Wakulla news

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Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00491

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CHECK IT OUT Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page .......................................................Pages 4-5A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 6A Church.............................................................................Page 8A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 9A Community ...................................................................Page 10A School .....................................................................Pages 12,14A Sports ............................................................................ Page19A Outdoors .....................................................................Page 20A Water Ways ..................................................................Page 21A Weekly Roundup ..........................................................Page 12A In The Huddle ...............................................................Page 23A Sheriffs Report ............................................................Page 24A Weekly Roundup ...........................................................Page 26A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 28A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 5B Holiday Guide .........................................................Pages 10-11B Thinking Outside the Book ............................................Page 14B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 15B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 15B Comics ...........................................................................Page 18B Travel .............................................................................Page 22BINDEX OBITUARIES Susan Cooksey Dodson Edwin Ed Jackson Porter Lloyd Watson Willingham Christmas in July Operation Santa is underway newsThe Wakulla Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century kulla County For More Than A Century kulla County For More Than A Centur y Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read Daily Se Se Our 118th Year, 47th Issue Wednesday, November 27, 2013Santas mailbox will be up soonSopchoppy proposes election changesVolunteers donate thousands of hours to help over 300 local families With controversy still fresh from the last election, changes would set city elections at the same time as general votesHillary Brigham family named Wakullas Farm Family of the YearSPECIAL TO THE NEWSHillary Brigham (second from right) is the recipient of the 2013 Farm Family award. Also in the photo are Hillarys son and daughter, Gary Crum (far right) Wakulla County Farm Bureau Board President, Dan Buchanan (center) and Les Harrison, UF/IFAS County Extension Director (far left). This issue is being delivered to every household in Wakulla CountyBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netThe City of Sopchoppy is proposing to amend its charter in order to change its procedures pertaining to election dates and terms of of ce. The city will hold a public hearing on language to be used on a referendum on Dec. 9. Currently, the charters reads that the term of each member of the city council shall be for two years and shall begin on July 1 of the year of election. In order to have staggered terms this requires an election every year. If the language is approved at the hearing, the question posed on the referendum will ask, Shall the Charter of the City of Sopchoppy be amended to read: The term of each member of the City Council shall be for four years and shall begin on the rst Monday following the general election in which that member is elected? The answer options will be yes or no. Should voter pass the item, it would mean a couple of different things. First, the city of Sopchoppy election procedures would be changed from being run independently from the county to being performed in conjunction with the general elections held by the countys Supervisor of Elections of ce. If changes are pushed through, it would mean that current city commissioners Martha Evans and Lara Edwards terms of of ce would be automatically extended to November 2014 and other commissioners, Eddie Evans, Nathan Lewis and Glenn Rudds terms would extend to November 2016. That will be something that the citizens will have to decide if they want, said Sopchoppy City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. According to a press release issued by the city, the amendment is being proposed for two reasons. Turn to Page 3A Santas mailbox will be up after Thanksgiving to accept letters from local children for their Christmas wishes. The mailbox will be up on by Friday, Nov. 29, and Santa will be checking it until Dec. 23. Santa will be calling children when he has time so please include your name and phone number on your letters. By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net About 350 Wakulla County families will have gifts, food and other items with which to celebrate Christmas this holiday season thanks to roughly 45 volunteers who have collectively donated thousands of hours worth of efforts to this years Operation Santa. Since August, a dedicated group of people has been diligently working to put together what has undoubtedly been one of the largest efforts over the past four years. From August until Oct. 31, Operation Santa volunteers were accepting applications for families expressing their needs during the holiday season. Those families are given a number and their identity is kept con dential throughout the entire process, explained Wakulla County Coalition for Youth Chairman Bruce Ashley. When we match them up with an adopter from the community, the adopter is given a number, not names. Each familys application contains information such as the number in the household, the familys dire needs, clothing sizes and any special wish items. As far as getting families what they need and ask for, Ashley said, We cant make anyone any promises. We do the best that we can. Ashley is also a detective with the sheriffs of ce as well as the Wakulla County Coalition for Youths (WCCY) president and chair.Turn to Page 7A PHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYORThe community center was over owing with donated items last week. Operation Santa volunteers Robin Lunn, Janice Eakin, and Charlene Lanier. By LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorThe Hillary Brigham family is the 2013 Wakulla County Farm Family of the Year. She and her business partner Rachel McClure run Wakulla Berries which produces thornless blackberries for the u-pick market. The award was part of the Farm-City Week recognition program and sponsored by the North Florida Fair. The award was made at the Farm-City Week Breakfast, held annually at the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of ce and sponsored by Florida Farm Bureau. Brigham recounted how she got the idea for a blackberry farm. I had car problems and met someone who had the thornless berries, she said. After much research and a visit to several farms, she and McClure decided to give the crop a try. After two years she is satis ed with their progress. We planted two berry cultivars developed by University of Arkansas that were known for their large sweet fruit, Ouachita and Natchez, she said. Natchez has been our best performer and we have sold everything we produced, she reported. In 2012 Brigham was recognized by the UF/IFAS Northwest Extension Districts with Wakulla Countys Ag Innovator Award. Also present were Wakulla County commissioners Ralph Thomas and Howard Kessler. Commissioner Thomas read a proclamation declaring Nov. 22 to Nov. 28 as Farm-City Week in Wakulla County. Lance Pierce, Florida Farm Bureaus Assistant Director of State Legislative Affairs, gave an update on the state of agriculture in Florida. The 7 a.m. breakfast and recognition program were attended by many of the local farmers and their families. Wakulla County Farm Bureau board members and employees prepared the breakfast. Hearts Gone Wild for Florida Wild Hearts Gone Wild for Florida Wild Mammal Association Mammal Association See Page 2A See Page 2A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Lottery announces that Raymond May eld, 47, of Crawfordville, claimed a $3 million prize in the Gold Rush Tripler Scratch-Off game at Florida Lottery headquarters in Tallahassee. May eld purchased his winning ticket at Quickstop, located at 2984 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. He chose to receive his winnings in annual payments of $150,000.00 for 20 years. The $20 Scratch-Off game, Gold Rush Tripler, is the latest installment of the player favorite, Gold Rush Scratch-Off games. Gold Rush Tripler offers better odds of winning $30 to $500, compared to previous Gold Rush games, and the best odds ever to win $500,000. There are four top prizes of $3 million and 10 top prizes of $500,000 remaining. The overall odds of winning are 1 in 2.95. The Florida Lottery offers approximately 60 scratch-off games at any given time through vending machines or counter displays at more than 13,000 retailers statewide. Scratch-Off games are an important part of the Lotterys portfolio of games, comprising approximately 60 percent of ticket sales and generating more than $575 million for the Educational Enhancement Trust Fund in scal year 2012-13.Crawfordville man wins $3 million in lottery47-year-old man chooses to receive $150,000 annual payment over 20 years WILLIAM SNOWDENThe lion in Azalea Park is painted blue for World Diabetes Day.Blue for World Diabetes DayStaff ReportGrace Keith, the health educator for the Wakulla County Health Department, painted the lion at Azalea Park blue for World Diabetes Awareness Day, which was Nov. 14. We have a major diabetes problem in Wakulla, Keith said. She noted that there are 14 students with Type 1 in Wakulla schools. Ten years ago, there were zero, she said. There are also four students with Type 2 diabetes. Wakulla ranks higher than the state average in the prevalence of diabetes, with 12.9 percent the state average is just over 10 percent. As far as local diabetics being educated and taking care of themselves, Keith said, Wakulla ranks only slightly better than the state average. What that shows, she said, is that, Even though people are diagnosed, theyre not taking care of themselves. PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMSPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe rst time touching a pelican might be a life-changing experience. Jessica Beatty with Duffy, the FWMA pelican used for educational purposes.Hearts Gone Wild fundraiser held for FWMAAt right, neighbors gather with some wine and enjoy the day of music, food, crafts and and old-fashioned get-together. Below, friends gather around Renee Mitchells leatherwork tables during the fundraiser for the Florida Wild Mammal Association in Sopchoppy on Saturday, Nov. 23.More photos online at thewakullanews.net Wakulla SeniorBiloxi Fun Weekend Bash! Friday, January 17 to Sunday, January 19, 2014A Deposit of $100 at the time of booking will secure your trip. Non-Refundable Cancellation/trip insurance is available. Final payment is due by Dec. 3, 2013. To book please call: Virginia Moore 850-508-9650 Becky Black 850-528-2276 OR Gloria, Sue or Gil at: SUN WORLD TRAVEL850-681-9074SPECIAL FEATURES INCLUDE:BOOK TODAY! SPACE WILL FILL UP FAST!!! at the Beautiful Four Points Sheraton Citizens Council Readers Choice 2011 Readers Choice 2012 Readers Choice 2013 Readers Choice 2010 Readers Choice 2009 Kris, Mikey, Chris and Mike Winner Remember It is YOUR Car! YOU have the right to have YOUR CAR Insurance Repairs Done at the Shop of YOUR CHOICE! Come See us for ALL your Automotive Needs!764 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville850926-7883 COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR Open: M-F 7:30 5:302008 2009 2010 2013 TheNe ws Wa k ulla Readers ChoiceWINNER Is your vehicle ready for Winter? COOLING SYSTEM FLUSH & EXCHANGE $ 39 99 most vehicles

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com From Front Page First, it states that by allowing the countys supervisor of elections to handle the ballots and run the election, it will reduce city costs. Currently, since the citys elections are held separately from the general elections, the city must reimburse the supervisors of ce for the cost of running an election something that Lawhon said will make a difference for the pockets of Sopchoppy citizens. Its less costly this way, Lawhon said. It gets quite expensive for the city to hold elections every year. Secondly, the changes are being proposed in order to insulate city staff from the process. In light of recent allegations of corruption and mishandled ballots during the last city election allegations that an FDLE criminal investigation report deemed invalid the city may be looking to avoid such situations in the future. However, Lawhon contends that the proposed changes have nothing to do with recent events. This is something that weve been talking about doing for years, said Lawhon. We just thought that now would be a good time to move on it. In any case, running elections in line with the county and handing procedures over to the supervisors of ce would ensure that city staff would not be responsible for the administration of absentee ballots or other duties pertaining to the election. This will result in lower cost to the citizens and more ef cient administration of the elections and city business, the press release reads. Citizens are encouraged to attend the public hearing on these changes scheduled for Dec. 9 at 6:30 p.m. at Sopchoppys City Hall. Lawhon also encourages anyone with questions to give city staff a call at 962-4611.Sopchoppy proposes election changes Special to The NewsUnited Way of the Big Bend is undergoing a strategic planning process to ensure that the agency delivers the greatest possible return for the monies invested by organizations and citizens across the Big Bend. It is important to us that as we undertake this process, we engage our stakeholders about your aspirations and concerns. United Way will host a series of conversations with a variety of stakeholder groups to discuss and identify local issues that we, as a community, can begin to address collectively. We would very much like for you to join us for a conversation in Wakulla County at TCC Wakulla on Thursday, Dec. 5, from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. To con rm your attendance, please email Megan Picht, megan@uwbb.org. If you are unable to attend, please consider sending a representative from your organization. For more information or if you have questions, please contact Heather Mitchell at (850) 414-0855.United Way to hold meetingBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce and School Board members held an anti-bullying discussion for parents of elementary aged children on Thursday, Nov. 21. Undersheriff Trey Morrison, Lieutenant Bruce Ashley and Sergeant Billy Jones opened the discussion by giving a brief presentation on what is considered bullying, what constitutes an investigation and what is done by both the school system and the sheriffs of ce in partnership to address bullying issues. Their approach to dealing with children with emerging behavioral issues stems from their want to change a culture that today, encourages kids to be lewd, rude and inappropriate. According to Jones, bullying can occur by means such as teasing, social exclusion, threatening, intimidation, stalking, physical violence and theft. Bullying can be anything that is said or done maliciously or willfully, or it can come in the form of harassment that is done intentionally either over the internet, in person or over another electronic device. When there is a nding of bullying, a process starts right away, he said. That process includes rst explaining to each child involved what the complaint is and how to stop the behavior. They are given a chance to correct what they are doing before disciplinary action is undertaken. We nd, commonly, that the spat has been going back and forth between the two children, its not just one-sided, Ashley said. Thats why we start at the ground level. We try to make them understand that what theyre doing is wrong and why. Then we explain what will happen if it doesnt cease. A new law gives the school system the ability to take into consideration things that occur off campus when considering a course of action as well. In some cases, they said, the problem is at home. Weve got to stop trying to be our childrens best friend and start being their best parent, Ashley said. A list of phone applications that are available in the area that children can potentially use in harmful ways was given out at the meeting. I look at all of it, Morrison said in reference to his childrens social media accounts. You have to. I have all of their passwords and Im checking it constantly. It was also mentioned that during an investigation, no matter how many times or how quickly something is deleted off of a cell phone or computer, materials can always be retrieved. There is not a word or photo that you send someone by phone or computer that we cannot get, Ashley said. In some extreme cases a child could potentially nd themselves behind bars, said Ashley. But we want to get involved early before a child has a chance to commit a crime, he said. Its not about making arrests, its about making a difference. Superintendent Bobby Pearce also spoke at the meeting, addressing some parents concerns about how and when the school system follows up with complaints about bullying. You need to call and say, I want to report a bullying situation, he said. That makes us have to go through the full rubric and open up a case. Pearce said that it is never going to be their advice that parents of children go to the other set of parents directly to address the problem, as the situation could potentially get dangerous. According to Pearce, bullying in the Wakulla County school system is worse than ever. Our kids are more stressed than any other group of kids that weve seen, he said. Weve had more Baker Acts in that last three to four months than we have ever had. Pearce said he was very concerned and urged parents to be vigilant of their childrens behavior. Those who have been working with the children have said that they are nding a lot of kids are holding in their concerns and their issues., Pearce said. He also urged parents to teach their kids to tell someone when they feel uncomfortable to address it rather than tolerate legitimate stress factors. Our promise to you is that where we have local control, we are going to do everything that we can to keep our kids safe, Pearce said. There will be another antibullying session for parents of high school-aged students on Thursday, Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. in the Crawfordville Elementary auditorium. Anti-bullying conversation is held 000GMM0 Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Independent Doctor of Optometry edgardneroptical@yahoo.comComprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50 Are you seeing clearly this hunting season? Get an eye exam and make sure your vision is ON TARGET!Ed Gardner, O.D. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the ADVERTISING DETAIL NOVEMBER 21, 2013 NOTICE OF INTENT NOVEMBER 14, 21, 28, 2013 DECEMBER 5, 2013 TO USE UNIFORM METHOD OF COLLECTING NON-AD VALOREM ASSESSMENTS NOTICE OF DISPOSAL OF SEIZED EVIDENCE BY WAKULLA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICENotice is hereby provided that the below described evidence has been in the custody of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce for longer than 60 days after the conclusion of all proceedings regarding its seizure, regarding said evidence. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Ofce, pursuant to Florida Statutes, Chapter 705.105(1) (a), pursuant thereto the Sheriffs Ofce elects to retain the following vehicle(s) for the agencys own use.1997 Red Isuzu Trooper VIN #JACDH58V4N7914966 1998 Silver Honda Accord VIN #1HGCG5645WA154546 1998 Oldsmobile Cutlass VIN #1G3AR17A58R459782 1990 White/Blue Chevrolet P/U VIN #1GCDC14Z8L213452 1998 Silver Ford Bronco VIN #1FMCU14T3LUA94136 2000 Silver Mitsubishi Gallant VIN #4A3AA6L5YE149039 2002 White Ford Windstar LX VIN #2FMZA50412BA78904NOVEMBER 28, 2013 DECEMBER 5, 2013WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARDBID #13/14-07 Request for Architectural Services for Renovation Wakulla Middle SchoolThe Wakulla County School Board is accepting proposals for Architectural Services to provide programming, planning, design and construction administration of Wakulla Middle School for renovation and remodeling to the existing buildings. All those interested should submit four (4) copies of the following: Resume, forms 254, SS 330, and 305 AIA, list of references and quali- cations to: by 10:00 a.m. December 18, 2013. Contact person is William R. Bristol, Executive Director of Facilities and Maintenance at (850) 926-0065. Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools P.O. Box 100, Crawfordville, FL 32326 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327NOVEMBER 28, 2013 DECEMBER 5, 2013

