Wakulla news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00500

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newsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School ............................................................................Page 9A Sports ..........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors .....................................................................Page 11A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 2B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B Comics .............................................................................Page 9B Travel .............................................................................Page 10BINDEX OBITUARIES Karen Louise Bellamy Elizabeth Ann Romanus Robert Kennley Turney Jr. Jane Newman Wilson Page 13A Page 13A Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 5th Issue Thursday, January 30, 2014 New exhibit is launched at museumHistorical Society remembers Forbes PurchesBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net The Wakulla County Historical Society has recently launched a new exhibit on the Forbes Purchase a pivotal occurrence in county history. The exhibit, which will reside at the museum until May, gives a detailed account of how and why a 1.2 million acre parcel of land was signed over to Panton Leslie & Company collectively by a group of tribes in 1804. The parcel included the land spanning from the Apalachicola River to the St. Marks River what is known today as Wakulla, Franklin, Gadsden and Liberty counties. The land deeded over to Panton Leslie who, at the time, had a monopoly on trade in the southeast, as a debt settlement after the illusive and mischievous William Augustus Bowles caused somewhere between $80,000 and $100,000 worth of damages after attacking the companys Magnolia Store located on the St. Marks river not once, but twice, according to the exhibits coordinator Sandra Vidak. The rst attack Bowles led took place in 1792, during which he was captured but later escaped. Eight years later Bowles returned to seize the fort at St. Marks and sacked the Magnolia Store again. Three years later, Bowles was tricked into showing up for what he thought would be a ceremony honoring him, but instead it was a trap that led to his capture. One year later, in 1804, the 1.2 million acres of land was signed over to Panton Leslie & Company and, shortly after, Panton Leslie was reorganized as John Forbes and Company. Bowles, who was born in Maryland into a wealthy family, served in the British Army during the American Revolution and eventually married into the Creek tribe. From there, Vidak said, Bowles started to develop some really grand ideas about what he wanted his position to be among the tribes. Its really interesting, Vidak said as she pointed out one of the men who signed the deed. Chief Perryman, who signed the deed, would have been Bowles father-in-law. A year after his capture, Bowles starved himself to death in the Cuban prison he was taken to. Turn to Page 3 By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net On Monday, Jan. 27, Colleen Skipper-Mitchell was honored, along with 13 others, as one who is featured on this years Cherry Hall Alexander African American History Calendar. The calendar, now in its fourteenth year, is intended to serve as an educational tool for the youth of the community, involving them in the history of local African-American leaders. In order to receive the honor, the individual must be nominated by someone else for recognition of outstanding services and accomplishments in the community. The calendar unveiling ceremony, presented at TCCs Turner Auditorium in Tallahassee on Monday, kicks off Black History Month, which begins in February. The calendar, rather than running January through December, runs from February through January of the following year. Skipper-Mitchell is featured as the month of February. Im so thrilled, Skipper-Mitchell said. It was an honor that coworkers and citizens of my county felt like I should be recognized. Co-Chair of TCCs African-American History Planning Committee Jacquelyn Steele said that the committee was thrilled to receive Skipper-Mitchells nomination. She is the rst to be honored from Wakulla, she said. Were very happy about that. Skipper-Mitchell was highlighted as being the rst African-American to hold a seat on the Sopchoppy City Commission, a seat that she held for 13 years four of which were as the citys Mayor. Honorees and their families were welcomed with a reception, refreshments and with words from prominent members of the community including Tallahassee Mayor John Marks, Cherry Alexander and TCC president Dr. Jim Murdaugh. Skipper-Mitchell earns recognition for service PHOTO BY AMANDA MAYORSandra Vidak stands with exhibit materials. Colleen Skipper-Mitchell with a plaque featuring the calendar cover.AMANDA MAYOR Herb Donaldson By AMANDA MAYOR amayor@thewakullanews.netLocal playwright, actor and author Herb Donaldson was born and raised in Wakulla and spent much of his time growing up with his grandparents in the Sopchoppy area. After earning his education in Wakullas schools, he went on to be a claims adjudicator in Tallahassee before eventually moving to Atlanta where he lived for a short time before being accepted into the American Academy of Dramatic Arts and moved to New York City in 1996. It was while he was in New York that he and about 30 other writers and actors began the Palaver Tree Theatre. The purpose of Palaver Tree, Donaldson said was to help each other produce our work without standing in lines full of thousands of people. The southern branch of Palaver Tree was brought to Wakulla when Donaldson moved back following the death of his grandmother in 2009. The name, Palaver Tree, originates from an African tradition in which when someone wants to express something, but may not have the words, they have a poet or an artist tell their story or idea for them. They would do so and gather under a large tree, Donaldson said. Furthermore, he said that when he was 13 years old, his grandfather planted a tree in the Sopchoppy area, under which people would gather and just do life together. The way I saw it, Donaldson said of his decision to move back to Wakulla, was that I could go somewhere where I can make a difference and actually know the people that Im working with. Since then he has been an active member of the community. I dont think there is any place Id like to stay more than Wakulla, Donaldson said. I like to travel and visit other places, but as far as residence, I like the idea of being around people that are familiar. When asked how Wakulla has helped to mold and shape who he is today, Donaldson described the sense of family that comes with being born and raised in Wakullas community. It really shaped me to love and respect that sense of family, he said. It is that same sense of family, he said, that inspired him to write his brand new book, Southern Shock Americana, which is based on the life and execution of his uncle, John Mills, Jr. Turn to Page 2A Wakulla native with a story to tellAMANDA MAYOR The mystery boat on the Ochlockonee

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $34 per year in Wakulla County $46 per year in Florida $49 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 From Front PageIm really nervous, Donaldson said about the book coming out for all of Wakulla to read. Im not sure how people will respond. I wanted people to see us, my uncle and the victim in ways they havent yet. Donaldson said one of the most common things he hears is people saying I never understood what happened there, or That never made any sense to me. I realized it didnt make sense to a lot of people, not just me, he said, which was a driving force in him putting his thoughts, conversations and ndings in the form of a book. I wanted to know more than what was being told, he said. So I began to seek and ask questions. Donaldson said that over the span of 14 years he conducted interviews and research in pursuit of knowing more of what happened in his uncles case. He went to the courthouse collecting documents, had numerous conversations with those that new him, looked at af davits from those in the community not just friends and family Mills lawyer Roosevelt Randolph and even the warden of the Florida State Prison who was present at Mills execution, Ron McAndrew. I took into account all these things when writing this, Donaldson said. I dont intend for it to be argumentative. Donaldson said that, over time, he dealt with a lot in writing the book, but that he decided that if he was going to put it in a book, he was going to say it all. If Ive said something that offends, he said, keep reading the book and maybe by the end you will have a better understanding of why. Although technically his uncle, Donaldson said that Mills was more like a big brother and that they were close both in relationship and age. Donaldson said that he was given some of Mills possessions, including his old journals. He had a heart for looking deeper into certain things, Donaldson said. Especially as it pertained to ones walk in life. He was a different type of person than your average Joe. Donaldson said the goal of the book is to represent a life that is no longer able to represent itself. He had a past, but he wasnt a terrible person, he said. John Mills, Jr. was arrested, convicted and sentenced to death by electrocution for the 1982 murder of Les Lawhon a murder that Donaldson is not convinced that he was guilty of. I asked him point blank if he did it, he said. The answer he wrote back to me is in the book. Mills spent 13 years on death row before his execution on December 6, 1996. He was 42 years old. What I need to say publicly is over, Donaldson said of his book and his uncles case. But Im still learning.Herb Donaldson By Marshall Catoe Sopchoppy Lions ClubTaylor Rowan, an eighth grade student at Wakulla Middle School, has taken the rst step to becoming an internationally recognized artist by winning a local competition sponsored by the Sopchoppy Lions Club. Taylors poster was among more than 375,000 entries submitted worldwide in the 26th Annual Lions International Peace Poster Contest. Lions Clubs International is sponsoring this contest to emphasize the importance of world peace to young people everywhere. Members of the Sopchoppy Lions Club selected this poster for its originality, artistic merit, and portrayal of the contest theme: Our World, Our Future. Club President Elaine Herndon is impressed by the expression of creativity of the students at Wakulla Middle School. It is obvious that these young people have strong ideas about what peace means to them. Im so proud that we are able to provide them with the opportunity to share their visions. Taylors poster will advance to face stiff competition through the district, multiple districts and international rounds of competition if she is declared to be the international grand prize winner, said President Herndon. One grand prizewinner and 23 merit award winners will be selected. The grand prize includes a cash award of $5,000, plus a trip for the winner and 2 family members at Lions Day with the United Nations. The 23 merit award winners will receive certi cates and cash awards of $500 each. Our club is cheering for Taylor as her poster advances in the competition, and we hope that her vision will ultimately be shared with others around the world, said President Herndon. Locally, Taylor and 3 other Wakulla Middle School students were honored and recognized for their participation by the Sopchoppy Lions Club during school morning announcements. Cash awards were given to Taylor Rowan for 1st place of $50, 2nd place and $35 went to Justin Price, 3rd place and $25 to Destiny Lockwood and Chance Jones won 4th place of $20.Taylor Rowan advances in international peace poster contest 2219 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville 926-3300 HAND HELD BLOWER $15900SPECIAL OF THE WEEKBG56 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service State Farm Bank, F.S.B., Bloomington, IL *Potential savings may vary based upon individual circumstances. Consult your agent for more details. Get a better ride with a better loan.And the more you save with a State Farm Bank car loan, the easier it is to get behind the wheel and just enjoy the ride. Thats borrowing better. GET TO A BETTER STATE.CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. Our great rates can save y ou hundreds of dollars. 1303025 07/13 Gayla Parks, Agent State Farm Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 SPORT ..........................................................AGE FEE T-BALL MINOR LEAGUE ...............................................4&5 $40 T-BALL MAJOR LEAGUE ..............................................6&7 $40 PITCHING MACHINE LEAGUE .......................................7&8 $45 WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN LEAGUEMinor ..................9&10 $100 WAKULLA CAL RIPKEN LEAGUEMajor* ..................11&12 $100 (All Cal Ripken players must attend Skills Assessment being conducted during registration times. Please bring your child with baseball gearglove, batting helmet and bat to registration so he may run, throw, catch and hit.)BABE RUTH ASSOCIATION ......................................13-15 $115 GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION ..............................9-10 $55 GIRLS SOFTBALL ASSOCIATION .............................11-12 $55* Means a Copy of Birth Certicate RequiredAll leagues age determining dates are April 30th, except Girls Softball age determining date is January 1st. Registration DEADLINE for T-ball and Pitching Machine League is 2/8/14 at 12:00 P.M. All of the associations deadlines may vary so please sign up early so your child secures a spot. You may also call 926-7227 for more information or go to our webpage at www.mywakulla.com or like us on Facebook. REGISTRATION DATES: SATURDAY 02/01/14 & SATURDAY 02/08/14 REGISTRATION TIMES: 8:00 A.M. TO 12:00 P.M. OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY 01/27/14 TO FRIDAY 02/07/14 8-5PMREGISTRATION DEADLINE: SATURDAY 02/08/14, 12:00 PM REGISTRATION PLACE: MEDART RECREATION PARK, OFF HWY 98. AGE DETERMINING DATE: APRIL 30, 2014 The following people have been remembered or honored at the Trees of Remembrance in Wakulla County.2889C Crawfordville Highway | Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 | 800.772.5862 | www.bigbendhospice.org Tree of Remembrance2013 Big Bend HospiceMany thanks to all who contributed to the Big Bend Hospice Tree of Remembrance. Your gifts allow Big Bend Hospice to provide care, comfort and hope to our patients each day. MANY THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS In Memory or Honor of: Making the Gift: Robbie Alexander Judy Duprey Cary Ard Dona Kerce Big Bend Hospice Coddington Family Wakulla Team Kathleen P. Causey Cathy Taylor Marie Cooper Coddington Family Luther E. Council, Sr. Sandra C. Mock Susan Dodson Walter Dodson John C. Drake Marie L. Drake Edgar Eltie Dale Eltie Austin Fleetwood Pam Barksdale Joe Green Joann & Ron Hutchinson Joe Green Annie Kate Green Fulton Harvey Betty Ann Harvey Kathy A. Harvey Beth H. Taff Tim Harvey Betty Ann Harvey Nell & Charles Houston Freddy & Debby Miller Mr. & Mrs. Ricky Langston Reddick Langston Carolyn B. Lovel Benny M. Lovel James McElroy Ann McElroy James M. McElroy Mitch & Belinda McElroy FamilyBilly A. Mock Sr. Sandra C. Mock Rolland Oberhardt Greg & Kristi Thomas Eugene C. Orlene Council Sandra C. Mock Edward Page Eddie Page Beverly Quinell Lenae Quinnell Harrell Jack Ridner Joeann Vesecky Allie Mae & Bill Roberts Freddy & Debby Miller Jason Scribner Dale Eltie Sopchoppy Homemakers Sopchoppy Homemakers Club Houston Taff Beth H. Taff Morris Tilley Loretta Tilley Annie Tubbs Sherry & Jerome Colvin John Elias Whidden, Jr. Norma R. Whiddon George Wildern Steve & Darlyne Bryant Rossie Wildern Steve & Darlyne Bryant CENTENNIALBANK Taylor Rowan displaying her winning artwork.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org From Front PageAs part of the exhibit, a 20-minute DVD can be played in which community members helped to tell the story and lay out the timeline of events involved with the Forbes Purchase. One participator, Wakulla Clerk of the Court Brent Thurmond, plays the role of Asa Hart eld, who was hired by Forbes to survey the new land in 1807. Brent was such a good sport, Vidak said. He even wrote his own part as Hartfield and has done a significant amount of research on the subject. Other contributors to the exhibit were storytellers Judge Mike Carter, Judge James Joanos and Scott Joyner. Also, contributors of the exhibits artifacts include Butch Calhoun, Mike Kinsey, Anna Lopez, P.G. Artifacts LLC and SYP Publishing. The idea for the exhibit itself stemmed from a decision made last May, Vidak said, by the Historical Society that the museum should feature the Forbes Purchase. From there, Vidak said, she began to get to work. A Historical Society member since 2009, Vidak said shes always enjoyed history. It intrigues me, she said. And the Forbes Purchase was so pertinent to Wakulla, I just found it really fascinating to research and put this exhibit together. Vidak encouraged citizens in the community, old and new, to visit the museum. It has so much to offer, she said. We welcome new residence to get to know the county through this museum. The museum is open on Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and on Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. Or you can call and make an appointment to come in, Vidak said. New exhibit is launched at museumSurvey equipment much like what was used by Asa Hart eld in the 1800s, abov, and Brent Thurmond as Hart eld, below.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners is seeking one volunteer to serve as the certi ed public accountant on the Industrial Development Authority (IDA). The IDA was established for the purpose of nancing and re nancing of industry or projects in Wakulla County, and for the purpose of encouraging economic development. The member must be a resident of Wakulla County and must be a certi ed public accountant. Interested persons should submit a cover letter explaining their interest in serving on the IDA, along with a resume or other statement of relevant experience which includes the persons name, address, telephone number, and email address no later than Friday, Feb. 14. Please e-mail your information to Jessica Welch, Communications & Public Services Director at jwelch@ mywakulla.com or by fax to 926-0940. County seeks volunteer to serve on IDA Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905. The City of St. Marks Board of Commissioners Election Wednesday, February 19, 2014 7:00 am 7:00 pmThe City of St. Marks is located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.JANUARY 23, 30, 2014 FEBRUARY 6, 13, 2014 STATE OF FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION EXEMPTION VERIFICATIONJANUARY 30, 2014The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) is seeking one (1) volunteer to serve as the certied public accountant on the Industrial Development Authority (IDA). The IDA was established for the purpose of nancing and renancing of industry or projects in Wakulla County, and for the purpose of encouraging economic development. The member must be a resident of Wakulla County and must be a certied public accountant. Interested persons should submit a cover letter explaining their interest in serving on the IDA along with a resume or other statement of relevant experience which includes the persons name, address, telephone number, and email address no later than Friday, February 14, 2014. Please email your information to Jessica Welch, Communications & Public Services Director at jwelch@mywakulla. com or by fax to 926-0940. Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners is Seeking a Certied Public Accountant to Serve on the Industrial Development AuthorityJANUARY 31, 2014 JANUARY 30, 2014 WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD January 9, 2014 February 13, 2014 March 13, 2014 April 10, 2014 May 8, 2014 June 12, 2014 July 10, 2014 August 14, 2014 *September 11, 2014 Governing Board 4:00 p.m., ET Budget Public Hearing 5:05 p.m., ET*September 25, 2014 Budget Public Hearing 5:05 p.m., ET October 9, 2014 November 13, 2014 December 11, 2014NORTHWEST FLORIDA WATER MANAGEMENT DISTRICT GOVERNING BOARD MEETING SCHEDULE2014*All meetings are scheduled to begin at 1:00 p.m., ET, at District Headquarters, 81 Water Management Drive, Havana, FL 32333, unless otherwise indicated.JANUARY 30, 2014 Monday, February 10, 2014 JANUARY 30, 2014A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNING NR Most popular stories online: Saturdays severe storms cause damage to homes CHAT gone, Animal Control carries on Veterans officer J.D. Johnson in coma after wreck Underwater WakullaJanuary 16, 2014 Underwater WakullaJanuary 23, 2014 ... And so its farewell Coast Guard Auxiliary Reports for January 16, 2014 Red Clay Footprints: For the BCS game, it was Pasadena or bust thewakullanews.com READERS WRITE: Is the county government working for you?Funding to help pay utility bills is availableWetlands ordinance is defective Why save wetlands? Follow us onEditor, The News: Who among us can cite the provisions contained within the Wakulla wetlands ordinance? Yes, I am speaking of the very same ordinance that is pitting commissioner against commissioner, igniting vicious attacks at county commission meetings, and in some instances causing neighbors to be less than civil to one another. Can anyone tell me if this ordinance denotes such items as: Relevant Definitions, i.e. wetlands, buffer zones, set backs, karsts, vernal pools, drainage ditch, ood zone, sediment ow; The width of a buffer zone deemed appropriate for sediment and or pollutants, for phosphorous, for nitrogen, for wildlife habitat; An exception to land having drainage runoff heading away from the wetland; A distinction in land use, i.e. high density vs. low density; agricultural vs. industrial; A distinction between fresh water and salt water buffer zones; Consideration given to the slope of the land or type of soil; Consideration to vegetation density; Mitigation options; Will signage be required to designate a buffer zone? The answers to these questions are less important than the fact that few of us have had an opportunity to review the ordinance, much less to read and study it. The overriding issue is not the wetlands issue but the manner in which the issue is ultimately decided. There should be no argument that the ordinance is defective since there is no perfect law and the wetlands themselves are uid both physically and scienti cally. At some point in the future, even those citizens who are now vigorously ghting to reinstate this ordinance will realize its aws. Who or how will future adaptations be addressed? If the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance (WWA) has its way changes will only be made via one of two methods. The rst is frightening in that it allows one person to block changes that would be in the best interest of the County. The referendum proposal, which has already been written, stipulates that to enact changes all ve commissioners must agree and vote unanimously. Four could agree but one holdout could prevent any modi cations. Where in this scenario is the voice of the people? It should not go unsaid that this mentality could also have consequences that even the WWA has not foreseen. The second method of changing the ordinance, should the referendum pass, is to write another referendum. This is the way in which bad law often gets written and passed. A special interest group, on this occasion environmentalists, will hold the majority votes on a committee that writes a new referendum or amends the previous one. Citizens will be told that workshops and discussion groups will be held to hear their concerns, yet after all is said and done, the committee will write the new referendum from their unique and often biased perspective. The people then vote on this. Again all that the voter gets is a yes or no to a bill written by an unelected group, some of whom may not even be residents. Special interest groups answer to no one but themselves and that needs to be kept in mind even when that group is in alignment with a voters opinion on a given issue. The third way to address the wetlands issue, and indeed all legislative issues, is the one set forth by our forefathers: through those elected to do the work of the people. Public Officers represent their constituency and make decisions based on the demands of the voter. Granted, this also has aws and is sometimes inaccurate; however, since elections have consequences, the voice of the citizen is heard. As previously stated, we the citizens now have a unique opportunity to decide between two distinct ways of governing. Do we follow the dictates of a special interest group, with no allegiance to the voter, to determine the future of such an important issue as the wetland buffer zones and how they affect the property owner, the county tax base and our evolving future, or do we trust (or vote out) those men and women who were elected to be our voice? The choice simply stated is the difference between a process that continually gives the voter nothing more than a yes or no vote or one that gives the voter a right to an opinion, a vote and the ability to remove from of ce someone who does not represent his or her interest --often known as the voice of the people. Dont be fooled by a slogan that implies that your voter rights are being denied. Decide for yourself if a referendum really represents your best interests, both now and in the future, because traditionally referendums, if passed, are rigid, in