTER REVIEW COMMISSION will hold a Public Meeting on at 5:30p.m., at the Wakulla County Public Library. Monday, March 10 WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a public hearing at 7 p.m. at the commission chambers regarding an application for Shell Point Preliminary Plat. WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Meeting will be held at 5:45 p.m., School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville. CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, regarding an amendment to its Land Development Code. Thursday, March 13 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center. While making some room on our DVD shelves behind the front desk last week, it was discovered that over 70 DVDs that cost us over $1000 are more than 90 days overdue. (See photo below.) This includes recently released DVDs for which there is high demand. While we all at WCPL know that public libraries have to expect some overdues and lost items, the sheer amount of materials missing from our collection is beginning to become overwhelming. Patrons with overdue items can put them in our drop box outside and we can work with you on the fines later. To replace all the items which we consider long overdue would cost over $90,000. Thats 3 YEARS of our books and materials budget. If you have any of our items laying around your house to please bring them back so everyone gets the same enjoyment out of what we try to provide as you do.Unshelved comes to WCPLGene Ambaum and Bill Barnes, the folks behind the Unshelved comic strip will be doing a program here as part of our annual staff day on Monday, March 3 at 10 a.m. Unshelved is a strip based in a library which is always good for a daily laugh. WCPL won a hand drawn strip based upon a story we submitted last spring at the Florida Libraries Association conference and we along with the Panhandle Libraries Access Network, and Wilderness Coast Public Libraries used that as a spring board to bring the guys across the country to our neck of the woods. This high energy humorous program is free and open to the public so we encourage anyone who enjoys a good laugh to come by and see these talented fellows.Remember our programs at Community CenterOur March cycle of Community Center programs start Thursday March 6 we will be holding our K-2 programs at the One Stop Community Center the 1st Thursday of the month at 4. 3rd-5th grade programs will be on the second Thursday, and the middle school program will be the 3rd Thursday, all at 4:00. We encourage all to not only come to our programs but come see all that the community center has to offer the citizens of Wakulla County. It needs your help and participation to grow into the active community center that this county deserves. By SCOTT JOYNERLibrary Director Library News... Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Big Bend Hospice Hometown GetdownThe Hudson House 6 p.m. 9 p.m.Girls Nite Out FundraiserBody Tek 24 Hr Fitness 4 p.m.7 p.m.KWCBs National Forest Cleanup Meet at Forest Road 13 at 8 a.m.Wakulla County Commission Meeting begins at 6 p.m. in boardroom.Thursday FridaySaturdayMonday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 3BFrom Page 1B cared for her in a way that seemed to look so easy. As I sit in my of ce on this foggy morning, my mind is a bit foggy too as I think about the love and laughter she shared with us. She always sported a beautiful hat and was beautifully dressed to come to the center in appropriate church attire. She was a radiantly beautiful lady and her smile brightened the center and the lives of all of us at the center. Her smile was infectious! There is a verse in the Bible in the book of Leviticus that calls for respect and honor for those who are older. It says, Rise in the presence of the aged. I pause a moment from my writing right now and will do just that. While I cannot rise in her literal presence any longer (though I always did), I rise and whisper a prayer of thanksgiving for the presence of her love and in uence. I dont think it would be inappropriate if you stopped reading long enough to pause and rise honoring the life of a good and godly lady. I want to honor Ms. Tessies faith. Church was a big part of Ms. Tessies life and she often spoke of her regular church attendance. As I read this little verse tucked into the chapter it appeared near out of place. But then I saw the rest of the verse and it said, Rise in respect for our elders and reverence for our Creator. I am the Lord. It was almost as if the little verse was saying you cannot honor a person who is aged without honoring God. That was exactly what it was saying because in doing so, it just goes hand-in-hand with the other. I read another couple of passages from my favorite book. Proverbs says, Gray hair is a crown of splendor; it is attained by a righteous life (Prov. 16:31). The glory of young men is their strength, gray hair the splendor of the old (Prov 20:29). Ms. Tessie was a beautiful lady and, as I said, always looked splendid. At times, though, she would come in to the center and have a down in the dumps day. We all have them. I woke up this morning looking and feeling like the picture of the guy on my drivers license. Well, we did our best to help cheer her up and it would not be long until her countenance was lled with laughter and joy. I stand in awe of the things she saw in her lifetime. She survived the nations wars, depressions and other changes that only a few can imagine. She lived in a time that went from Model Ts to Space Shuttles, from no phones, to party lines to smart phones. She lived in the BC era Before Computers. She came from an era of radios, and at rst, no television and certainly no remotes. She could remember life before electricity and indoor plumbing. The only running water she was once familiar with is what ran out of the bucket that she carried from the pitcher pump into the house. Ms. Tessies era and environment was lled with lead paint and leaded gasoline operating old cars without airbags and seatbelts. She grew up when prayer and paddlings were common in the schools. She worked hard in her family, and then to raise her own family she worked even harder. She lived and loved and sacri ced for the next generation of which I am a grateful part. We owe her much. Truly the Scripture is right when it tells us to Rise in the presence of the aged, show respect for the elderly... Truly gray is my favorite color! I want to honor Ms. Tessies hope and optimism: She came through a lot of dif culties in her lifetime. However, she always knew that during the toughest times, God is always greater. When others turned sour, Ms. Tessie became sweeter. Why? Because God never let her down in the past and she was sure that He would never let her down in the future. A number of times she said to me; Baby, God is good all the time. She didnt dote or dwell on her physical dif culties, though she had many. She could have stayed at home, laid in the bed and felt sorry for herself for the parts of her body that didnt work or work well any longer. However, she decided, she chose, to get out of bed every day and use the parts of her body that still remained in good working condition. Maybe more of us should do the same. Did I mention that gray is our favorite color at the center? Seniors, let me close with a special appeal directed especially to you. No matter what you may be tempted to think, God isnt nished with you yet. Your sons and daughters and grandchildren still need a thing or two from you. The rest of the folks in this county are still depending on you. We still need the same things you have always given us. We need your perseverance. We need you to encourage us to persevere. We need you to keep reminding us that we can do all things through Him who strengthens us. We still need your faith. You dont know how much it meant for me to hear from Ms. Tessie; Baby, God is still faithful. Your faith tells us that the life of faith is worth the effort and for us to keep on keeping on. I honor Ms. Tessies example: She was not able to do everything she once did. But we felt she deserved a rest. She reminded the girls in the of ce that they needed to come along and pick up the slack. She was an encourager, Yall are doing a good work was her statement on numerous occasions. It was Ms. Tessies way of giving us