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Corrections Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. Its preferred that you email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, but you can also mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $34/yr. $20/6 mo. Out of County $46/yr. $28/6 mo. Out of State $49/yr. $29.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: A daughters sacrifice Wakullas oldest voter Red Clay Footprints: Desperate fight in the Virginia turkey woods Sheriffs Report November 21, 2013 Florida Wild Mammals work continues TDC aims to promote bird watching in Wakulla Harden is new commission chairman Wakulla Middle finishes undefeatedthewakullanews.com Making Panacea a city will mean higher taxes anks for re safety demonstrationAirport will become Mount Tarpine Follow us on Correcting an earlier letterAlzheimers Walk supports respite programTake a look at The News:Content you cant get anywhere elseIf youre not a regular subscriber to The Wakulla News, you may be wondering why you got this in the mail. This is the issue we do every year thats delivered to every address in Wakulla County. If youre not a subscriber, we hope this issue shows you why you should be there is no other source of local news as complete as what you have in your hands. Our lead stories this week are about Operation Santa getting underway the annual effort to help local families in need during the holiday season. Reporter Amanda Mayor also has a follow up story on the City of Sopchoppy proposing some changes to when, and how, it holds its elections. The changes are largely in response to allegations of voter fraud in the most recent election allegations that FDLE determined were unfounded. The News covers local government, ranging from the county commission and the city governments of St. Marks and Sopchoppy. Wakulla Extension Director Les Harrison, who writes a weekly Natural Wakulla column about things in nature that capture his fancy, also wrote about our Farm Family of the Year. On our Outdoors page we have several columnists who write about local sports Marj Law writes about shooting in her Home on the Range column, Capt. Jody Campbell writes a shing report every other week in his From the Dock column, and George Weymouth writes about wildlife in his occasional Wakulla Wildlife column. We also cover whats happening on the water with the Coast Guard Auxiliary Report by Carolyn Brown Treadon, and a regular dive column by Gregg Stanton. Other popular features include the Sheriffs Report, with some of the interesting law enforcement activity of the past week, and News Service of Floridas Weekly Roundup, which reports on happenings in state government. Weve also made Just a Pinch recipe column a regular feature, and I know a couple of readers who enjoy trying out the recipes. Every week of the month, we have a different focus in this edition, its Senior Citizen news. The rst week of the month, its the Chamber of Commerce and business news; second week is Green Scene with environmental news; and we have an Arts & Entertainment section on the third week. On those months when theres a fth week, we have the News Extra! which focuses on special news and reports. I think if you take a few minutes to look through The News, youll nd its more news about Wakulla than youll nd anywhere else. Are we missing something youd like to see in the paper? Let me know. You can call me at 926-7102 or email at editor@thewakullanews.net.William Snowden is the editor of The Wakulla News. William Snowdenwsnowden@thewakullanews.netEditor, The News: Mount Tarpine is what we will have. It will be: As high as the eaves of the old VFW building at U.S. 98; Over 12 feet high on the south end near Surf Road, and 250 feet wide, and 2,400 feet long, and topped with asphalt. Mount Tarpine what a sight to see! At a cost of $5.6 million (up from $3.2 million at the beginning of all this and down from $7.6 million a couple of months ago) is over $180 for every man, woman and child of Wakulla County, as a grant from FDOT when over 70 percent of those grant funds come from the gas taxes for our cars. Hey FDOT, if you want to do Wakulla a favor, use those dollars to widen the Crawfordville Highway! Does anyone believe the nal costs for the Mount Tarpine tourist attraction will come-in at the costs estimated today? And the worst part: the annual costs from the county treasury for upkeep plus the costs for replacements after storms! What about those hangars with the new ood plain requirements? Hangars on stilts! Now that might really draw some tourists. Oh, I forgot, they could get an exception to build hangars and other improvements below the ood line but golly, wouldnt that affect the FEMA rating of the county as a whole causing ood insurance rates to increase for all of us? They wouldnt do that would they? QUESTION: Mr. Fults (airport manager) how many planes are based there? ANSWER: Six. HMMM: $5.6 million 6 = $933,333 per plane for planes worth less than $150,000 each. An airstrip that was deeded with the provision that it be used for light aircraft as it has been and should continue to be. Like the small single engine planes parked in garage/hangars of homes in Tarpine. Is building more hangars such a good idea, when the existing hangar building is nearly vacant? I must admit, those powered hang gliders and experimental types of aircraft really are a joy to watch as they slowly circle around riding the breezes. Arent those also light aircraft? Bye, bye! So now, because one person as president of the Tarpine Homeowners Association and the airport manager, fed data to FDOT to support his cause, we may end up with a Panacea plateau from which his noisy twin-engine aircraft can y out of and in to with ease. The existing hangar and most of those homes along the side of the runway in Tarpine were built when: 1. The airport was publicly noticed as being out-of-compliance, and was 2. Operating under a conditional license. With the raised runway, all of those structures will be below the clear zone. Gee, just go build and government will come along to bail you out. The formula that makes sense for county airports is when they act as a catalyst or magnet for commerce to cluster around. That is, commerce increases the commercial tax base thus making it economically viable for a county. Again, on what land around Mount Tarpine? There are only a few precious acres of upland and those too would require raised oor grades above the ood line. But wait, another tourist attraction: semi-trucks backing to light industrial buildings on stilts! For the county as a whole? Oh, come on! Tallahassee Regional is closer to Wakulla Springs than Tarpine and has rental cars to boot. There are three wetlands directly under Mount Tarpine plus another that will be affected to re-route the entry road to The Refuge at Panacea subdivision if the Refuge homeowners are willing to go along with the changes to: move the entry, eliminate a few lots from the subdivision, shift the runway over next to their lots in The Refuge and build Mount Tarpine out their back windows? NOT going to happen! It is just too bizarre to imagine. Leigh Ann Mills Panacea Editor, The News: The annual Alzheimers Walk sponsored by the Alzheimers Project Inc. and the Pilot Club took place Sunday, Nov. 3. The Wakulla Walkers Journey of Hope team wants to thank all of you who made donations helping make this a successful event. The proceeds from the Walk help provide the Alzheimers Project/Wakulla Respite Program available to our community at no cost to our clients. The respite program is available to any memory impaired person every Monday at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For information call Pat Ashley 9845277. Angie and Bill Meisenheimer Team Captain Linda and Franz Buytendorp Sharon Fox Jerri Lucking Earlene Pigott Pat and Regie Ashley Editor, The News: I am following the story on making Panacea a city and there is one element that no one is talking about and that is the many unrepresented members of this community who will be affected but who can not vote. This is also a shing and tourist community and a lot of the property owners, like me, dont live here permanently but we own property, pay ad valorem taxes, franchise fees and other taxes just like everyone else but we dont get a voice in the process. The idea is to start this city with a franchise fee but we all know that is not the end of it. More taxes will be added as more expenses are incurred. I cannot see any positive side to making Panacea a city. I know what it cost to run a city. I am a three-time elected city councilman in my home town of Macon, Ga., and I was chairman of appropriations with an $80 million dollar budget. Cost rises every year with all governments. Several county commissioners there realize that and admit they have to dip into reserves just to balance their budget now. I rst came to the area in the 1980s, fell in love with it, and bought my property in so I think my and every other property owners opinion should be considered. I dare say most non-residents dont know about this and the only reason I do is because I get the Wakulla paper. If everyone in support of this thinks its a great idea, I suggest sending a questionnaire to every property owner outlining the cost, the bene ts and the down side, and then you will know whether we the people really want Panacea to be a city. Mike Cranford Macon, Ga. Editor, The News: Fire safety is something everyone should know. It is never too soon to start teaching our children about re safety. Children age 4 and younger, those least able to make their way safely without help, account for roughly half of all childhood deaths and injuries suffered in res. We are lucky to live in a community where re ghters take the time to come into childcare centers and educate our children on re safety the ages of the children do not matter, they talk and use words that even the smallest child can understand. There are many tips worth sharing. Make sure your home has re detectors. Test them once a month. Also, change the batteries on the re detectors in the fall and the spring. Have an escape plan for your family and practice it monthly so that if a re does break out, everyone can escape the house safely. Your child needs to know the physical address of the home and how to call 911. Teach your children never to play with lighters, matches, etc., and be sure to teach them to stop, drop and roll if their clothes should catch on re. So, with saying all this, I would like to personally thank the Wakulla County Firemen for coming out and educating our children and taking the time to answer questions and to show off their re trucks. It is people like this that are the true heroes of our county. Lucy Ward Owner/Director Bright Beginnings Preschool and DaycareEditor, The News: While at the U.S. Post Of ce on Saturday, I had a conversation with Commissioner Howard Kessler. Although he was busy asking people to sign the wetlands petition, he did take the time to let me know that I was wrong about something I said in an opinion piece published in the Wakulla News two weeks ago. I had written that James Hennessey stomped out of a commission meeting after hearing something he did not agree with. Commissioner Kessler pointed out that this was not true, that he was escorted out by a sheriffs deputy due to disruptive behavior. I apologize to Mr. Hennessey and stand corrected. Cynthia Webster Crawfordville A front page story in last weeks News about Wakullas oldest voter, Lottie Roddenberry, gave an incorrect age. She is 102, not 103. The story also gave the wrong rst name for her son, David. We regret the errors.READERS WRITE:

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 5Areaders speak out More OpinionsAlliance takes issue with omas letterPrefer a local guard dog for wetlandsMaybe its not about setback, but densityREADERS WRITE: Reasons to protect Wakullas wetlands Wetlands vote makes no sense Wetlands are worth protecting Editor, The News: The fate of the wetlands in Wakulla County is a matter of consequence and conscience. Sometimes we make mistakes, past and present, from lack of information or incorrect information. However, there is no mystery about the reasons for protecting Wakullas wetlands or the irreparable damage and cost for ignoring the facts we now have. It is unthinkable that we would risk this fragile and important asset of our county. Please consider the following: 1. The wetlands mitigate storm and ood water damage. Almost exactly a year ago we learned a dif cult lesson from Hurricane Sandy. The clean up and rebuilding is ongoing. Only a few weeks ago there was an announcement concerning the tremendous cost of the effort to regain this natural defense against ood water damage. How can we possibly justify reducing a buffer when we know what happens when the wetlands are compromised and how costly it is to try to repair the loss? Our taxes will pay these costs. 2. Save our seafood. The wetlands provide food, shelter and breeding grounds for shrimp, oysters, clams, crabs and sh. Our commercial shermen, sport shermen and anyone who loves seafood will suffer. Destruction and pollution to the wetlands caused by development will affect the growth and health of seafood. One of the treasures of Wakulla County is our fresh seafood second to none, but it wont be if we do not protect the wetlands. 3. Protect water purity. Once water quality has been compromised it rarely can be restored and never without enormous cost. The quality of the water off of our beaches is already polluted and much of it caused by runoff from overly developed areas. The buffer under dispute helps to clean water even before it reaches the wetlands. 4. Enhance the tourist industry. It does not make sense to promote Wakulla as a tourist destination then turn around and compromise the wetlands which provide prominent attractions that draw tourists to our area. Tourists come here for shing, swimming, canoeing, bird watching, nature walks and more than I can list. They come to observe and photograph the beauty of our county and feast on our local seafood. I have lived here more than half of my life for the same reasons. Why would we risk all of this? 5. Who is hurt from sacri cing the wetlands? All of us will be hurt. And our pocketbooks will hurt too. Dont be surprised when flood insurance increases due to development in areas not suited for development. If we harm our wetlands we all lose. To compromise the integrity of the wetlands is never a good thing and once destroyed they are rarely if ever restored. We should keep Wakulla Countys Comprehensive Plan and its Wetland Ordinance intact not weaken it. Donna Crowley Sopchoppy Editor, The News: County Commissioner Ralph Thomass letter published in Oct. 31 of The Wakulla News (Wetlands ght is about freedom) defames The Wakulla Wetlands Alliance. In his letter, Thomas poses questions and answers to Emily and John, a real or hypothetical young Wakulla couple who apparently live in a typical middle-class Wakulla subdivision where wetlands occur. My purpose here is to correct Thomas grossly inaccurate and incomplete answers and assertions. However, I definitely agree with Thomas that: Good people are signing this petition because it seems like the right thing to do. Good people should be given the entire picture. Yes, it seems like the right thing because it is the right thing to do and, yes, the people deserve all the facts. Thomas: Do you own your own property? Do you think you have the right to decide how you use your property? Within reason, all of us should have the right to decide how to use our property. However, Emily and John should not have the right to use their property in a manner that will substantially harm their neighbors. Would the couple be agreeable to allowing their next-door neighbors place on their property a recycling/land- ll facility similar to what was proposed earlier this year in the Panacea area that ran into opposition? Does the couple believe they should have the freedom to do whatever they wish regardless of how it impacts their next-door neighbors? Thomas: Do you think a group of citizens should have control over your property? The WWA as a private non-governmental entity should not, does not, and does not want to have control over Emily and Johns property. But we do believe that local government should have a reasonable planning and zoning oversight. Otherwise there would be anarchy. Thomas: Did you know the wetlands petition is not about government against the people, but is about a group of citizens against the people? The WWA is not against the people to the contrary, we wish to empower the people to decide for themselves if they want our countys wetlands protected. Commissioner Thomas obviously believes he knows what is best for the people regardless of what they want. Thomas: Did you know, the people pushing this petition live in or near wetlands? Yes, some of our WWA members live near wetlands. We are proud to assert that our citizens should have the right to decide if our county government needs to protect our wetlands, including those near where some of our members live. But I dont believe any of our members live in wetlands. Thomas: Did you know they dont want you to have what they have? To the contrary we want Emily and John to have what we have i.e., the ability to enjoy the shing and hunting, the seafood, the outdoor scenery, the clean water, and the other amenities we have in Wakulla that our wetlands support. And we want Emily and John to have the opportunity to vote whether or not they want Wakullas wetlands protected. Thomas: Did you know they dont think you are responsible enough to make decisions for yourself? We believe, very much so, that Emily and John are responsible enough to make decisions for themselves, that is why the WWA wants to give the couple the opportunity to decide in conjunction with others citizens if Wakulla wetlands need local government protection. Evidently, Thomas does not believe that Emily and John should have that right. He wants Big Brother to make the decision for the couple, regardless of what they want. However, we dont believe that the couple should have the right to do something on their property that will substantially harm their neighbors. Thomas: Did you know our commissioners are trying to return property rights to the property owners? We dont believe that is Thomas motive. However it is obvious that he does not trust Emily and John and our other Wakullas citizens to decide for themselves if our county government should protect our local valuable wetlands. Thomas: If the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance can take away private property rights on this issue do you think they will stop there? The WWA is a one-issue organization and will cease to exist after our citizens decide whether or not our local government will provide reasonable protection for our wetlands. The question that needs to be asked is, If Thomas and like-minded commissioners are successful in eliminating local-government protections, do you think they will stop there? Almost, every argument Thomas uses to justify elimination of local wetlands protection could be used to justify the elimination of practically every planning and zoning activity our local government engages in. Gee, would it be OK with Emily and John that someone could build next door to them a garbage dump, a sport arena, or a chemical-manufacturing plant spewing smoke, or a sawmill without government approval or oversight, regardless of our couples point of view or knowledge. Thomas: Will you stand up against the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance and let them know they cannot take away your property rights? If the WWA is successful in getting the local wetland issue on the ballot every Wakulla citizen will have the opportunity to tell our government they do or dont want local protection of our wetlands. Thomas evidently does not trust Emily and John and all our other citizens to make that decision, he wishes to make that decision for them. The WWA trusts them to make the correct decision. Victor W. Lambou Chairman Wakulla Wetland AllianceEditor, The News: Wakulla Countys vote to dismantle local wetlands ordinances makes no sense given the role of wetlands in sustaining our states water supply, economy, and overall quality of life. Although population growth in Wakulla may not currently rise to the levels in my county, Manatee, the change will most certainly allow holders of large tracts of land to quickly develop new towns in Wakulla that will, in turn, contribute to our states diminishing aquifer system. The research is quite clear in that by 2060, if land use and management policy in this state does not change, Florida will lose at least one of its water management districts (see University of Floridas Florida 2060). The vote shows a paucity of leadership and how out of touch the majority commissioners are with what most people in this state know is right and good for their children and Floridas future. How do I know? First, other counties are now changing their land use policies in order to preserve wetlands and protect the states freshwater supply. Second, this past summer I was a leader in a movement to protect a valuable saltwater marsh and upland freshwater wetland from a massive dredge-and-fill project on Sarasota Bay. My demographic tracking of the movements supporters and 6,700 petitioners suggests that people of all social and political stripes care about the environment and want to see it preserved for the enjoyment, health, and economy of future generations. Those who objected to Wakullas dismantling of the wetlands ordinance must now petition agencies such as Floridas Department of Economic Opportunity, Game and Fish Commission, Environmental Protection Agency, Water Management District, and Regional Planning Council. Then they must run their own candidates in the next elections and vote Wakullas regressive politicians out. Terri K. Wonder Old Florida native and candidate for Manatee County Commissionerat-LargeEditor, The News: The Wakulla County Commission recently voted 4-1 to eliminate the wetland protection language from its comprehensive plan. The wetland protection language was put in place to protect not only the countys wetlands, but the jobs that depend on these pristine wetlands. To eliminate wetlands protection in the name of property rights and the prospect of economic development is very short sighted. Yes, Wakulla County might increase its tax base by allowing for additional commercial development, but with this new development comes the high cost of eventually remediating these sensitive wetlands and adjacent natural habitats that will become contaminated as a result of stormwater runoff from these facilities. Stormwater controls adjacent to wetlands do not work! Wakulla County attracts thousands of people from throughout Florida and other states who enjoy visiting the natural attractions that make Wakulla County famous. Additionally, these natural habitats attract hundreds of international visitors as well. The lakes, springs, creeks, rivers, and bays of Wakulla County all depend on healthy wetlands. Visitors to the county provide a solid economic base for existing commercial businesses which include restaurants, motels, shops, and gas stations. Fishing, hunting, birding, boating, hiking, and just plain enjoying the outdoors are the activities that bring these visitors to Wakulla County. Without protection of Wakullas wetlands, these nature-based amenities would eventually degrade to the point that visitors would cease to visit. As a Leon County resident who enjoys the natural habitats that Wakulla County provides, I am aware that your countys economic engine is based on the visitors from beyond your borders. Demand that the county commission reinstate the wetland protection language. Otherwise, that Gift of Nature will be only a memory. Harry Hooper Leon CountyEditor, The News: Would you trust the bureaucrats in Tallahassee to run your personal household and your business for you? I do not trust the state and federal government to keep an eye on our interests instead of our local of cials watching out for our wetlands. I would feel better having a local guard dog protecting my interests than a busy watchdog that little ol Wakulla is not a priority for. With the federal government and state government spread so thin we would get lost in the shuf e after all its always better when we take care of our own concerns. Keith Grumbly SopchoppyEditor, The News:What makes a 50-yard-line seat the best seat to watch a football game? Isnt it because it gives you the best view of the whole eld? Sometimes a view is better when you step back. Thats why the penthouse oor the most distant from the street is more expensive than the rst oor. A landscape view has its own special kind of beauty, which is best enjoyed from a distance. Wetland views are landscape views. They are best enjoyed from a distance. In the hearing on Monday, Nov 4, some of our county commissioners told us that citizens who want to protect our environment, and keep the existing additional 25-foot setback from the wetlands in place, simply do not understand the issue. Ralph Thomas stated: I do not understand the hypocrisy. You want to build your house on your property, and yet you do not want to allow someone else to do the same on theirs. Jerry Moore stated: Wetlands, wetlands, wetlands what were talking about is setbacks The people want us to repeal this ordinance. If what we are talking about is setback distance, then more distance contributes to a better view. Twenty- ve feet the setback distance the majority of commissioners want removed is less than a rst down on the football eld. Why would our elected of cials want to repeal the protection of such a short distance, and, go so far as to refuse to allow the people to vote on the repeal? Protecting our wetlands protects our shing, tourism and oyster businesses. The ground in our area is porous, so everything we put into the ground nds its way onto our beaches, and into our oceans. Wetlands provide a lter for the runoff from human activity, as the water nds its way toward the ocean. Wetlands provide a natural buffer against hurricane damage. They absorb wave energy and storm surge. Protecting our wetlands protects us. I live on property with a wetland. In our neighborhood, we protect it. Maintaining the setback around it is a part of that protection. I cannot tell which people some of our commissioners are referring to, but at this hearing, those of us who spoke in favor of protecting the wetlands outnumbered the opposing view about 20-4. However, perhaps the majority of our commissioners are not concerned about setback distances at all. Evidently, they are really talking about density. Changing the protected distance to the wetland may mean that some properties can be more dense have more than one building site, for instance, or perhaps some properties would be more attractive to outside developers. More density means more human impact, more wastewater treatment required, more nitrogen introduced into our estuaries, more chances of beach closures, oyster closures and dangers associated with sh kills and marine mammal (dolphin and manatee) death. Its not about the view, is it? Citizens, please help us protect our dolphins, manatees, oysters, sh, beaches, tourism and marshes. Our next step is to sign a petition to place this issue on the ballot for November 2014, so that the people can decide. Respectfully submitted, Taylor Phillips Crawfordville