exible and extremely dif cult to alter. Becky Black Panacea Editor, The News: Recently, I sent out a question to our County Commissioners. Remember, we pay their salaries and elect them to of ce. I was very much disappointed that only two Commissioners bothered to answer my question, along with the County Administrator, who was not asked, but was copied by the two Commissioners who attempted to answer my question. Commissioner Kessler and Commissioner Thomas replied and Commissioners Merritt, Harden and Moore did not think it was necessary to do so. Oh well, so much for politics. Something to remember when the next election comes around. The interesting part is that those guys have the same party af liation as I do. Heide Clifton Crawfordville Editor, The News: There is funding available for Wakulla citizens to help wtih utility bills and we know with dropping temperatures, its needed by many of your readers. However, we also know that they may not be aware of this availability. We are hoping to spread the word to as many people as possible. Eligible Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, and Wakulla county residents are encouraged to apply for the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) immediately! The program helps individuals pay their utility bills through energy assistance and crisis grants. Community Action Agency is ready to help you get ahead! Please contact us immediately. Priority given to households with: Elderly (60 years or older) Disabled (with documented proof) Children (5 years or younger) Please log onto http:// cacaainc.org/ImportantDocs.aspx to learn more about eligibility and which documents you must have to apply. To schedule an appointment for assistance, please call the appropriate of ce where you live, between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. Monday through Friday at 9263122. Ann Howard Capital Area Community Action Agency Editor, The News: The wetlands of Wakulla County have stood since the melting of the last ice age ten thousand years ago. Yet some people say, Theres plenty of wetlands on refuge and national forest lands, why not develop the rest? Ask the birds. They give us pleasure, few things can lift the spirit or rival the beauty and magni cence of a Great Blue Heron rising up from the marshes with its wings outstretched. Yet, as development encroaches on their feeding grounds, its becoming harder for these creatures to nd food. To a Great Blue Heron in search of a frog or craw sh, there are no legal boundaries; it doesnt know whether a wetland is public or privately owned or whether humans label it isolated or connected. De nitions such isolated or a connected wetlands mean nothing to it. To a mullet foraging among the marsh grass on an incoming tide, there is no such thing as mean high water. These are but legal de nitions devised by man, an attempt at a political compromise between developers and environmentalists. They have no ecological meaning whatsoever. Standing there with endless patience, the herons and egrets stalk the rivers, the lakes, the swamps and bogs, waiting for a sh to swirl. The reeds, lily pads, St. Johns Wart bushes. sawgrass and cattails are their home. They know that life abounds in the low swampy places that we call wetlands with their mucky wet hydric soils. Multitudes of aquatic insects, grass shrimp and other crustaceans, mosquito sh and tadpoles abound there. Flocks of woodstorks sweep the water and mud with their large bills until they feel something alive and a thousandth of a second, grab it with a re ective snap. Here in the eternal food chain, the big prey upon the little: the tiny mosquito fish picks at the decaying vegetation, delicately eating the nearly microscopic water mites and nematodes, until a sun sh, bream or crappie rushes in and grabs one. Then down stabs the beak of the dazzling white snowy egret, who has been standing in the reeds, perched above the shallows with endless patience waiting for the right moment. In the endless cycle of life and death, a marsh hawk swoops down and catches a water snake to feed its young, an eagle grabs the rabbit, or an alligator scores a pond turtle. And yes, there are mosquitoes that live in wetlands, that make us part of the food chain. But thats part of living in the country and on the coast. Sometimes, during periods of draught, wetlands become dry lands, and tiny creatures dig down into the mud, go into torpid sleep, die or move on. Alligators, frogs, turtles move from one low puddle to another seeking water. Some wetlands are but ephemeral low spots, seemingly barren of life that evaporate completely, yet they may be the home to endangered at woods salamanders. They require areas that dry out, keep sh populations from building up and eating their eggs. When the rains come, the bogs, marshes, depressions even the high ground pinewoods turn into what surveyors call swamp and over ow lands. When it oods all wetlands are connected and sh swim through the forests, and frogs which were silence by the drought, chirp and grunt, and ll the night with music. The dark enriched tannin stained waters ow through the wiregrass and palmetto into creeks then to the rivers. Rivers of tannin tea ow out to the Gulf of Mexico carrying dissolved and digested vegetation from uplands which stimulates the growth of sea grass. Miles out at sea, the swamp waters cause plankton to ourish and give us delicious seafood to eat. Untold trillions of tiny larval fish, crabs, shrimp and oysters derive benefit from wetlands. But when dump trucks pile dirt on them and turn them into permanent drylands the eternal life cycle is diminished. Ditching and draining shallow wetlands destroys their numerous functions. They lose their ability to retain storm water as life disappears. Wetlands remove excess nutrients and retain storm water, keeping adjacent lands, roads and houses from ooding. Their ability to cleanse and lter storm water runoff disappears when wetlands disappear. Regardless of their size, or their ownership, whether they are classed as wetlands, bogs and marshes, isolated or not, they all act like livers and kidneys removing pollutants and heavy metals. They affect the micro-climate, preventing the air from becoming too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter. To function properly, wetlands also need a buffer, a forest or wooded area around their edge, which act as a transition from dry land to wetland. The greater the size, the better the level of protection. Because the North Florida Water Management Board does not have authority over isolated wetlands, the panhandle lacks the protection that South Florida has. Until the legislature changes the law, it may be possible for developers to ll in isolated wetlands. But when that happens, the quality of life is diminished for everyone else who lives here. The birds lose their food, the ability of the land to harmlessly absorb ooding is lost, the ltering of pollutants out of the water is reduced, and the serenity and peace of mind that wading birds in scenic wetlands give us goes with them.Jack Rudloe Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Panacea

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 5A< STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Do you want it to snow?CLIFF HANCOCKAssistant Manager CornerstoneNo thats what makes Florida... Florida, no snow! This is called the Sunshine State for a reason... DEBRA RUSSELLWakulla Property Appraisal Of ceYES I DO! My son has never seen it and is dying for it to snow! MARC EARNESTWakulla County Community CenterYes, I want it to snow tomorrow for my birthday! I am from Kentucky and I havent had snow on my birthday for a while... would be pretty cool! MARCO MILLSMarcos Mobile DetailingNo! No! No! I work outside and I dont want that! MARGARET ROGERSRetiredI dont really care because I will be staying in the house! Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Winner Carole Sloan drawn from Coastal Restaurant in Panacea Winner receives one meal from the following: OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantWin One Meal from Each Listed Restaurant Every Month! Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the theCoastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideSKYBOX Lunch for 2 order from menuHuttons Sandwich of your choice Talk O The Town Sandwich & a drinkNOW WEEKLY!Board chooses members to serve on Charter Review CommitteeBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netOn Due to the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, the board met on Tuesday, Jan. 21 where, among other things they voted to approve a list of 15 citizens who voluntarily signed up to serve on the countys Charter Review Committee. There is a requirement spelled out in the countys charter, which mandates that one such committee be formed by July 2015 with the purpose of reviewing the charter and recommending any changes that might be suggested. The 15 that will serve are: Becky Black, Bill Russell, Bob Danzey, Chris Russell, Chuck Hess, Done Grimes, Donnie Crum, John Shuff, Judith Harriss, Larry Taylor, Michael Stewart, Mitch Hampton, R.H. Carter, Ronald Fred Crum and Verna Brock. Before Tuesdays meeting, the ve commissioners were presented a list of the 30 names and asked to rank them in order of their personal preference as to who they would like to see serve on the committee. The three topmost citizens on each of the commissioners lists would take a seat on the committee and if either commissioners three were duplicated, then the next person down earned a spot. However, many seemed unhappy with the final list. Complaints were voiced that referred to the different districts being represented unequally and that two families the Russells and Crums had two representatives each that would have a say in charter decisions. Some citizen input claimed that the names were chosen using a awed system. Discussion got slightly more heated as Commissioner Howard Kessler was put on the hot seat as to why he only ranked nine of the 30 names he received. Commissioner Kessler gave his reasoning, contending that he didnt feel as if he knew some of the citizens, or their quali cations, well enough to rank them in any meaningful order. I also know some of these people to be against charter government, he said. Kessler seemed unhappy with some of the names chosen and said that he was of the mind that the board didnt have to establish the committee that evening or even this year. I think its shameful that a commissioenr can give someone like Ron Piasecki a 29/30 ranking on this, Kessler said. I think we can do better. Commissioner Ralph Thomas stepped in to say that he believed the conversation going on was merely political drama. We did not go out seeking these names, he said. We cant go and grab a certain group or number from each district. There is no stacking of the deck here. We were tasked simply to rank the list that came before us nothing more, nothing less. This is nothin more than drama. Despite the discussion back and forth, however, not a single commissioner voted against the list and the item to establish the 15-member committee passed with a 5-0 vote. Towards the end of the meeting, Chairman Richard Harden announced his intention to give citizens their full three minutes to speak, even if there are several citizens present. In the past if there have been a large amount of speaker cards, we usually limit the time to speak to two minutes, Harden said. But I would like to make the full three minutes available as many people dont use their full time anyway. The rest of the board presented no argument to Hardens discussion item. Also, during citizens to speak toward the end of the meeting, Chuck Robinson announced that he was currently working on a microsite for the countys new One-Stop Community Center. The site is up right now and is a prelude to an even greater site to come, he said. For now you can visit the site. The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com Coastal Restaurant Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under All you can Eat Chicken $699 Tues. & urs. MIXED Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & Dogs Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand$599 Cooked To Order Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Open 7 Days n n s s 2669 Crawfordville Hwy DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLEMOM & POPRestaurantThe Original 926-7530 Restaurant SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9771 11AM TIL MIDNIGHTCALL IN OR DINE IN Come Have Come Have With Us! With Us!DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE Come by to see Our Daily Specials!FRITO CHILI PIETopped with Sour Cream, Onions, Cheese & Jalapeo$595 926-3500

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR How to deal with Mother Natures cold shoulderPet therapy dog Ryley to the rescueBy JAMES L. SNYDERI have a little confession to make. I do not often make public confessions, but confession is good for the soul. My confession, however, has nothing whatsoever to do with my soul. Simply put, I am cold to the bone! I guess I have been colder but I am suffering from brain freeze right now I was hoping all that chatter about global warming was somewhere in the neighborhood of being true. If so, nobody happened to send the memo to Mother Nature. With the sophistication of our communication technology today, I am not sure how this memo failed to get to her. Of course, they could have sent the message with one of those infamous government computers. We all know how reliable they are. Another thought along this line is that maybe Mother Nature got the memo all right, but, like all good mothers do, ignored it and went about her own business. After all, mothers really do know best even when it does not seem so at the time. However, I am cold and need some encouragement or at least some warm thoughts along this line. The warmest thought I have had recently has been that I have relatives in colder areas then I am. I must confess it does make me feel a little better, just not that much warmer. Where I live we dont have that cold stuff that piles up on the ground like they do up north keeping you from getting to where you want to go. Whoever was singing, Im Dreaming of a White Christmas, please stop singing, Christmas is over. Start dreaming about something a little warmer than all of that white stuff, like a Green Easter. This probably has been the coldest winter in a good long time and it got me to thinking, after all, what else can you do when everything is frozen? With all the advancements in science and technology, why is it we cannot control the weather? Something as simple as the weather and nobody seems to be able to control it. Politicians will get up and spout off at how they are going to change things and control things and improve things. Well, Mr. Politician, why dont you begin with the weather? Change the weather for a change. It seems quite a paradox that when our country is going through hard times and people who pay the taxes have to tighten their belts that it is time for politicians to vote on a raise in their salary. For once, I would like to see these political big shots vote on decreasing their salary and standing alongside the American people. The danger of that is, it would be such a shock to the American people that people would be dropping dead left and right. So why cant these people control the weather? Why cant they pass a law regulating the temperature? They have a law regulating everything else. Why not the temperature? Why not the weather? I am for having some of these politicians put together one of their infamous subcommittees, sit down with Mother Nature and negotiate something that will make everybody happy, like warm weather. I would like to see some of my tax dollars go for something that would bene t everybody instead of some party at some insigni cant political convention. Personally, I think Mother Nature would be easy to work with under such circumstances as we have today. Every mother has a nurturing side and I believe there is no exception here with good old Mother Nature. Maybe she does not know how inconvenient this cold weather has been for us. I think she would be willing to negotiate a long these lines. I would like to select the politicians to be on this committee myself. I have my own list and would be happy to set it up. The reason is, I know that when one of those politicians throws his chest out and begins one of those mindnumbing speeches, and you know they will, they always do, it will irritate Mother Nature. Boy, would I love to see her light into one of them. Nothing is more awesome than the fury of Mother Nature. Besides, nothing is more idiotic than men or women, big in their own eyes, pontificating on things they cannot control as if they had any say in it. I think if you cannot control something as commonplace as the weather you had better find out who can and align yourself up with that person. The Bible tells us exactly who that is. The LORD is slow to anger, and great in power, and will not at all acquit the wicked: the LORD hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds are the dust of his feet (Nahum 1:3). I do not have to deal with Mother Nature, who incidentally does not exist; I deal with God who controls all things and I am happy to have him control my life as well.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. From Covenant HospiceYou may have seen Ryley, a rare seven year old at coated retriever, riding in the Lions Club parade these past two years. But what you cant tell by just looking at her in a parade is what her and her owner does for others. Ryley was a rescue dog originally from Ohio where she and Michelle Weltman lived. They recently relocated to Wakulla after Michelle married her husband Michael following their high school reunion. Ryley is a canine good citizen certi- ed and Delta Society International pet therapy female canine. Ryley has volunteered for several years in nursing homes and hospitals. Locally they are proud to visit Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center representing Covenant Hospice. Ryleys presence, like many of her kind, brings a little joy to those she comes in contact with. It is amazing what the presence of a companion therapy animal can do in our society today. From one who was rescued, to one who brings joy to hearts in a time of need, Covenant Hospice salutes Michelle Weltman and Ryley the rescue dog for all their voluntary time in the service of others. If you, like Ryley would like to bring joy to others, please contact Lori Fitzpatrick at Lori.Fitzpatrick@covenanthospice. org for more information. Hospice Volunteer Michelle Weltman with her pet therapy dog Ryley, who was a rescue dog from Ohio. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 7A Robert Kennley Turney Jr., 70, passed away Tuesday, Jan. 21, 2014 in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 25 years, Diane Turney, of Crawfordville. He was born in Ft. Wayne, Ind., coming from Ft. Lauderdale, and had lived in this area 13 years. He was a contractor. He was a war vet who served in the United States Marine Corps during the Vietnam War. Services will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family requests you make a donation to the Wounded Warriors Project, Inc., 4899 Belfort Road Suite 300, Jacksonville FL 32256. In addition to his wife, survivors include his mother, Esther Turney Voirol; four children, Jean Gibbons, Bobbie Jo Gearhart, Eric Guzelf and Wendy Guzelf; nine grandchildren and six great-grandchildren; sisters, Joy Luginbill and Connie Cochran; and brother, Keith Turney. He was predeceased by his father, Robert K, Turney Sr.; a sister, Diana Turney; and daughter, Veronica Turney. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Elizabeth Ann Romanus, 69, passed away on Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014 at her home in Crawfordville. She was born in Jacksonville, and lived in this area her entire life. She graduated from Florida State University where she obtained her Masters Degree in Education. She taught for 39 years before retiring from Shadeville Elementary School. A gathering of family and friends will be held at a later date. Survivors include her son, George Romanus III; daughter-in-law, Teresa Romanus; brother, Earl Russell Sanders Jr.; and grandchildren, Christian and Anthony Romanus. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements. Karen Louise Bellamy, 56, of Crawfordville, passed away Monday, Jan. 20, 2014 in Tallahassee. She was born in Lima, Ohio, and had lived in this area 28 years. She was vice-president of Bellamy Outdoor Sports. She loved gardening and being outdoors, antique shopping, laying on the beach and looking for seashells. She loved her dog Bandit, he went everywhere with her. Memorial services will be held Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014 at 1:30 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. The family will receive friends following the service. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to the American Cancer Society, 241 John Knox Road, Suite 100, Tallahassee FL 32303 (800-342-2383). She is survived by her mother, Myra Maidlow Wood (Jerry); son, Joey Wyant; daughter, Sherri Parsons (Aaron); three grandchildren, Autumn Wyant, and Kara and Leila Parsons; brothers, Brad Maidlow (Maureen) and Rodney Maidlow (Barb); sister, Debbie Hurst (Ron); and many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her father, Howard Maidlow. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Jane Newman Wilson, 79, passed away Thursday, Jan. 23, 2014, at her home in Crawfordville. Funeral service and burial for Mrs. Wilson will be held at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell. Date and time will be announced later. She was born Jan. 28, 1934 in Cleveland, Tenn. Her parents were John Gaston Newman and Mary Lee Lawson Newman. Jane married Duane Wilson and they moved to Crawfordville in 1973. Her parents and husband preceded her in death. Mrs. Wilson was retired from the State of Florida Department of Insurance. She did volunteer work with elder affairs (S.H.I.N.E.). After her retirement, she enjoyed being a homemaker. Survivors include her daughter, Sherry Jane Krause of Wisconsin; step-daughters, Cynthia Wesner of Indianapolis, Diane Williamson and husband, Clint, of Grafton, Mich., and Jane Downey and husband, Keith, of Sydney, Ohio; granddaughter, Rhonda Kois of New Orleans; great-grandchild, Cecily Pennington of Norfolk, Va.; brothers, Lester Eugene Newman of Tucson, Ariz., and Johnny Robert (Bobby) Newman of Jacksonville; sisters, Loretta Lee Pryor and husband, Bobby N. of Old Hickory, Tenn., Jody Pennington and husband, Tony of Goodlettsville, Tenn., and Phyllis Sanderson of Jacksonville; brotherin-law, Gary Wilson and wife, Cindy of Rockingham, N.C., and Raymond Wilson of Winter Haven; sister-in-law, Helen Lake of Winter Haven; numerous nieces and nephews; very good friends, Emily Cadwell and Sherry Smith, both of Crawfordville, Florida; and faithful companion, Pepper.Obituaries Karen Louise Bellamy Elizabeth Ann Romanus Robert Kennley Turney Jr. Jane Newman Wilson David Andrew Drew Kimberl Elizabeth Ann Romanus Karen Louise Bellamy Jane Newman Wilson NAMI BASICSNAMI Basics is a Six Week Program Completely FREE for Parents and Caregivers!If youre a parent or caregiver who has struggled in raising a child who has shown signs or symptoms of possible brain disorders, mental illness, behavioral problems this program is for you. You are trained in preparedness and emotional resiliency, the fundamentals of caring for self, family and empowerment as an effective advocate!WHEN: Tuesday, February 18, 2014, 6pm until 8:30pm and every Tuesday through March 25th. WHERE: Wakulla County Community One Stop Center, WCCOSC, Corner of Shadeville Highway and Trice Lane CONTACT: NAMI Wakulla at the WCCOSC (850) 745-6042ENROLL IN PERSON AT WCCOSCThe Ounce of Prevention Fund of Florida Inc.NEW PROGRAM from Wakulla By TRACY RENEE LEE Grief manifests itself in many painful facets. There is emotional pain, psychological pain, spiritual pain, the pain of loneliness, the pain of sadness and even physical pain. Physical pain is very often brought on through continued avoidance of the grief experience. Not everyone suffers the same amount or type of pain once a loved one dies. The pain intensity is usually predicated on the level of attachment the survivor experiences with the deceased. It is nearly impossible, however, to avoid a painful experience at the loss of someone with whom you shared an attachment. Of important note, the deceased need not be a loved one to feel pain at his or her passing. When I was a young woman, I joined a large corporation in a secretarial capacity. It was not long after I began working there that one of the district managers died. Although I worked in a different of- ce building, and had only seen this man at regional meetings, I was affected by his loss. My attachment to the company included this man as an integral part of my newly acquired associated network. I pondered my pain at his loss for many years, and truly did not understand it until I entered funeral service. Although I did not know him very well at all, our work overlapped. I relied on his reports to compose my reports. I had an attachment to him because I had a reliance on his work. His passing created a structural defect in the security of my newly acquired income. The stress, though short lived, was very unnerving. If grief is left unresolved or ignored, it will eventually surface in ones life as physical ailments. Grief shifts into medical conditions as an underlying cause. If you nd that you are developing unexplained physical or mental conditions, you might discover that if you will address your grief issues, your other conditions might actually resolve themselves. Grief affects the body and soul the same way stress does. If you continue to ignore your grief, other conditions will develop that are avoidable by allowing the pain of grief to present itself and working through it. I hope that if you have experienced unresolved grief that you will find the courage to face it and overcome the ill effects it creates within your physical and mental health. If you can muster up the courage to do it, you and those around you will bene t immensely. Your health will be better, and your life will be better too.Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushinup-daisies.blogspot. com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Griefs physical pain BEREAVEMENT COLUMNSpecial to The NewsEighty-eight percent of doctors said they would recommend exercise as a tool to combat stress. This needs to be communicated more from doctor to patient, however, because according to A Stressed Nation, only 58 percent of Americans said their doctor has suggested exercise as a way to control their stress level. 55 percent of Americans reported stress during their everyday life, while 64 percent of Americans are stressed during a typical workday. Two-thirds (66 percent) of providers said that emails, text messages, or phone calls with personalized tips from doctors between visits would help patients better manage their overall health, including their stress level. Negative Effects: More than half of Americans (52 percent) and nearly two-thirds (65 percent) of providers said that stress is negatively affecting Americans health. 88 percent of doctors said they would recommend exercise as a tool to combat stress, while just 58 percent of Americans said their doctor has suggested exercise as a way to control their stress level.55 percent of Americans feel stressed A Church Beyond Its WallsPromise Land Ministries Lighthouse invites you to join us as we celebrate the opening of the new sanctuary and community center. Join us for a 3 day revival meeting at 3167 Coastal Hwy, next door to the Dollar General in Medart. Come on by and see the new facilities and help us prepare for the work the Lord has given.Come as you are everyone is welcome!Revival Friday, Jan. 31 .............................. 7:00 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 1.............................7:00 p.m. Sunday Morning, Feb. 2 .............10:30 a.m. For more information please visit their website at www.promiselandministries.org or call 850-926-3281

