Wakulla news

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Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00501

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newsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School ............................................................................Page 9A Sports ..........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors .....................................................................Page 13A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 14A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Taking Care of Business ..................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B Travel .............................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Ruth Eleanor Balchuck Jonathon Michael Dunlap William McCoy Sanders Barrett Bear McCoy Townsend Robert Kennley Turney Jr. Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 6th Issue Thursday, Feburary 6, 2014A winter storm hit Wakulla County last week, and schools were closed Wednesday and Thursday, Jan. 29 and Jan. 30. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce reported no road closures throughout the night and no traf c accidents. Wakulla Public Works placed sand on the Lost Creek Bridge on U.S. 319 south of Crawfordville which required the bridge to be closed for less than an hour during the night. Message boards were placed on both sides of the bridge to warn motorists about potential ice. The U.S. 319 Sopchoppy River Bridge was sanded to protect against icing after a patch was found. The Walker Bridge in Ochlockonee Bay began to ice on the shoulders. The bridge received sand from DOT contractor Transfield Services. FHP monitored the conditions on the bridge. There was minor icing on the lower Wakulla River Bridge on U.S. 98. This is an awesome county, said Emergency Management Director Scott Nelson. Our folks are working well together. They are all very much appreciated. By ELINOR A. ELFNERSpecial to The NewsIn 1943, a privileged white man from the North wrote This is the first time I have been south of the Mason-Dixon Line. It makes a shudder run through me every time I see a sign For Whites For Colored. All the pentup emotion of rebellion crowds to the front and I want to ght anything to break such narrow bestial practices. I suppose I will shock some of the good brethren and will probably be the target of criticism. So it is when one goes into a strange social culture. From a letter dated April 18, 1943 by Don F. Pielstick to his wife. That same year, George Swanson Starling, an African-American man, decided to move to Detroit to work in the war-industry as soon as the citrus picking season was over in Eustis. Surrounded as he was by the arbitrary violence of the ruling caste, it would be nearly impossible for George or any other colored boy in that era to grow up without the fear of being lynched. This is how Isabel Wilkerson tells the story of George and others in The Warmth of Other Suns: An Epic Story of Americas Great Migration. According to Wilkerson, George had been picking citrus, selling insurance and ferrying people in his old car, putting all those nickels, quarters and halfdollars in a Mason jar saving to return to Florida Agricultural & Mechancial College (now Florida A&M University) in Tallahassee and to send his wife, Inez, to Angelo Beauty College in Tampa. He heard about goodpaying jobs up north. He left his wife and with two friends traveled by bus to Detroit. There he worked in a factory making B-29 cargo planes. The tension was high because the manager thought any worker might be a communist who might make intentional mistakes in the production line to cause trouble with the planes. The work was very exacting. The white man was my father, the Rev. Don F. Pielstick. For three years he taught in two-week Rural Institutes for Negro ministers at various black colleges in the south, including Florida A&M. Dad never met George Starling although George attended FAMC about the same time Dad was there. That is, George attended until his father received so much social pressure in Eustis that he stopped supporting his sons college education. What Dad learned of the strange social culture of the South he learned from reading lots of books and from his own experiences traveling in the South by bus and train and by living and teaching on the black campuses. These institutes were intended to train rural black ministers in preparation and delivery of sermons, counseling and caring for parishioners, etc. They also gave my Dad a chance to learn a great deal by just living in a very different society. The 1940s were dif cult years for many Americans. The country was at war with Germany and Japan. Gas, sugar, fruit and many other products were rationed. Young able-bodied men were drafted in the military and then sent to training stations across the country. Industries were converted to production for the war effort, with defense communities growing up overnight nearby. Buses and trains were crowded and schedules unpredictable. From Tallahassee, Dad wrote about the institutes: The men are ne spirited and seem to wish to learn so it is encouraging to work with them I am very interested in the singing here. They sing without accompaniment and the tendency is to emphasize the beat rather than keep the time. Turn to Page 2A BLACK HISTORY MONTHParallel Lives: Florida in the 1940sGORDON MCCLEARY SPECIAL TO THE NEWSIcicles on a road sign. Elinor Elfner with a picture of her father, the Rev. Don F. Pielstick. By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netWakulla County faces a projected shortfall of $600,000 because of continuing decreases in the countys jail-bed revenues, which come from renting bed space in the Wakulla County Jail to federal agencies. The issue was raised by Commissioner Howard Kessler at Mondays county commission meeting, when he asked for a rst quarter nancial review. Even though the jail-bed revenue is still positive, it is not performing at the level anticipated in the budget. A workshop was set for March 3 at 2 p.m. to discuss the issue. This is a coming crisis, Commissioner Randy Merritt said at the meeting, agreeing with Kesslers request for a workshop. The budgeted numbers are not happening, not even close. Merritt noted that projected revenues were about $500,000 a month, but actual revenues are closer to $200,000. County Administrator David Edwards added that the real number is now closer to $150,000. Edwards brought the issue to the boards attention last year during budget negotiations. The elephant in the room is that there will have to be cuts, Kessler said after the meeting, and they have to come from somewhere. By law, the county must have a balanced budget, therefore there is no choice but to nd a solution to the discrepancy. Currently, the sheriffs of ce receives the largest portion of the county budget.County faces $600,000 budget shortfallInternet cafe suesBy WILLIAM SNOWDEN editor@thewakullanews.netThe owner of a Crawfordville internet cafe led a lawsuit last week seeking a judges determination on whether the cafe was operating legally. The lawsuit was led in Wakulla Circuit Court on behalf of Sharlyne Miller of Two Palms Cyber Cafe and names State Attorney Willie Meggs as defendant. The lawsuit was led by Crawfordville attorney Steve Glazer. The two-page complaint indicates that the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and Meggs through friendly persuasion suggested that she close the doors of her business. The lawsuit states she was given until Friday, Jan. 24, at 5 p.m. to shut down the Caf. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office quite fairly and reasonably explained to (Miller) that she could be charged with various criminal acts including but not limited to operating a gambling house, illegally holding a sweepstakes, possession of slot machines among other possible criminal acts. The state legislature took up the issue of internet cafes last year and most were outlawed as gambling houses under language regulating sweepstakes. At one point, there were a handful of internet cafes in Wakulla County, but they all closed, including Two Palms, in April 2013. In a phone conversation, Glazer indicated that Two Palms had reopened after obtaining a different software that was legal. Two Palms reopened in November 2013. Glazer said the lawsuit was led to get a legal determination on whether the software is indeed legal. Meggs was named as a respondant because it would be his of ce that would prosecute for violating the gambling statute. Meggs said that, if the case goes forward, its likely that the Of ce of Attorney General Pam Bondi would assist his of ce because of the statewide rami cations. Glazer said his client had no choice but to le the suit. So its either a civil suit and nd out if its legal or go to jail, Glazer said. e owner of Two Palms Cyber Cafe seeks declaratory judgment on law PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Two Palms Cafe, south of Crawfordville, closed in January and a lawsuit was led to get a court determination if the cafes software is legal. A sign in the window, right. Winter weather hits Page 11A Sports Sports WAR EAGLES WIN REGIONAL QUARTERFINAL

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Front Page One afternoon the staff of an institute was having a discussion about fears and racial tension when Dad let go a bombshell. He wrote home in May 1943: I protested the segregation for eating. I said that I came here to get acquainted with these pastors and that I could only get to talk with them when we ate I did not pretend to speak for the others but only for myself. I wanted to eat with the men. Rev. Stidham, who is white, went with me and we ate in the main dining hall tonight. The two government men ate by themselves. Now tell me who is leading, the church or the state? At the end of the 1943 Institute, he wrote, I think I have made some real friends on this trip and hope I have been able to lend a little Christian in uence on the race question. Activities in the Institutes included more than lectures. In 1945, the participants and leaders had dinner at the presidents house (All very tasty and lots of fun) and the leaders encouraged the men to play. In Dads words, Some of the ministers down here feel that any play is a sin. Only one would play softball with us yesterday. But today we hooked most of them in. We got them to playing hand-wrestling. You stand face-to-face with feet braced and one arm behind your back. You then clasp hands and try to make the other man move off balance so he will have to move his feet. Most of them played that and they laughed and cut up like boys. It was really good for them. In June of that year, the Detroit race riots broke out. Wilkerson elegantly described this as the rst major riot in which blacks fought back as earnestly as the whites and in which black residents began attacking and looting perceived symbols of exploitation So many people (were) injured that the municipal hospital was admitting riot victims at a rate of one a minute. George would have no part in the looting. The rioting he saw on the bus ride to work on Monday disgusted him. Then he discovered that several of his co-workers had been shot. He quit. He had to sit and wait for his pay, but the next day he went back to Eustis. In Florida, George and his friends noticed that there were only a few strong pickers left, fruit was rationed but still prized and grove owners need to get the produce to market. George and his friends started negotiating for more pay. They insisted that the other workers stay on the truck until negotiations were complete. The foreman would say they were paying 15 cents a box, but George would talk until the agreed pay was 22 cents a box. This continued for many days, only occasionally did the whole crew not work because the pay was too low. Throughout Florida grove owners and farmers desperately needed laborers. Authorities were arresting colored men if they were caught not working, charging them with vagrancy, and then sending them to the elds to earn money to pay their nes. And George was acting like a union organizer. Then one day, a friend overheard the grove owners talking about the trouble George and his friends were causing. George realized then that he had to leave Eustis if he wanted to live. It was April 1945. He sent a letter to aunts in New York City and quietly left Florida, promising to send for his wife as soon as he got settled. At the same time, back in Tallahassee, Pielstick wrote home, I arrived in Tallahassee at 2:10 a.m. and taking a taxi I directed the driver to the Negro college. Twice he turned and looked hard at me. I dont know whether he was trying to decide if I were colored or if I were crazy. But he brought me out. Sometimes they refuse. Staying in a dorm on campus, Dad explained in a letter, The students are always very interested to see if I am going to enter into campus life, live here, eat here, play with them, attend their plays and movies and school programs. You see all of these are against the tradition of segregation. Yesterday I borrowed some clothes and played some tennis. All of these things mean so much to those who have experienced nothing but the Southern pattern. Just after I dressed for tennis and while walking to the courts, I passed a girls dormitory. I heard a girl say in an excited tone of voice, Oh looky, theres a white man going to play some tennis. It makes you feel conspicuous to say the least. When Pielstick spoke in chapel at FAMC, April 25, 1945, he spoke from the heart about rural life. His text was Hosea 4:1, The Lord has a controversy with the inhabitants of the land. He believed the city could not provide for its citizens and were always having to draw upon the rural population. He described his points as showing how we were killing ourselves off by moving to the city. Yet, George Starling could not stay in rural Florida. My Dad spoke of destruction of the soil, not eating the right diet when we know what we need for health and our not respecting the underlying principles in the social order. Today, I wonder what principles in the social order he meant. Im sure he was not referring to the Jim Crow society that caused George to move to NYC. In a 1944 letter describing his warm welcome by Negro friends at Morehouse, he reminded Mom of the Jim Crow laws and wrote, So you see, I am constantly violating the law. You may have to bail me out and pay my ne most anytime. He wasnt worried for his own safety, but recognized that many whites would not understand his friendship with longtime Negro friends from seminary days. During that weekend visit, these friends introduced Dad to many leaders of this black college. Dads Negro friends were sharing this opportunity for their black colleagues to get to know the Rev. Pielstick, a white colleague. These Black leaders had not had the opportunity to become friends with whites and most of the time felt that the good intentions of whites were a racket or veneer. Dad and Mom believed strongly that they were living their Christian values. Even today, like George we may need to leave an oppressive situation, or like my father, we may sometimes shock the good brethren and be the target of criticism. So it is when one goes into a strange social culture. I hope we can seek to understand and respect different social cultures, and still treat each other with dignity. The very different, parallel lives of George Swanson Starling and my Dad, in the Florida of the 1940s should remind us how easy it is to live our own lives, isolated and unaware of the lives of our fellow humans. Now, each year at the beginning of Black History Month I consider what I might do to further understanding between peoples of different backgrounds. Last year, I made a commitment to explore the social and legal aspects of our present criminal justice system a system which seems to marginalize people of color. With a another member of my church, I lead a discussion based on The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander, a book recommended by Leonard Pitts. Now in 2014, through the leadership of people from the Unitarian Universalist and the First Presbyterian Churches, there are sessions on Monday nights based on the same book but with community speakers stimulating the discussion at each session. You can call either church to get more information on this effort to reduce the Jim Crowism remaining in our area of Florida. And, for myself, I have read and am willing to discuss a very recent book by Herb Donaldson of Wakulla County entitled Southern Shock Americana, a true story of the life of his uncle, also an African American, who spent 14 years on death row and was executed in 1996. Someday, perhaps, we can all treat everyone with dignity. Black History month is a good time to renew our commitments for justice for all humanity.Parallel Lives: Florida in the 1940s Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Independent Doctor of Optometry edgardneroptical@yahoo.com E d Ga r Start the year off right by taking care of yourself! Make it your New Years resolution to schedule an eye exam. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER LUNCH PARTNER F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., CrawfordvilleWith Any Order Deli DeliFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Receive a Complimentary Copy of FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netFriends of Wakulla Springs have partnered with Keep Wakulla County Beautiful this year and have gathered artists and volunteers to create a series of over-sized puppets for the March 29 Springtime Tallahassee Parade. Madeline Carr, incoming and past president of Friends of Wakulla Springs, contacted Tallahassee artist and longtime park volunteer Linda Hall to lead the group. Additionally, David Moynahan, local nature photographer, is acting as a mentor on the project. Hall once worked at Wakulla Springs as an Americorps volunteer and created the original puppets that have been used during the Wakulla Wildlife Festival for the past ve years. When the idea came up to make new wildlife puppets to be used in the 2014 parade, Hall was sought out for her expertise in the process. Ambitiously, new animals being created for the parade are an Anhinga, a bobcat, a deer, large and small turtles, and three manatees. Some of the older puppets created by Hall years ago are also being refurbished. Other artists involved in the project are Kathryn Gibson, Heidi Haire, Julie Argue and Joan Matey. In addition to the puppets making their debut at the Springtime Tallahassee Parade, they will be at the Wakulla Wildlife Festival in April. PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMFriends of Wakulla Springs work on creating puppetsVolunteers discuss giant puppet making techniques at a warehouse located at Wakulla Springs.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905. By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net The countys Tourist Development Council met recently with a company called Media Design, based in Jacksonville, to discuss plans pertaining to the countys Visitors Guide, which is currently in the works. The company had submitted a response to an RFP put out by the council and had been chosen to help develop content for the new upcoming destination management system, as well as content for the guide. These efforts are all funded by the BP oil spill grant money that the TDC received, which must be spent and reported on by July this year. The group modeled plans and ideas from other guides published for surrounding areas like Franklin County and discussed what the guides layout, in terms of sections and information, would include. One aspect that the guide will definitely have, will be separate sections featuring the different communities in the county Crawfordville, Sopchoppy, Ochlockonee Bay and St. Marks for example. Specific information that the council plans to include, are things like accommodations, information about the area, county history and maps containing pertinent landmarks, roadways and emergency information. Suggestions were made to designate full pages in the guide to popular community attractions such as Gulf Specimen Aquarium, Wakulla Springs Park and the lighthouse. There will be no paid advertisements in the guide and the content will collected, in part, from prior publications put out by the TDC. For new and inexistent information, the council has hired two travel feature writers. Members also acknowledged the fact that easily accessibly information about things to do, either by community or simply by category, would be bene cial. The council plans to include the full spectrum of what Wakulla has to offer shing, boating, trails for kayaking, biking, hiking and paddling, birding, hunting and much more. The council also expressed the importance of including the fresh from Wakulla seafood markets and their information. According to discussion, that information will span about two pages and will cover all of the marketplaces. Restaurants will be listed toward the back. The plan is for the guide to go to print by June 1, if not sooner. With a $35,000 contract with Media Design, the TDC is hoping to print 10,000 guides, though more may be possible depending on the size and number of pages that is decided on. Currently, the plan is for the guide to contain about 60-80 pages worth of material. Once that information is nalized, the TDC will look at how it will distribute based on postage and other factors. The guides will, for sure, be made available at the Chamber of Commerce and Welcome Center for easy access to visitors. Another aspect of the TDCs contract with Media Design lends itself to the company consolidating the councils logo into one updated version, made available in different resolutions and formats to be disbursed and easy to use. The TDC will hold its next meeting on Feb. 13 at 8:30 a.m. at the Welcome Center in Panacea. Meetings are open to the public.Tourist Development Council planning a visitors guideBy JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThe possible realignment of U.S. Highways 319 and 98 in Medart was brought up as a possible con ict of interest for a commissioner over his ownership of property at the intersection. Proposed plans to change the intersection, which is currently a Y south of Wakulla High School in Medart, to a T-intersection with a stoplight in front of the high school was discussed including concerns about the possible hazards to teen drivers at the school. Mama, hang on to your teenager because they are going to get killed today, citizen Dana Peck told the board about the proposed realignment and her concerns about safety. Peck also blasted the the unwieldy wording of the item on the agenda, saying it masked an important issue. If written in plain English, she said, citizens could better understand the issues being raised, and voted upon, before the board meeting. Peck noted that Commissioner Jerry Moore owns property at the intersection, which he plans to develop. She claimed it was con ict of interest for Moore as a commissioner. Moore did not respond at the meeting to Pecks claims. Commissioner Randy Merritt noted the possible realignment of the intersection is a state road issue not a county issue. It might not be a county issue, but its still our taxpayer dollars, Kessler said. The item being discussed was a comprehensive plan text amendment to move and/or repair ve major intersections in the county. The other intersections are U.S. Highway 319 at Bloxham Cutoff, U.S. Highway 319 at Wakulla Arran Road, U.S. Highway 319 at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Boulevard, and U.S. Highway 319 at Ivan Church Road. These intersections are part of an infrastucture plan that the county adopted on Oct. 15, 2012. Commissioner Kessler revisited the comprehensive plan and stated that these issues are not going away, so as a board we need to discuss this situation. A motion passed that would change the wording on the application slightly, but there was no more discussion at this time on speci c projects regarding intersection improvements, nor was there any date set to further discuss the plan. The board unanimously approved the wording change, which dealt with the countys imposition of impact fees, from shall to may. The county currently has impact fees on the books but has reduced the levies to zero in the current economic climate. In other business: BOCC voted on a request for approval for two bids for drainage improvement projects one for Bostic Pelt Road, and the other for Surf Road. Kessler raised concerns about the disparity of the four bids received for the projects. The lowest bid was more than $100,000 lower than the next highest bid. Additionally, the two highest bids were well above the lowest bid, leading the commissioner to question the integrity of the bids received. Merritt explained that a performance bond must be secured by the company awarded the contract to ensure the completion of the project. Commissioners voted unanimously to award the project to the company with the lowest bid, Gulf Group, Inc. The Wakulla County Marine Advisory committee was selected by a ranking process. Appointed to the committee were Cypress Rudloe for waterfront business, Steve Cushmon for recreation angler/diver, John Gunter for marine biologist, Capt. Jody Campbell for shing guide and Chuck Shields as marina operator.Possible realignment of 319 and 98 draws concern Certied applicants will be given rst consideration. The Wakulla County Public Works Department will conduct a silent auction between the hours of 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 19th 2014. Surplus items will be on display from 9:00 am until 12:00 pm at the Lower Bridge Landll located at 156 County Landll Road, Crawfordville, Florida. Interested parties may also request a list of items to be auctioned with the accompanying bid sheet from the Public Works Department at 340 Trice Lane, Crawfordville, Florida, or by calling (850)9267616. A list of items and bid sheet are also available at www.mywakulla.com. Sealed bids should be delivered to the Public Works Department from 9:00 a.m. until 4:00 p.m. on February 19th.NOTICE OF WAKULLA COUNTY SOLID WASTE DEPARTMENT SURPLUS AUCTIONFEBRUARY 6, 13, 2014 The City of St. Marks Board of Commissioners Election Wednesday, February 19, 2014 7:00 am 7:00 pmThe City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.JANUARY 23, 30, 2014 FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2014NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on February 12, 2014, at 5:30pm FEBRUARY 6, 2014 WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDPREQUALIFICATION NOTICE BID #13/14-07 The School Board of Wakulla County is requesting Proposals for Pre-Qualifying for General Contractors for Wakulla Middle School Renovating. PROJECT DESCRIPTION The scope of work includes the renovation of the main building and gym. The work shall include but not limited to replacement of locks, doors, hardware, door frames, gym oor, rekey lockers, oor nishes, ag pole, main water line in building, stage curtains, plumbing xtures, windows, folding walls, painting interior and exterior, and tack boards. Pre-Qualication packets are available at the School Board Ofce.WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Telephone Number: 850-926-0065JANUARY 16, FEBRUARY 6, 2014Interested parties may pick up packets between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Completed packets and a Public Entity Crime Statement must be returned to the ofce of Robert Pearce, Superintendent, Wakulla County Schools, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Attention: William R. Bristol by 2:00 p.m. February 20, 2014. There will be a pre-qualication meeting at 2:00 p.m. on February 13, 2014 in the Wakulla County School Boardroom. LYNDA KINSEYThe Y intersection of U.S. Highways 319 and 98 in Medart is being proposed for a realignment that would create a T-intersection with a stoplight in front of Wakulla High School.