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com< STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Do you have a Thanksgiving family tradition?JAMES ROWE Bob McKeithan Roo ngMy mom and my sister get together and make their homemade yeast rolls. Everyone looks forward to those. BRIAN RUDOLPH Best for Less tree serviceMy family and I all go out of town to Pine Mountain for primitive camping. PAM WATKINS RetiredMy mother is a stickler for tradition. Family must be together and there must be collards, dressing or dumplings on the table! MISSY GRUBEStop & SaveMy tradition is to make my moms homemade noodles. I use her same bowl and rolling pin she used to use to make it. MARK SMITHEden Springs maintenanceThe guys all go out hunting in the morning. My wife and my sister-in-law always compete to see who can make the best Ambrosia. Compiled by Lynda Kinsey By PETRA SHUFFSpecial to The NewsAs a Humane Society, CHAT always looks to improve the lives of our domestic animals. Knowing that some dogs have to live in the yard and may not have shelter from the elements we followed up on the suggestion from one of our volunteers to build dog houses. Enlisting David Damon and Boy Scout Troop 8, CHAT began organizing a dog house build for Saturday, Nov. 23. A simple barrel design was chosen and preparations started earlier in the week. John Shuff, who is also an Eagle Scout, contacted Gulf Coast Lumber about our project, and they didnt hesitate to donate the wood needed for the framework. John cut the wood to t the barrels and hold bedding in ahead of time, and also cut one of each size barrels to attach for overhangs. Volunteer Mike Eakin smoothed edges, and pre-drilled holes to make assembly easier. Scout Master David Damon paired his Scouts, and an assembly line was set up. Everyone had a job to do, and equipped with drills, rivets and screws everyone went to work eagerly, and this group of great young men nished their job within three hours. Once again, CHAT thanks Boy Scout Troop 8, Gulf Coast Lumber, John Shuff, and Mike Eakin for helping us make these dog houses for dogs in need of shelter. Dog houses are available at CHAT 1 Oak St., free of charge while they last. Boy Scout Troop 8 and CHAT team up for community projectSPECIAL TO THE NEWSBoy Scouts and volunteers with the dog houses.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 7AFrom Front Page Currently, the sanctuary portion of the countys community center building is chock-full of donations made by generous individuals, businesses and other community members. Clothes and shoes, sorted by gender and size from newborn clothing to fullgrown men and womens, are laid out and labeled neatly, pew by pew. However, those items did not get there by themselves. Donation boxes were set out in places all around the county and, throughout the three months that donations were being accepted, volunteers emptied the boxes contents and brought them to the building to be sorted. But before the items were placed in pews, volunteers washed the clothes using their own washers, dryers and most importantly time. The rst stage of Operation Santa began last week, as what was called the general store was available for the families to come shop for available clothes, shoes and a few other items. Charlene Lanier, who was is this years volunteer and donations coordinator, made it her mission to organize the store and all of the other donations to make things easy for shopping and distribution which is no small task. I was kind of thrown into deep water this year, Lanier said. But its been really enjoyable. Everyone has been a great team and Im happy to help. The need is de nitely great. Lanier, who also serves as a partner with WCCY, is involved with NAMI and volunteers for several other organizations, is in her third year with Operation Santa. The next phase of the project will involve preparing for the nal stage, which is what volunteers call D-day or distribution day. Well be taping off squares in the sanctuary, explained Ashley. Each square will represent a family and well begin locating items according to their applications and putting them in their square. The items, he said, wont be extravagant nothing like expensive electronics or even bicycles. Just primary needs like soap and toilet paper and maybe a few toys, said Ashley. Id rather give something to a family, like a board game that they can do together. Items like that make a big difference in a home. Ashley said that a lot of parents that applied for help indicated that they wanted nothing for themselves, and wrote something like, but I would love if my child could have This is a hand up, not a hand out, said Lanier. Janice Eakin, another volunteer who sits at the WCCY table, works with NAMI, CHAT and others, said that most of the families that utilize Operation Santa are one year participants. About 70 percent of this years clients are new, she said. Its just circumstances beyond a persons control. We are happy to help, were not here to judge anyone. Eakin said they have even had someone who was a client last year, offer to adopt a family this year. Also, she said, someone called and said that her husband received a bonus at work and, therefore, wanted to take themselves off the list in order to give someone else a chance to receive help. It gave me the chills, she said. The kinds of things you see here are unreal. Robin Lunn, who is in her rst year helping with Operation Santa, is in charge of matching families with adopters. She said she got involved when a friend of hers decided to volunteer and she threw her name in as well. During my rst meeting I was asked to do this, this and this, Lunn said. Its been quite an undertaking, but very worthwhile. Lunn said she also keeps track of the operations cash donations. Whatever is not received in actual donations, the volunteers use the cash to shop for what is missing, she said. According to Lunn they have received about 20 percent of their goal in cash and would be grateful for any amount that those in the community may be able to give. She also added that Operation Santa is run completely by volunteer efforts. Every penny of every dollar that we receive goes directly towards this cause, she said. This is run 100 percent by volunteer efforts. Its heartwarming. Thats why we do it. With that in mind, Operation Santa would like to thank the hundreds of families who have donated and the number of local entities who have gotten involved, the list of which can be found on their Facebook page. Perhaps the biggest challenge that Operation Santa has faced this year, said Eakin, is getting the word out. That and getting people in the Christmas spirit a little earlier than they would otherwise think. Facebook likes are extremely important for Operation Santa right now as they have the opportunity to earn a dollar for each like that they receive, up to $500. Bentlee Boo, who is kind of CHATs mascot, and his owner, Chris Russell, has made that pledge. We are so grateful, but we need a lot more likes. The Operation Santa Facebook page can be found at facebook.com/ WakullaOperationSanta or by searching Operation Santa Wakulla in the Facebook search bar.Operation Santa is underway AMANDA MAYORAn over owing box of donated goods for Operation Santa.

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR Tis the season to stuff myself and get away with itBy JAMES L. SNYDERNow that summer is out of the way and the holiday season has begun, I can throw out the kitchen window all of those diet restrictions introduced by the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. After all, the whole purpose of the holiday season is to eat. It begins in late October with the mass distribution of candy, which I have no objection. A little candy in somebodys life can go a long way to produce happiness. Why, a handful of jelly beans really makes the world go around, which may be why I am just a little bit dizzy. From October all the way through to New Years Day, it is nothing but one delicious delicacy after another. And I love it. Around the middle of October my wife announces, This year you need to be a little careful about what you eat during this holiday season. Of which I smile back at her and nod my head in the af rmative, whatever that means. Far as I am concerned, a nod is not quite as committed as a word spoken. In October when I am doling out candy to the kids knocking on my door, I always use this formula: one for them and one for me. After all, whats fair is fair. I have to make sure I have enough candy to go all the way around. As one who is very conscious about not wasting anything, I make sure all of the candy is properly consumed by midnight. I get away with this because my wife usually has the grandchildren on the other side of the neighborhood going door to door getting candy. My duty is to distribute the candy however I see t. Thanksgiving really tickles my fancy. It is an opportunity to stuff myself like a turkey and get away with it. After all, with all the family around the Thanksgiving Day table there is little opportunity for my wife to supervise what I eat or do not eat. As long as the dishes keep passing, I keep participating. One thing that makes the Thanksgiving Day dinner so wonderful is that you can stuff your stuff without feeling guilty about it. Dont you think youve had enough? my wife will ask. I have one response to this query I have used for years. Do not worry, my dear, I say as I pile more mashed potatoes on my plate, I plan to go on a diet for my New Years resolution. What a wonderful New Years resolution scenario. Whoever invented that should receive the Nobel Peace Prize because it has come in quite handy in my situation. Thanksgiving is so close to New Years that it makes a very convenient excuse. Take the Fourth of July picnic, for example. That is a long way from New Years Day and the New Years resolution scenario that I cannot use that excuse. What about the summer family picnic time when all of us are getting together? The same thing is happening there. New Years Day and its resolution scenario are too far in the future to use as a ploy to get second or even third helpings. During any summer picnic, I am on my own and in some regards, I do not like it. But the ThanksgivingChristmas-New Years holiday season is my kind of season. The holiday season is a time for indulgence. After all, has anybody ever seen a skinny Santa Claus? It would be blasphemous to go to the mall during the holiday season and see a skinny Santa Claus. Personally, I would turn around and go home and sit in the corner for a while to get over it. The holiday season is for extravagance. Christmas gift giving is giving people presents they do not really need. I cannot recall how many ties I have received down through the years as though I have not enough ties, but every one was an absolute delight. The season begins with the hearty Thanksgiving dinner, goes to the Christmas Day dinner and then ends with the New Years Day dinner. What more could a person really ask for? There is something about the family gathering around the table indulging in the delicacies of the season and just having a good time. It is not a time to count calories, but rather, a time to count your blessings. It is not a time to monitor what somebody else is eating, but a time to enjoy the family fellowship around a good table set by somebody who knows how to set a good table. If someone in our family did not cook so well I would not have a problem in restraining my eating. So, I do not believe it is my fault. After the festivities have subsided and all the food has all been consumed, we still are left with the rest of our life. In light of that I like what Paul said, Giving thanks always for all things unto God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ (Ephesians 5:20 KJV). For those who know the Lord Jesus Christ giving thanks for everything is a wonderful way of life all year long.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Quilt ra eChrist Church is raf ing off this quilt with a drawing on Sunday, Dec. 15 after church services. Tickets are on sale for $1 each or six for $5. For more information, call Roberta Phillips at 9262458 or Mary Lou Martin at 210-2103.The quilt being raf ed by Christ Church Anglican. Charlottes Faith to hold Holy Ghost revivalCharlottes Faith and Deliverance Temple will hold a Holy Ghost healing revival at the church Nov. 28 through Nov. 30 at 7:30 p.m. nightly. Apostle Tony Sanders will be presiding. Charlottes Faith is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road. Bishop Alice Williams is pastor. Everyone is invited. Holiday alternatives for gift givingJoin us for the Alternative Christmas Market where you can donate to those who are in need this Christmas. Numerous non-pro t organizations provide shopping opportunities to honor loved ones at Christmas. Instead of taking home tangible items, you get instead an attractive hand lettered card detailing for the person you honored, exactly how the donation will bene t a less fortunate person or family locally, nationally, or abroad. Its a convenient and heartwarming shopping experience. There will also be tangible gifts available in the form of handcrafted fair trade items from third world artisans. Many local charities also have items for sale. Alternative Christmas Market at John Wesley United Methodist Church on 1689 Old St. Augustine Road on Saturday, Dec. 7, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 8, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. More information at www.alternativechristmasmarketjwc.com. Alternative Christmas Market at Christ Presbyterian Church on 2317 Bannerman Road on Friday, Dec. 12 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 13 from 8 a.m. to noon. More information at http:// cpusa.org.Church BriefsMessiah set for Dec. 8Handels Messiah will be performed for the 13th year by the Wakulla Community Chorus on Sunday, Dec. 8, at 3 p.m. at Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. The chorus of 50 singers and musicians is directed by Reba Mason. Soloists are Daryl Langston, Becton Roddenberry, Terri Egler, Arlene Petrandis, Edie Brandt, Patsy Roberts, Staci Welch, Leah McManus, and Laura Hudson. Accompanists are Chris Hart, piano and Jennifer Brown, organ. Instrumentalists include Corban Scott, harp; Mike Crouch, timpani; Lona Burton, trumpet; Hannah Tinsley and Laura Hudson, ute. Acolytes will be Bailey Strickland and Kaylee Sanders. Assistant directors are Laura Hudson and Becton Roddenberry. The concert is free and refreshments will be served afterward in the church fellowship hall. A special highlight of the concert is the grand nale of the Hallelujah Chorus, one of the most inspiring pieces of music ever written. For more information see Wakulla Community Chorus Facebook page.

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Susan Cooksey Dodson passed away Saturday, Nov. 23, 2013. Susan was born in Tallahassee on March 2, 1950. Susan is survived by her husband of 43 years, Wally; one son, Walt Dodson (Kristen); and two daughters, Ashley Savary (Chris), and Alison Dodson; and one grandson Jacob Dodson. She is also survived by two sisters, Pat Patterson (Jerry) of Crawfordville and Judy Owens (Steve) of Port St. Joe; and one brother, Doug Cooksey (Barbie) of Tallahassee; as well as ve nephews; four nieces; and nine double rst cousins. She was preceded in death by her parents, Douglas and Marian Cooksey. Susan was a class of cer of Leon High School, Class of 1968, and enjoyed planning high school reunions with her former classmates. She was a co-owner of Forest Realty with close friend Doris Crosby; past president of the Crawfordville Womens Club; a former First Lady of the Florida Bankers Association; past Board Member of Big Bend Hospice; and a member of the Christ Church Anglican. Susan enjoyed riding her bike, walking on the beach, climbing lighthouses, and watching birds visit her birdhouses. Susan loved her YaYas and Soul Sisters. A memorial service will be held Wednesday, Nov. 27 at 11 a.m. at Christ Church Anglican, 3383 Coastal Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The family will receive friends Tuesday, Nov. 26 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Christ Church Anglican of Crawfordville. In lieu of owers, donations can be made in her name to United Way of the Big Bend, 307 E. 7th Ave., Tallahassee FL 32303. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850/9263333 or www.bevisfh.com) is assisting the family with their arrangements. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 9AObituaries Susan Cooksey Dodson Edwin Ed Jackson Porter Lloyd Watson WillinghamLloyd Watson Willingham, 66, passed away Thursday, Nov. 21, 2013, after a long illness. Born in Macon, Ga. on May 22, 1947, he was the son of Mary Watson Willingham and the late Frank Mallary Willingham. He was a graduate of Furman University in Greenville, S.C., and he earned his Masters of Business Administration degree from the University of Georgia. He was a Risk Manager for the Leon District School System and The Coordinator of Insurance and Risk at Florida State University in Tallahassee. A memorial service will be held on Monday, Dec. 2, at 1 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church in Crawfordville. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations for Big Bend Hospice Inc., 2889 Crawfordville, Hwy., Crawfordville FL. 32327, or the church or charity of the donors choosing He is survived by his wife of 33 years, Carol Pittman Willingham; his children, Thomas and Brandon Willingham; and brothers, Broadus and Frank Willingham and their families. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements. Edwin Ed Jackson Porter, 69, of Spring Creek died on Nov. 10, 2013 in Sopchoppy. A service was held on Wednesday, Nov. 13 at Bevis Funeral Home HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville at 2 p.m. Survivors include his wife, Martha Porter; four children, Angela Wildes (Steven), Daniella Jones (Matthew), Edwin Porter II, Charro Porter; and four grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents Russell and Blanchard Porter of Spring Creek. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh. com) assisted the family with their arrangements.Lloyd Watson Willingham Edwin Ed Jackson Porter Susan Cooksey DodsonA Thanksgiving loss BEREAVEMENT COLUMN By TRACY RENEE LEEI had a dear friend die this past year. Although he passed away in a different state, I go to his social media page and leave him messages every now and then. I miss him so terribly, because he was an amazing human being. His heart was true and good, and he was honest with his fellow man and with himself. He was a friend to my family, and when you met him, you loved him, because of his goodness. My friend died smack dab in the middle of Thanksgiving and Christmas. How like him, he died in the season of family tradition and giving, two things he revered. It would be easy to be miserable this year, thinking of how much we miss our dear friend, but he would not want that. Instead, we will remember all of the good that he contributed during his short life. We will be thankful for the time we had with him, the growth he inspired in us, his kindness, his generosity and for his passion for truth. I read his obituary today, for the rst time. It spoke volumes about my friend. It mentioned his accomplishments, which were many; and then, there was a paragraph that told who he was. Preston always stood up for correct principles. He was a scriptorian, loved music, upheld the Constitution, big on selfsuf ciency and was courageous and undaunted (Rich eld Reaper, December 2012). I am thankful for so many things, and although I may shed a tear that he is gone, I will forever remain grateful for the in uence of my dear friend, and the example he set for me. The holidays can be a very dif cult time for someone who has lost a loved one, especially if this is his or her rst holiday season since the loss. Even though we try to focus on how much better our lives are for having had our loved one, we miss them so terribly, that it is dif cult to experience the cheer of the season. If you know someone suffering through his or her rst holiday season after loss, please be mindful of him or her. This is a particularly difficult time and they may feel lonely and isolated. Take a moment to remember with them, the wonderful moments of life they shared with their loved one. Participate in family traditions and create new ones that honor their deceased. Your blessings will be great, and you will have helped someone through a time, when your good acts of kindness were priceless. That is what my friend Preston would have done. Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author, and freelance writer. It is my lifes work to comfort the bereaved and help them live on. Please follow my blog at http://pushinup-daisies.blogspot. com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information. Special to The NewsNovember is National Hospice and Palliative Care Month and hospices across the country are reaching out to raise awareness about important care issues for people coping with life-limiting illness. Covenant Hospice will use this annual healthcare observance to help people learn more about hospice and palliative care. Throughout the month of November, organizations across the nation are hosting activities that focus on celebrating this unique system of support and the bene ts provided by the loving care of hospice. Covenant Hospice is committed to bringing important information throughout North Florida and South Alabama. Every year, more than 1.65 million people living with a life-limiting illness receive care from hospice and palliative care providers in this country, said Dale O. Knee, president and CEO of Covenant Hospice. These highly-trained professionals dont only provide quality medical care. They work to make sure patients and families nd dignity, respect, and love during lifes most dif cult journey. Hospice is more than traditional healthcare. Hospice and palliative care programs provide pain management, symptom control, psychosocial support, and spiritual care to patients and their families when a cure is not possible. Hospice and palliative care combines the highest level of quality medical care with the emotional and spiritual support that families need most when facing the end of life. Celebrating its 30th anniversary, Covenant Hospice is a not-for-pro t organization dedicated to providing comprehensive, compassionate services to patients and loved ones during times of life-limiting illnesses. For more information about Covenant Hospice or to make a hospice inquiry, contact the local branch of ce at 575-4998 or visit www.covenanthospice.org Covenant Hospice teaches about special care of hospice Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse A special holiday tradition for families since 1993 Visit our Wakulla County Trees at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville. Join us for the Wakulla County Service of Remembrance December 1, 2013, 4:00 pm at Hudson Park Call 850.926.9308 for more information! Dedicate a bow, porcelain bell or porcelain angel in honor or memory of someone you love!2889C Crawfordville HighwayCrawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.org2013 Tree of RemembranceAll that we love deeply becomes a part of us. ~Helen Kellerto benefit Big Bend Hospice