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsDr. Walker Jackson, Ph.D., son of Buddy Jackson of Panacea, has been published in the prestigious science journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA for his creation of two extraordinary mouse models for advancing the study of rare prion diseases which cause fatal brain diseases in humans. The project was initiated by Dr. Susan Lindquist, Ph.D., Member, Whitehead Institute of M.I.T. in Boston. Dr. Lindquist chose Walker as the lead researcher of her team while completing his post-doctoral training researching prion proteins which, in the brain, become infected and cause fatal diseases. Such extraordinary mouse models have never been created by scientists working on prion diseases before now. With these two mouse models, Jackson should be able to advance the study of prion diseases.Jackson published for study of rare prion diseasesQuilters Guild donates to Big Bend Hospice Special to The NewsA total of seven quilts were presented to Big Bend Hospices Pam Allbritton on Friday, Jan. 10. According to Allbritton, the quilts are ditributed to homebound patients in the community and are highly appreciated. They really do make a difference, she said. In addition, the guild held a drawing for an Opportunity Quilt, the proceeds of which are used to purchase material and supplies for future hospice quilts. The most recent winner was Mike Kelly of Pennsylvania. BBHs Pam Allbritton, left, is presented with quilts by Guild members Irene Burroughs and Sheri Potter.PHOTO BY AMANDA MAYOR Special to The NewsCaptain Jody Campbell, perhaps best known as one of the foremost shing Captains in the Big Bend, was honored at the January meeting of the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department for more than 25 years of service. Jody was one of the original fire responders before there was a re station and in fact it was he and several other Apalachee Bay volunteers who had the insight and determination to build the station that is now located in Shell Point. Initially, that meant fundraising rst for the building and then to maintain it and to provide training and equipment for the volunteers. Of course the fundraising has taken many forms. There have been yard sales, sh fry events, steak outs, theme dinners, raf- es and even community theatre; Jody has been a partner in every effort. In addition he has served on the Board of Directors for many of those 25 years. There is never a truly worthy way to honor a person who has done so much, asked so little, and never has sought to highlight his own work over that of his neighbor but Monday evening was a beginning. District Fours commissioner, Jerry Moore commended Jody for his good works not only to the re department but in many other ways to Wakulla County including his sitting on various marine committees and his contributions to Operation Santa. wo past of cers of the ABVFD also spoke: President Robert Middleton and Chief Larry Lowhorn. There were some light moments in their recollections of the old days, acknowledgement for what the re department has accomplished over the years, and some serious moments about the attributes that make people like Jody Campbell so important to the survival of any organization. Wakulla County Fire Chief Mike Morgan presented Jody with a plaque and current volunteer Fire Chief, Jeff Cybulski gifted Jody with a mini Bass Pro Shop tackle box. A specially designed cake re truck and all was ordered but as often is the case in the re and rescue business, the unexpected happens. Delicious as it was, the cake arrived only after having gone through an auto accident. We thank Jody for his caring and silent contributions to the community. The citizens of Apalachee Bay have benefited for 25 years from his dedication. Captain Jody Campbell recognized for 25 years of service Unger begins law enforcement career at TCCSpecial to The News2009 WHS graduate and 2011 TCC graduate, Tyler Unger, was sworn in on Jan. 14, as an of cer with the Tallahassee Community College Police Department. Unger graduated from the Pat Thomas Law Enforcement Academy in June 2013 and is currently a junior at FSU pursuing a degree in Law Enforcement Operations. He has also worked at the Advanced Manufacturing Training Center at TCC for the past three years. Unger is the son of Myrna Hoover and step father Paul Hoover of Crawfordville and Tim Unger and step mother Lisa Unger of Tallahassee.TCC to host Day of Dialogue for women in leadershipSpecial to The NewsOn Tuesday, February 18, Tallahassee Community College presents a Day of Dialogue, an event for women, about women, by women featuring an emphasis on discussions of women in leadership. Tickets are on sale now. A Day of Dialogue is presented by TCC Workforce Developments Leadership Institute. The daylong event will feature a keynote address from Nancy Carter, PhD and Senior Vice President of Catalyst, Inc. Carter has over 30 years of experience as a researcher, educator and consultant specializing in womens professional development and advancement. Utilizing a combination of presentations, small group activities and group discussions the event will examine how women are currently leading in life and the collective concerns that women share about self-empowerment and leading others to their full potential. In order to receive input from women throughout the community, TCC is seeking a diverse group of participants. The event will be held on February 18 from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Mission San Luis. The cost is $75 and includes breakfast, the keynote presentation, all sessions, lunch and a tour of San Luis. To register, please contact the TCC Leadership Institute at (850) 201-8760 or visit www.TCCWomenInLeadership.com. TCC would like to thank the sponsors of this inaugural event: FSU Jim Moran Institute Advice Straight Up Speaker Series, Devoe and Shirley Moore Tallahassee Automobile Museum, 850 Magazine, First Commerce Credit Union, Gem Collection, Millennium Nail and Day Spa, Proctor University and Tallahassee Magazine. Special to The NewsCome one come all to the first Community Variety Show. A host of talented local Musicians & Dancers will perform at the Wakulla High Auditorium beginning at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 1. All proceeds will go to our own Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. If you love good music then mark this date on your calendar as you dont want to miss this event. Some of Wakulla Countys nest musicians will be playing for your enjoyment. Soloists will include Brianna Marin, Jada Walker & Alex Williams, who thrilled audiences at the last WHS talent show will be performing for your pleasure. Our local old-time music historian, raconteur and musician, Frank Lindamood will be playing banjo & guitar while singing classic folk favorites. The Senior Citizens own Pickers & Grinners lead by Dick Bickford & Company will be bringing you the very best in folk, country & bluegrass tunes. Former student and now guidance counselor Danny Lilly will be playing classic rock along with the Allbritton brothers, Brett & Lyle & friends. Jazz musicians will include Sammy Tedder, Rene Arbogast, Stan Gramling, Mr. Mike Crouch and Snorrii & Susan Solburg. A blues group featuring Brian White, Stan Gramling, Snorrii Solburg, Jeff Dutrow and Susan Solburg will also perform For you dance fans, Lauren Mannings students from Studio 88 will show off their best moves. Its all for a wonderful cause, and you wont be disappointed. The cost for students is $4, Senior Citizens $5 and adults $6. A variety of refreshments prepared by our Senior Citizens will be sold during intermission.WHS Dramatis Personae will host Variety Show Feb. 1Key-Bateman engagementSpecial to The NewsKeith and Michele Key and Victor and Sherrill Bateman are pleased to announce the engagement of their children, Jared Key and Maya Bateman. Both Jared and Maya are graduates of Wakulla High School. Maya is pursuing her nursing degree at Florida A & M University and Jared is self-employed at Keith Key Heating & Air. Jared and Maya will be married on March 8 at Sopchoppy Southern Baptist Church with the reception to follow at the Historic Sopchoppy Gym.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsJanuary Teachers of the Month are Shadeville Elementary Schools Raquel Alvarez and Wakulla High Schools James Vernon. They are recognized with the District Maintenance Departments Marc Hooker. Superintendent Robert Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the service each of these individuals give to the children of Wakulla County and the dedication they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Raquel Alvarez, January Teacher of the Month, began her teaching career nine years ago at Shadeville Elementary School. Alvarez relocated to Wakulla County in April 2000, moving over five hundred miles away from her many of her family members. Her transition to full-time teaching began as a substitute teacher when her children started elementary school at Shadeville. Alvarez grew up and attended school in Miami, Florida, graduating from the Florida International University with a bachelors degree in elementary education. Teaching kindergarten is a perfect t for Alvarez. She shares, Students arrive each year in August and I have the honor of watching them grow in so many ways, including recognizing words as they begin to read. One of the most exciting statements I get to hear is, Mrs. Alvarez, I can read. Alvarez serves on the sunshine committee and has been a Sunday school teacher at her church. She enjoys every aspect of elementary school, especially the annual Halloween parade. Principal Susan Brazier adds, As a veteran teacher, Mrs. Alvarez creates a warm and enriching first school experience for children through the use of academic centers, music, art and even beginning Spanish. Her love of young children is evident when you enter her kindergarten classroom as it is lled with student artwork, engaging games and books, developmentally appropriate technology and the sweet voices of children actively involved in learning. Shadeville students are lucky to have such a caring, kind, and dedicated teacher on our kindergarten team. James Vernon, Wakulla High School Teacher and Coach, has been serving Wakulla students in a professional capacity since 2005. Vernon considers it an honor to return to his roots as a War Eagle following his graduation from FSU. James Vernon attended Crawfordville Elementary School and Wakulla Middle School and is currently working toward his masters degree in Educational Leadership at the University of Phoenix. He shares, I enjoy the fact that I am able to give back to the school system. The dedicated professionals of the Wakulla School District gave me a chance to build myself into who I am today. The solid education and strong connections to principled centered role models in our school system brought out the best in me. I was raised in a single parent household with limited nancial means. The teachers and coaches in my life helped me acquire scholarships and pointed me in the right direction. Every day I strive to pay it forward. It is a blessing to be a part of this great school system. I work every day to do my part to make it better. Vernon not only teaches economics and personal tness but he also serves the students as assistant head football coach, weightlifting coach, wrestling coach, AVID site team member and FCA, a leadership building program. Principal Mike Crouch adds, Mr. Vernon is very deserving of this honor. He is the consummate team player in both his academic pursuits as well as his extracurricular responsibilities. Our students know how much he cares about them as he maintains a strong work ethic and optimistic attitude. Not only does Mr. Vernon spend time after school coaching, he is at the field house almost every Saturday and/or Sunday in the fall. Mr. Vernon has served as the AP macro-economics teacher for several years, providing a quality academic program while simultaneously coaching. Coach Vernon understands the important of balance as he manages his professional responsibilities while including his family and being a great father. James Vernon is another example of the great teachers and coaches we have at Wakulla High School. The January Employee of the Month is the Maintenance Departments Marc Hooker. Hooker started working with the school district November 2009 as a trade specialist. Hooker attended school in Leon County and graduated with a plumbing certi cate from Lively Vo-Tech. Hooker understands the importance of being exible working in maintenance. He shares, We make plans, but dont always keep them because of emergencies, such as broken water pipes, HVAC equipment, freezers, res, sink holes, fallen trees, accidents or backed-up sewers. However, the unexpected keep the job exciting and we know it is all for a good cause as we see the smiling children and school staff when repairs are completed. It is not uncommon for Hooker to arrive early and/ or work on weekends. He says, I do it because I love my job. Wakulla County School Board is the greatest place to work. Maintenance Supervisor Buddy Lawhon adds, Marc is a hard working employee. He is an excellent plumber and great key maker. He is willing to help anyone, with anything, at any time day or night. Marc is an asset to the school district and I appreciate his dedication to the job and his co-workers.School Board announces January Teachers, Employee of the Month Raquel Alvarez James Vernon Marc HookerSpecial to The NewsWakulla High School (WHS) is gearing up for the exciting task of scheduling students for the 2014-2015 school year. Both Riversprings Middle School (RMS) and Wakulla Middle School (WMS) 8th graders were given WHS Scheduling Guides and Course Request forms during the second week of January to take home and share with their parents/guardians. Students and their parents/guardians need to carefully consider the courses the student is interested in. Then using the Curriculum Guide to help them, they need to ll out, sign, and return the Course Request sheets to their schools before February 4th. Students from RMS and WHS have attended an Electives presentation held at WHS and were invited to the Curriculum Fair that was held on the evening of January 27th in the gym. WHS scheduling counselors and Mrs. Chancy, Assistant Principal of Curriculum, will journey to Riversprings Middle School (RMS) on February 4th and to Wakulla Middle School (WMS) on February 5th to assist the rising ninth graders with their schedule requests. Curriculum Guides and Course Request forms were given to WHS students in homeroom on Monday, January 27. Students were to complete the Course Request sheets, take them home to share with their parents/guardians, and then return them by this Friday, January 31, 2014. WHS students were also invited to the Curriculum Fair held on January 27th. Wakulla High Schools scheduling will begin with the rising sophomores from February 11th through the 13th and the rising juniors will be completing their scheduling requests from March 4th through the 6th. Rising seniors will meet one on one with their Guidance Counselor, Mrs. Krista Sharin, Mr. Danny Lilly, or Mrs. Bonny Salib, starting in February, until all of their scheduling requests are complete. All student report cards for the rst semester went out on January 13, 2014. If you have not received a report card from your high school student, please contact WHS Student Services at 850-926-2221. Special to The News The Riversprings Academic Team competed in the 4th annual Bainbridge Middle School tournament on Saturday, Jan. 11. Although Riversprings has a very young team, being comprised of only seventh and sixth graders, they performed admirably and came in 4th in their ight. Team captain Logan hicks was recognized as the third highest scorer overall, with an individual score higher than the cumulative scores of 14 of the 28 teams present. Pictured left to right: Dylan Franck, Madison Howard, Carmen Zachry, Andrew Lourcey, Logan Hicks, Makenna Roddenberry RMS Academic Team competes in competition, comes in fourthScheduling begins for Wakulla High is offering a seminar for parents of middle-school children with an emphases on discovering a new view and attitude regarding the traits of ADHD. Join us and learn to help your child discover how to put the brakes on his Ferrari brain. Seminar will be held every Tuesday in February beginning 2/4/14.Call Rita Haney, MSW,LCSW 850-926-2039 and/or email Catherine Harris Small, Ms.Ed.S/MSW at ms.catherapy@gmail.com for location and fee.PARENTS OF CHILDREN WITH ADHDDiscovery Place850.224.4960www.fsucu.org 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................50 classrooms/newspapers .........$800/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr Wakulla High School ................50 classrooms/newspapers .........$800/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center.......................20 newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Lynda Kinsey at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of STOP 000H6C2By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachFollowing a season that saw both the WHS boys and girls teams qualify for the State Meet for the rst time in school history, six local runners efforts were recognized by being named to the All Big Bend post-season teams. This group included ve girls and one boy. Headlining the group was rst year cross country runner, Madison Harris. Harris has been an outstanding runner on the Track team since placing sixth at State in the 800 meters her freshman year. She has steadily improved since then, culminating in a state runner-up nish at that distance last season. Harris, also one of the best soccer players ever at WHS, put soccer on hold temporarily this fall to run cross country for the rst time in her senior year. She quickly served notice that she was also going to be a force on the trails as well as the track. Harris was the overall winner at the Cougar Challenge, the Dolphin Dash and the prestigious Panhandle Championships. She also placed 12th, running in the Elite Girls division, at the ultra-competitive Pre-state meet hosted by FSU at the Apalachee Regional Park in Tallahassee. In this meet she notched her season best time of 18:30, a First Team US Standards time. Then, in post-season competition, she notched a District Championship, a Regional Runner-up title and placed ninth at the State Meet. She also placed third at the prestigious Florida Athletic Coaches All-Star Meet, which hosts the best senior runners from all school classi cations from all over the state. In the course of the season and post-season competitions, she recorded four sub19:00 minute 5Ks and was the only female in the Big Bend to go under 19:00 this past season. For her efforts, she was named not only to the first team All-Big Bend squad, but was also named the female All-Big Runner of the Year! This is the rst time a WHS runner, of either gender, has garnered that award. Joining Harris on the first team All-Big Bend Team was WHS freshman Haleigh Martin. Martin started out the season rather slowly, running 27:27 in her first high school meet, but improved steadily over the course of the season until she recorded a State Elite Time of 19:58 at the State Meet. Her time is a WHS freshman school record. Over the course of the season, she improved her 5K time by a whopping 7 minutes and two seconds! This is also the rst time the local harriers have ever placed two runners on the First Team. Senior former school record holder, four year varsity runner and two -time team captain, Margaret Wiedeman, was named to the All-Big Bend second team while teammates Lydia Wiedeman and Kayla Webbe garnered Honarable Mention honors. For the boys, sophomore Albert Smythe, who was the District Champion, the team leading runner all season and ran an excellent 17:01 at the Panhandle Championships, was named to the Honorable Mention team. During the course of the season, he recorded eight sub-18:00 minute 5Ks. This is by far the largest number of kids we have ever had named to these All-Big Bend Teams, noted Coach Paul Hoover. To have two girls on the First Team and ve recognized overall is a tribute to the hard work and dedication these ladies have shown all year. They worked so hard and never got discouraged when faced with challenges, they simply got tougher and would not be denied. I couldnt be prouder of them. Albert had a great season and ran so consistently all season long and hes only a sophomore, so we have pretty high expectations for him the next couple of years, said Hoover. The teams this year were really special and we look forward to building on their success and dedication next year. Staff Report Coach J.D. Jones, for whom the Wakulla High School football and soccer eld are named after, was recently inducted into the Florida Athletic Coaches Association (FACA) Hall of Fame. Coach Jones coached at WHS for 33 years, serving as head coach for 29. During that time Jones posted a 21999 career winning record. Jones was named Coach of the Year six times by the Gulf Coast Athletic Conference, twice by the Coca Cola Dunkel Index, three times by the Tallahassee Democrat, two times by the FACA and served as Head Coach in the 1982 North/South FACA All Star Classic. Jones was not just recognized for his career as a football coach. He was also a two-time Coach of the Year recipient in softball and weightlifting as designated by the Tallahassee Democrat. In addition, Jones won the 1980 and 1981 Florida High School Athletics Association (FHSAA) football state championships and was inducted into the FHSAAs Hall of Fame in 2012. Upon his retirement in 2007, Coach Jones received the FACA Dub Palmer Football Coach Lifetime Achievement Award. Jones was recognized, along with six other inductees, during the 38th annual FACA Hall of Fame Luncheon on Jan. 11 in Daytona Beach. J.D. Jones Inducted into FACA Hall of Fame Port St. Joe Coach John Palmer, left, with Coach J.D. Jones at a past event.FILE PHOTO CROSS COUNTRYSix War Eagles named to All Big Bend teamsFOOTBALLFormer WHS coach of 33 years is honored by Florida Athletic Association