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comI want to thank the members of the Wakulla County Youth Coalition and Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce for supporting our Newspapers in Education program. Both agreed to help underwrite our program that gets more than 200 papers into the schools. Our Thinking Outside the Book page is created for use by teachers in the classroom. Upper level teachers can use the news stories in the paper to teach students about where they live, their government, and more. Right now, Crawfordville Elementary gets 36 papers a week, Riversink gets 20, Shadeville gets 40, Medart 50, Wakulla High School 50, the Sopchoppy Educational Center gets 20, and COAST Charter School gets 10. Its costly to send out all those papers and I really appreciate the support of those groups so that we can keep it going forward. In another matter, Id like to welcome back, Jenny Odom to The News. About a year ago, when our reporter left, Jenny came aboard to help out with some light reporting and laying out some pages. Less than a year later, greener pastures called to the replacement reporter, and Jenny again agreed to step into the fray and help out. Of course, Jenny has been with us all along shes been writing the artist pro les for the Arts & Entertainment page every month. Shes also been the face of The News at local festivals. An artist herself, Jenny was both reporting on and participating in the Friends of Wakulla Springs parade puppets project. (See the story on Page 2A.) Jenny has also agreed to pick up some heavier reporting duties see the county commission stories on the Front Page and 3A. Welcome back, Jenny. William Snowden is editor of The Wakulla News. Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNING NR Most popular stories online: Sheriffs Report January 23, 2014 Griefs physical pain The mystery boat on the Ochlockonee River Herb Donaldson Funding to help pay utility bills is available Underwater Wakulla January 30, 2014 Six War Eagles named to All Big Bend teams New exhibit is launched at museum thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE:Thanks, youth coalition and schools for NIE supportSupport appreciated after loss Support appreciated after loss Net laws are a legal absurdity ank you, Big Bend Hospice Deputies helped when car broke down Closing schools was the right thing William Snowdenwsnowden@thewakullanews.net Follow us onEditor, The News: We would like to thank Big Bend Hospice for all they did for my sister Mary and my family. We had to go to Lakeland to bring my sister back. We got back at 2 in the morning and they already had oxygen out to our house for her. They were here the next day with her bed. Big Bend Hospice is a wonderful thing. They were here right to the end. All the ladies that helped were loving, kind, and gentle. They came out late at night when I called and stayed as long as I needed. Thank you to everyone at Big Bend Hospice. YOU ARE A TRUE BLESSING FROM GOD. We also want to thank our special friends Mark and Sherry Callaway for all they did for us, the phone calls, helping us get everything set up. The very good food they made. And Kim, thank you thank you for the nights you sat up with me. That is what friends are about. Mickie, thank you for all the things you did also. Howard and Linda Hobby Crawfordville Editor, The News: I would like to thank the three deputies who helped me out of a jam Friday. My car broke down at the light at Wal-Mart and, as luck would have it, Deputy Sparby, Deputy Gibson and a third deputy whose name I didnt get and for that I am sorry made sure I was off the road to a safe place, got my car going, helped me get it to a place to be xed, and they even wanted to take me home. They were NOT going to leave me alone. Deputy Gibson stayed with me until my daughter could get to me. I know they are supposed to help the citizens, but these three went way beyond that and for that I am very grateful. So a BIG thank you guys for making sure this very upset lady got to safety and got the help she needed. Thanks for being there, Phyllis Smith Crawfordville Editor, The News: It appears that the wetlands issue that has been haunting Wakulla County for several months continues to evolve in both methodology and focus. I read with interest a letter by Becky Black in last weeks edition of the paper (Wetlands ordinance is defective). I too have noticed that what started out as a petition drive by a group of environmentalists has turned into what looks like an intentional demonization of good citizens and elected personnel who do not believe that a referendum is in either the best interest of the county or even of the wetlands. The argument now seems to be about voting rights. I have witnessed this and I have heard this from friends. The people who were originally seeking a ballot referendum are now telling the citizens of Wakulla County that the commissioners are trying to take away their right to vote. Nothing could be farther from the truth. Yet they persist with this dishonest attempt to change the focus from the wetlands ordinance to a right-to-vote issue. Hasnt there been enough deception in the country without bringing it to our county? To set the record straight: 1. A referendum does not give people a voice. Yes, it allows them to vote, BUT ON WHAT? A referendum only allows the people to vote for or against what someone else has decided it should say. The ordinance that is being pushed by the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance may be awed, may be damaging to property owners, may be expensive for the county but this does not seem to matter to the petition gatherers. Once they obtain a referendum on the ballot there can be no discussion, no debate, no modi cation, no intensive study of the ordinance there can only be a yes or no vote. The truth is: A referendum limits the voice of the people. 2. As the referendum is written there is no way to have a logical or truthful discussion regarding legal changes to the ordinance, should it pass. In fact, it advocates tyranny rather than giving citizens the right to decide. This is what happens. The referendum states clearly that the ordinance could only be changed by a 5-0 vote of the commissioners. A 5-0 is unheard of in America. Majority vote is the norm. However, with a 5-0 commissioners vote, one commissioner can hold at bay the entire legislative process. This is ne if it happens to be an issue compatible to your way of thinking but consider this in a context other than the wetlands. What would happen should the issue be lowering the millage rate and four of the ve commissioners said yes but one said no. That would result in no decrease in the property tax. The majority would be at the mercy of one naysayer. That is not the way American Government works. But, in the case of the Wakulla wetlands ordinance, that is the way it would work. One commissioner could keep change from becoming law. Is that fair; is that right; is that democracy? 3. Or, the alternative method for changing the ordinance is another referendum. And that raises the question of who authors that ordinance and that referendum? The answer is probably not you, the citizen. It would be the people who are most involved with the issue. Special interest groups write laws from their perspective and not the community at large. We all have seen the terrible results of special interests dictating what the rest of us should have. For the majority of Wakullans the future of the wetlands is important. Special interests however should not dictate that future. Our current Board of County Commissioners is trying to preserve your rights as a free American to not only have a vote but to, as Ms. Black said, have a voice. This will never happen in a government by referendum. The voice of the people needs to be in the hands of the voting majority not in the hands of the special interests James Grey Crawfordville Editor, The News: A legal absurdity. That is how the Honorable Judge Jackie Fulford described the mullet net shing rules created by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. She said the laws contradict each other and their application by the FWC appears to be fundamentally unfair. Then she asked, Could it be that FWC is only enforcing these laws against mullet shermen, as the shermen suggest? She continued, The laws, as they now exist, are simply unfair...it appears the commercial mullet shermen are being singled out for prosecution. She concluded, An absolute mess has been created. I, as well as others, have been working to rectify this unfair bias against mullet shermen since 1996. Our work actually began in 1994 when we went to court to oppose certain shrimp net rules. That final ruling came rather quickly, handed down by the Florida Supreme Court in less than two years. Then we took up the cause of the mullet shermen, and that has turned out to be quite another matter. For the shrimpers, the state allowed the construction of the net to be the same, with the overall size being shrunk from 100,000 square feet to 500 square feet. For the mullet shermen, however, not only was the overall net size shrunk to 500 square feet, but the actual construction of the net was changed to create a smaller mesh size. At the time Florida voters passed the Net Limitation food sh seine net rules required 95 percent large mesh with 5 percent small mesh and studies showed it had a 3 to 5 percent bycatch. A major problem with the smaller mesh size is that 98 percent of the sh that it catches are small and not what the mullet shermen are trying to catch. We call that a 98 percent bycatch, which means that 98 percent of the sh are not taken to market, but end up back in the water, where many do not survive. A larger mesh size would solve this problem, yet the FWC simply will not change the rule, even though the current rule causes massive problems for the shermen, for the sh, and for the ecostructure of our Florida waters. The FWC was supposed to gather ample data about the impact of this rule before passing it. They did not. How would this rule impact the economy, the marine environment, and the citizens? The FWC did not answer these legally required questions before passing the net rules for mullet shermen. They simply created the rules, and in the process created what Judge Fulford called an absolute mess. When will there be justice for the mullet shermen? Perhaps within the next month or so, when the First DCA will consider Judge Fulfords recent order to stop the unfair prosecution of commercial mullet shermen until the legal confusion is corrected. Until then, the coastal economy is hampered, shermen are not allowed to sh as they should, 98 percent of the sh they catch are caught for no good reason, and the FWC continues to prosecute and persecute Florida citizens who are just trying to continue their family tradition of making a living from our beautiful, God-given Florida waters. Ronald F. Crum President Wakulla Fishermens Association Editor, The News: When my northern friends heard we were closing schools down here due to possible ice pellets they rolled their eyes and chuckled. Then, the disasters in the Atlanta area occurred with many students stranded in schools overnight. They stopped laughing..... Kudos to Superintendent Pearce and his team for prioritizing the welfare of our students! Paul Young Crawfordville Editor, The News: We wish to express our gratitude for all the prayers, visits, food, cards, flowers and every gesture of love and support shown, following our loss of Fred Oliver Jr. We especially thank Bevis Funeral Home and also Big Bend Hospice for their professional and caring manner. Family of Fred Oliver Jr.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 5A< STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Do you plan to watch the Super Bowl? BRENDA CLENNEYCancer SurvivorYep. I enjoy watching it with the whole family and friends. I enjoy the excitement and hype of it all. I will have to make guacamole dip for everyone. DEBBIE LEWISRealtor/Property ManagementNope! The T.V. will be on and my husband will be watching it, Il be on the computer working. JUSTIN HARVELLConstructionOf course without a doubt. This year it is the best defense vs. the best offense. MEGHANN RUDOLPHStay-at-home momOf course. I am rooting for the Broncos, they are my team. TOM RICHARDSONRetiredYes. Denver Broncos all the way. Manning all the way. Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Winner Carole Sloan drawn from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea Winner receives one meal from the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the theCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideSKYBOX Lunch for 2 order from menuHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drink The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & Dogs Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand$599 Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n n s s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9771 11AM TIL MIDNIGHTCALL IN OR DINE IN Come Have Come Have With Us! With Us!DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE Come by to see Our Daily Specials!FRITO CHILI PIETopped with Sour Cream, Onions, Cheese & Jalapeo$595 926-3500Two men arrested for church break-inSpecial to The NewsTwo Crawfordville men were caught in the act of committing a burglary at a Medart church Sunday, Feb. 2 at 4 a.m., according to Wakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel. Tyler Dylan Trice, 20, and Dewin Jeamel VelezAlvarez, 21, were each charged with two counts of burglary, possession of burglary tools, vehicle theft, two counts of criminal mischief and two counts of larceny in the case. The two men are accused of entering Medart Assembly of God on Feb. 2 and removing items from the church. WCSO detectives also connected Trice and VelezAlvarez to a second burglary on Jan. 30 that involved the Promised Land Ministry Thrift store in Crawfordville. A concerned citizen contacted the WCSO about a potential burglary occurring at Medart Assembly of God. Deputy Mike Zimba responded and observed two men dressed in military camouflage hiding in the bushes at the nearby Lake Ellen Baptist Church. Deputy Zimba took the subjects into custody and observed a long screwdriver which was seized as evidence as well as guitar strings, microphones and chocolate candy, property suspected to be owned by the Medart Assembly of God. The two men also possessed two-way radios when they were arrested. Two bicycles used to transport the men from one church to the other were also discovered on the scene. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Deputy Zimba responded to Medart Assembly of God and discovered a forced entry into the church and a church van that had windows open and was left unsecured. Missing items from the church included speakers, an amplifier, computer equipment, camcorder, electronic games, two guitars and chocolate candies. Both subjects allegedly admitted taking the items from the church and using the church van to transport the items to a vacant home on Emmett Whaley Road in Medart where the items were being stored. All of the stolen items from the church were recovered from the location and returned to the church. The stolen items are valued at $1,800. Damage to the church doors and locks is estimated at $1,200. During the interview process with Detective Derek Lawhon, the two subjects also allegedly confessed to an unrelated burglary of the Promise Land Ministries Thrift Shop which occurred on Thursday, Jan. 30. A safe with a small amount of cash, a watch and two bicycles were taken from the thrift store at the time. The two men were charged with burglary, grand theft and criminal mischief in connection with the thrift shop case. They two men are being held in the Wakulla County Jail with no bond. Dewin J. Velez-Alvarez Tyler Dylan Trice SELL & INSTALLFREE OIL CHANGE(850)926-6526charliegrim@msn.com Lube-Xpert.com2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned by Charlie GrimTIRESwith the purchase of 4 tiresWe NOW

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com BUCKHORN NEWS Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR At least its not snowing!John and Charlotte Rosier Celebration is this week First Pentecostal Church to host special speakerThe First Pentecostal Church of Crawfordville would like to invite you to visit our service with special speaker the Rev. David Forrest of Ocala on Sunday, Feb. 9 at 2:30 p.m. The church is located at 3055 Crawforville Highway, directly across from the Courthouse. For more details, contact Pastor Joseph Abraham at (850) 7289070. Camp meeting to be held in SopchoppyAn old-fashioned camp meeting with Brother T.R. Williams is set for Feb. 17-21 at 7:30 p.m. nightly at the Odom Memorial Campground, 198 Pull Back Road in Sopchoppy.Church BriefsBy ETHEL SKIPPER The annual John and Charlotte Rosier Celebration of their children, family and friends will come together this week to do what they enjoy best. On Friday, Feb. 7, at 7 p.m., will be fun, chew and chat talent show, Tshirt contest and much, much more. The youth will have a chance to showcase their talent and give tributes or stories about Mom Charlotte and Daddy John. On Saturday, Feb. 8, at noon, will be church service conducted by Bishop Joseph E. Rosier from Greenville, S.C., Decon Merddie Rosier, Deaconess Alberta Hines, Pastor Ethel M. Skipper of Sopchoppy, Pastor Ruth Easter of Seattle, Sister Callie Gavin of Tallahassee, Brother John Rosier Jr. Dinner will be served. The activities will all be held at Skipper Temple Church, 165 Surf Road, in Sopchoppy. For more information, call (850) 962-7838. Tallahassee Church of Christ Written in Heaven will have a three-night revival held at Tallahassee No. 1 Church. Elder E. Morgan is host pastor. Our prayer and concern goes out to all the sick and shut-in, those in the hospital, nursing homes, homeless, the prisons, and all in need of prayer everywhere. By JAMES L. SNYDERIf somebody gave out an award for grouchiness and downright cantankerousness, I am sure I would take top honors. Of course, according to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage, there is no honor in being grouchy or cantankerous nor is there room for it in our humble abode. For the past week I have been grouchy and cantankerous and any other adjective you might want to throw into that pot of naughtiness. By the time the week ended that pot was boiling hot and about to explode. It is always bene cial to look back over an incident and gure out where you made your mistake. I often dont do it, but in this case, the mistake I made was so obvious it could not be overlooked. Most faults can be remedied if you know what to do about it. Then, there are those mistakes that no matter what you do, it still ends up being a mistake. My mistake was I exhibited my downright grouchiness and cantankerous spirit in front of my wife. I know the marriage manual says there should be no secrets between husband and wife. Down through the years I have tried to maintain that part of the marital relationship, and I have done a good job thus far. What the manual does not say is, there are special times when a husband should not speak his mind in front of his wife. My wife constantly reminds me that God gave men two ears and one mouth for a particular purpose, open our ears and shut our mouth. I do not think I got that far in the instructions, but I will take my wifes word on that one, you can be sure. In my defense, however, this past week I was colder than I have ever been in all my life, at least that I can remember. Now, it is one thing to be cold, but quite a different thing to tell somebody, especially your wife, that you are cold. I made that mistake once and told my wife I was cold. She felt my forehead, got out my bathrobe, fussed over me all evening and made me hot tea with honey to drink. I wanted to tell her that I was cold; I did not have a cold. It was so cold the little gray cells were shivering so much they were not functioning 100 percent. According to some peoples opinion, it is a rare occasion when they do function 100 percent. As I remember it, I was looking out our back patio window, watching it drizzle and shivering in the cold. If I need any defense on my side, I did not realize that in the same room was the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Enveloped in this aroma of sheer ignorance, I said out loud something to the effect, I hate this cold weather! Following that pointed observation, as I now re ect, I also growled most viciously. It was then I heard a noise explode behind me. Well, at least it is not snowing! You should be grateful for that. I swung around as quickly as possible, and there standing in all her glory with both hands rmly planted on her hips was my wife staring in my direction. The tone of her voice and her demeanor revealed I was in for one of her infamous lectures. All week long, we had been noticing some of our family up north experiencing some very severe snow conditions. Some even missed school for several days because of the snow drifting. One family member way up north was without electricity for nearly a week. In some of these areas, the temperature has been in the minus degree for at least a week. Dont you know how lucky you are to live in a place where it doesnt snow and the temperature doesnt get below zero? Instead of complaining, you should be grateful for what you really have. Think of members of our family up north suffering in that freezing weather! Would you like to change places with them right now? I have often said this and I am sure I will continue saying it until the day I die, when my wife is right she is right. No argument from me here. Then she made a statement I am still mulling over. Be thankful for what you dont have. I must say she had a great point there. Sometimes it is quite hard to be thankful for what you do not have when you are so caught up in the problems right in front of you. Thinking about that, my grouchiness and cantankerousness began evaporating. I suppose they have their place, and I am ashamed to admit they are in my place more often than I should allow them. In many ways, it is easy to be thankful for what you have in your hand at the time. The apostle Paul pointed this out in one of his letters. And let the peace of God rule in your hearts, to the which also ye are called in one body; and be ye thankful (Colossians 3:15). For most of us, being thankful does not come naturally. It is something we have to work at on a daily basis. It has to go a step further. Be thankful for what you do not have and you will be all that more thankful for what you do have.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 7A William McCoy Sanders, 62, of Sopchoppy, died on Thursday, Jan. 30, 2014. He was a lifelong Wakulla County resident. Survivors include his wife, Matilda Sanders of Sopchoppy; son, John (Rachel) Sanders of Sopchoppy; daughters, Laura (Donald) Bodiford and Mary Ann Sanders (James Trowell), both of Sopchoppy; sisters, Viola Henderson, Pearlie Revell, and Dorothy (David) Kelly, all of Sopchoppy, and Peggy Porter of Tallahassee; and seven grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents, Walter McCoy and Lois Victoria Bradey Sanders; and brothers, Fred Sanders, Clyde Sanders, and James Sanders. A celebration of his life took place at his home, 97 Syfrette Creek Road in Sopchoppy, on Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014 at noon. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, Macclenny, Florida 850-559-3380. Jonathon Johnny Michael Dunlap, 25, of Tallahassee, died on Thursday, Jan 30, 2014. Survivors include his girlfriend, Della Mercer of Hosford; stepson, Chase; infant son, Bentley Michael Dunlap; father, Tommy Dunlap (Liz Stoudinger) of Crawfordville; his brothers and sisters, William W.T Dunlap (Beth), Josh Stoudinger (Dee), Brandi Vining, Kelli Stoudinger (Josh Hicks) all of Crawfordville, and Christina Comerford (Phillip) of Sneads; his paternal grandparents, Thomas Grady Dunlap (Patricia) of Tallahassee; his maternal grandmother, Elli Clemons of Tallahassee; and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews and cousins. He was predeceased by his mother, Mary Virginia Clemons; and his maternal grandfather, Donald Clemon. The Celebration of Life is scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 6, 2014, at 10 a.m. at Culleys on Timberlane Road. Family will receive friends immediately following the service in the reception hall. Pastor Dennis Young is of ciating. Culleys will be handling the arrangements. Ruth Eleanor Balchuck, 88, of Crawfordville, died Feb. 1, 2014 in Crawfordville. She was born in Cambridge, Mass. Survivors include her three sons: Stephen Laverne Balchuck, Kenneth Paul Balchuck, and Paul Edward Balchuck, all of Crawfordville. She was predeceased by her husband, Stephen Laverne Balchuck; a daughter, Patricia Rose Noah; and a son, Douglas Claude Balchuck. A memorial service will be held Saturday, Feb. 8, 2014, at 11 a.m. at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, 3609 Coastal Hwy., in Medart. Bevis Harvey-Young Funeral Home is assisting the family with the arrangements (850-9263333).Barrett Bear McCoy Townsend, 22, of Temple Terrace, passed away on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014. He was born on Feb. 15, 1991 in Tampa to his parents, Jack L. Townsend Sr. and Helen Cox Townsend. Bear was the youngest of three children. He was a 2009 graduate of Jesuit High School and attended Auburn University where he was studying Computer Software Engineering. Bear was a yoga instructor for the Auburn Student Activities Center. He was a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity Alabama Alpha Chapter, Cupola Engineering Ambassadors, the Honors College at Auburn University, the Jesuit High School Alumni Association and Temple Terrace Presbyterian Church. He enjoyed life immensely: dancing, singing, playing guitar, yoga, parkour, traveling, sailing, playing canasta, painting, drawing, mountain climbing and spending time with family and his many, many friends. Bear never met a stranger and enjoyed everyones life story. The nal chapter of his story will be written by his friends and family each day as they remember his joy, his happiness, his smile and his laughter. Bear will be remembered by his loving parents, Jack and Helen Townsend; and his brothers, Light and Jake. He is also survived by grandmother, Margaret Cox; and many loving aunts, uncles and cousins. Bear was predeceased by grandparents, LeRoy and Anita Townsend and George Cox. A visitation for Bear was held at 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014 at St. Anthonys Chapel at Jesuit High School, 4701 N. Himes Avenue, Tampa FL 33614, followed by a funeral service that began at 3 p.m. with an on-campus reception thereafter. We are so grateful for the outpouring of love and prayers. In lieu of owers, donations in Bears honor may be directed to Jesuit High School, 4701 N Himes Avenue, Tampa FL 33614 or Auburn University Foundation, c/o Kurt Sasser, Director of Development, 255 Heisman Dr., Ste. 3248, Auburn AL 36849, please include in memory of Bear Townsend on your checks memo line. Words of comfort may be expressed at blountcurryterraceoaks.com.Obituaries Ruth Eleanor Balchuck Jonathon Michael Dunlap William McCoy Sanders Barrett Bear McCoy Townsend Robert Kennley Turney Jr. William McCoy Sanders Jonathon Michael Dunlap Ruth Eleanor Balchuck Barrett Bear McCoy Townsend By TRACY RENEE LEE Embalming is a scientific process that serves one purpose over its many others. That purpose is to prolong a decedents presentational integrity. As a funeral practitioner, I am often asked about embalming. Some clients want to know what it entails scientifically; some are spiritually concerned, while others have a morbid interest in the details. Except in certain special cases, embalming is not required by law (Federal Trade Commission, Funeral Rule, Disclosure No. 2) This statement begs the question, What are the certain special cases and do they apply to my loved one? Embalming is not required if a loved one is going to be cremated or buried without services, as in Direct Cremation or Immediate Burial. Services include viewings, visitations, funerals and graveside services where the body will be available for others to see. Without embalming, the body may not be present at any type of service where the public may be exposed to it. In some cases, a family may choose to have a visitation with a closed casket or a funeral with a closed casket, and in these cases, embalming may not be required. Generally, without embalming, the service must take place within 24 hours of death. There are extenuating circumstances, however. If your loved one were brutally murdered and sent for autopsy, the funeral home would not have your loved one for a number of days. Quite often, brutal murders negate the opportunity for viewing due to extensive damage to the deceased, rendering the body unembalmable. The family may still have a visitation and funeral with the body present with the added services of refrigeration and Mylar encasement. Viewing, however will not be lawful or possible. Embalming does not extend the decedents presentational integrity inde nitely. Although decomposition has been chemically impeded, it has not been stopped; it merely continues to decompose on a slower schedule. How long the decedents presentational integrity is preserved is dependent on a multitude of factors. The condition of the body at death, the illnesses suffered by the deceased and the span of time between death and embalming. In most cases, if the body is in good condition before embalming and if embalming takes place within a few hours of death, the decedents presentational integrity is extended for three to ve days. If additional time is required and your embalmer is proactively working on the body daily, eight days may be possible. In rare cases, if the embalmer is diligently exercising restorative measures, one might be able to press an additional day or two more. Funeral Practitioners are trained in the arts of restoration, however, if a deceased individual was brutally murdered, even restoration may not be what the family wants to see. If you ever suffer such a tragic experience, discuss it as openly as possible with your funeral practitioner, they will be honest about the esthetic possibilities of the restorative work. Embalming is required with any funeral that includes services where the casket may be opened. Other situations requiring embalming are those that require transportation of the body. In some states and counties across America, a body may not be transported across county or state borders without embalming. Air travel and dangerous or contagious diseases also require embalming.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushinup-daisies.blogspot. com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Embalming is a scienti c process BEREAVEMENT COLUMN Robert Kennley Turney Jr., 70, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014 in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 25 years, Diane Turney, of Crawfordville. He was born in Ft. Wayne, Ind., coming from Ft. Lauderdale, and had lived in this area 13 years. He was a contractor. He was a war vet who served in the United States Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. Services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests you make a donation to the Wounded Warriors Project, Inc., 4899 Belfort Road Suite 300, Jacksonville FL 32256. In addition to his wife, survivors include his mother, Esther Turney Voirol; four children, Jean Gibbons, Bobbie Jo Gearhart, Eric Guzelf and Wendy Guzelf; nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren; sisters, Joy Luginbill and Connie Cochran; and brother, Keith Turney. He was predeceased by his father, Robert K, Turney Sr.; a sister, Diana Turney; and daughter, Veronica Turney. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Robert Kennley Turney Jr. Have something on your mind?Send it to William Snowden, Editoreditor@thewakullanews.net Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Dignied Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com The First Pentecostal Church of Crawfordvillewould like to invite you to visit our service with Special Speaker Reverend David Forrest of Ocala, Florida on Sunday, February 9th at 2:30pm. The church is located at 3055 Crawforville Highway, directly across from the Courthouse.For more details, contact Pastor Joseph Abraham at (850) 728-9070.