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsNot only does his passion lay within Emergency Nursing and attending the Queen of Englands Derbys, Social Seasons, and Court Functions, but Becton James Roddenberry of Sopchoppy has another passion, a love for chickens. This passion isnt just a novice one, Becton is an experienced and proud Poultry Farmer since his early years in grade school, raising up to 30 different breeds of chickens over the years, and becoming a member of the American Poultry Association. After being approached by a fellow farmer to show his chickens, Becton decided to enter his eight best chickens in his ock of fty in the North Florida Fairs Poultry Show this year from Nov. 7-17. Becton brought home 7 blue ribbons, 1 red ribbon, Best of Breed, and Best of Show. All in total, Becton brought home 10 winning ribbons. He competed against 86 other chickens, ducks, geese, quail, guineas, and turkeys entered from surrounding counties of North Florida. This was a record number of poultry entered in the show in years, states JoAnne Jackson, Poultry Show Chairperson. The judge was George Henry of Tallahassee. This was Bectons rst time showing his ock of poultry, although raising chickens since grade school. Becton was approached by a member of the fairs farm exhibitors, learning that Becton had a passion for raising chickens, hearing rumor that they were blue ribbon potential. I took them up on the offer, I had no idea I would walk away with 7 blue ribbons, Best of Breed, and even better, Best of Show, I was shocked, Becton says. Bectons Best of Breed and Bed of Show winner is one of his four roosters, a Dutch Brown Leghorn Cock named, Prince William. I thought it an appropriate name; his disposition, his character, and his handsome looks match perfectly. Bectons chicken coop and meek poultry farm was dubbed the name Cluckingham Palace by a family member because of Becton being a Courtier of the Queen. I loved the name, so I started naming the chickens after Royal Family Members; it has become a fun process. Becton attributes his success by reiterating that chickens need a balanced diet including protein, grains, fresh greens, fruits, multivitamins, and electrolyte and antioxidant supplements. His true secrets; shampoo, vinegar, glycerin, a blow-dryer, and a few others he remains to keep secretall of which proved to be blue ribbon and Best of Show special ingredients!Mike and Teresa Murphy of Tallahassee, FL are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Mary Kate Murphy to Clayton Vann Watts. Clay is the son of Nancy Watts, Crawfordville, FL. The bride and the groom are high school sweethearts and they are both 2009 graduates of Wakulla High School. Mary Kate graduated from the University of West Florida, and is currently employed as a RN at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. Clay graduated from Tallahassee Community College and is currently employed as an assistant manager at Wells Brothers Bar and Grill, Tallahassee. A New Years Eve wedding is planned. Mr. Clyde Ogden of Monticello and Mrs. Laura Dodson of Crawfordville are pleased to announce the engagement of their son, Malcolm (Mac) Keys Ogden to Kristen Holley Bateman, daughter of Mr. Brian Bateman and Mrs. Edie Ethridge of Bristol. The groom-to-be is a 2007 graduate of Wakulla High School. Mac is employed at the Wakulla County Correctional Institution. Maternal grandparents are Ellsworth and Mary Harvey of Crawfordville. Paternal grandparents are the late Malcolm and Gladys Keys Ogden of Tampa. The bride-elect is a 2008 graduate of Liberty County High School. Kristen is employed with the State of Florida Department of Economic Opportunity in Tallahassee. Maternal grandparents are Mildred and the late Marvin Goodson of Bristol. Paternal grandparents are John and Lila Davis of Bristol. Paternal great-grandmother is Shirley Bateman of Bristol. The wedding will take place in Bristol, Florida on Saturday, April 26, 2014. Special to The NewsBefore campaign season heats up, the Wakulla County Election of ce is offering a candidate workshop. Voters interested in running for public of ce can learn what it takes to become a candidate. The workshop is scheduled for Friday, Dec. 6, from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Elections Of ce located at 3115-B Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville. The workshop is open to candidates, campaign managers, campaign treasurers, members of the public and anyone interested in running for of ce, whether they are a rst time candidate or a long-standing incumbent. The election laws are constantly changing, so it is important that candidates are familiar with the new legislation. The workshop focuses on fundamentals of becoming and being a candidate, while introducing participants to candidate qualifying, reporting, campaign finance and political advertising. Interested parties should register for the workshop no later than Nov. 29. To register, please contact Joe Morgan at the elections of ce by calling (850) 926-7575 or by emailing jmorgan@ mywakulla.com. The candidate workshop is free to attend. Workshop for candidates to be held by supervisorMurphy Watts engagementBateman Ogden engagementRoddenberry wins Best in Show at North Florida Fair NAMI donation letters availableNAMI Wakulla would like to announce that they have memory and honorary donation letters available. If you would like more details, please call the NAMI of ce at 926-1033. Seidler graduates naval aviation rescue schoolSpecial to The NewsElliot Alexander Seidler, class of 2008 of Wakulla High School, has recently graduated from the Naval Aviation Rescue Swimming School at NAS San Diego. Elliot is a Naval Air-crewman and will be stationed on the aircraft carrier USS George Washington at Atsugi, Japan beginning in December for his four year tour. BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW! Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & DogsOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed 570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand 926-2200Call Today! Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Medicare PERIOD OPEN ENROLLMENT Ends December 7

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 11A Cosmetologist Cosmetologist Cosmetologist Barber/Stylist Receptionist Nancy Angie Brenda Lucia Gisela Barber Barber Barber Barber Barber Misty Cheryl Donnie Andrea Gerald If you have not visited us before, you will nd that we have many services and a friendly staff to ll your individual needs.We bid a bigTHANK YOUto all our customers who have put their trust in us throughout the years! Our Chemical prices vary but are usually lower than other shops.Established in 1997 We have a great group of experienced Barbers and Stylists performing a variety of services. From Barber styling, womens styles, Perms, Colors, and Waxing. We are also Certied in the Brazilian Smoothing Technique Treatment which is a favorite here in the South. We are proud that we have been able to keep our prices low! So, For a Great Style at an Affordable PriceWalk ins Welcome or Call for Appointment.ROSE ALLEY business center Come in and see us TODAY!850-926-4282 Barber Shoppe926-4282 & & & Invite You to Come In and CHECK US OUT!

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsSchool Board Attorney Holly Dincman, Esq. explains penalties associated with ethics violations to Wakulla School Board members. School Board Attorney Holly Dincman, Esq. explains penalties associated with ethics violations to Wakulla School Board members. School Board attorney Holly Dincman and Chief Human Capital Officer Karen Wells facilitated Where do you draw the line? Ethics Training Government in the Sunshine. Superintendent Bobby Pearce said, Effective ethics training helps reinforce the message that Wakulla County School District does not approve of ethics violations in the workplace. The training addressed the Sunshine Amendment S.8, Art. II of the State Constitution, the Florida Code of Ethics for Public Of cers and Employees, and the public records and public meetings laws of this state. The goals of The Code of Ethics, Chapter 112, Part III, Florida Statutes, are to promote public interest and maintain respect of people for government and to ensure that public of cials act independently and impartially, not for private gain. School Board Chairman Ray Gray applauded the training and added, Government must be accountable to the people. Ethics training turns likeminded employees into a community of common intent dedicated to serving the public good rather than private interests. School Board member Jerry Evans notes, As a trusted public servant Ethics training gives us all the knowledge to go about our jobs in the right way and the support to do so, even when it involves making dif cult choices.School district leaders complete ethics training Special to The NewsOn Nov. 5, Wakulla High School unveiled the renovation of its Media Center to include 185 new computers for student use. With students being expected to do more online research and testing, this was a good compromise between maintaining a traditional Media Center and adding all new online research opportunities for projects and papers, said Superintendent Bobby Pearce. Of the 210 new computers allocated to WHS, the WHS Media Centers 185 computers are part of the 655 new computers ordered to replace outdated computers districtwide and to add more for computer-based research and testing at all of the schools. Computers in labs at elementary, middle, and high schools were replaced because they could no longer support the newer software and digital resources students need to have their learning keep pace with the state standards. Renovation of the WHS Media Center was an idea brought to the table by WHS Assistant Principal of Curriculum Sunny Chancy. The purpose was to provide a centralized place where students could take required online state tests while also opening the computers for students to do online research throughout the school year. Also, this addressed the growing problem at WHS that so much computer-based testing from the state made teachers and students lose time in their Business Education computer labs because these were the few rooms in which they could test. Business Education teachers cannot afford time out of their labs due to students earning industry certi cations in computer software areas such as Microsoft Excel, Powerpoint and Access. Its great to not have to disrupt everyones educational process whenever we have a computer-based test to give. The EOCs (End of Course exams) alone are offered four times per year for students to pass, so Business Ed. classes were constantly being displaced and students had a tough time getting enough computer time to do their lessons to prepare for earning industry certi- cations, observed WHS Career Specialist Sarabeth Jones. Now no students or teachers should be displaced from their classroom computer labs at WHS while other students are testing. New graduation requirements for high school students include passing the computerbased FCAT (Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test) Reading and the Algebra 1 EOC exam. In addition, all other state EOCs are taken on computers, including those for Biology, Geometry, and United States History. Director of Technology Belinda Fries and the IT department have installed over half of the 655 computers and are on track to have this massive project completed early in the new year. The project has been undertaken with very little disruption to the school day. Facilities Director Randy Bristol spearheaded renovations of electrical and other facility upgrades needed to support the new computers. States Fries, Under the leadership and support of Superintendent Pearce, there was collaboration between administrators at each school, the IT Department, the Facilities Department, and the Finance Department to come up with plans and put the plans into action. Any nancial and personnel resources we can use to increase opportunities for student learning are resources well spent, noted Superintendent Pearce. Wakulla High Research and Computer Center creates more opportunities for studentsBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAThe State Board of Education could consider changes to the state's standards for student learning as soon as February, Education Commissioner Pam Stewart said Tuesday. The changes could also result in a re-branding of sorts for what have until now been known as the "Common Core State Standards" -part of a nationwide movement to set common education benchmarks that have angered conservative activists. Stewart told the board at its meeting in Gainesville that nearly 19,000 comments had been received since Gov. Rick Scott ordered a fresh review of the standards in September. As part of that effort, three public hearings were held across Florida, and the state accepted comments online. The Department of Education is working to reach an agreement with a Florida-based researcher to analyze the results of that outreach, with a report on the comments being released in January. "I think that as we consider moving forward in rule development ... this will provide us the opportunity [so] that we can be moving along that direction with the public having the information available to them from those 19,000 comments," she said. Common Core has become a political ashpoint in recent months, with tea party activists and others arguing that the standards amount to a federal intrusion in education, despite the fact that the development of the standards was spearheaded by governors and education of cials. The standards have been adopted in some form by almost four dozen states. Stewart said a nal draft of the benchmarks should be in front of the board by the spring, in February or March. The new standards might also have a new name, said Joe Follick, a spokesman for the department. Given the input that the state has taken and the changes that are likely to be made, "it would be disingenuous to call them common core standards," he said. Some supporters of the emerging benchmarks have begun referring to them as the "Florida standards." But there is still resistance to the idea of any major overhaul of the guidelines, a pet project of former Gov. Jeb Bush. Kathleen Shanahan, a board member with close ties to Bush, pushed the board to consider teacher comments more heavily as it continues its review of Common Core. Teachers at the public hearings were generally more support of the standards. "Parents will be subjective, because they should be," said Shanahan, who is leaving the board at the end of the year. "Teachers will be objective because that's their role." Former Gov. Charlie Crist, a onetime Republican running for his old job as a Democrat, told reporters Tuesday that he stands behind Common Core, which supporters say will allow greater comparison among states. "I think in order to be able to have an opportunity on behalf of our children to see how we're doing, I think that those standards are appropriate," Crist said. ... And I think this is a real opportunity where we can start moving together as a country and as a state." Meanwhile, the Florida Association of District School Superintendents is pushing the state to delay the full implementation of the standards by up to three years. Currently, Common Core is only fully implemented in kindergarten, rst and second grade, but is expected to be taught to all students next year after having been phased in. Volusia County Superintendent Margaret Smith told the board going forward with a new test based on the standards, and then grading schools based on that test, was unfair -particularly given the uncertainty currently surrounding them. "It is not realistic to expect that we can fully have a full and quality implementation in all K-12 grade levels by next year," she said.Stewart: standards changes ready by spring FridayDecember 6Medart Elementary School4pm 8pmAll funds raised will go towards the purchase of new playground equipment for the school.Winter Holiday Festival Come visit with Santa and decorate Christmas cookies with Mrs. Claus!Annualgames, prizes, bingo, cake walk, inatable rock wall obstacle course, jump house, paintball and giant slides, go-cart racing, face painting, sno-cones and lots of delicious food.2558 Coastal Highway. For more information, call 962-4881. GIVE-AWAY! Robert Donnell Fain Smith Grand Prize $100 Winner Week #8 WinnerI cant belive I WonIts worth the timeEntry drawn from: Bay Leaf Market in CrawfordvilleEntry drawn from: Tallahassee-Leon Federal Credit Union in Crawfordville R One Lucky Winner was selected Each Week for 8 Weeks!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 13A GRAND OPENING DECEMBER 6 & 7 2510 Crawfordville Hw y Crawfordville, Fl. 32327 Sundance Western Wear, Boots, Jewelry & Home Furnishings

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSchool Board announces November Teachers, Employee of the MonthSpecial to The NewsNovember Teachers of the Month are Crawfordville Elementary Schools Amber Stallings and Riversprings Middle Schools Carol Broome. The Transportation Departments Cheryl Whaley is Novembers Employee of the Month. Superintendent Bobby Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dedication and creativity each of these individuals, who give to the children of Wakulla County. The energy they contribute on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve is an inspiration. Crawfordville Elementary selected Amber Stallings to represent the District as the November Teacher of the Month. Stallings began her career at Riley Elementary School in Tallahassee nine years ago and quickly transferred to Crawfordville Elementary School to teach kindergarten. After completing her internship at Shadeville Elementary School Stallings knew she wanted to teach in Wakulla County because, of the professional and personal support. Stallings states, I take pleasure in academic achievements. Everything is new and exciting to young learners, whether its the wonderment of learning to read or watching a piece of colored ice melt. My students remind me every day that we learn the most through the little things that happen every day. Crawfordville Principal Angie Walker said, Stallings loves children; she embraces educational opportunities; she teaches to individual needs; she is kind; she is an active member of our school; she is a devoted team member; she continually seeks best practices; and she takes teaching ve year olds as seriously as someone who teaches chemistry or physics. She is respected and admired. I am a fortunate principal because I have true superheroes working at our school and Mrs. Stallings is one of them. Carol Broome, November Teacher of the Month, has been teaching in Wakulla County Schools for more than 10 years. She began her career at Pre-K after serving as a parent volunteer and substitute teacher, taught elementary school at Shadeville and Riversink and is now a sixth grade teacher at Riversprings Middle School. Broome is on schedule to complete her masters degree in December 2013. She dedicates her time and energy and resources because she enjoys her students. Broome shares, I enjoy being an active presence in the lives of my students. By integrating humor and celebration in the classroom I believe I am able to make a difference. Our youth is our further and watching them succeed brings me pleasure. One of the activities Broome most enjoys is the Shuttle Space Flight Simulation. By taking Challenger Center Classes, my students are able to benefit from their programs. Riversprings Middle School Principal Michele Baggett said, Even though Broome is only in her second year at our school, she has taken the ball and run with it. She is a team player who will quickly assist or lead any activity here at Riversprings. Her innovative teaching style keeps students engaged and on task. She truly makes learning fun. Transportation Department employee, Cheryl Whaley has been selected as the November Employee of the Month. Whaley has been a school bus driver for the school district since November 2009. In four short years she has also been designated as the CPR trainer and the routing and planning coordinator. Transportation Coordinator Pat Jones said, Mrs. Whaley is a true professional, performing her duties with the utmost ef ciency and ability. Behind the wheel of the school bus, she can handle any situation that comes her way. She has a gentle and delightful sense of humor and excels in kindness. She is a true asset to our department. Prior to working with the school district Whaley served a legal assistant with the Williams Gautier law Firm and was the assistant manager of Kinkos Copy Center. However, her desire to be home with her daughter in the evenings and attend her sporting events became most important and a job with the school district was a good t. Whaley has roots deep in Wakulla County as she attended Sopchopy Elementary School, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School. After high school graduation she attended Tallahassee Community College and while in South Korea she attended a branch of the University of Maryland. Whaley states, I enjoy the student interaction. My goal is to have a positive impact on every student that I encounter. Because I drive as a substitute most of the time, I am able to see almost every student. This year, I participated in crazy hair day and the students loved it. Whaley attends Panacea First Baptist Church where she sings in the choir and teaches vacation Bible school. Carol Broome Cheryl Whaley Amber StallingsMedart Winter Festival Dec. 6Special to The NewsMedart Elementary's Annual Winter Holiday Festival will take place on Friday, Dec. 6 from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. at 2558 Coastal Highway. All the funds raised during this annual event will go towards the purchase of new playground equipment for the school. Everyone is welcome to join this fun event, come visit with Santa, participate in games, win prizes, get your face painted and many more activities and games. A variety of delicious food and sno-cones will also be available. Gary & Shari Edington 850-933-6364 or 850-556-4736We wish you a Blessed and Happy Holiday SeasonServing Leon, Wakulla and Franklin Counties for all your Real Estate Needs!Thank You Wakulla County!visit us at www.ShariEdington.com Realtors Who CareGary & Shari Edington Shell Point Realty Giving thanks.1101000.1 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, ILI thank you for your continued business. Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family. Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there.CALL ME TODAY. Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 15A 984FISH(3474)OPEN 7 DAYS Join us for a fun, casual dining Atmosphere with a neighborhood feel!FRESH SEAFOOD MARKET Shrimp $4.00 and up per lb FRESH OFF THE TROPICAL TRADER FLEET While they last daily ~ Hurry in & Check with us often as the $4.00 a lb. Shr imp GO FAST! $5.00 Live Blue Crab Watch us Shuck your Fresh Oysters at the bar Y ou kno w t hey are fresh!3 BIG SCREEN TVS TO WATCH YOUR FAVORITE TEAM Huge Selection of AppetizersWings~Smoked Fish Dip~ U-Peel Shrimp & so much more!Contact us for Christmas Parties and to Cater your Special Events! BREAKFASTSATURDAY & SUNDAY We offer a Full Breakfast Menu AND... a Full Breakfast Buffet 7 A.M. to 11 A.M TUESDAYS Kids EAT FREEwith 2 adult dinner entrees LUNCH Luncheon specials $8.95 LUNCH & DINNERSeafood, Steaks, Soups, Salads, and so much more! Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Sunday 7 a.m. to 10 p.m OPENCheck out our long line of specialty sauces and smoked dips. Great Christmas Gift Basket Idea for the seafood lover on your list!91 Coastal Hwy., Ochlockonee Bay

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Community Thanksgiving Feast About 1,000 people were served at this years community Thanksgiving feast an event in its eighth year that has been put on by Hallowed Be Thy Name Church and many other community partners. Lead coordinator and pastor of Hallowed Be Thy Name Church, Tim Davis (pictured far left), said not only does the event serve those who come to eat, but nonperishables were also collected in an effort to replenish the shelves of local food banks.PHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYOR Lynn Cole-Eddinger David Hoover Coastwise Realty,Inc.Coastwise Realty,Inc. Thanksgiving NOW OPEN ON SUNDAYS! 984-5243 1506 COASTAL HWY., SCENIC BIWAY SUN., TUES., WED,. THURS, 11-9 FRI. & SAT. 11-10Poseys Dockside Thanks you for all the times you spent with us!Now join us at Poseys Steam Room and Oyster Bar for our added menu items brought over from Dockside. TUESDAY... AUCE Catfish ....$11.95 THURSDAY AUCE Shrimp ...$14.95 Baby Back Ribs ..$9.95 FRIDAY NIGHTS Prime Rib Dinner $16.95Weve added many new Menu Items you will love!! Family owned and operated boarding facility with over 10 years experience and a veterinary technician on-site. Indoor and outdoor boarding facilities for dogs small and large, cats and birds. Large and secure play areas with hands-on attention daily and friendly service we are sure to accommodate your needs. Whether you and your family are going on vacation, an extended stay or just away for the day, we are here for you. No duration is too long or short and our rates cant be beat! Livestock care at your farm or home is available!Personal care is given to each and every animal every day. Play time is our favorite time!(We do not make breed restrictions)Proud supporter of local rescues! Stefan Pedler, Owner1886 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 www.BloxhamBoardingKennel.com We Now Offer Training Service & Grooming! (850) 597-1739

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 17A Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 Jason Rudd 850-241-6198 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 reo and short sale specialists 850926-1011 our ome own ealtor

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Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information In Historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium featuringSOUTHBOUND BAND859 Oak Park Road Sopchoppy, Fl 32358 A GREAT CHRISTMAS GIFT !Come join us at the Sopchoppy Opry for the 2014 season! Shows will feature South Bound Band with individual guests along with a special group/band! Look whos coming to the Opry in 2014!2014 Season Schedule13 Great Shows Are Scheduled For 2014 Season! www.sopchoppyopry.compresentsJanuary 25 Ms. Lisa Watson & Pure Platinum February 22 Wayne Martin & Country Gold w/Artie Rodriquez March 29 Rick Weathersby w/Boys of RockApril 12 Margo Anderson w/Encore, Tribute to Music of 50s & 60sApril 29 Westeld 1924 w/Jeff Tilley & Diana Clarke May 31 The Way Up Band w/Tom Roberts June 28 Cherry Street Band July 26 Margo Anderson w/Encore Patsy Cline Tribute August 30 Purvis Brothers September 27 Chipola Shanachie w/Joan, Amy & Katherine AldermanOctober 25 Swiftwater w/Al & Wretha Webb November 22 Kenny Hill Band December 13 Annual Christmas Show All thirteen (13) shows are included in the season ticket price. Individual tickets purchased at the door are $12 each. Group rates available.Thanks for your support of good family entertainment, the restoration of historic Sopchoppy High School & classic country, bluegrass & Gospel music! You can always nd out whats coming up at the Opry at www.sopchoppyopry.com e Rodriq quez Enjoy All 13 Shows For Just $115 With Your Season Ticket Purchase!

