Wakulla news

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00497

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newsThe WakullaStreet Beat .........................................................................Page 3 Public Notices ....................................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Church................................................................................Page 5 Obituaries ..........................................................................Page 6 Community ........................................................................Page 7 Sports ...............................................................................Page 8 Outdoors ..........................................................................Page 9 Water Ways ......................................................................Page 10 Sheriffs Report ................................................................Page 11 Green Scene ....................................................................Page 12 Week in Wakulla .............................................................Page 13 Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 14 Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 15 Classi eds ........................................................................Page 16 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 16 Comics .............................................................................Page 19 Natural Wakulla ...............................................................Page 20INDEX OBITUARIES Irving W. Greek Carey Betty Martin Dover James Jimmy Fred Flanagan Donna Pauline Hand Benjamin Salathiel Johnson June B. Pascarella Elinor T. Schumacher Charles Lamar Shaw Jr. One Section One Section 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 119th Year, 2nd Issue Thursday, January 9, 2014See Page 8Coumn By Marj Law on Joe Walls See Page 8By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Editors Note: In an effort to represent both sides of the wetlands issue, The News sat down with an advocate for each side, Chad Hanson and Commissioner Ralph Thomas. Chad Hanson is an environmental advocate for a non-pro t company where he does a lot of work with sheries and the sustainability in the Gulf. Hanson, who lives along the Wakulla River in the Mysterious Waters neighborhood, was part of the original Concerned Citizens of Wakulla group in the early 2000s and has long been a close follower of the countys wetlands issues. Hanson is a strong supporter of keeping development projects out of wetlands areas. Ralph Thomas is vice-chairman of the Board of County Commissioners and a major proponent in advocating for the rights of property owners when it comes to current wetlands issues. Commissioner Thomas feels it is his job as a politician in a representative form of government to provide a voice for those who stand in smaller numbers. He acknowledges the need for environmental protections and said that he greatly respects those that are passionate about them, but that a balance is needed between rights and protections. In order to get to the crux of their argument, both Hanson and Thomas were asked to try to look at the issue of wetlands protections from the other sides point of view and then explain what exactly it is that they dont agree with. They want people to be able to use the property that they bought and own, Hanson said. But theres a disconnect there. The thing is, the stuff that I do on my property yeah, its mine but it still affects other people. If I dump oil on my land, its going to affect others and the environment. Hanson said he understands the pull for individual property rights and that commissioners dont want to infringe on those, but that government has a role. They set the framework and infrastructure and are responsible for the greater good and for the environment, he said. Commissioner Thomas said, This is my home, I grew up here and I chose to raise my children here. I care about this environment just as much as those who are ghting for this ordinance to stay in place, he said. But we need to nd a balance between protecting the environment and protecting a persons individual freedoms. Thomas said that he agrees with and understands the science behind wanting the protections. But theres no speci c science that says a 75-foot buffer is good and 74 is bad, he said. Obviously 500 feet is better, but thats not realistic. Thomas has been criticized in the past for being one of the commissioners who let an item die at a board meeting that would have brought in different state agencies and experts to have a workshop on wetlands and their environmental impacts. To me, its obvious you dont really need a scienti c argument to convince me that the more buffer the better, he said. But where do you draw the line between protecting the environment and protecting an individuals rights? My thing is, if an individual, like those who are for the protections and also live on and near wetlands, can live in harmony with the environment, then why cant his neighbor? Wakulla County wetlands buffers were originally established in 1995, not through an ordinance but, rather, through a conservation element of the countys comprehensive plan. It was not until the spring of 2006 that Wakulla saw its rst wetlands ordinance passed. However, Judge N. Sanders Sauls threw out that ordinance in 2009 because of problems in how it was enacted which were brought to the courts attention through a lawsuit led against code enforcement. The next year, in 2010, the thencounty commission adopted the current ordinance, which was reformed by a wetlands advisory committee. The proposed ordinance passed then with a unanimous 5-0 vote. That ordinance is the one that was challenged last June when Commissioner Randy Merritt brought an item to the table wanting to establish a variance procedure which would make it possible for those with wetlands on their property to build inside the buffer zone if no other option was available for them to use their land. A short time after, in July, Commissioner Richard Harden brought an item before the board, which proposed the countys added protections be gotten rid of all together. That item, like Merritts, passed with a 4-1 vote the lone vote each time cast by Commissioner Howard Kessler. Since that time, a group of concerned citizens banned together to form an organization called the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance (WWA), which as been collecting petitions in an effort to get the countys wetlands ordinance on the referendum, allowing citizens of the county to vote on the matter. Currently, WWA is continuing with collecting petitions and four of the ve commissioners have made it clear that they have no intention of changing their minds. Turn to Page 3 Brrrr! Cold front brings subfreezing temperaturesPHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYORAngela Lucas and her 7-year-old daughter Joy, above, braved the cold for a walk at Azalea Park. Lucas, who is from Indiana, actually thought the temperatures down in the 20s werent quite cold enough. The Centennial Bank thermometer, right, shows the cold. Staff ReportA polar vortex brought artic air deep into Florida this week, dropping temperatures in Wakulla down into the lower 20s overnight on Monday and Tuesday. An earlier cold spell on Thursday and Friday had the National Weather Service issuing a wind chill advisory. It warmed up over the weekend before the colder air swept through the region on Monday bringing a hard freeze. This weeks Street Beat on Page 3 asked how people have been dealing with the cold. And Capt. Jody Campbell, writing in his shing column on Page 9 concluded it was too cold to think about shing.Wetlands: A look at both sides of the issue e thing is, the stu that I do on my property ... it still a ects other people. If I dump oil on my land, its going to a ect others and the environment. Environmentalist Chad Hanson We need to nd a balance between protecting the environment and protecting a persons individual freedoms. Commissioner Ralph omas Because of the MLK holiday on Jan. 20, advertising deadlines will be Friday, Jan. 17 at 10 a.m. for display and classi ed ads, and Thursday, Jan. 16 at 4 p.m. for line legal ads.Ad deadlines PHOTO BY NEIL HOSTNICK/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAn ultralight guides in eight whooping cranes to St. Marks Wildlife Refuge. Whooping cranes fly in Whooping cranes fly inOperation Migration brings in cranesStaff ReportA group of eight Whooping cranes ew over St. Marks on Sunday morning, Jan. 5, on the way to the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. The migration, in which the juvenile cranes follow an ultralight aircraft, is intended to teach the birds to migrate. The migration began from Wisconsin in October and ended in St. Marks, their wintering home a 1,100-mile trip. In April, the birds will return north on their own. This was the 13th migration led by aircraft own by an organization called Operation Migration. Each fall, the group leads a ock of young cranes south to teach them a migration route. The birds are on their own for the return trip north in the spring and subsequent migrations. Florida State Universuty NATIONAL CHAMPS

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Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................50 classrooms/newspapers .........$800/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr Wakulla High School ................50 classrooms/newspapers .........$800/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center.......................20 newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Lynda Kinsey at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of STOP Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Independent Doctor of Optometry edgardneroptical@yahoo.com E d Ga r Start the year off right by taking care of yourself! Make it your New Years resolution to schedule an eye exam. Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $34 per year in Wakulla County $46 per year in Florida $49 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Cant Cant access access The The Wakulla Wakulla n ews ews online online content? content? Subscribe Subscribe today and today and get full get full access! access!By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Lt. Bruce Ashley has been a law enforcement of cer going on 38 years. Although only about 11 of those years have been spent in Wakulla County, Ashleys ties to Wakulla go back to his childhood. Born in Jacksonville, he would travel by train to the area to visit a great uncle who owned a country store in Leon County. He had a place on Ochlockonee Bay and hed bring us down to go shing in his homemade boat or off the dock, Ashley said. Wed also come to Wakulla for the seafood. Ashley earned his degree in Public Administration from Barry University in Miami and later, in 1995, graduated from the Federal Bureau of Investigations National Academy program a prestigious 10-week course that takes place in Quantico, Va., for which you have to be nominated and selected. After spending time in several different parts of the state and serving as chief for two different state agencies, Ashley eventually retired. It was around that time that he was approached by the then-Sheriff David Harvey who asked if he would come on board at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce. Ashley credits the generosity of the countys past three sheriffs, and their beliefs about building the quality of the community through relationships between youth, families and law enforcement, for the ability to be involved with the things hes doing currently. Today, Ashley is plays a key role in several community organizations, namely Keep Wakulla County Beautiful (KWCB) and the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth (WCCY) both of which he serves on as president. Im very fortunate to be able to represent the sheriffs office through those organizations and to be allowed to be involved with their goals and missions, he said. To me, you dont just show up at work and do your job. You do something extra. Something that makes a difference. Ashley is responsible for the countys school resource of cer program and the countys Community Oriented Policing Services (COPS) grant. When asked what the hardest thing about his job is, he had two answers. Emotionally, the hardest thing to do is to notify families when loved ones are lost in a tragic event, he said. Thats really hard. The second thing, Ashley said, is something that frustrates him and a lot of other law enforcement of- cials. Trying to be able to affect greater change in someone elses life, he said. Its really hard sometimes when youre not able to affect a person or a situation positively. When asked what he thought the biggest thing he was a part of currently is, Ashley said, Being a part of an effort to break the traditional response to youth related incidents and work with people who are dedicated to making a difference in kids lives. Ashley said that in a small, rural county like Wakulla, one of the coolest things is to be able to see your successes sometimes. In law enforcement, you never get to report on and you never really know what didnt happen, he said. The number of times someone didnt make that life-altering bad decision because of something you may have done for them is intangible, but its there. In an urban setting, Ashley said, you almost never really know, But here, in a community like this, we can nd them sometimes. People will come up to us and tell us or we can just see it. Its the most you can hope for.By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.net Its hard to believe Maurice Langston has only been director at the senior center for a year. It seems longer. Langston stepped into the post in January last year, taking over for retiring director R.H. Carter. Langston, who spent 33 years in law enforcement, had run for sheriff and lost the election in November. He said at the time that as one door closes, another opens. He had no idea where he would end up, but expresses how very pleased he is that ended up where he is. Its the best loss I ever won, Langston says. Coming in to the job, he focused on gaps in services for seniors and one major issue was those senior citizens who depend on the center for food, whether lunch at the center or Meals on Wheels. Over the weekends, or when the center is closed, they just dont eat. So Langston suggested a senior backpack program, where food is sent home with seniors. Over the holidays, when the center was closed for four days, the center provided four days of food. At one point he learned that some seniors were sharing their food with their dog or cat because they didnt have money for pet food. So he put together a plan to collect broken bags of cat and dog food from local businesses to send home for seniors pet food the businesses happily donated. The program has grown to nearly 100 seniors who receive pet meals on wheels. And it has not cost the center a dime, he says. Budget cutbacks at the state level, including 5 percent cut to Meals on Wheels, meant the center had to turn to the community to make up those dollars. We turned to the people and the people responded, Langston says. Not only the business community, but individuals who wanted to help, who wanted to be part of this. Some of those fundraising efforts have included the mystery dinner theatre, with a play put on by students from Wakulla High School. The district also stepped in when Superintendent Bobby Pearce challenged schools to come up with donations to support the center. Students in the district raised $9,500 for the center. Bevis Funeral Home held a fundraising sh fry that prompted Langston to come up with the idea of holding community sh fries in Ochlockonee Bay, Sopchoppy, Shell Point and still to come in the spring St. Marks. Its part of his plan to water balloon the county with the message of what the senior center is doing, what programs it offers. Hes started a drumming circle at the center that meets quarterly and hes convinced of the effectiveness of those primal drumbeats in giving Alzheimers and Parkinsons sufferers a way to communicate. There are several big fundraisers for the center coming up. One is the second annual Big Bend Kayak Fishing Classic, which brought in 95 anglers last year, and Langston is hoping draws 130 this year. There will be another dance this year last years featured the Tallahassee Swing Band. And, something new, the center plans to host a food truck cookoff at Hudson Park in the spring. Meantime, Langston says his goal is to make the senior center become the community center. Its all about the seniors, he says.People You Should KnowBRUCE ASHLEY MAURICE LANGSTONLieutenant in the sheri s o ce heads youth coalition and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Former sheri s deputy is now director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center AMANDA MAYOR WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 3 PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: How are you dealing with the cold weather?ROBERT LASHLEY Kevins MachineI work inside most of the day but I just put a coat on and deal with it! DAVID PAUL D&T ConstructionIm from the real Florida and am a Florida Cracker from Tarpon Springs and this is Yankee weather! TREY BUNKLEY Tallahassee DemocratStaying in the house more, No golf! GENE McCLARY Home repairI dont like cold weather! I run my own business and am trying to take a few days off! LEE ELDRIDGERainbow InternationalJust keeping jackets on, warm coats, staying in the house, snuggling up with my signi cant other! Compiled by Lynda Kinsey Sealed responses for Bostic Pelt Road NRCS Drainage Improvements addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Director, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until January 29, 2014, 11:00 a.m., at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Any responses received after the time and date specied will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. JANUARY 9, 16, 2014 Sealed responses for Surf Road NRCS Drainage Improvements addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Director, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until January 29, 2014, 11:00 a.m., at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Any responses received after the time and date specied will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. JANUARY 9, 16, 2014 City of Sopchoppy Notice of Public MeetingThe City of Sopchoppy Depot Committee is holding a Public Meeting on Thursday, January 9, 2014 at 6:00 p.m. The meeting will be held at Sopchoppy Depot, 34 Rose Street, Sopchoppy, FL Purpose of Meeting: General PlanningIf a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the City of Sopchoppy, Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 962-4611.JANUARY 9, 2014From Front Page It is the decision of those four commissioners Jerry Moore, Merritt, Thomas and Harden that Hanson says he doesnt understand. On the sign coming into Wakulla County, it claims that this is The natural place to be, he said. We are trying to promote things like our eco-tourism, birding and our scenic highway, but if we are going to capitalize on those then protecting our wetlands is a natural t with that. Hanson said that areas with wetlands are not only attractive, but that they play huge roles in providing habitats, food for wildlife and other environmental assets. When it comes down to it, he said, theres just a vast difference between state ability and local ability when dealing with the countys wetlands. The state said point blank that it would be less costly for both the state and the local government to keep our protections, said Hanson. They simply do not have the manpower or ability to send inspectors to properties, but we have the ground level knowledge and the ability to regulate development properly. Commissioner Thomas gave an example of a case that he knows of currently of a man who owns a piece of property in Spring Creek who is trying to build a home. Hes been working with Planning and Zoning to gure out a size for his home, Thomas said. But hes at the point where hes got to build it at multiple stories and shrink the footprint to 700 square feet. This person, Thomas said, has already obtained state permitting, but Wakulla County, because of the current protections, is telling him he cant build on his property. Now, weve effectively taken his property away from him, Thomas said. When and if he goes looking for someone to sue, who is he going to choose? Thomas pointed out that it will mostly likely be the county, in which case it will be the citizens who will foot the bill.Wetlands: A look at both sides The Wakulla High School carpentry class created red and white hobby horses and tabletop basketball goals for distribution to citizens in the Operation Santa program Saturday, Dec. 14. The students created the wooden toys so that less fortunate Wakulla County children could have a brighter Christmas. Hobby horsesSpecial to The NewsAlby, the white blue crab that was caught a several months ago by a Panacea sherman and brought to Gulf Specimen Marine Lab has just molted meaning he recently shed his shell and emerged as an albino. This may be the rst albino soft shell crab known to science, according to Jack Rudloe, founder of Gulf Specimen. When a crab molts, it sheds its hard armor shell for a period until its new shell hardens. During this brief time, which may only last two or three hours, the crab becomes soft and edible and is a high priced delicacy. Upon hearing about the event, Thomas Petrandis of the Tropical Trader Restaurant in Panacea offered to make a substantial donation to the aquarium if he can have the honor of serving the rst ever albino soft shell crab sandwich. Its an intriguing offer, said Rudloe. Thomas and I both want to know if the crab would stay white, or turn orange when cooked, but we are going to decline. We hope to keep Alby alive until we nd an female albino crab to see if we can breed them. That may take a while, since this is the second white blue crab the Rudloe has seen since 1966. A search of the internet shows that there are four others that have been found along the Atlantic seaboard, in Maryland and Virginia over the past 20 years. Most of them were brought in dead, one lived for three days and then died, but Alby has outlasted all the rest by weeks and has now shed his shell and increased his body length by a third. Alby was originally caught by a crab sherman Pistol Tim Misspell, then rushed to Gulf Specimen by Hutton Seafood that produces regularly blue soft shell crabs. They hold them in vats until they shed their shells, and serve them in their seafood restaurant trailer at Medart. Stacey Hutton, the owner of the seafood market, has noti ed her crabbers to keep on the alert for a mate for Alby. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA rare albino blue crab named Alby at Gulf Specimen.Albino blue crab is found