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to the newsChristie Lenee, Philadelphia based singersongwriter, brings her unique style of ngerstyle and two-handed, guitar tapping to Wakulla County for the rst time. Lenee plays a Veilette Soprano 12 string guitar called The Gryphon and uses a drumstick for playing it called The Engle. The instruments she uses create a sound that is reminiscent of a mandolin mixed with a 12 string guitar, or a chorus of dulcimers. She is currently touring the U.S. after producing an all instrumental album called Chasing In nity. On the album, Tim Reynolds, of The Dave Mathews Band, joins Lenee for two improvised duets. Christie Lenee is a wonderful spirit making beautiful music on the guitar. She has epic compositions that take one on a journey through time, says Reynolds. From The Heart Recording Studio hosts the house concert on Saturday, February 8, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $15 and seating is limited. To reserve tickets call 850-962-5282, or email fromtheheartrecordingstudio@ gmail.com. The Wakulla News Big Bend Maritime Center and the Larry Tucker Watercraft Center announce that they are looking for a family or group to build a small sailboat this spring break, April 18 through 26. The opportunity to build a handmade, wooden boat is being sponsored by Bateau Boats, who will pay for the plywood, berglass and epoxy over $800 worth of materials. This includes everything but the boom, sail, and mast and the varnish/paint you want to use for the nish. Also, this summer BBMC will hold three weeklong camps. The first and third weeks are for beginning boat builders who will build a wooden skiff. They begin by building a wooden tool box to practice woodworking skills and learn to use tools for boat building. The campers use all local woods including recovered cypress and pine from local rivers that is centuries old. The second week is designed for youth who attended boat building camp last year. Seasoned campers will build a ghenoe, a half skiff, half canoe. Hunters use them a lot and you can put a small motor on them. This would include using some wood stripping, various woods joined cove and bead. This year BBMC has created some low benches and added wood vices that will help the younger campers saw and hammer. If you are interested in attending either the family camp or any of the summer camps, please contact rpinholster@gmail. com or call (850) 728 -2121. The February Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Friday, February 14, 2014. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 6:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15.00 for the general public and $10.00 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 6:28 p.m. and the moon will rise at 6:27 p.m. on February 14. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10.00 for the general public and $5.00 for SGLA members. Reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 850-927-7745. Special to the NewsDavid DeCoeur, a Sophomore at Wakulla High School of Crawfordville has been nominated to attend the Congress of Future Medical Leaders in Washington, DC February 14-16, 2014. The Congress is an honors-only program for high school students who want to become physicians or go into medical research elds. The purpose of this event is to honor, inspire, motivate and direct the top students in the country who aspire to be physicians or medical scientists, to stay true to their dream and, after the event, to provide a path, plan and resources to help them reach their goal. David DeCoeur was nominated by Dr. Connie Mariano, the Medical Director of the National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists to represent Florida based on his academic achievement, leadership potential and determination to serve humanity in the eld of medicine. This is a crucial time in America when we need more doctors and medical scientists who are even better prepared for a future that is changing exponentially, said Richard Rossi, Executive Director, National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists. Focused, bright and determined students like David DeCoeur are our future and he deserves all the mentoring and guidance we can give him. The National Academy of Future Physicians and Medical Scientists was founded on the belief that we must identify prospective medical talent at the earliest possible age and help these students acquire the necessary experience and skills to take them to the doorstep of this vital career. Special to the NewsJacks B Quick has once again hit the road with eagerness and excitement. Travis loaded up the doggie wagon and headed to Enigma, GA for the annual Yule Tide Dog Trial held Dec 7 and 8. Travis said this was perfect timing for he had two new additions to the Jacks B Quick race team. The rst and most important was his young grandson Jackson Hartsfield. Travis says even at such a young age he has already become part of the dogs lives. Jackson helps with feeding and is learning the responsibilities of owning a pet. Travis says all this has come about because of the second addition Jacks B Quick Long Shot, Smacky, a six month old puppy that Jackson has grown to love. Jackson has been a part of Smackys training from day one. Travis and Jackson have been taking Smacky on her long work out runs for months. Now that Smacky has turned six months it was time to see if all the teaching and hard work has paid off time to put her on the track. It was a rainy Saturday morning everything was wet and Travis was a bundle of nerves. Would she get behind and give up? The time had arrived, Smacky to the start box. Boom, the gate ew open, out Smacky comes down the track she goes. Smacky placed rst in ats, and rst in hurdles, and she was in the Championship race. As the rest of the Jacks B Quick team was trying their legs out on the track, Smacky was getting ready for the big race. She had to race a male that was a week shy of a year old. The time had come for the biggest race of her young life. Smacky was out of the box like a shot, but wait the older male pulls ahead. Thats when Travis says it got good, as the male came by Smacky she showed all the heart and no-quit attitude. By half track Smacky pulled ahead and never looked back. She did it, she won her rst puppy championship. All the hard work and constant love paid off. Wow what a weekend. Jacks B Quick came home with seven rst place nishes, ve second place and four championships. All of us at Jacks B Quick would like to throw a huge thanks out to Wakulla for the continued support. We always strive to represent Wakulla in the highest standards.DeCoeur chosen for Future Medical Leaders Congress Happy birthday to Camdyn Lawhon, who turned one year old on Feb. 6. Her parents, Amanda and Derek Lawhon, reside in Crawfordville; Maternal grandparents, Sandra and Bill Moody, also reside in Crawfordville; Paternal grandparents, Jeannie and Mick Lawhon, reside in Tallahassee. Happy First Birthday Finger-style guitarist to perform at From The Heart Champion Race Team Has GrownFull moon climb at St. George Lighthouse Maritime Center announces boat building camps Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850-591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327our ome own ealtor Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to the NewsTALLAHASSEE If Florida parents want to choose new schools for their children for the upcoming (2014-2015) school year, they need to start researching the schooling options available to their children right away. Thats the message from organizers of National School Choice Week, which this week featured 860 events across the Sunshine State and a history-making 5,500 events nationwide. School Choice Week focused attention on the importance of empowering parents with the freedom to choose the K-12 schools that best meet their childrens individual learning needs. The efforts president, Andrew Campanella, said that the longer parents wait to exercise the options available to them, the less choices theyll have. The process of beginning to research new schools for your children for 2014-2015 should begin right now, Campanella said. Seats in great schools are already lling up for the next school year, so parents cant afford to wait until the spring or the summer if they want to select a different school for their children. The winter is the time to start. Campanella said that parents should start the school selection process by making a list of desired attributes that they hope to see in the ideal school for their child -such as student achievement in key subject areas, parental involvement at the school level, class sizes, the theme of a school, or the quali cations of school personnel -and then visit schools that match the criteria developed by the parent. Its important that parents visit the schools that their children might possibly attend, and ask as many questions as necessary of teachers, principals, and other parents, Campanella said. Selecting a school for your child is a very personal decision. Every child is unique and different, and there is no one-size- tsall approach to educating children. National School Choice Week raises awareness of the need for effective education options for parents, including traditional public schools, public charter schools, magnet schools, online academies, private schools, and homeschooling. The goal of the effort is to inform and educate parents about the school choice options available to them, while providing a platform for families to demand even greater opportunities. For a list of the speci c types of school choice programs and policies in Florida, visit www. schoolchoiceweek.com/ statesParents urged to begin school search promptlySpecial to the News Wakulla High School will begin spring testing with FCAT Writing, Wakulla Writes, followed closely by the FCAT 2.0, the End of Course (EOC) exams, and Advanced Placement (AP) testing. Wakulla Writes is administered to the 9th grade while the FCAT Writes is given to the tenth grade. All ninth and tenth grade students are required to take the FCAT 2.0, but for ninth grade students, the FCAT scores are used to place students in the appropriate classes for the following year and the tenth grade students must pass it with a level 3 or higher for graduation. End of Course exams (EOCs) are required in four courses; Algebra I, Biology, Geometry, and US History. Students currently enrolled in these courses are required to take these exams. The Algebra I EOC is the only EOC that a student must pass for graduation and it still counts as 30% of the yearly grade. Students taken Advance Placement (AP) classes are required to take the exam but if they do not pass the test they cannot receive college credit for the class. A score of 3 or higher is required to pass. If you have any questions or concerns, please contact Mrs. Sunny Chancy in the Student Services Department at WHS. On January 17th, Mr. and Mrs. Marshs after school Geography Club held its annual competition The Shadeville Geography Bee. Twenty nine students competed, showing their knowledge of the States and the Continents. This year the rst place trophy was earned by Samantha Piotrowski and runner up was Elizabeth Thaxton. What a wonderful event to highlight our commitment to student learning. Thank you Mr. and Mrs. Marsh. The schedule for testing follows : Test name Grade Date Time Wakulla Writes 9 February 25 8 am FCAT Writing 10 February 25 8 am FCAT 2.0 retakes 11 & 12 April 8 & 9 8 am FCAT 2.0 9 April 15 & 16 8 am FCAT 2.0 10 April 22 & 23 8 am EOC US History 11 April 28-30 8 am EOC Biology 10 May 1-5 8 am AP Enviro Science any May 5 8 am AP Psychology any May 5 12 pm AP Comp Science any May 6 8 am AP Art any May 6 12 pm AP Calculus any May 7 8 am EOC Algebra I 8 & 9 May 7-9 8 am AP English Lang any May 9 8 am AP Statistics any May 9 12 pm AP US Gov any May 13 8 am AP US History any May 14 8 am AP Macro any May 15 8 am AP World History any May 15 12 pm EOC Geometry 9 & 10 May 20-22 8 am Geography Bee winners announced Special to the NewsFCAT testing to begin this month NAMI BASICSNAMI Basics is a Six Week Program Completely FREE for Parents and Caregivers!If youre a parent or caregiver who has struggled in raising a child who has shown signs or symptoms of possible brain disorders, mental illness, behavioral problems this program is for you. You are trained in preparedness and emotional resiliency, the fundamentals of caring for self, family and empowerment as an effective advocate!WHEN: Tuesday, February 18, 2014, 6pm until 8:30pm and every Tuesday through March 25th. WHERE: Wakulla County Community One Stop Center, WCCOSC, Corner of Shadeville Highway and Trice Lane CONTACT: NAMI Wakulla at the WCCOSC (850) 745-6042ENROLL IN PERSON AT WCCOSCThe Ounce of Prevention Fund of Florida Inc.NEW PROGRAM from Wakulla *Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.ANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGIST Crawfordville Miracle Ear3295 Crawfordville Hwy, The Log Cabin, Barry Building1-850-942-4007 NOW $27WE OFFER HEARING HELP AS LOW AS BUY ONE AID & GET 2nd Aid at 50% OFF!per monthwith approved credit.(Oer is good on any make or model)Valid at participating Miracle Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. May not be combined with any other oers and does not applyto prior sales. Expires February 27, 2014IS THE TIME TO HEAR BETTER! N Y N Call for an appointmentEVERY THURSDAY rr s Give Your Sweet Heart The Gift of Hearing

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy ROBERT DOUINSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles traveled to Godby High School for wrestling districts this past weekend where they advanced all 13 of the wrestlers to regionals this upcoming weekend held at Bishop Snyder high school in Jacksonville. Wakulla nished rst with 214 points, Suwannee was second with 172, Florida High was third with 118, Godby was fourth with 75, Richards was fth with 39 points. Wrestlers who advanced weight and place was 106 second place Johnathan Hunter, 113 1st place Larry Smith, 120 1st place DyJuan Carney, 126 1st place Hunter Royce, 138 3rd place Joshua Douin, 145 1st place Cody Davis, 152 3rd place Jacob Austin, 160 2nd place Joshua Strickland 170 2nd place Cody Ochat, 182 1st place Nathan Tyre, 195 1st place James Douin, 220 1st place Keith Godden, 285 2nd place Jacob Marin.Special to The NewsWakulla High School Girls Weightlifting team had ve girls place in the top three at the Regional Finals in Panama City to advance to the State Finals. Leah Kennedy, Ashley Stevens, and Brandi Stevens all took rst place, while Lateisha Curry placed second, and Christen Brown placed third. The girls will be competing at the Kissimmee Civic Center on Saturday Feb. 8. LADY WAR EAGLE TEAM: Rachel Woofter, Micahlyn Jeziorski, Coach Tom Graham, Kenzie Lee, and Alyssa Stokely. GIRLS GOLF WRESTLING GIRLS WEIGHTLIFTINGCoach Tom Graham named All-Big Bend Coach of Year, Kenzie Lee named to All-Big Bend Team Five girls place in top 3 at regionalsStaff ReportThe Tallahassee Democrat recently named Wakulla Girls Golf Coach Tom Graham as its All-Big Bend Girls Golf Coach of the Year. Golfing stand-out Kenzie Lee was named to the All-Big Bend Girls team as well. The Democrat noted Graham, who is also the schools softball coach and in his last year after a 16-year career at the school, was named thegirls Coach of the Year for his work with much improved rst-team player Kenzie Lee and the War Eagles steady competitiveness in each match they played despite their home course at Wildwood Golf Course being torn up and closed most of the year. Whenever youre recognized by your peers, it just makes you feel really good, Graham told the Democrat.It makes you feel like youve really been doing something right and I really do appreciate the time Ive put in at Wakulla and enjoyed all the kids that came through. War Eagles win districtsPHOTOS BY ROBERT DOUIN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS The Wakulla War Eagle wrestling team after districts.FILE PHOTO $ 6$ 6 JUST JUST 3 MO. FOR 3 MO. FOR Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:P.O Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 1-877-401-6408TheWakullaNews.comThe Wakulla newsExp: 02/28/2014 Promo Code: LOVESavings apply to NEW Wakulla County subscriptions only.Please accept my new 3 Month subscription at the price of $6 Save the Date!Hometown Getdownth h$15 per personCall Pam Allbritton at 850.926.9308 for more information or to RSVP. FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 11 SportsBy DON GREGGAssistant CoachThe District 2-2 A Boys Soccer Championship game was played on Friday, Jan. 24, at Wakulla High School. The War Eagles defeated a stubborn Florida High team by a 4-2 score. The game was very intense and competitive. Goal scorers for the home team were Josh Vick (senior), assisted by Tarique Humes (freshman); Tyler Bennett (senior) with one score on an assist by Vick and one unassisted; and EJ Yeboah (senior) unassisted. Jordan Vaughan (junior) was in goal and he had ve saves. Jordan played well as the goal keeper and anchored a determined defense. The defense thwarted several opportunities by the Seminoles to preserve the victory. The score was 4-1 at half-time in the home teams favor. Wakulla advances to the Region One quarter- nals after being eliminated by Florida in the 2012-13 season. In the Region 1 Class 2A quarter- nals: Pensacola Catholic (District 1 Winner, 17-6-0) defeated Florida High(District 2 Runner-up, 10-10-1) on Friday, Jan. 31 in Pensacola by a 3-0 score. Wakulla (District 2 Winner, 16-4-1) defeated Freeport (D1 Runner up, 14-7-4 on Saturday, Feb. 1 by a 7-1 score. Both winning teams advance to the Region 1 Class 2A semi- nals on Feb. 4. The game will be played in Pensacola at Pensacola Catholic at 7 p.m. CST. The winner will advance to the Region 1 2A championship game(TBA) on Friday, Feb. 7th (TBA). The opponent in the Region 1 nal will be the winner of the Bolles vs. Episcopal game on Feb. 4. The War Eagles have been led by seniors Tyler Bennett (13 Goals, 2 Assists), Micah Gray (14 G, 10 A), and Josh Vick (19 G, 8A) on Offense. The Defense has been anchored by senior Jacob Martinez (8g/3a), senior EJ Yeboah (3g/8a), junior Dalton Rathel, sophomore Riley Carrier, and sophomore Joseph Kramer. Others making signi cant contributions to the teams success are: freshman Tarique Humes (5G/10A), sophomore Matthew Warnock (4G/3A), senior Jonathan Phillips(Sr/M/Gk) and Jordan Vaughan(So/Gk/M). This season has been a record-breaking one and it has been a complete team effort. Teamwork Works Magic... 16 wins have surpassed the old record of 14 wins in a season. Records are to be broken and new ones set for goals to attain. The Wakulla High School Baseball Team will be hosting the Sixth Annual Houston Taff Memorial Alumni Game on Saturday, Feb. 15, at Wakulla High Schools Houston Taff Field. The fundraiser includes a seven inning game, Alumni vs. Alumni, and a Homerun Derby Competition. The Homerun Derby will begin at 11 a.m. and the Alumni Game will begin at noon. The 2014 WHS Baseball team will be selling barbecue pork dinner tickets for $10 to help support the needs of the team. All proceeds will bene t the Wakulla High School Baseball Team. Thursday, Feb. 13 kicks off the rst home game for our 2014 Wakulla High School Baseball Team. They will be taking on the talented and competitive Godby High School team at 6 p.m. Coach Mike Gauger and Coach Keith Anderson have been working with the players both mentally and physically over the past few weeks strengthening their skills and techniques in preparation for the upcoming pre-season tournament. The 2014 WHS Baseball Team is: Seniors: Kaleb Atkins, Jay Estes, Jordan Franks, Micah Gray, Bryan Nichols; Juniors: Keifer Beaty, Devin Caldwell, Chance Carter, Brian Edge, Brandon Geiger, Bailey Metcalf, Jacob Plouffe, Reid Strickland, Jake Webb; Sophomores: Jake Bryan, Shane Davis, Chase Forester, Feleipe Franks, Aaron Ginn, Nick Lentz, Bucky McGlamry, Greyson Rudd, Jordan Vaughan, John Weber; Freshmen: Payton Bennett, Jacob Estes, Austin Hogan, Kaleb Langston, and Zach Norman.BOYS SOCCER BASEBALLWar Eagles win regional quarter nalHouston Taff Memorial Alumni Game is Feb. 15 The War Eagles Boys Soccer Team.AMANDA MAYOR WAKULLA INSURANCE AGENCY Wakulla Insurance Agency, a division of Rogers, Gunter, Vaughn Insurance, is your team of risk reduction advisors. We provide comprehensive insurance solutions and serve as part of the WellU ACAdemy bringing together experts in health care, business and insurance to help individuals and businesses navigate the changing health care landscape and make sound, condent health care decisions. Schedule your free WellU session today at WellU@rgvi.com or call 850.926.7900. RGVI.com @RGVI facebook.com/RogersGunterVaughnInsurance RGVI Health ACA demy:Navigating Health Care Choices 2190 Crawfordville Hwy. Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Kevin Vaughn, PresidentWERE ALL ABOUT YOU! SPORT ..........................................................AGE FEE T-BALL MINOR LEAGUE ...............................................4&5 $40 T-BALL MAJOR LEAGUE ..............................................6&7 $40 PITCHING MACHINE LEAGUE .......................................7&8 $45 WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN LEAGUEMinor ..................9&10 $100 WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN LEAGUEMajor* ..................11&12 $100 (All Cal Ripken players must attend Skills Assessment being conducted during registration times. Please bring your child with baseball gearglove, batting helmet and bat to registration so he may run, throw, catch and hit.)BABE RUTH ASSOCIATION ......................................13-15 $115 GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION ..............................9-10 $55 GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION .............................11-12 $55* Means a Copy of Birth Certicate RequiredAll leagues age determining dates are April 30th, except Girls Softball age determining date is January 1st. Registration DEADLINE for T-ball and Pitching Machine League is 2/8/14 at 12:00 P.M. All of the associations deadlines may vary so please sign up early so your child secures a spot. You may also call 926-7227 for more information or go to our webpage at www.mywakulla.com or like us on Facebook. REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 02/01/14 & SATURDAY 02/08/14 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 01/27/14 TO FRIDAY 02/07/14 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 02/08/14, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK, OFF HWY 98. AGE DETERMINING DATE: APRIL 30, 2014