a pat on the back. What we needed most was her warm embrace! The greatest gift she gave us was the gift of herself and she never hesitated to make the offer. She would tell us, I am proud of you! And she didnt whisper it either. Ms. Tessie let the halls of the senior center ring with words of encouragement. I honor her labors, but in closing, I honor her rest with the One who loves her more than we all did. Seniors, we still need your example, we still need you. We know that you may not be able to do everything that you once did. A lot of you have earned a rest. So for those who cant do, rest. But for those of you who can do, do. It is your perseverance, your faith, and your example of hope and encouragement that we honor. If you can help us enable the next generation and the one after that to someday say, even if they dont know it right now, Gray is my favorite color then all will be well in this county and in this country. T.W. Maurice Langston is the director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Honoring the memory of Tessie MillerDue to lack of participation and low enrollment numbers, the Wakulla Senior Center Child Summer Program will be canceled. If you have any questions please call Ms. Debbie VanHorn at 9267145 Ext. 222 or Ms. Shelly Homan at 926-7145 Ext. 221. This Summer Program will be revisited in the future if more interest is shown, said Maurice Langston, Executive Director, Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Wakulla Senior Centers Child Summer Program Canceled From Page 1B Also you can stop by and pick up a calendar of events and join in the fun. All donations are tax deductible and go to our Meals on Wheels, and other senior programs provided through the center. There are many more activities that go on here at the center, so stop by and pick up a calendar of events. You can also nd us on Facebook at this link https://www. facebook.com/WakullaSeniorCenter, or go to your Facebook page and type in Wakulla Senior Center in the search box. Click on the like button and you will get all our post and keep up with what is going on here. Any questions please call the center at 9267145 ext. 221. You can also pick up a brochure on all the other services that are provided through the Wakulla Senior Center.January was cold, etc.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Home stretch of pre-session meetings By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 21 Before lawmakers returned to their districts for the last week before the 2014 legislative session begins, they capped off a week of discussions about living arrangements and homecomings. A rule outlining how to gure out where a legislator resides began moving through both chambers. The House tried to prod the Senate into acting on a measure giving in-state tuition to students who live in the state illegally. And Florida State University President Eric Barrons appointment at Penn State University became of cial, marking Barrons departure from one home only to return to another. Meanwhile, the prospect of overhauling the states retirement plan seemed to settle into its usual Senate neighborhood among the bills which have longer odds of passing. And the State Board of Education was strayed into hostile territory in dealing with the ery objections of activists angry about Floridas plans to move forward with education guidelines resembling the Common Core standards. RELUCTANT ON RETIREMENT When Senate Community Affairs Chairman Wilton Simpson, R-Trilby, unveiled an overhaul to the Florida Retirement System that would largely exempt law enforcement of cers and emergency workers, it was seen as a gesture to a bloc of mavericks who torpedoed a more expansive revamp of the pension plan last year. Instead, the rst of those mavericks to cast a vote on the measure in a Senate panel voted against it. Ive got more convincing to do, Simpson said after Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, opposed the bill Tuesday. Latvala, one of the leaders of last years opposition to pension changes, teamed up with the Democrats to nearly defeat the bill (SB 1114), which the committee approved with a 5-4 vote. This years Senate proposal would close the Florida Retirement Systems traditional pension plan to new employees after July 1, 2015, though those employees already in the system would remain. New hires would be required to choose between a 401(k)-style investment plan and a cash balance plan, which in some ways acts like a 401(k) but guarantees a minimum bene t. Law enforcement officers and emergency personnel who qualify for the special risk category could still sign up for the traditional pension plan. But Latvala suggested that some law-enforcement personnel arent classi ed as special risk, and he questioned moving forward with the bill before an accounting review of the proposal was nished. I really am taken aback by how you would want us to start voting on a bill where although you may understand, and you may believe in your heart, and I know you believe in your heart that this is the right thing for our future when we dont have any numbers, any actuarial study to show us that, Latvala said. DIVIDING LINE Since taking over their respective chambers in late 2012, Weatherford and Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, have gone out of their way to work together. The buddy act was one of the foundations of last years relatively peaceful legislative session, at least when it came to House-Senate relations. But, Gaetz said half-jokingly during an interview with The News Service of Florida on Friday, the two have nally found an issue on which they disagree: Allowing some undocumented students to avoid paying out-ofstate tuition rates. The bill (HB 851), strongly backed by Weatherford, won approval Wednesday from a House subcommittee. But prospects for the measure in the Senate are uncertain at best --though it seemed Friday that Gaetz was opening the door to the idea that the bill could pass. Somebody who favors providing in-state tuition to the children of undocumented, or if you wish, illegals, did a vote count and came in and talked with me about it and they said theres 18 votes to pass what the speaker is proposing. And thats before the debate even starts. I think well have a divided Senate in this issue, Gaetz said. Latvala is expected to roll out a proposal that would allow students who have attended at least three years of high school in Florida to pay cheaper, instate tuition, similar to the measure that received unanimous support in a House subcommittee this week. Latvala said he plans to release the details of his plan Wednesday at a press conference in Clearwater. HOME AWAY FROM HOME The in-state tuition rate might have had something to do with one of the high-pro le departures from Florida government this week: FSU President Eric Barron, whose hiring by Penn State became of cial during a meeting in State College, Pa., on Monday. Barron, who spent 20 years as a faculty member and administrator at Penn State beginning in 1986, is leaving Tallahassee four years after becoming president at FSU, his alma mater. In many ways I never left Penn State, said Barron, wearing a light blue shirt and dark blue tie after being introduced at a board meeting called to vote on his appointment. Pointing to his heart and then his head, Barron added: Penn State lives here, Penn State lives here, and its a great pleasure to be about to live here. Florida States board of trustees met a couple of days later to begin the process of replacing its former president, who at times seemed frustrated with Scotts efforts to hold down college tuition. The trustees want a replica of their last president to take over now. IM GOING TO MAKE THIS PLACE YOUR HOME One place that seems to be headed for easy passage is a joint House-Senate rule that would set residency standards for lawmakers, expected to be one of the first measures to pass the Legislature when the session begins March 4. The Senate Rules Committee unanimously passed the bill Wednesday after a brief discussion. The House Rules and Calendar Committee followed up Thursday in a meeting that lasted less than 10 minutes. Both chambers hope to approve the proposal on the rst day of the session and try to put the smoldering issue to rest. Latvala, whose advocacy on the issue has prompted suspicions that Senate politics are at play, is rmly on board with the new measure. I think that this will go a long way in giving some guidance to members of the Legislature on how theyre supposed to conduct themselves and where theyre supposed to live and how to determine where their real residence is, for anybody that has a hard time guring that out, he said. Anybody could very well refer to Sen. Maria Sachs, DDelray Beach, one of Latvalas top targets in his campaign to make sure lawmakers live in their districts. In the 2012 elections, Sachs defeated one of Latvalas supporters in his race for the Senate presidency. Latvala has since publicly accused Sachs of living outside her district. Sachs strenuously denies those charges and says her residency has been established by state reviews. COMMOTION CORE Away from the Capitol, the normally sedate meeting of the State Board of Education turned into a rowdy protest of the Common Core State Standards just as the panel voted to tweak, but not trash, the benchmarks for student learning. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart has argued that the changes, which include reinserting creative writing into the standards and explicitly including calculus guidelines as well as the fact that the state has science and social studies standards that arent part of the Common Core justify renaming the initiative as the Florida Standards. But largely conservative activists who have fought to get the state to drop the entire common core initiative seemed unmoved. They see the plan as a federal plot to take over education and blame it for a variety of ills. I do not want a watereddown, world-class system; I want a school system that promotes American exceptionalism, said Chris Quackenbush, a leader of the anti-Common Core movement. At one point, Quackenbush and board chairman Gary Chartrand clashed over an attempt to stop audience members from clapping during the meeting. For a while, the crowd seemed to go along, waving their hands and at least one American ag instead of applauding. Most lawmakers and Scott seem willing to try to leave the entire issue behind for now. Whether they can in the face of dogged opposition during an election year remains to be seen. STORY OF THE WEEK: Florida State University President Eric Barron is hired by Penn State University, prompting a search for his replacement. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: There is an emergent psychological pandemic taking place among children in Florida. Its called Common Core, or it used to be until it was rebranded. Our children are suffering from anxiety attacks, vomiting, emotional outbursts, headaches and even self-mutilation. Stacie Clark, a critic of Common Core, at a meeting of the State Board of Education. WHITES WINESAmericas unquenchable taste for wine, exploringBy DAVID WHITEThe wine world is a big, fabulously diverse place, and arguably the greatest pleasure that oenophilia offers is the pleasure of discovery -of nding new grapes, regions, and wines. These words appear in The Wine Savant, a new book from Michael Steinberger, the former wine writer for Slate and a current columnist for Mens Journal. Hes right. The pleasure of discovery is what drives wine enthusiasts. Those of us who obsess over wine arent just looking for something tasty; were looking for an experience. This concept is rmly taking root in Americas wine culture. And it belies the notion that Americans are intimidated by wine. Books with titles like Wine For Dummies and Great Wine Made Simple line bookstore shelves. The media perpetuates this assumption, eagerly reporting on every study that proves oenophiles are full of baloney. But the numbers tell a different story. New data from the Wine Market Council, an independent, nonprofit trade group, show that Americans are increasingly comfortable with wine. And were thirstier than ever before. Last year, the nation consumed 297 million cases of wine, a 27-percent increase from just ten years ago. From the upscale wine bar to their local 7-11, consumers can now purchase wine from more than 522,000 different outlets. Across consumer goods with more than $1 billion in annual sales, only wine, coffee, and snacks have experienced consistent growth over each of last ve years, in both dollars and volume. For more evidence of Americas wine confidence, look no further than your closest grocery store. Thirty years ago, the local market sold little more than jug wine like Gallos Hearty Burgundy -if wine was even stocked. Today, the average upscale supermarket carries 1,500 wine selections or more. The number of breakfast cereals pales in comparison. Specialty wine shops also illustrate how the wine market is changing. Across the country, boutique retailers are lling their shelves with interesting, small-production wines -and helping consumers learn. More and more wine bars are also sprouting up, providing opportunities for people to explore. High-end restaurants have responded to the nations self-confident wine culture by changing their approach entirely. Whereas sommeliers were once glori ed sales agents who intimidated guests by pushing expensive, predictable wines, todays sommeliers are wine educators, eager to share their passion and palates. The nation has clearly embraced wine. The United States is still a nation of beer drinkers, of course. Of every dollar spent on alcohol, 49 cents goes toward beer. But wine is catching up. In 2002, six in 10 alcoholic beverages consumed were beers. Today, its one in two. Unsurprisingly, a recent Gallup survey found that Americans are equally divided between beer and wine when asked which they drink most often. Even though Baby Boomers spend the most money on wine, millennials are driving the market. This generation of consumers those between 20 and 37 already makes up 30 percent of drinkers. And its participation is having a profound impact, as millennials take great pleasure in discovery. In fact, the Nielsen survey asked consumers to react to the following statement: I love to keep ahead of whats happening. I love trying new things. I often tell others about them. And more than any other generation, millennials agreed. Its no wonder that millennials frequently purchase wine over $20 per bottle and are more willing than Boomers to purchase imported wine. Todays wine drinkers are an adventurous bunch, con dent in their own palates and willing to explore the unknown. As the purchasing power of millennials increases, more and more Americans will pursue the pleasure of discovery.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 5B Able Advertisements Angry Ants Award Bangs Cats Claw Complement Cycle Deaf DiedDisappointmentDown Drew Drip Duck Earn Ears East Else Ends Estate Faced Fast Fearful Five Floats Foam Gift Glad Hats Here Idea Invaded Israel June Kids Lids Lime Maid Mess Misery Nest Note Others Pace Pain Pear Peep Penny Pioneer Raised Rate Reds Reeds Rest Rows Sandy Side Sign Snap Stamps Talk Thank Tire Very Wasnt Wine Writing The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comSWINE SHOW Grand Champion Class Winners Barbecue dinners Reserve ChampionCole Gowdy shakes hands with a representative from Grand Champion sponsor Publix with the 265-pound winner. Cole Gowdy shakes hands with a representative from Reserve Champion sponsor Centennial Bank and the 275-pound winner.2014 WinnersGrand Champion -Cole Gowdy Reserve Champion Cole Gowdy Class Winners Class #1 (190-229 lbs) Michael Jarmon Class #2 (230-245 lbs) Bethany omas Class #3 (248-265 lbs) Cole Gowdy Class #4 (270-295 lbs) Cole Gowdy Class #5 (297-309 lbs) Oliver Green Class #6 (320-350 lbs) Anna Green Showmanship Winners Ages 15 & older Kristin Chew Ages 13 & 14 Rainey Vause Ages 11 & 12 Oliver Green Ages 9 & 10 Gracie Lawhon Ages 6, 7 & 8 Anna Green Presidents Excellence Award Oliver Green Spirit Award Riley Davis Herdsman Award Chase Roberts Swine Project winners 6-8 years old 1st Justin Barnidge, 2nd Anna Green, 3rd Chase Linville, 4th Carter Christensen 9-10 years old 1st Dawson Vause 11-12 years old 1st Oliver Green, 2nd Caitlynn Linville, 3rd Spencer Christensen 15 years & older Kristin Chew Judging Contest Junior High Individual 1st Justin Barnidge, 2nd Carter Christensen, 3rd Isaac Pollard Junior High Team 1st Mason Jarmon, Kane Tucker, Kanoa Tucker, and Landon Owens; 2nd Brayden Lawhon, Parker Lawhon, Maverick Stubbs and Riley Davis; 3rd Emma Vaughn and Olivia Vaughn. Intermediate High Individual 1st Spencer Christensen, 2nd Michael Jarmon Intermediate High Team 1st Lincoln Porter and Landon Turner; 2nd Jonah Lawhon, Oliver Green, and Chase Roberts; 3rd Anna Green, Lochlyn Vause, and Bethany omas. Senior High Individual 1st Kristin Chew, 2nd Nicole Smith and Kerri Sanders. 