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As this controversy over the wetlands issue has been going on, Ive heard from several people saying they wanted The News to give it a more in-depth look. One reader told me, he wasnt sure who to believe that he saw value in the arguments put forth by both sides. Whats unfortunate about the issue is that it has so frequently devolved into personal attacks. In some of the hyperbole, that gets slung around and passed off as political thinking, is the idea that the four commissioners who support repealing the ordinance want to ll in the sinkholes and pave Wakulla County to the coast. The opposite view is of these tree-huggers who already got their piece of paradise on the water and now they dont want to let anybody else in, or share what theyve got. I may be naive, but I think both sides when they talk about their reasons for supporting wetlands protection or repealing the ordinance are expressing sincerely held beliefs. The ve sitting county commissioners are all political conservatives some more conservative than others. But a cornerstone of current Republican philosophy and all ve are Republicans is to reduce government instrusion in private life. There is a sincere disagreement between the two sides and its expressed well in this weeks front page story by reporter Amanda Mayor over how far government should go. Nobody in this controversy wants to pollute Wakullas waters. Nobody is saying there should be a gate at the Wakulla county line to keep newcomers and new growth out. Rather, one side sees it as a property rights issue. The other side sees it as protecting what makes Wakulla special. Those sincerely held beliefs are sometimes ercely expressed but shouldnt cloud the real issue. PEOPLE YOU SHOULD KNOW This weeks issue also includes another installment in our occasional series on People You Should Know. Pro led this time are Lt. Bruce Ashley and Maurice Langston, both of whom are doing great things for Wakulla. Past pro les have included R.H. Carter, Amy Geiger, Scott Joyner and Jimmie Doyle. But there is one pro le I have been after for years and she wont agree to do an interview: Gail Campbell. I have begged and pleaded with her. But she insists she doesnt want the attention. I think there are few people more deserving of the attention. Gail has been a driving force behind the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and Operation Santa, and has done so much to help so many young people and people in need. I called her a week ago and left a pleading message on her answering machine to let me interview her. I received a handwritten card from her: Thank you for the call. Your words meant a lot and your words are enough. There are so many people in Wakulla who give and give and do and do and so my answer is the same. Not me. You are a special person, Gail.William Snowden is editor of The Wakulla News. Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriffs Report for December 26, 2013 Underwater Wakulla January 9, 2014 Natural Wakulla: 2013 saw heavy insect activity Local man will appear on reality show Underwater Wakulla January 2, 2014 Year in Review: A look at 2013 Sundance western store is now open on Highway 319 More cold on the waythewakullanews.com Follow us onNot the only victim of mail order eraBuyer beware on animal adoptionsREADERS WRITE: Unfortunately, wetlands issue gets personalSchool board candidate needed Support Rotary Valentine Celebration Concern about e ect of violence on children Editor, The News : My family very much enjoyed your Polaris Submarine buying spree (Still waiting on my Polaris Nuclear submarine, Opinion, Dec. 26). I too was a victim of that mail order era. However, my baking soda powered submarine actually worked and I actually received it. Besides my submarine, I spent all of my spare change, of which there wasnt much, on comic books. I had stacks and stacks of 1950s and early s comic books of the type that are worth a fortune now including your Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos as well as Sgt. Rock of Easy Company and Johnny Cloud, the Navajo Ace and of course, all the Superman and Batman series! We moved. I threw those rare edition comic books that wouldve made me a millionaire today, in the trash. Didnt want the hassle of moving them from our old house to the new. Like you, my disappointment continues to this day! If I had only known! Bill Catalina Crawfordville Editor, The News: An old but wise way of doing business. Now that CHAT has left the adoption business, anyone adopting animals in our county should insist on a healthy animal. Please insist on documentation of vaccinations, recent heartworm test, fecal test, feline Leukemia test etc. Make sure this documentation is something you can check with the veterinarian that provided the care for the animal. As always, please take the animal to your veterinarian as soon as possible to be checked (within seven days, if possible). Please do not adopt any animal that has not been spayed or neutered. Everyone wants to help reduce the number of homeless animals we have. Patricia Ross pkross@jsmithlanier.com Editor, The News: We have a very good school system, thanks to our dedicated teachers and hard working students. Our students living in District 1, the Woodville Highway area, need a good role model to represent them on the Wakulla County School Board. If no one steps up to run against Ray Gray, he will automatically be re-elected. I do not enjoy speaking ill of anyone and would never say anything I couldnt verify. Ray will greet you with a big smile and hug but he is carrying a lot of baggage. He cant seem to manage his own affairs, so why would we want him to represent our students? He was red as director of Parks & Recreation. He has active Judgment Liens, delinquent property taxes and was ned $7,500 for five years of falsifying information on the Form 6 reports. He is now facing a Motion for Final Judgment after default led by Pamela Bondi, attorney general of the State of Florida. The hearing is scheduled for Feb. 5 at 9 a.m. in courtroom B of the Wakulla County Courthouse. If you are at least 18 years old, a registered voter and live in District 1, you qualify to run for the position. The $25,000 a year salary plus health insurance, life insurance and retirement bene ts could really help with college tuition or family bills. You need no prior experience. The school board meets once a month for about an hour. The agenda will be sent to you prior to the meetings. If you dont understand items, ask questions, then vote with our students interest at heart. Go see Buddy Wells at the Supervisor of Elections of ce and get started. The primary election is Aug. 26 and you need to qualify by June 16. Donna Sanford Crawfordville Editor, The News:Here it is ve years later and things are worse than ever, wholesome cartoons of yesteryear are gone and what replaces them are violent pictures of cute animals or people carrying guns and beating each other to a pulp. Kindles, iPods, iPhones, and computers allow our children free downloads to all kinds of violence. Now most of these games have a rating of 17+ on them, so parents beware of what your child is downloading it may look cute and innocent but looks can be very deceiving! Kick the Buddy is a very cute little gingerbread man looks innocent enough, right? However, this game has guns where you can kill the poor gingerbread man. This along with Kick the Boss and Sniper, just to name a couple more, are very violent games for small children but your child is looking at the picture not the violent quality, thats why it is our job to take a closer look at anything our children are doing this will keep them safe. There are, unfortunately, a lot of factors that can and will effect or impact the behaviors of children in this day and age. Sad to say that most of it could be contained and recti ed but isnt because our standards and morals in the world have changed. For example, TV shows and movies they are all about murder, sex, and drugs. You dont see any family movies out anymore that are clean and that you can watch without feeling uncomfortable around your children. Even all the new kid movies that the kids love so much like Shrek, Open Season, Call of the Wild and all those, they are all lled with adult humor. Sure, some of the kids dont catch the punchline, but why bother putting it in there? To amuse the adult who took the child to see it? Why should we be amused by the trash that is ultimately harming our children? I mean, really, look at the Tom and Jerry cartoons that everyone loves so much. They blow each other up, hit with frying pans and throw knives at each other just to mention a few. Things like this are planting seeds in our childrens minds for violence. Letting them think that it is funny and acceptable does not help at all. And the other factor is that in some cases, people use the TV as a babysitter. It is a lot easier to place your child in front of the TV and let them get lost in all the shows than it is to spend some quality time with them and talk to them. If parents today would nd time to spend with their children, talking to them and nding out what is on their mind and what is going on in their lives, I truly believe that a lot of the violence would be avoided and there would be plenty more happy homes. But that is only my opinion. According to the research provided some of the traits and behaviors that parents and childhood providers would be able to spot before childhood violence would be: Temper tantrums lasting over 15 minutes that cannot be calmed by parents, or caregivers; Aggressive outbursts for no reason; Overly active, impulsive, and fearless; Consistently refusing to follow directions and listen to adults; Little or no attachment to parents; Frequently watches violence on TV; Engages in play that has a violent theme; Cruel to animals and other children. So by paying close attention and getting involved with your children you will notice these traits and be able to handle them before it is out of control. For more information about violence in children please visit Child & Adolescent Health, www.nimh.nnih.gov/publicat/ childmenu.cfm and the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, www. aacap.org. Linda Wicker CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: Rotarians of Wakulla County are making plans for the 16th annual Rotary Valentine Celebration. It will be held on Saturday, Feb. 8. This event will attract thousands of our friends and neighbors along with many folks from outside our area. Over the past decade, the Rotary Valentine Celebration has allowed the Wakulla Rotary Club to donate over $175,000 to local charities that work to improve the lives of people right here in Wakulla County. The celebration will kick off this year with our second 5K Cupid Dash and Fit for Love Walk. This run will take participants behind Hudson Park, down Arran Road and circle back to the Crawfordville Womens Club. Breakfast in the Park, which is always a great crowd pleaser, will begin at 8 a.m. The Valentine Parade rolls out at 10 a.m. and then we move right on to the Celebration in Hudson Park. The Celebration features live entertainment, food and craft vendors, and carnival rides as well. Again this year, we are selling tickets for a grand prize of $1,000 cash, which will be drawn at 3 p.m. Were asking you to be a sponsor of this exciting event. Sponsorship levels range from $1,000 and up for the Sugar Daddy level to $500 for Dream Boat, $250 for Sweetheart, $175 for Angel, $100 Valentine, and Cupid sponsors for the 5K Dash. We hope that you will choose to be a sponsor of the 16th annual Rotary Valentine Celebration. Help us continue raising funds that will brighten the future of Wakulla County. Sincerely, Richard Russell President Rotary Club of Wakulla Niraj Patel Chair, Valentine Celebration William Snowdenwsnowden@thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 5 BUCKHORN NEWS Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am S t 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR Cold is as cold feels and I dont like feeling coldResolve to make this year a better oneBy ETHEL SKIPPER Happy new year to everyone. Last year was a good year for most of us, but we hope this year will be much better. There are some things we can do to make it better. Things that are not righteous and true it is not a good practice to fall for them. One has to stand for something, if not you will fall for nothing. If you have been taught what is right, thank the Father His words are placed in you. They are spirit and life. Let the Word dwell in you richly in all wisdom. The ability of God is released within you by the preaching and teaching of your leader is the word of God. Gods word is true and alive in you if you believe. Have faith, there is power in the word, love, peace, joy and all good things. Our prayers go out to all the sick and shut-in, those in the hospital, nursing home, prison, jail, homeless, and those who have not confessed Christ as their personal savior. Let us pray for the healing of the Lord. Happy birthday to the following people in January: Betty Green, Colleen Mitchell, Glenda Simmon, Willie Mae Steven, Earnest Andrew, Debra McRay, Lizzie Webster, Mother Josephine E. Allen, Sandra Johnson. Belated happy birthday to Kevin Hines and Felice White from your mother Alberta Hines. On Jan. 15 at 7:30 p.m. at Skipper Temple Church will be a fellowship with Macedonia Church of Christ and Skipper Temple. The Tallahassee district presiding Elder Edward Brigham will make his yearly visit. The public is welcome. By JAMES L. SNYDER I was sitting on the back porch sipping an ice-cold tea with a splash of lemon when I received a text from a relative up north. I was enjoying a pleasant afternoon basking in the winter sun of Florida. I am not sure what God was thinking of when He created the north with all that bad weather and snow and such, but I know what He was thinking of when He created the south especially Florida. He was thinking in particular of me and my insatiable love of the sun. Basking in the Florida sun is the great reward of being smart and moving to Florida. I have some friends who were born in Florida and think they are a little bit better than me. I remind them that they had no choice of being born in Florida but I, on the other hand, moved to Florida on my own volition. I think I have the upper hand on that one. I may be old but I certainly do delight in the modern technology. It used to be that when you got a call from a relative you had to answer the telephone and talk to the person on the other end for as long as they hung on. Today, thanks to modern gadgetry, when a relative wants to contact me, they usually do it by text. I love it. Getting a text is a strange thing, or it can be. If I do not respond right away, I can always claim that there is something wrong with my cell phone and my texting isnt working right today. Then I can get back to that relative whenever it suits me. Or, as the case with some relatives, and you know who I mean, I can ignore it. If you are a relative of mine and have not heard from me or had any of your text answered the simple answer is, I am not really ignoring you (ha ha ha) my cell phone is not working correctly. This relative that text me was complaining about how cold it was up north and even had the courtesy to send me a picture of their backyard just chockfull of some white substance known as snow. The text read, I bet you wish you were here to enjoy this! I think that relative would have lost that bet for sure. I love those snow scenes on postcards or in text messages like this one, but as to be personally involved with all of the frigid snow, do not bet on me! Years ago, Cold and I experienced a deep disagreement and we have been separated ever since. As far as I am concerned, the separation is nal! I really do not want anything more to do with Cold. We are not even on speaking terms. Up north, they complain when the temperature falls below 30. Here in Florida I complain when the temperature falls below 70. Whenever the temperature dips below that magical 70, I have to break out one of my sweaters. What an inconvenience for me to have to put on a sweater because it is just a little bit cool on the outside. Then my relative sent me a picture of her standing in the snow looking like the abominable snowman. She had more clothes on than I actually own and have in my closet. I wonder how she walks around wearing all those clothes? How in the world does she ever sit down wearing all those clothes? And what about that thing wrapped around her head? We have hats here in Florida but not quite like the one she was wearing. It looked like she was wearing some igloo. At this point in my life, I could not afford, for a variety of reasons, to move back north. I do not think my relatives up north could put up with me at this point. They offer me a friendly invitation to come and spend some time with them during the winter season. I really could not handle it. As soon as the temperature dropped below 70, I would be complaining, grouching and working on everybodys nerves. I would be such a nuisance that they would have to get together and buy me a plane ticket back to sunny Florida. My relatives should thank me for not moving up north to enjoy the snow with them. No relationship is quite like that relationship that spans several hundred miles. You know the old saying, Absence makes the heart grow fonder. So, if you add distance to that absence you have the epitome of a wonderfully fond heart. Many things separate us from one another. Sometimes that separation is voluntary and sometimes it isnt. The apostle Paul understood that nothing could separate him from God. For I am persuaded, that neither death, nor life, nor angels, nor principalities, nor powers, nor things present, nor things to come, Nor height, nor depth, nor any other creature, shall be able to separate us from the love of God, which is in Christ Jesus our Lord (Romans 8:38-39). It does not matter how cold it is outside as long as inside there is a warm relationship with God bordering on ery expectation.The Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. A 90th birthday celebration luncheon in honor of the Rev. John Marvin Nichols will be held at the Atha Church of God Fellowship Hall, 26000 Fuqua Circle in Altha from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. CST on Saturday, Jan. 11. RSVP to Karen Columbus at (850) 384-9288. Your presence is the only gift desired. By TRACY RENEE LEE Both visual and auditory hallucinations are common during bereavement. Although disconcerting to some, others nd these experiences to be comforting. The hallucinatory experience is generally transient, occurring within the rst few weeks of loss. Hallucinations are not an indication of a more complicated grief experience, nor do they allude to an extended grief experience. Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http:// pushin-up-daisies.blogspot.com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www. QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.90th birthday luncheon set Hallucinations are common GRIEF BRIEF