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports ++anytime. any device. with to Your Subscription Just Got Beter ALL ACCESSavailable to all subscribers in one convenient subscriptionprint digital mobile1 G o to thewak u llanews.com an d click s ub scri b e2 Click activate existing accoun t 3 S earch f or your account and thats it! Its easy to act i vate your subscr i pt i on f or FREE ACCESS today! Need help reg i ster i ng? Call us at 850-926-7102Not a subs c riber? Visit thewakullanews. c om and c li c k the subs c ribe button Make the switch to EZ Pay for the lowest rate! N O W MO B IL E anytime. any device. anywhere. anywhere. Lady War Eagles fall to BollesGIRLS SOCCERThe Wakulla High School Lady War Eagles fell to Jacksonville Bolles on Friday, Jan. 31, in the regional nals. The girls had made it to the Elite Eight in the state playoffs.PHOTOS BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 13By MARJ LAWOne of the most basic rules of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office range, and of every range Ive visited, is the rule of hot and cold. When the range is cold, you can go down range and put up your target. A handy red line by the ring line shows that you stand behind it when the range is cold. This way, you dont touch your guns or your ammunition when someone is downrange putting up targets. The cold rule is a tool to keep people safe from accidental shooting. A hot range allows people to stand in front of the red line in the shooting area. When the range is hot, you can shoot your rearm. You must wear eye and ear protection and keep your gun pointed in a safe, down-range direction. We ladies who shoot on Wednesday mornings watch out for each others safety and for the safety of all shooters. Since our first and most basic tenet of safety is to conform to the practices of the hot and cold range, we pay special attention to this rule. And, just in case someone forgets about hot and cold, we jump to remind her. Range is cold! Youre over the line, Sally! youll hear someone call. Oops! Senior moment, explains Sally ruefully. She hops back into the safe area behind the red line. Even if very few gals are at the pistol range, we still abide by hot and cold. Cold range! someone reminds. I was just cleaning the wet off the table! justi es the gal. Doesnt matter. Range is cold! So I was just puts her cloth down and moves behind the line. Sigh. She knows she should have waited. Cold range! I was just setting my guns down is the explanation. Doesnt matter! Cold range! Were behind the line! Cold range! I was just looking at Tanyas new 9mm Spring- eld! Doesnt matter! Cold range! Everybody who comes to the WCSO range signs a paper saying that he/ she understands what to do during a hot or cold range. And Ill bet each one of the Wednesday morning gals have forgotten at least once. Since were a friendly group, we pick on each other a little bit. Were quick to remind each other of range rules, and just as quick to comply (although we feel a little silly those few times weve gotten caught). Since one of the Wednesday morning groups major decisions is always where well go for lunch, I was standing with my back to the range, facing the gals who were sitting on the bench. So, wherere we going today? I ask. Youre going to step back over the red line. Range is cold! they sing out gleefully. I look down at my feet. Sure enough, my heels are over that line. I was just talking lunch! I say, knowing its no defense. Cold range! Cold range! They got me.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.outdoor sports and shing reports Outdoors From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Its cold and foggy, and not much shing going on Safety dictates rules about hot and cold on the range HOME ON THE RANGE From FWC News In the world of the endangered Florida panther, 2013 brought less mortality, a female panther successfully released back into the wild, and signi cant public participation in reporting panther sightings. Twenty panther deaths were documented by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission in the past year, compared with 27 panthers that died in 2012. Vehicle strikes continue to be the primary cause of mortality, with 15 panthers dying last year because they were hit while crossing highways compared with 18 in 2012. The birth of 21 panther kittens also was documented in 2013. A brother-and-sister pair of panthers, rescued as kittens in 2011 and raised at the White Oak Conservation Center in Yulee, was returned to the wild in 2013. The female, released in January in Picayune Strand State Forest in Collier County, was documented last June to have given birth to a kitten. However the male, released last April in the Rotenberger Wildlife Management Area in Palm Beach County, died Jan. 4 due to unknown causes after being located a day earlier in a very lethargic state and then taken to a veterinary clinic. That was the second panther death recorded in 2014, after another panther was killed Jan. 2 due to a vehicle collision. Additionally, more than 1,100 panther sightings have been reported statewide since the FWC launched an online site in August 2012 enabling the public to report when and where they have seen a Florida panther or its tracks and upload photos: MyFWC.com/ PantherSightings. Though only 5 percent of the sightings were veri- ed as panthers, the FWCs panther team considers public reports of panther sightings vital to the management of this species brought back from the brink of extinction.In 2013, there were fewer panther deaths This time of the year it gets pretty tough to write a shing report. It gets even tougher nding somebody thats been shing. This past weekend was extremely foggy at Shell Point on Sunday morning, cleared a little in the afternoon, and then about 4 p.m. the fog rolled back in. Its Tuesday morning and the fog hasnt lifted since Sunday. Just got off the phone with JR and he said you couldnt see the bridge from his store it was so foggy. He talked with several people who shed yesterday and they said you couldnt see across the river at any time during the day. They also said they didnt catch but two trout. JR said the water has gotten so cold, the sh just arent biting. He said he thinks shing up in the creeks will get fairly good this weekend due to the rising temperatures. Reports from the Keaton Beach area say trout are still being caught in two to three feet of water using mostly Mirrolures and other hardbaits. Some trout and reds, mostly small, are being caught in the St. Marks River. I talked to one person who fished up the Wakulla and caught a nice bunch of sheepshead. The deep holes in the river and the pilings at the Yacht Club usually produce some nice sheepshead this time of the year. Fishing up the Ochlockonee River has been hit or miss. Go there one day and catch nice reds and go back the next and nothing. There are plenty of small sheepshead and reds that will eat all the shrimp you care to feed them. Dr. Julian Hurt nally got some time off and fished the Oyster Bay and Spring Creek area. He said on Saturday they caught several nice trout but that wasnt the same for Sunday. Capt. David Fife continues to catch his limit out around Spring Creek and Oyster Bay. Last Friday he took Richard Gardner from Shell Point and they were back home by 10:30 with their limit. On Saturday Dwayne Broadway and I shed the Spring Creek area and caught at least 50 trout, but all but three were very small. I went back on Sunday and caught and released about 30 and seven of those would have been legal. All hit a white Gulp shed very, very slow. One of David Fifes good friends and shing buddies, Charlie Thomas, took his grandkids shing on Saturday and caught three nice reds, quite a few sheepshead and three black drum over 15 pounds. I asked David where they caught em and he said most were caught in the mouth though they did snag one of the sheepshead in the tail. Curt Daniels with Wakulla Carpet Brokers was telling me of an unbelievable freshwater shing trip he and his son from Atlanta, Jeremy, had around Thanksgiving. They shed out of Fort McCoy on Rodman Reservoir with Sean Rush. They caught about 16 bass and were back at the landing by 11:30. You say thats not unbelievable. Ten of those bass were over 8 pounds and the largest weighed 10 pounds. Thats unbelievable. All of the sh were caught on live shiners. Sean told Curt his largest sh to date was 17 pounds 1 ounce and the week before they were down they caught one over 13 pounds. I believe his website is Florida Trophy Bass if you want to check him out. A few articles back I said this a good time to make sure your motor was running well before you took it out for that rst trip. Especially if it had been sitting. One of the folks at Shell Point went to the Econfina, put the boat in and went about a half mile before his engine quit. Four hours later it was in the shop for a tune up. Dont let this happen to you. I dont know if the groundhog saw his shadow or not but understand we have quite a bit of winter weather left. Oh well, theres nothing we can do. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSOne of the Shoot Like a Girl Club members ring on the hot range. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service 2219 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville 926-3300 $19900SPECIAL OF THE WEEKPR500HIGH WHEEL PUSH MOWER Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 T H ES H O PGREATBICYCL E 3624 Woodville Hwy., 1/2 mile south of the Fairgrounds SALES SERVICE PARTS RENTALS ADULT TRIKES850-402-0545