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsSea turtles are susceptible to cold weatherJames Burnett named to lead North Florida wildlife refuge complex 27 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights LeslieTues-Sat576-3105MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020&, 2 2 Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-6020 r a nda es -S at 5 -2905 R ob y n Th ur sSa t 926-6 0 0 2 0 & i c e H a i r S a l o n e H o n H a i a l o n r S a c e c e i F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 reo and short sale specialists 850926-1011our ome own ealtor o u By CYPRESS RUDLOEGulf Specimen Marine LabJanuary is the month for new beginnings. However this time of year is also one of the coldest months in Florida. Sea turtles are especially susceptible to cold temperatures. Cold-stunned sea turtles are usually a bigger problem in northern places such as New England, Maryland, and Cape Hatteras. However, they can also become a problem here in the Sunshine State. In 2010 there were over 1,500 cold-stunned turtles stranded in St. Joe Bay. Gulf Specimen has been a sea turtle rehab facility since it was opened in 1961. Gulf Specimen founder Jack Rudloe worked closely with Archie Carr, considered one of the rst people to study with sea turtles. We were able to take in 65 green turtles and three Kemps Ridley sea turtles. Sea turtles have ambient body temperature so that basically means that their body temperature will match the water they are in. Once the water temperature reaches 50 degree, the sea turtles go into a coma-like state where they can no longer move. As they float at the surface they are subject to wind and current. They have no ability to maneuver themselves. St. Joe Bay is a hotspot for cold-stunned sea turtles because of its geographical location. Large sea currents push from Pensacola towards Tampa and the St. Joe peninsula works as a hook catching all different types of cold stunned sea turtles. As these turtles wash up on tide ats and shallow lagoons in the bay they are subject to the elements. Some of the injuries that we saw were severe frostbite to the turtles eyes, ippers and shells. The cure of for a cold stunned sea turtle is to remove them from their environment until temperatures returned to normal. As I was writing this, the U.S. was hit by a Arctic vortex which brought cold temperatures to the south. There were over 65 cold stunned turtles found in St. Joe Bay this past week. If you nd yourself out at the beach, keep an eye open for a sea turtle they could use your help. If you come across one of these turtles please contact Gulf Specimen or the FWC.From FWC News This is a reminder that the Feb. 1 through March 31 closure that would have affected several species of grouper in Gulf state waters has been removed and will not occur as it has in previous years. This closure was removed at the September 2013 meeting of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. A similar closure was also removed in federal waters shoreward of the 20 fathom line, or about 120 feet (excluding waters off Monroe County). To learn more about the federal closure, visit the NOAA Fisheries Southeast Regional Of ce at Sero.NMFS.NOAA.gov and click on Fisheries, Gulf Fisheries, Reef Fish and Gag and Shallow-water Grouper Framework Recreational Season. The closure would have applied to the following species: black, red, yellow n, scamp, yellowmouth, rock hind and red hind. The closure did not apply to gag grouper, which has its own season and opens April 1 through June 30 in state waters off Franklin, Wakulla, Taylor and Jefferson counties; and from July 1 through Dec. 3 in all other state waters of the Gulf (excluding Monroe County, which is managed under the Atlantic season). More information regarding Gulf grouper shing regulations is available online at MyFWC.com/Fishing by clicking on Saltwater Fishing, Recreational Regulations and Gulf Grouper. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA Gulf Specimen staffer working with a cold-stunned sea turtle.From Fish and WildlifeJames Burnett has been named Project Leader for the new nine-refuge North Florida National Wildlife Refuge Complex. This Complex will unify national wildlife refuges along Floridas Big Bend or Nature Coast, which is one of the largest, undeveloped, mostly privatelyheld coastal areas in the nation. We are fortunate to have Mr. Burnetts strong leadership to forge new partnerships on the landscape while restoring and managing refuges through re management, forestry, invasive exotics removal, and visitor services and outreach, said David Viker, Chief of the Southeast Region of the National Wildlife Refuge System, Fish and Wildlife Service. Refuge Supervisor Elizabeth Souheaver noted that, Though we will see a net reduction in staff as a result of this combination of stations as part of workforce planning, I remain encouraged about the future knowing we have James and other great managers leading talented staffs in this important geography. Currently the Project Leader for St. Marks and St. Vincent NWRs, Burnett has a high degree of technical knowledge with a Masters Degree in Wildlife Management and more than 25 years of onthe-ground management on several eld stations in re management and refuge management roles. Burnett also has diverse service experience in different roles and programs, having served at the Regional level as a Deputy Refuge Supervisor and then Regional Private Lands Coordinator. Recently he served on a national Conserving the Future: Wildlife Refuge and the Next Generation team developing strategic growth policy for the National Wildlife Refuge System. Refuge Ranger Robin Will, Secretary of State Ken Detzner and James Burnett.PHOTO BY George Burton/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Reminder: Gulf grouper recreational season will not close Feb. 1 SKYBOX WE ARE Celebrating SERVING Y OU!Y EARS12 HORSESHOE BOWL XII 10AM ........................................Sign Up 11AM ......................Tournament Begins 2-5 PM .....................Live Entertainment 4-6 PM ..............................Tailgate Party 6:07 PM ..................Super Bowl XLVIII Halftime .....................Games and Prizes FEB. 2 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. 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From DEP NewsJodi Eller, 31, of St. Augustine became the rst woman to complete the 1,515-mile Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail that runs from Pensacola to Key West to the Georgia border. Eller paddled most of the trail in 2008 with husband Matt Keene, the rst thru paddler of the trail, and she completed the remaining segments in late 2013. This trail is amazing, Eller said. It goes through so many different ecosystems. How the beaches change along the trail is just incredible. The trail made me a stronger paddler and it also rede- ned who I am in a way, bringing me back to the essence of being human. Its a powerful experience to go through. Highlights of Ellers trip included seeing a black bear cub in a tree along the Crooked River near Carrabelle, island-hopping in the Indian River Lagoon and experiencing perfect water conditions for her last segment from Flamingo to Everglades City through Everglades National Park. The Florida Park Service offers many ways for Floridians and visitors to experience the real Florida, whether by kayaking, hiking, biking or swimming on a warm summer day, said Donald Forgione, Director of the Florida Park Service. I applaud Jodi and others who are able to get a special glimpse of Florida through the amazing Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail. Eller, a kayaking guide for St. Augustine EcoTours and an Environmental Science teacher at Flagler College, has this advice for paddlers interested in taking on the trail: Do your research prior to your trip by reading everything on the trail website. Beginners paddling with friends can attempt this and build muscles and skill along the way, but it would be best to experience different types of water conditions first. Hopefully, more women will want to do it. Eller is the 11th person to have completed the entire Florida Circumnavigational Saltwater Paddling Trail since it opened in 2008. For more information, visit www.floridagreenwaysandtrails.com. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThe following message was written by Division Vice Commander T.J. Del Bello to the members of Division 1: Welcome to our new bridge and 2014. We have come to a way point change and are altering course. We are excited with our staff of cers and the positive plans planned for 2014. Our course change will help us to become more ef cient and effective promoting boating safety and supporting USCG missions. Marine Safety, Vessel Safety Exams, Watch Standing and Surface Operations are some of the missions that are high priority. New Member Service, Diversity, and Communications are to be highlighted and Public Education and Pro-gram Visitor missions will receive attention. During our Change of Watch meeting, Jan. 4, Staff Of cers (SO) presented their role and plans. An important discussion dealt with our business communications. A flotilla member with a question or desire to support a mission the need to seek their Flotilla Staff Of cer (FSO) in charge of the mission. Training and assignment begins with the FSO. If an FSO has a question, problem or report, the SO is their immediate contact. Your Division Vice Commander (Chief Of Staff) will work with all the Staff Of cers. I am pleased to share 2014 alongside you and look for-ward to a terrific Division One year of growth and productivity. T. J. Del Bello D1VCDR, DSO-VE/PV If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Officer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Being prepared is your best defense! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Instructional models. Every year about this time I face the new summers training opportunities, now complicated by our participation at TCC with the Introduction to Professional Diving course. And every year I lament the changing world of instructional models used to educate our inspiring underwater adventurers. I interview folks to nd out what they want and on what to expect with current instructional standards and procedures. When I taught at FSU for 30 years (1974-2004), we offered semester long (16 week) classes that were comprised of two hours of academic lectures and two hours of pool (skill) training every week. Admittedly, you can nd no better model than 32 hours of academics, 32 hours of pool work and 16 hours with ve check-out dives, for a total of 80 hours to get certi ed on scuba. While at FSU, we taught over 4,000 students! National Training agencies continue to encourage a combined minimumof 27 hours of scuba training to earn a basic scuba certi cation card. And this effort must turn a pro t for the facility and Instructor when offered outside the con nes of a college environment. Time is money and costs are rising. If the motive for training is to sell dive technology, then the amount charged may be arti cially lowered by hiding it in the price tag of the required equipment sales. We found that ratio came down to $2,000 of dive technology sold to justify free tuition (and we advertise as such). With discounted Internet sales now (who cares about the absence of warranty anyway), many use our facility to try on product for t and comfort only to purchase it on line whether they take class from us or anyone else. In these cases, the quality of the education and training has become of less importance than the sale of equipment, and both suffer. Independent instructors often barter for their service, exchanging whatever you may have of interest, such as guns or an old motorcycle and the likes, for scuba training. These folks love to dive and carry their passion through their instruction because they dont need the income. They have another job for that. And no one can compete with that situation. They are seldom af liated with a shop, sending their students to the Internet for dive equipment. Once you get beyond this entry level training, you nd there is a better way. I call it mentoring rather than training. Apparently, training is where a student demonstrates a skill and his/her monitor checks off a box on a form, seldom returning to it again. Mentoring is where the student is encouraged to achieve a level of pro ciency before the topic is woven into the next exercise, building toward a level of excellence that develops con dence when undertaking their next adventure. I recently attended a NAUI Course Directors workshop where we were told that in an effort to improve the education of aspiring Dive Instructors, distance learning through the internet, was now required! E-learning is available for all dive classes at virtually all training agencies. And we are told the new way now is to send the prospective student a code and expect them to get all their knowledge from this on-line class. Once completed, the prospective student arrives at the instructors location to demonstrate his or her skill and get a certi cation card. While I am all in favor of any way to transmit information to a student, I cannot believe this model works for more than a few very selfmotivated people. The library is full of self-help books that few use effectively. But I can see why it has gained traction. Now the facility can offer a weekend class by expecting the student to complete the e-learning before investing time on water work. The cost invested in a knowledgeable instructor is no longer required, and they go away, replaced by what we used to call pool instructors, very capable divers to teach skills. The facility collects enough e-trained students by months end to schedule a set of economical checkout dives and they make a pro t. Is that what you want from your scuba instruction? UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jan 30, 14 Fri Jan 31, 14 Sat Feb 1, 14 Sun Feb 2, 14 Mon Feb 3, 14 Tue Feb 4, 14 Wed Feb 5, 14 Date 3.6 ft. 12:57 AM 3.6 ft. 1:47 AM 3.6 ft. 2:35 AM 3.4 ft. 3:22 AM 3.1 ft. 4:09 AM 2.7 ft. 4:59 AM 2.2 ft. 5:56 AM High -1.3 ft. 7:52 AM -1.1 ft. 8:32 AM -0.9 ft. 9:10 AM -0.5 ft. 9:45 AM -0.0 ft. 10:17 AM 0.4 ft. 10:47 AM 0.9 ft. 11:16 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:16 PM 3.3 ft. 2:51 PM 3.3 ft. 3:24 PM 3.3 ft. 3:55 PM 3.2 ft. 4:24 PM 3.1 ft. 4:53 PM 3.0 ft. 5:24 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:48 PM 0.3 ft. 8:34 PM 0.1 ft. 9:19 PM -0.0 ft. 10:04 PM -0.0 ft. 10:52 PM 0.1 ft. 11:46 PM Low Thu Jan 30, 14 Fri Jan 31, 14 Sat Feb 1, 14 Sun Feb 2, 14 Mon Feb 3, 14 Tue Feb 4, 14 Wed Feb 5, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:49 AM 2.7 ft. 1:39 AM 2.7 ft. 2:27 AM 2.5 ft. 3:14 AM 2.3 ft. 4:01 AM 2.0 ft. 4:51 AM 1.7 ft. 5:48 AM High -0.9 ft. 8:03 AM -0.8 ft. 8:43 AM -0.6 ft. 9:21 AM -0.3 ft. 9:56 AM -0.0 ft. 10:28 AM 0.3 ft. 10:58 AM 0.6 ft. 11:27 AM Low 2.5 ft. 2:08 PM 2.5 ft. 2:43 PM 2.5 ft. 3:16 PM 2.5 ft. 3:47 PM 2.4 ft. 4:16 PM 2.3 ft. 4:45 PM 2.2 ft. 5:16 PM High 0.4 ft. 7:59 PM 0.2 ft. 8:45 PM 0.1 ft. 9:30 PM -0.0 ft. 10:15 PM -0.0 ft. 11:03 PM 0.0 ft. 11:57 PM Low Thu Jan 30, 14 Fri Jan 31, 14 Sat Feb 1, 14 Sun Feb 2, 14 Mon Feb 3, 14 Tue Feb 4, 14 Wed Feb 5, 14 Date 3.3 ft. 1:33 AM 3.4 ft. 2:23 AM 3.3 ft. 3:11 AM 3.1 ft. 3:58 AM 2.8 ft. 4:45 AM 2.5 ft. 5:35 AM High -1.2 ft. 8:56 AM -1.0 ft. 9:36 AM -0.8 ft. 10:14 AM -0.4 ft. 10:49 AM -0.0 ft. 11:21 AM 0.4 ft. 11:51 AM 0.1 ft. 12:50 AM Low 3.0 ft. 2:52 PM 3.1 ft. 3:27 PM 3.1 ft. 4:00 PM 3.1 ft. 4:31 PM 3.0 ft. 5:00 PM 2.9 ft. 5:29 PM 2.1 ft. 6:32 AM High 0.5 ft. 8:52 PM 0.3 ft. 9:38 PM 0.1 ft. 10:23 PM -0.0 ft. 11:08 PM -0.0 ft. 11:56 PM 0.8 ft. 12:20 PM Low 2.7 ft. 6:00 PM High Thu Jan 30, 14 Fri Jan 31, 14 Sat Feb 1, 14 Sun Feb 2, 14 Mon Feb 3, 14 Tue Feb 4, 14 Wed Feb 5, 14 Date 2.8 ft. 12:41 AM 2.8 ft. 1:31 AM 2.8 ft. 2:19 AM 2.6 ft. 3:06 AM 2.4 ft. 3:53 AM 2.1 ft. 4:43 AM 1.8 ft. 5:40 AM High -1.3 ft. 7:31 AM -1.1 ft. 8:11 AM -0.8 ft. 8:49 AM -0.5 ft. 9:24 AM -0.0 ft. 9:56 AM 0.4 ft. 10:26 AM 0.8 ft. 10:55 AM Low 2.6 ft. 2:00 PM 2.6 ft. 2:35 PM 2.6 ft. 3:08 PM 2.6 ft. 3:39 PM 2.5 ft. 4:08 PM 2.4 ft. 4:37 PM 2.3 ft. 5:08 PM High 0.5 ft. 7:27 PM 0.3 ft. 8:13 PM 0.1 ft. 8:58 PM -0.0 ft. 9:43 PM -0.0 ft. 10:31 PM 0.1 ft. 11:25 PM Low Thu Jan 30, 14 Fri Jan 31, 14 Sat Feb 1, 14 Sun Feb 2, 14 Mon Feb 3, 14 Tue Feb 4, 14 Wed Feb 5, 14 Date 3.6 ft. 12:54 AM 3.7 ft. 1:44 AM 3.6 ft. 2:32 AM 3.4 ft. 3:19 AM 3.1 ft. 4:06 AM 2.7 ft. 4:56 AM 2.3 ft. 5:53 AM High -1.4 ft. 7:49 AM -1.2 ft. 8:29 AM -0.9 ft. 9:07 AM -0.5 ft. 9:42 AM -0.0 ft. 10:14 AM 0.5 ft. 10:44 AM 0.9 ft. 11:13 AM Low 3.3 ft. 2:13 PM 3.4 ft. 2:48 PM 3.4 ft. 3:21 PM 3.3 ft. 3:52 PM 3.3 ft. 4:21 PM 3.2 ft. 4:50 PM 3.0 ft. 5:21 PM High 0.6 ft. 7:45 PM 0.3 ft. 8:31 PM 0.1 ft. 9:16 PM -0.0 ft. 10:01 PM -0.0 ft. 10:49 PM 0.1 ft. 11:43 PM Low Thu Jan 30, 14 Fri Jan 31, 14 Sat Feb 1, 14 Sun Feb 2, 14 Mon Feb 3, 14 Tue Feb 4, 14 Wed Feb 5, 14 Date 2.5 ft. 1:03 AM 2.4 ft. 2:02 AM 2.3 ft. 2:59 AM 2.0 ft. 3:57 AM 1.8 ft. 5:00 AM 1.5 ft. 6:13 AM High -0.9 ft. 7:30 AM -0.8 ft. 8:10 AM -0.5 ft. 8:46 AM -0.3 ft. 9:18 AM 0.0 ft. 9:48 AM 0.3 ft. 10:15 AM 0.6 ft. 10:42 AM Low 1.9 ft. 3:10 PM 1.9 ft. 3:33 PM 1.9 ft. 3:54 PM 2.0 ft. 4:15 PM 2.0 ft. 4:38 PM 2.1 ft. 5:03 PM 2.2 ft. 5:32 PM High 1.0 ft. 6:58 PM 0.8 ft. 7:47 PM 0.5 ft. 8:37 PM 0.4 ft. 9:29 PM 0.2 ft. 10:25 PM 0.1 ft. 11:30 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJan. 30 Feb. 5First Feb. 6 Full Feb. 14 Last Feb. 22 New Jan. 3012:06 am-2:06 am 12:36 pm-2:36 pm 6:56 am-7:56 am 6:18 pm-7:18 pm 1:05 am-3:05 am 1:33 pm-3:33 pm 7:44 am-8:44 am 7:27 pm-8:27 pm 2:01 am-4:01 am 2:29 pm-4:29 pm 8:28 am-9:28 am 8:33 pm-9:33 pm 2:56 am-4:56 am 3:22 pm-5:22 pm 9:10 am-10:10 am 9:38 pm-10:38 pm 3:44 am-5:44 am 4:13 pm-6:13 pm 9:50 am-10:50 am 10:40 pm-11:40 pm 4:39 am-6:39 am 5:03 pm-7:03 pm 10:29 am-11:29 am 11:41 pm-12:41 am 5:28 am-7:28 am 5:53 pm-7:53 pm 11:10 am-12:10 pm --:-----:-Best Better Better Average Average Average Average7:28 am 6:12 pm 6:57 am 6:19 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:28 am 6:13 pm 7:45 am 7:27 pm 7:27 am 6:14 pm 8:29 am 8:34 pm 7:26 am 6:15 pm 9:11 am 9:39 pm 7:26 am 6:16 pm 9:51 am 10:41 pm 7:25 am 6:16 pm 10:31 am 11:42 pm 7:25 am 6:17 pm 11:11 am --:--5% 3% 11% 19% 26% 33% 40%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Division Vice Commander T.J. Del Bello. First woman completes circumnavigational paddling trailJodi Eller is the11th person to complete the trail. PHOTO BY MATT KEENE/DEP

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 13ABy BILL McLEANSpecial to The NewsSome of you may remember the article I wrote in The Wakulla News on July 19, 2012, about my search for information on an old paddle-wheel boat on the Ochlockonee River. The following story tells how I solved the mystery. In 1948, my grandfather, Vernon Brabham, built a house on the Ochlockonee River in North Florida, as a vacation home and my family started going to the River on weekends and summer vacations. When we rst started going to the river, there was an old paddlewheel boat that was abandoned next to the U.S. 319 Highway Bridge, on the Franklin County side of the river. Even though the boat was sunken, the upper part of the boat was in fair condition. The paddle-wheel was intact and the cabins were existing. About 1959, my older brother and I were taking my mother for a boat ride, and she wanted to see the paddlewheel boat. There were windows on the side of the old boat, and we pulled alongside so she could see in the boat. The rst thing she saw was a painting on one of the interior walls and she asked if we could cut out the boards and save the painting. We were able to saw the painting out of the boat and my mother had it framed. After finding the painting, my grandfather asked around Sopchoppy about the history of the boat, and was told the owner abandoned the boat about 1930, walked away and never came back. He was also told the owner was of German descent, and after some period of time, people removed anything of value and it has been there ever since. This is all we were able to nd out about the boat. That was over 50 years ago and since then the boat has continued to rot away until all that is left are the ribs. I retired in 2009 and in 2010 I started looking for information about the boat, hoping to nd a picture, and information about the owner, who I assumed was the artist. RESEARCHING THE MYSTERY For the next three and a half years, I ran into a lot of dead-end clues, and I spent a lot of time searching that did not turn up anything of value. So, I condensed my research into only what I thought was important for this story. I interviewed more than 20 people in Wakulla, Franklin, and Leon counties, and I talked to over 70 people by phone, looking for information about the boat. Most were in Wakulla County or Franklin County, but I also talked to people in Washington, D.C., Maine, and Washington State. I made many trips from my home in Moultrie, Ga. to Crawfordville, to go to the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum, the Wakulla County Courthouse, and the Wakulla County Library to do research. I also made trips to the Franklin County Library, Franklin County Courthouse, Apalachicola Maritime Museum, Camp Gordon Johnston Museum and the Carrabelle History Museum. I made trips to the Florida State Archives in Tallahassee and the Leon County Library. All together, I made over 50 trips I can remember. When I tried to locate people to interview, most of the people who might have known something about the boat in the 1930s, were already dead. So this limited the number of people that could help. I rst started looking for people who lived in McIntyre and Curtis Mills. McIntyre was a sawmill community on the Franklin County side of the Ochlockonee River. Curtis Mills was also a sawmill community, but on the Wakulla County side of the river. Both of these communties were near the location of the paddle-wheel boat. In addition to these communities, I also interviewed people in Sopchoppy, Panacea, Medart, Crawfordville, Apalachicola, Carrabelle and Tallahassee. One of the rst clues I heard was the boat owners name was Dierdorff, which is a German name. I found out it has also been Americanized to Deerdorff and Deardorff. Another clue that several people mentioned was the owner was from up north, I took this to mean that the owner probably had a German or Yankee accent. The next clue that helped was when I interviewed Mildred Sanders Willis. She told me that, in 1937, when she and her husband were courting, they would drive over the Ochlockonee River Bridge and there would be a man standing on the paddlewheel boat. She thought he lived on the boat. We had originally been told in 1959 that the boat had been abandoned about 1930, but she was positive about the date because it was before they were married in 1938. The next person to give me good clues was Charles Smith, who lived on the dirt road that went to Breakaway Lodge, which was very close to the location of the paddlewheel boat. He told me he thought the paddlewheel boat showed up about 1936 or 1937. He also said the owners name was Dierdorff, and he thought he came from up north. He then told me the owners wife and two young daughters also lived on the boat. This was the rst time I had ever heard there was a family who lived on the boat, and the date, 1936-1937, agreed with what I had been told by Mrs. Willis. With this new information, I started looking for people with the name Dierdorff. I wrote to people named Dierdorff. I called people with the name Dierdorff, and I contacted people by email with the name Dierdorff. None of my searching turned up anything of value. In August 2013, I had exhausted almost all of my leads in Wakulla County, but I am still trying to locate Marilu Patton. She is J.P. Pattons granddaughter. J.P. Patton owned a store in Wakulla County just across the river from where the paddlewheel boat was located. A GOOD LEAD I was looking at the 1935 Florida Census in Wakulla County, for J.P. Pattons family, when I noticed lower on the page the name C.D. Deerdorle. He had two daughters, Marjorie and Wanda. When I saw this, I thought this is mighty close to the name Deerdorff and they have two young daughters. Then I noticed they were born in Indiana, which is de nitely up north and the fathers occupation is a painter, and I am looking for an artist. Wow, could this be who I have been looking for? So now I start looking for C.D. Deerdorle in Florida and Indiana without any luck. Then I looked for C.D. Deerdorff, again without any luck. Then I decided the youngest daughter Wanda, would be the most likely to be alive, so I looked for Wanda Deerdorle, Wanda Deerdorff and nally, Wanda Deardorff and I got lucky.Turn to Next PageThe mystery boat on the Ochlockonee RiverAn area historian tracks down the story of the mural on the abandoned boat SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBill McLean and his brother cut this mural off the inside of the abandoned paddlewheel boat on the Ochlockonee River in 1959. The mystery of the boats origins and the artist interested him ever since. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! 