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Elinor T. Schumacher, 84, of Crawfordville, died Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, at home surrounded by loved ones. She was born on Nov. 15, 1929 in Atlanta to Floramae and James Milton Tingle and grew up in Hapeville, Ga. Survivors include her son, Robert Thomas Cooley; her daughters, Carole Cooley Walker and Christina Cooley Smith; six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The family will hold a private memorial service at a later date. In lieu of owers, please make memorial donations in her name to Big Bend Hospice, 2889 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327. June B. Pascarella, 86, passed away on Thursday, Jan. 2, 2014 in Blountstown. She was born in Harvest, Ala., and had lived in this area for ve years coming from Quincy. She was a Rural Mail Carrier for the U.S. Postal Service. She was a member of Jehovahs Witness Kingdom Hall in Crawfordville. Visitation was held Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville prior to the service. Funeral Services were held Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. There will be a private burial. Survivors include one son, Gene Pascarella (Marilyn) of Crawfordville; one sister, Helen Dorris (Bill); two brothers, Kenneth Buffaloe and Joseph Buffaloe; two grandchildren, Seth Pascarella and Ervin Duarte; and ve great grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Jene Pascarella in 1985; children, Ann Pascarella and Donald Pascarella; and granddaughter, Rena Pascarella. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Charles Lamar Shaw Jr., 74, of Crawfordville, formerly of Tallahassee, passed away Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2014. An ordained Community of Christ minister, he was a devoted father and grandfather. He was a retired elementary school teacher who loved writing, drawing, and spending time with his family and friends. He was a member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary and loved shing. He was an avid Alabama football fan. Survivors include his son, Charles L. Bo (Jean) Shaw III of Panacea; daughter, Cristina (Ricky) Harrell of Crawfordville; sister, Patricia (Ralph) Sapp of Havana; grandchildren, Nathan Shaw, Ava Shaw, Jesse Shaw, and Ariel Harrell. He was predeceased by his parents, Charles and Bertha Evans Shaw; brothers, Bill Shaw and Barney Shaw; and sister, Mary Cornelia Vice. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 3, 2014 at Faith Holiness House of Prayer with Elder Thomas Roberts of ciating. Interment will follow at the Vice Family Cemetery in Wakulla Gardens. The family received friends at 1 p.m. at the church, the day of the service. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, Macclenny, 904-259-4600. Please sign the online guestbook at http://www. forbesfuneralhome.net/ Benjamin Salathiel Johnson, 67, died on Wednesday, Dec. 24, 2013 at Tallahassee Regional Memorial Hospital after a brief illness. He was a resident of St. Marks, and was born Oct. 10, 1946 in Quincy to Mary A. and Archie S. Johnson. He served in the U.S. Navy. Survivors include his brothers, Sidney Johnson of Quincy, Billy Johnson (Gay) of Wytheville, Va., Mike Johnson (Dorothy) of Panama City, and Taylor Chambers (Valerie) of Walls, Miss.; sisters, Carolyn Mills of Bristol, Charlene Spears (John) of Crawfordville, Maxine Johnson of Tallahassee, and Marilyn Revell (Pervis) of Quincy; many nieces and nephews, as well as numerous greatnieces and great-nephews. He is also survived by his adopted family Bryan and Jeanette Alsup of Tallahassee and Amelia Alsup. He was predeceased by his parents; and a niece, Maricarole Mills. Services were held Friday, Dec. 27, 2013, at Washington Street Church of Christ in Quincy. Family will have visitation at 1 p.m. and services will be at 2 p.m. The family was hosted at the residence of Marilyn and Pervis Revell, 203 Dupont Ave. in Quincy. Charles McClellan Funeral Home, 850-6277677. Betty Martin Dover, 73, formerly of Shelby, N.C., died on Thursday, Dec. 26, 2013 at St. James Health and Rehabilitation Center in Carrabelle. Born in Cleveland County on Oct. 5, 1940, the daughter of the late O.D. and Linnie Mae Smith Martin. In addition to her parents, she was predeceased by her husband, Donald Earl Dover; and three brothers, Howard Martin, James Martin, and Charles Martin. Survivors include three sons, Don Dover (Sue) of Hickory, N.C., Kim Dover and Tonda Putnam, and Tim Dover (Brenda), all of Shelby, N.C.; a daughter, Tracy Peavy (Delacy) of Crawfordville; five sisters, Loretta Ivey, Gale Edmunds, Fay Williams, Kay Hamrick, and Barbara Harris; three brothers, Pete Martin, Harry Martin, and Dale Martin; seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Funeral services were held on Saturday Dec. 28, 2013 at 2 p.m. at Faith Baptist Church in Shelby, N.C. with Dr. Barry Goodman of- ciating. A memorial service will be held on Jan. 18, 2014 at 2 p.m. at the Moose Lodge in Panacea. James Jimmy Fred Flanagan, 64, passed away, Saturday, Jan. 4, 2014 in Tallahassee. He was born in Dalton, Ga., grew up in Macon, Ga., and moved to this area in 1993. He was a retired Senior Chief in the U.S. Navy. He was a member of the VFW. Graveside services were held Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 at 2 p.m. at Panacea Cemetery in Panacea. Survivors include his sister, Betty Posey of Tallahassee; a brother, Daniel Flanagan (Lois) of Dalton, Ga.; and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, James and Mary Flanagan; and a brother, Robert Flanagan. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Irving W. "Greek" Carey, of Crawfordville, died Dec. 4, 2013. He was born in Tarpon Springs on Feb. 17, 1931 to Isadora Nedley Carey and Walter Carey. He served as an active duty Marine for eight years and continued service as a Naval Reservist for an additional 14 years. He moved to North Florida in 1967 to work for Southeastern Telephone Company, as it was then known. He later retired from there. Survivors include his wife of 39 years, Marlene Cavanaugh Carey; his children, Phil Carey (Sue), Walter Carey, Mary Ann Smith (Les) and their mother Eva Nelson; his stepchildren, Chip Agerton and Margaret "Cissy" Agerton Jones; six grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents and a step-son, Charles "Chuck" Agerton. A graveside service, with Military Honors by the U.S. Marine Corps, was held at Roselawn Cemetery on Monday, Dec. 9, 2013 at 11 a.m. A private family viewing was held one hour prior to the service at the graveside. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Charles McClellan Funeral Home, Quincy, (850) 627-7677, was in charge of arrangements. Donna Pauline Hand, 57, of Panacea, Florida, died on Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2013. She was a 40 year resident of Wakulla County. Survivors include her sons, Josh Barton, Clint (Joy) Barton, and Ricky Barton all of Crawfordville; a daughter, Jessica (Merritt) Taylor of Panacea; brothers, Donnie (Dorothy) Moore and Nikki Jo Dahlia, both of New Mexico; sisters, Carolyn (Bob) Pascoe and Mary Mead, both of Michigan, Kathy (Ed) Rice of West Virginia, Debbie Moore of Port Orange, and Helena Dahlia of New Mexico; and eight grandchildren. She was predeceased by her parents, Donald and Betty Moore. A memorial service was held on Monday, Jan. 6, 2014 at 2 p.m. at the Mt. Beasor Primitive Baptist Church in Sopchoppy, with Elder Bruce Taylor of ciating. The family received friends at 1 p.m. at the church the day of the service. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, Macclenny, 850-559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at http:// www.forbesfuneralhome.net. Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comObituaries Irving W. Greek Carey Betty Martin Dover James Jimmy Fred Flanagan Donna Pauline Hand Benjamin Salathiel Johnson June B. Pascarella Elinor T. Schumacher Charles Lamar Shaw Jr. Benjamin Salathiel Johnson Betty Martin Dover James Jimmy Fred Flanagan Irving W. Greek Carey Donna Pauline Hand June B. Pascarella Charles Lamar Shaw Elinor T. Schumacher *Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.ANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGIST Crawfordville Miracle Ear3295 Crawfordville Hwy, The Log Cabin, Barry Building1-850-942-4007 NOW This Holiday Season Did You: $27WE OFFER HEARING HELP AS LOW AS BUY ONE AID & GET 2nd Aid at 50% OFF!per monthwith approved credit.(Oer is good on any make or model)Valid at participating Miracle Ear locations only. Limit one coupon per purchase. May not be combined with any other oers and does not applyto prior sales. Expires February 18, 2014IS THE TIME TO HEAR BETTER! N Y N H T Call for an appointmentEvery Thursday rr s Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 reo and short sale specialists 850926-1011our ome own ealtor ou Looking for Looking for the latest the latest Local News? Local News? LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 7happenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsNicole Martin of Crawfordville recently graduated from Florida Gulf Coast University with a Master of Science degree from the College of Arts and Sciences. Florida Gulf Coast University is dedicated to providing a student-centered learning environment that offers the highest quality educational opportunities for the development of the knowledge, insights, competencies, and skills necessary for success in life and work. Call us at 1-888-889-1095 or visit our website at www. fgcu.edu.Special to The NewsArmy Pfc. Melissa M. Durden has graduated from Basic Combat Training at Fort Leonard Wood, Waynesville, Mo. During nine weeks of training, the soldier received instruction in drill and ceremony, weapons, ri e marksmanship quali- cation, bayonet combat, chemical warfare, field training and tactical exercises, marches, military courtesy, military justice, physical tness, rst aid, and Army history, traditions, and core values. Durden is the daughter of Connie and Joey Metcalf of Tallahassee. She is a 2006 graduate of Wakulla High School.Special to The NewsHannah McCann was recognized for her writing by the American Society of Nondestructive Testing for her paper titled "Neural Network Burst Pressure Prediction in Composite Overwrapped Pressure Vessels Using Mathematically Modeled Acoustic Emission Failure Mechanism Data." The award is designed to acknowledge individuals who demonstrated a high degree of effort toward technical, educational or managerial achievement in nondestructive testing through publication in Research in Nondestructive Evaluation. Recipients of the award are selected on the merit of written contributions. Hannah is DaDT Engineer working for Lockheed Martin on the F-35 Strike Fighter in Ft. Worth Texas. Hannah has a Masters degree in Aerospace Engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Hannah is the daughter of Gene & Darlene Surber of Headland, Alabama. She is the granddaughter of Franklin & Gracie Roberts of Sopchoppy and Lee & Pat Plympton of Crawfordville.Special to The NewsCome stop by for our rst ever pot luck social luncheon and meeting to be held at the home of our Democratic Womens Club President, Diane Wilson, 175 Tarpine Drive in Panacea at 11:30 a.m. on Jan. 20. Please bring a small dish suitable for lunch to share with others. Refreshments will be furnished. We will primarily be discussing the upcoming First Annual Girls Nite Out Health Fair which we are planning in order to benefit the Wakulla County Relay for Life. For more information, contact Diane Wilson at dwilson.1947@gmail.com or (850) 984-4768.Democratic Womens Club will hold potluck McCann receives award for work on paper Durden graduates basic trainingMartin graduates from Florida Gulf Coast T H ES H O PGREATBICYCL E 3624 Woodville Hwy., 1/2 mile south of the Fairgrounds SALES SERVICE PARTS RENTALS ADULT TRIKES850-402-0545 Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & DogsOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed 570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-12902 Special to The NewsThe January Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Wednesday, Jan. 15. The event will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. and will include light hors d'oeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association (SGLA). The sun will set at 6:03 p.m. and the moon will rise at 5:55 p.m. on that evening. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost for afterwards is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at (850) 9277745.Full Moon Climb will take place on Jan. 15Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Cattlemens Association will hold its rst quarterly meeting of the year on Thursday, Jan. 16, at 6 p.m. The meeting will be held at the UF/IFAS Extension Of ce, 84 Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. Dr. Cheryl Mackowiak, associate professor at the UF/ IFAS North Florida Research and Education Center, will speak on getting the best performance from pasture soil. She will address the special needs of, and expectations for, winter pastures in Wakulla County. Long time Wakulla County cattleman Richard Gowdy is president of the association which represents local beef and dairy producers. He extends an invitation to all area residents who would like to come and learn about cattle in Wakulla County. Wakulla Cattlemens Association will hold quarterly meeting Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Historical Society will begin its monthly programs, on Jan. 14 at 7 p.m. Meetings will take place at the Wakulla County Public Library with the revelation of a couple years' worth of research oral and written by a gentleman from Moultrie, Ga., named Mr. Bill McLean. A number of Wakulla County residents have met Mr. McLean and remember him asking about the old boat that sat partially submerged in the Ochlockonee River near the Highway 319 Bridge for many years. His questions were not casual but were in earnest search for answers as to who owned the boat that was abandoned on the river and how did it happen to have a handpainted picture on an interior wall that reminded all who saw it of pictures and stories of the ceiling painting at Wakulla Springs as well as pictures painted on the walls of the old Carter House, aka Gamble House, aka the Langston House. Mr. McLean persevered and now has answers which he will share in our January meeting! Anyone with memories of the old boat or any of the paintings in the other buildings will be fascinated to hear of his research and what he nally learned. Don't miss this program detailing determined queries leading to long lost answers. Remember, WCHS meeting, Jan. 14, 7 p.m., at the Wakulla County Public LibraryMcLean will share ndings during Historical Society meeting

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Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com SportsSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Middle School boys basketball team concluded their season with a record of 7-5 after a commanding victory over Riversprings Middle, 47-34. The Wildcats took the lead on the opening tip and never looked back maintaining the lead to the nal buzzer. The team was led by Antwan Thomas and Cephus Greene, who both nished with 12 points. Greene hit four 3-pointers in the game; both played their nal game as a Wildcat. Chris Beverly, who nished with 21 points helped the Bears chip away at large lead getting within 6 points early in the 4th quarter, but WMS went on multiple runs to take the wind out of the Bears sails. WMS went 2-0 against RMS this season.Staff ReportThe Rotary Club of Wakulla will again be holding its Cupid 5K Dash & 1 Mile Fun Walk as part of the 16th annual Valentine Celebration on Feb. 8. Check-in will begin at 7 a.m. with the walk at 7:30 and 5K at 8 a.m. You can register online at raceit.com at https:// www.raceit.com/Register/?event=24619. Registration is $15. A T-shirt will be available for the rst 100 racers. If you have any questions, please contact us at wakullavalentine@gmail.com and like us on Facebook at Rotary Club of Wakulla.Special to The NewsPractices for the 2014 Wakulla High School track teams will start on Wednesday, Jan. 8. All high school students interested in participating in Track & Field should meet at the high school track at 2:30 p.m. on Jan. 8. All athletes should report in workout gear and make sure they have a current physical, an EL 3 and an EL3CH form either with them or on le in the Athletic Directors Of ce. These forms are mandatory before a student can participate in any practice. The forms are available online at the High School website, in the Athletics tab. Practices will be held daily, Monday through Friday, beginning at 2:30 p.m. and ending around 4:30 p.m..BASKETBALL TRACK ROAD RACEWMS Boys are county champs WHS track practice starts Cupid 5K will be held again sports news and team viewsNATIONAL CHAMPSLocal photographer Ken Fields, who shoots Wakulla High School and FSU football games for The News, traveled to Pasadena to the Rose Bowl to photograph the national championship game. I couldnt pass it up, Fields said. It was the chance of a lifetime. Ken FieldsStaff ReportFlorida State pulled out a last second win against Auburn in the BCS National Championship on Jan. 6 in Pasadena, Calif., with a nal score of 34-31. FSUs quarterback and recent Heisman Trophy winner, Jameis Winston, who has not shown much sign of getting rattled during the regular season, showed a little on Monday night as it took him most of the game to gain momentum. The Seminoles trailed the Auburn Tigers for the majority of the game until the fourth quarter, when Florida State scored 21 points and began to close the de cit. The team was down 31-27 with 1:19 left on the clock after Auburns Tre Mason ran the ball in 37 yards for a touchdown. With 13 seconds left in the game, Winston threw to Kelvin Benjamin for the winning touchdown. With the win, the Noles nished their season with a perfect 14-0 record, ended SECs record streak of seven national championships and earned the schools third ever national title.Clockwise from top: FSU fullback Chad Abram just before he scored in the fourth quarter; a Seminole cheerleader; quarterback Jameis Winston during an interview just after the Noles victory; Jameis Winston with the national championship trophy; Defensive back P.J. Williams makes a leaping interception; Winston evades Auburns defense; and Jimbo Fisher with the championship trophy.