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comIt was a busy weekend for several members of Flotilla 12. On Saturday, members Tim Ashley, Phil Hill and Dave Rabon headed down to St. Marks for the annual Wildlife Heritage festival. The three had a foggy beginning, but it turned out to be a nice sunny day. Tim Ashley wrote: Under early morning overcast and misting skies the day started but ended with the sun shining through the clouds to a beautiful blue sky afternoon. The Wildlife Heritage Festivals exhibitors were located at the entrance to the Refuge and out at the Lighthouse. This years attendees had an opportunity to experience something new about the rich history of this region here in North Florida. The USCG Auxiliary Flotilla 1-2 represented the historical presence of the U.S. Coast Guard serving as an integral component in the Apalachee Bay Community having had small boat stations in Apalachicola, Shell Point, and at the St. Marks Lighthouse. Having a chance to meet fellow boating enthusiasts, kayakers, former Coasties and discuss the Auxiliarys programs/activities made for a great day. Throughout the day, the members handed out coloring books to the children and stamped a compass rose on several childrens hands. Later that evening, members came together for the February business meeting. With so many things going on this weekend, it was a smaller than usual group. We were happy to also have two prospective members attend! Those present worked to strategize about upcoming opportunities for ful lling our mission to promote boating safety. We have plans to participate in several other festivals and activities as well as expand our options for public education classes. One such expansion includes providing boating safety classes to groups like the boy scouts. Chuck Hickman sent in the following: This past weekend Mark Rosen, Phil Hill and Chuck Hickman of Apalachee Bay Flotilla 1-2 taught an ABS class of Boy Scout Troop 5 sponsored by the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Eight boys and two adult Scouters participated in two consecutive Sunday afternoon training sessions along with a new flotilla member to pass the requirements for the FWC Safe Boating Card, required by all boaters born after Jan. 1, 1988. This accomplishment will accelerate the boys toward earning several boating merit badges, such as Rowing, Motor Boating and Canoeing. Topics of the course included types of boats, required safety equipment and rules of the road on the water. All students passed the written, closed-book test. Thank you to Tim Ashley and Phil Hill for their photos of both events! If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Officer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident being prepared is your best defense! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Wakulla County History Trail I realized that a record of our countys history is located in our sinkholes while attending a recent discussion with the Capital City-to-the-Sea Trail folks. Wally Jenkins once told me his frustration with early diving in Wakulla County was the required removal of obstructions restricting access to local caves. Our residents have been dumping all manner of artifacts in our sinks (out of sight, out of mind right) for many, many generations. Remember when Union soldiers ed the area southward during the Civil War, they could not carry their cannon and carriages, so they dumped them into local sinkholes. Later Sonny Cockrell, once our State underwater archaeologist, told me to expect to nd 30,000 years of Florida history in local sinkholes. While he was referring to Warm Mineral Springs, south of Tampa, the same applies here. The volume of fossilized bone fragments in Wakulla Springs is testament to that fact. Twenty years ago criminologists in my science diving class at FSU hypothesized that every sinkhole was a crime scene. After the rst three we visited, we were asked to stop because the police did not have the resources to keep up. And our county has had bodies dumped in our sinks. With over 400 of these windows into our aquifer in Wakulla County alone, evidence of local terrestrial activity should be available for the search. Our discussion over surface/underwater trails dropping south from Tallahassee considered access to many of these portals into our aquifer, which may be located on private property, as an invasion of privacy. When we sought new species of crustaceans in the Bahamas, we were discouraged from exploring sites until we assured owners we had no interest or ability to inspect the bottom of the sinkhole. We were only interested in the cave that left the sinkhole. Fortunately, the City to the Sea project is a decade long project, which can be started in locally interesting pockets and expand to a master plan. Who read James Mitchner? He used a fascinating format, building stories in layers of time over a land, such as Hawaii. I envision hiking (or swimming) a trail that exposes participants to the many facets of Wakullas history, presented through kiosks located at karst portals (windows) into our aquifer. Our topic periods should begin with the formation of the rock, the shifting sea levels and the formation of the caves (Speliogenesis) best located at the Leon Sinks Geologic Area off route 319. Further to the north, we should document the water quality challenges between Leon and Wakulla, and how they are being solved together. We can include fossil animal groups before the arrival of Man, the arrival of Man (about 12,000 BP), and Tribes before Western arrival best discussed at portals near Wakulla Springs. Just to the north of Wakulla Springs, topics about the Civil War and the battle of Natural Bridge. Just south of Wakulla Springs could host kiosks on topics of the great plantations and slavery. At strategic locations we can present the importance of the paper company, turpentine and other forest products, the railroads, and waterways. The importance of cave exploration, water quality, the great water debate, later cave explorers, and the advent of the state park system in Wakulla should nd a kiosk at appropriate locations such as Indian Springs and further south. Near the coast, displays relating to our rst western explorers, missionaries, and the early pioneers along the St. Marks River can document a fascinating history. Wakulla County is an eco-destination when set in context to our history. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Feb 6, 14 Fri Feb 7, 14 Sat Feb 8, 14 Sun Feb 9, 14 Mon Feb 10, 14 Tue Feb 11, 14 Wed Feb 12, 14 Date 2.9 ft. 12:13 AM High 0.2 ft. 12:52 AM 0.3 ft. 2:18 AM 0.2 ft. 3:52 AM 0.0 ft. 5:04 AM -0.2 ft. 5:55 AM -0.3 ft. 6:35 AM -0.4 ft. 7:08 AM Low 1.9 ft. 7:15 AM 1.8 ft. 9:11 AM 1.9 ft. 10:54 AM 2.2 ft. 11:49 AM 2.4 ft. 12:25 PM 2.6 ft. 12:56 PM 2.8 ft. 1:25 PM High 1.2 ft. 11:50 AM 1.5 ft. 12:41 PM 1.7 ft. 2:15 PM 1.6 ft. 4:07 PM 1.4 ft. 5:22 PM 1.1 ft. 6:12 PM 0.9 ft. 6:52 PM Low 2.8 ft. 6:00 PM 2.6 ft. 6:55 PM 2.5 ft. 8:41 PM 2.6 ft. 10:25 PM 2.7 ft. 11:28 PM High Thu Feb 6, 14 Fri Feb 7, 14 Sat Feb 8, 14 Sun Feb 9, 14 Mon Feb 10, 14 Tue Feb 11, 14 Wed Feb 12, 14 Date 2.2 ft. 12:05 AM High 0.1 ft. 1:03 AM 0.2 ft. 2:29 AM 0.1 ft. 4:03 AM 0.0 ft. 5:15 AM -0.1 ft. 6:06 AM -0.2 ft. 6:46 AM -0.3 ft. 7:19 AM Low 1.4 ft. 7:07 AM 1.3 ft. 9:03 AM 1.4 ft. 10:46 AM 1.6 ft. 11:41 AM 1.8 ft. 12:17 PM 2.0 ft. 12:48 PM 2.1 ft. 1:17 PM High 0.9 ft. 12:01 PM 1.1 ft. 12:52 PM 1.2 ft. 2:26 PM 1.2 ft. 4:18 PM 1.0 ft. 5:33 PM 0.8 ft. 6:23 PM 0.6 ft. 7:03 PM Low 2.1 ft. 5:52 PM 1.9 ft. 6:47 PM 1.9 ft. 8:33 PM 1.9 ft. 10:17 PM 2.0 ft. 11:20 PM High Thu Feb 6, 14 Fri Feb 7, 14 Sat Feb 8, 14 Sun Feb 9, 14 Mon Feb 10, 14 Tue Feb 11, 14 Wed Feb 12, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 12:04 AM 2.7 ft. 12:49 AM High 0.2 ft. 1:56 AM 0.2 ft. 3:22 AM 0.2 ft. 4:56 AM 0.0 ft. 6:08 AM -0.1 ft. 6:59 AM -0.3 ft. 7:39 AM -0.4 ft. 8:12 AM Low 1.8 ft. 7:51 AM 1.7 ft. 9:47 AM 1.8 ft. 11:30 AM 2.0 ft. 12:25 PM 2.2 ft. 1:01 PM 2.4 ft. 1:32 PM 2.6 ft. 2:01 PM High 1.1 ft. 12:54 PM 1.4 ft. 1:45 PM 1.5 ft. 3:19 PM 1.5 ft. 5:11 PM 1.3 ft. 6:26 PM 1.0 ft. 7:16 PM 0.8 ft. 7:56 PM Low 2.6 ft. 6:36 PM 2.4 ft. 7:31 PM 2.3 ft. 9:17 PM 2.4 ft. 11:01 PM High Thu Feb 6, 14 Fri Feb 7, 14 Sat Feb 8, 14 Sun Feb 9, 14 Mon Feb 10, 14 Tue Feb 11, 14 Wed Feb 12, 14 Date High 0.2 ft. 12:31 AM 0.3 ft. 1:57 AM 0.2 ft. 3:31 AM 0.0 ft. 4:43 AM -0.2 ft. 5:34 AM -0.3 ft. 6:14 AM -0.4 ft. 6:47 AM Low 1.5 ft. 6:59 AM 1.4 ft. 8:55 AM 1.5 ft. 10:38 AM 1.7 ft. 11:33 AM 1.9 ft. 12:09 PM 2.0 ft. 12:40 PM 2.2 ft. 1:09 PM High 1.2 ft. 11:29 AM 1.5 ft. 12:20 PM 1.7 ft. 1:54 PM 1.6 ft. 3:46 PM 1.4 ft. 5:01 PM 1.1 ft. 5:51 PM 0.8 ft. 6:31 PM Low 2.2 ft. 5:44 PM 2.0 ft. 6:39 PM 1.9 ft. 8:25 PM 2.0 ft. 10:09 PM 2.1 ft. 11:12 PM 2.3 ft. 11:57 PM High Thu Feb 6, 14 Fri Feb 7, 14 Sat Feb 8, 14 Sun Feb 9, 14 Mon Feb 10, 14 Tue Feb 11, 14 Wed Feb 12, 14 Date 3.0 ft. 12:10 AM High 0.2 ft. 12:49 AM 0.3 ft. 2:15 AM 0.2 ft. 3:49 AM 0.0 ft. 5:01 AM -0.2 ft. 5:52 AM -0.3 ft. 6:32 AM -0.4 ft. 7:05 AM Low 1.9 ft. 7:12 AM 1.8 ft. 9:08 AM 2.0 ft. 10:51 AM 2.2 ft. 11:46 AM 2.4 ft. 12:22 PM 2.7 ft. 12:53 PM 2.9 ft. 1:22 PM High 1.3 ft. 11:47 AM 1.6 ft. 12:38 PM 1.8 ft. 2:12 PM 1.8 ft. 4:04 PM 1.5 ft. 5:19 PM 1.2 ft. 6:09 PM 0.9 ft. 6:49 PM Low 2.8 ft. 5:57 PM 2.6 ft. 6:52 PM 2.5 ft. 8:38 PM 2.6 ft. 10:22 PM 2.8 ft. 11:25 PM High Thu Feb 6, 14 Fri Feb 7, 14 Sat Feb 8, 14 Sun Feb 9, 14 Mon Feb 10, 14 Tue Feb 11, 14 Wed Feb 12, 14 Date High -0.0 ft. 12:44 AM -0.1 ft. 2:04 AM -0.2 ft. 3:18 AM -0.3 ft. 4:21 AM -0.4 ft. 5:14 AM -0.4 ft. 5:58 AM -0.4 ft. 6:36 AM Low 1.3 ft. 7:46 AM 1.3 ft. 9:57 AM 2.1 ft. 7:46 PM 1.6 ft. 12:49 PM 1.7 ft. 1:18 PM 1.8 ft. 1:44 PM 1.9 ft. 2:07 PM High 0.8 ft. 11:10 AM 1.0 ft. 11:46 AM 1.2 ft. 3:07 PM 1.2 ft. 4:26 PM 1.1 ft. 5:23 PM 0.9 ft. 6:09 PM Low 2.2 ft. 6:07 PM 2.2 ft. 6:51 PM 2.1 ft. 8:52 PM 2.1 ft. 10:01 PM 2.1 ft. 11:05 PM 2.1 ft. 11:59 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 6 Feb. 12First Feb. 6 Full Feb. 14 Last Feb. 22 New March 16:17 am-8:17 am 6:42 pm-8:42 pm 12:39 am-1:39 am 11:51 am-12:51 pm 7:06 am-9:06 am 7:31 pm-9:31 pm 1:35 am-2:35 am 12:34 pm-1:34 pm 7:55 am-9:55 am 8:19 pm-10:19 pm 2:27 am-3:27 am 1:19 pm-2:19 pm 8:44 am-10:44 am 9:08 pm-11:08 pm 3:18 am-4:18 am 2:07 pm-3:07 pm 9:31 am-11:31 am 9:55 pm-11:55 pm 4:06 am-5:06 am 2:56 pm-3:56 pm 10:19 am-12:19 pm 10:42 pm-12:42 am 4:50 am-5:50 am 3:47 pm-4:47 pm 11:05 am-1:05 pm 11:27 pm-1:27 am 5:32 am-6:32 am 4:39 pm-5:39 pm Average Average Average Average Average Good Better7:24 am 6:18 pm 11:52 am 12:40 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:23 am 6:19 pm 12:35 pm 1:35 am 7:22 am 6:20 pm 1:20 pm 2:29 am 7:22 am 6:21 pm 2:08 pm 3:19 am 7:21 am 6:21 pm 2:57 pm 4:07 am 7:20 am 6:22 pm 3:48 pm 4:51 am 7:19 am 6:23 pm 4:40 pm 5:33 am47% 53% 59% 66% 72% 78% 84%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Participants in the Boy Scout boating class, above. Tim Ashley and Dave Rabon staf ng the Auxiliarys booth at the Wildlife Heritage Festival, left.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 15Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Tuesday, Jan. 21, Deputy Scott Rojas investigated a complaint from a 15-year-old male juvenile regarding an incident that occurred while the juvenile was hunting squirrel with relatives. The juvenile separated from his party and was approached by a man in Sopchoppy who berated the juvenile with a profanity laced tirade. The man was armed with a rearm while shouting at the juvenile. The deputy is working to identify the aggressive subject. The victim was not injured. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: THURSDAY, JAN. 23 A 16-year-old juvenile reported the theft of her wallet. The victim went to a cheerleading competition in Orlando. The victims wallet was stolen from her duffle bag at a hotel. The wallet and contents were valued at $20. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Siefe Awad of Panacea reported a theft at Wal-Mart. The victim left several bags of goods next to a relatives vehicle. He returned inside the store for a period of time and came back out to nd the bags missing. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Willie Lindsey of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary and criminal mischief. The victim reported that someone damaged two vehicles on his property and entered his home. The damage to the vehicles included broken windows as well as damage to the interior and exterior. A forced entry was observed at the home. One vehicle suffered $500 worth of damage and the other vehicle suffered $7,000 worth of damage. Damage to the residence was estimated at $200. Deputy Scott Powell and Detective Matt Helms investigated. Gerald Richards Sr. of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Five unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank card. The transactions totaled $570 at an unknown Starbucks location. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. FRIDAY, JAN. 24 Henry Skipper of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Three vehicles were damaged on the victims property. Tires were punctured. The tires are valued at $460. Deputy Ashley McAlister investigated. Christopher Alward of Crawfordville reported the theft of a mailbox and post at a Crawfordville rental property. A second post was damaged after the victim replaced the original post. Damage was estimated at $35. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Kasi Waltermon of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. A suspect was identified in the vehicle theft and the vehicle was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base. The vehicle was recovered at a later time. Deputies Richard Moon, Adam Pendris and Ashley McAlister investigated. SATURDAY, JAN. 25 Deputy Alan Middlebrooks conducted a traf c stop of a vehicle with a non-functioning brake light. The vehicle had also been called in as reckless to WCSO dispatch. During the traf c stop Deputy Middlebrooks detected a strong odor of alcohol. Charles Bradley Vaughn, 25, of Apalachicola allegedly failed eld sobriety exercises. During the investigation marijuana was allegedly discovered inside the vehicle and David Ellis Barber, 31, of Eastpoint was arrested for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. The marijuana weighed 8.7 grams. Vaughn was given a verbal warning about the brake light. Lt. Sherrell Morrison and Deputy Matthew Hedges also investigated. Jim Furey of Panacea reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of six fishing rods and reels from the residence. The fishing equipment is valued at $1,650. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. A 16-year-old male from Crawfordville allegedly struck his 51-yearold father in the head with a steel pot. The juvenile struck the victim in the head approximately 10 times following an argument. Wakulla EMS treated the victim at the scene and he refused hospital transportation. The victim suffered a laceration from the cooking pot. The juvenile was arrested for aggravated battery and was transported to juvenile detention in Leon County. Deputies Vicki Mitchell and Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Julie Tanner of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft. Firewood was stolen from the victims property. The wood was valued at $500. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. SUNDAY, JAN. 26 Deputy Richard Moon observed an expired vehicle tag on U.S. Highway 319. Prior to executing a traf c stop, Deputy Moon reportedly observed the motorist drive partially off the roadway onto the shoulder and cross the centerline. Detective Clint Beam joined the investigation as the deputies smelled the strong odor of alcohol. The driver, Toby Lee Sheats, 43, of Lanark Village, allegedly failed eld sobriety exercises and open beer bottles were observed inside the vehicle. Sheats was arrested for DUI and knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license suspended or revoked. The vehicle tag was seized. FHP Trooper Stone also assisted with the investigation. Lyle Punausuia of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim loaned his vehicle to a friend and the vehicle was not returned. The vehicle was entered in the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. Later, Deputy Adam Pendris received information on the location of the vehicle in Crawfordville. He observed the vehicle and conducted a traf c stop. Lori Susanne Strickland, 40, of Crawfordville was charged with motor vehicle theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. A 22-year-old Crawfordville victim reported that a male suspect, who has been identi ed, posted suggestive photographs of her on social media. The photographs also contained vulgar language about the victim. The victim said the photographs were taken while she was a juvenile. The investigation has been turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Raney Beson of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone attempted to break-in to her home. The door frame suffered $150 worth of damage. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks conducted a traf c stop on a suspicious vehicle in the Park subdivision. The vehicle and two occupants pulled into a residential driveway but did not get out of the vehicle in an apparent attempt to elude the deputy. Joey Eugene Guinn, 19, of Crawfordville and Jayvontae Deshay Schwartz, 20, of Evansville, Ind., were arrested for trespassing. Guinn had an outstanding warrant for possession of paraphernalia which was also served at the time of arrest. The vehicle was towed from the scene. Lt. Sherrell Morrison, and deputies Richard Moon and Adam Pendris also investigated. MONDAY, JAN. 27 Brenda Thomas of Coastal Corner in Ochlockonee Bay reported the theft of gasoline. An elderly couple failed to pay for their gasoline. The cost of the stolen gas was $23.41. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Frances Cook of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. A suspect has been identi- ed. A trespass warning was issued against the suspect. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Jessica Herron of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim answered an employment advertisement on Craigs List. A male subject sent a check to the victim for $2,300 with instructions to deposit the check in her personal bank account. The subject requested the victim send back a money order for $2,130. The victim mailed the money order to the Philippines as instructed, but her bank advised her that his check was not valid. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. TUESDAY, JAN. 28 Billy K. Barton of Crawfordville was involved in a one-vehicle traf c crash at Sanders Hill Road and Sopchoppy Highway. The driver lost control of his vehicle and totaled his Volkswagen. The driver did not report any injuries. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Karlyn Langford of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on her bank account. The charge was created through a telephone company in California in the amount of $75. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Manuellena Smith of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims mailbox was shot 10 times with a rearm. The holes were created over a three day period. The mailbox is valued at $60. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Janice Weldy of Elkhart, Ind., reported the theft of a wallet during or around the time she was at Wal-Mart. The license could not be found in Crawfordville. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Clara Bottorf of Crawfordville reported the theft of a laptop from her home and currency from her bank account. The victim reported that a suspect, who has been identi ed, removed her bank card from her purse and made bank withdrawals. The monetary loss is $140 and the value of the computer is $250. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. On Jan. 28, Jan. 29 and Jan. 30, deputies kept an eye on Wakulla County roads and bridges for potential freezing conditions and ice. Sand was spread on several bridges as ice began to build up. No traf c crashes were reported. Road patrol, county public works, re- ghters and Emergency Management continued monitoring as the winter storm moved through the area. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29 Niranjan Patel of Best Western reported a possible fraud. A subject contacted motel guests in an attempt to acquire financial and personal information. The subject claimed to be a bookkeeper for the franchise. It has not been determined if any of the guests revealed any personal information in the scam. One of the guests was offered a bogus free hotel stay if she would reveal her personal information. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Irena Nichols of Sopchoppy reported the theft of seafood products. The victim reported purchasing oysters from two suspects who have been identified. The victim checked her cooler and determined that nine bushels of oysters were missing from the cooler. The missing oysters and currency used to purchase oysters is valued at $565. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated. Emily Winston of the Inn at Wildwood reported a theft as a guest failed to pay for a nights lodging. The credit card machine was not operating at the time the suspect, who has been identi ed, checked in. Later, when the victim attempted to charge the subject for the room, the subjects credit card was declined. The subject said she would pay the balance at check-out but left the facility without paying. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Glen Browning of Crawfordville reported a burglary to his shed. A forced entry was observed and shing equipment was stolen from inside. The stolen property is valued at $240 and damage to the shed is estimated at $150. Detective Derek Lawhon and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Theodore Hoehn of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in St. Marks. A forced entry was observed at the victims sheds. Two saws and a ladder were reported stolen. The value of the stolen property is $500. Detectives Clint Beam and Derek Lawhon investigated along with Deputy Vicki Mitchell. The Wakulla County Sheriff Of ce received 1,036 calls for service during the past week including 15 residential and business alarms; 10 assists to other agencies; 79 citizen contacts; 16 disturbances; 3 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 3 E-911 abandoned calls; 18 E-911 calls; 55 investigations; 47 medical emergencies; 14 school security checks; 389 business and residential security checks; 40 special details; 10 suspicious vehicles; 44 traffic enforcements; 99 traf c stops; 10 wanted people; and 22 watch orders. FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-13903926-2200 Medicare Plans Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterNeither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent.

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comHaving family close by can be a mixed blessing. Under the best of circumstances they will be supportive and helpful in trying times. The relatives will know all the challenges faced given their immediacy. If threats materialize, aid and assistance from the family is promptly assured. The down side is these close kin likely compete for many of the same resources which are close by and easily identifiable. Such is the case with the Wood Stork, Mycteria Americana, a native Wakulla County wading bird with a distinct appearance. These storks are a social bird and may have up to 25 nests in one tree. The nests are usually found in swamps and wetland where tall cypress trees offer ideal nesting sites. The adults have few problems with predators, but the eggs and young are quite susceptible to marauding birds and animals. Raccoons, skunks, grackles (black birds), and buzzards are all waiting for the opportunity to dine on the young occupants of a storks nest. Only watery moats containing alligators and large water moccasins which surround the nesting trees deter raccoons and skunks from pillaging the nesting sites. During dry years when the water recedes, the land-bound predators have a much easier time acquiring a stork dinner. From the storks perspective the swamps and wetlands deliver more than security. Fish, insects, frogs, snakes and small mammals all live in or near these water sources and each are popular meal selections for storks and their young. Storks produce one clutch of eggs annually, usually with three to ve eggs. The incubation period takes about a month, and then a completely helpless two-ounce chick breaks through the egg shell. The tiny chicks arrive with a super-sized appetite which challenges their parents ability to keep the groceries owing. Within a week each chick is consuming 15 meals daily and gaining weight. At two weeks the chick will have increased its bulk tenfold and at a month will have reached over four pounds. Full grown adults weigh four and a half to 10 pounds, depending on the birds sex. At this point both parents are busily seeking any food source the young will eat. It takes almost a quarter-ton of rations to feed the family while raising the young. In normal to wet years, the nourishment for ock is readily available in the surrounding woods and waters. Drought years are a problem for wood stork chicks, especially the late hatching ones. When food sources are short, competition for this resource becomes increasingly severe and antagonistic. In extreme cases only the older chicks are fed, leaving the younger ones to starve. Unlike many wading birds which wait for a fish to swim within plucking range, wood storks actively pursue their quarry. They submerge their open bills until they encounter a sh, and then snap it shut on the unlucky swimmer. One of the wood storks unique qualities is it has no vocal call. This bird is mute and without the required organ necessary for uttering a sound. Their large and resonant bill is used for communication. A series of clattering and clicking sounds are used for communication, likely another reason to keep the wood stork family close. To learn more about Wakulla Countys wood storks, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County website at http://wakulla.ifas. u .edu or call (850) 9263931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Wood storks are social birds Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThese wood storks might be close neighbors, but when it comes to food there is no sharing. Valentine Celebration & Parade For more information email WakullaValentine@gmail.com 16th Annual SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 2014HUDSON PARK A FAMILY FRIENDLY DAY PACKED FULL OF FUN AND LIVE ENTERTAINMENT! All proceeds to bene t Community Projects the Rotary Club of Wakulla Supports!7:00 a.m. ............Cupid Dash check-in and registration TCC Complex (Sponsored by Walgreens) 7:30 a.m. ............Fun Walk begins 8:00 a.m. ............5K Cupid Dash 8:00 a.m. ............Breakfast in the Park (Sponsored by Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites) 9:00 a.m. ............Parade entries line-up 10:00 a.m. ...........Arts & Crafts, food, games and rides 10:00 a.m. ...........Sweetheart ParadeRaising of the Flag by the Boy Scouts of America Troop #5 11:00 a.m. ...........Presentation of Parade awards: 1st Place $100 2nd Place $75 3rd Place $50 $150 Prize for best use of recyclable materials 3:00 p.m. ............Drawing for $1000 cash prize Entertainment Featuring: 11am 11:30am .....Vocals Kristine & Angel 11:30am -12pm ......Tiger Rock Martial Arts 12pm 12: 30pm ....Vocals from Brianna Harvey 12:30pm 1pm ......Arabian Flair Belly Dancing 1pm 1:30pm ........Pickin & Grinning Band w/ vocals by Angel Carter 1:30pm 2pm ........Gospel Music by Charles & Joan Smith 2pm 2:30pm ........Studio 88 2:30pm 3pm ........Sharon Fox & The Singing Saxes Wakulla Inn & SuitesCallaway Auto and Truck RepairWAKULLA INSURANCE AGENCY BRIAN C. ENGLISH, CHFC CLTC & WILLIAM F. VERSIGA RAY & LINDA BOLES Bevis Funeral Home & CrematoryHarvey-Young Chapel Thank You To Our Sponsors! Anytime Fitness of Crawfordville Brad Harvey Donnie Sparkman Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Lamar Advertising Walgreens RoadID Wave 94.1 Coca-Cola of Tallahassee The Wakulla Area TimesFriends of the Wakulla County Library Keith Key Heating & Air, Inc. Commissioner & Mrs. Jerry Moore Ms. Alice Veasman Wakulla Senior CenterSKYBOX Sports BarFRANCES CASEY LOWE

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Taking Care Taking Care of Business of Business Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014By PETRA SHUFFOf the ChamberOur networking luncheons were off to a good start with Kast Net catering the January event. Ms. Tus cooking is not something you want to miss, and it showed in the number of reservations. The menu included her famous egg rolls, salad, pasta salad, pulled pork and grilled chicken, green beans almondine, and as always, the desserts topped off a wonderful meal. We thank TCC Wakulla Center for making their facility available to us. Ms. Tus husband Fred shared that Kast Net will again hold their annual Valentine Extravaganza, offering three seating times. There are only a few spots open, and you can call 421-1255 to make your reservation. In addition, Kast Net Catering truck is now set up at Macks Meats Wednesday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. offering breakfast and lunch. Mary announced TDCs upcoming Spring Travel Show campaign visiting three military bases in South Georgia during mid-March to share the Wonders of Wakulla and Fresh from Wakulla encouraging active military personnel, their families, retirees, and civilian staffs to visit us. TDC invites local businesses and organizations to participate by supplying brochures, booklets, special offers, coupons etc. for inclusion in the Wakulla TDC information kits. Your contributions are needed by March 1. You may deliver items to the Welcome Center in Panacea or, for more information, contact Tourist Development Council Director Sam Martin by email (SMartin@MyWakulla. com) or phone (850) 9843966. Coupons for a free cup of coffee, supplied by Bay Leaf Market, were given out, and Mary encouraged everyone to not just get a free cup of coffee but, also support Bay Leaf Market and other local small businesses that are vital to our local economy. Mary stated how she loves the fact that she does not have to go to Tallahassee all the time for items and how wonderful it is for our community to be small but to be able to offer as much as it does. Its important that we support our local businesses. New members for December and January were announced: Trading Post Rentals, Sundance, Florida Big Bend Realty, R. H. Carter, Angelo and Son Restaurant, and Family Coastal Restaurant. We notice when we have new faces, so introductions of rst timers were made: Julie Sythe new Wakulla representative for Costo, Karen Richardson Southern Flooring, Megan Ward Wakulla Realty, Cheryl Campbell new office manager for growing business Shepard Accounting, James Hodges My Office Products, Dustin Grubbs Chamber VP, Tonya Hobby Florida Dept. of Health, Molly Core St. Marks Yacht Club, and Curtis Benton Sperry & Associates. Mary Jones, with Tallahassee Lenders Consortium was our spotlighted business. The Tallahassee Lenders Consortium Inc.is a non-pro t organization whose mission is to make the dream of homeownership a reality by improving peoples ability to obtain and retain safe, decent and affordable housing through creating housing options, providing homebuyer education, and providing access to affordable nancing. Turn to Page 3B PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber members listen to the program during rhe lunchtime event. Mary Wallace holds up the winning card drawn by TCC Wakullas Bonnie Holub, right.Networking event held at TCC, catered by Kast Net VACANT LANDMLS #238556 TRACT 2 BROWN DONALDSON .....4.78 Acres $29,900 MLS #238553 TRACT 3 BROWN DONALDSON .....4.78 Acres $29,900 MLS #239512 LOT 7 Hidden Horse Way ....................8.03 Acres $40,000 MLS #224751 10806 Military Trail ...............................5.07 Acres $89,000 MLS #210546 H-2 Saddle Rope Trail .........................8.02 Acres $95,000 73 Dogwood Forest Rd. 12 Blue Heron Way 2820 Shadeville Rd. 8701 Freedom Rd. 4 Cutting Horse Court Wakulla Gardens 3611 Bloxham Cutoff 10 Woodstork Dr. 3605 Bellingrade Court 223 Wakulla Beach Rd. Great Moments are born from Great Oportunities.Herb BrooksWelcomes Sandy Lott As their New Buyers AgentSandy brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to Mar-LU Properties, Inc. Her background includes; Residential, New Construction, Resales, REOs, ShortSales, Foreclosures and Distressed Properties. Call Sandy today to view available properties.Sandy LottRealtor (850) 926-1010Sandy@SandyLott.com www.MarLuProperties.com 850-597-2923 Cell & Text 850-562-0234 Tallahassee 850-926-0230 Crawfordville 850-926-0235 FaxMary A. Bookmiller GRI, CRS, CFS, RDC Pro Certi ed Broker/RealtorNorth Pointe Center1626-D Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Springbrook Farms 4BDRM., 3 BA. FIREPALCE $234,900 MLS #241265Near Beach -Panacea Shores3BDRM., 3 BA. $289,900 MLS #2415183 BDRM., 1 BA. $39,900 MLS #2415174BDRM., 2 BA. 2.73 ACRES$69,900 MLS # 239054Tallahassee Ranch Club5BDRMS., 5BA. FIREPLACE 8 ACRES$587,900 MLS #198417102 Mohican Trail 2BDRM., 2 BA. $59,900 MLS #2417994BRDM,. 2 BA. 1.70 ACRES $89,900 MLS #240230Port Panacea 3BDRM., 2 BA. 0.5 ACRE $169,900 MLS #241774Tallahassee4BDRM., 2 BA. FIREPLACEPOOL$219,900 MLS #2406732BDRMS., 2BA. $139,900 MLS #242313National Association of REO Brokers Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Member Experienced asset management, preservation and marketingMarLU Properties, Inc. MAR LU PROPERTIES, INC. WE ARE HEREFOR YOU For more Information and to Schedule a Portfolio ReviewTrustYourPlan.comBob Beargie, Wealth Advisorbob.beargie@raymondjames.com 850-562-6702Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS.The Raymond James Wealth Advisors at Gulf Winds are ready to help you create a Life Well Planned. Conveniently located in Crawfordville, we offer the nancial strength of Raymond James and the reliability of being local. If you would like to get started with your nancial plan, or if you just need a second opinion, give us a call. We are here for you.1447 Mahan Drive Tallahassee, FL 32308