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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comFrom previous pageI found an obituary where Wanda Deardorff died in 2012 in Indiana. The obituary listed her father as Charles Deardorff, her mother as Sylvia Deardorff and it listed two surviving sisters, Lona of Delphi, Ind., and Marjorie of Wolcott, Ind. So I started looking for Marjorie Deardorff in Wolcott, Ind., but I could not nd a phone number for her. Then I looked for Lona Deardorff, in Delphi, Ind. I nally found a phone number and called and left a message on her recorder. That night about 7:30, she called and wanted to know what this was about. I asked her if her daddy was Charles Deardorff and she said yes. I asked her if she had a sister Marjorie and a sister Wanda, who had passed away in 2012 and she said she did. Next I asked her if she knew if they ever lived in Florida in the 1930s and she said yes, they lived in Florida before she was born. Then I asked if she knew if they ever lived on a boat in Florida and she said yes, it was the Ed Ryan Hayes and I have a picture of the boat on my wall. I could not believe what I was hearing, finally, after several years of searching, I had solved the mystery and for the first time I knew the name of the boat. Then I asked about her father being a painter and was he an artist? She said that he made his living as a sign painter, but that he was also an artist. Then I told her why I had been looking for her family and about the painting on the paddlewheel boat and how long I had been searching. She was excited to learn the story and asked me to please send her a picture of the painting. Next, I asked about her older sister Marjorie, was she still alive? She said Marjorie was 86 years old, lives in Wolcott, Ind., and was still sharp as a tack. I asked when would be a good time to call Marjorie, and she said right now and gave me her phone number. When I called Marjorie and told her who I was and why I was calling, she could not believe that anybody knew anything about that boat and could nd her after 76 years. I started asking questions about her family and how they ended up on the Ochlockonee River in North Florida, living in a paddlewheel boat and she started to tell me the story. THE STORY OF THE PADDLEWHEEL BOAT Marjorie said they lived in Indiana and her daddy, Charles Deardorff, did not like cold weather, so their family went to Florida in a car house, which she described as a camper built on the back of an old car. They were living in the car house in Wakulla County, near the Ochlockonee River Bridge in the spring of 1935 (where I found them in the Florida Census). She told me that one day they were driving along the coast, and her daddy saw a sunken boat in Ochlockonee Bay that was only exposed at low tide. When the tide would come in, the boat would be completely covered with water. So her daddy waded out to the boat and scraped the mud and sand away from the hull and determined that the boards were still in good condition. This was an open hull boat without any deck, and every time the tide would go out, the boat would be full of water. Her daddy drilled some holes in the side to allow the water to drain out when the tide went out. He would then clean out the sand and mud and would caulk the bottom of the boat each time the tide went out. When he finally got the boat re-caulked, he repaired the holes in the side and was able to get the boat oating. He then had somebody tow the boat up river to the bridge between Sopchoppy and Carrabelle. There were no cabins, so he started building cabins so they could live on the boat. Her daddy worked on the boat until they could live on the boat and move out of the car house. He also added the paddlewheel. He did all of this with only hand tools. They lived on the boat in 1935, 1936 and 1937. He never completed the construction on the boat before they decided to go back home in late 1937 and they never returned. Marjorie told me Ed Ryan Hayes was the name on the boat when they found it, and her daddy never changed the name. Before we hung up, I promised to send her a picture of the painting from the paddlewheel boat, and she promised to send me a picture of the Ed Ryan Hayes. Now I knew the history of the paddlewheel boat, how it arrived at the Ochlockonee River Bridge and who the artist was that painted the scene in the boat. The date was Aug. 29, 2013. SEARCH FOR MORE INFORMATION Now that I knew the name of the boat, I found more information. The boat was built in 1913 (100 years ago) in Apalachicola. It was 50.4 feet long and 15.6 feet wide and the depth of the hull was 3 feet. It was used for freight and had a crew of two in addition to the captain. It was built with a 16 horsepower gas engine with twin screw propellers. So it was never operated as a paddlewheel boat, like I had always believed. I was able to determine that the boat was licensed from 1913 through 1924, and was Abandoned in 1925. Now I wanted to nd out who Ed Ryan Hayes was, and what the boat was used for in 1913. Since I now knew the name of the boat, I contacted the National Archives in Atlanta and Washington, D.C., to see if they could locate any of cial documents issued to the Ed Ryan Hayes. In less than two weeks, I heard from both of these agencies. They located the Master Carpenters Certificate, which indicated the boat was built by Samuel J. Johnson. He built the Ed Ryan Hays for the Oliver Turpentine Company. The owners of the vessel, were Homer L. Oliver, Nicholas R. Hays and George M. Counts. All of the documents that had been discovered by the National Archives have the boat name spelled Ed Ryan Hays instead of Ed Ryan Hayes which is the way Marjorie Deardorff thought it was spelled. So, who is Ed Ryan Hays and who are Homer L. Oliver, Nicholas R. Hays and George M. Counts that owned the Oliver Turpentine Company? I then called Mark Curenton, who I had met in Apalachicola recently. Mark is interested in Apalachicola history and I thought he might be able to help. I told Mark, the name of the boat was Ed Ryan Hays and the owner was the Oliver Turpentine Company from Apalachicola. The company was owned by Homer L. Oliver, Nicholas R. Hays and George M. Counts. Would he see if he could nd any information about these men. In a few days, I had a letter from Mark, he did some research in the Franklin County records and found the three men had been associated with the Island Turpentine Company. Apparently, they had changed the name from Oliver Turpentine Company, to Island Turpentine Company and had a lease to turpentine the trees on St. George Island. Mark also sent me a copy of the 1910 Federal Census in Apalachicola, that showed Homer L. Oliver was living in a boarding house owned by William H. Gibson. There was also a daughter, Annie Gibson Hays, 27, who was a widow, and her son, Edward Hays, who was 2, living in the boarding house. When I saw this, I immediately thought Homer L. Oliver must have named the boat after her son, Edward Hays. I bet his middle name was Ryan. About two weeks earlier, I ordered a book called Images of America, Apalachicola, hoping I might nd a picture of Oliver Turpentine Company. It arrived the next day. It turned out that this book answered a lot of my questions. On the front cover of the book is a man driving a 1915 Buick. The driver is Homer L. Oliver. There was a picture of Edward Ryan Hays as a grown man. There was also a picture of Kathleen Reams, who married Edward Ryan Hays in 1933, and a picture of Patsy Hays, their daughter who lived in Apalachicola. There was a picture of Annie Gibson Hays, Ed Ryan Hays mother. Near the back of the book was a picture of the Franklin Hotel, which Annie Gibson Hays and her sister, Sunshine Gibson, bought in 1923 and renamed the Gibson Hotel. There was also a picture of Samuel J. Johnson, the man that built the Ed Ryan Hays. This book was full of pictures and information I needed. The next day I called Mark Curenton and told him I found out who Ed Ryan Hays was and that he had a daughter, Patsy Hays, who lives in Apalachicola, did he know her? He said he did, and looked up her phone number for me. That afternoon I tried to call Patsy and she was not home, so I left a message and asked her to please return my call. That night when she returned my call, I started telling her my story about the painting, the paddlewheel boat, the family in Indiana, and how the trail led me to her in Apalachicola. She was very interested in my story and we talked for almost an hour. She did not know Homer Oliver had the boat built and named it for her daddy, when he was 5 years old. She also did not know Homer Oliver lived in the boarding house owned by her greatgrandparents. She knew about Nicholas Hays and George Counts. Nicholas Hays moved to Apalachicola from South Carolina shortly after 1900. He had a younger sister, Addys Hays, who came to visit him in Apalachicola and she stayed for awhile and became good friends with Annie Gibson. About 1904, Addys invited Annie to go to South Carolina with her to visit her family. In South Carolina she met Addys brother, Alfred Gordon Hays, and they fell in love. They were married in Apalachicola in 1905 and moved to South Carolina. Her daddy, Edward Ryan Hays, was born in July 1907. In September 1909, Alfred Gordon Hays died of an apparent heart attack when his son was only 2 years old. By 1910, Annie and two year old son Edward, moved back to Apalachicola to be with family and were living in the boarding house owned by her parents. About 1923, Annie Gibson Hays and her sister, Sunshine, bought the Franklin Hotel and renamed it the Gibson Hotel. Edward Ryan Hays helped run the Gibson Hotel. In 1933, he married Kathleen Reams and they had a daughter, who I had been talking to for the past hour. This pretty much answered all of my questions about the family, but before I hung up, I asked her, where in South Carolina her grandfather lived, and she said, Bamberg. Bamberg! That is where all my ancestors on my mothers side of our family are from I could not believe my ears. I told Patsy I have a lot of information about Bamberg, and would start digging into it as soon as possible. BAMBERG, SOUTH CAROLINA My grandfather was Vernon Brabham, he was born in Bamberg, S.C. in 1883, and built the vacation house on the Ochlockonee River in 1948 that got all of this started. His father was Henry Jasper Brabham who was born in 1843 and lived until 1912 in Bamberg. Edward Ryan Hays grandfather, Major Edward Ryan Hays, was born in 1836 and died in 1906 in Bamberg. Major Hays was married to Hibernia Cooner and they had eight children, four of whom play a part in this story. One of their daughters, Maggie Hays, married George M. Counts, and they had a son, George M. Counts Jr., who was born in 1889 and would move to Apalachicola in 1906. He is Ed Ryan Hays rst cousin and would become one of the owners of the Island Turpentine Company. Nicholas R. Hays was born about 1870 and moved to Apalachicola in 1900 and would also become one of the owners of the Island Turpentine Company. He was Ed Ryan Hays uncle. Alfred Gordon Hays is the youngest son and was born in 1874 in Bamberg. He would marry Annie Gibson and they would have a son, Edward Ryan Hays, named after his grandfather. Addys Hays is the youngest daughter and was born in Bamberg in 1881. She became friends with Annie Gibson and introduced Annie to her brother Alfred Gordon Hays. I was also able to nd connections between Henry Jasper Brabham, my great-grandfather and Major Edward Ryan Hays, Patsy Hays greatgrandfather. They had both been in the mercantile business in Bamberg, they had both been associated with the Bamberg Banking Company and the Bamberg Cotton Mill. Both played a big part in the forming of Bamberg County when it was created in 1897 and both of them had been Mayor of Bamberg. After locating the information about the Hays family and the Brabham family in Bamberg, I called Patsy Hays and set up a time when I could come visit. My wife and I went to Apalachicola to visit Patsy on Oct. 2, 2013. I carried her copies of everything I located about her family. I also gave her a copy of the painting that we removed from the paddle-wheel boat and copies of all of the information from the National Archives about the Ed Ryan Hays. We had a great visit talking and going over the information I brought and looking at her family pictures. Marjorie Deardorff sent me the picture of the Ed Ryan Hays that was taken in 1936 when they lived on the boat. I have also received copies of two other paintings that were painted by her father. I sent her a copy of the painting that we removed from the paddle-wheel boat and copies of everything I discovered about the boat and the Ed Ryan Hays family. We talk by phone on a regular basis and I hope to go to Indiana to meet her someday.Bill McLean lives in Moultrie, Ga. He can be reached at (229) 941-5127. e mystery boat on the Ochlockonee River PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Ed Ryan Hays in 1936, at right, and all that remains of it today, above, on the banks of the Ochlockonee River.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 15Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Friday, Jan. 17, Fabian Miller of Monticello reported shots being red near the corner of Ashley Hall Road and Bob Miller Road. The complainant reported hearing three gunshots as he traveled through the intersection. He noted that he heard the bullets hit the trees near him. A witness also reported hearing the shots. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of- ce:THURSDAY, JAN. 16 Christy N. Hay of Crawfordville and Shirley P. West of Crawfordville were involved in a minor traf c crash at McDonalds restaurant. There were no injuries. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated.FRIDAY, JAN. 17 Willie Mae Rosier of Crawfordville reported a structure re. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Adam Pendris responded to the stove re. Deputy Kromer grabbed his re extinguisher and entered the home extinguishing the fire behind the oven. Wakulla Fire Rescue arrived on scene and cleared the home of smoke. The victim and her family were cleared to return to the home. There was minor smoke and electrical damage reported. David Williams of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of an electronic game system. A suspect has been identi ed. The equipment is valued at $200. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. Deputy Roy Gunnerson conducted a traf c stop due to faulty equipment. Deputy Gunnerson discovered William David Chadwell, 29, of Crawfordville did not possess a valid driver license. Chadwell was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction. The motorist had four prior suspensions for DWLSR and is a habitual traf c offender. Lt. Jimmy Sessor also investigated. Kay M. Small of Crawfordville reported a vehicle re. Deputy Jeff Yarbrough and Deputy Stephen Simmons arrived at Highway 267 and Wakulla Springs Highway and observed a vehicle fully engulfed in ames on the eastbound shoulder. The victim pulled off the road after observing smoke coming from the vehicle but was not able to contain the ames. Wakulla Fire ghters put out the re but the vehicle was destroyed. A leaf blower and tools inside the van were also destroyed. They were valued at $700. The re was ruled accidental.SATURDAY, JAN. 18 Eugene Freeman of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. An air compressor and two nail guns were reported stolen from the victim. The equipment was taken by a suspect who has been identi ed. It is valued at $1,300. Jason Conway Sousa, 31, of Crawfordville was developed as a suspect in the case and Deputy Gibby Gibson observed Sousa while performing a business check at a gas station. Sousa told Deputy Gibson that the air compressor was located at a Tallahassee pawn shop after he pawned it. Sousa was arrested and charged with grand theft. The compressor was recovered and the nail guns were later discovered by the victim in a work trailer.SUNDAY, JAN. 19 Tamera Nichols of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported that someone entered her unsecured vehicle and removed a childs car seat. The seat was valued at $50. Evidence was collected at the scene. Later in the day the victim contacted Deputy Gibby Gibson that the car seat had been located off Spring Creek Highway at Cayuse Drive. The seat was discovered just off the highway.MONDAY, JAN. 20 Michael Nalley of St. Marks reported a boat burglary. The victim observed trash and beer cans inside the vessel. A piece of jewelry was also discovered as missing. It was valued at $1,500. Other property not belonging to the victim was also found on the vessel. A suspect returned to the vessel during Deputy Vicki Mitchells investigation. Shelly Renee Martin, 42, of Port St. Joe took Deputy Mitchell to Daniel Cory Logan, 33, of St. Marks where Logan was questioned. Logan was arrested and charged with burglary and grand theft while Martin was charged with trespassing. The missing jewelry was pawned at a shop in Woodville by Logan. Deborah Paul of Crawfordville reported the theft of a camper shell from her property. The camper shell is valued at $300. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated.TUESDAY, JAN. 21 A resident of Harvey-Melton Road in Crawfordville reported a suspicious vehicle on her property. Lt. Sherrell Morrison responded and observed three people ee from the vehicle. Deputy Adam Pendris and Deputy Richard Moon also responded and ordered the individuals to stop running. James Arthur Farmer, Jr., 43, of Crawfordville gave himself up to deputies. A short time later, Morgan Michelle Lawrence, 20, of Crawfordville and Haylee Brooke Warrick, 18, of Crawfordville were located by Lt. Morrison. Lawrence was allegedly found to be in possession of .05 of a gram of marijuana. All three subjects were arrested and charged with resisting arrest without violence and Lawrence was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated along with the Florida Highway Patrol. Rebecca Davis of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed 14 unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges were created at a convenience store in Hernando County. The charges totaled $1,441. The case was forwarded to the Hernando County Sheriffs Of ce. Sgt. Ray Johnson and Detective Matt Helms investigated. Tammie Nason of Southeast Eye Specialists reported finding a small baggie with a white powdery substance on the oor of the facility. The substance weighed .04 of a gram and was seized for destruction. It was consistent with cocaine. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Nina Ashley of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traf c crash involving a deer. The victims vehicle suffered $1,000 worth of damage but no injuries were reported. Deputy David Pienta investigated. Joey Wimberly of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims home while he was away. The victim reported the theft of medications and $60. Damage inside the home was estimated at $200. Food was observed as eaten inside the residence. Deputy Adam Pendris and Deputy Richard Moon investigated.WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22 Casey Ryan Stelly, 23, of Sopchoppy was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana from inside his vehicle. A traffic stop was conducted for a faulty piece of equipment and failure to maintain a single lane. Deputies smelled the strong odor of marijuana and searched the vehicle. A bag of marijuana was allegedly discovered inside the vehicle. The marijuana weighed nine grams. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks, Deputy Matthew Hedges, Deputy Adam Pendris and Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Vicki Anderson of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported that someone attempted to use her Social Security number to collect unemployment from a previous employer. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Vito Knowles of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag. The tag was removed from the victims trailer. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Deputy Ross Hasty and Deputy Gibby Gibson responded to a call for a vehicle crashing into a tree at Highway 267 and Wakulla Springs Highway. Kevin Edward Parker, 49, of Crawfordville admitted to driving the vehicle and not having a valid driver license. The deputies noticed that the tag on the vehicle was assigned to another vehicle. Parker was charged with attached tag not assigned and knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license suspended or revoked. There were no injuries and damage was estimated at less than $1,000. Merritt Taylor of Panacea reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of medications from his home. Suspects have been identified. The medications are valued at $390. Capt. Chris Savary and Capt. Randall Taylor investigated. Kenrick Adams of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A washing machine, dryer, trampoline and oven were removed from the victims property. The property is valued at $1,048. The victim also reported the theft of a relatives van from the property. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Sgt. Billy Jones investigated a report of a 3-year-old child being run over by a vehicle in Crawfordville. The child was struck by a vehicle that was backing up on a Crawfordville property. The child was transported to Capital Regional Medical Center for treatment and was later released. Sgt. Jones had contact with the child who appeared in good health. Contact was made with the Department of Children and Families to conduct an investigation and the Florida Highway Patrol was contacted regarding the unreported traf c incident. Marcia Springsteen of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on her bank account from a supermarket in Fayette, Ga. The charge was for $120. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 978 calls for service during the past week including 17 business and residential alarms; 63 citizen contacts; 15 E-911 abandoned cell calls; one E-911 abandoned call; 30 E-911 calls; 39 investigations; 37 medical emergencies; 30 school security checks; 365 business and residential security checks; 19 special details; 12 suspicious vehicles; 10 thefts; 34 traffic enforcements; 117 traf c stops; and 13 wanted people. 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Being repulsive is not normally an enviable quality. All it guarantees is rejection, rebuff and isolation from any and all who would wander into close proximity. History and Hollywood are replete with stories of the unlucky who, despite many other ne qualities, were repellant to the population at large. Included in this list were monsters, nonconformists and miscreants who possessed at least one vile or hideous trait which was generally perceived as insurmountable. Wakulla County has its own candidate for repellent champion. The native Southern Red Cedar and its lumber are high on the list with some local insect residents as a reason to stay away. The Southern Red Cedar is a common and rarely noticed juniper, at least by the areas human residents. It grows wild in forested areas and is occasionally used as a landscape specimen or windbreak. There are other cedars and members of the juniper family which have been transplanted into the area, including the closely related Eastern Red Cedar. All have been used as landscape enhancements. For the areas moth population, the presence of cedar is a story with an unhappy ending. Southern Red Cedar lumber or shavings is the only natural, native reason to find other lodgings, but many of the non-native junipers produce the compound cedrol which wards off insects. The annals of history do not identify the person who first realized cedar wood is bad news for moths. No doubt it was someone who had a wool sweater and was weary of local moths preference for this textile. The discovery proved popular and created a niche furniture industry. Cedar chest, cedar lined closets and bags of cedar shavings all were used to eliminate moth damage and add the sweet scent to the woolens. Wool was an important addition to any cool season wardrobe because it is the only natural textile which can get wet and keep the wearer warm at the same time. Unfortunately, cedar could not withstand the rigors of sea travel and saltwater. In the days before synthetic moth repellants, sea chests were made from camphor wood. This native of southeast Asia did withstand exposure to seawater and repel moths, but with a very distinct and strong odor. Another insect pest which is susceptible to cedar is the carpet beetle. Like moths, they have a distinct preference for wool products, but will consume a number of other animal derived items used in upholstery, clothing or oor coverings. The newly hatched larvae will die upon exposure to cedar, but mature insects are only repelled. Additionally, the cedar must be fresh to work effectively. The development of manmade repellants and synthetic textiles in the 20th century dramatically lessened the demand for cedar as a timber product. Still they have an important function in Wakulla Countys environment.The native Hairstreak butterflies are dependent on southern red cedar as a food source. Birds and a variety of wildlife species utilize the cedar berries as a seasonal food source. Even the occasional ornamental pest, bagworms, will shelter in and dine on southern red cedar foliage. To learn more about Southern Red Cedar and its uses in Wakulla County, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County website at http://wakulla.ifas. u .edu or call 850-9263931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931. Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comCedars are bad news for moths Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRed cedar is a natural pest repellant. Live Well. Choose Well. 