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By MARJ LAWIf you are seated in a restaurant setting with your family, and someone comes in with a gun, what do you do? Lt. Boonie Mitchell of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce (WCSO) offered more training to the group of women who meet at the range each Wednesday morning from 9 a.m. to noon. This group is comprised of women of all ages and any experience from absolutely none to having shot as a child. This time, Lt. Boonie suggested we would be in a restaurant with our family of two children. We see a threat a person is waving a gun at a cashier and swinging it towards seated customers. Think safety rst. Concealment. Slide your children (and husband?!) under the table so they are less of a target. Normally, if you werent trapped by your table, youd try to nd a way to create distance from the threat. Even though we may have a conceal carry license, we are not law enforcement in any way, so our job is to get away from the threat, or to give the adversary a chance to escape. But in this case, we cant leave the table. So first, conceal the kids. Next, push your jacket away and draw. Lt. Boonie set up targets in front of our seated women. He ipped the targets away, then turned them so they faced us for just a matter of seconds. We had to practice shooting the target fast at about 5 yards away. We shot 3 to 4 rounds if we reacted quickly enough. Drawing and shooting rapidly isnt as easy as it looks! And rapid response seems to get slower as we get more ahem mature. Not only did we have to react quickly, we also had to shoot for the body mass which includes the triangle of shoulders to midsection or the reverse triangle of low hips to midsection. Try drawing fast and being accurate at the same time! And, Lt. Boonie cautioned, do not (do not) re-holster your weapon. Engage until the threat is gone. Dont assume there is only one threat. Scan right and left. Your adversary is likely to have brought reinforcements. If the adversary leaves, good. Let him go. Make sure, wherever you keep your concealed weapon, that you are able to draw it in a ash. And know your weapon well. Although you may have shot several handguns, this one is critical. Each time we meet at the WCSO range, we learn something new. Recently, weve shot from barricades using dominant and non-dominant hands. Weve learned some unarmed techniques to protect ourselves. Weve shot from seated positions. The education and support we get from the sheriffs of ce range personnel is enormous. Learning how to be safer is our most important accomplishment. Well, next to having lunch afterwards! Socializing is part of the experience!Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 9outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsPHOTO BY MARJ LAW?SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMembers of the Shoot Like a Girl Club in a training scenario in which they are threatened while out with their family and shoot from a sitting position. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 Get Your THE WEAT HE R THE WEATHE RIS IS I hope you had a safe and Happy New Year. As I am writing this column, we are expecting two extremely cold nights and then a warming trend. The cold should push more sh into the rivers if they havent already moved offshore in search of warmer weather. It could also kill sh that get stuck up in a creek in very shallow water. Lets hope that doesnt happen and it makes our river shing very good. Its really hard to think about shing with the wind blowing about 25 knots and the temperature hovering around 38 degrees. When I was much younger the cold didnt bother me but now Id rather sit inside on days like this and watch Roland Martin catch fish and dream about the warmer days. Dr. Jim ONeil went to the St. Marks River and caught a pile of reds and some sheepshead. He was shing live shrimp on the bottom. Capt. David Fife has been catching lots of sh in and around Spring Creek. David strictly uses Mirrolures this time of year and chartreuse or bone are his favorite colors. He said there are some sh in the boil but most are small. He said they did catch some trout trolling very slow in the river. JR said the trout were really biting on the Aucilla and he was having trouble catching trout under 20 inches in many of the creeks around the Aucilla. I took my brother-inlaw down there last Monday and I was surprised at the number of people down there fishing. I guess folks were off for the holidays. Some had good luck and some had no luck. We fished quite a few places on the rising tide and only caught a few but when the tide rst started falling they turned on and we got our limit using white Gulps being reeled in real slow. One of my neighbors was down there and they only caught one. The next day they went to the Econ na and did nothing. Capt. David Fife was down there that same day and he did nothing. Jeff May from Carrollton was down last week and they went out in search of rock bass. They came in with 25 real nice rock bass and said they also threw back ve or six nice grouper. They were shing in about 20 feet of water. Last Thursday we had the lowest tide I think I can ever remember. My dock was completely out of the water and most of the sailboats were tipped on their sides. The cormarants were having a eld day on the small pin sh in the canals and Ill be surprised if there are many left. Well, tonight is the night. Hopefully, Florida State will return with the trophy and well prove to everyone what a good team we really have. My New Years hope for everyone is that the smallest sh you catch this year will be bigger than the biggest one you caught last year. With the weather like it is, its really hard to think about shing. When I was much younger though it didnt bother me. Now I cant put on enough clothes to get warm. Good luck and good shing! GO NOLES! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Its so cold its hard to think about shing P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! Your sex life and erection can now surviveDIABETES OR PROSTATE CANCER? 800-777-1922 More self-defense lessons for the Shoot Like a Girl Club HOME ON THE RANGE Releasing Floridas biggest TrophyCatch earns angler bling and ultimate bragging rightsFrom FWC News Bass anglers in Florida have more reasons than ever to practice catch-andrelease. To help encourage the angling public to document and release largemouth bass, 8 pounds or larger, a program called TrophyCatch rewards participating anglers for their environmental stewardship with a range of fishing-related prizes, including the first ever championship ring. The biggest bass legally caught, properly documented and released in Florida waters in 2013 earned one lucky Florida tourist an award t for a true champion a ring with some bling! The American Outdoors Fund TrophyCatch Florida Champions Ring is made by the same company that makes rings for Super Bowl, World Series and Bass Master Classic champions. It also has the winning anglers name as well as the weight and date of the winning catch engraved on it, so there is no mistake about who has bragging rights to the biggest bass of the season. At a presentation made at Bass Pro Shops in Orlando, the American Outdoors Fund TrophyCatch Florida Champions Ring was awarded to Bob Williams from Alloway, N.J. While on a Florida shing vacation in February 2013, Williams booked a trip on Rodman Reservoir with bass fishing guide Sean Rush from Trophy Bass Expeditions. It was a bitter cold morning in Florida with temperatures in the low 20s, and neither Williams nor Rush could have fathomed how the day would unfold. After casting a live shiner around a cluster of lily pads, the New Jersey angler hooked and landed the fish of a lifetime, a 13-pound, 14-ounce largemouth bass. Rush, a seasoned Florida shing guide, immediately put the giant sh in an aerated live well and called the TrophyCatch hotline: 855-FL-TROPHY (358-7674). The FWC immediately dispatched TrophyCatch coordinator KP Clements as well as biologists Allen Martin and Dan Dorosheff to document and celebrate the catch and release of Williams sh. Visit TrophyCatchFlorida.com to register and become eligible for a random drawing for a Phoenix bass boat powered by Mercury, and to submit your trophy Florida bass for rewards, including competing for this years TrophyCatch ring.

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Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comThe following article was submitted by Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon: This past weekend five members, Fran Keating, Raye Crews, Norma and Phill Hill and Duane Treadon traveled to Fort Walton Beach to attend Division 1s Change of Watch (COW). Change of watch is an annual meeting held to of cially welcome in the new leadership and staff of the division. In the past, the COW was a luncheon where new flotilla commanders, vice commanders, division staff and otilla staff of cers took their oath followed by brief remarks on the direction of the division for the coming year. However, this years COW was an all day event. New Division Commander Eric DeVuyst and Vice Commander T.J. Del Bello welcomed about 35 members to the meeting. Though open to all members in the Auxiliary, attendees primarily consisted of Division Staff and Flotilla Commander and Vice Commanders from across the Division. Duane Treadon and Fran Keating were attending as Flotilla Commander and Vice Commander for Flotilla 12. Member Raye Crews was attending at Division Staff Of cer for Diversity. In addition to serving as Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon also serves at the Division level as Staff Of cer for Computer Services (website management) and Secretary of Record. During the morning, Eric, T.J. and District Captain East Mo Davis gave a presentation on Division structure and its role in supporting the five Flotillas of the Division (Apalachee Bay, Panama City, Destin, Pensacola, and Milton). Flotilla Commanders and Vice Commanders were given tools to help their Flotillas have a successful year serving the boating public. After lunch each Division staff of cer gave a short presentation on 2014 goals for their program area. Some of these area included Public Education, Public Affairs, Operations (water activities/ patrols), Communications, Marine Safety, Navigation Systems, Member Training, Publications, and Program Visitor/Vessel Safety Exams. Staff carried on the common theme of support to the Flotillas that resonated during the morning session. Based on the presentation, our Flotilla can expect a lot of support form our Division Leadership and Staff during the coming year. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Officer for Human Resources at fso-hr@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident Start your new year off in the right direction! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Ice diving 30 years ago. On Tuesday, I will take my Wakulla Environmental Institute students taking Introduction to Professional Diving into the water during possibly the coldest day of the year. I explained to Dr. Stringer that such is the nature of the class, and nothing like what we endured under Antarctic ice on a project I attended nearly 30 years ago. I explained that people who expect to work underwater must overcome creature comforts with determination, technology and skill, something I hope to instill in this semesters students. They will suffer in a heated pool, cold tomorrow only when they get out. Back then I was 36 and full of determination that everything was surmountable. Indeed, I had developed a full face mask (against the advice of the U.S. Navy) that could tolerate the warm 27 degree F water temperature found under the ice. I shielded the metal parts with a rubber shroud that was lled with warm hyper-saline water before immersion. My mask was fed warm air and supportive communications from the surface by way of an umbilical hose. I dressed in a dry suit in a heated sh hut that was located over my 3-foot diameter hole that was our passage way through 10 feet of hard ice to reach our research site in roughly 60 feet of water. Once con gured in our surface-supplied rig, the hot water was delivered to the mask through a funnel, caped and in I went. What a joy it was to breathe warm air for a short time, slowly changing to the bitter cold that my body could tolerate. Once on the bottom I would swim to the research site and sample the sponge spicuole mat that comprised the benthic community surrounding McMurdo Station. Samples were returned to the surface to study for their bacterial content. I could then ask topside to send down a Nikonos 35 mm camera so that I could photo document this amazing reef quickly before the batteries froze. We soon became very popular amongst our counterparts who were diving in more traditional dress (well, until a visiting helicopter blew away our tent and all the masks were super chilled in the 20-below-zero surface conditions). Our rst checkout dives were required on open circuit using double hose regulators and typical scuba masks. I jumped in and had to grasp the downline as the world around me went to stars and birdies! After what seemed an eternity, my vision slowly returned as my face went numb. We knew we had about 30 minutes before the muscles of the jaw would no longer function and the regulator would drop out of your mouth. Your face was exposed to subfreezing water which was not a pleasant matter. Once out of the water, most folks were exhausted for the rest of the day. Soon there was a list of requests for training on our gadget that permitted up to 70+ minutes underwater in relative comfort. The next year I was granted funds to purchase new Full Face masks that I am told is now the dominant diving technology at the station. I am tasked now, three decades later, with nding a way to convince aspiring professionals to overlook the obvious discomfort of the task and seek out ways to make it achievable in comfort Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jan 9, 14 Fri Jan 10, 14 Sat Jan 11, 14 Sun Jan 12, 14 Mon Jan 13, 14 Tue Jan 14, 14 Wed Jan 15, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 12:20 AM 3.1 ft. 12:57 AM High 0.3 ft. 3:01 AM 0.0 ft. 4:21 AM -0.2 ft. 5:23 AM -0.4 ft. 6:11 AM -0.5 ft. 6:51 AM -0.6 ft. 7:26 AM -0.6 ft. 7:58 AM Low 1.9 ft. 9:45 AM 2.1 ft. 11:08 AM 2.3 ft. 12:02 PM 2.5 ft. 12:41 PM 2.6 ft. 1:15 PM 2.8 ft. 1:47 PM 2.9 ft. 2:17 PM High 1.4 ft. 2:00 PM 1.6 ft. 3:20 PM 1.5 ft. 4:35 PM 1.4 ft. 5:33 PM 1.2 ft. 6:20 PM 1.0 ft. 7:01 PM 0.8 ft. 7:38 PM Low 2.7 ft. 8:24 PM 2.7 ft. 9:40 PM 2.8 ft. 10:45 PM 2.9 ft. 11:37 PM High Thu Jan 9, 14 Fri Jan 10, 14 Sat Jan 11, 14 Sun Jan 12, 14 Mon Jan 13, 14 Tue Jan 14, 14 Wed Jan 15, 14 Date 2.3 ft. 12:12 AM 2.4 ft. 12:49 AM High 0.2 ft. 3:12 AM 0.0 ft. 4:32 AM -0.1 ft. 5:34 AM -0.3 ft. 6:22 AM -0.4 ft. 7:02 AM -0.4 ft. 7:37 AM -0.5 ft. 8:09 AM Low 1.5 ft. 9:37 AM 1.6 ft. 11:00 AM 1.7 ft. 11:54 AM 1.9 ft. 12:33 PM 2.0 ft. 1:07 PM 2.1 ft. 1:39 PM 2.2 ft. 2:09 PM High 1.0 ft. 2:11 PM 1.1 ft. 3:31 PM 1.1 ft. 4:46 PM 1.0 ft. 5:44 PM 0.9 ft. 6:31 PM 0.7 ft. 7:12 PM 0.6 ft. 7:49 PM Low 2.0 ft. 8:16 PM 2.0 ft. 9:32 PM 2.1 ft. 10:37 PM 2.2 ft. 11:29 PM High Thu Jan 9, 14 Fri Jan 10, 14 Sat Jan 11, 14 Sun Jan 12, 14 Mon Jan 13, 14 Tue Jan 14, 14 Wed Jan 15, 14 Date 2.7 ft. 12:13 AM 2.8 ft. 12:56 AM 2.9 ft. 1:33 AM High 0.2 ft. 4:05 AM 0.0 ft. 5:25 AM -0.2 ft. 6:27 AM -0.4 ft. 7:15 AM -0.5 ft. 7:55 AM -0.6 ft. 8:30 AM -0.6 ft. 9:02 AM Low 1.8 ft. 10:21 AM 1.9 ft. 11:44 AM 2.1 ft. 12:38 PM 2.3 ft. 1:17 PM 2.5 ft. 1:51 PM 2.6 ft. 2:23 PM 2.7 ft. 2:53 PM High 1.3 ft. 3:04 PM 1.4 ft. 4:24 PM 1.4 ft. 5:39 PM 1.2 ft. 6:37 PM 1.1 ft. 7:24 PM 0.9 ft. 8:05 PM 0.7 ft. 8:42 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:00 PM 2.5 ft. 10:16 PM 2.6 ft. 11:21 PM High Thu Jan 9, 14 Fri Jan 10, 14 Sat Jan 11, 14 Sun Jan 12, 14 Mon Jan 13, 14 Tue Jan 14, 14 Wed Jan 15, 14 Date 2.4 ft. 12:04 AM 2.4 ft. 12:41 AM High 0.3 ft. 2:40 AM 0.0 ft. 4:00 AM -0.2 ft. 5:02 AM -0.4 ft. 5:50 AM -0.5 ft. 6:30 AM -0.6 ft. 7:05 AM -0.6 ft. 7:37 AM Low 1.5 ft. 9:29 AM 1.6 ft. 10:52 AM 1.8 ft. 11:46 AM 1.9 ft. 12:25 PM 2.1 ft. 12:59 PM 2.2 ft. 1:31 PM 2.3 ft. 2:01 PM High 1.4 ft. 1:39 PM 1.5 ft. 2:59 PM 1.5 ft. 4:14 PM 1.3 ft. 5:12 PM 1.2 ft. 5:59 PM 1.0 ft. 6:40 PM 0.8 ft. 7:17 PM Low 2.1 ft. 8:08 PM 2.1 ft. 9:24 PM 2.2 ft. 10:29 PM 2.3 ft. 11:21 PM High Thu Jan 9, 14 Fri Jan 10, 14 Sat Jan 11, 14 Sun Jan 12, 14 Mon Jan 13, 14 Tue Jan 14, 14 Wed Jan 15, 14 Date 3.1 ft. 12:17 AM 3.2 ft. 12:54 AM High 0.3 ft. 2:58 AM 0.0 ft. 4:18 AM -0.2 ft. 5:20 AM -0.4 ft. 6:08 AM -0.6 ft. 6:48 AM -0.7 ft. 7:23 AM -0.7 ft. 7:55 AM Low 2.0 ft. 9:42 AM 2.1 ft. 11:05 AM 2.3 ft. 11:59 AM 2.5 ft. 12:38 PM 2.7 ft. 1:12 PM 2.8 ft. 1:44 PM 3.0 ft. 2:14 PM High 1.5 ft. 1:57 PM 1.7 ft. 3:17 PM 1.6 ft. 4:32 PM 1.5 ft. 5:30 PM 1.3 ft. 6:17 PM 1.1 ft. 6:58 PM 0.9 ft. 7:35 PM Low 2.7 ft. 8:21 PM 2.8 ft. 9:37 PM 2.9 ft. 10:42 PM 3.0 ft. 11:34 PM High Thu Jan 9, 14 Fri Jan 10, 14 Sat Jan 11, 14 Sun Jan 12, 14 Mon Jan 13, 14 Tue Jan 14, 14 Wed Jan 15, 14 Date High -0.1 ft. 2:45 AM -0.3 ft. 3:53 AM -0.5 ft. 4:50 AM -0.6 ft. 5:40 AM -0.7 ft. 6:23 AM -0.7 ft. 7:01 AM -0.7 ft. 7:34 AM Low 1.2 ft. 10:16 AM 1.4 ft. 12:27 PM 1.6 ft. 1:26 PM 1.7 ft. 2:02 PM 1.8 ft. 2:31 PM 1.8 ft. 2:55 PM 1.9 ft. 3:17 PM High 0.9 ft. 12:53 PM 1.1 ft. 2:04 PM 1.2 ft. 3:29 PM 1.2 ft. 4:40 PM 1.2 ft. 5:36 PM 1.1 ft. 6:21 PM 1.0 ft. 7:01 PM Low 2.2 ft. 7:51 PM 2.2 ft. 8:35 PM 2.2 ft. 9:24 PM 2.2 ft. 10:16 PM 2.2 ft. 11:07 PM 2.2 ft. 11:55 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJan. 9 Jan. 15First Jan. 10 Full Jan. 19 Last Jan. 28 New Feb. 67:34 am-9:34 am 7:58 pm-9:58 pm 1:51 am-2:51 am 1:11 pm-2:11 pm 8:22 am-10:22 am 8:46 pm-10:46 pm 2:46 am-3:46 am 1:52 pm-2:52 pm 9:10 am-11:10 am 9:34 pm-11:34 pm 3:41 am-4:41 am 2:35 pm-3:35 pm 9:58 am-11:58 am 10:23 pm-12:23 am 4:32 am-5:32 am 3:22 pm-4:22 pm 10:47 am-12:47 pm 11:11 pm-1:11 am 5:22 am-6:22 am 4:10 pm-5:10 pm --:-----:-11:35 am-1:35 pm 6:09 am-7:09 am 5:00 pm-6:00 pm --:-----:-12:22 pm-2:22 pm 6:52 am-7:52 am 5:52 pm-6:52 pm Average Average Average Average Better Better Best7:34 am 5:54 pm 1:12 pm 1:52 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:34 am 5:55 pm 1:53 pm 2:48 am 7:34 am 5:56 pm 2:37 pm 3:42 am 7:34 am 5:57 pm 3:23 pm 4:34 am 7:34 am 5:57 pm 4:11 pm 5:23 am 7:34 am 5:58 pm 5:01 pm 6:10 am 7:33 am 5:59 pm 5:53 pm 6:53 am58% 64% 70% 76% 82% 89% 95%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWST.J. Del Bello, Phil Hill, Raye Crews, Duane Treadon, Fran Keating and Norma Hill. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 11reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Wednesday, Jan. 1, Andrew Mark Whigham, 24, of Cairo, Ga. was arrested for possession of cocaine, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment following a traf c stop. Deputy Anthony Paul conducted a traf c stop due to a faulty headlight. The driver allegedly admitted having a smoking pipe and marijuana in the vehicle. Cocaine was also allegedly discovered in the vehicle. Rolling papers were observed in addition to the smoking pipe. The vehicle was impounded and Whigham was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. The marijuana weighed 1.8 grams and the cocaine weighed 6.1 grams. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Deputy Ashley McAlister also investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce: THURSDAY, DEC. 26 Michelle Stewart of Crawfordville reported the theft of two vehicles. One of the stolen vehicles was the victims work truck. The vehicles were left securely locked when they were taken. There are subjects of interest who were identi ed in the investigation. Both vehicles were entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Sgt. Lorne Whaley and Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Kathleen Cox of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Five unauthorized charges were reported in Greensboro, Ga. The charges were from a merchandise store and a restaurant in Greensboro and totaled $132. Deputy Mike Zimba and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Gladys Kilgore of Crawfordville reported a one vehicle traffic crash with a deer at 400 Shadeville Highway. There were no injuries reported and minor damage to the vehicle. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Jeffrey Ranew of Crawfordville and Jessica Landolt of Crawfordville were involved in a two vehicle traf c crash in the McDonalds parking lot. There were no injuries reported and only minor damage. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. FRIDAY, DEC. 27 An arrest warrant was requested for Daniel Ray Patterson, 52, of Crawfordville. Patterson was released from incarceration in August and failed to register as a sex offender. Deputy Mike Zimba conducted an address veri cation and discovered that the address Patterson reported in Crawfordville was not his actual address. Patterson faces charges of failure to report to the local sheriffs of ce after release from custody and failure to report an address change. Detective Josh Langston also investigated. SATURDAY, DEC. 28 Denise Waters of Sweet Magnolia Bed and Breakfast in St. Marks reported a grand theft. A business bicycle was stolen from the porch of the establishment. The bike is valued at $500. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Hellen D. Forehand of Tallahassee reported the theft of a deceased relatives property. A camper, utility trailer, television, lawn mower, guitars and other items were reported missing. A person of interest was identi ed. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Rex Lytle of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered four unauthorized charges which totaled $780 at a Radio Shack and Toys R Us in Pennsylvania. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. SUNDAY, DEC. 29 Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated a traf c crash at Highway 61 and Highway 267. George William McKee, 69, of Crawfordville conducted a left turn from Highway 61 to Highway 267 and was struck by Robert Douglas Adams, 71, of Davie who was eastbound on Highway 267. Adams was found to have a suspended driver license and received a traf c citation for driving while license suspended. Both vehicles were damaged in the crash. A passenger in the McKee vehicle suffered a head injury and was taken to the hospital by a friend. MONDAY, DEC. 30 Caige Hunter Parvis, 21, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court following a traf c stop. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston conducted a traffic stop after observing a vehicle with a missing headlight. Parvis granted Sgt. Johnston permission to search the vehicle and he located marijuana and a smoking pipe inside the vehicle. The marijuana weighed 2.2 grams. James Barwick of Bryson City, N.C. reported a criminal mischief in Panacea after someone keyed his vehicle. Scratches were observed around the vehicle and obscenities were scratched on the vehicle. A second vehicle owned by Chris Barwick of Panacea was scratched and had an obscenity on it as well. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ross Hasty investigated. Manuel Randolph of Crawfordville reported the theft of windows from his property. The 20 windows are valued at $200 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Deputy Jeff Yarbrough investigated. Paul Love of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of shing equipment from his boat. The boat was located at the victims home. The stolen rods, reels and lures are valued at $1,050. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. TUESDAY, DEC. 31 Catherine Harrell of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed 11 unauthorized charges on her bank account which totaled $920 during November and December. The charges were created out of state. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Pamela R. Sapp of Crawfordville and Maliyah A. Farmer of Crawfordville were involved in a two-vehicle traf c crash at 1392 Shadeville Highway. There were no injuries and minor damage to the vehicles. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. WEDNESDAY, JAN. 1 Wrenn Green of Panacea reported a felony criminal mischief. The victims mailbox and post were damaged. The victim reported the value of the mailbox at $1,500 due to a custom paint job. The mailbox suffered scratches and minor damage and was recovered on the ground. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Susan Blake of Tallahassee reported a lost wallet. The victim reported the loss at a Crawfordville fast food restaurant. The restaurant did not have anyone turn in the wallet. The wallet was valued at $25. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Gary Wines of St. Marks reported a vehicle theft. A suspect, who has been identi ed, took the victims vehicle from his home. The suspect returned the vehicle to the victim several hours later. The vehicle was turned over to the victim and Judith Sanford Hall, 50, of Carlton, Ga. was charged with grand theft of a motor vehicle and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,006 calls for service during the past week including 10 business and residential alarms; 78 citizen contacts; 29 E-911 calls; 38 investigations; 12 noise complaints; 50 medical emergencies; 12 school security checks; 440 business and residential security checks; 14 suspicious vehicles; 36 traf c enforcements; and 78 traf c stops.Special to The News The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce worked 189 traf c crashes in 2013 compared to 405 in 2012. The worst month for crashes in 2013 was in February with 32 followed by 28 in March and 20 in January. October had the fewest traf c crashes with nine followed by July with 10 and September, November and December with 11 each. WCSO made 63 DUI arrests in 2013. The month with the most DUI arrests was May with nine and April, June and September with eight each. February had only one DUI arrest. Over the course of 2013, the WCSO made 224 arrests of motorists for driving while license is suspended or revoked. The total works out to an average of nearly 19 arrests for DWLSR each month. The number of fatal traf c crashes in Wakulla County dropped from seven in 2012 to two in 2013. The total number of cases worked by WCSO deputies in 2013 was 2,947. The number dropped from 3,389 in 2012 and 3,545 in 2011. The highest number in the past decade was 3,626 in 2010. The rest of the decade included 2,921 cases in 2003; 3,158 in 2004; 2,790 in 2005, 2,934 in 2006; 2,707 in 2007; 2,697 in 2008; and 3,074 in 2009.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of- ce Litter Control Unit picked up 8,040 pounds of trash during the month of December. The amount exceeded only the months of June and August as the third lowest amount of the year. October collections netted 20,490 pounds of trash as the highest collection month. Trash collections are based on available manpower and cooperative weather conditions. The total for 2013 was 136,450 pounds of trash taken to the Wakulla County transfer station for disposal. The litter control crew collected 661,920 pounds in 2009; 201,830 in 2010; 196,420 in 2011 and 213,680 in 2012. The 2013 total would have exceeded the 2012 total except for 80,270 pounds of debris collected by the unit as a result of Junes Tropical Storm Debbie in July 2012. Male and female crews collect trash along the side of state and county roads on a regular basis using inmate and community service labor.Sheri s o ce 2013 statistics8,000 pounds of trash picked up HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 LUNCH PARTNER Now with F REE Wi-Fi!926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the special Deli Deliand receiveof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS a Complimentary Copy of 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. BREAKFAST PARTNER FREE book by doctor reveals what the drug companies don't want you to know! 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Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Green Scene Innovative parents and teachers, are you in need of a science fair project or studentcentered science learning experience? Let me suggest you and your child or classroom construct a solar oven with household items while offering a wealth of learning. Not only are you preparing your student for an award-winning science fair project but you are providing an energy source which is available during power outages. You will be able to enjoy having a no electricity meal. UF/IFAS just released updated information on making an oven powered by the sun of which I want to share. Solar ovens utilize the suns heating energy to cook, just like you do in the heat of your car on a warm day. Solar ovens can be purchased or one can be made from homemade, recycled boxes. All solar ovens are insulated and have reflective, absorptive and glazing surfaces to collect and intensify the heat from the sun. UF/IFAS Specialists offer two examples of how to build a solar cooker. Promise that if you experiment with your own design and want to share your ideas with me, I would love to hear from you! BUILDING A BOX SOLAR OVEN FROM A PIZZA BOX Materials needed: One pizza box, newspapers, black construction paper, clear plastic wrap and aluminum foil. Secure an assembled and closed pizza box. Trace a square on the outside of the lid of the box. Allow about an inch between the edges of the box and the square outline. Cut three sides of the square, leaving the hinge side uncut. Gently lift the cut portion and fold the uncut side to create a flap. Line the underside of the flap with aluminum foil, securing firmly with tape. You have now assembled the oven reflector. Line the inside of the pizza box with black construction paper to help absorb the suns heat. Stuff the edges of the box with newspaper to create insulation. With the flap open, line both the underside and top of the cut opening on the pizza box lid with plastic wrap. Once you have taped one side of the plastic, pull it tightly and tape to secure. The plastic will let the suns light through but keep the heat in. Seal up any cracks to keep air from escaping but make sure you can still open the box. Your new solar cooker is ready to use. If you want a larger cooker to accommodate bigger pots or dishes, try this construction with two cardboard boxes. BUILDING A BOX SOLAR OVEN FROM TWO BOXES Materials needed: Two cardboard boxes with lids (consider copy paper boxes or cardboard file boxes) with one slightly smaller than the other, insulation materials (rigid foam, fiberglass, newspaper or packing peanuts), corrugated cardboard, aluminum foil or other reflective materials, glass, Plexiglas or clear plastic wrap, black paint, prop sticks and string. Paint the inside of the smaller box black to absorb heat and place the smaller box inside the larger one. Fill the space between the two boxes with your insulation material. Cut a hole in the box cover and cover it with plastic wrap or place glass or Plexiglas in the cut-out portion. Cut a piece of corrugated cardboard the same size as the box lid and cover it with foil to create the reflector. Attach and hinge the reflector onto the cooking box. Attach the sticks and string to hold up the reflector. USING THE SOLAR OVEN A solar oven can be used like a slow cooker or a normal oven. It does require sunlight, so make sure you position your cooker in an appropriate place and only use it on sunny days. Cooking times will vary with the amount of intensity of the sunlight; the best time to use it is between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. Your solar cooker can reach between 200 to 300 which means they safely cook dishes though cooking times will often be longer. Generally allow about double the cooking time than in a conventional oven. Utilize a thermometer to monitor the temperature and insure food safety. Cooking foods to the correct internal temperature is our first concern when it involves protein! UF/IFAS has published some suggested recipes. They can be secured on our website, www.wakulla.ifas.ufl. edu or by calling the office at 926-3931. Using solar ovens can be a fun and educational activity or a needed disaster time technique. Experiment with your own recipes and contact me with updates. I can picture the winning science fair entry right now!Shelley Swenson is Wakulla County UF/ IFAS FCS Agent III. She can be reached at 9263931.By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Cooking with a solar ovenBy LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSON of the Extension Of ceThe recent frigid artic weather has most Wakulla County residents thoughts off gardening. Only the hardiest of vegetable plants can survive, much less grow and produce a usable crop, when the thermometer indicates long hours of subfreezing temperatures. Luckily, cabbage is a resilient cool season vegetable which is easy and inexpensive to grow, and produces a large amount of usable food in a relatively small area. A dollar will purchase hundreds, if not thousands, of seed. Cabbage is in the Brassica genus which includes turnips, mustard, collards and radishes. All are propagated from small seed. Transplants are more expensive, but are an easy alternative if a few plants are needed. Planting time in North Florida is August through February for this crop, which takes about 100 days to reach maturity. The planting date and maturity date will be in uenced by weather conditions. The edible leaves can be a variety of colors, depending on the cultivar, and with a smooth or crinkled texture. Green, white, red and purple varieties are proli c producers for gardeners of any level of expertise. The historical record on ancient production of cabbage is sparse. It is thought to have been descended from a wild European eld cabbage over 3,000 years ago. Like many other crops which could be traced back to speci c locations, the spread and use of cabbage corresponded to the period of time labelled the Enlightenment. The increase in trade and the exchange of ideas and recipes moved the cabbage to new locales and uses. The hard small seed were easy to transport and had excellent storage features. The production volume and ease of propagation made it a popular crop to feed the workers in class conscience Europe and Asia. Sowing cabbage, like any Brassica, is simple. Distribute the seed in rows and cover with a slight amount of soil. Cabbage seeds usually germinate within a week. Cool and moist soil temperatures offer the best chance for success, and supplemental nitrogen should be added. Many gardeners dilute their seed in sand for ease of sowing. If properly mixed, this technique allows for the uniform seed distribution. Thinning the plants, once they germinate, is advised. Disease and insect problems may result when the plants are populated too thickly. Brassicas, including cabbage, are high in ber and loaded with antioxidants and vitamins, including A, C, K, and folate. The cabbage dish can be fat free, low in sodium, few calories and cholesterol free depending on the other ingredients. To store at home, refrigerate the whole head of cabbage in a plastic bag and keep it chilled after cutting. It is best to use the remainder within two days after cutting the head as it will lose its quality after seven days. China is currently the worlds biggest producer and consumer of cabbage. It is, however, an important crop in Floridas winter vegetable production schedule. Several varieties of cabbage are growing in the UF/IFAS Wakulla County demonstration garden. They were protected during the recent extreme cold temperatures. To learn more about growing cabbage in Wakulla County, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County website at http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu or call 850926-3931. Les Harrison is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director and Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent.PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHardy vegetables like cabbage can withstand cool temperatures In the garden now: In the garden now: Cabbage Cabbage Cabbage CabbageEvery year we start our ritual of dropping weight, dieting, exercising, and lots of other types of things to make ourselves a new and improved model. Did you know that even Barbie is trying to improve herself? but unfortunately in the opposite direction. Yes, Barbie has been posting questions on Facebook about adding a new Plus Size Barbie. It seems obvious that this would be the norm, since the U.S. population has now become a larger, fatter nation. Did you know that Plus-size was rst used as a technical fashion industry term for sizes 14 and up in the 1970s? Plussize clothing existed before then, but was referred to as stout sizes, larger sizes, junior plenty. So with the increase in the population (78 percent) being overweight or obese, all sorts of business and companies are trying to keep up from larger airline seats, dentist chairs, hospital beds, and a whole big (excuse the pun) market of items that are bigger, better, and of course pricier. Is there any hope in returning to a normal slightly smaller and healthier size? Hope is on its way. It is exciting to know that natural whole foods, gluten free foods, fresh vegetables and fruits are getting the recognition that they so deserve, for us to get back on track and on the rise of healthy habits! Of course, we still have that huge aisle in the grocery store with candies, cookies, and other sugary and fat delights (with tons of preservatives) but we now have areas and aisle in those same supermarkets with dried blueberries, pea pods, Greek yogurt bites, hummus dips, spinach wraps, and turkey sandwiches on gluten free breads and other natural and whole food delights. Our nation is learning that we need to eat more natural and fresh foods and stay away from arti- cial sweeteners and preservatives. These natural and fresh foods are also great-tasting, have huge bene ts, are very convenient now as they are in the grocery stores and they are helping us reduce our waistline! In addition to the way we eat, it is a great plus to know that we have so many types of quick exercises to choose from ranging from a 3 minute Tabata to 10 minute abs, tons of Phone Apps that help you get quick ideas on how to get a decent cardio workout done in a short period of time, even your cable television has a health channel that can show you various of types of exercise to help you trim down and keep your body strong and heart healthy! Even our medical society is working with us to reduce our sizes. We as a nation are paying more attention to how costly it is to be overweight, more medicines, more doctor appointments, and more pain and less mobility, and of course more insurance. Here is a simple way to evaluate your own health risk: Try measuring your abdomen (waistline). Fat in your abdomen region is known as visceral fat, which is associated with greater risk of Type II diabetes, dyslipidemia (elevated levels of free fatty acids in the blood), hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Evidence from various medical studies show that waist circumference is the best predictor of abdominal-fat content. For men, its a waist larger than 40 inches, and for women its a waist larger than 35 inches. So for your healths sake, eat your vegetables and please workout daily! We need to stay strong, live long and healthy.Pamela Chichester, CFT, SPN, can be reached at (850) 926-2348.HEALTH & FITNESS2014 is a plus-size year GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 13Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Jan. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Jan. 10 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.Saturday, Jan. 11 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Jan. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Jan. 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Jan. 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please.Wednesday, Jan. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. MAH JONGG CLUB meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. SHOOT LIKE A GIRL meets every Wednesday from 9 a.m. until noon. Join in learning safety with handguns and enjoy companionship of women of all ages at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range located on 319 to Sopchoppy.Biweekly & monthly meetings and eventsTuesday, Jan. 14, 28 FOOD BANK is open every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at the Seventh-Day Adventist Church located at 107 Shadeville Road from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.Saturday, Feb. 1 NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will not hold their Jan. meeting, but will continue with business as usual at 11 a.m. at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe on Feb. 1. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com.Special EventsFriday, Jan. 10 FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE will be shown at the Wakulla County Public Library at 7 p.m. The lm is an acclaimed kidnapping drama, starring Academy Award nominees Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhall, Terrance Howard, and Viola Davis. Because of the R-rating, all children are required to be accompanied by an adult. Doors open at 6:45 and the event is free to the public.Saturday, Jan. 11 PET ADOPTION EVENT will take place at the North Fla. Fair Grounds from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. There will be food trucks, vendors and an obedience and rally fun match held by the Tallahassee Dog Obedience Club. Participating rescue groups include Wakullas Cauzican and CHAT. Raf e items will bene t local rescue groups. Donation items are gladly accepted. For more information please visit www.TakeMeHomePetAdoption.com. Sunday, Jan. 12 AUTHOR DALE COX will give a presentation at the San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park museum from 2:30 p.m. until 3:30 p.m. His presentation will be on his newest book, Milly Francis: The Life & Times of the Creek Pocahontas, and will take place inside the museum. The event is free with a paid museum admission fee of $2. Monday, Jan. 13 THE WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES (WILD) governing board will hold a meeting at 1:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library located at 4330 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, please call (850) 997-7400. Tuesday, Jan. 14 FOOD BANK is open every second and fourth Tuesday of the month at the Seventh-Day Adventist Church located at 107 Shadeville Road from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.Wednesday, Jan. 15 FULL MOON CLIMB will take place at the Cape St. George Lighthouse from 5:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. The event will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 850-927-7745. Thursday, Jan. 16 WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group Meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. Spouses, caregivers and friends are welcome as well. For more information, call 926-6050.Upcoming EventsMonday, Jan. 20 THE DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB will hold a potluck luncheon at club President Diane Wilsons home, 175 Tarpine Drive in Panacea at 11:30 a.m. Please bring a small dish suitable for lunch to share with others. Refreshments will be furnished. The primary purpose of the meeting is to discuss the upcoming First Annual Girls Nite Out Health Fair which we are planning in order to bene t the Wakulla County Relay for Life. For more information, contact Diane Wilson at dwilson.1947@gmail. com or (850) 984-4768.Thursday, Jan. 23 UF/IFAS GROWING WINTER SALADS class will be held from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. taught by Trevor Hilton and Monica Brinkley. Trevor will share with you how to grow lettuces and many of the cool weather vegetables that make tasty salads. Monica will have your hands busy making salads for tasting. Registration required. Contact Shelley Swenson at sswenson@u .edu for more information. Tuesday, Jan. 28 GREEN DRINKS hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will be held at the Wakulla Springs Lodge at 6:30 p.m. Speaker to be announced. Jan 9 Jan 16 DALE COX PRESENTATION St. Marks 2:30 p.m. WILD BOARD MEETING Public Library 1:30 p.m.FULL MOON CLIMB St. George Lighthouse $15 5:30 p.m. CANCER SUPPORT MEETING Crawfordville UMC 7 p.m.SundayMondayWednesdayThursday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akulla Government MeetingsThursday, Jan. 9 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold their monthly meeting at the Welcome Center in Panacea beginning at 8:30 a.m. The purpose of the meeting is to conduct general business. CITY OF SOPCHOPPY DEPOT MEETING will take place at 6 p.m. at 34 Rose Street in Sopchoppy. Tuesday, Jan. 21 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Jan. 23 TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a special meeting at 1 p.m. at the Welcome Center in Panacea. Monday, Feb. 3 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Email your community events to amayor@thewakullanews.net Email your community events to amayor@thewakullanews.net We, at WCPL, hope that everyone had a safe and happy holiday season. We are rested and rearing to go in our quest to make 2014 WCPLs best year ever! Planning has already begun on our Summer Program of Events for the children of Wakulla County. We, along with the Friends of the Library, intend to have a more visible presence at community events such as the Valentines Festival next month, St Patricks Day events, and other community activities. Beginning in February, the AARP Tax Prep service will again be available here for those in need so mark your calendars. Computer classes will be ramping up in February as well. We will continue to build on both our physical and e-book collections as well as continuing to look for other services we can provide to the citizens of Wakulla County. As always, we are open to any ideas or suggestions you may have and my door is always open so please either come by, check out our website www. wakullalibrary.org, or our Facebook page for all thats happening at WCPL! FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE Our first Friday Night Movie of the year is an acclaimed kidnapping drama, starring Academy Award nominees Hugh Jackman, Jake Gyllenhall, Terrance Howard, and Viola Davis. This rated R (for language and adult content including some torture) tells the story of two families who have their children abducted and the extreme choices one of the fathers makes in trying to save his little girl. Meanwhile, a detective with issues of his own relentlessly tries to find the children as well. Will both children be found or will one fathers actions put both children at risk? Please join us for this exciting suspenseful thriller. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for a 7 p.m. showing. Due to the rating, all children must be accompanied by an adult. THE COMPUTER DOCTOR IS IN! Carly (aka The Computer Doctor) from Wilderness Coast Public Libraries will be in Thursday, Jan. 9, from noon until 5 p.m. to help you with any computer, tablet, internet related questions you may have. If you got a new device over the holidays and would like to know how to use all of its capabilities, this is just the thing for you! Please come by and get the help you need.By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News...

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Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Issues that will command the Capitols attention this year By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Jan. 3 As 2014 kicks off, heres a look at some of the key issues that could dominate the political landscape in the year ahead. GOVERNOR VS. GOVERNOR FOR GOVERNOR: The most closely-watched race in Florida this year will be the battle between Gov. Rick Scott and his immediate predecessor, former Gov. Charlie Crist, for the states top job. The psychodrama in the race adds a dimension to what would already be a tough contest for commanderin-chief of a critical swing state. Crist is a Republican-turned-independent-turned-Democrat running against his old party, at times taking shots at policies he once supported while accusing the GOP of wandering too far to the right. Scott, meanwhile, has plans to spend up to $100 million to trash Crist and tout an economic record that he says has earned him a second term. Crist is also up against the troubled record of his new party, which hasnt won a gubernatorial election in Florida in 20 years. And he still has to ght off a primary challenge from former Senate Minority Leader Nan Rich, D-Weston. ITS THE ECONOMY, STUPID: Providing a backdrop for the gubernatorial contest will be the state of the economy, which has continued to slowly emerge from the shadow of the recession. Already, Floridas unemployment rate shrank to 6.4 percent in November, down from 6.7 percent in October, according to the state Department of Economic Opportunity. That marks the lowest rate in Florida since July 2008 during Crists tenure. Scott has already begun touting the fact that jobs lost under Crist have been replaced while he was in of ce. At the same time, the good economic news has provided additional tax revenue for Scott to use to boost spending on public education and to propose tax cuts two things hell be certain to remind voters about in the fall, especially if things continue to improve as expected. FLORIDA, FLORIDA, FLORIDA: The nations capital will also be focused on Florida. With Democrats heavy underdogs to retake control of the U.S. House, the biggest swing state in the country will be one of the places they look to cut into the GOP majority. Former Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink is already running in the special election to replace the late Republican Congressman C.W. Bill Young; her GOP opponent is yet to be decided. Gwen Graham, the daughter of former governor and U.S. Sen. Bill Graham, is mounting a Democratic campaign against incumbent GOP Congressman Steve Southerland in a Northwest Florida seat. Southwest Florida Congressman Trey Radel, also a Republican, was arrested for purchasing $250 of cocaine during an undercover sting in October in Washington, D.C. But Radels district is heavily Republican, and his biggest threats might come from within the party. SENATE PRESIDENCY: Theres no real drama in the race for control of the Legislature this year. Democrats are hoping instead to diminish the GOPs hefty majority in both chambers. The more intriguing ght might be in the Senate, where the presidency following the 2016 elections is still very much in play. On one side is Sen. Joe Negron, R-Stuart, a wonkish legislator who serves as the chambers budget chief. On the other side is Sen. Jack Latvala, RClearwater, a gruff Senate veteran on his second stint in the chamber. Much of the battle could be decided during the primaries but general election contests could shape the ght as well. SEARCH FOR A LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR: Florida is nearing the end of its 10th month without a formal No. 2 for Scott since Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll resigned in March. Carroll co-owned a company that provided consulting services to St. Augustine-based Allied Veterans of the World while she was a member of the House, which became problematic when Allied Veterans became ensnared in a racketeering investigation. Carroll was never charged with a crime. Since then, Scott hasnt rushed to ll the position. The governor could wait until after the legislative session and then name a running mate who could strengthen his hand in the general election. Until then, Attorney General Pam Bondi would take over for Scott if he was unable to carry out his duties. ROLLING BACK CAR FEES: Scotts signature legislative issue is his promise to reduce taxes and fees by $500 million, most of which --$401 million --would come from a proposed cut in vehicle-registration fees. Scott has endorsed doing away with an increase approved during tough budget times in 2009. But Scott and Negron -who rst pitched the idea of a decrease -say the conditions that led to the increase have receded. The fee decrease carries the added political bonus for Scott of blaming Crist, who was governor when the fees went into effect, for the price hike. The former governor has already taken steps to inoculate himself, arguing that he never intended the increase to be permanent and that it has been in place longer under Scott than it was under Crist. GAMBLING: Undeterred by the long odds facing any hot-button legislation in an election year, gambling supporters are expected to ante up and try to get something through the Legislature. Theres already talk of a sweeping bill that could include a rewrite of the states gambling laws and regulations, the creation of a gambling commission and, possibly, a kitchen-sink of elements sought after by existing race tracks and frontons as well as destination resorts coveted by out-of-state casino operators. But other proposals are also emerging, including the idea of a constitutional amendment to decide issues such as whether the state opens the door to Las Vegasstyle casinos, an idea oated by House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel. PENSION PLANS: Weatherford is also expected to make another run at overhauling the pension plan for public workers. Ideas range from the speakers proposal last year, which would require new employees to enter a 401(k)style retirement plan, to offering a cash balance plan, which allows employees to take their pension either as a lump sum or as an annuity. An overhaul of state pensions died last year in the Senate, when a maverick group of Republicans teamed with Democrats to block Weatherfords plan. But Weatherford continues to send signs that hes not abandoning the issue. The time for pension reform has come. RT if you agree! Weatherford tweeted on Friday. VOTING PURGE: Secretary of State Ken Detzners of ce is expected to soon begin forwarding the names of suspected non-citizens on the voter rolls to local elections of cials. The state has been working to nalize a procedure for using a federal list to vet registered voters since 2012, when it rst struck a deal with the Department of Homeland Security over the use of the Systematic Alien Veri cation for Entitlements, or SAVE, database. That would replace a process using a state database that ran into resistance from county elections chiefs because of problematic scrub lists. The renewed program could still face legal challenges from votingrights organizations. REDISTRICTING LAWSUITS: The legal fight is expected to continue over the districts that lawmakers approved in 2012 for Floridas congressional delegation and the state Senate, dragging it into a third year. Critics of the maps contend that they were drawn to aid Republicans and incumbents in violation of the anti-gerrymandering Fair District amendments that voters added to the constitution in 2010. The Florida Supreme Court has ruled that the state Senate maps can be the subject of a civil lawsuit, despite receiving preliminary approval from the high court in 2012. And the Supreme Court decided that lawmakers can be forced to testify about the redistricting process even though legislators generally enjoy a privilege shielding them from speaking in court about their of cial duties. HEALTH CARE FIGHTS: Floridas participation in the federallybacked expansion of Medicaid, a key part of the Affordable Care Act approved by Congress in 2010, appears to be off the table for good. Scott had thrown his support behind it last year, but the idea was ultimately rejected by legislative leaders, who offered their own plans but which all failed to pass. GOP lawmakers are unlikely to reconsider the issue again in 2014, but Democrats will push it anyway. Candidates could keep an eye on the once-troubled rollout of the federal exchange where some consumers are signing up for and buying insurance. TROUBLES AT DCF: The embattled Department of Children and Families could also face continuing changes. Scott could choose a long-term replacement for agency Secretary David Wilkins, who resigned in July. Interim Secretary Esther Jacobo announced she will stay on the job until 2014 legislative session ends in May. Meanwhile, Jacobo has asked Scott and the Legislature for funding to slash caseloads for frontline staff and other proposals aimed at keeping children more safe. Lawmakers are also determined to strengthen laws dealing with sexual predators in the wake of reports by the South Florida Sun Sentinel that found that nearly 600 sexual predators had been released only to be convicted of new sex offenses -including more than 460 child molestations, 121 rapes and 14 murders. COMMON CORE CONTROVERSY: State education of cials are also expected to make a series of key decisions about Floridas educational guidelines, currently based on the Common Core standards. Those benchmarks, which were developed by of cials from Florida and other states, have drawn anger from conservative critics who say they could increase federal involvement in the states public schools. Education Commissioner Pam Stewart has said changes to the standards could go before the State Board of Education as early as February. -Janet WHITES WINESBig love for big ChampagneBy DAVID WHITE Wine writers love explaining why Champagne and other sparkling wines deserve a spot at the dinner table all year long. Good sparklers are characterized by vibrant acidity and freshness, which help them cut through spicy meals, complement savory food, and elevate even the simplest of dishes. Plus, theyre delicious every night of the week, regardless of whether theres anything to celebrate. But we inevitably write about this topic in late December. After all, Champagne houses and retailers alike spend millions each year to convince us that New Years Eve is best enjoyed with a glass of sparkling wine. And marketing matters. The focus of these columns is just as predictable. Writers who cater to the everyday consumer offer tips on how to nd value, steering readers toward sparkling alternatives like Cremant de Bourgogne, Cava, and Prosecco. After all, Champagne isnt cheap. Writers who cater to a more sophisticated audience laud grower Champagnes. Made by the farmers who grow the grapes, these wines have exploded in popularity over the past few years and offer a refreshing alternative to big brands like Moet & Chandon and Veuve Clicquot. Plus, just as food consumers feel better about purchasing fruit at the local farmers market, wine consumers feel better about supporting grower-producers. Consequently, few writers champion the brands you can easily nd at wine shops across the country. This is unfortunate. While Champagnes big brands arent trendy right now, the top producers deliver consistent, high quality wines year after year. And their offerings have never been better. Earlier this year, I hosted several friends for a blind tasting focused on these brands. We focused entirely on non-vintage wines. Champagne is Frances most northern wine region, so growing conditions can vary signi cantly and the grapes often struggle to ripen. Since Champagne houses strive to offer a consistent style every year, utilizing multiple vintages helps winemakers achieve uniformity. Of course, if the growing season is strong, many producers will also produce a vintage bottling. We also kept the tasting limited to blends. Most Champagne houses purchase grapes from growers across the region, utilizing varying amounts of Pinot Noir, Pinot Meunier, and Chardonnay, again to achieve consistency. So for the blind tasting, we avoided Blanc de Noirs (comprised of Pinot Noir and/or Pinot Meunier) and Blanc de Blancs (comprised entirely of Chardonnay). Finally, we limited ourselves to Brut, the most popular style of sweetness. We threw in one of my favorite grower-producers, Chartogne-Taillet, and also included Costcos Kirkland Signature Champagne. The biggest surprise? Kirkland. With ve rst place votes, it won the tasting! That Costcos Champagne did so well makes sense. The wine is produced by Manuel Janisson, a well-known producer with a long history in the region. Of course, the Kirkland label lacks charm; its hard to see the bottle and not think of generic toilet paper or peanuts. And Ive since learned that the wine lacks the consistency one would expect from Champagne, so be sure to try a bottle before stocking up.