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach While the season ended two weeks ago for most high school runners, a few of the elite competitors, including WHSs Madison Harris, are still competing in the post-season all-star and invitational meets. On Saturday, Nov. 23, the Florida Athletic Coaches Association hosted the annual FACA Senior All-Star Meet at the Apalachee Regional Park just east of Tallahassee which was also the site of this years state meet and is rated as one of the top ve cross country courses in the country. Participation in the meet was by invitation only, with only the top senior boys and girls from around the state having a chance to compete. Invitations are extended to the top 40 boys and girls who are then divided into four geographical teams North, South, East and West. The teams then compete head-to-head against each other over the 5K distance. Harris, who has gained recognition this year as a top cross country competitor, was invited to run for the North squad. To garner an invitation to this meet is quite an honor and is recognition for all the hard work and excellent performances that the individuals had over the course of the season and their high school careers. So, at 9 a.m on Saturday, 29 of the top senior girls in the state toed the familiar starting line at the ARP course, ready to do battle one more time as a high school runner. The depth of the eld and quality of competitors was, as expected, outstanding, with the South girls expected to dominate the team competition. Almost immediately, the South girls, who were wearing yellow singlets, shot to the front leaving the rest of the eld chasing them, except for the one blue singlet of the North team worn by our own Madison Harris. Harris was tucked right in with the leaders and sent the message right away that she was there to race and intended to challenge the South squad. At the halfway point, the eld began to string out behind the leaders, who were still from the South team. Harris was right with the lead pack, running in about fth place, but looking like she was ready to move up. Over the next mile and a half, she did just that. When the runners topped the last hill and started the downhill push to the nish, Harris had moved up into second place, sandwiched between two South team runners. As the runners approached the nish line, Katrina Santiago had opened a gap on Harris and Katherine MacNeal, with the rest of the eld signi cantly behind the three leaders. Harris looked to have second place locked up, but a surprising surge by MacNeal put her .15 of a second ahead of Harris as they crossed the line. The surge surprised Harris and she fought to get second place back, including literally diving across the nish line in her attempt to re-take second place, but coming up just short. Still, it capped a superb and gutsy performance by Harris and is the highest nish ever in this meet by a WHS runner. Madi showed today exactly why she is considered one of the best cross country runners in the state, said Coach Paul Hoover. For her to transition from a true track middle distance runner to the 5K was a big adjustment for her this year, but she handled it even better than we expected. To be included in this group of girls in her first year of cross country is quite a tribute to her talent, work ethic and competitiveness and then to compete like she did is pretty amazing, he said. She has had a great year and I cant wait to see what she does this year in track. It is going to be exciting and something special. Harris has one more cross country meet on her schedule, as she will travel to Charlotte, N.C., at the end of this week to compete Saturday in the prestigious Footlocker South Regional meet. She will run in the Championship Girls classification, competing against some of the finest runners from 14 southern states and Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Local sophomore standout Albert Smythe, will also make the trip to the South Regional and compete in the boys sophomore race on Saturday. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 19Asports news and team views SportsCROSS COUNTRYWakullas Madison Harris competes at All-Star meet By JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachDespite a lot of changes in the Riversprings Boys Basketball program, the Bears are starting off the 2013 campaign with a bang. Despite losing seven 8th graders (four of them starters) and a change at the head coaching position, the Bears are 2-0 in the regular season so far. Coach Joey Jacobs attributes the Bears success to a couple of factors, the rst of which is playing style. Coach Jacobs was an assistant coach to Coach Devon Miles for the RMS girls team during their outstanding 2006 season. According to Jacobs, Coach Miles taught an up-tempo, high pressure defense when he was here, which relentlessly pressured opponents. He still does over in Holmes County where he led the girls team over there to the state nal four two seasons ago. Lucky for me, that Coach Louis Hernandez had the same style and approach whenever he took over the RMS girls team the next season in 2007. We are doing the same things here now with the boys. Jacobs added that the second factor is the play of RMS outstanding point guard, Chris Beverly. Chris is amazingly talented. He is a great dribbler, savvy passer, and can score from anywhere on the oor, but those are not even his best qualities. His leadership is what sets him apart. He is so knowledgeable; he is really like having a coach on the oor. Beverly has scored 13 and 29 points respectively in RMS first two games. In a tournament game, Chris dropped 38 points on Marianna a very athletic team. Chris just has an incredibly high basketball IQ. Beverly is joined in the starting line-up by 8th graders Jackson Russell, Hezekiah Gross, Easton Lawhon, and 7th grader Devonta Holton. The rest of the RMS roster consists of 8th graders: Jared Weber, Latrel Bolden, Richie McMullen, 7th graders: Al Thomas, Joseph Meeks, Malik Murray, and 6th graders: Alvin White, Dejuan Hughes, Paxton Tomani, and Jordan Bolden. The Bears are on hiatus until after Thanksgiving break, until they return to play Port St. Joe on Dec. 2, Taylor County on Dec. 3 in Perry, and WMS Dec. 5. All three games begin at 6 p.m. Other games on the schedule: Dec, 9 SHANKS, at RMS at 6 p.m. Dec. 10 STARS ACADEMY at RMS at 6 p.m. Dec. 13 SHANKS at Quincy at 6 p.m. Dec. 19 TAYLOR COUNTY at RMS at 6 p.m. And the County Championship on Dec. 20 when RMS and WMS face off at WMS. Time TBA.MIDDLE SCHOOL BASKETBALLRMS is 2-0 to start season CHERI HARRIS/GADSDEN COUNTY TIMESThe Wakulla War Eagles boys basketball got their rst win of the season with a 5350 victory over East Gadsden on Saturday, Nov. 23. The War Eagles top scorer in the game was Bryson Beverly with 24 points. The War Eagles are 1-2 so far, having dropped games to Madison County and FAMU High.High yers Providers from the TMH Family Medicine Residency program see patients in your health department on a regular basis. Our experienced physicians and nurse-midwives provide personalized healthcare to women before, during and after pregnancy. We proudly deliver babies at the TMH Womens Pavilion, the only hospital in the region with a Newborn ICU. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment, call us at (850) 926-0400. COMPLETEPrenatal Care IN WAKULLA COUNTY Having a bay? Want pregnancy care close to home?Florida Department of Health Wakulla County 48 Oak Street Crawfordville, FL 32327

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Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsCleaning guns with the Shoot Like a Girl clubBy MARJ LAWLast Wednesday, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Range was closed for training of cers. That meant the Shoot Like a Girl group had to gure something else to do, so we decided to get together at my house to clean our handguns. And to trade secrets on what solvents and tools work the best to get into all the tiny dif- cult crevasses. First, a safety message: Always check your gun to make sure it is unloaded. This means drop the magazine. Remember to pull back the slide and look in the chamber to make sure it is empty. For wheel gun shooters, roll out your cylinder and make certain every single chamber is empty. Whichever gun you use, point the barrel away from people as you check for bullets. Wheel guns are comparatively easy to clean. You can take a bore snake with some solvent on it and run the snake through each cylinder in the wheel portion of the gun and then down the barrel. After that, you clean off both the front and back faces of the wheel portion. Sometimes people forget this. We also clean places where the wheel touches the gun itself. So thats about it for wheel guns. The major discussion was on which solvent to use. Oldtimers like Hoppys #9, but I dont because the smell is violent. Some of the new synthetics do a great job of cleaning and leaving a thin coat of oil. My personal favorite is X-KOTE GT-X cleaner and lube. Doesnt stink and does the job well. Then I like TW25B gun grease. It comes in a neat injection-like container which allows only the thinnest line of grease. Because of the small cone-shaped nose, you can get into tiny parts of the handgun. Places where the parts marry are spots you want to remember to grease. Then I wipe those areas with a cotton rag to get all the excess off. I go by the thought that when you dont see the grease, but just see a shine, youve got enough and not too much. I like the way the semi-automatics Spring- eld XDM 40 and the Sig 380 come apart. You drag the slide to a certain spot and either twist a lever or pull a pin out and the slide comes off. Then you pull out the spring and barrel and clean all those inside portions. When you take apart guns like this, hold on to the spring firmly while you remove it. The spring is under a fair amount of pressure and will shoot out if you dont have a good hold on it. You dont want to damage the spring. Or yourself. Most manufacturers strongly suggest safety glasses when you eldstrip the gun, especially when taking the spring off. Dont forget to clean the barrel as well. The inside of the barrel has no protective coating, so its really important to clean it well. You want the ri ing inside to be pristine sos you can hit that x-ring! We used toothbrushes, Stanley pointy tools (carefully) and old manicure sets for cleaning tools. We also used round brushes, cotton squares of cloth called gun cleaning patches and lots of Q-Tips. Lots. And solvent. One gal brought a large bottle of solvent and a couple towels. Unfortunately, the bottle fell over and the cap must have not been on tight. The liquid fell generously and completely into the towels. Good thing she brought them too! We greased the slides and wiped out the excess, then ran the rag over the guns to give a light grease protection avoiding rust. One of our group members wanted to make sure we did not expire from hunger after all our work. She brought really good fresh bagels and cream cheese from our local bakery. We demolished them while discussing our cleaning abilities. Then, as we usually do after a morning of shooting holes in paper, we went off to lunch. Wouldnt want to go hungry.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement.Florida fish camps earn national acclaim HOME ON THE RANGE MARJ LAW/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA semi-automatic stripped down and reading for cleaning.From FWC News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission claimed the top prize Nov. 21 for a Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration award in a nationwide competition administered by the American Fisheries Society (AFS). Mike Stone of the AFS presented the 2013 Sport Fish Restoration Outstanding Project Award for aquatic education to the FWC, at its meeting in Weston, because of the FWCs Fishing and Basic Boating Skills Camp program. Floridas Fish Camp program exempli es the professional, scienceinformed approach to sheries education that effectively reaches the public, especially our youth, who are so critical to the future of sh and wildlife conservation, said Stone. The American Fisheries Society is the worlds oldest and largest organization dedicated to the fisheries profession and resources. It annually solicits and evaluates nominations for the project that best exemplifies the userpays, public-benefits approach that is the Sport Fish Restoration Program. The Sport Fish Restoration program began in 1950 and uses money paid by the industry on shing tackle and other fees paid on pleasure boats and motor boat fuel sales to match state conservation agency funding. The Fish Camp program was born in 2000 and nurtured through 2007 at the FWCs Joe Budd Aquatic Education Center outside of Tallahassee. Rae Waddell, director of the Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network (www.fyccn. org), was instrumental in developing the camp outline and procedures. The FWC understands that the future of our states sh and wildlife resources depends on current and future generations caring enough about the resources to be committed to their care, FWC Chairman Dick Corbett said recently when learning of the decision. According to FWC Fisheries Adminstrator Steve Marshall, results from an independent university evaluation of the pilot Fish Camp program demonstrate its groundbreaking success getting youth involved in healthy, outdoor recreation and becoming the next generation that cares about and understands Floridas sheries resources. Because of the results of the 2007 evaluation, the FWC has expanded the program, from one location with the potential to reach 80 children, to 14 locations across the state that can reach 900 children. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the Feel good about sending a healthy gift this holiday season. 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The NovaBright DiamondExcel is the ONLY diamond simulant cut with an amazing 106 facets; other simulants and even mined diamonds are cut with only 58 facets. In special light testing, the DiamondExcel emitted 72% more sparkling light than a high-grade mined diamond. See for yourself the 106-facet, 4ct. t.w. DiamondExcel earrings will outshine any jewelry you own. Call Now 1-800-613-7231, only for the next 72 hours. One pair per household. Offer Code: K1730Get the Look of a $20,000.00Pair of Diamond Earrings... Lindenwold Fine Jewelers S-9843 OF27823R-1FREE* P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service T H ES H O PGREATBICYCL E 3624 Woodville Hwy., 1/2 mile south of the Fairgrounds SALES SERVICE PARTS RENTALS ADULT TRIKES850-402-0545