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Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 $ 6$ 6 JUST JUST 3 MO. FOR 3 MO. FOR Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:P.O Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 1-877-401-6408TheWakullaNews.comThe Wakulla newsExp: 02/28/2014 Promo Code: LOVESavings apply to NEW Wakulla County subscriptions only.Please accept my new 3 Month subscription at the price of $6 By MICHELLE HUNTEROf the Senior Center It wouldnt be Christmas morning without hot chocolate, Christmas music, gifts and everyone in their pajamas. As Santa entered the room he was greeted by the seniors and staff in their pajamas, and felt right at home. The theme for Decembers party was Christmas Morning with Santa, and we all felt like children again. The Pickin and Grinnin Band played Christmas music, the guest enjoyed hot chocolate, breakfast breads and Christmas cookies, and there were many gifts shared with everyone. Bruce Ashley, of the Wakulla Sheriffs Department, and board members from the Wakulla Senior Center gave stuffed animals and toys to all of seniors and guest at the center. The toys were provided by the WCSO. Because so many went to great efforts to wear pajamas that day, we awarded gift cards to those that wore the most unique, unusual, funny, tacky, pretty, and homemade. This was the one day we could wear our pajamas in public and get some good laughs, and have great fun also. Our Naughty and Nice elves in the kitchen, Glenda and Wendy, got the OK from Santa that they would both be getting presents for Christmas. They served up a delicious turkey dinner with all the xins, and pie for desert to 125 guests, staff and board members. During the Christmas holidays the center is lled with music and dancing to entertain us all. Turn to Page 3B Everyone who has ever heard a preacher preach about crossing old Jordan knows he/she is talking about death. I began wondering is it possible to cheat the river? The question is paradoxical and what I mean is the answer is yes and no! We begin to die the moment life is given inside the womb! Prenatal care is medical science that improves life for the yet unborn. So before birth and even at birth we gain the health bene ts of the modern world. America is a country that dispenses good health and longer life spans in unequaled doses depending on where, when, and how a person enters it or grows up. If you want to live longer, genetics are very important. Unfortunately, a fetus cannot choose its parents, but if it could a longer life span would nearly be guaranteed. Our bodies and minds hold up better as we age from those who gifted life to us (mom and dad). The stress of our surroundings as we come into the world and grow up, and the lifestyle choices we make or are forced to make (depression days) can determine length or haste of a lifespan. How mothers treat babies in the womb makes a difference in how well they grow into senior citizens later in life. Scientists state that the period before birth and during infancy is a window of opportunity when genes can be programmed for good (or ill) health through epigenetics according to Alan Jones of the University College Londons Institute for Child Health. Epigenetics is the delicate interplay of genes and the environment and has a bearing on the whole of a persons life. (Epigenetics: the study of heritable changes in gene function that do not involve changes in DNA sequence). Turn to Page 3B Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $34 per year in Wakulla County $46 per year in Florida $49 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Cant Cant access access The The Wakulla Wakulla news ews online online content? content? Subscribe Subscribe today and today and get full get full access! access! THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director Cheating the River Jordan SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe staff of the Senior Center in their pajamas for a Christmas party with Santa Claus.In December, seniors celebrated Christmas with a party, a turkey dinner, and lots of music NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 Prices Good Through January850926-32121.75LSEGRAMS VO $ 21 99 S $ $ 1.75LSEGRAMS 7 $ 19 99 S 750MLCOURVOISIERVS $ 19 99 C $ $ C 1.75LCOURVOISIERVS $ 39 99 R 9 9 C O $ $ BUD OR BUD LIGHT24PKBO TT LES O R CAN S 24 C AN S 24 P K K B O TT L E S O R C AN S $ 19 991.75L GIFTCAPTAIN MORGAN W/COKE $ 22 99 R R 9 9 9 9 C C M M M M $ $ $ $ As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. 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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 thewakullanews.comClubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Jan. 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Jan. 31 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.Saturday, Feb. 1 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Feb. 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Feb. 3 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Feb. 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post at 475 Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please.Wednesday, Feb. 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Biweekly & monthly meetings and eventsTuesday, Feb. 11, 25 FOOD BANK is open every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at the Seventh-Day Adventist Church located at 107 Shadeville Road from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.Saturday, Mar. 1 NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will hold its regular meeting beginning at 11 a.m. at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe on Feb. 1. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Special EventsSaturday, Feb. 1 USED BOOK SALE hosted by the Friends of the Library will take place from 9 a.m. until noon at the Public Library. Browse thousands of titles and make a donation to the Friends. NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will hold its regular meeting beginning at 11 a.m. at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe on Feb. 1. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don or Barbara Lanier at 7297594, or email bardon56@aol.com.Tuesday, Feb. 4 DISCOVERY PLACE SEMINAR for parents of middle school children with an emphasis on discovering a new view and attitude regarding the traits of ADHD. Attend the seminar to learn how to help your child discover how to put the brakes on his Ferrari brain. This seminar will take place on each of the four Tuesdays in February. Please call Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW at (850) 926-2039 and/or email Catherine Harris Small, Ms.Ed.S/MSW at ms.catherapy@gmail.com for location and fee information. PANHANDLE ARCHAELOGICAL MEETING will take place at at 7 p.m. located at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Gov. Martin House, 1001 De Soto Park Dr. in Tallahassee. Bob Hurst will present In Search of Floridas Royal Road, El Camino Real. Please call (850) 245-6444 for more details.Upcoming EventsFriday, Feb. 7 SENIOR EXEMPTION ASSISTANCE will be available at the senior center every Friday in February from 10 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. Wakulla County Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkmans staff will be there to educateand assist with senior exemption and any other exemptions which they may qualify for. Saturday, Feb. 8 VALENTINES DAY CELEBRATION will be hosted by the Rotary Club of Wakulla and will include another 5K Cupid Dash and Sweetheart Parade. Start the day with the 2nd Annual 5K Cupid Dash & 1 Mile Fit for Love Walk and then watch the parade beginning at 10 a.m. Also be sure to visit our many vendors including arts & crafts and food. There will be entertainment beginning at 11 a.m. and a drawing for a cash prize of $1000 at 3 p.m. There is still space for vendors and parade participants applications can be obtained by contacting wakullavalentine@gmail.com. For more information on registering for the 5K or to become a sponsor and have your name on our t-shirts, contact Jo Ann Palmer at 7282072. Wednesday, Feb. 12 WCSO BLOOD DRIVE will be held with Oneblood from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. in the WCSO parking area. All donors will receive a free T-shirt and a wellness check-up including blood pressure, iron count and cholesterol screening. Participants may register in advance by contacting WCSO PIO Keith Blackmar at (850) 745-7110 or kblackmar@ wcso.org. Appointments are not required and walks-ins are welcome. Saturday, Feb. 15 SPRINGS SWEETHEART SERENADE hosted by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park will kick off with the rst of three events at the Wakulla Springs Lodge beginning at 5:30 p.m. The event will include a romantic boat cruise, dinner and entertainment with the Dorian Q Jazz Quartet. Cost is $25 per person. Because the event is limited to 125 people, advance ticket purchases are strongly advised at wakullasprings.org. Monday, Feb. 17 DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB will be holding their next meeting starting at 6 p.m. at Beef OBradys in Crawfordville. The club will be nalizing plans for the upcoming Girls Nite Out Health Fair to bene t Wakulla Relay for Life. All Democrats are welcome to attend. Any questions, please contact Diane Wilson, President Wakulla DWC at 984-4768 or by emailing dwilson.1947@gmail.com. Jan 30 Feb 6 3rd-5th GRADE AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM Community Center 4 p.m. 5 p.m. AARP FREE TAX PREP PROGRAM Public Library 9 a.m. 12:30 p.m. BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA Public Library 9 a.m. MIDDLE SCHOOL PROGRAM Community Center 4 p.m. 5:30 p.m.ThursdaySaturdaySaturdayThursday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akulla Government MeetingsMonday, Feb. 3 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop regarding the countys mobile food vendor ordinance beginning at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a special meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Welcome Center in Panacea. Tuesday, Feb. 4 HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the BOCC Administration Conference room. Monday, Feb. 10 PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a public meeting beginning at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, Feb. 12 CODE ENFORCEMENT will hold a public meeting beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. Email your community events to amayor@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to amayor@thewakullanews.net BUSY SATURDAY PLANNED AT WCPL! On Saturday, Feb. 1 from 9 a.m. until noon we have two big events planned at the Library! First will be our rst Book Extravaganza Fundraiser of 2014. As always therell be thousands of books, video, and audio available for your browsing pleasure. All funds raised go directly to the Friends of the Library and stay in house to help support our Summer Programs, book budget, planned Teen Room expansion, as well as other library needs. With the help of these fundraisers, the Friends have saved the taxpayers of Wakulla County over $80,000 the past 5 years so please come out and continue to support YOUR library! The Friends also have some neat fundraising planned in the works to please keep an eye on them at community events like the upcoming St. Valentines and St Patricks events. Secondly, the AARP begins their annual Free Tax Preparation program from 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. in our Computer Lab. This program will run each Thursday and Saturday from 9 a.m. until 12:30 p.m. during tax season. It is intended for low to middle income lers with special attention paid to senior citizens. This is a rst come rst served program so please be prepared for wait. Because of these two programs running at the same time we ask for your patience and understanding as parking may be an issue Saturday morning. COMPUTER CLASSES UNDERWAY SOON! The new schedule of computer classes is now available on our website and at the front desk! From late this month through early March, well be offering classes on Computer Basics, iPad, Digital Photography, computer tutoring, and more! You can sign up for these free classes by coming by the front desk or by giving us a call. Classes must me signed up for beforehand to avoid cancellation and overcrowding. Please take advantage of these free opportunities to brush-up on your skills or learn new things! WCPL AT THE COMMUNITY CENTER As mentioned in past weeks, we, at WCPL are now offering weekly after school programs at the Wakulla County Community Center. In conjunction with the One Stop Program initiated by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, were offering a 3rd -5th grade program on Jan. 30 from 4 p.m. until 5 p.m. and a middle school program from 4 p.m. until 5:30 p.m. on Feb. 6. After a week-long break, the cycle will begin again on Feb. 20, with the K-2nd program. Future expansion of programs will depend on attendance and demand, so please come by to not only see what WCPL has to offer you at the Community Center, but all thats available there through the One-Stop Program!By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 3BFrom Page 1B The Wakulla Middle School 8th Grade Band, lead by Laura Hudson, performed their rendition of some old and new Christmas songs. The Silver Belles chorus sang songs that were traditional and some that were new. The seniors really enjoy singing along to the songs they know and remember. Music is such an important part of the activities that go on at the center, so we are always looking for musical entertainment to provide for our seniors. Dancing is another fun activity we provide. The Wakulla Wigglers is a line dancing group that practice here at the center on Mondays at 1:30 p.m. for beginners, and Wednesdays at 2 p.m. for advanced. The Wigglers performed in December to a variety of Christmas tunes. This group also performs at different events in Wakulla, such as the Valentines Day and St. Patricks Day festivals at Hudson Park. If you are interested in learning line dancing, stop by the center on a Monday at 1:30 p.m. and speak to Bobbie Glover or Harriet Rich. Also if you like to dance, we have the Pickin n Grinnin Band performing every Tuesday and Friday from 10 a.m. to noon. We also have Gospel music the rst Thursday of every month at 10:30 a.m. Our new music endeavor is a quarterly drumming circle lead by Kent Hutchinson of Tallahassee. Our next one will be on Feb. 27 at 10:30 will be our next one. You can bring your own drum or one will be provided for you. Donations are accepted for this event and would be greatly appreciated. Jeff Tilley and J.J. Mahaffey stepped in for an hour with guitar and banjo in hand and lled the dining room with a great set of Christmas songs and gospel music. Maurice Langston even stood in for a couple songs. Carolyn and Joey Grubbs, a singing duo, entertained us with a variety of Christmas, gospel, pop, and country. They visit the center a couple times a year, and are a favorite of the seniors. They cover songs from Johnny Cash to The Beatles, and Carolyn can sing Etta James like the best of them. If you see them on our calendar of events, do stop by and enjoy the music. There were so many things going on the month of December that it was like non-stop Christmas. There were many give-aways, gifts, food and other needed items given to the seniors and others in need this holiday season. We would like to thank all that donated money, items, and their time to make sure everyone had a wonderful, fulfilling, and joyous holiday. The Wakulla community helps in such a generous way to when it comes to our seniors. We are blessed to have this wonderful center to provide a place for seniors to fellowship, have a hot meal, and other services that help them live a healthy and safe life. Please come and visit our center. We are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. We serve lunch daily at noon but you can always come earlier and enjoy our activities. Our food pantry supplied by Farm Share and Second Harvest is open for pick up on Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. If you are a senior who is 60 or older and are homebound and would like to make an appointment with our Meals on Wheels program you may call Pat or Angel at 9267145 ext 223. Also you can stop by and pick up a calendar of events and join in the fun. All donations are tax deductible and go to our Meals on Wheels, and other senior programs provided through the center. There are many more activities that go on here at the center, so stop by and pick up a calendar of events. You can also find us on Facebook at Wakulla Senior Center. Click on the like button and you will get all our post and keep up with what is going on here. Any questions please call the center at 926-7145 ext. 221. You can also pick up a brochure on all the other services that are provided through the Wakulla Senior Center. From Page 1B I wrote all of that to write this: there is good news too. If we begin to die in the womb, we also can begin to live longer than we might otherwise have with good parental care. The moments and movements just before and at birth are so vital to a persons long-term health and chances of becoming a senior citizens. Did you know it is even with the best medical and prenatal care offered in the world, some children do not survive? I looked out at the center this morning and I saw people in relative good health. Some of whom grew up in the Great Depression. They made it! Despite their dif culties, challenges and fears they made it. I wondered what it must be like to have grown up in the 1920s and s during the period known as the Great Depression and the effects it had on them as children. The unemployment rate had skyrocketed and peaked! This forced many poor families to send their children to work (as early as 10 years old) rather than to school so the family could meet their nancial obligation. There was no such thing as child labor laws and some seniors recall their working hours as being from daylight until dark-thirty! The challenges these children faced to stay physically strong and emotionally stable is a test that most young people today facing these identical circumstances and environments could not handle. The coming of the winter of 1931 brought along with it 8 million unemployed workers. By December, 13.5 million people were out of work. Because they were jobless and penniless many of these took to riding railroad boxcars to nowhere in particular, looking for employment. Some of the seniors tell me they went to bed hungry at times. This tells me that malnourishment was an issue and with malnourishment comes illness and medical care and dental care was near non-existent. For some families that did not have work for the multiple children, the children were placed in the custody and care of other more fortunate family members while others sadly were left to fend for themselves as orphans. Some children worked for room and board if orphaned and were coerced into hard labor. Our seniors tell me that they did not have toys and play time whats that? The infant mortality rate was off the charts due to lack of prenatal care. Therefore, disease increased at an alarming rate and periodontal disease set in at a young age. I can see the effects of the great depression on their faces and in their smiles. As I studied this particular dif cult era in American history I found that for children the greatest malady was that of fear and depression. Then it hit me, dear God, its still senior citizens greatest concern and the number one and number two killer of senior citizens. Some of these children in the Great Depression (not our seniors) ran away from the labor farms and the only way to survive was to resort to criminal activity which resulted in the chain-gang. Our seniors tend to hold on, some to the point of hoarding as they suspect that another depression could loom on the horizon, and they are correct in their suspicions. Still today you can hear them say, Dont throw anything away. They are the most resourceful people I know. They can stretch a dollar to the point that George Washington resembles Twiggy in stature. Should another economic fall occur, greater than this one, while you and I would most likely be in despair, these seniors would be determined to live every day, to survive if they could not thrive. I thoroughly understand why our seniors and others of their generation feel the way they do today about economics and the role of government plays in peoples lives. They have overcome many hardships that have made them critical and suspicious of the banking system (they use to bury their money in mason jars in the back yard) and government programs (if they wont feed us, we will feed ourselves thus row crops). There is no other way that they could feel. They themselves experienced the hardships of the time. I greatly admire and respect their generation because of their perseverance and will to survive. This is why I and the Senior Citizens Team love what we do and the people we serve. These seniors began living inside the womb, they survived a dif cult life that most of us cant even imagine. They have lived in a time when many babies didnt survive. They have gained a quantity of life that is not just natural, but near supernatural. They appreciate their parents and loved them dearly; no doubt some have seen their friends become orphans. Their parents were resilient, innovative and creative, and our seniors speak of their parents with tear-filled eyes of deep affection. All in all, I think yes they have cheated the River Jordan. Maybe they didnt and dont understand epigenetics, DNA sequence, how genes function, environmental risk factors, etc. but they understand life at its best and its worst. But they make the best of every situation and ,as far as the River Jordan is concerned, many sit close to it, perhaps even on its banks. How do they view it? They have a cane-pole in hand, waiting on the next bite.T.W. Maurice Langston is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Cheating the River Jordan In December, seniors celebrated Christmas with a party, a turkey dinner, and lots of music The Wakulla Middle School 8th Grade Band.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTop, a happy face at the Christmas party. Above, the Wakulla Wigglers dance troupe. At left, Maurice Langston with Jeff Tilley and J.J. Mahaffey. Carolyn and Joey Grubbs. Santa with the Naughty and Nice elves. The Silver Belles perform.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Weddings, water and maybe weed By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Jan. 24 There seemed at times this week to be a bit of the Rime of the Ancient Mariner in Florida politics. A wedding guest? Gay-marriage advocates looked to seize on recent momentum in other states to pave the way for similar rights in Florida. Water, water, every where? Gov. Rick Scotts latest batch of budget pitches included funding for water projects. An albatross around the neck? Scotts Department of Economic Opportunity was still trying to untangle the knot of technology issues surrounding its new unemployment computer system. As for the more supernaturally tinged parts of the poem? Well, John Morgans drive for medical marijuana will head to the ballot barring intervention by the Florida Supreme Court. So who knows what some Floridians might see if the measure becomes law. EQUAL DIGNITY OR PUBLICITY STUNT? The last two years, in particular, have seen gay-rights groups secure victory after victory in the drive for what supporters call marriage equality. President Barack Obama endorsed the idea of gay marriage in 2012, and a succession of Democratic politicians quickly did the same. State after state has also followed suit, with the number of states where gay marriage is allowed or has been approved by the courts jumping from 12 to 17 since the U.S. Supreme Court decision overturning the federal Defense of Marriage Act on the basis that it violated due-process rights. Among those states are Utah and Oklahoma, states not exactly known for unchecked liberalism. The legal fight has now moved to Florida, with six gay couples challenging Floridas ban on same-sex marriage in state court, saying the prohibition violates U.S. Constitution protections against discrimination and denies them equal dignity and respect. The six couples and the Equality Florida Institute filed the lawsuit Tuesday against MiamiDade Clerk of Courts Harvey Ruvin, four days after his of ce refused to grant them marriage licenses. Florida is one of more than two-dozen states with amendments in the state constitution that ban same-sex marriage, and the lawsuit led Tuesday is one of 40 throughout the country. The suit could set up a Florida Supreme Court showdown over the Florida Marriage Protection constitutional amendment approved by nearly 62 percent of voters ve years ago. Social conservatives pushed back. John Stemberger, president of the Florida Family Policy Council and author of the constitutional amendment banning gay marriage, called the lawsuit a publicity stunt timed to coincide with the onset of the legislative session, which begins in March. IS SCOTT ALL WET? But even if gay marriage gains political momentum, it would be only one of myriad issues facing lawmakers. Gov. Rick Scott, approaching his re-election bid, will be looking for action on his budget requests, the latest of which were rolled out this week. After years of becoming something of a bte noir to the environmental movement thanks to efforts to dismantle what was left of the states growth-management laws, Scott is turning over a greener leaf in 2014. The governor announced that he would include $130 million for Everglades and South Florida waterway projects in his 2014-15 budget proposal --$60 million more than what Florida is currently spending on the River of Grass. Also included in the measure: a message to Obama, who has become a frequent Scott foil as the governor eyes what could be a GOP-friendly mid-term electorate. I hope the federal government will do the right thing and continue to provide the funding we need, Scott said Wednesday during a state Cabinet meeting at the Osceola County Administration Building in Kissimmee. But it wasnt just the Everglades that would bene t from Scott as an environmental rainmaker. The governor also proposed letting $55 million ow to restoring and maintaining the states natural springs, as state lawmakers continue to focus on water quality and quantity. Charles Pattison, president of 1000 Friends of Florida, was encouraged by the recent proposals from Scott, who was criticized after taking of ce for his environmental actions. He is putting forward a budget that is about ve times larger for springs restoration than weve seen in the past few years. We think thats a good step, Pattison said. But not everyone was quite as eager to shower the proposals with praise. John Moran, co-director of the Springs Eternal Project, a collaborative of researchers and artists focused on the states springs as part of the Alachua Conservation Trust, said Scott needs to provide leadership by stressing a reduction in the use of water and springs-killing fertilizer. What ails our springs cannot be xed just by throwing a few million dollars at the problem, Moran said in an email. Scott, who