2nd Annual Swine Show Barbecue Cooko Winner Boog-A-LousPHOTO BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENWinners Barbara Green, Michael Jarmon, Cole Gowdy, Anna Green, Bethany Thomas, Oliver Green, PJ Piland, and Master of Ceremonies Ed Brimner. Elected of cials were on hand to serve up barbecue dinners, left, including School Board Chair Ray Gray and County Commissioner Ralph Thomas as Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond looked on. Diners enjoy their meals, right.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 7BSWINE SHOW Showing the di erent classes Pig Scramble Alumni showPHOTOS BY HUNTER TUCKER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WILLIAM SNOWDENPast participants in the Swine Show got a chance to show off their skills, including Tom Richardson, center.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.com Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Todays New Ads Class B with AirbrakesDrivers NeededMust have CDL license and experience required Apply W ithin Brooks Concrete,1532 Coastal Hwy. 98 Panacea(850) 984-5279 CRAWFORDVILLE2 Bedroom 2 Bath upstairs apartment for lease 1st month $300.00,$674.00 Per month after that.(Bridlewood Apartments) must complete Bridlewood application and meet Bridlewood requirements. 850-363-5132 CRAWFORDVILLEBradley Court, Mill Hollow Subdivision, Saturday, March 1st. Multifamily yard sale. Household items, tools, furniture, clothes, to much to list PILLOW TOPMATTRESS AND BOX SET BRAND NEW, NEVER BEEN USED, STILLIN BAG. $195 OBO 850 727 0390 LOST CHIHUAHUA light gray, approx 2 lbs, female, 12 yrs old lost in the vicinity of Azalea Park $100 REWARD pls call (850) 661-7979 or contact Animal Control Wildlife Technician OPSFL Fish & Wildlife Conservation Com. Tates Hell Wildlife Mgt. Area Franklin County $27,487.20 Annual. Heavy equipment operation, vegetation maintenance, controlled burns, manage public hunts and wildlife surveys. Send electronic resumes to: Billie.Clayton @MyFWC.com For additional information contact: Billie Clayton 850-265-3676 EEO/AA Employer CDL-A Team Owner Operators:$2,500 Lease Incentive! Team Dedicated Routes. Great Revenue & Regular Weekly Home Time! 888-486-5946 NFI Industries nfipartners.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSDriverTrainees Needed NOW! Become a driver for Werner Enterprises. Earn $800 per week! Local CDL Training (877)214-3624 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Now Hiring: OTR CDLA DriversNew Pay Package and $2500 Sign -On Bonus! Mostly 5-10 days out. Full benefits, achievable bonuses. Call for details 1-888-378-9691 or www.heyl.net Class B with AirbrakesDrivers NeededMust have CDL license and experience required Apply W ithin Brooks Concrete,1532 Coastal Hwy. 98 Panacea(850) 984-5279 DRIVERS:Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. CALL: 888-880-5911 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 877-741-9260 www .fixjet s.com Heating And Air Conditioning Technician Training! Fast Track, Hands On, National Certification Program. Lifetime Job Placement. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-877-994-9904 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/ month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 QUEEN PILLOW TOP MATTRESS & BOX SET BRAND NEW, NEVER BEEN USED, STILLIN BAG. $195 OBO 850 727 0390 -Twin Bed with frame (Headboard, Footboard), mattress, and drawers. Excellent condition. $200 -Pool table with accessories, good condition. Needs new pockets. $500 or best offer. -License plates, sporting or misc. $5 -$10 each. -Zenith TV, $30 Call 850.294.8829 RIDING LAWN MOWER John Deer 42 riding lawn mower.17hp $500 352 613 5522 CRAWFORDVILLEBradley Court, Mill Hollow Subdivision, Saturday, March 1st. Multifamily yard sale. Household items, tools, furniture, clothes, to much to list GUN SHOW MARCH 1-2 SAT. 9-5 & SUN. 10-5 ATLANTAEXPO CENTER (3650 JONESBORO RD SE) BUY-SELLTRADE. INFO: (563) 927-8176 Mobile Homes with acreage. Ready to move in. Seller Financing (subject to credit approval). Lots of room for the price, 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 VMFhomes.com CRAWFORDVILLE2 Bedroom 2 Bath upstairs apartment for lease 1st month $300.00,$674.00 Per month after that.(Bridlewood Apartments) must complete Bridlewood application and meet Bridlewood requirements. 850-363-5132 Commercial Building for Rent61 Rose Street Historical Downtown\ Sopchoppy Florida(850)962-4226 17 Acres with fish pond Rehwinkel Rd 5 miles outside of Crawfordville additional info call (850) 926-7756 New Log Home* on 10+ acres only $89,900 3 Bed, 2 bath log home with direct river access. Convenient to downtown Jacksonville. Excellent financing. Call now 877-525-3033, x.19 *Constructed weather-tight log home shell. EHO 2000 Holiday Rambler Camper, 26, 5th wheel, has slide out $5500 (229) 317-0166 5052-0227 TWN Public Notice Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitiou s Name Law, pursuant t o Section 865.09, Florid a Statutes. NOTICE I S HEREBY GIVEN that th e undersigned, desiring t o engage in business unde r the fictitious name of: PIRATES LANDING BAR & GRILL located at 785 POR T LEON DRIVE, ST. MARKS FLORIDA 32355, in th e County of Wakulla, in tends to register the sai d name with the Division o f Corporations of the Flor ida Department of State Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Tallahassee Florida, this 19th day o f February, 2014. By: /s/ Michael W. Pag e Owne r Published one (1) time i n Wakulla County: Februar y 27, 2014 5028-0227 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION, Petitioner, vs. DANIEL R. HEZLEP, Case #35654 Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DANIEL R. HEZLEP, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before March 30, 2014. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: January 30, 2014 Susan Benton, Chair CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION By: -s-Kandace Zachary, Division Representative Feb. 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2014. 5046-0227 TWN 3/08 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 08, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouses containing personal property of: DANNY KELLY DUSTIN SMITH WILLIAM COTTON Before the sale date of March 08, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. February 20 & 27, 2014. Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a ve A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l the M M o o o o d d e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m ent to He C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED JESUSHARDWOOD FLOORS TILE PAINTING CARPENTRYLic. #7827 Licensed & Insured ( 850 ) 570Interior & Exterior FREE Estimates COASTWISE IS THRILLED TO WELCOME! Coastwise Realty,Inc.(850) 926 ~ (850) 926 fax 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL Visit him at the Coastwise ~Log Cabin~ for All Your Real Estate Needs. WALLY DODSON 850-508-2295 or email him at Tues-Sat576-3105Tues-Sat545-2905Thurs-Sat926-6020&, Tues-Sat TuesSat 576-3105 Tues-Sat TuesSat 545-2905 Thurs-Sat ThursSat 926-6020 & STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-6020 EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES LIBRARY ASSISTANT I Circulation Division of Library Services 3Br 2Ba DWMH start at $850 3Br 2Ba Twnhs start at $875 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs start at $1,100 3Br 2Ba Hs start at $1300APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIRED RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. 