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 21Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Oxygen Delivery When diving rebreathers in Curaao last month, I discovered how spoiled we are here with an abundance of available pure oxygen. Rebreathers need 90 to 100 percent oxygen to ef ciently operate. Once found in the islands, the cost was prohibitive, and moving it from one source to another very challenging. Here at the Center however, I purchase oxygen in the liquid form, gasify it and blend through a compressor or booster pump into any concentration from pure oxygen to nitrox and trimix. When I shifted from purchasing gaseous oxygen by the $20 per 300 cubic foot cylinder to a Dewar ask of liquid oxygen, I cut my oxygen cost by 75 percent. The cost of the Dewar was half the cost of the oxygen storage cylinders. But this technology is heavy, and can be unstable. Access to liquid oxygen can be challenging in the Caribbean. Try carrying a Dewar ask on a sailboat! Its just not going to happen. So what other options do we have to make oxygen? Beer brewers, needing a source of nitrogen, developed a membrane that separated nitrogen out of air. They dumped the leftover back into the air. Bob Olsen then became a diver and learned about Nitrox, the undesirable stuff he was dumping to get nitrogen. He (and others) reversed their process and now produce Nitrox by pumping air at around 800 PSI down a long pipe membrane. Out from the sides of this pipe comes nitrogen, off the end, an enriched Nitrox. However, this process, which is available in Crawfordville at the other dive shop, usually makes no more than a 50 percent Nitrox blend, and requires a low pressure and high pressure compressor, in addition to the expensive membrane. Again, convenient technology, but not likely going to t on a sailboat or easily installed at a remote lab in the Caribbean. Earlier this month we were at the Diving Equipment Manufacturers Association conference in Orlando and reviewed oxygen accumulators called Pressure Swing Absorption (PSA) technology usually associated with health care. A resort in Micronesia has an Oxygen Bar available for their guests to breathe avored 90 percent oxygen after a long day of diving to reduce decompression stress. Here, air at low pressure is fed through twin beds of nitrogen absorbing granules that lter or ush alternatively on a continuous cycle delivering 90 percent oxygen. By placing a booster pump downstream of the PSA system, we can ll a 300 cf cylinder in 24 hours! And the entire unit weighs under 100 pounds! So we purchased one and brought it back to the shop. What an awesome technology! I contacted the folks setting up rebreather ll stations in the Caribbean and found considerable interest in the application of PSA technology. And I will add this capability to my sailboat currently being upgraded for Caribbean research. Next year this time I will be working with the University of the Andes (Colombia) diving the Mesophotic (Twilight) Zone conducting sheries surveys. Yesterday, my 95-year-old father needed continuous oxygen. We used the traditional oxygen delivery systems until we ran low and realized we had the exact make and model required for his care. What a wonderful world of opportunity technology has provided us that we can solve the challenges of one community through the success of another. Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD This week, we are taking time to spend with our family and friends. We hope you are all able to do the same! Sunday, it is back to business for many members of the Auxiliary. Weather permitting; we will have two facilities in the water in St. George for requalification of two coxswains, Bob Asztalos and Tim Ashley as well as crew members. Coxswains and crew must re-qualify every three years for currency under the supervision of a quali cation examiner. Our Division Commander Elect Eric DeVuyst will oversee the requali cations. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at FC@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident be a part of a solution, not part of a problem! Please watch out for manatees Special to The NewsThis year has become the deadliest year ever for Floridas endangered manatees. In total, 769 manatees have died so far this year from Jan. 1 through Oct. 29, making it the largest annual manatee die-off in Florida since recordkeeping began. The previous record was set in 2010 when biologists with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission documented 766 dead manatees, of which hundreds died from cold stress. With more than two months still to go in 2013, nearly twice the number of manatees have already died than died in all of 2012. According to Dr. Katie Tripp, Save the Manatee Clubs Director of Science and Conservation, two unusual mortality events in 2013, coupled with the regular threats manatees face on a daily basis, have been responsible for the unprecedented losses. A record number of 276 manatees succumbed from exposure to a toxic red tide bloom in southwest Florida, centered in Lee County. Meanwhile, on Floridas east coast, an unusual mortality event claimed more than 100 manatee lives in Brevard County this year. This years recordbreaking manatee mortality is a loud and clear signal that our waterways are in trouble, says Tripp, who explained that of the total number of manatee deaths so far this year, 123 were stillborn, newborn, or young calves less than ve feet in length, which sets another annual record for this category of mortality. Of these, at least 49 were found in Brevard County, at the epicenter of the unusual mortality event linked to a variety of algal blooms and loss of 47,000 acres of seagrass since 2010. Patrick Rose, who is an aquatic biologist and the Executive Director of the Club says, With 2013s catastrophic loss of manatee lives coming so close on the heels of the mass mortality suffered during 2010, the already dif cult job to ensure the survival of these gentle and defenseless marine mammals has been made all the more challenging, and its not over yet. What we put into our waters, how much we pump from our aquifer and draw from our springs and rivers, together with how we use our waterways, all has an impact on our own lives and the lives of every aquatic species. We must be better stewards of our waters and waterways or suffer even more severe consequences going forward. Save the Manatee Club reminds the public that November is Manatee Awareness Month in Florida the time of year when manatees are on the move, making their way to important winter warm-water sites. The Club offers a variety of ways for the public in Florida to be directly involved with manatee protection during November and throughout the year. Free public awareness waterway signage, boating banners and decals, waterway cards, and educational posters are produced by the Club. The bright yellow waterproof banner which cautions, Please Slow: Manatees Below, can assist in warning boaters to slow down for manatees who may be in the area. Shoreline property signs and matching boat decals are also available, featuring the FWCs hotline number (1-888404-3922) for reporting sick and injured manatees. Boater and diver awareness posters are also available for dive shops, marinas, businesses, visitor centers, classrooms and libraries. Family-friendly outdoor signs are produced by the Club and distributed to state, municipal, and county parks; marinas; and other sites where human/manatee interactions can be a problem. Requests for any of these free materials can be sent via e-mail to education@savethemanatee. org or by calling toll free at 1-800-432-JOIN (5646). The publics ongoing participation in manatee conservation, in Florida and outside the state, is essential for the welfare and protection of the species and the aquatic habitats upon which they depend, says Rose. For more information on endangered manatees, visit the Clubs website at www.savethemanatee. org. Watch manatees in their natural habitat on the Clubs Blue Spring webcams at manatv.org.Dire year for the manateesDeath toll highest on record and still climbing Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Nov 28, 13 Fri Nov 29, 13 Sat Nov 30, 13 Sun Dec 1, 13 Mon Dec 2, 13 Tue Dec 3, 13 Wed Dec 4, 13 Date 3.7 ft. 12:24 AM 3.8 ft. 1:04 AM 3.9 ft. 1:47 AM High 0.5 ft. 4:22 AM 0.1 ft. 5:14 AM -0.4 ft. 6:01 AM -0.7 ft. 6:47 AM -1.0 ft. 7:31 AM -1.1 ft. 8:16 AM -1.1 ft. 9:01 AM Low 2.7 ft. 10:42 AM 3.0 ft. 11:41 AM 3.2 ft. 12:33 PM 3.4 ft. 1:20 PM 3.4 ft. 2:05 PM 3.4 ft. 2:49 PM 3.3 ft. 3:32 PM High 1.2 ft. 4:10 PM 1.3 ft. 5:02 PM 1.3 ft. 5:49 PM 1.3 ft. 6:33 PM 1.3 ft. 7:15 PM 1.3 ft. 7:57 PM 1.2 ft. 8:41 PM Low 3.1 ft. 10:25 PM 3.3 ft. 11:05 PM 3.5 ft. 11:44 PM High Thu Nov 28, 13 Fri Nov 29, 13 Sat Nov 30, 13 Sun Dec 1, 13 Mon Dec 2, 13 Tue Dec 3, 13 Wed Dec 4, 13 Date 2.8 ft. 12:16 AM 2.9 ft. 12:56 AM 2.9 ft. 1:39 AM High 0.4 ft. 4:33 AM 0.0 ft. 5:25 AM -0.3 ft. 6:12 AM -0.5 ft. 6:58 AM -0.7 ft. 7:42 AM -0.8 ft. 8:27 AM -0.8 ft. 9:12 AM Low 2.0 ft. 10:34 AM 2.2 ft. 11:33 AM 2.4 ft. 12:25 PM 2.5 ft. 1:12 PM 2.6 ft. 1:57 PM 2.6 ft. 2:41 PM 2.5 ft. 3:24 PM High 0.9 ft. 4:21 PM 0.9 ft. 5:13 PM 1.0 ft. 6:00 PM 1.0 ft. 6:44 PM 0.9 ft. 7:26 PM 0.9 ft. 8:08 PM 0.9 ft. 8:52 PM Low 2.4 ft. 10:17 PM 2.5 ft. 10:57 PM 2.6 ft. 11:36 PM High Thu Nov 28, 13 Fri Nov 29, 13 Sat Nov 30, 13 Sun Dec 1, 13 Mon Dec 2, 13 Tue Dec 3, 13 Wed Dec 4, 13 Date 3.3 ft. 12:20 AM 3.4 ft. 1:00 AM 3.6 ft. 1:40 AM 3.6 ft. 2:23 AM High 0.5 ft. 5:26 AM 0.1 ft. 6:18 AM -0.3 ft. 7:05 AM -0.7 ft. 7:51 AM -0.9 ft. 8:35 AM -1.0 ft. 9:20 AM -1.0 ft. 10:05 AM Low 2.5 ft. 11:18 AM 2.8 ft. 12:17 PM 3.0 ft. 1:09 PM 3.1 ft. 1:56 PM 3.2 ft. 2:41 PM 3.2 ft. 3:25 PM 3.1 ft. 4:08 PM High 1.1 ft. 5:14 PM 1.2 ft. 6:06 PM 1.2 ft. 6:53 PM 1.2 ft. 7:37 PM 1.2 ft. 8:19 PM 1.1 ft. 9:01 PM 1.1 ft. 9:45 PM Low 2.9 ft. 11:01 PM 3.1 ft. 11:41 PM High Thu Nov 28, 13 Fri Nov 29, 13 Sat Nov 30, 13 Sun Dec 1, 13 Mon Dec 2, 13 Tue Dec 3, 13 Wed Dec 4, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 12:08 AM 3.0 ft. 12:48 AM 3.0 ft. 1:31 AM High 0.5 ft. 4:01 AM 0.1 ft. 4:53 AM -0.4 ft. 5:40 AM -0.7 ft. 6:26 AM -1.0 ft. 7:10 AM -1.1 ft. 7:55 AM -1.1 ft. 8:40 AM Low 2.1 ft. 10:26 AM 2.3 ft. 11:25 AM 2.5 ft. 12:17 PM 2.6 ft. 1:04 PM 2.7 ft. 1:49 PM 2.7 ft. 2:33 PM 2.6 ft. 3:16 PM High 1.2 ft. 3:49 PM 1.2 ft. 4:41 PM 1.3 ft. 5:28 PM 1.3 ft. 6:12 PM 1.3 ft. 6:54 PM 1.2 ft. 7:36 PM 1.2 ft. 8:20 PM Low 2.4 ft. 10:09 PM 2.6 ft. 10:49 PM 2.7 ft. 11:28 PM High Thu Nov 28, 13 Fri Nov 29, 13 Sat Nov 30, 13 Sun Dec 1, 13 Mon Dec 2, 13 Tue Dec 3, 13 Wed Dec 4, 13 Date 3.8 ft. 12:21 AM 3.9 ft. 1:01 AM 4.0 ft. 1:44 AM High 0.5 ft. 4:19 AM 0.1 ft. 5:11 AM -0.4 ft. 5:58 AM -0.8 ft. 6:44 AM -1.1 ft. 7:28 AM -1.2 ft. 8:13 AM -1.2 ft. 8:58 AM Low 2.8 ft. 10:39 AM 3.0 ft. 11:38 AM 3.3 ft. 12:30 PM 3.4 ft. 1:17 PM 3.5 ft. 2:02 PM 3.5 ft. 2:46 PM 3.4 ft. 3:29 PM High 1.3 ft. 4:07 PM 1.4 ft. 4:59 PM 1.4 ft. 5:46 PM 1.4 ft. 6:30 PM 1.4 ft. 7:12 PM 1.4 ft. 7:54 PM 1.3 ft. 8:38 PM Low 3.2 ft. 10:22 PM 3.4 ft. 11:02 PM 3.6 ft. 11:41 PM High Thu Nov 28, 13 Fri Nov 29, 13 Sat Nov 30, 13 Sun Dec 1, 13 Mon Dec 2, 13 Tue Dec 3, 13 Wed Dec 4, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 12:07 AM 3.0 ft. 12:54 AM High 0.3 ft. 4:03 AM 0.0 ft. 4:51 AM -0.3 ft. 5:35 AM -0.5 ft. 6:19 AM -0.7 ft. 7:03 AM -0.8 ft. 7:48 AM -0.8 ft. 8:34 AM Low 1.8 ft. 10:56 AM 1.9 ft. 12:21 PM 2.1 ft. 1:29 PM 2.3 ft. 2:27 PM 2.4 ft. 3:18 PM 2.4 ft. 4:05 PM 2.3 ft. 4:48 PM High 1.1 ft. 2:56 PM 1.3 ft. 3:55 PM 1.4 ft. 4:49 PM 1.5 ft. 5:38 PM 1.6 ft. 6:23 PM 1.6 ft. 7:07 PM 1.5 ft. 7:54 PM Low 2.6 ft. 9:37 PM 2.6 ft. 10:10 PM 2.7 ft. 10:45 PM 2.8 ft. 11:24 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacNov. 28 Dec. 3First Dec. 9 Full Dec. 16 Last Dec. 25 New Dec. 28:34 am-10:34 am 8:58 pm-10:58 pm 2:32 am-3:32 am 2:28 pm-3:28 pm 9:23 am-11:23 am 9:48 pm-11:48 pm 3:32 am-4:32 am 3:07 pm-4:07 pm 10:15 am-12:15 pm 10:43 pm-12:43 am 4:33 am-5:33 am 3:51 pm-4:51 pm 11:11 am-1:11 pm 11:41 pm-1:41 am 5:38 am-6:38 am 4:40 pm-5:40 pm 12:11 pm-2:11 pm --:-----:-6:42 am-7:42 am 5:36 pm-6:36 pm 12:42 am-2:42 am 1:13 pm-3:13 pm 7:47 am-8:47 am 6:37 pm-7:37 pm 1:44 am-3:44 am 2:15 pm-4:15 pm 8:47 am-9:47 am 7:43 pm-8:43 pm Average Average Good Better Best Best Better7:13 am 5:37 pm 2:34 am 2:29 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:14 am 5:36 pm 3:33 am 3:09 pm 7:15 am 5:36 pm 4:34 am 3:52 pm 7:15 am 5:36 pm 5:38 am 4:42 pm 7:16 am 5:36 pm 6:43 am 5:37 pm 7:17 am 5:36 pm 7:48 am 6:38 pm 7:18 am 5:36 pm 8:48 am 7:43 pm34% 27% 20% 13% 6% 2% 10%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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Page 22A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com TEXT LUBEX TO 55678 FOR INSTANT SAVINGS! We are a Driving Force to Earn Your Business & Trust... and Keep it! $10.00 OFF Cabin Air Filter Expires 12/31/14 $3.00 OFF New Air Filter Expires 12/31/14 $10.00 OFF Winterize Cooling System Expires 12/31/14 $10.00 OFF Fuel System Cleaning Expires 12/31/14 We Now Sell & Install Tires!!charliegrim@msn.com LubeXpert.usMon. Fri. 8am 6pm ~ Sat. 8am 4pm2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 (850) 926-6526Mon. Fri. 8am 6pm ~ Sat. 8am 4pm ~ 2219 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned & Operated FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGEFull services include: New Oil (5qts. Mobil) New Filter Brake Fluid Check Power Steering Fluid Check Battery Check Transmission Fluid Check Fill Washer Fluid Inspect Belts & Hoses Check All Exterior Lights Lube Chasis Vacuum Interior $6.00 $6.00 OFF OFFExp. 06/30/2014$3599 less $6 = $2999+ tax FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGEFull services include: New Oil (5qts. Mobil) New Filter Brake Fluid Check Power Steering Fluid Check Battery Check Transmission Fluid Check Fill Washer Fluid Inspect Belts & Hoses Check All Exterior Lights Lube Chasis Vacuum Interior $6.00 $6.00 OFF OFFExp. 03/31/2014$3599 less $6 = $2999+ tax FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGEFull services include: New Oil (5qts. Mobil) New Filter Brake Fluid Check Power Steering Fluid Check Battery Check Transmission Fluid Check Fill Washer Fluid Inspect Belts & Hoses Check All Exterior Lights Lube Chasis Vacuum Interior $6.00 $6.00 OFF OFFExp. 09/30/2014$3599 less $6 = $2999+ tax FULL SERVICE OIL CHANGEFull services include: New Oil (5qts. Mobil) New Filter Brake Fluid Check Power Steering Fluid Check Battery Check Transmission Fluid Check Fill Washer Fluid Inspect Belts & Hoses Check All Exterior Lights Lube Chasis Vacuum Interior $6.00 $6.00 OFF OFFExp. 12/31/2014$3599 less $6 = $2999+ tax AN ENTIRE YEAR OF SAVINGS FREE Oil Change w/purchase of 4 Tires Expires 12/31/14 $10.00 OFF HEADLIGHT RESTORATION MONEY BACK GUARANTEE Expires 12/31/14MV61796 Buy One Get One FREE Wiper Blades(max value $12.99) Expires 12/31/14MV61796 MV61796 MV61796 MV61796 MV61796 MV61796 MV61796 MV61796 MV61796 MV61796

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 23A By TIM LINAFELT In 1993 and 1999, the Florida State Seminoles had to go through Gainesville on their way to football national championships. If the 2013 Seminoles are to continue their quest for a third title, theyll have to do the same. The similarities, though, end there. The 1993 Gators faced No. 2 FSU with a 9-1 record and No. 7 national ranking. They gave the Seminoles a scare before Charlie Wards 79-yard swing pass to Warrick Dunn sealed a 33-21 victory and a trip to the Orange Bowl. In 1999, Florida again had a 9-1 record, was ranked No. 12 and forced FSU to recover a late onside kick in order to preserve a 30-23 win. This years Gators, however, are in the midst of a disaster unlike any in the schools modern football history. In coach Will Muschamps third season at the helm, Florida is 4-7, has lost six consecutive games and is assured of its first losing season since 1979. The season plunged to a new depth Saturday with a 26-20 loss to Georgia Southern that marked UFs rst-ever loss to an FCS opponent. Very disappointed for our program, Muschamp said after the game. (Its) an embarrassment (to be) in this situation. Florida State, ranked No. 2 in the nation and 11-0 for the third time in school history, gures to be a heavy favorite this week at Ben Hill Griffin Stadium the first time either FSU or Florida has faced the other with a losing record since UFs 0-10-1 campaign in 1979. But the Seminoles are still saying all the right things in advance of the annual rivalry game. At the end of the day, they are still the University of Florida, said junior defensive tackle Timmy Jernigan, a Lake City native who grew up a Gators fan. They are going to come out and play us hard. Probably harder than any other team that we play. FSU has seen its title hopes fall by the wayside in Gainesville before. In 1997, the Seminoles arrived in Gainesville with a No. 1 ranking, a 10-0 record and a spot in the national championship game assured should they beat the Gators. Instead, tenth-ranked Florida spoiled the party with a 32-29 victory on the heels of star performances by Fred Taylor and Jacquez Green. FSU quarterback Jameis Winston said that UFs struggles this season will be irrelevant come Saturday. A win would give the Seminoles their fourth perfect regular season in school history. Whatever the Gators did in the past few games, it doesnt matter when you put those two teams, Florida State and Florida, together, Winston said. Theyre going to play their best game when they play against us. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102#2 FSU (11-0) at Florida (4-7)Saturday, Nov. 30 at noon.The game can be seen onESPN/radio WTNT 94.9.Florida Head Coach Will Muschamp and FSUs Jimbo Fisher.vs.PHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY FSU is a heavy favorite going into The Swamp A look at last weekFSU running back Devonta Freeman protects the ball during Saturdays matchup against Idaho.PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ/SEMINOLES.COM STEVE JOHNSON/GATORBAITDuring their respective Nov. 23 games, the Florida State Seminoles beat the Idaho Vandals 80-14 to extend their record to 11-0, while the Florida Gators dropped to 4-7 with a 26-20 loss to their FCS opponent, the Georgia Southern Eagles. The two teams will meet during the biggest rivalry of the year this Saturday at Florida. The game is scheduled to begin at noon. Sources say that Florida Head Coach Will Muschamps job may be in jeopardy as the Gators continue down a long losing streak.