has also allowed budget details on child-protection, public safety, economic development and tax cuts to trickle out in recent weeks, will unveil his full spending plan during an Associated Press meeting Wednesday with editors and reporters from across the state. UNEMPLOYMENT WHEELS STILL SPINNING The states new unemployment website continues to have problems, but the bright side is that fewer people are landing on the unemployment rolls. Given the fact that the new Connect system isnt fully living up to its name, the federal government said it will allow the state to pay unemployment claims in cases that have been in dispute for more than a week, as of cials look to ease a backlog created by the troubled $63 million unemployment assistance website. The announcement from the Department of Economic Opportunity actually came Saturday, buried amid the three-day weekend that included Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. This step should serve as a great relief for claimants who have faced hardships due to technical problems with the system, Department of Economic Opportunity Executive Director Jesse Panuccio said in a prepared statement. Some claimants have suffered and DEO and USDOL (the U.S. Department of Labor) are committed to helping them through all legal and available means. Connect has been in the works since 2009 to replace a 30-year-old system jobless Floridians used to claim their weekly bene ts, monitor accounts and request information. The department provides up to $275 weekly to more than 200,000 Floridians. Democrats, meanwhile, took the opportunity to hammer Scott about the system, which was built by Minnesota-based Deloitte Consulting. In over three months, Rick Scott has failed to make fixing the system a priority, said House Minority Leader Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale, in a conference call Thursday with reporters. Rick Scott has never set a deadline or a goal for xing the system. The states jobless rate dropped to 6.2 percent in December, down 0.2 percent from November, according to numbers released Friday, a further boost to Scotts hopes of holding onto his job in November despite his low popularity. BATTLE OVER THE BALLOT Two proposed constitutional amendments look poised to appear on Floridians ballots this November, both of them dealing with various shades of green. Voters will be asked if funding for land conservation should be cemented into the Florida Constitution when they vote on Amendment No. 1, which got nal approval this week from the Department of State. Legislative leaders did not seem overly pleased with the prospect. The proposed amendment, backed by a group called Floridas Water and Land Legacy, Inc., seeks to set aside 33 percent of the states documentary stamp tax revenues fees paid when real estate is sold for 20 years to acquire conservation and recreation lands, manage existing lands, protect lands that are critical for water supply and restore degraded natural systems. Will Abberger, the groups campaign chairman, said the intent of the amendment is to provide a dedicated and sustainable source of money to protect Floridas water resources. The case for medical marijuana seems a bit murkier. Backers of a proposed amendment that would allow pharmacological joints have submitted enough valid petition signatures to get on the November ballot, according to the state Division of Elections website. People United for Medical Marijuana, the group behind the amendment drive, reached 710,508 valid signatures as of early afternoon Friday, topping the 683,149 needed to get on the ballot. Also, the group had met legally required petition thresholds in 14 congressional districts. STORY OF THE WEEK: Six gay couples challenge Floridas constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Heres the nice thing: People want to come to our state. Weve had record tourism numbers it looks like again last year. So people want to come to our state, basically they like all parts of our state. But if you come here youve got to comply with the law. Gov. Rick Scott on Justin Biebers traf c arrest in Miami Beach, according to the Palm Beach Post. WHITES WINESCelebrating balance in Pinot NoirBy DAVID WHITEIf a Pinot Noir is overwhelmed with fruit or, indeed, by any element, like oak, fruit extraction, fruit ripeness, or alcohol youre going to lessen the possibility that the wine can express essential place. And for me, Pinot Noir is all about essential place. If any grape demands contemplation, its Pinot Noir. The great ones translate time and place, clearly expressing the characteristics of their vintage and the soils and climate in which theyre grown. So I wasnt surprised to hear these words from Jasmine Hirsch, as her father, David, planted what is considered one of Americas top Pinot Noir vineyards nearly 35 years ago. We were chatting about an annual wine event she launched with Rajat Parr, a celebrity sommelier, in 2011. Dubbed In Pursuit of Balance, it applauds the California winemakers who eschew ripeness and power in favor of restraint and elegance. The event has helped counteract the notion that California only makes fruit bombs. And its brought attention to some of Californias top Pinot Noir producers. In Pursuit of Balance traces its roots to 2008, when Hirsch entered the wine industry by taking over sales and marketing for her familys winery. At the time, she was living in New York and had fallen in love with Pinot Noir, so it made sense to join the family business. But the wines that stole her heart came from Burgundy. She was continuously blown away by what they were able to achieve in France. When she started working for her family, she began drinking more California Pinot Noir. Too often, she didnt enjoy the wines. They were, quite simply, too big. In ripeness, alcohol, and oak, they lacked the subtlety and poise shed grown to love in Burgundy. Around that same time, Hirsch developed a friendship with Rajat Parr, the wine director for the Mina Group, a restaurant management company with a global reputation for its wine program. Parr was known for his obsession with Pinot Noir, so Hirsch asked him why California couldnt produce more elegant wines. Parr showed Hirsch that the state could. Indeed, a handful of producers had been making Pinot Noir that achieved the grapes higher purpose translating both time and place for decades. The two friends soon hashed out a plan for a formal tasting for sommeliers, journalists, and eager consumers. The rst brought together nearly 25 California producers and generated tremendous buzz. Most oenophiles believed what Hirsch thought just a few years prior: that California wines were over the top. Parr and Hirsch sought to debunk this notion. Naturally, the event stirred controversy. By presenting a limited number of producers, Hirsch and Parr created an exclusionary event. Plus, the word balance which refers to fruit, acidity, structure, and alcohol coexisting harmoniously, with no single element dominating is a lightning rod. Last year, Wine Spectators Harvey Steiman proclaimed that he [resented] the implication that richer, more full-bodied wines cant be balanced. Hirsch and Parr acknowledge these criticisms. Today, wineries that hope to join their tasting must first pass muster with a panel of judges who taste blind. And Hirsch admits that the event might have been misnamed. For my palate, the wines that Hirsch and Parr have chosen to celebrate are among Americas most exciting and delicious. Producers like Copain, Littorai, and Peay make precise, focused wines that are full of charm. The wines from Hirschs own property and Rajat Parrs two labels, Sandhi and Domaine de la Cote, are similarly stunning. Pinot Noir is one of viticultures most fickle grapes. Its challenging and expensive to grow. By bringing attention to the California wineries that work hard to achieve Pinot Noirs higher purpose, Hirsch and Parr deserve everyones praise.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com, which was named Best Overall Wine Blog at the 2013 Wine Blog Awards. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 5B Angels Arabs Blend CalmCloak Course Data Dust EatenEstablishmentEvil Gaze Hall Helmet Here Hurt Idea IllustrationInland Item Joke Kissed Laid Like Lime Loom Mane Media Mined More Nests Oddly Ones Onion Peak Pear Pint Plate Race Recent Regard Same Says Sent Sign Sleek Sleep Smack Soil Sons Specimens Spun Tend Tidy Tile Trail Turn Ugly Vans Verb Wants Watery Weed Willow Woke Wood Woolen Worms Yarn The following organizations are proud to support Wakulla County Education through sponsoring the Newspaper in Education Program.

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Previous management experience.Strong problem solving/analytical, organization,decision-ma king, communication, and time management skills Ability to multi-task, work under pressure and meet tight deadlines (maintains a sense of urgency) in a fast paced and changing environment. Please call Residential Elevators, Inc. @ 1-850-528-8661 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE PARK MANAGERHosts to manage 26 lot RV Park on Steinhatchee River. Free RV site, utilities & modest salary in exchange for grounds upkeep & minor maint. Also housekeeping for two rental cottages.To Apply: (229)263-8364 or email: dfletch@svic.net FUND RAISERS NEEDEDVeterans Outreach needs reps for GREETERPosition. Help in our Donation efforts that aid our Program Services. Grocery /Dept Stores, Gun Shows etc are where our venues are assigned and the Outreach display is set up. Must have car and be willing to travel. Comp/Exp pd for P/T position. Seniors W el comed! Call 866-212-5592 or email resume & letter of interest to: jely@veteransout r each.com AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-649 7 NOW HIRING! Truck Driving School InstructorsJoin CRSTs brand new training school in Cedar Rapids, Iowa! Relocation assistance provided. Call: 866-756-3407; email: mknoot@crst.com BANKRUPTCY AUCTION 5,700 +/-Acres North Port, Florida February 13 World Class Hunting Development Potential. 800-504-3010 National Auction Group, Inc. Thomas J. Bone, FL# AU3422 DISH TV Retailer. Starting $19.99/ month (for 12 mos.) Broadband Internet starting $14.95/ month (where available.) Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALL Now! 1-800-980-6193 MEDART2BR, 2BA, Very Nice, Fenced yard,, central Heat/Air, ceiling fans, No pets or Non smoking firm $600/month + dep. 850-545-0126 SOPCHOPPYNestled in the woods, located close to Park Rivers, and on Forest, 3 bedroom 2 bath, single wide, also on a small creek, 650 mo + depositREVELL REALTY 850-962-2212 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsAvailable with rental assistance if qualify.Call (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. CRAWFORDVILLE3 bedroom. 2 bath. Custom home in Magnolia Ridge. Close to CVS and Winn Dixie. Large fenced yard, energy efficient appliances. Pets welcome. $1,350 month plus security. 850-510-4931 N. Crawfordville3bd/2ba, fenced yard $750. per month (850) 697-5300 Ochlockonee Bay2Br/1Ba home in gated community liv/din/kit, washer/ dryer, deck ,carport. Access to lot w/ boat ramp and picnic area. Ref. reqd. Owner /Broker $800 month and deposit. 850-524-2608 E. Crawfordville $425. mo, $200. dep prefer a quiet person to rent a room in my home, priv entrance, mini fridge, microwave no: drugs, smoking, dogs. steady income, refs (850) 926-9037 SONGBIRDTwo Rooms available in private home. util. incl. Bob (469) 766-2116 1.84 Acres with 3 St ate Views! Prime, wooded, mountaintop acreage with majestic three state views. EZ access to US National Forest. Incredible 4 season recreation. Paved roads, underground power, fiber optic cable, municipal water. Perfect for primary/ vacation/ retirement home. Just $24,900! Only one, wont last. Call now 866-952-5303, x120 MERCEDES-BENZ2008, R Class $18,000 obo (850) 508-4927 Experienced care provider. Providing befor e & after school care. Transportation to Crawfordville & Riversink Schools. Breakfast/Snacks included. $225/mo 850-528-5953 5011-0130 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Berrys One Stop Mobile Small Engine & Marine Repair located at P.O. Box 267, Crawfordville, FL 32326, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 22 day of Jan. 2014. /s/ David Berry Owner Published Jan. 30, 2014. 5012-0130 TWN 2/17 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Vehicle will be sold for towing and storage. Charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78 Sale: 2/17/2014, 9:00 AM at 1502 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville, FL 1999 Ford Vin# 1FAFP58S6XA282731 Hobbys Towing & Recovery reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. 1502 Shadeville Rd Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-7698 Jan. 30, 2014. 5019-0130 TWN 2/17 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction, for towing and storage, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at: 2683 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida on 02/17/2014 at 9:00 a.m. on the following vehicle(s): 2002 SUBARU Vin # JF1SF65572H709484 Jan. 30, 2014. 5020-0206 TWN Vs. Sapp, Rhonda T. 2013-CA-000219 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2013-CA-000219 Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Jerry Payne Major Appliance Repair & ServiceWindow and Wall A/C Units, Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators, Ice Machines, Stoves, Water Heaters, etc. jerrypaynemajorappliance@gmail.comLICENSED / INSURED HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o d d e e e e r r n n E q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t t o H e C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED JESUSHARDWOOD FLOORS TILE PAINTING CARPENTRYLic. #7827 Licensed & Insured ( 850 ) 570Interior & Exterior FREE Estimates Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com 8AM 2PMSUPERBOWLYARD SALEJANUARY 31st FEBRUARY 1stBLOWOUTBRING THIS AD FOR VENDOR DISCOUNTS!GOOD THROUGH FEB 1 1Br 1Ba Cottage $500 2Br 1Ba Hs start at $660 3Br 2Ba DWMH start at $600 3Br 1Ba Hs $750 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650 2Br 1Ba SWMH $450 3Br 2Ba Twnhs start at $850 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $1100 3Br 2Ba Hs start at $1100 4Br 2Ba DWMH $800APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIRED RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org The Wakulla news 363-2351 363-2351Selling Something?Advertise with a Classified Ad inFor As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 7B JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC Plaintiff, -vs.Rhonda T. Sapp; Unknown Spouse of Rhonda T. Sapp; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated January 16, 2014, entered in Civil Case No. 2013-CA-000219 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Successor by Merger to Chase Home Finance, LLC, Plaintiff and Rhonda T. Sapp are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on February 20, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 33, BLOCK N, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Chris Helms, DEPUTY CLERK OF COURT ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 Jan. 30 & Feb. 6, 2014. 13-259781 FC02 CHE 5009-0130 TWN vs. Akins, Collin A. 12-221-CA Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-221-CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. COLLIN A. AKINS; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 3 day of Jan., 2014, and entered in Case No. 12-221-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and COLLIN A. AKINS ADVANCED BUILDERS AND REMODELERS, INC. PATRICIA M. AKINS; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 6 day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 16 AND 17, BLOCK E, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of cer5014-0206 TWN vs. Houck, Timothy E. 12-324-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 12-324-CA Division RBS FINANCIAL PRODUCTS INC Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHY E. HOUCK A/K/A TIMOTHY ELLIS HOUCK AND REBECCA C. HOUCK A/K/A REBECCA COTTONGIM HOUCK AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on November 21, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 3, LAKE ELLEN SHORE, PHASE 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLATTHEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 8 BEING A CORRECTIVE PLAT OR REPLAT OF PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 57 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1990 FLWD DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE ID# FLFLK32A11821GH, TITLE #61424729 AND ID# FLFLK32B11821GH, TITLE #61436683 TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1990 FLWD DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME, TITLE 61424729 AND TITLE #61436683 MOBILE HOME, VIN(S) FLFLK32A11821GH, AND FLFLK32B11821GH. and commonly known as: 10 LAKE ELLEN SHORES DR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse on February 20, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 18 day of December, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Tony A. Perez, (813) 229-0900 x1346 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com January 30 & February 6, 2014. 327878/1337592/idh 5015-0220 TWN vs. Boothco Coastal, LLC 4:12-cv-00404-MW-CAS Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT FOR THE NORTHERN DISTRICT OF FLORIDA TALLAHASSEE DIVISION CASE NO.: 4:12-cv-00404-MW-CAS HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. BOOTHCO COASTAL, LLC, a dissolved Florida limited liability company; HURLEY H. BOOTH, JR., an individual; UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF 2273 SURF ROAD, PANACEA, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, an individual; and WAKULLA COUNTY, a political subdivision of the State of Florida, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, Michael Rayboun, Special Master appointed by the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Florida in the 5016-0206 TWN vs. Nabors, Mary 65 2009 CA 000389 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65 2009 CA 000389 SEC.: A SECOND OPPORTUNITY OF AMERICA, LLC. Plaintiff, v. MARY NABORS A/K/A MARY DEMICCO; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 23, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65 2009 CA 000389 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 27 day of February, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in accordance with Chapter 45 Florida Statues, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 2528.00 FEET, THENCE RUN WEST 1650.00 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTHE ALONG THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF HENRY DRIVE 300.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 50 SECONDS WEST 199.97 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF BERNARD DRIVE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 01 EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 299.83 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 199.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 1.36 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. ALSO BEING KNOWN AS LOTS 1,2,3,4,13,14,17,18,19,20,21 AND 22, BLOCK F OF LAKE ELLEN PROPER AN UNRECORDED SUBDIVISION IN SECTION 26, TOWNSHIP 4, SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated at CRAWFORDVILLE, Florida this 23 day of October, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk January 30 and February 6, 2014. FL-97007499-10-FLS 5017-0206 TWN vs. Dick, Alan S. 65-2012-CA-000441 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000441 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ALAN S. DICK, MALLARD POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC., UNITED GUARANTY RESIDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH CAROLINA, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALAN S. DICK, 5018-0206 TWN vs. Yarbrough, Christopher 652011CA000329CAXXXX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 652011CA000329CAXXXX DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC., Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER YARBROUGH, CHRISTOPHER R. YARBROUGH, VALERIE YARBROUGH, VALERIE A. YARBROUGH, MOSSEY COVE TOWNHOUSE OWNERS ASSOCIATION F/K/A CAMELOT TOWNHOMES OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, Defendants NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Order Vacate Sale and Re-Schedule Sale entered Jan. 9, 2014 in Civil Case No. 652011CA000329CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein DLJ MORTGAGE CAPITAL, INC. is Plaintiff and CHRISTOPHER YARBROUGH, CHRISTOPHER R. YARBROUGH, VALERIE YARBROUGH, VALERIE A. YARBROUGH, MOSSEY COVE TOWNHOUSE OWNERS ASSOCIATION F/K/A CAMELOT TOWNHOMES OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 13th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 13, Camelot Phase 2, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, at Page 9 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing was: Mailed this 9th day of Jan., 2014, to all parties on the attached service list. Dated this 9th day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301, (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page January 30 and February 6, 2014. 11-02800-6 Defendants RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Order Re-Scheduling Sale dated Jan. 9, 2014 in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000441 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Crawfordville, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is Plaintiff and ALAN S. DICK, MALLARD POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC., UNITED GUARANTY RESIDENTIAL INSURANCE COMPANY OF NORTH CAROLINA, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 1, UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION 2, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ALAN S. DICK are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes on the 13th day of February, 2014 at 11:00 AM on the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 71, OF MALLARD POND, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 56-57 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. I HEREBY CERTIFY that a true and correct copy of the foregoing was: Mailed this 9th day of Jan., 2014, to all parties on the attached service list. Dated this 9th day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) BY: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk MCCALLA RAYMER, LLC, ATTORNEY FOR PLAINTIFF 110 SE 6TH STREET, FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33301, (407) 674-1850 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page January 30 and February 6, 2014. 11-03742-5 above-styled action, will on the 27th day of February, 2014, at 11:00 oclock a.m. at the front steps of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, and in accordance with the practice and procedure of the State of Florida as provided in Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situated in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida to-wit: Lot 50 of TARPON SHORES, UNIT 1, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page(s) 45, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. also described as: BEGIN AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 50 OF TARPON SHORES, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 45 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SURF ROAD (STATE ROAD NO; 372), THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 196.76 FEET TO THE WATERS EDGE OF OCHLOCKONEE BAY, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY AND NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE THE FOLLOWING THIRTEEN (13) COURSES; SOUTH 60 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 7.76 FEET, SOUTH 68 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 21.70 FEET, NORTH 83 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 20 SECONDS WEST 31.10 FEET, NORTH 79 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 21.42 FEET, NORTH 88 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 58.35 FEET, NORTH 83 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 26 SECONDS WEST 36.76 FEET, NORTH 89 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 67.39 FEET, SOUTH 76 DEGREES 48 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 58.70 FEET, NORTH 88 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST 49.54 FEET, NORTH 67 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 48.22 FEET, NORTH 76 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 44 SECONDS WEST 33.59 FEET, NORTH 83 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 13.35 FEET, NORTH 31 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 24 SECONDS WEST 46.27 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID WATERS EDGE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 218.14 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 80 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 490.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Pursuant to the final judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is listed above. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. Persons with a disability who need special accommodations must notice the individual signed below not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding which is the subject of this notice to insure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and official seal this ___ day of January 2014. /s/ Michael Rayboun as Special Master January 30, February 6, 13 and 20, 2014. JAX\1825901_1 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS Dispennette 3/2 $750 mo., $750 Deposit. 43 Squaw 3/2, $750 mo., $900 Deposit. 26 Magnolia Ridge 3/2. No smoking, Pets upon owner approval. $1,125 mo. $1,125 Deposit Available 1/1/14. 99 Comanche Trail 3/2 $925 mo., $925 security deposit. No smoking, No pets. 16 Parkside Circle 3/2 $1,300 mo., $1,300 security deposit. No smoking, No pets. Avail. Jan. 1, 2014. 20 Liberty Rd. 3/2, No smoking, no pets. $850. mo., $850 Deposit. Available 2/1/14 Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!104 Navajo Trail Wakulla Gardens 2BR/2BA, large bedroom, home has open oor plan. $740. mo. No Smoking, No Pets. 2879 Shadeville Road 3 BR/1BA Home with detached garage. $640.00. mo. No pets. No smoking.28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has hardwood oors, 4 car carport, boat slip, community club house and pool. $2,000 mo. No smoking, No pets.25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated community w/ pool. 2BR/2BA Condo, hardwood oors, washer & Dryer. $950. mo. No Smoking, No Pets. 56 Blue Heron 3 BR/1BA Walking distance to Mashes Sands Beach. $750. Mo. No smoking, No pets. 2BR/2BA Marina Village Mashes Sand Rd. 2 Story Condo # B5. Fully Furnished, washer/ Dryer, Community Pool, Boat Slip w/ Lift. $1,200 mo. No smoking, No pets. 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/Dryer, Pool, Boat Slips. No Smoking, No Pets! $1,100. mo. No smoking, No pets. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEED TO RENT YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Iguazu National Park, Parana State, Brazil. Image Scott Warren