8AM 2PM NO EARLY BIRDS!SPRINGTIMEYARD SALEFERUARY 28th MARCH 1stSAVINGS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 9B5047-0227 TWN Lamendola, Mark G. 652010CA000442 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 652010CA000442 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE HOME EQUITY ASSET TRUST 2007-3 HOME EQUITY PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-3, Plaintiff, VS. MARK LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK G. LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK GREGORY LAMENDOLA; et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF FORCLOSURE SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that sale will be made pursuant to an Order or Final Summary Judgment. Final Judgment was awarded on in Civil Case No. 652010CA000442, of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein, U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE HOME EQUITY ASSET TRUST 2007-3 HOME EQUITY PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-3 is the Plaintiff, MARK LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK G LAMENDOLA A/K/A MARK GREGORY LAMENDOLA; CHERYL LAMENDOLA; FLORIDA COMMERCE CREDIT UNION; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARK LAMENDOLA A/K/A; FIA CARD SERVICES, 5048-0227 TWN Bailey, Sandra 13000201CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 13000201CAAXMX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. SANDRA BAILEY; LEON BAILEY; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 06, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000201CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and SANDRA BAILEY, LEON BAILEY and UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE in WAKULLA County, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 6th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 89 32 MINUTES WEST 2,822.25 FEET, TO A POINT ON THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 369, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 13 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 1,438.62 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 32 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A PROPOSED 50.00 FEET ROADWAY, 824.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 89 32 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 200 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 MINUTES WEST 200.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 21 MINUTES EAST 485.60 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPT: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NORTH HALF OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 2,822.25 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF STATE ROAD NUMBER 369; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY NORTH 14 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 1,438.00 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY OF DOLLY DRIVE; THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 89 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 824.33 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 20.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN NORTH 00 29 MINUTES 16 SECONDS WEST 296.81 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 89 29 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 180.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 30 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 188.07 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 89 29 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 199.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE SOUTH 00 29 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 484.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 1988 TITA MOBILE HOME WITH VIN #538195T4503A AND #538195T4503B AND TITLE #45159877 AND #44843413, PERMANENTLY AFFIXED TO THE LAND. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 06th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services) Kahane & Associates, P.A., 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com February 20 & 27, 2014 13-00573 BOA 5049-0227 TWN Eddens, Rae Anna 65-2010-CA-000169 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE FIFTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR SUMTER COUNTY, 5050-0227 TWN McClellan, Danny R. 65-2010-CA-000082CA Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 65-2010-CA-000082CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. DANNY R. MCCLELLAN A/K/A DAN R. MCCLELLAN; et. al., Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 30th day of January, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000082CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC is the Plaintiff and DANNY R. MCCLELLAN A/K/A DAN R. MCCLELLAN; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) N/K/A ANDRE GREEN IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 13th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 1, BLOCK D, OF MAGNOLIA GARDENS, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 10th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com February 20 & 27, 2014. 10-08896 5051-0306 TWN Wilson, Lynda C. 13197CA Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 13197CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. LYNDA C WILSON A/K/A LYNDA CATHERINE WILSON; BRIDLE GATE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; JOHN R WILSON; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment fo Foreclosure dated the 6th day of February, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13197CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and LYNDA C WILSON A/K/A LYNDA CATHERINE WILSON BRIDLE GATE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. JOHN R WILSON UNKNOWN TENANT; and IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 6th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 38, BRIDLE GATE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 57 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com February 27 & March 06, 2014. 12-04002 5054-0306 TWN Delong, Shawn D. 13000227CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 13000227CAAXMX 5055-0306 TWN vs. Strickland, Somer S. Case 2012-FC-000216 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-FC-000216 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SOMER S. STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STOKES STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STRICKLAND; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SOMER S. STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STOKES STRICKLAND AKA SOMER STRICKLAND; RICHARD R. STRICKLAND, II AKA RICHARD RAY STRICKLAND II AKA RICHARD R. STRICKLAND AKA RICHARD STRICKLAND; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 20th day of March, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 42, of Block 21, of WAKULLA GARDENS, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accomodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 22 day of November, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT BRENT X. THURMOND (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) /s/ Tiffany Deschner Deputy Clerk of Courts Attorney for Plaintiff: Amanda Renee Murphy Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E, Orlando, Florida 32812, (407)381-5200 February 27 & March 06, 2014 B&H 288251 5056-0306 TWN Kent, Charles M. Jr. 2010-CA-000170 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2010-CA-000170 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FF15, Plaintiff, vs. CHARLES KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES M. KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES MITCHELL KENT; KAREN KENT, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CHARLES KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES M. KENT JR A/K/A CHARLES MITCHELL KENT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KAREN KENT; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment fo Foreclosure dated the 21st day of November, 2013, and entered in, WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE HOLDERS OF THE FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-FF15 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FF15 is the Plaintiff and CHARLES KENT JR., and KAREN KENT are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 3 AND 4, BLOCK P MAGNOLIA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. The Property address is 12 Ted Lott Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6th day of February, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365, Facsimile: (954) 771-6052, Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com February 27 & March 06, 2014. 