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Page 24A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Friday, Nov. 15, WCSO deputies made a DUI and drug arrest while investigating a report of a hit-and-run. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks was dispatched to Wakulla Springs Highway and Old Shell Point Road. The suspect driver struck another motorist in the rear but when the victim pulled over the driver continued southbound. Deputy Middlebrooks observed the suspect at another location. The deputy conducted a traf c stop and observed an open container of alcoholic beverage and smelled the odor of marijuana. Marijuana was observed inside the vehicle and in the suspects clothing. Brian Lewis Charles, 34, of Crawfordville was arrested for possession of marijuana with intent to sell and DUI with property damage. Three bags of marijuana weighed a total of nine grams. The victim whose vehicle was struck by the suspect was identi- ed as Kristen R. Herron of Crawfordville. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston, Deputy Richard Moon and FHP Trooper Greene also assisted at the scene. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: THURSDAY, NOV. 14 Nicholas Reed of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized transaction on his bank account for $50. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Alison Williams of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An unauthorized withdrawal was observed on her bank account. The fraud was for $200. It was later determined to be a bank error. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Brittany Harrell of Crawfordville reported a fraud as her family attempted to connect to cable service. The victim was informed that her family had an outstanding bill with the cable company from 1999. It was determined that a member of the victims family had his name and Social Security information used to open the account. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Mary Goddard of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victims jewelry and a gift card were stolen from her home. The stolen property is valued at $530. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Lonnie Lee of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Four unauthorized purchases were observed on the victims bank account. All of the charges were created at a Wal-Mart in Cordova, Tenn. The charges totaled $229. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. WCSO deputies assisted an elderly female who needed an escort to her daughters home after getting lost on her travels from Gainesville. The woman stopped at Macks Meats and owner Tim Rose called the sheriffs of ce for her. A WCSO deputy escorted her to her daughters home on Royal Oaks Court. Carolyn Castillo of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. An unauthorized charge of $159 was observed by the victim on her bank account. The charge was created over the Internet. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. FRIDAY, NOV. 15 Ronald Brown of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed fraudulent activity on his bank account. Ten unauthorized charges were observed for a total of $3,349. The charges were created at Tallahassee stores. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. James Hurley of Panacea reported a grand theft. Two stainless steel boat propellers were stolen from his residence. The property is valued at $1,000. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. A 14-year-old Wakulla High School juvenile was found to be in possession of two pills that were concealed in his head gear. Both pills were listed as a Schedule 2 controlled substance. The juvenile also had unknown powder in his possession which will be analyzed to determine if it is a controlled substance or not. The juvenile was charged with two counts of possession of a controlled substance. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Dennis Brandt of AutoZone in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The store delivery vehicle was damaged from an attempted entry. Damage is estimated at $100. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. David Hutchinson of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim responded to an Internet service list advertisement for job training program in Tallahassee. The advertisement told the victim to purchase a prepaid credit card to pay for the class. A call to the Leon County Civic Center where the class was allegedly to have taken place revealed that several individuals in the area were victims of the same scam. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Deputy Ashley McAlister responded to a medical call where a Crawfordville woman was in distress. Deputy McAlister discovered crack cocaine and drug paraphernalia at the home. In addition, marijuana was observed in the home. The narcotics and paraphernalia were seized by the deputy and Wakulla EMS transported the woman to the hospital for treatment. No charges were led at the time of the incident. SATURDAY, NOV. 16 Richard Peter Kowalczyk, 20, of Marianna was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked. Deputies Will Hudson and Ashley McAlister responded to a disturbance call at Dux Liquors. Hudson contacted Deputy Vicki Mitchell about a vehicle passing him at 92 miles per hour. Mitchell conducted a traf c stop. The driver did not have a valid license and his tag was also expired. Kowalczyk was instructed to contact another driver for transport back to Tallahassee while Deputy Mitchell assisted two other deputies with the disturbance call. Later, Mitchell observed Kowalczyk driving past her again. The deputy conducted a second traf- c stop and arrested her subject and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail. The vehicle keys were turned over to a friend. Rhonda Kay Johnson, 54, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court after a traf c stop. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks conducted a traffic stop after determining that the tag was not on the vehicle to which it was assigned. Johnson told the deputy she removed the tag from another vehicle and placed it on the one she was driving. The tag was seized and the subject received a notice to appear in court for tag not assigned. Katherine Carraway of Sopchoppy reported the possible theft of her wallet from Dollar General in Crawfordville. The victim left the store without knowing the whereabouts of her purse. The wallet and contents are valued at $62. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Caroline Miller of Panacea reported a fraud. Someone used the victims personal information to apply for credit. The credit attempt was through Sears. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Jodee Bolieu of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of wiring from a rental property in Panacea. Copper wire was cut from beneath a trailer. Replacement cost is estimated at $400. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Sgt. Ryan Muse conducted a traf c stop of a vehicle with an expired tag. The tag check came back as stolen. Shenica Lasha Gilbert, 31, of Tallahassee could not produce a valid driver license and admitted that she had knowledge of the tag being stolen. Gilbert was transported to the Wakulla County Jail where she allegedly attempted to dispose of marijuana on the oor. The marijuana weighed 1.3 grams and the vehicle tag was seized. Gilbert was charged with driving while license suspended or revoked habitual offender, attached tag not assigned, possession of stolen property, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and introduction of contraband into a detention facility. Detention Deputy Vicky Hughes also investigated. James Arthur Farmer of Crawfordville was observed driving westbound on the one-way east bound Bream Fountain Road in Crawfordville. A traffic stop was conducted and it was determined there was a seize tag order on the vehicle due to an expired tag. Farmer did not possess a valid driver license. He received a criminal traf c citation for traveling the wrong direction on a one way roadway, operating a motor vehicle with an expired tag of six months or less and knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license is suspended. Deputy Ward Kromer and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Joseph Dean Hicks, 31, of Crawfordville was arrested for vehicle theft on Wakulla Beach Road. Jennifer L. Whittinghill of Panacea reported her vehicle as stolen earlier in the road patrol shift and identified Hicks as a possible suspect. The vehicle was observed as wrecked and earlier the suspect was seeking assistance from a resident in the area. During the arrest process, Hicks attempted to ee from Deputy Vicki Mitchell and FHP Trooper Stone. The suspect ran approximately 100 yards before being apprehended by Trooper Stone who deployed a Taser to gain compliance. Hicks was charged with resisting arrest without violence and he faces additional charges from Trooper Stone. SUNDAY, NOV. 17 Adam Piotrowski of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims portable building and stole a rearm. The ri e and scope are valued at $375. Persons of interest were identi ed. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Tully Taff of Crawfordville reported the theft of a portable DVD player. The victim allowed a female subject to stay at his home and she removed property from the home without permission. The player is valued at $189. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Ronald Edmondson of Panacea reported a criminal mischief. The victim reported a juvenile shooting out a vehicle window with a BB gun. Damage was estimated at $275. The juveniles father agreed to pay for the damage to the victims vehicle and the 13-year-old juvenile was issued a Juvenile Civil Citation. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. Ricky A. Dyke of Crawfordville and Saeedeh P. Posey of Crawfordville were involved in a minor traffic crash at the WalMart parking lot. There were no injuries reported. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Reca Kay Hiers, 47, of Tallahassee was arrested for introduction of contraband into a detention facility. Detention deputies received information that Hiers smuggled tobacco products and a lighter into the jail. The lighter and rolling papers were recovered. The tobacco was already smoked. MONDAY, NOV. 18 Barry Broering of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The charges totaled $2,095 with the majority coming from Internet sites. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Two female teenagers were observed attempting to steal $48 worth of merchandise from the store. The investigation determined that the teenagers were from North Carolina and Tennessee and the girls were transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Later, it was determined that one of the females was only age 14. The 14year-old was determined to be a runaway from Tennessee and the 18-year-old was identi ed as Kathrine Jane Laughter of Etowah, N.C., who had outstanding warrants out of Kingsport, Tenn., with full extradition. No charges were led for retail theft as the property was recovered. The 14-year-old was transported to juvenile detention in Leon County to be held until she can be extradited. Laughter is being held in the Wakulla County Jail until she can be extradited. The vehicle used by the teenagers was held for pickup by the parents of the older teenager. Beverly Keister of Panacea reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized charge on her credit card account. The charge was for $160 for owers. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. TUESDAY, NOV. 19 Joseph Perdue of Crawfordville reported two vehicle burglaries. Both of his family vehicles were rummaged through and a GPS unit and $2.50 in cash and change was stolen. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Ashley Taylor of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed 10 unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges totaled $750 at the same Wal-Mart in Atlantaa. Robert D. Heide of St. George Island and David T. Rickards of Carrabelle were involved in a two vehicle minor traf c crash at the intersection of U.S. Highway 319 and U.S. Highway 98. There were no injuries and minor damage to the vehicles. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Stacie Phillips of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to The Wakulla News building. Several holes in the vinyl siding were observed that appear to have been caused by rocks. It has not been determined if the damage was caused by lawn care equipment or criminal activity. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. David A. Koppenaal of Crawfordville and Susan M. Schatzman of Crawfordville were involved in a two vehicle traf c crash at Wal-Mart. There were no injuries and minor damage to the vehicles. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Warren Wollschlager of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. A bank card was used without the victims permission. The charge was for $26. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. Deputy Billy Metcalf and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Of cer Jason Godwin investigated teenagers smoking marijuana on Purify Bay Road at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge property. When Of cer Godwin determined the teenagers were smoking marijuana he was granted permission to search the vehicle. Law enforcement discovered 1.1 grams of marijuana inside the vehicle. Two 17year-old males and an 18year-old male were given a Juvenile Civil Citation or notices to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. A female juvenile was released to her father and was not charged. Eddie Oliver of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone stole the victims camcorder from inside an unsecured vehicle at his home. The camera and case are valued at $770. Deputy Ross Hasty and Sgt. Lorne Whaley investigated. WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20 Kellie Talbot of Crawfordville reported a noise complaint in Crawfordville. The victim told Deputy Ross Hasty and Sgt. Lorne Whaley that her family could not sleep due to loud music coming from the home of Henry Malcolm Bramblett, 24, of Crawfordville. Deputies spoke to the subject on more than one occasion about turning down loud music. Due to the previous warnings, Bramblett was arrested for disorderly conduct and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Elouise Washington of Crawfordville reported the theft of a lawn mower. A push mower, a shovel and hanging plants were taken from her property. The mower is valued at $80. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. Essie Long of Big Top Grocery in Panacea reported a retail theft. Kellie Ann Michal, 29, of Panacea was allegedly observed taking cough medicine, cigarettes and beef sticks out of the store without paying for them. The suspect gave Long some of the items back when confronted in the parking lot. Michal attempted to pull away from the store but went over the curb and struck an ice machine with her vehicle. Long removed the keys from the vehicle. Michal left the scene but was observed by Deputy Mike Crum nearby and detained. Michal was charged with retail theft and a juvenile child and the vehicle were turned over to a family member. The stolen items are valued at $30 and have been recovered. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 860 calls for service during the past week. Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 25A HARRISON BAIL BONDSA-AAA Franklin County 850-670-3333850-926-2299 Daryn Quick Wiles Mike HarrisonWELCOMES Daryn Quick Wiles to the StaffThe areas leading company for Judicial Monitoring. Locally Owned and Operated Drug TestingScramGPS24/7 Service926-TEST 926-2299MIKE HARRISON / DUFF HARRISON / DARYN WILES 17 HIGH DRIVE SUITE C

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Page 26A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Dont worry? No. But be happy? Maybe HOME COUNTRYThankful for the small things on Thanksgiving By SLIM RANDLESYou see that sunset last night? Steve said. Now that was a honey. Ill say, said Doc. You know, with Thanksgiving on us, I have to tell you Im very thankful for sunsets like that one. Those of us who dont live in the big cities tend to be thankful for different things than those who may live in stucco cliff dwellings. We tend to look at the natural blessings more than the manmade ones. Our gratitude extends past not having our teenager go to jail, or for the raise we just got at the factory. Our favorite ball team can win or lose on its own without our having to look for Divine Intervention, usually. We tend to be grateful for other things, like calves in the spring, and how clean they look before they discover mud. We are deeply grateful that tasty rabbits arrive in large litters, and bears dont. When we think about it, we are thankful that we get eggs from hens and not from rattlesnakes, as checking the rattler house each morning could get way too exciting. When you consider that porcupines have quills, and not deer, it gives us pause for praise, and were happy that its skunks who carry scent glands and not squirrels. We are thankful too, that hurricanes and tornadoes only happen in warm weather. Its bad enough to lose the barn without being chill-factored to death while its happening. Turkeys, Dud said, sipping his coffee. What? Im thankful turkeys are stupid. Ever looked in a turkeys eyes? Not only is no one home, but there was a mass evacuation sometime during the Eisenhower Administration. A turkey has just enough brains to operate his heart and lungs. Youre thankful for that? Doc said. Sure, said Dud. If turkeys had been given the rudimentary intelligence of a garden snail, we might be forced to eat sheep on Thanksgiving. Give the gift of hearing this Christmas. Start your loved one off with a free hearing test at BELTONE. Call 1-866-8678700.By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Nov. 22 At this rate, Gov. Rick Scott might start commissioning weekly surveys by the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute. Consider: In June, the last time that Connecticut-based school did a poll in Florida, Scott had sliced his de cit against former Gov. Charlie Crist from 16 points to 10. The following Friday, the states unemployment rate fell from 7.2 percent to 7.1 percent. This weeks Quinnipiac release had more good news for the Republican governor: The gap between Scott and Crist is now down to seven points. And gures released Friday showed the unemployment rate slipping yet again, from 6.8 percent in September to 6.7 percent in October. It might not quite be time for Scott to start singing Happy Days Are Here Again. But if the governors bid for re-election is compared to the movie that song first appeared in -Chasing Rainbows -it looks like Scott might be gaining on them.BOUNCING BACK?The bottom line for the Quinnipiac poll was still not a great number for Scott. Crist, a former Republican who became a Democrat last year, leads his successor, 47-40, and Scotts job approval rating is still underwater (47-42). Things might be looking slightly brighter for the incumbent, but his numbers would almost have to improve or Crists worsen for Scott to claim a second term. In other words, for Scott to win, hes going to have to convince voters that Charlie was not a good governor and that he (Crist) is a political opportunist, said Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac institute. And we all expect that he will spend tens of millions of dollars to make that argument. Well see whether it works or not. Democratic consultant Steve Schale brushed off the results as an inevitable tightening of the governors race. The idea that this was ever a 15-point race is foolish, said Schale, who is advising Crist but made clear he wasnt speaking for the campaign. Meanwhile, Crist was making the rounds at the Florida Press Center an opportunity to schmooze with the journalists who will be covering his race and perhaps watching nervously the actions of a certain former spaceman. Confirming reports that have circulated for months, Democratic U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson told Politico -a D.C.based news organization -that he might jump into the race for governor if Crist gets into trouble. When asked to elaborate on what trouble might mean, Nelson said, Thats in the eye of the beholder, according to Politico. Nelson spokesman Dan McLaughlin said in an email he had nothing to add to the report, and Schale tried to downplay it. It doesnt change anything. Charlie Crist is still running for governor. Hes still building a campaign. Hes still out there every day doing the kinds of things you do when you want to get elected governor. Theres nothing about this thats changing any of that except that Bill Nelsons not doing that, he said. Nelson, for the record, was not included in any of the scenarios that Quinnipiac ran in its November poll; Brown said they would put the senator back in the mix if he showed any interest in actually running.AN OPPORTUNITY ECONOMYThe new unemployment gures, meanwhile, marked Floridas lowest unemployment rate in more than ve years, according to the state. The new seasonally adjusted unemployment rate of 6.7 percent still represents an estimated 625,000 people who are out of work. The October number also represents 31,000 fewer people being out of work than in August, the last monthly jobless gures available before Fridays release. The September numbers were delayed because the U.S. Department of Labors Bureau of Labor Statistics suspended all data collection during the federalgovernment shutdown. The drop in the overall number of unemployed outpaced the number of people who simply left Floridas workforce between September and October 9,000. Scott used the numbers to tout his progress and also to test some themes for when he faces voters next year. We dont just want a state where job creation reaches a certain number, or unemployment falls to a certain number, Scott said in a prepared statement. We want to create an opportunity economy. We want a state with dynamic, growing industries that will create jobs and careers for generations to come. Another central plank of Scotts re-election effort will almost certainly be his pledge to lower taxes and fees by $500 million during the legislative session that opens in March. State economists met Wednesday to try to attach a price-tag to some of the items on the menu. For example, slashing the communications-services tax, which affects things like cell phone services, by 2 percent would drain $255 million out of state revenue. Slicing a percentage point off a commercial rental tax would reduce state revenue by about $235.6 million, and local revenue by $20.2 million with the price tag going up in future years. Repeating the three-day back-to-school sales tax holiday would cost the state $35.9 million, while a similar measure for hurricane gear would likely reduce income by just $3.3 million. One idea that is relatively unlikely to go far is Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnams proposal to trim the sales tax on energy used by businesses. Putnam said Monday he remains behind the proposal to cut in half the 7 percent tax and to redirect the remaining revenue for school construction and maintenance -but it probably wont go anywhere as lawmakers offer their own proposals for how to reach Scotts half-billion dollar goal. Ive been in their shoes, I know theyve got a lot of ideas, Putnam, a former lawmaker, told reporters during a pen and pad session in his Capitol conference room. Theyve got a budget they need to balance, and concerns about a surplus that hopefully will continue to be as robust as theyve projected. But given the uncertainty of the national economy, we may not know until March just what type of budget outlook we have and how much there is to make the type of investments this might cost.THE CHANCELLORS CORONATIONIn one of the least surprising developments of the week, the Florida Board of Governors reached out and touched their next choice for chancellor: Marshall Criser, currently the president of AT&T in Florida. The board voted unanimously to name Criser to the position Wednesday afternoon, putting a xture of Floridas business and political establishment atop the network of 12 universities. Criser, the son of a former president of the University of Florida and member of the UF board of trustees, has long been the front-runner for the position. Criser has headed up the telecoms presence in Florida since 2005 and has had a role in government relations in Florida for AT&T or its state predecessor, BellSouth, off and on since 1989. He is also a former chairman of the Florida Chamber of Commerce and currently serves as chairman of the Florida Council of 100. I believe that our state has laid the foundation to be the leader in academic quality, access for Floridas students, and accountability to ensure the value of investing in Floridas future, Criser said in a statement following the vote. STORY OF THE WEEK: Floridas unemployment rate hit 6.7 percent, its lowest level in more than ve years. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Ive hit a bottom and I realize I need help.--Southwest Florida Congressman Trey Radel to Judge Robert S. Tignor after pleading guilty to possession of cocaine, as quoted by The Washington Post. The Wakulla News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 27A ATTRACT ATTENTION WORLDWIDE for WAKULLA TOURISM W akulla R. Wakulla State Forest Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park Apalachicola National Forest Leon Sinks Geological Area Apalachicola National Forest Edward Ball Wakull a Springs State Park Wakulla Springs State Park 369 267 61 365 373A 61 319 61 You are hereWAKULLA WAKULLA LEON LEON Apalachicola National Forest Leon Sinks Geological AreaTurner SinkSUBJECT PROPERTY 475 ACRESLeon Sinks/Wakulla Springs Cave Connection (26 miles long) Wakulla Springs Sally Ward Spring Indian Spring For Sale Sign FERRELL PROPERTY NOT FOR SALE (INGRESS/EGRESS) Creme Promise Upper River Sink Lower River Sink Innisfree NOTICE: The Ferrell Property is two parcels: One is For Sale (solid line-475 acres) and one IS NOT for sale (Dotted line-235 acres.) There are sinks, caverns and caves on and underneath both parcels. Dive sites on both Ferrell parcels are being surveyed and mapped by divers of the Aquatic Science Association. Flyer Updated November, 2013 Big Dismal Cheryl Emerald ClearCut Whiskey Still Westend Sink Hectadon County Line Road Chason Woods DEP What would a SCUBA diving park mean for Wakulla County? It would aract worldwide visitors to Wakulla County It would bring customers to our restaurants, motels, shops and service staons It would enhance the countys revenue base Imagine the many possibili es...The Ferrell property is believed to have one of the highest concentra ons and widest variety of dive-able sinks, caverns and caves all on private land anywhere in the United States. Wakulla County is poised to become the Number One Dive Des na on for a world-wide, a uent, eco-friendly, cave diving community. Ask your county commissioners and Restore Commi ee members to consider funding acquisi on of this property as a park for educa on, outdoor recrea on and SCUBA diving.Centered in the middle of the proposed CAPITAL CITY TO THE SEA TRAILSCheck out the economic Impact Cave Diving has made in Jackson County Think of what nine dis nctly di erent dive proles this property o ers and what it could mean for Tourism in our county. J. Brent PichardLic. Real Estate Broker( 850 ) 933-0238