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com, which was named Best Overall Wine Blog at the 2013 Wine Blog Awards. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 15 The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comAttract Avoid Awhile Beetle Butter Chain Cheers Chill Cloak Costs Crest Dental Drink Drums Earache Edges Enters Entry Equal Erase Escape Given Glistening Havent Honey Hoping Italics Nests Nines Plainly Plate Point Puffs Reins Rested Rinks Rough School Scout Secrets Shaken Sheet Softer State Storms Style Supply Sweeps Sweet Theirs Trumpet

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JESUSHARDWOOD FLOORS TILE PAINTING CARPENTRYLic. #7827 Licensed & Insured ( 850 ) 570Interior & Exterior FREE Estimates Page 16 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.com Todays New Ads Crawfordville14x70, 2bd/ 2ba gas appliances, no pets $550. mo.$350. dep (850) 926-1428 lv. msg Crawfordville24x48, 3bd, 2ba all electric, no pets $650. mo. $450. dep. (850) 926-1428 lv. msg E. Crawfordville $425. mo, $200. dep prefer a quiet person to rent a room in my home, priv entrance, mini fridge, microwave no: drugs, smoking, dogs. steady income, refs (850) 926-9037 Chewy Male Catahulla Lab Mix, has fur colors of brown shading, about 50 lbs, Call Jake @ 850-590-1341 MISSING & LOST: Hexcopter by DJI F550 is a remote controlled helicopter used for search & rescue missions. REWARD offered Call: 850-294-7827 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 You can become an expert in HVAC installation and repair. Pinnacle Career Institute Online HVAC education in as little as 12 months. Call us today: 1-877-651-3961 or go online: www.HVAC-Online-Ed ucation.com AUCTION Roofing Company Liquidation, Online Auction Only, Bid Dec. 27 thru Jan. 14, Items Located in Maryland & Florida. Motleys Auction & Realty Group, 804-232-3300, www.motleys.com, VAAL #16 Crawfordville14x70, 2bd/ 2ba gas appliances, no pets $550. mo.$350. dep (850) 926-1428 lv. msg Crawfordville24x48, 3bd/ 2ba all electric, no pets $650. mo. $450. dep. (850) 926-1428 lv. msg Crawfordville3bd/2ba dblwd, c/h/a, lg fenced yard close to Walmart $795. deposit is $600.(850) 228-7197 E. Crawfordville $425. mo, $200. dep prefer a quiet person to rent a room in my home, priv entrance, mini fridge, microwave no: drugs, smoking, dogs. steady income, refs (850) 926-9037 ONE LOT at Wakulla Gardens Unit 3, Block 19, Lot 22 $2,200. obo (706) 663-4054 5085-0109 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: 2Ts & ME located at 13 Card Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 31st day of Dec., 2013. /s/ Molly Clore Owner Published Jan. 9, 2014. 5095-0109 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Christian radio station WUJC will be holding a public meeting at St. Marks Volunteer Fire Dept, on Thursday, January 9 at Noon This is a general meeting that will address public issues, and any questions or concerns about CSN International The public is invited to attend. January 9, 2014. 5089-0116 TWN vs. Cook, Bobby 65-2012-CA-000379 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000379 LPP MORTGAGE LTD., Plaintiff, vs. BOBBY COOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BOBBY COOK; JAN COOK; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JAN COOK; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER EPRSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE 5090-0116 TWN vs. Sapp, Larry D. 65-2012-CA-000121 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000121 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. LARRY D. SAPP; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF LARRY D. SAPP; SAMUEL L. SAPP; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAMUEL L. SAPP; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER EPRSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 4, Block 6, WAKULLA GARDENS, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. A/K/A 32 Navajo Trl, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 oclock, A.M., on January 30, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 27 day of September, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree Dwillis, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 9 & 16, 2014. 123648 5092-0116 TWN vs. Brown, Martha J. 12-222CA Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 12-222CA WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. MARTHA J. BROWN; et. al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 23rd day of December, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12-222CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. is the Plaintiff and MARTHA J. BROWN BRIDLE GATE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. (UNKNOWN TENANT(S) (REFUSE TO PROVIDE NAME) N/K/A JOHN DOE; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARTHA J. BROWN IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT LOBBY OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 30th day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 9 OF BRIDLE GATE A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 57 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 23rd day of December, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Chris Helms, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com 09-80788 January 9 & 16, 2014. 12-06008 5094-0116 TWN vs. Chamizo, Jorge 65-2012-CA-000092 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2012-CA-000092 DIVISION WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. JORGE CHAMIZO, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 23, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000092 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Jorge Chamizo, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 23rd day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT A LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 5 OF THE HARTSFIELD SUVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO BEING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 5 OF THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY IN WALULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; THENCE RUN ALONG THE NORTHERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID LOT 5 AS FOLLOWS; SOUTH 70 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 4032.96 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 28 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 215.06 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF TIGER HAMMOCK ROAD, SAID POINT LYING IN A CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 3335.65 FEET; THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY LINE OF SAID LOT 5, RUN ALONG SAID CURVE AND SAID RIGHT OF WAY FOR A DISTANCE OF 435.86 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 07 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 12 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 30 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 435.55 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY AS FOLLOWS; NORTH 34 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 593.50 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 496.42 FEET; THENCE NORTH 34 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST, A DISTANCE OF 162.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 310.51 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 68 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 08 SECONDS; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 368.62 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 00 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 10 SECONDS WEST, 347.35 FEET; THENCE NORTH 33 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 246.02 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 3,983.76 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 04 D3EGREES 20 MINUTES 48 SECONDS; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 302.22 FEET; CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 31 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST, 302.14 FEET; THENCE NORTH 29 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 35 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 134.43 FEET; THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 256.06 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 284.62 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 30 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 31 SECONDS; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 151.22 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 16 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST, 149.45 FEET; THENCE NORTH 01 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 539.16 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 1,509.35 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 54 SECONDS; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC A DISTANCE OF 234.85 FEET; CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 05 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST, 234.61 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 4,070.28 FEET AND A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 34 SECONDS; THENCE NORTHERLY ALONG THE ARC, A DISTANCE OF 141.57 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 09 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST, 141.56 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE CONTINUE ALONG SAID CURVE FOR 399.93 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 05 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 47 SECONDS; CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 05 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 10 SECONDS EAST 399.77 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 02 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 174.34 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP MARKING THE POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING A RADIUS OF 2145.94 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE FOR 303.60 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 08 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 21 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 01 DEGREES 31 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 303.34 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP MARKING THE POINT OF REVERSE CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING A RADIUS OF 7780.10 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE FOR 213.73 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 01 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 26 SECONDS, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 04 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 213.72 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN NORTH 86 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 17 SECOND EAST 2818.61 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE APPROXIMATE NORMAL WATERS EDGE OF THE WAKULLA RIVER; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID WATERS EDGE AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 38 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 39.55 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 40 SECONDS WEST 110.45 FEET TO A POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF A 230 FOOT WIDE FLORIDA POWER CORPORATION POWERLINE; THENCE LEAVING SAID ORDINARY HIGH WATER MARK RUN ALONG SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY NORTH 85 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST A DISTANCE OF 2781.37 FEET TO A ROD AND CAP LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID TIGER HAMMOCK ROAD; THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY RUN ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY AS FOLLOWS; SOUTH 01 DEGREES 17 MINUTES 49 SECONDS EAST, A DISTANCE OF 173.54 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE ON A NON TANGENT CURVE TO THE LEFT, A RADIAL DISTANCE OF 7780.10 FEET; THENCE SOUTHERLY ALONG THE ARC, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 02 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 10 SECONDS, A DISTANCE OF 369.26 FEET, CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 02 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 369.22 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 21.75 ACRES MORE OR LESS. ABOVE LAND LYING IN THE HARTSFIELD RIVER SURVEY LOT 3 A/K/A 2 TIGER HAMMOCK RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. January 9 & 16, 2014. 11-88648 5093-0116 TWN 1/25 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, Jan. 25, 2014, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: TIMOTHY WHITE CLIFFTON K. MARLOW Before the sale date of Jan. 25, 2014, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. Jan. 9 & 16, 2014. Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 1Br 1Ba Cottage $500 2Br 1Ba Hs start at $660 3Br 2Ba DWMH start at $600 3Br 1Ba Hs $750 3Br 2Ba SWMH $650 2Br 1Ba SWMH $450 3Br 2Ba Twnhs start at $850 3Br 2.5Ba Twnhs $1100 3Br 2Ba Hs start at $1100 4Br 2Ba DWMH $800APPLICATION AND SEC. DEP. REQUIRED RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850-9265084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co.Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 A-1PRESSURE CLEANING FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .......43 CU. FT. $125 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $275COD UPON DELIVERY FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceMichael Mongeon 850421-8104 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE FIREWOOD AVAILABLE!ISA CERTIFIED ARBORIST FL-6125 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l th e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t to He C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f t t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 17 Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lots 15 & 16, Block 44 of WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT FIVE, accordin to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56, of the Public Records of wakulla County, Florida. Being the same property conveyed to Bobby Cook and Jan Cook by deed dated 7/30/04 and found of record in Deed Book 551, Page 738 in Wakulla County, Florida. A/K/A 75 Paulette Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 oclock, A.M., on February 6, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 4 day of November, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 9 & 16, 2014. 129380/edc 5071-0109 TWN Vs. Eichler, Christopher W. 12000333CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 12000333CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment dated November 21, 2013, entered in Civil Case Number 12000333CA, in the Circuit Court for Wakulla, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP is the Plaintiff, and CHRISTOPHER W. EICHLER, et al, are the Defendants, Wakulla County Clerk of Court will sell the property situated in Wakulla Florida, described as: LOT 15, BLOCK A OF WAKULLA FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 54, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A 2000 JACOBSEN MOBILE HOME, TITLE NO. 80910726, 80910919, 80910982, I.D. NO. JACFL20876A, JACFL20876B, JACFL20876C at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM. on the 23 day of January, 2014. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: November 22, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Wakulla County Clerk of Court CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to ap5072-0109 TWN Vs. Sudeall, Joyce 2010-CA-000102 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2010-CA-000102 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., PLAINTIFF, VS. JOYCE SUDEALL, ET AL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated September 20, 2013 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on January 23, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for the following described property: LOT 13 OF THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISIONS AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: October 18, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk of the Court Gladstone Law Group, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 1499 W. Palmetto Park Road, Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL 33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 January 2 & 9, 2014. 13-002723 5073-0109 TWN vs. Heaton, Linn D. 09000291CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.: 09000291CA BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. LINN D. HEATON, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated September 20, 2013, and entered in Case No. 09000291CA of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, is Plaintiff, and LINN D. HEATON et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 30 day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: LOT 9 OF THE RESORT ESTATES AT SHELL POINT UNIT ONE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 58 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: October 21, 2013 Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Tel: 954-462-7000 Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Sim J. Singh Phelan Hallinan, PLC Sim J. Singh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 98122 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303. 