1043244.1 5057-0306 TWN vs. Norton, Jerry L. 12000149CAAXMX Re-Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 12000149CAAXMX WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. JERRY L. NORTON A/K/A JERRY LEE NORTON, SR., et al Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE RE-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale filed February 10, 2014, and entered in Case No. 12000149CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is Plaintiff, and JERRY L. NORTON A/K/A JERRY LEE NORTON, SR., et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville, FL 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 13th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: Lot 5, Block D, LAKE ELLEN SHORES, (PHASE TWO), according to plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 67, of the Public Records of WAKULLA County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: February 21, 2014 Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Tel: 954-462-7000 Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Heather Griffiths Phelan Hallinan, PLC Heather Griffiths, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0091444 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303. 850-577-4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 February 27 & March 06, 2014 PH # 49561 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SHAWN D. DELONG; GRACE E. DELONG; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 16, 2014, and entered in Case No. 13000227CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and SHAWN D. DELONG; GRACE E. DELONG; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, at 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE in WAKULLA County, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF LOT 6, OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 6, OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 72 16 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 6 OF SAID HARTSFIELD SURVEY A DISTANCE OF 2001.56 FEET TO AN OLD 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 13 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 929.82 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 17 13 MINUTES 19 SECONDS EAST 101.96 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 25 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST 461.25 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE SOUTHWESTERLY MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY OF TRIPLETT ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 35 13 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY 98.15 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID MAINTAINED RIGHT-OF-WAY RUN SOUTH 73 33 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 430.94 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 16th day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services) Kahane & Associates, P.A., 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486, Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com February 27 & March 06, 2014 13-01626 FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000169 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE OF J.P. MORGAN ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-S4, Plaintiff, v. RAE ANNA EDDENS, ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 08, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on March 06, 2014 at 11:00 A.M., at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 32 MINUTES WEST 4088.28 FEET TO THE APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE OF OCHLOCKONEE BAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 71 00 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID APPROXIMATE MEAN HIGH WATER LINE 100.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 17 MINUTES WEST 351.03 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 71 42 MINUTES EAST 101.00 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 12 05 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 349.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. LEGAL DESCRIPTION (EASMENT) (BASED ON SURVEY) COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 3, TOWNSHIP 6 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, AND RUN SOUTH 00 32 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 3449.62 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. S-372, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 331.13 FEET TOTHE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY NORTH 84 55 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 15.09 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 01 08 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 414.49 FEET, THENCE NORTH 71 45 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 15.70 FEET, THENCE NORTH 01 08 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 408.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 2171 Surf Road, Panacea, Florida 32346 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: February 11, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs an accommodation in order to participate in a proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850)577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850)577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Attorney for Plaintiff: Amal Laassel, Esq. Quintairos, Prieto, Wood & Boyer, P.A. 225 South Orange Avenue, Suite 900, Orlando, FL 32801 February 20 & 27, 2014. 62639 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit. 3/2, $850 mo., $850 Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has 25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated communi2BR/2BA Marina Village 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 112 Captain James St Wakulla Station Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyEE TO RET YOUR HOUE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.com N.A., F/K/A BANK OF AMERICA; AND UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION; are defendants. The clerk of the court will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 AM at the front door of the Wakulla County courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in Wakulla County, Florida, March 6, 2014 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A GOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN NORTH 00 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 2483.28 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY GRADED ROAD, MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 05 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WESTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 19 AND EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID ROAD A DISTANCE OF 149.90 FEET TO A 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE WEST QUARTER CORNER OF SAID SECTION 19, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 19, A DISTANCE OF 292.06 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 00MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 149.54 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 89 17 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 292.33 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Property Address: 33 SAM MARKS RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accomodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson: ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on February 11, 2014 BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Chris Helms, As Deputy Clerk Aldridge/Connors, LLP, Attorney for Plaintiff(s) 7000 West Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 307, Boca Raton, FL 33433 Phone: 561.392.6391, Fax: 561.392.6965 February 20 & 27, 2014. 1012-059 5041-0227 TWN vs. Walker-Smith, Leila M. Case No. 652011CA000372CAAXMX NOFS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652011CA000372CAAXMX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST 2006-31CB, MORTGAGE PASSTHROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-31CB Plaintiff, vs. LEILA M. WALKER-SMITH A/K/A LEILA WALKER-SMITH, ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 23rd day of October, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652011CA000372CAAXMX, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 A.M on the 6th day of March, 2014 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 81, OF THE HAMMOCKS, PHASE 1 A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 44 & 45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 4th day of November, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond Clerk & Comptroller, Wakulla County, Florida [CIRCUIT COURT SEAL] By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Giuseppe Cataudella, Esq.Florida Bar#: 14236 Connolly, Geaney, Ablitt & Willard, PC. The Blackstone Building,100 South Dixie Hwy, Ste. 