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Feb. 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Feb. 7 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.Saturday, Feb. 8 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Feb. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Feb. 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Feb. 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post at 475 Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please.Wednesday, Feb. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 5451853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Biweekly & monthly meetings and eventsTuesday, Feb. 11, 25 FOOD BANK is open every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at the Seventh-Day Adventist Church located at 107 Shadeville Road from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.Special EventsFriday, Feb. 7 SENIOR EXEMPTION ASSISTANCE will be available at the senior center every Friday in February from 10 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Wakulla County Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkmans staff will be there to educate and assist with senior exemption and any other exemptions which they may qualify for. Saturday, Feb. 8 VALENTINES DAY CELEBRATION, hosted by the Rotary Club of Wakulla begins with the 2nd Annual 5K Cupid Dash & 1 Mile Fit for Love Walk. The parade begins at 10 a.m. Entertainment begins at 11 a.m. and a drawing for a cash prize of $1000 is at 3 p.m. There is still space for vendors and parade participants applications can be obtained by contacting wakullavalentine@gmail.com. For more information on registering for the 5K or to become a sponsor contact Jo Ann Palmer at 728-2072. FROM THE HEART Recording Studio in Sopchoppy welcomes musician Christie Lenee for a house concert, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Lenee is a folk singer/songwriter from Philadelphia. Learn more about her music at www.christielenee.com. Tickets are $15. To reserve seating contact From The Heart at 850-962-5282, or send an email to fromtheheartrecordingstudio@gmail.com.From The Heart is located at 55 Rose Street, Sopchoppy, 32358. Sunday, Feb 9 SAFEGUARDING THE SPRINGS is a special presentation at 12:30 p.m. and precedes the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Parks annual meeting. Talking about Safeguarding Wakulla Spring will be Sean McGlynn, PhD, and Bob Thompson, former park ranger and photographer. This special presentation will conclude in time for hors doeuvres and the annual election of directors in the lodge.Tuesday, Feb. 11 BETTY GREEN WILL CHAIR THE WCHS program Looking back at the Wakulla Community. We look forward to sharing pictures and stories of the once busy little community that produced several leaders in Wakulla County as well as the state. As we have found from past meetings pertaining to particular communities, we always come up with interesting stories and facts about Wakulla Countys past. The public is encouraged to join us at the Wakulla County Public Library on at 7 p.m. for another session of Looking Back.Wednesday, Feb. 12 WCSO BLOOD DRIVE will be held with Oneblood from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. in the WCSO parking area. All donors will receive a free Tshirt and a wellness check-up including blood pressure, iron count and cholesterol screening. Participants may register in advance by contacting WCSO PIO Keith Blackmar at (850) 745-7110 or kblackmar@wcso.org. Appointments are not required and walks-ins are welcome. Thursday, Feb. 13 WINE & CHOCOLATE TASTING at Bay Leaf Market. Learn how to appreciate the subtlety and complexity of avors that both wine and chocolate have, as well as being able to pair them well. The tasting will be held from 5 p.m. 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15 SPRINGS SWEETHEART SERENADE hosted by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park will kick off with the rst of three events at the Wakulla Springs Lodge beginning at 5:30 p.m. The event will include a romantic boat cruise, dinner and entertainment with the Dorian Q Jazz Quartet. Cost is $25 per person. Because the event is limited to 125 people, advance ticket purchases are strongly advised at wakullasprings.org. WHS BASEBALL TEAM will be hosting the Sixth Annual Houston Taff Memorial Alumni Game at Wakulla High Schools Houston Taff Field. The fundraiser includes a seven inning game, Alumni vs. Alumni, and a Homerun Derby Competition. The Homerun Derby will begin at 11 a.m. and the Alumni Game will begin at noon. The 2014 WHS Baseball team will be selling BBQ Pork Dinner tickets for $10. All proceeds will bene t the Wakulla High School Baseball Team.Sunday, Feb. 16 THE WAKULLA CHRISTIAN COALITION will celebrate Black History Month with a Read-In from 3 5 p.m. The event will be held at the Wakulla Public Library. Monday, Feb. 17 DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB will be holding their next meeting starting at 6 p.m. at Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. The club will be nalizing plans for the upcoming Girls Nite Out Health Fair to bene t Wakulla Relay for Life. All Democrats are welcome to attend. Any questions, please contact Diane Wilson, President Wakulla DWC at 984-4768 or by emailing dwilson.1947@gmail.com. Feb 6 Feb 13 COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB Poseys Steam Roomnoon VALENTINES DAY PARADE Crawfordville 10 a.m. WCSO BLOOD DRIVE WCSO parking lot9:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m.ALUMNI GAME & BBQ DINNER WHS Baseball eld11 a.m.ThursdaySaturdayWednesdayNext Saturday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akulla Government MeetingsMonday, Feb. 10 PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a public meeting beginning at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, Feb. 12 CODE ENFORCEMENT will hold a public meeting beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, Feb. 10 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold the public meeting beginning at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center. SOPCHOPPY PARK COMMITTEE is holding a Public Meeting at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at City Hall. Thursday, Feb. 13 SOPCHOPPY DEPOT COMMITTEE is holding a Public Meeting on at 6:00p.m. The meeting will be held at Sopchoppy Depot. Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to reporter@thewakullanews.net Wed like to thank all who came out to our Book Extravaganza fundraiser last Saturday. With your generous help we raised over $450 for the Library. All funds raised go directly to the Friends of the Library to help support our Summer Programs, book & materials budget, and help fund our planned teen room expansion. Thank you for your ongoing support and please come by as we put that money to work! Friday Night Movie This weeks lm is a comedy starring Academy Award Winners, Robert De Niro, Michael Douglas, Morgan Freeman, and Kevin Kline. This PG-13 (language & sexual content) lm tells the story of Billy (Michael Douglas), Paddy (Robert De Niro), Archie (Morgan Freeman) and Sam (Kevin Kline) who have been best friends since childhood. So when Billy, the groups sworn bachelor, finally proposes to his thirty-something (of course) girlfriend, the four head to Las Vegas with a plan to stop acting their age and relive their glory days. However, upon arriving, the four quickly realize that the decades have transformed Sin City and tested their friendship in ways they never imagined. The Rat Pack may have once played the Sands and Cirque du Soleil may now rule the Strip, but its these four who are taking over Vegas. Doors open at 6:45 for the 7:00 showing and we ask that all children be accompanied by an adult. St Valentines Festival Swing by the Librarys tent at the Valentines Festival sponsored by Rotary of Wakulla. Well have books to give away, info on library programs, the Friends of the Library, and you can even sign up for a library card! Please stop by and say hi and show us your continued support of WCPL and the Friends of the Library! AARP Tax Prep The AARP has begun their annual free tax prep service at WCPL. They will be here each Thursday and Saturday from 9-12:30 throughout tax season. This first come first served program is intended for low to middle income lers with special attention to senior citizens. Please come and take advantage of this free service to the community if eligible.Schedule Change on Library programs at the Community CenterBeginning Thursday, Feb. 6, we will be holding our K-2 programs at the One Stop Community Center the 1st Thursday of the month at 4 p.m. 3rd-5th grade programs will be on the second Thursday, and the middle school program will be the 3rd Thursday, all at 4 p.m. We encourage all to not only come to our programs but come see all that the community center has to offer the citizens of Wakulla County. It needs your help and participation to grow into the active community center that this county deserves!By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 3B Tell us about your business: We are located in the unique town of Sopchoppy in the historical downtown area. If you take a right on Municipal Avenue you will nd the 1912 historic red-brick building that Sopchoppy Pizza Company calls home. This building used to be a Drug Company & Pharmacy back in the early 1900s complete with a soda fountain, later a doctors of ce in the 1940s and, before it closed down, a dress shop, Corine Hodges Ready-To-Wear in the 1950s. The building was condemned and ready to be bulldozed into oblivion until a trio of dedicated men Nelson Martin, Robert Seidler and Dave Pierce purchased, restored and renovated the dilapidated building in the late 1990s. They replaced the roof, rebuilt crumbling walls, added bathrooms, installed a Vermont-made Blodgett pizza oven, built the now famous tiled Alligator Counter and found the infamous Gorilla that greets guests outside when they arrive. First known as Backwoods Pizza, it then became The Backwoods Bistro and is now called Sopchoppy Pizza Company. What services, products do you offer? Our menu offers many different and amazing specialty pizzas to choose from or you can build your own. Besides the famous pizzas there are appetizers, burgers, salads, desserts and a variety of custom brews and wine to choose from. Dining in at our comfy 75-seat establishment is a wonderful experience or you can call ahead for a hot & fresh take-out order. The restaurant is also available for small parties and receptions if youd like. We also provide full service catering for delivery to your location. What sets your business apart from the competition? We provide exquisite food and drinks in a fun and exciting, family-like atmosphere. The food and drinks we offer meet the highest standards of quality and freshness. The menu is fun and fantastic with weekend specials to tempt your palate. The pizzas are custom made with a signature tupelo honey thin crust that melts in your mouth. We use local tupelo honey and when available, we use locally grown produce. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? Our goal is to provide our customers with an exquisite dining experience while we demonstrate ef ciency, professionalism and integrity in our work. We want everyone to feel the love that we feel for Sopchoppy Pizza Company and the opportunity to provide a service to our community. We would like for every customer to leave thoroughly impressed and excited to bring their family and friends back! How long have you been a Chamber member? We joined the Chamber in November of 2013. Why did you join the Chamber? We decided to join the Chamber for a couple of reasons. Not just to promote our business and get our name out there, but also to build relationships with other business owners in our community. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? We are still relatively new to the Chamber and havent taken full advantage of all that being a member offers, but we plan to join in on the networking mixers and monthly luncheons this year. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? Shopping local is good for everyone involved. When shopping locally, you simultaneously create jobs, fund more local services through sales tax and promote community development. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Call us at (850) 962-1155 or check out our website at www.sopchoppypizzacompany.com or you can like our Facebook page for specials and weekly updates. Sopchoppy Pizza Company 106 Municipal Avenue P.O. Box 623 Sopchoppy FL 32358 sopchoppypizzacompany@gmail.com (850) 962-1155By KEVIN VAUGHN It is a great honor to be given the opportunity to serve as your new Chamber president. We are excited about 2014 and the tremendous possibilities the New Year brings. As we continue our journey together as a Chamber, we look forward to discovering new ways to serve our membership. I would love to hear from you any ideas you may have as we continue to focus on ways to enhance member bene ts and grow our membership. We have a great board lined up so please contact anyone on the board including me with your ideas. Speaking of a great board, Id like to take this opportunity to congratulate our latest Immediate Past President Tammie Bar eld on a successful year as President. Not only did she enjoy a busy year as Chamber President, she decided to start one of our newest local treasures, Bay Leaf Market, in the same year! We appreciate you sharing your time and talents with us and look forward to your continued service on our board this year. One of our initiatives for 2014 will be focus on growing our membership base. This will include welcoming new businesses, retaining our existing members and reaching out to our peers that have not yet chosen to join. We need your help in actively recruiting new Chamber members and showing our appreciation to our fellow members who faithfully renew each year. Our goal for 2014 is to grow our membership by a net of 10 percent which results in 30 net new members. Achieving our goal will result in growing our membership to over 300 strong! We have a number of educational and networking opportunities planned for this year which we hope you will take advantage of. Our monthly luncheon provides an opportunity to enjoy great food, provided by one our local restaurants, and to visit with local area businesses. Our numbers continue to rise at this event with 70 to 80 folks each month. You may even win an opportunity to be featured as our Member Spotlight for the month. We are sponsoring an educational event on Feb. 25, designed to provide answers to your questions regarding the Affordable Care Act. We will host a panel of experts that will offer information in a health academy format. Our goal is to provide businesses and individuals with the most accurate, up to date and unbiased information to make informed health care decisions as ACA implementation continues to phase in. ACA will impact the way businesses and individuals purchase and manage health insurance protection and everyone is invited to participate in this important discussion. In our business, and Im sure your organization is no different, we always strive to do a little bit better each year making each year our best year ever. Your Chamber has a busy 2014 planned and I look forward to working with our board and all of you in making this our best year ever! Kevin Vaughn is president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce. Taking Care of Business Taking Care of Business Business News from Business News from From Page 1BThe consortium provides information and education regarding credit counseling and the process of purchasing a home to low income and very low income families. In addition, the consortium administers the City of Tallahassees Down Payment Assistance Programs and assists local lenders in making affordable loans by processing, underwriting and packaging these loans. The Tallahassee Lenders Consortium provides down payment assistance from the City of Tallahassee to first-time home buyers buying within its City Limits. For others needing assistance, the consortium provides homebuyers education certi cates that may be used to qualify for funds from Florida Housing Finance Corporation and Escambia Bond Funds. The consortium also offer assistance to persons experiencing a mortgage default. Through our mortgage default prevention counseling, we assist clients to understand their rights and options available through their lender to resolve the delinquency and retain their home. The Florida Hardest Hit Program, Principal Reduction Program, HARP, HAMP and other programs are available to be discussed with the client as options. The consortium offers post-home ownership education and counseling to each of our buyers after closing. The organization offers counseling locally at the public library by appointment. Ms. Jones drew our next business spotlight, Don Henderson with Coldwell Banker Hartung and Noblin Inc. Jo Ann Palmer reminded everyone of the upcoming Rotary Valentines Celebration, including the 5K Cupid Dash, and lots of people bought tickets for the $1,000 cash drawing. Jo Ann, as director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, also made everyone aware of the KWCB Green Drinks event Tuesday, Jan. 28th. Guest speaker Rick Peters, division manager with Waste Pro USA Inc., will be discussing the waste management program in Wakulla County, recycling guidelines and interest in business/ commercial recycling programs. The event is held quarterly at Wakulla Springs lodge, and is free and open to the public. Petra Myrick with Shell Point Realty won the $66 cash drawing. Mary likes to do something special for our January luncheon guests, and as in previous years, Mary Wallace, Cook Insurance and her marketing rep for Olympus Insurance, Amy Banning, continued their annual ritual, the giveaway of a bottle of beach berry wine to celebrate a prosperous 2013 and to thank all for supporting our local community. We also thank Florida Big Bend Realty, Hamaknockers, Ed Gardner, O.D., Lionel & Marianne Dazevedo, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce, The Wakulla News, Petra Shuff, Opus Broadcasting, and Costco for their contributions to our drawing.Networking event held at TCC, catered by Kast NetNew members: Angelo & Son specializing in seafood, and catering. East Coast Judicial Monitoring, LLC specializing in drug testing and pre-employment drug screening, 17 High Drive, Crawfordville (850) 926.8378 Family Coastal Restaurant specializing in Southern cuisine, seafood and catering Next networking luncheon Wednesday, Feb. 26, noon to 1:15 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center, catered by Hamaknockers. Topic: Business Accounting and Budget Wednesday, March 19, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce of ce in Crawfordville. The course is intended as a foundation for using QuickBooks as a cash ow building tool. We want you to be able to have accurate nancial information that can be used to manage a business better. We will cover accounts payable, accounts receivable, banking, writing checks and various reports that will help manage your business. This course is designed for business owners, spouses and bookkeepers who know they can get more out of the program, rst time users and seasoned users with tough questions. We will not leave until every question is answered. You will receive a workbook covering the areas that are discussed in the course. Speaker: Dennis Scarry of Timesaver Accounting. Co-Sponsor is the Small Business Development Center at FAMU. Fee: Free and open to all businesses Seating is limited, please reserve your spot early. Visit our website homepage http://wakullacountychamber.com to register online. Location Chamber of ce, 23 High Dr., Crawfordville. is year brings new opportunities for the Chamber Presidents MessageBusiness: Sopchoppy Pizza Company Owners/partners: Dale Scott, Cathy Sheats, Cody Solburg and wife JillianFree workshop set on QuickBooks made easy