850-577-4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 January 2 and 9, 2014. PH # 12961 5082-0109 TWN vs. Crosby, John W. 13-141-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-141-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 201 S. Broad Street P.O. Box 240 Cairo, GA 39828, Plaintiff, v. JOHN W. CROSBY A/K/A JOHN WAYNE CROSBY, LAURA M. CROSBY A/K.A LAURA MARGARET CROSTBY, GREAT SENECA FINANCIAL CORPORATION d/b/a GREAT SENECA FINANCIAL CORP., DODGE ENTERPRISES, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: Commencing at the intersection of the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane and the Southern boundary of Pecan Street, as per map or plat of Hudson Heights, Unit 4, recorded on Page 38 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Thence run Southerly along the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane 450 to the Norther boundary of a new street known as Walnut Street, thence run Easterly and at right angles to the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane and along the Northern boundary of Walnuts Street 518 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street and the Easterly boundary of Cypress Street. Thence continue in the same direction along the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street 194 feet to an iron pipe which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From the POINT OF BEGINNING run thence Northerly and parallel to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 225 feet to an iron pipe, thence run Easterly and at right angles to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 97 feet 5086-0116 TWN Vs. Nelson, Buddy E. 10-00035 Re-Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 10-00035 Division No. BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. BUDDY E. NELSON, et al., Defendants/ RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated October 21, 2012, and entered in Case No. 10-00035 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY is the Plaintiff and BUDDY E. NELSON, SHERRY A. NELSON, WAKOVIA BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, THE FARM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., JOHN DOE N/K/A ROBERT NELSON are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 30 day of January, 2014, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 1, Block B, The Farm Subdivision, Phase I, A Subdivision As Per Map Or Plat Thereof, Recorded In Plat Book 3, Pages 93-98 Of The Public Records Of Wakulla County, Florida. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 27 day of September, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk GILBERT GARCIA GROUP P.A. Attorney for the Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110, Tampa, Florida 33607 (813)443-5087, Fla. Bar# 46196 January 9 & 16, 2014. 864242.0083/ns 5088-0116 TWN vs. Dollar, Scott S. 65-2012-CA-000433 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No. 65-2012-CA-000433 Division MIDFIRST BANK Plaintiff, vs. SCOTT S. DOLLAR, YALONDA J. DOLLAR AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on October 23, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 50 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 50 A DISTANCE OF 18.10 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF U.S. HIGHWAY NO. 98, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY 2255.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 17 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY BOUNDARY (AS MONUMENTED) A DISTANCE OF 342.36 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 86 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 320.53 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 365, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 162.31 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 67 DEGREES 12 MINUTES 21 SECONDS EAST 470.26 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2001 PION MOBILE HOME, VIN(S) PH2124GA6328A & PH2124GA6328B. and commonly known as: 74 STEPHEN DONALDSON RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse on February 6, 2014 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 4 day of November, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Tony A. Perez, (813) 229-0900 x1346 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800, Tampa, FL 33601-0800 ForeclosureService@kasslaw.com January 9 & 16, 2014. 086150/1217644/hmj to an iron pipe, thence run Southerly and parallel to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 225 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe on the Northern boundary of Walnut Street, thence run Westerly along the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street and at right angles to the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane, 97 feet, more or less to the POINT OF BEGINNING, and being situate in the E1/2 of Lot No. 76 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; together with a 1999 Redman mobile home ID#FLA14613828A & FLA14613828B. Commonly known as: 80 HARVEY PITMAN STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash on January 16, 2014, at 11:00 a.m. EST, or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, at the courthouse steps, located at Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, in accordance with section 45.031, Florida Statutes. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk January 2 & 9, 2014. pear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC 4855 Technology Way, Suite 500, Boca Raton, FL 33431 (727) 446-4826 January 2 & 9, 2014. CA12-02491 /KG 5075-0123 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 008 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2357 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 00-00-106-000-11746-000 Description of property: LOT 106 HS P-4-M-18 LYING ACROSS W SIDE OF LOT 106 DB 52 P 340 & OR 88 P 459 Name in which assessed W illiam W Porter Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: December 5, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2014. 5076-0123 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 009 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1027 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 33-2S-01E-000-04991-000 Description of property: 33-2S-1E P-6-M-74 IN N 1/2 OF NW 1/4 OF S33 369 X 601 FT OR 28 P 684 OR 101 P 920 OR 109 P 985 OR 154 P 8 Name in which assessed BOURBON STREET BLUES HALL Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: December 5, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2014. 5077-0123 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 010 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 835 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 30-25-01W-000-04175-000 Description of property: 30-2S-1W P-5-M-57 CONTAINING 2.24 ACRES IN SEC 30 S2 1W OR 10 P 603 & OR 83 744 OR 173 P 772 & OR 245 P 94 Name in which assessed LISA MILLER & GAR Y EUGENE DONALDSON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: December 5, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2014. 5078-0123 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 011 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 412 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 23-5S-02W-123-02816-008 Description of property: TWIN LAKES ESTATES UNIT 1 BLOCK A LOT 8 OR 48 P 830 OR 105 P 489, 490 OR 106 P 226 Name in which assessed HEIRS OF CHARLES D AGER TON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: December 5, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2014. 5079-0123 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 012 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 167 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 14-4S-02W-000-01966-001 Description of property: 14 4S 2W P-2-1-M-50B IN S1/2 OF 14 4S 2W OR 57 P 508 OR 84 P 759 OR 103 P 633, 634 OR 101 P 754 OR 206 P 465 OR 389 P 843 Name in which assessed GEORGE & CHERE MA THERS Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: December 5, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2014. 5080-0123 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PNC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1966 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 00-00-059-048-10072-000 Description of property: HOLIDAY HILLS BLOCK C TRACT 1 OR 46 P 717 & OR 67 P 35 Name in which assessed HEIRS OF KENNETH J BARKSDALE Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: December 5, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2014. 5081-0123 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2014 TXD 015 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that PPF HOLDINGS III L TD the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1280 Date of Issuance May 26, 2011 Parcel # 00-00-035-008-06813-000 Description of property: WAKULLA GARDENS BLOCK 5 LOT 64 OR 2 P 192 & OR 121 P 984 OR 228 P 366 OR 495 P 394 OR 517 P 725 OR 534 P 163 Name in which assessed SCOTT & KA THERINE STRA TTON Said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on February 12, 2014 at 10:00 A.M. Dated: December 5, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: J. Harrell, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 2, 9, 16 & 23, 2014. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 26 Magnolia Ridge 3/2. No smoking, Pets upon owner approval. $1,125 mo. $1,125 Deposit Available 1/1/14. 99 Comanche Trail 3/2 $925 mo., $925 security deposit. No smoking, No pets. Avail. Dec. 1. 42 Francis Avenue (Panacea) 3/2 Doublewide mobile home. $700 mo. $700 Deposit. No smoking. No pets. 16 Parkside Circle 3/2 $1,300 mo., $1,300 security deposit. No smoking, No pets. Avail. Jan. 1, 2014, possibly by mid Dec. 26 C Guinevere 3/2. $800 mo., $800. Deposit. No smoking, No pets. Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!104 Navajo Trail Wakulla Gardens 2 BR 2 BA, large bedroom, home has open oor plan. $740. mo. No Smoking, No Pets. 2879 Shadeville Road 3 BR/ 2BA Home with detached garage. $650.00. mo. No pets. No smoking. 28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has hardwood oors, 4 car carport, boat slip, community club house and pool. $2,000 mo. No smoking, No pets. 240 oak St. Across form Azalea Park, Crawfordville. 3BR1BA includes washer & Dryer. No smoking, No pets. 25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated community w/pool. 2BR/2BA Condo, hardwood oors, washer & Dryer. $950. mo. No Smoking, No Pets. 56 Blue Heron 3 BR/1BA Walking distance to Mashes Sands Beach. $700. Mo. No smoking, No pets. 2BR/2BA Marina Village Mashes Sand Rd. 2 Story Condo # B5. Fully Furnished, washer/Dryer, Community Pool, Boat Slip w/ Lift. $1,200 mo. No smoking, No pets. 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/Dryer, Pool, Boat Slips. No Smoking, No Pets! $1,100. mo. No smoking, No pets. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEED TO RENT YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com

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Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 12345 6789 101112 13 14 15 161718 19 20 21 22 23 2425 26 27 2829 30 31 32 3334 3536 37 38 39 40 4142 43 444546 47 48 49 50 51 525354 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 Across 1 Crook's other name 6 Therefore 10 Half a dance 13 Tropical fruit 14 Keaton of "Annie Hall" 15 Concert ticket information 16 Type of opportunity 19 These may clash 20 Last Greek letter 21 Iowa State University's town 22 Place to sleep 23 Ted Turner network 24 One of the colors of the rainbow 26 Franklin of R&B 28 Skin feature 30 1960s-70s war locale, for short 31 Hits that clear the bases 33 Public humiliation 35 Old yarn 38 Belgian treaty city 39 Loves to death 40 ___ Vegas, Nevada 41 "___ Well That Ends Well" 43 Horrified 47 Canada's capital 49 Oinking beast 50 Doubting Thomas's comment 51 Got 100 on, as a test 52 Unflavored 55 "Cup or ___?" (ice cream parlor question) 56 Commodores hit ballad 59 Sushi fish 60 Dog's name, in cartoons 61 Less covered 62 In need of rain 63 Summit 64 Tennis star Agassi Down 1 One-celled organism 2 German golfer Bernhard 3 Hard to decipher, as a message 4 Gets on in years 5 "___ Married an Axe Murderer" (Mike Myers film) 6 Kitchen floor piece 7 Former Defense Secretary Alexander 8 Lopsided, as an advantage 9 Spot 10 Thief or arsonist, for example 11 Fan's favorite event 12 "Cool!" 14 "___ Yankees" 17 Lacking fame 18 Small dollop 23 Southern tribe 25 Golden years fund 27 Slender 28 Spurs to action 29 Norway's capital 32 End-of-list abbr. 34 Chopped meal 35 Former British Prime Minister Margaret 36 Like some winds 37 Empties the tub 38 Was a bad winner 42 Mobile computer 44 On the train 45 Workshop tool 46 "___ here!" ("Poltergeist" catchphrase) 48 Ending for lemon or lime 49 Dock 53 Not taped 54 Visa rival, for short 55 Family 57 Historian's time 58 Lawyer's gp.Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 2 3 456 378 82 5764 71 564398 592 517 364 00 9 HometownContent 681 9245 3 7 247315986 395786124 829 571643 473698215 156243798 718 459362 564132879 932867451 ALIAS THUS CHA MANGO DIANE ROW ONCEINALIFETIME EGOS OMEGA AMES BED CNN INDIGO ARETHA PORE NAM HOMERS SHAME TWICETOLDTALE GHENT ADORES LAS ALLS AGHAST OTTAWA PIG BAH ACED PLAIN CONE THREETIMESALADY EEL ROVER BARER DRY APEX ANDRE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 Page 19 1. ENTERTAINERS: What did standup comedian Phyllis Diller call her husband? 2. HISTORY: The ancient Inca empire was centered in which South American country? 3. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What kind of creature is a newt? 4. RELIGION: In what year was the original Nicene Creed adopted? 5. LANGUAGE: What does the Latin phrase sine qua non mean? 6. GEOGRAPHY: In which U.S. state is the Acadia National Park located? 7. THEATER: In what play did The Demon Barber of Fleet Street appear? 8. MOVIES: What was the name of the town in the vampire movie The Lost Boys? 9. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Who was the first president to die in office? 10. LITERATURE: The character of Isabel Archer appears in which Henry James novel? 2014 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Fang 2. Peru 3. Salamander 4. 325 A.D. 5. Essential 6. Maine 7. Sweeney Todd 8. Santa Carla, Calif. 9. William Henry Harrison 10. The Portrait of a Lady Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 20 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 9, 2014 www.thewakullanews.comWakullas brown bears arent cute cartoons Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison Cartoon animals are cute and funny. They are assigned personalities and traits which endear them to the reader or viewer. These creations have been a staple of newspapers for more than a century and Walt Disney brought them to life in the movies about 90 years ago. Television, and now the internet, perpetuates the perception of these domestic and wild creatures. With the advent of computer generated graphics, these animated constructions are capable of acting right alongside well-known actors. Bears are a common subject for the imaginative mind of animators. They have all the features capable of making them lovable, sympathetic clods. What is not to love with a big furry animal with a pleasant and occasionally mischievous personality? Whether it is a desire for picnic baskets or honey pots, the bears of ction exude an irresistible aura. Reality is quite different. The black bears which inhabit Wakulla County and the surrounding region are Ursus americanus oridanus, a subspecies of the native American Black Bear. They are the largest native mammal. Despite the name, their fur color may range from jet black to a honey brown and coats can include a white chest patch. These bears are at home in the forested lands of Wakulla County. Whether oak hammocks or cypress swamps, bears are ready to settle in for a stay. As an apex or top of the food chain predator, local black bears will eat meat. They will take larger species, but are much more likely to take smaller, easy to catch animals. Their protein needs are sometimes satis ed by consuming insect larvae. The bears claws, thick fur and strength make nests an easy and satisfying target. Wakulla Countys beekeepers have a long running battle with bears in their attempts to keep these social insects producing honey and pollinating crops. Winnie the Pooh notwithstanding, bears favor the honeybee larvae to the honey itself. In addition to meat and insect larvae, the local black bear population consumes plant and vegetative materials. Acorns, nuts and grains are especially popular and are usually found in concentrations large enough to interest the bears. Deer hunters who use corn in feeders are likely to attract hungry bears looking for an easy meal. Many feeders have been tipped over and ripped apart as the bears gorge themselves on the corn. The bears excellent sense of smell is attributed to the structure of its nose. Much like dogs and hogs, the number and placing of sensory receptors provides the animals with the ability to find food miles away. While the local black bears tend to be shy and avoid contact with humans, the hunt for nourishment can create unintended meetings. Food waste left in the open can attract bears to an area. Once the bears are in an area, they will search for additional food sources. This has the potential of placing anything which smells interesting at risk, including pets and people. It is prudent to handle and dispose of food waste properly with the possibility of a bear contact. An adult bear will weigh as much as or more than a person, and must eat regularly too. To learn more about Wakulla Countys bears, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County website at http://wakulla.ifas.ufl. edu or call 850-9263931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA bear drawn to a feeder at night, captured by a trail camera. NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Prices Good Through January850926-32121.75LSEGRAMS VO $ 21 99 S $ $ 1.75LSEGRAMS 7 $ 19 99 S 750MLCOURVOISIERVS $ 19 99 C $ $ C 1.75LCOURVOISIERVS $ 39 99 R 9 9 C O $ $ BUD OR BUD LIGHT24PKBO TT LES O R CAN S 24 C AN S 24 PK K B O TT L E S O R C AN S $ 19 991.75L GIFTCAPTAIN MORGAN W/COKE $ 22 99 R R 9 9 9 9 C C C M M M $ $ $ $ We are CRAZY to Offer We are CRAZY to Offer $ 12$ 12 JUST JUST 6 MO. FOR 6 MO. FOR Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:P.O Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 1-877-401-6408The Wakulla NewsExp: 01/31/2014 Promo Code: CRAZYSavings apply to NEW Wakulla County subscriptions only.Please accept my new 6 Month subscription at the price of $12 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. --------------Furniture 25% Tues. -----------------Seniors 25% Fri. & Sat. Select Items 50% 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYouve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the926-2200 Medicare Plans Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterNeither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. 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