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Primary E-mail: pleadings@acdlaw.com, Secondary E-mail: mbruning@acdlaw.com Toll Free: (561) 422-4668,Facsimile: (561) 249-0721 Counsel for Plaintiff February 20 & 27, 2014 File#: C60.6518 5042-0227 TWN Richardson, Thomas A. 65 2009 CA 000428 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65 2009 CA 000428 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS A. RICHARDSON; DONNA M. RICHARDSON; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; TALLAHASSEE-LEON EMPLOYEES FEDERAL CREDIT UNION A/K/A TALLAHASSEE LEON FCU, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 21, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65 2009 CA 000428 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 20th day of March, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statues, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: TRACT 22, CASORA ESTATES, UNIT NO. 2, (UNRECORDED): COMMENCING AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 90, HARTSFIELD SURVEY, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (ALSO A POINT ON THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND MARKED BY A U.S. FORESTRY DEPARTMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT); THENCE RUN NORTH 72 33 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF LOT 90, 165.80 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CASORA DRIVE; THENCE RUN ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF CASORA DRIVE AS FOLLOWS, SOUTH 47 43 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 335.61 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; SOUTH 50 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 755.74 FEETTO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; SOUTH 46 19 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST, 277.20 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; SOUTH 50 56 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST, 192.80 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING OF THE TRACT HEREIN CONVEYED; FROM THE POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 29 15 MINUTES 24 SECONDS EAST, 518.53 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 43 MINUTES 52 SECONDS EAST, 297.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 29 34 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE LANDS OF HARVIE STOKELY, 363.80 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF CASORA DRIVE; THENCE RUN NORTH 45 45 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST, ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF CASORA DRIVE, 164.28 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE CONTINUE ALONG THE EAST RIGHT-OF-WAY OF CASORA DRIVE, NORTH 50 56 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST, 53.35 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN LOT NO. 90, HARTSFIELD SURVEY, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. 5043-0227 TWN Tucker, Kimberly D. 65-2010-CA-000199 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2010-CA-000199 DIVISION U.S. BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY D. TUCKER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 15th, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000199 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Kimberly D. Tucker, Todd W. Tucker, Magnolia Ridge North Homeowners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Home Loan Center, Inc. d/b/a Lendingtree Loans, a California Corporation, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 20th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 37, BLOCK A, OF MAGNOLIA RIDGE NORTH, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 55 THROUGH 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 204 MAGNOLIA RIDGE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 17th day of January, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. February 20 & 27, 2014. WB-10-38222 5044-0227 TWN Lehman, Nerissa P. 2012-CA-000030 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000030 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order rescheduling foreclosure sale, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000030 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, AT 11:00 A.M. on March 6, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 38, BLOCK OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO (2), AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) 5045-0227 TWN Jones, Billy Lee 2013-CA-000015 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 2013-CA-000015 Division CENTRAL MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. BILLY LEE JONES, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BILLY LEE JONES, JOHN DOE, JANE DOE, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on February 06, 2014, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 46 AND 47, BLOCK 52, OF WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, AT PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 68 JR MILTON ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on March 06, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 6th day of February, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Alicia R. Whiting-Bozich, (813) 229-0900 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800, ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com February 20 & 27, 2014. 327446/1338493/abf Dated at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida this 22nd day of November, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (CIRCUIT COURT SEAL) /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk February 20 & 27, 2014. FL-97008058-10-FLS 5040-0227 TWN Veldkamp, Jans Hendrik 14-6-CP NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO.: 14-6-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JANS HENDRIK VELDKAMP, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JANS HENDRIK VELDKAMP, deceased, whose date of death was December 16, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 14-6-CP, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be serve must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE RO THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: 02/20/2014 Personal Representative: RIANNE SHANABARGER 2607 116th Drive NE, Lake Stevens, WA 98258 Attorney for Personal Representative: AARON R. HOLLOWAY, Florida Bar No. 0096426 Ausley & McMullen P.O. Box 391, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 (850)224-9115, Email: aholloway@ausley.com, spelham@ausley.com February 20 & 27, 2014. 5032-0306 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 016 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 369 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 05-5S-02W-000-02611-002 Description of property: 55S-2W P-7-2-M-32 N 1/2 OF A 208.25 x 416.50 AS DESC. IN OR 44 P 76 OR 64 P 841 & OR 81 P 792 Name in which assessed JAMES W GREEN JR Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on March 19, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: February 3, 2014 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: D. Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Published Feb. 13, 20, 27 and March 6, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700, (561) 998-6707 February 20 & 27, 2014. 11-237156 FC01 CHE Brain Teaser 1234 5678 9101112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 2021 22232425 26 27 282930 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 4748 49 50 51 5253 54555657 58 59 60 61 62 63 Across 1 Turn toward 5 A goatee covers it 9 Random guess 13 "American ___" 14 Call up 15 "The Way We ___" 16 Where players drive and putt 18 Boleyn or Tyler 19 Slimy veggie 20 Yogurt brand 22 Some infielders 26 Hawaiian necklace 27 Stated to be true 28 Become unified 33 Basmati and jasmine 34 Chewing gum, chocolate bars, etc. 35 "___-ching!" 