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 thewakullanews.comChamber Installation Banquet The Chamber Of cers and Board of Directors after being sworn-in by Wakulla County Judge Jill Walker. Tina Johnson listens to TCC Wakulla Director Bob Ballard and his wife, Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, his wife Rita, and Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells, Chamber members Dorothy White of Ouzts Too, Charlean Lanier, and St. Marks City Manager Zoe Mans eld.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENNew Chamber President Kevin Vaughn presents Past President Tammie Bar eld with a gift for her service an etching of the Old Courthouse. Angelo Petrandis, who hosted the Chamber banquet at his restaurant, Angelos. e Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce held its annual installation banquet at Angelos on Jan. 9. Kevin Vaughn was installed as the new Chamber president for the year, and new o cers and board of directors were also sworn-in.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 5BFrom the Council on Culture & Arts In her 84th year, artist Charlotte Williams is well aware of the progression of time. Her new collection of artwork deals with transience, change and the cycles of nature. She shares her own handcrafted quilts, wearable needlework and drawings created especially for this exhibition. Inspired by and produced with elements found in our local landscape, these artworks depict and mimic bark, moss, lichen, and leaves at various points in their lifecycle, revealing the honest beauty of aging and mirroring our own journey through existence. Using natural materials that might be considered detritus or past their prime, she hand-dyed fabric creating unexpected depths of color. Rich umbers and moody greys are produced from the outer husks of black walnuts found moldering on the ground. Soft corals are coaxed from fallen wild cherry and red bud leaves. These fabrics are then lovingly stitched together, reminding us that things in decline show a great sense of grace. Williams drawings of sloughed bark and weathered limbs, artfully cracked over time, are reminiscent of the lines on a persons face. Those lines show how much one has worried, laughed, grimaced, and carefully considered in their lifetime. These drawings are embellished by lacy renderings of lichen and moss which also served as inspiration for a crochet technique that Williams developed for this show. Mimicking natures undulating frills, this needlework trim has been incorporated into wearable art also on display. The signatures of nature can be so subtle that it takes an insightful mind and a cultivated eye to discern them. This exhibition nds beauty in imperfection and profundity in accepting the natural cycle of growth and decline. It celebrates the cracks and crevices and all the other marks that time, weather, and loving leave behind. Let us embrace the wrinkles, spots and rough edges, and the march of time they represent. The exhibit continues through March 3. This exhibition is presented by the Council on Culture & Arts as part of the Art in Public Places program sponsored by the City of Tallahassee. The gallery itself is located in the Tallahassee Regional Airport, 3300 Capital Circle SW, and is open daily from 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. For more information about this exciting exhibition, upcoming exhibitions or the Art in Public Places program, contact Amanda Karioth Thompson at (850) 224-2500 or amanda@cocanet.org.By JASON ALDERMANOn Valentines Day, peoples emotions run all over the map some are head-over-heels and want to shower their loved one with gifts, while others are despondent because currently they have no one special in their life. Whatever your love status, one thing everyone needs to guard against at this time of year is scams. Valentines Day brings out the best and worst in human behavior. Our impulse is to be generous and search for the ideal gift. Internet thieves know this and coolly set traps for unsuspecting shoppers. And, not surprisingly, dating websites experience greater activity, along with a corresponding increase in relationship scammers. Here are some of the more common Valentines Day scams to avoid: Electronic greeting cards are popular yearround, especially near holidays. Scammers count on you not paying attention when you receive an email with an innocuous subject line like, Someone you know just sent you an e-card. Unless youre certain someone sent you an ecard, never click on links or follow instructions to download software to open the message. Chances are youll load a virus or malware onto your computer, dooming you to receive endless spam or even endangering your personal and nancial information. Valentines Day is the busiest day of the year for orists. Since many people now order owers online, these purchases are a common target for fraud. A few tips when choosing a orist: Make sure the physical location, contact information and fees for the orist whos actually ful lling your order are fully disclosed. Pay by credit card so if theres a problem you can dispute it with your card issuer. If you receive an email saying theres a problem with your order, call the orist to make sure its legitimate; dont click on any links they could be malware. Beware of emails and social media ads touting great deals on other Valentines themed gifts like chocolates, jewelry or lingerie. Unless youve previously done business with a company that legitimately has your email address, be skeptical. Watch out for minor typos in the web address www.macys. comm instead of www. macys.com, for example. Its no coincidence that dating websites are busier during the winter holidays and leading up to Valentines Day. Lonely peoples defenses are lowered, making them vulnerable to online romance scams. Before they know it, victims are conned into sharing personal or financial information, or lending money money theyll never see again. Im not saying dont pursue love online at legitimate dating sites. Just watch out for these warning signs: They want to move your conversations off the dating site immediately and use personal email or instant messaging the better to avoid policing by the sites Webmaster. Their online pro- le sounds too good to be true. Thats because theyve probably shaped it to re ect your stated preferences. Or, conversely, their pro le may be suspiciously sketchy on details or their photos dont seem genuine. They profess love very quickly, even before youve spoken or met. They claim to be a U.S. citizen working overseas often in the military. They make plans to visit, but are suddenly prevented by a traumatic family or business event one which your money can overcome. Bottom line: Dont let your emotions get the better of your common sense when it comes to matters of the heart. For more tips on spotting and reporting online scams, visit the Federal Trade Commissions website (www.ftc.gov).Jason Alderman directs Visas financial education programs. To Follow Jason Alderman on Twitter: www.twitter. com/PracticalMoney Dont fall for Valentines Day scams SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHallelujah by Charlotte Williams is at the Artport Gallery.Leaves, Limbs and Lichens: Artworks by Charlotte Williams e exhibit at the Tallahassee Airports Artport Gallery will hang through March 3 Dear EarthTalk: Does the fact that weve had such a cold and snowy winter mean that global warming might not be such a big problem after all? Lacey L. Lynchburg, Va. Its tempting to think that the cold air and snow outside augur the end of global warming, but dont rejoice yet. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), weather and climate are two very different beasts: Weather is whats happening outside the door right now; today a snowstorm or a thunderstorm is approaching. Climate, on the other hand, is the pattern of weather measured over decades. Isolated weather events and even seasonal trends are not an indication of global warmings existence one way or another, and most climatologists agree that the carbon pollution we have been spewing into the atmosphere for the past century is leading to more frequent and intense storms of every kind and causing greater temperature swings all around the planet. In short, the harsh winter we are having shouldnt be viewed as a refutation of global warming, but rather as further evidence of a growing problem. There is a clear longterm global warming trend, while each individual year does not always show a temperature increase relative to the previous year, and some years show greater changes than others, reports the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The agency chalks up these year-to-year uctuations to natural processes such as El Nio or volcanic eruptions, but points out that, regardless, the 20 warmest years on record have occurred since 1981, while the 10 warmest were in the past 12 years. And global average temperatures have risen by 1.4F overall since the early 20th century. According to Becky Oskin of LiveScience. com, shrinking polar ice caps as a result of global warming in recent decades are one factor that may be contributing to the cold weather in North America this winter. One way the shrinking ice changes weather is by pushing winter air south, she reports. When the stored ocean heat gradually escapes in autumn, it changes the pattern of an atmospheric wind called the polar vortex, streaming frigid Arctic air into North America and Europe. Meanwhile, a 2012 study by researchers Jennifer Francis and Stephen Vavrus concluded that intense warming in the Arctic has caused changes to the jet stream that regulates air circulation around the planet, potentially leading to stronger winter storms hitting the eastern seaboard of the U.S. And what about all that snow? Hotter air around the globe causes more moisture to be held in the air than in prior seasons, reports UCS. When storms occur, this added moisture can fuel heavier precipitation in the form of more intense rain or snow. The U.S. is already enduring more intense rain and snowstorms, says the group: The amount of rain or snow falling in the heaviest one percent of storms has risen nearly 20 percent, averaged nationally almost three times the rate of increase in total precipitation between 1958 and 2007. And some regions of the country have seen as much as a 67 percent increase in the amount of rain or snow falling in the heaviest storms. And Oskin points out that while we may be bundling up and shoveling out in the U.S., its turned into another scorcher of a summer in the Southern Hemisphere: 2013 was Australias hottest year on record, and 2014 has started off even hotter, with temperatures soaring to 125F and severe fire warnings issued in at least two states there. Apparently global warming is still on. CONTACTS: UCS, www.ucsusa.org; NOAA, www.noaa.gov; LiveScience.com, www.livescience.com. Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine. com.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www. emagazine.com). What does this cold weather mean about global warming? The harsh winter we are having shouldnt be viewed as a refutation of global warming, but rather as further evidence of a growing problem. Pictured: Trying to get around in Cortland, Ill., on Jan. 4, 2014.MICHAEL KAPPEL, COURTESY FLICKR NOAA reports that the 20 warmest years on record have occurred since 1981, while the 10 warmest were in the past 12 years.

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 thewakullanews.comBy SLIM RANDLESOur resident cowboy, Steve, brought us the shocking news: cowpuncher Three-Chord Cortez, that bunkhouse balladeer, plans to study opera, in hopes an aria or three will make him even more attractive to girls during a serenade. Apparently, singing La Donna Mobile might be more effective than You dont know what lonesome is til you start herding co-o-o-ows especially if she doesnt speak European. I thought Id jot down a few opera truths for ol T.C. just to help him out. 1. Take off your hat. You can keep jujubes in it if you want. 2. If you like a particular aria, you can yell Bravo! if its a man, Brava! if its a woman, or Bravisimo! if its an isimo. Its considered poor form to yell Eeeee-HAAA! or You get em, Hon! 3. One of the strangest operatic devices is called recitative pronounced rest-a-TEEF (dont ask), and is a combination of singing and speaking that is used when the composer wants to hurry through a song because he wasnt too fond of it in the rst place but it was in the contract and he wants it out of the way quickly. Feel free to mention recitative to a woman at half time. Operas have two half times. The speaking part of the recitative is done like a machine gun, and then you break into song when you get tired of that, and it can happen in the same sentence. For example: Dont make me come down there, dont make me come down there, dont make me come down there and k-i-i-i-I-I-II-i-i-ck your bu-u-u-u-u-tt. 4. That bit of music they play before the curtain goes up is called the overture, and not foreplay. Its to give you a hint of whats to come, in case you decide to leave early. You might listen to the overture and say, That allegretto tickles my fancy, but if that tenor duet goes on for more than two minutes, Ill get the scours. This makes a guy a connoisseur, you see. Connoisseur is European for smart aleck. And nally, 5. Dont forget to clean your boots. A free hearing test will ease the grief if you cant hear the recitative. Beltone 1-866-867-8700.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Gearing up for session, campaigns By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Jan. 31 The beginning of February brings with it a month that promises several things, from Valentines Day to the beginning of spring training. And, for all intents and purposes, the start of the legislative session. Like pitchers and catchers who report and start spring training by knocking off the proverbial rust, lawmakers wont go into full sprint mode over the following month, instead holding committee meetings ahead of the of cial March 4 opening of the session. But also like the players who will soon show up at camp locations across Florida (and Arizona), they will lay the critical groundwork for what happens in the months ahead. So Gov. Rick Scott, House Speaker Will Weatherford and Senate President Don Gaetz spent part of Wednesday detailing their plans for the 2014 session to reporters and editors gathered for the Associated Press annual legislative planning meeting in Tallahassee. Scott and his prime opponent, former Gov. Charlie Crist, also traded political shots at the event. Meanwhile, the Florida Supreme Court declined to snuff out a medical marijuana initiative that could change all of their calculations. BUDGETS AND BALLOTS Of cially, Scotts remarks at the AP meeting were to introduce his new, nearly $74.2 billion budget for the scal year that begins July 1. Most of the highlights were already known: The plan would boost spending for education and child welfare, slash taxes and fees by more than $500 million and fund an array of other politically popular programs in an election year. There were a couple of new details $21.6 million in tax breaks by raising the exemption on the corporate income tax from $50,000 to $75,000, and setting aside up to $70 million for Florida Forever, a major land conservation program. But the governor tried to keep the focus on the tax cuts in the package, including rolling back a motor-vehicle registration fee increase approved in 2009. My message to the people of Florida is this: Its your money, Scott said. We want you to keep it in your pockets. Invest in your hopes, invest in your dreams. Democrats were unimpressed, noting that the historic education budget increase would largely come from rising local property tax revenues, which would account for $374.7 million of the $542 million boost for schools. Historic disappointment -thats whats historic about this governors budget, sneered House Minority Leader Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale. Scott, though, didnt focus solely on budgetary business. He used the growth in state revenues and the general improvement in the economy to take some swipes at Crist, a former Republican governor now running as a Democrat for his old job. Florida shed more than 800,000 jobs in the four years before I took office, he said, without needing to point out who was governor then. Taxes increased, debt increased and the unemployment rate rose to 11.4 percent, all while hundreds of thousands of jobs were lost. Florida was in a hole and for four years, there was just more digging. Crist pointed out that Scott had a history of his own, including the incumbents time as CEO of hospital giant Columbia/HCA. After Scott left the rm, it paid a record $1.7 billion in nes, fees and damages in a settlement for Medicare and Medicaid fraud. The fraud occurred while Scott was CEO but he left the rm days after the feds raided company of ces Floridians need to be reminded who Im running against, Crist said. This is a guy who headed a company that ended up having to pay the largest ne for fraud in the history of the United States of America at the time. To me that is stunning and unconscionable. Im going to talk about it every day. Crists primary opponent, former Senate Minority Leader Nan Rich, tried to tie both men together using Crists former time in the GOP as a cudgel. I stand on my record, she said. I think he has rewritten his. So far, the last couple of months of campaigning appear to have made no real difference. A Quinnipiac University poll released the day after the AP event showed Crist leading Scott, 46 percent to 38 percent about the same as a November survey by the universitys polling arm. Scott would beat Rich by 4 points, 41 percent to 37 percent, though with a huge chunk of voters undecided. LETS GET TO WORK PLAN Less political, at least on the surface, was a presentation by Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Gaetz, R-Niceville, on their shared agenda for 2014. It marks the second straight year that Gaetz and Weatherford, seeking to distance themselves from the rancor between the House and Senate under their predecessors, have done the two-man show. Especially for an election year, when the tendency is for lawmakers to do their work as quickly as possible and get out of the town, the agenda was ambitious. The two leaders want to cut the differential tuition increases that universities can request, expand the states tax-credit voucher program, pass a Florida GI Bill, turn Florida into scorched earth for sexual predators, hit Scotts tax-cut target and overhaul the states pension system. Were doubling down with our legislative agenda in 2014, Weatherford said. What were doing here today is creating a framework that I believe our legislators and the members of our committees in the House and Senate can work on to re ne and improve upon. Thurston said he backs the proposals to roll back motorvehicle registration fees and limit tuition hikes, and the intent of the Republican leaderships military-friendly GI Bill. But he said further details on the GOP agenda are needed. Some of the stuff on the list weve been advocating for years and years and years, Thurston said. So if theyre moving towards that, Id support that. But Id like to see the details of how they intend to do that. Gaetz said the intent of the GI Bill is to make Florida the number one military friendly state. It would include out-ofstate tuition waivers for all veterans, free tuition for members of the Florida National Guard and waiver of licensing fees for returning service personnel who move to Florida. Weatherford and Gaetzs plans for higher education would include lowering the cap on annual increases under differential tuition from 15 percent to 6 percent. The House speaker said the purpose of the proposal is to rein in the costs of prepaid tuition plans, which allow parents to lock in tuition and fees for their children to attend state colleges and universities. Because of the differential tuition law, approved in 2009, the plans have to assume that tuition rates will increase 15 percent every year. The proposal will dramatically reduce the cost of what is now an unaffordable and out-ofreach Florida prepaid plan for our citizens and for the middle class, Weatherford said. But its not clear if universities, many of which have chafed under Scotts efforts to rein in tuition in recent years, will ght the proposal. FLORIDA: RED STATE, BLUE STATE, OR GREEN STATE? Meanwhile, after weeding through the minutiae of the English language, a narrowly divided Supreme Court ruled that it was high time voters got to decide whether medical marijuana would be allowed in Florida. By a 4-3 margin, the court ruled that the summary of a constitutional amendment that voters will see at the polls isnt deceptive, swatting away arguments from Attorney General Pam Bondi and legislative leaders that the proposal is actually far broader than the summary lets on. We conclude that the ballot title and summary fairly inform voters of the chief purpose of the amendment and will not mislead voters, who will be able to cast an intelligent and informed ballot as to whether they want a provision in the state constitution authorizing the medical use of marijuana, as determined by a licensed Florida physician, under Florida law, the majority wrote in a joint opinion. In a dissent, Chief Justice Ricky Polston said the ruling will result in Floridians voting on a constitutional amendment in disguise. He said the amendment would allow a far wider use of pot than the ballot suggests. For example, despite what the title and summary convey to voters, minor aches and pains, stress, insomnia, or fear of an upcoming ight could qualify for the medical use of marijuana under the text of the amendment, Polston wrote. This is seriously misleading. The ruling means that the marijuana proposal will appear on the November ballot as Amendment No. 2. But it could also complicate efforts to pass a legislative measure to legalize a marijuana extract known as Charlottes Web. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott unveils the nal pieces of his nearly $74.2 billion budget ahead of this years legislative session. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Theres this perception that theres going to be unlimited money. Its not like its going to be only a Rick Scott negative campaign against Charlie Crist and Charlie Crist is just going to have his name on the ballot. Its going to be a conversation. Its not going to be like Pepsi and Tab or Ford and the Malaysian Proton. Steve Schale, an adviser to Charlie Crist, on the 2014 governors race. The Wakulla News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com HOME COUNTRYFive truths about opera singing -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 7B AbbreviationAims Air All And Any Arc Arm Ash Ask Ate Awe Ax Bar Be Box Brief By Cat Cone Cord Course Dam Dim Do Due Ears Era Eye Fable Fierce Find Fit Focus Fox Gap Gets Go Gym He Hi Hot IfIncreasinglyInk Is Its Jaw Joy Keep Knew Led Lie Linen Loom Made Making Map Marks Mobs Monster Moth Mrs My Navy Need Nib Now Oak Of Organ Over Prey Ray Roam Routes Rub Sacred Sad Sea Sew Sign Sings Sky Son Swan Times To Try Tub Two Up Way Web Welcome Why Yea Yes Yo-yo The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 thewakullanews.com The family of Bettye Gray Rudd would like to thank everyone for the delicious food, flowers, cards, phone calls and visits during this difficult time. We would like to extend a special thank you to Dr. Frable and his great staff, NHC Home Care, Big Bend Hospice, and the Wakulla Co. Senior Center. Todays New Ads CrawfordvilleSat, Feb 8th 8am to 2pm 606 Whiddon Lake Rd Todays New Ads SHELLPOINTWatch sunsets and water birds from 3rd floor wrap deck. Furnished studio apartment has full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. 6 month lease $650/month; utility package available. 850-591-3306 SHIPPING MANAGERDuties: Managing shipping, warehouse and drivers Daily/ weekly reporting of department status. Communicate any receiving, delivery or quality issues Manage all inventories and inventory systems Qualifications: 3-5 years related experience with warehousing / driver dispatch / inventory control. Previous management experience.Strong problem solving/analytical, organization,decision-ma king, communication, and time management skills Ability to multi-task, work under pressure and meet tight deadlines (maintains a sense of urgency) in a fast paced and changing environment. Please call Residential Elevators, Inc. @ 1-850-528-8661 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE DRIVERS:Home EVERY Weekend, Dedicated Southern Lanes & OTR! All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Or Walk Away Lease: NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. CALL: 888-880-5911 $1500 Spring Bonus. Hiring 3/4 or One ton Diesel Pickup Trucks. Special Georgia Orientation scheduled. Apply today at www .foremosttrans port.com or 866-764-1601 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-649 7 You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-OnlineEducation.com CrawfordvilleSat, Feb 8th 8am to 2pm 606 Whiddon Lake Rd SHELLPOINTWatch sunsets and water birds from 3rd floor wrap deck. Furnished studio apartment has full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. 6 month lease $650/month; utility package available. 850-591-3306 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsAvailable with rental assistance if qualify.Call (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. CRAWFORDVILLE3 bedroom. 2 bath. Custom home in Magnolia Ridge. Close to CVS and Winn Dixie. Large fenced yard, energy efficient appliances. Pets welcome. $1,350 month plus security. 850-510-4931 N. Crawfordville3bd/2ba, fenced yard $750. per month (850) 697-5300 Ochlockonee Bay2Br/1Ba home in gated community liv/din/kit, washer/ dryer, deck ,carport. Access to lot w/ boat ramp and picnic area. Ref. reqd. Owner /Broker $800 month and deposit. 850-524-2608 SONGBIRDTwo Rooms available in private home. util. incl. Bob (469) 766-2116 3 STATE VIEWS! Natl Forest Access. 1.84 AC-$24,900 Prime, wooded, mountaintop acreage with majestic three state views. EZ access US National Forest. Incredible 4 season recreation. Paved roads, underground power, fiber optic cable & municipal water. Perfect for primary/vacation/retirement home. Excellent financing. Only one available, wont last. Call owner now 866-952-5303, x120. AGuaranteed Offer in 48 Hours! We Buy Homes! www .dbuys homes.com 800-741-6876 5028-0227 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF FLORIDA, CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION, Petitioner, vs. DANIEL R. HEZLEP, Case #35654 Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: DANIEL R. HEZLEP, Residence Unknown YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an Administrative Complaint has been filed against you seeking to revoke your CORRECTIONAL Certificate in accordance with Section 943.1395, F.S., and any rules promulgated thereunder. You are required to serve a written copy of your intent to request a hearing pursuant to Section 120.57, F.S. upon Jennifer C. Pritt, Director, Criminal Justice Professionalism, Florida Department of Law Enforcement, P. O. Box 1489, Tallahassee, Florida 32302-1489, on or before March 30, 2014. Failure to do so will result in a default being entered against you to Revoke said certification pursuant to Section 120.60, F.S., and Rule 11B-27, F.A.C. Dated: January 30, 2014 Susan Benton, Chair CRIMINAL JUSTICE STANDARDS & TRAINING COMMISSION By: -s-Kandace Zachary, Division Representative Feb. 6, 13, 20 & 27, 2014. 5025-0213 TWN vs. Sapp, Larry 12000354CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION 5026-0213 TWN vs. Isaacs, Shelia K. 652012CA000412CAAXMX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 652012CA000412AAXMX CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. SHELIA K. ISAACS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHELIA K. ISAACS; CENTENNIAL BANK SUCCESSOR BY IN INTEREST TO WAKULLA BANK; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lots 5,6,7,8,19 & 20, Block B, CRESTWOOD FIRST ADDITION, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 7, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. A/K/A 45 Pinewood St, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 oclock, A.M., on March 6, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of November, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February 6 & 13, 2014. 153057 /edc 5029-0213 TWN v. Stanfill, Dorothy L. 2012-CA-465 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2012-CA-465 GULF WINDS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION AS SUCCESSOR TO SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION VIA MERGER, Plaintiff, v. DOROTHY L. STANFILL, et al Defendants CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 17, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 oclock on February 27, 2014, the following described property: LOT 3, BLOCK F, SPRINGWOOD, PHASE II, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 14-17 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: January 27, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND (Court Seal) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk February 6 & 13, 2014. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $500 2Br 1Ba Hs start at $660 3Br 2Ba DWMH start at $600 3Br 1Ba Hs $750 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650 2Br 1Ba SWMH $450 3Br 2Ba Twnhs start at $850 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $1100 3Br 2Ba Hs start at $1100 4Br 2Ba DWMH $800APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIRED RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 36 TUSCANY TRACE, CRAWFORDVILLENew Construction! Pafford Construction is offering 1600 sq ft, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, Garden Homes with custom features throughout for only $169,900. Real wood oors, granite counter tops, beautiful trim package, soaring stepped-up tray ceilings, in a great location at a great price. Call David at 519-7944 for more information or come by on Sunday to see this gorgeous home! Dir: From Bloxham Cutoff, south on Hwy. 319, Right on Ivan Church Road (Walmart trafc light), First Left after stop sign on Tuscany Trace. Home on left. dhoover2@hotmail.com COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. (850) 926 ~ (850) 926 fax 520 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL OPEN HOUSE EVERY SUNDAY 1-3 68 Tillis LaneGorgeous home by Southern Construction on over 1/2 acre. Large living room with vaulted ceiling and lots of natural light. Dining room and kitchen overlook big back yard. Inside utility room, 2 car garage, front and back covered porches. Master bedroom has tray ceiling, spacious walk-in closet, and great master bath. Short drive to coast! Unbelievable price of $168,000. Call Lynn for more information or to see this great home. Dir.: Hwy 319, Left on Martin Luther King, Left into Hidden Meadows, Right on Tillis Lane COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. IN HIDDEN MEADOWS Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s EC13005851, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e e r r n n E q q q q q q q q q u i p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m m e n n t t t o H e C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED JESUSHARDWOOD FLOORS TILE PAINTING CARPENTRYLic. #7827 Licensed & Insured ( 850 ) 570Interior & Exterior FREE Estimates