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 thewakullanews.com tain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6 day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com 09-80788 January 23 & 30, 2014. 12-05647 5005-0130 TWN vs. Wildwood Greene, Inc. 13-000351-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No. 13-000351-CA Circuit-Civil Division II C.B., L.P., a Texas limited partnership Plaintiff, vs. Wildwood Greene, Inc., a Florida corporation; Michael P. Luby; and Any Unknown parties in Possession, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 13th day of Feb., 2014, at 11:00 a.m. in the lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: See Attached Exhibit A Pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said court this 13th day of January, 2014. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff James M. DuRant, Jr., B.C.S. Florida Bar No. 673242 Boyd/DuRant, P.L. 1407 Piedmont Drive East Tallahassee, Florida 32308 jd@boydlaw.net Addl Service Email: Service@boydlaw.net Phone (850) 386-2171 Counsel for Plaintiffs Exhibit A THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF Wakulla, STATE OF FL, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL 1 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 86 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LAND IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 86 A DISTANCE OF 132.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF US HIGHWAY 98 FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 76.58 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 30.88 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 48.52 FEET TO A RE-ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 233.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 412.38 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 264.58 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID US HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 305.48 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. More Patriculary described as Commence at the Southeast corner of Lot 86 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands recorded in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Southeast corner run North 17 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West along the Easterly boundary of said Lot 86 a distance of 132.00 feet to a set 5/8 inch iron rod and cap (LB# 3293) lying on the Northerly right of way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 98 (200 foot right of way) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run long the said Northerly right of way boundary South 72 degrees 31 minutes 22 seconds West a distance of 76.59 feet to a point of curve to the right; thence leaving said Northerly right of way boundary run Northwesterly along said curve having a radius of 30.00 feet through a central angle of 93 degrees 10 minutes 42 seconds for an arc length of 48.79 feet (chord bears North 61 degrees 20 minutes 02 seconds West a distance of 43.59 feet) to a found 5/8 inch iron rod and cap (illegible); thence run North 17 degrees 28 minutes 45 seconds West a distance of 233.11 feet to a found 5/8 iron rod and cap (illegible); thence run North 72 degrees 31 minutes 01 second East a distance of 412.48 feet to a set 5/8 inch iron rod and cap (LB #3293) lying on the Westerly boundary of that property described in Official Records Book 634, Page 664 of said Public Records; thence run along said Westerly boundary South 17 degrees 35 minutes 07 seconds East a distance of 64.27 feet to a found 4 inch diameter concrete monument (LS #2919) marking the Southwest corner of said property also being the Northwest corner of that property described in Official Records Book 140, Page 831 of said Public Records; thence leaving said Northwest corner run along the Westerly boundary of said property South 17 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East a distance of 200.31 feet to Southwest corner of said property being marked by a found inch open pipe lying on the said Northerly right of way boundary; thence run along said Northerly boundary South 72 degrees 31 minutes 22 seconds West a distance of 305.49 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 2.50 acres, more or less. AND ALSO PARCEL 2 COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 86 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MIN5006-0130 TWN vs. Spears, David 2012ca000489 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2012ca000489 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITA 1 INC. TRUST 2004-NC8, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-NC8, Plaintiff, vs. DAVID SPEARS; ET. AL., 5007-0130 TWN vs. Vaillancourt, Debra 2012CA000083 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 2012CA000083 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. DEBRA VAILLANCOURT; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 3 day of January, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2012CA000083, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION is the Plaintiff and DEBRA VAILLANCOURT WILSHIRE HOLDING GROUP, INC UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL T BRACKIN (PUB); and JUSTIN VAILLANCOURT UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 6 day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 63 AND 64, BLOCK WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT V, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORD IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6 day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com 09-80788 January 23 & 30, 2014. 11-24435 5008-0130 TWN vs. Rigdon, Shirley C. 65-2011-CA-000259 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 65-2011-CA-000259 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. SHIRLEY C. RIGDON A/K/A SHIRLEY CARRAWAY RIGDON A/K/A SHIRLEY VOHREESE CARRAWAY; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated Jan. 6, 2014, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000259, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NA is the Plaintiff and SHIRLEY C. RIGDON A/K/A SHIRLEY CARRAWAY RIGDON A/K/A SHIRLEY VOHREESE CARRAWAY CAPITAL CITY BANK; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 6 day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT A ST. JOE PAPER COMPANY CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 9, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 25 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARY, OF SAID SECTION 1307.64 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 1294.07 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A 30 FOOT COUNTY ROAD AND THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 53 SECONDS EAST 356.04 FEET TO AN OLD IRON PIPE; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 690.10 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST 906.42 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID 30 FOOT COUNTY ROAD; THENCE RUN NORTH 38 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY 879.81 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6 day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com 09-80788 January 23 & 30, 2014. 11-04355 UTES WEST 132.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 76.58 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 905.94 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 29 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 57 SECONDS WEST 356.73 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 89.34 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 62 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 18.90 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 29 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 269.77 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST 590.43 FEET TO A RE-BAR ON A CORNER OF WILD WOOD COUNTRY CLUB, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 35, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN ALONG THE BOUNDARY OF WILD WOOD COUNTRY CLUB AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 1074.21 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 27 SECONDS EAST 509.97 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST 205.06 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 19.25 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 264.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 53 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 53 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 249.17 FEET, THENCE NORTH 56 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST 141.20 FEET TO A POINT ON A CURVE, THE RADIUS POINT OF SAID CURVE BEING LOCATED NORTH 61 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 375.00 FEET, THENCE NORTHERLY, EASTERLY, SOUTHERLY, WESTERLY AND SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 375.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 350 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 2296.13 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 141.20 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 324.39 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 26 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 116.20 FEET, THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 46 SECONDS WEST 258.92 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE SOUTH 02 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 789.21 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST 1088.51 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 300.13 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE NORTH 49 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST 258.00 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE NORTH 87 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 109.71 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID SUBDIVISION BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 29 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF WILD WOOD ACRES UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, A DISTANCE OF 1248.54 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 02 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY 240.77 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 52 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY 338.14 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 59.88 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 59 SECONDS WEST 1033.03 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST 2181.96 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 472.42 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 47 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 807.94 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 246.22 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 322.21 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 30.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 94 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 15 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 49.33 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST 334.99 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 267.36 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 20 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 05 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 100.66 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 87 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 287.13 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 64 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 34 SECONDS EAST 244.94 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 590.90 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 62 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 324.10 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 47 SECONDS EAST 1304.39 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 32 MINUTES 02 SECONDS WEST 412.34 FEET TO A RE-BAR, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 233.18 FEET TO A RE-BAR MARKING A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 30.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 93 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 55 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 48.89 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES BELOW, OVER AND ABOVE THE PROPERTY SHOWN IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 226, PAGE 422 THROUGH 424, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 86 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST ALONG THE EAST BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 86 A DISTANCE OF 132.00 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U. S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 76.58 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 30.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 90 DEGREES 00 MINUTES FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 47.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES WEST 358.58 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES EAST 411.91 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 11 SECONDS WEST 1179.36 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 62 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 324.12 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 12 SECONDS WEST 590.05 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 42 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 285.34 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 42 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 60.04 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 49 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 306.13 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 15.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 42 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 64.27 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 68 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 28.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 49 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 293.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND UTILITIES BELOW, OVER AND ABOVE THE PROPERTY SHOWN IN OFFICIAL RECORDS BOOK 226, PAGE 422 THROUGH 424, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGIN AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 19, BLOCK ?C? OF WILDWOOD ACRES UNIT 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 78 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 23 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID SUBDIVISION 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 23 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 66 DEGREES 15 MINUTES WEST 60.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN APPURTENANT GOLF BALL RETRIEVAL EASEMENT IN COMMON WITH OTHERS IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE TERMS AND CONDITIONS CONTAINED IN THE RESTRICTIVE COVENANTS OF WILDWOOD COUNTRY CLUB, RECORDED IN BOOK 235, PAGE 23 AND RELATIVE TO THE USE THEREOF January 23 & 30, 2014. 5013-0206 TWN Williams, Zelma 13-115 CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-115 CP PROBATE DIVISION IN RE: ESTATE OF ZELMA WILLIAMS Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Zelma Williams, deceased, File 13-115 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is January 30, 2014 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq., Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Valencia Statam 1959 Bloxham Cutoff Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 January 30 & February 6, 2014. Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 3 day of January, 2014, and entered in Case No. 2012-ca000489, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS TRUSTEE FOR MORGAN STANLEY ABS CAPITAL 1 INC. TRUST 2004-NC8, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-NC8 is the Plaintiff and DAVID SPEARS LEAH SPEARS; and UNKNOWN TENANT IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 6 day of February, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 8, BLOCK L OF HUDSON HEIGHTS UNIT NO. 3, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 PAGE 26 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 6 day of January, 2014. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com 09-80788 January 23 & 30, 2014. 11-01974 Brain TeaserEach puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 23 4 5 561 47 8 2 1854 96483 37 2 546 82359 2009 HometownContent 618 2739 4 5 795864312 342951786 273 196854 581437269 964528173 437 689521 159742638 826315497 CHAP RAFT HAPPY HAVE EDIE OLLIE ERIC DORA PLANT REDSTORMRISING INN VON MADAME ALAN ATM ARESO INON ACRE GREENEGGSANDHAM NORA ROLE EIEIO AWE RARE CHESTS BIT FOR THECOLORPURPLE BOOTH STOP IRIS ANOTE ATME COMP MIKES TOAD EDEN 1234 5678 910111213 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25262728 2930 313233 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 4849 5051 52535455 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64Across 1. Fellow 5. Simple boat 9. In a good mood 14. Be in possession of 15. Singer Brickell 16. North of a 1980s scandal 17. Guitarist Clapton 18. ___ the Explorer 19. Thing in a pot 20. Tom Clancy book 23. Word after Quality or Days 24. ___ Trapp (family name in The Sound of Music) 25. ___ Bovary 29. Actor Arkin 31. Its T stands for teller 34. You ___ Beautiful 35. Part of, as a plot 36. Land amount 37. Dr. Seuss book 40. A Dolls House heroine 41. Job for an actor 42. Old MacDonald chorus 43. Leave amazed 44. Hard to nd 45. They may have drawers 46. Used your teeth 47. Thanks ___ asking! 48. Alice Walker book 56. Request to a restaurant hostess 57. Put an end to 58. Eye part thats also a ower 59. Make ___ of (remember) 60. Look ___! 61. Give free food to 62. Tyson and Myers 63. Frogs cousin 64. Garden of ___ Down 1. One-named singer/actress 2. He loses to the tortoise in a race 3. Enthusiastic 4. Bodybuilders muscles 5. Completed again 6. Decorate 7. Like a good mattress 8. Crying drop 9. Boards, as a bus 10. Poker statement 11. Scheme 12. ___-pong 13. Up to now 21. Shakespeares ___ of Athens 22. The Donalds mate, once 25. ___ Carta 26. Weapon for Robin Hood 27. John who makes tractors 28. Sailing, poetically 29. Slant 30. Go down in ames 31. Aspirin targets 32. Characteristic 33. Of ce notes 35. Dr. Frankensteins assistant 36. Roll ___ (take your turn, in many games) 38. One of the Muses 39. Indias rst prime minister 44. Rags to ___ 45. ___ a plea 46. Midler or Davis 47. Kiss ___ Rose 48. Tennille or Collette 49. Captain in Peter Pan 50. Test for future attorneys: abbr. 51. The Simpsons bus driver 52. Paella ingredient 53. Egg on 54. Margarita avor 55. Sporty cable letters 56. Emeril Lagasses shout

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 Page 9B 1. LANGUAGE: What does the verb bibble mean? 2. FAMOUS QUOTES: Who once said, Humor is just another defense against the universe. 3. MOVIES: Which Charlton Heston movie used more than 1 million props? 4. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: About how long is the Iditarod Trail sled dog race? 5. AD SLOGANS: What advertiser urged consumers to Say it with flowers? 6. ANATOMY: Of the 206 bones in the adult body, about one-fourth are located where? 7. LITERATURE: Which book written by Charles Dickens features a young boy named Pip? 8. MUSIC: What was Paul Simons first solo to hit the Top 10? 9. MYTHOLOGY: Who was Hippolyta in Greek mythology? 10. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of fruit is the liqueur Chambord made from? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. To drink often or much 2. Mel Brooks 3. Ben-Hur 4. More than 1,000 miles 5. FTD 6. In the feet 7. Great Expectations 8. Mother and Child Reunion 9. Queen of the Amazons 10. Raspberry Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 30, 2014 thewakullanews.com Valentine Celebration & Parade 5K CUPID DASH 1 MILE FIT FOR LOVE WALK2ND ANNUALCheck in 7 A.M. 1 Mile Walk begins 7:30 A.M. 5K Dash begins 8 A.M. Register for the 5K Cupid Dash, go to Raceit.com/Register/?event=24619For more information email WakullaValentine@gmail.com 16th Annual SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 2014HUDSON PARK A FAMILY FRIENDLY DAY PACKED FULL OF FUN AND LIVE ENTERTAINMENT! All proceeds to bene t Community Projects the Rotary Club of Wakulla Supports!Breakfast in the Park, Arts & Crafts Fun & Games for ALL Ages Pony Rides, Lots of Great Food Your Organization, Group or Individuals are invited to Join us! Your Organization, Group or Individuals are invited to Join us! Registration is FREE and EASY Parade line-up 9 a.m. Parade starts at 10 a.m. Cash Prizes awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd placeand a prize for Best Use of Recycleable MaterialContact Brian English or Nancy Thomas at 850-926-7487Or email Nancy for Form or more information at nancy_thomas@glic.com PARADECall for Vendors Booth Space AvailableREGISTER TODAY! Call Niraj Patel at 850-926-3737By LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsIf its Tuesday it must be Belgium. Coined in a 1969 romantic comedy, the phrase is often aptly used to describe a whirlwind bus tour in Europe. Instead, experience the continent at a relaxed pace. Opt for a river cruise. First impression, wow! Docked right in the city center along the harbor front a beautiful, sleek new ship. On each side of the river amazing historic buildings, all with walking distance. An overnight stay provides ample time for tours, and for exploring on your own. Once inside, the Avalon Waterways Expression is modern with clean lines and cool colors. Accented with live orchids, and fresh ower arrangements, it is much like a ve star hotel. Reception is immediately visible upon entry, and within days the attentive staff knows both your name and your cabin number. Perhaps due to the small number of guests, only 168 at full capacity, security harkens back to the pre-9/11 days, when you simply take a shore pass when you leave the ship and return it when you get back, no ID required. Cabins are attractive and comfortable, but compact, even more so than an ocean cruise ship. On the lower level, cabins have small windows high up on the wall, due to the proximity of the water level. Upper level cabins are appointed with French balconies. Light just spills in. Slide the window wall open and turn your whole stateroom into a balcony, instead of simply a narrow chair width space outdoors. Between river cruises, amenities vary greatly, so inquire before you book. Meals are made fresh daily. Mornings nd the chef visiting local markets to shop for the evening dinner. Both breakfast and lunch are served buffet style, with bountiful choices, both local specialties, and traditional standbys. Dinner is a la carte, with an available daily selection of beef tenderloin, chicken and salmon, for those who prefer traditional cruise ship fare. Complimentary local wines and beer are served with dinner and selections vary throughout the trip. Cappuccino and snacks are available 24 hours, if you need an afternoon treat. Local performers come aboard to entertain throughout the sailing, and most evenings a keyboardist plays a selection of contemporary music. Dont expect the nonstop activity of a big cruise ship, or the Broadwaystyle shows, instead there are plenty of quiet times more suited to a good book as the ship meanders down the rivers. Daily complimentary tours typically begin after 9 a.m., allowing guests a leisurely start. Extra tours are available to purchase, but even without them, you experience a lot. Tours last several hours, with additional time to explore on your own. Warm weather entices you sit on the top deck, or retreat inside to the lounges for a climate controlled viewing experience. As a means to discover a region in a relaxed yet thorough fashion, a river cruise is the perfect vehicle with no additional packing and unpacking required. (This is the rst in a series of articles, based on the stops along the Avalon Waterways 15 day Magni cent Europe Tour, so come along with us as we experience the breathtaking scenery.)Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www. luxurycruise-travel.com.Diaries of a river cruise through Europe PHOTOS BY LINDA CARTER/LUXURY CRUISE AND TRAVEL Above, a river boat passing Durnstein. At right, a cabin on Avalon Expression on the lower level. is the Library on the Avalon Expression.