36 Apple computers 37 Extra feature 38 Dress up like (for Halloween) 39 Devoured 40 Songs for one 41 Not beating around the bush 42 Soft piece of sports equipment 44 Journalist's secret 45 Little white lie 46 Weightlifter's helper 47 Nike rival 50 Store 51 One of many in a strawberry 52 Where players check and deke 58 Starbucks size 59 Host 60 Swedish furniture chain 61 Word in cutesy store names 62 Speaker's platform 63 Moisture covered, as a meadow Down 1 ___ Newtons 2 "Much ___ About Nothing" 3 Rank below gen. 4 Will Ferrell Christmas movie 5 Make butter 6 Circular dance 7 Plug-___ 8 Require 9 "Way down upon the ___ River..." 10 Where players lob and volley 11 Florence's river 12 "Where have you ? 14 Nudged with a stick 17 Shows up 21 No enemy 22 Server of beers 23 Take to the skies 24 Where players dribble and shoot 25 Female sheep 28 Panama or Erie 29 Burden 30 Super Bowl highlights? 31 One of three spaces on a Monopoly board 32 Holiday with eggs 34 Cobra's shape 37 Sports ___ 38 Oversupply 40 Swedish group that did Fernando 41 Pirate's treasure 43 Violin's cousin 44 Shopping ___ 46 "___ alive!" 47 Concerning 48 "Let's Make a ___" 49 Structure for storing tools 50 1221, in Roman numerals 53 Grandma, in Germany 54 (Free) of 55 Pres. Eisenhower 56 ___ Mexico 57 Letter after "jay"Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 23 456 34578 8 93 6713 274 395 47 873 61 2 00 9 HometownContent 159 7823 6 4 748356219 263419578 584 931627 627548193 931627845 395 264781 412875936 876193452 FACE CHIN STAB IDOL PHONE WERE GOLFCOURSE ANNE OKRA DANNON BASEMEN LEI AVOWED COALESCE RICES CANDY CHA MACS BONUS GOAS ATE ARIAS BLUNT NERFBALL SOURCE FIB SPOTTER ADIDAS MART SEED HOCKEYRINK TALL EMCEE IKEA OLDE DAIS DEWY

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 Page 11B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the Blarney Stone located? 2. TELEVISION: Who was executive producer of the Animaniacs television cartoon show? 3. MOVIES: What Jon Voight/Dustin Hoffman film won the Academy Awards Best Picture in 1970? 4. MUSIC: Which Pink Floyd song featured the lyrics, All in all youre just another brick in the wall? 5. GAMES: How many dominoes are in a standard set? 6. POLITICS: In what year did a Republican run for president on the slogan, A chicken in every pot and a car in every garage. 7. FAMOUS QUOTES: What ancient philosopher said, The roots of education are bitter, but the fruit is sweet. 8. MYTHOLOGY: According to some popular accounts, what was the last name of the legendary King Arthur? 9. COMPUTERS: What does the acronym JPEG stand for? 10. LITERATURE: In which novel does the character of Madame Therese Defarge appear? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Blarney Castle, Cork, Ireland 2. Steven Spielberg 3. Midnight Cowboy 4. Another Brick in the Wall Part 2 5. 28 pieces 6. 1928, Herbert Hoover 7. Aristotle 8. Pendragon 9. Joint Photographic Experts Group 10. A Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 27, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy LINDA CARTER Special to The News Our visit to Vienna coincided with the largest Austrian National Holiday that commemorates the countrys regaining their independent nation status and permanently declaring their neutrality is celebrated annually on Oct. 26. Festivals abound, and most businesses are closed, there is a military ceremony, and open houses at The Austrian National Parliament; the State House of the Austrian National Library; and at the Federal Chancellery of the Republic of Austria. Many museums offer free or reduced entry as well. An incredibly busy downtown; expect it to be busier as most Austrians are given the day off as well. Like so many other fortified towns, a wall once surrounded Vienna. Today the wall is gone and a ring road circles historic Vienna. During the 1600s and 1700s the government sold off parcels of land to fund construction. Many of the buildings are still in use today. Due to the larger size of Vienna, our tour began with a bus overview of the area, followed by a walking tour of the downtown. Famous for the Giant Ferris Wheel, constructed in 1897, the worlds tallest as recently as 1985. Once there were 30 gondolas, damaged during World War II, now only 15 remain. At 212 feet tall you can view the whole city from this sky-high perch, or rent a gondola for a private occasion. Only kings once used the Hapsburgs many palaces and gardens. Today they have become public parks and museums. The bus passes centuries of architecture. The baroque Church of St. Charles is from 1715. Flanked by columns that appear as if they came straight from Egypt, entry is only 4,50 euro. Nearby, two prefabricated Art Nouveau buildings, by Otto Wagner from 1900, are constructed of metal frames and solid marble slid in to each section, one a train station the other a caf. Another, the Secession Building, is topped with an open weave golden ball that resembles flowers, built as an exhibition space for artists in 1897. It was not popular at the time but is an extraordinary stop today. The Rathaus, or city hall, was located outside the original city walls. On Oct. 26, live music lls the air, children squeal in delight as rides spin and people nosh on fair food. The Opera a famous cultural landmark, is beautiful by day, and the scene of endless entertainment by night. Our circle complete, we tour through the historic core. In the center of town, a UNESCO world heritage site, Gothic St. Stephens Church steeples rise 450 feet and were originally used as watchtowers to check for res in the city. The church sports four gothic towers. As styles changed, the last incomplete tower was topped in the later style Renaissance fashion. During World War II, the church was not bombed, but a re next door caused the church roof to burn. The conflagration resulted in all the majolica tiles cascading to the oor. The interior was saved because it was already bricked up to prevent damage. The new metal roof is covered with majolica tile, still displaying the original coats of arms. Modern day pollution leaves soot stains on the church, requiring a year round cleaning operation. In the historic core only one modern structure creates discord. Built before the entire downtown was designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, the mirrored structure re ects back the surrounding buildings. Windows so delicious you want to lick the glass front the famous Demel Chocolate Confectionary & Bakery. In a city famous for chocolate and tortes, there are many competing shops, all awaiting you to sample their delicacies. The Hofberg palace and Spanish Riding Stables famous for the internationally known Lipizzaner stallions is packed with spectators on this particular day, as speeches are given and awards presented. Located close to the metro station, it is a quick trip downtown to continue exploring once the river cruise tour is complete. With an abundance of history, music, and chocolate, it would be easy to spend days here exploring all that Vienna has to offer.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 2904058 or www.luxurycruise-travel.com.Vienna has days of exploring to offer travelers PHOTOS BY LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL The Vienna cityscape from horse-drawn carriage. The Church of St. Charles in Vienna. Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. D ed i cated to t h e r escue & r e h ab ili tat i o n o f in ju r ed a n d o r p h a n ed wil d m a mm a l s a n d b ir ds GIANT YARD SALE Thurs Mar 13th 8am 3pm (Set Up) Fri Mar 14th 4 8am 3pm Sat Mar 15th 4 8am 1pm At Townsend's Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit A32 or brought to the Yard Sale (before Friday afternoon) For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.fwma.org 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission KWCB Seas to TreesPick-It-Up2014 Apalachicola National Forest8:00 a.m. Meet at Forest Road 13 Dip Pond (Dir: Turn West off of Hwy 319 at the corner of Arran (Courthouse traffic signal) continue to the pavement ends Noon to 1:00 p.m. HICKORY PARK (BEHIND SONIC) Minors must be accompanied by an adult PLEASE WEAR CLOSED TOED SHOES, BRING HEAVY DUTY GLOVES AND OTHER PERSONAL PROTECTION GEAR YOU MIGHT NEED. LIMITED SUPPLIES MAY BE AVAILABLE ONSITE.