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 9BCASE NO. 12000354CA CITIMORTGAGE, INC. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. LARRY SAPP; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LARRY SAPP; SAMUEL SAPP; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMUEL SAPP; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER EPRSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 7, Block 6, WAKULLA GARDENS, a subdivision, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. A/K/A 40 Navajo Trail, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 oclock, A.M., on March 6, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of November, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February 6 & 13, 2014. 133134/edc 5017-0206 TWN vs. Dick, Alan S. 65-2012-CA-000441 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000441 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ALAN S. DICK, MALLARD POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC., UNITED GUARANTY RESIDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH CAROLINA, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALAN S. DICK, Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Order Re-Scheduling Sale dated Jan. 9, 2014 in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000441 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is Plaintiff and ALAN S. DICK, MALLARD POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC., UNITED GUARANTY RESIDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH CAROLINA, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALAN S. DICK are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 13th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 71, OF MALLARD POND, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 56-57 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing was: Mailed this 9th day of Jan., 2014, to all parties on the attached service list. Dated this 9th day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) 5018-0206 TWN vs. Yarbrough, Christopher 652011CA000329CAXXXX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 652011CA000329CAXXXX DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC., Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER YARBROUGH, CHRISTOPHER R. YARBROUGH, VALERIE YARBROUGH, VALERIE A. YARBROUGH, MOSSEY COVE TOWNHOUSE OWNERS ASSOCIATION F/K/A CAMELOT TOWNHOMES OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Order Vacate Sale and Re-Schedule Sale entered Jan. 9, 2014 in Civil Case No. 652011CA000329CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC. is Plaintiff and CHRISTOPHER YARBROUGH, CHRISTOPHER R. YARBROUGH, VALERIE YARBROUGH, VALERIE A. YARBROUGH, MOSSEY COVE TOWNHOUSE OWNERS ASSOCIATION F/K/A CAMELOT TOWNHOMES OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 13th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 13, Camelot Phase 2, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, at Page 9 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing was: Mailed this 9th day of Jan., 2014, to all parties on the attached service list. Dated this 9th day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301, (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page January 30 and February 6, 2014. 11-02800-6 5020-0206 TWN Vs. Sapp, Rhonda T. 2013-CA-000219 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000219 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, -vs.Rhonda T. Sapp; Unknown Spouse of Rhonda T. Sapp; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 16, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000219 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Rhonda T. Sapp are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on February 20, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 33, BLOCK N, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 Jan. 30 & Feb. 6, 2014. 13-259781 FC02 CHE 5021-0213 TWN vs. McCord, Paulina E. 65 2013 CA 000387 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65 2013 CA 000387 Division WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, 5022-0213 TWN Vs. Justice, Jessica Catherine 2012-CA-000383 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000383 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Jessica Catherine Justice a/k/a Jessica C. Justice a/k/a Jessica Brown; Shawn V. Brown; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated October 25, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000383 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Jessica Catherine Justice a/k/a Jessica C. Justice a/k/a Jessica Brown are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY., CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on March 6, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND, SITUATE, LYING AND BEING IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, TO-WIT: LOT 2 COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 2,597.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 1,090.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 104.83 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 273.33 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 88 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 37.67 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 844.14 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 11 DEGREES 30 MINUTES FOR ARC DISTANCE OF 169.43 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE WESTERLY ALONG SAID REVERSE CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1,203.46 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 30 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 15 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 74.30 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 255.16 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 280.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ALSO: THE EASTERLY 75 FEET OF THE FOLLOWING LEGAL DESCRIPTION: LOT 1 COMMERCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 2,597.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 1,090.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 104.83 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 280.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 270.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 250.17 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 145.00 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN EASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 1,203.46 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 45 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 125.24 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS WEST 255.16 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE NORTHERLY 30.00 FEET THEREOF. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 February 6 & 13, 2014. 12-245550 FC01 CHE 5023-0213 TWN vs. Barbee, Cecil 652012CA000279CAXXXX Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 652012CA000279CAXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. CECIL BARBEE; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 26th day of December, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652012CA000279CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and CECIL BARBEE PATRICIA BARBEE; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 27 day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 210.00 FEET; THENCE WEST 423.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST 105.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 204.00 FEET; THENCE EAST 105.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 204.00 FEET TO THE BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A 30.00 FOOT EASEMENT, BEING MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST 1/4 OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 210.00 FEET; THENCE WEST 423.50 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE WEST 30.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 182.22 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF A COUNTY ROAD; THENCE EAST ALONG SOUTH BOUNDARY 30.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 182.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1998 LEGE DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN # THL2354AAL AND THL2354BAL. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 24th day of December, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com 09-80788 February 6 & 13, 2014. 12-00531 5024-0213 TWN vs. Lischalk, Alan B. 652010CA000340CAXXXX Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 652010CA000340CAXXXX DIVISION PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. ALAN B. LISCHALK, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 9th, 2014, and entered in Case No. 652010CA000340CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Corporation, is the Plaintiff and Alan B. Lischalk, Bunting Neighborhood Property Owners Association, Inc, Estelle F. Lischalk, Songbird Subdivision Property Owners Association, Inc., are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 6th day of March, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 17, BLOCK B OF SONGBIRD PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3 PAGE 88 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 7 BUNTING DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 9th day of January, 2014. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. February 6 & 13, 2014. 11-92083 vs. PAULINA E. MCCORD F/K/A PAULINE E. BROWN, UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OF VIRGINIA E. MCCORD A/K/A VIRGINIA E. MCCO, DECEASED, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OF VIRGINIA E. MCCORD A/K/A VIRGINIA E. MCCO, DECEASED CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN LAST KNOWN ADDRESS 456 SUMMERWIND CIR N, CRAWFORD, FL 32327 You are notified that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT NO. 15, BLOCK C, SUMMER WIND, UNRECORDED, AS IS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AND MADE A PART HEREOF, LOT 15, BLOCK C, SUMMER WIND, UNRECORDED: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SW CORNER OF SECTION 32, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN N. 01 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST, ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 32, A DISTANCE OF 2734.18 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SW CORNER OF THE NW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32; THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST, ALONG SAID WEST BOUNDARY OF SECTION 32, A DISTANCE OF 1331.85 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 0-1 SECONDS EAST 448.93 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE N. 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 01 SECONDS EAST 427.40 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE S 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 658.68 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT; THENCE N. 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 49 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 247.39 FEET; THENCE N. 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 30.00 FEET; TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE N. 15 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 651.65 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A 60 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT. TOGETHER WITH A 1997 FLEETWOOD 76X26 MOBILE HOME, MODEL #4764B commonly known as 456 SUMMERWIND CIRCLE N, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Kasey Cadavicco of Kass Shuler, P.A., plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 800, Tampa, Florida 33601, (813) 229-0900, on or before March 8, 2014, (or 30 days from the first date of publication, whichever is later) and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated: January 22, 2014. CLERK OF THE COURT Honorable B.X. Thurmond 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February 6 & 13, 2014. 327611/1340789/arj 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 43 Squaw 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit. 20 Liberty Rd. 3/2, No smoking, no pets. $850 mo., $850 Deposit. Available 2/1/14 42 Chickat Trail 3/2, $850 mo., $850 Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!104 Navajo Trail Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA, large bedroom, home has open oor plan. $740. mo. No Smoking, No Pets. 2879 Shadeville Road 3 BR/1BA Home with detached garage. $640.00. mo. No pets. No smoking.28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has hardwood oors, 4 car carport, boat slip, community club house and pool. $2,000 mo. No smoking, No pets.25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated community w/pool. 2BR/2BA Condo, hardwood oors, washer & Dryer. $950. mo. No Smoking, No Pets. 56 Blue Heron 3 BR/1BA Walking distance to Mashes Sands Beach. $750. Mo. No smoking, No pets. 2BR/2BA Marina Village Mashes Sand Rd. 2 Story Condo # B5. Fully Furnished, washer/Dryer, Community Pool, Boat Slip w/ Lift. $1,200 mo. No smoking, No pets. 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/Dryer, Pool, Boat Slips. No Smoking, No Pets! $1,100. mo. No smoking, No pets. 112 Captain James St Wakulla Station 3BR/2Ba LG MH. 2,390 Sq ft. on 9 acres Large front & back yard. Storage building. $800. mo. No pets, No smoking. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEED TO RENT YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 thewakullanews.comBY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301, (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page January 30 and February 6, 2014. 11-03742-5 5014-0206 TWN vs. Houck, Timothy E. 12-324-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 12-324-CA Division RBS FINANCIAL PRODUCTS INC Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY E. HOUCK A/K/A TIMOTHY ELLIS HOUCK AND REBECCA C. HOUCK A/K/A REBECCA COTTONGIM HOUCK AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on November 21, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 3, LAKE ELLEN SHORE, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 8 BEING A CORRECTIVE PLAT OR REPLAT OF PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 57 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1990 FLWD DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE ID# FLFLK32A11821GH, TITLE #61424729 AND ID# FLFLK32B11821GH, TITLE #61436683 TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1990 FLWD DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, TITLE 61424729 AND TITLE #61436683 MOBILE HOME, VIN(S) FLFLK32A11821GH, AND FLFLK32B11821GH. and commonly known as: 10 LAKE ELLEN SHORES DR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse on February 20, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18 day of December, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Tony A. Perez, (813) 229-0900 x1346 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com January 30 & February 6, 2014. 327878/1337592/idh 5015-0220 TWN vs. Boothco Coastal, LLC 4:12-cv-00404-MW-CAS Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:12-cv-00404-MW-CAS HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. BOOTHCO COASTAL, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company; HURLEY H. BOOTH, JR., an individual; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 2273 SURF ROAD, PANACEA, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, an individual; and WAKULLA COUNTY, a political subdivision of the State of Florida, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Michael Rayboun, Special Master appointed by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida in the above-styled action, will on the 27th day of February, 2014, at 11:00 oclock a.m. at the front steps of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, and in accordance with the practice and procedure of the State of Florida as provided in Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida to-wit: 5016-0206 TWN vs. Nabors, Mary 65 2009 CA 000389 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65 2009 CA 000389 SEC.: A SECOND OPPORTUNITY OF AMERICA, LLC. Plaintiff, v. MARY NABORS A/K/A MARY DEMICCO; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 23, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65 2009 CA 000389 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 27 day of February, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statues, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 2528.00 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1650.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTHE ALONG THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF HENRY DRIVE 300.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 199.97 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF BERNARD DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 299.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 199.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.36 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ALSO BEING KNOWN AS LOTS 1,2,3,4,13,14,17,18,19,20,21 AND 22, BLOCK F OF LAKE ELLEN PROPER AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 4, SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida this 23 day of October, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) 5013-0206 TWN Williams, Zelma 13-115 CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-115 CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF ZELMA WILLIAMS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Zelma Williams, deceased, File 13-115 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is January 30, 2014 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq., Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Valencia Statam 1959 Bloxham Cutoff Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 January 30 & February 6, 2014. Lot 50 of TARPON SHORES, UNIT 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 45, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. also described as: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 50 OF TARPON SHORES, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SURF ROAD (STATE ROAD NO; 372), THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 196.76 FEET TO THE WATERS EDGE OF OCHLOCKONEE BAY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY AND NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE THE FOLLOWING THIRTEEN (13) COURSES; SOUTH 60 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 7.76 FEET, SOUTH 68 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 21.70 FEET, NORTH 83 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 31.10 FEET, NORTH 79 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 21.42 FEET, NORTH 88 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 58.35 FEET, NORTH 83 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 36.76 FEET, NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 67.39 FEET, SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 58.70 FEET, NORTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 49.54 FEET, NORTH 67 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 48.22 FEET, NORTH 76 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 33.59 FEET, NORTH 83 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 13.35 FEET, NORTH 31 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 46.27 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WATERS EDGE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 218.14 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 490.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Pursuant to the final judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is listed above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Persons with a disability who need special accommodations must notice the individual signed below not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding which is the subject of this notice to insure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and official seal this ___ day of January 2014. /s/ Michael Rayboun as Special Master January 30, February 6, 13 and 20, 2014. JAX\1825901_1 /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk January 30 and February 6, 2014. FL-97007499-10-FLS Brain Teaser 12345 6789 10111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 2122 232425 26 27 28 29 30313233 34 35 36 373839 40 4142 43 44 45 4647 4849 50 51 52 5354 55 5657 58 59 60 6162 636465 66 67 68 69 70 71 Across 1 Finalize the deal on your house 6 TV show set on an island 10 Eve's guy in Eden 14 How some household cleaners smell 15 One of the Great Lakes 16 Ripped 17 Houses on the market, e.g. 19 Bed size 20 Exam for future 48Acrosses 21 Embarrassing public disputes 23 Penalty caller, in football 26 Have a mortgage 27 Snakes of Egypt 28 Love, to the French 30 The ___ Stone (famed archaeological find) 34 It goes wall-to-wall in some homes 36 Christmas trees, often 37 "Uh-huh!" 40 Smooch 41 Make a logical assumption 43 Actor Sharif 44 Org. that kidnapped Patty Hearst 45 "Zip-___-Doo-Dah" 46 "I think it's ___ say..." 48 Attorneys 51 Copenhagen residents 52 Not there 53 Ancient 55 Three, in Italy 56 Have a home 58 Blazing 60 Manning and Wallach 61 Final meeting in the house-buying process 66 Advantage 67 Follow closely 68 Was the father to 69 They cool you off in summer 70 Highfalutin' 71 Gumbo and goulash Down 1 It saves thousands of lives yearly 2 Fib 3 ___ whim 4 Be a vendor 5 Unpleasant thing to look at, like a pile of garbage 6 Alpha, zeta, or sigma 7 "___ my father used to say..." 8 Take a chair 9 Golf pegs 10 Vouch 11 First money towards a home 12 Zodiac ram 13 Word on a public restroom door 18 Tool with teeth 22 Purring Persians, say 23 Gets the pool table ready for the next game 24 Modern message 25 You might see it in front of your dream house 29 Company with brown trucks 31 Bid 32 "Sprechen ___ Deutsch?" 33 Makes a mistake 35 Neat 38 Picky ___ 39 Not poetry 42 Wedding announcement word 43 "Son ___ gun!" 45 Amazed 47 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, for the White House 49 Comes up in conversation 50 Not in a loud voice 52 ___ grudge (wouldn't forgive) 54 "___ Abner" 56 Surfing hazard 57 It is, in Spain 58 "He's ___ again!" 59 Give off 62 Body part associated with Van Gogh 63 Before 64 ___ England Patriots 65 Scores for 64-Down: abbr.Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 2 2345 5674 218 46 94 53982 6 523 7825 19 00 9 HometownContent 174 9253 6 8 623841795 589637421 218 459637 937268514 465173982 846 592173 791384256 352716849 CLOSE LOST ADAM PINEY ERIE TORE REALESTATE TWIN LSATS SCENES REF OWE ASPS AMOUR ROSETTA CARPET FIRS YEP KISS INFER OMAR SLA ADEE SAFETO LAWYERS DANES HERE OLD TRE RESIDE AFIRE ELIS SETTLEMENT EDGE TAIL SIRED FANS ARTY STEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 Page 11B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Which two South American countries do not border on Brazil? 2. LANGUAGE: What does the word Volkswagen mean in German? 3. LITERATURE: What is believed to be Shakespeares first play, chronologically speaking? 4. TELEVISION: What city was the setting in the TV comedy Eight is Enough? 5. U.S. PRESIDENTS: How many presidents were born as British subjects? 6. FAMOUS QUOTES: Who said, The only way to have a friend is to be one? 7. PSYCHOLOGY: What is venustraphobia? 8. MOVIES: What was the name of the caretakers cat in the Harry Potter movies? 9. AD SLOGANS: What products advertising slogan is: Betcha cant eat just one? 10. BIBLE: How long did Methuselah live, according to the Bible? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Ecuador and Chile 2. Peoples car 3. The Two Gentlemen of Verona 4. Sacramento 5. Eight Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, J.Q. Adams, Jackson and Harrison. 6. Ralph Waldo Emerson 7. A fear of beautiful women 8. Mrs. Norris 9. Lays potato chips 10. 969 years Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 6, 2014 thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $34 per year in Wakulla County $46 per year in Florida $49 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 By LINDA CARTER Special to The News Singapore, at the tip of Malaysia, is both exotic and urbanized. For most people, its just a transpaci c stopover. But if you want an exciting experience embrace the delay. This country is incredibly modern, sleek, clean, and safe. Singapore can be hot, so plan on mornings for outside activities. Start with the botanical gardens. Explore acres of tropical vegetation. Then discover The National Orchid Garden, over 1,000 species of orchid, bursting with almost every color of the rainbow. Open 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., entry is just $5. Religious culture is unlike anything youve ever seen. You can visit a Buddhist Temple. Then theres the magical Sri Mariamman Temple, looking more like a cross between an amusement park exhibit and a childhood fantasy. This oldest part of the temple, dates back to 1843. Open from 7 a.m. to noon and 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. A donation is requested of visitors. Sample the food. Every tourist book extolls the virtues of eating at an authentic hawker center. These open-air food courts feature dozens of locally owned establishments, often selling the same meals. Take your meal to communal picnic tables and enjoy. Alternatively, you can sample gourmet cuisine, or local specialties at the Food Opera located in the basement of the ION Orchard Road Shopping Mall. This thriving complex features not only multiple levels of high end shopping paradise, but a food smorgasbord conveniently located right on the metro station. With too many restaurants to count, serving both the familiar food and the unknown. Sample spicy Asian noodles, delicate crispy sh, succulent duck, assorted unidentifiable food on a stick, the choices are overwhelming. Most important fact, know how to eat with chopsticks before you arrive, many restaurants dont have forks. Now that youve done the outdoor activities, enjoy shopping in airconditioned comfort. Malls here are on a scale never dreamed of. With over 800,000 square foot, or a total of 18 acres, the Marina Bay Sands Shopping Center is one of the largest. You can travel the mall in style aboard a Sampan, a handcrafted Chinese boat, gliding along the indoor canals for only $10 per person. Then stay to watch the hourly cascade of 22,000 liters of water from an artists sculpture 2 stories above you, or just browse the huge selection of stores. Be sure to pick up a map, as even the hardiest shopper, is hard pressed to explore it in a day. Open daily from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. At dusk, discover the magic of Chinatown. Streets are festooned with red lanterns, glittering lights, and tiny shops whose merchandise spills out on to the streets. Cheap, touristy trinkets, sold amid tons of atmosphere, invite you to browse. Located in a quaint area, here the turn of the century buildings still remain, not yet replaced by glittering mammoth high-rises When night falls return to the mall. Exit at the harbor front, and enjoy the twice-daily 15minute long fireworks show. Exploding against the Singapore skyline, rockets burst skyward, and glitter; all against a background of neon edged skyscrapers. Accompanied by a live orchestra, this nightcap is a great way to end the day. More than just a convenient connection on your next ight, Singapore is an exciting city. Take the time and discover its wonders.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www. luxurycruise-travel.com.Visit Singapore, the jewel of the Paci c PHOTOS BY LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL A colorful temple in Singapore. As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 Get YourFRESH WATER TOO! IN SHOREIS ON F NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 Rhonda A. 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