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Page 28A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comThroughout recorded history, colors have been an initial indicator for a variety of conditions. Sometimes the colors indicated a positive situation, and sometime a negative circumstance. Ancient Chinese used different smoke colors to indicate the relative safety at any particular time. White smoke on the Great Wall meant no problems were present, black smoke signi ed an immediate threat. Colors have been used by kings, emperors, potentates and every other stripe of political creature with aspirations to rule and/or conquer. When certain colors were on display, the commoner knew he was in the presence of power. On the battlefield these same colors were used to rally the troops. Like modern gangs, certain colors denoted friends while other colors suggest a quick retreat. Wakulla County currently has many wondrous colors in the leaves of plants and trees which indicate the autumn season. The color and shade indicates the plant species and the seasons progression. While there is still plenty of green being produced by pines and palms, other deciduous plants are displaying reds, yellows, purples and browns. Deciduous plants are those which lose their leaves in winter. Leaves are green because of the chemical pigment chlorophyll. This substance dictates the appearance of the leaf during the growing season, but there are other materials present. Chlorophyll is critical to plants health and growth during the warmer months. It is the chemical catalyst which converts energy from the sun and nutrients into sugars which the plant or tree uses. Trees and plants produce and consume chlorophyll throughout the growing season. The robust green coloration is a sign that it is healthy and functioning to its fullest capacity. As summer passes into fall, the cooler temperatures and waning hours of light each day cause plants to constrict their veins and lower the availability of chlorophyll. The plants vascular system which carries uids into and out of the leaves is gradually closed off by a membrane layer at the base of each leaf. As the seasonal transition progresses leaf veins will remain green as the other leaf tissues change color. The color and intensity depend on the species of tree or plant. Carotenoids, which reveal their presence by orange and yellow hues, appear gradually. Hickories and pecans, which are in the Carya genus, have distinctive yellow leaves. The reds and purples come from another pigment group called anthocyanins which reside in the cells. This chemical compound develops in the sap of the leaves. These pigments are not present in the leaf during much of the growing season, but are quickly produced in August and September. The amount and intensity of the reds and purples in leaves depends on a combination of environmental factors. The breakdown of sugars, the intensity and duration of sunlight and the level at which phosphate declines in the leaf combine to produce a nearly in nite number of shade and hue possibilities. The brightest colorations commonly occur when the fall days are bright and cool, and the nights are cold but not below freezing. Sweet gums, Florida maples and dogwoods all have red leaves. To learn more about autumn leaf color in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Fall colors are on display in Wakulla County Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe brightest colorations usually occur when days are cool and nights are cold but not freezing. 18 Holes of Golfwith Lunch850-697-9606www.stjamesbay.com See a Fading Way of Life Through Their Eyes The Wakullas Working Waterfronts Photo Project has been made possible by a grant from the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs. WE ARE HEREFOR YOU For more Information and to Schedule a Portfolio ReviewTrustYourPlan.comBob Beargie, Wealth Advisorbob.beargie@raymondjames.com 850-562-6702Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS.The Raymond James Wealth Advisors at Gulf Winds are ready to help you create a Life Well Planned. Conveniently located in Crawfordville, we offer the nancial strength of Raymond James and the reliability of being local. If you would like to get started with your nancial plan, or if you just need a second opinion, give us a call. We are here for you.1447 Mahan Drive Tallahassee, FL 32308

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Photographers cover Wakullas waterfrontsPage 2BPages 10-11BStroll Pine Mountain and Warm Springs, Ga.Travel, Page 22BHave you ever been water-ballooned? A balloon is lled with water and when thrown the balloon bursts and the object struck is saturated and completely hydrated. As director of the Senior Center, I wanted to water balloon Wakulla County in an effort to say thank you for your support as well as provide information to other seniors about their center. Our staff and I with the help of friends decided to keep the community events in the tradition of Wakulla County. Therefore, we decided to fry sh and not just any sh, but mullet, and serve them to folks along with cold slaw or baked beans, hushpuppies and iced tea. The Board of Directors, our Friend-raising Committee decided to take this menu on the road, or at least in various communities within Wakulla County. We needed Friends and sponsors in order to carry out this informational project. It all started when Rocky Bevis and David Conn of Bevis Funeral Home at Harvey-Young Chapel stepped in and said we want to sponsor the full cost and host the event in Crawfordville on a Saturday. Bevis ne staff planned it, organized it, and presented it and we sold 250 pounds of mullet at $5 a plate and the turn-out and support from the community was overwhelming and humbling. All of the proceeds were donated to Meals on Wheels in order to feed home-bound seniors who were unable to come to the senior center for their meals. Thank you to Mr. Bevis, Mr. Conn and staff for a wonderful event in Crawfordville. We are grateful. Mr. Clark Nichols was on hand to cook mullet and Ms. Nichols was right there cooking hushpuppies, and Mr. Jim and others were also working over a hot cooker. Turn to Page 13B By MICHELLE HUNTEROf the Senior CenterThe colors this October were not the typical fall colors, but a whole lot of black and white, a splash of orange and red, and every shade of pink. October was Breast Cancer Awareness Month, so to show our support we had a Think Pink Day. The dining room was set in pink, the kitchen staff made pink cupcakes decorated with pink ribbon frosting, and everyone came dressed in their favorite pink out t. When you walked into the dining room it was like walking into a stunning painting of the loveliest shades of pink. It was such a great way to honor and support those with Breast Cancer, and the families and caregivers that help them along the way. Our rst Walk With Ease Program, a six week exercise and walking class, ended with a graduation party. All of the participants received a certi cate of completion, and a gift from the instructors, Angel Carter and Mary Tollefson. The next class began Nov. 4 and will run until Dec. 16. You can join in at any time; the classes are on Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 11 a.m. This program was developed for the Arthritis Foundation, and can be adapted to most physical levels. If you have any questions, call Angel Carter at 926-7145 ext. 223. The Wakulla Senior Center partnered with American Second Harvest and the United Way of the Big Bend, to provide a Mobile Pantry Day at the senior center. All of the food was donated, staff and volunteers helped to bag it up and pass it out. It was set up like a drive-thru: as families drove through and were given a variety of food items to take home. Turn to Page 9B Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director Water ballooning WakullaIn October, seniors observed Breast Cancer Awareness, distributed free food, and dressed up for Falloween SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA black-and-white Falloween. Seniors dress in pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month. WIN THIS UNIQUE FIREARM!24 Karat Gold Plated Wakulla County Winchester model 94AE 45 caliber, long Colt / carrying case and all papers included Only 10 rifles were manufactured for Wakulla County $100 per ticketDrawing will be held on January 17, 2014 @ 11:45 am Wakulla Senior Center / 33 Michael Dr. / Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.7145All proceeds benefit Wakulla Senior Center Meals-on-Wheels ProgramTax Deductible Donation / Tax ID # 59-1316667Do not have to be present to win. Your donation alone will provide meals for a senior for a month. As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Prices Good Through November850926-32121.75LABSOLUTVODKA $ 29 99 $ $ 1.75LPINNACLE VODKA $ 16 99 $ $ BAR SPECIALS DAILY750MLCOURVOISIERVS $ 19 99 C $ $ C 1.75LCOURVOISIERVS $ 39 99 R 9 9 C O $ $ PREMIUM BEER24PKBOTT LES OR CANS 9 9 24 C A NS 24 P K B OTT L ES OR C A NS $ 19 99

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.comBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsTheres a wonderful feeling that comes with being surrounded by seasoned artists. That feeling is enhanced when the artists have chosen to use their creative ability to boost the morale of the communities in which they live. Six photographers came together earlier this month to discuss Wakullas Working Waterfronts Photo Project and its possible impact on tourism and economic development. Recently, the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth received a grant from the state Division of Cultural Affairs to kick the project into gear. The challenge now is to capture visually the faces, character, and spirit of Wakullas maritime family in a series of photos to be exhibited in April 2014. The exhibit will travel to other counties in the state before making its nal home in Wakulla. Donnie Crum was highly instrumental during the developmental phase of the grant, and County Commissioner Richard Harden is also lending a hand. Leo Lovel, Herb Donaldson, and others made their pleas of support for Waterfronts to the FDCA earlier this year during a roundtable judging process. Organizations from all over the state were there to pitch their ideas in the hopes of being funded. Waterfronts made the cut and has now begun the next phase of an endeavor that has been more than 15 months in the making. The vision has been rede ned by the virtue and combined experience of the artists and supporters involved. Holding its rst advisory group meeting this past October, there was a great desire to see the project expand to other organizations that could offer support and expertise in certain areas. This would include gathering individual and family histories, or creating awareness in sister counties to draw tourists to Wakulla for the April exhibit. This could only bene t the efforts of local tech marketing guru, Chuck Robinson, and his company, Brick Launcher, which is set to unleash a digital media blitz for Waterfronts soon. Although Waterfronts is open to partnerships, it cannot overlook what the grant requires: 45 photos that depict Wakullas maritime history and tells the story of past and present generations. Nine photographers have chosen to participate, including Brett Allbritton, Mickey Cantner, Katie Deal, Betsy Kellenberger, Lou Kellenberger, Lynda Kinsey, Jo Ann Palmer, Robert Siedler, and Mark Wallheiser. The nine photographers have already begun capturing what is set to become the most de nitive photo collection of the countys maritime history. Im looking forward to preserving our history through these photos, says photographer Jo Ann Palmer, who is also director of Keep Wakulla Beautiful. We have artists onboard whove been professional judges for photography. Its good to have someone we can see and touch right away that is willing to assist. Lynda Kinsey, a photographer who has worked for The Wakulla News for more than 25 years, took her rst photograph when she was just 4 years old. Im excited to do this project for the fisherman, says Kinsey, so that they can go down in history and show what it was like during this period in time. These days, you dont see the same scenes that you saw on the coast 20 years ago. The necessity of such an exhibit can be found in the exploration of heartbreak, pain, and political divide associated with shing in the county. And though much of that disappointment has not gone away, what has quickly begun to fade are the names, faces, and histories of those who have been most at work in the maritime industry within our lifetimes. The goal of the Waterfronts project is not to sink into the realm of politics that can halt progress in its tracks, but to delight and celebrate the sherman, shrimpers, crabbers, worm-grunters, crab pickers, trap-makers, boat builders, seineyard workers, marine intellectuals, and more, by capturing through photography their generations-long contribution to the county. Wakulla is a cool place, says filmmakerphotographer Robert Siedler. But it needs a better face on it. And we all need to work hard to make that better face. There are only so many opportunities in this county to do good work. And they are eeing. We see a culture closing, but theres a culture opening too. As one way of life leaves, another takes its place. An example would be the off bottom oyster farming practices, such as the Australian longline method, that have begun to be used locally. This newly found way of harvesting oysters is being taught to students and in sheries all over the world and is showing itself to be profoundly successful. With Waterfronts I see the history, says Siedler, but I also see the reinvention associated with it. Were celebrating people that did it one way, while also celebrating those that are doing it in a new way. Its easy to pay tribute to a group, or a people, and say that was the past and leave it. Its harder to highlight the evolution of a tradition. Lou Kellenberger and his wife Betsy, volunteer with the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge and Maclay Gardens. Both are freelance photographers, and Lou, a retired nancial advisor, has worked for tourist development councils in Franklin and Leon counties, and with Visit Florida. Given the caliber of the professionalism around this table, said Lou Kellenberger during the photographers meeting, theres enough expertise to capture the moment, the soul, and the true essence of what it is Waterfronts is looking for. It will take the participation of Wakullas maritime workers and other organizations looking to preserve, honor, and record the current evolution of an age-old tradition, to prove him right.Photographers will cover Wakullas Working WaterfrontsProject aims for 45 photos of the local maritime tradition, plus family histories SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSome of the people involved in the project to document Wakullas waterfronts: back row, Jo Ann Palmer, Mark Wallheiser, Robert Seidler, Chuck Robinson; front row, Herb Donaldson, Lynda Kinsey, Lou Kellenberger and Betsy Kellenberger. For more information Call 210-8831 or 528-1527 4 p.m. 8 p.m. Boat On Trailer Parade This Advertisement Sponsored by The New s Wakulla ertisement Spons or r ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed ed b b y s s CENTENNIALBANKMember FDICwww.my100bank.comA Home BancShares Company KidsCome Visit Santa Crums Mini Mall Wakulla Discount Liquor Mikes Marine Supply East Coast Connections at Angelos My-Way Seafood Mineral Springs Seafood Big Top Supermarket Dollar General Sea-Tow Two Blondes Yasmania Sheer Expressions Hair Salon Brooks Concrete Rock Landing Marina Angelos Tropical Trader Seafood Coastal Restaurant Poseys Steam Room Big Daddys Pizza Blue Lagoon Saloon Stevens Seafood & Chicken Restaurant Coastal Corner Barwicks Seafood & Deli Free Admission from 2-6p.m. in Panacea Panacea Market Place 2pm 8pmNEXT TO BIG TOP SUPERMARKETLocal Arts & Crafts Vendors Saturday, Dec. 7 th The 8th Annual ALL Kids Activities are FREE!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 5B Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Nov. 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet each second Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Nov. 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Call 926-1437 with any questions.Saturday, Nov. 30 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m.p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Dec. 1 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Dec. 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Dec. 3 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library as well as in the evening at 7 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.Wednesday, Dec. 4 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsMonday, Dec. 9 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will hold a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. on changing city elections to coincide with the general election cycle. The hearing will be followed by the councils regular monthly meeting. HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the board of commissioners conference room, 3093 Crawfordville Highway. Tuesday, Dec. 10 PLANNING COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, Dec. 12 CITY OF ST. MARKS will hold its regular city meeting at the St. Marks City Hall beginning at 7 p.m. TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold its regular meeting at the Panacea Welcome Center at 8:30 a.m.Weekly meetings Special EventsSunday, Dec. 1 BIG BEND HOSPICE will host a service of rememberance at Hudson Park beginning at 4 p.m. Big Bend Hospice also invites you to visit our Wakulla County Trees of Remembrance at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville. Proceeds bene t patients and families of Big Bend Hospice. Call 926.9308 for more information! Monday, Dec. 2 RESPITE PROGRAM is available to any memory impaired person every Monday at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. This is an opportunity for caregivers of those with memory impairments to take an afternoon for themselves. For more information call Pat Ashley at 984-5277. ALZHEIMERS CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP meeting will be held at Lake Ellen Baptist church at 1 p.m. These meetings are held every rst Monday of the month. NAMI WAKULLA will host a Christmas potluck dinner at the Crawfordville Womens Center at 6:30 p.m. Come enjoy a meal and great personal stories of the bene ts of NAMI Wakulla Meet our board of directors and our consumers. Call 926-1033 with any questions. Thursday, Dec. 5 UNITED WAY OF THE BIG BEND will host a Wakulla County community conversation meeting from 9 a.m. until 10 a.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center in order to discuss and receive input on local issues as part of a current strategic planning effort. To con rm your attendance, please email Megan Picht, megan@uwbb.org. If you are unable to attend, please consider sending a representative from your organization. ANTI-BULLYING SESSION will be hosted by the school system and Sheriffs of ce at Crawfordville Elementary School at 7 p.m. This session will focus on high school-aged children. All interested parties are welcome to attend.Upcoming EventsFriday, Dec. 6 2014 ELECTION CANDIDATE WORKSHOP will be held at the Wakulla County Elections Of ce located at 3115B Crawfordville Highway from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. The workshop is open to candidates, campaign managers, campaign treasurers, members of the public and anyone interested in running for of ce. MEDART ELEMENTARY WINTER FESTIVAL will take place from 4 p.m. until 8 p.m. at 2558 Crawfordville Highway. All the funds raised during this annual event will go towards the purchase of playground equipment for the school. Everyone is welcome to join this fun event. Come visit Santa, participate in games, win prizes, get your face painted and more. A variety of delicious food will also be available. Saturday, Dec. 7 CHRISTMAS IN PANACEA will take place from 2 p.m. until 8 p.m. next to the Big Top Supermarket. The event will include the Panacea Market Place and the Boat on Trailer Parade. As part of the event, Gulf Specimen Marine Lab will be offering free admission from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. All kids acitivities will be free. For more information call 210-8831 or 5281527. HOLIDAY BOOK GIVEAWAY will be held by the Friends of the Wakulla Library from 9 a.m. until noon. In addition to the thousands of books that are available, the Friends will be providing hot chocolate and coffee to all who attend. To raise funds for the library, we will also be selling holiday cakes, pies, cookies and cupcakes made by the WHS Culinary Arts Program, a certi ed hygienic kitchen facility. Please come and show your support for our wonderful public library! 5K REINDEER RUN/WALK will begin and end at the Wakulla Senior Center. The race starts at 8:30 a.m. and pre-registration begins at 7 a.m. The cost of participation will be $20 on the day of the race (includes a shirt if available) or $15 if you would like to opt out of the shirt. For more information contact Susan Jones at (850) 566-7584 or bluewatersusan@gmail.com. Walkers are welcome. All proceeds will bene t the Senior Center. APALACHEE BAY VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPRTMENT will be holding a fundraiser consisting of smoked chicken wing meals in honor of the FSU Noles playing in the ACC Championship game. To order ahead of time call 926-9254 or just drop in at the rehouse in Shell Point between 9 a.m. and 11 a.m. on game day. Whole chicken wings are also available frozen in 5 pound bags (about 30 large wings) for $12 (below wholesale). Call to order and arrange pick up. Saturday, Dec. 14 CHRISTMAS IN SOPCHOPPY will take place from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Santa will join the festivities from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. Come out and enjoy relaxed shopping among arts, crafts, food vendors and local merchants. Nov 27 Dec 5 HAPPY THANKSGIVING! RESPITE PROGRAM Lake Ellen Baptist Church 9 a.m. 3 p.m. UNITED WAY COMMUNITY CONVO TCC Wakulla Center 9 a.m. ANTI-BULLYING SESSION Crawfordville Elem. 7 p.m.ThursdayMondayThursdayThursday Week Week in in W akulla akulla W akulla akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net Above, photos from last years Big Bend Hospace rememberance service. This years event will take place on Dec. 1. Below, a photo from last years Christmas in Panacea parade. This years parade will take place on Dec. 7.FILE PHOTOS

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.com When Old Man Winter arrives, will you be ready?Leon PropaneCall us today for our tank set special!850-877-3156No Hidden Fees No HazMat Fee No Delivery Fee Leon Propane 4750 Woodville Hwy Tallahassee, FL 32305We are here to help with our tank set special and no delivery fees. Leon Propane Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday 10-5 Thursday & Friday 10-6 Saturday 10-51616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850) 926-6241Here We Are! Clothes, Accessories & Gifts...Really GreatDear Savvy Senior, Can you recommend some good resources that can help seniors create a living will? Getting Old Dear Getting, Creating a living will is one of those things most people plan to do, but rarely get around to actually doing. Less than 30 percent of Americans currently have one. But preparing one now gives you say in how you want to be treated at the end of your life, not to mention it can spare your loved ones some very stressful medical care decisions at an emotional time. Heres what you should know along with some resources to help you create one. ADVANCE DIRECTIVES To adequately spell out your wishes regarding your end-of-life medical treatment you need two legal documents: A living will which tells your doctor what kind of care you want to receive if you become incapacitated, and a health care power of attorney (or health care proxy), which names a person you authorize to make medical decisions on your behalf if you become unable to. These two documents are known as an advance directive, and will only be utilized if you are too ill to make medical decisions yourself. You can also change or update it whenever you please. You may also want to consider including a do-not-resuscitate (DNR) as part of your advance directive, since advanced directives do little to protect you from unwanted emergency care like CPR. Doctors and hospitals in all states accept DNR orders. One other tool you should know about that will compliment your advance directive is the Physician Orders for Life-Sustaining Treatment (POLST). Currently endorsed in 16 states with dozens more in some phase of development, a POLST translates your end-of-life wishes into medical orders to be honored by your doctors. To learn more or set one up, see polst.org. DO-IT-YOURSELF There are several free or low-cost resources available today to help you write your advance directive, and it takes only a few minutes from start to nish. One thats completely free to use is Caring Connections, a resource created by the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization. They provide statespeci c advance directive forms with instructions on their website (caringinfo. org) that you can download and print for free. Or you can call 800-658-8898 and they will mail them to you and answer any questions you may have. You may also be able to get free advance directive forms from your doctors of ce, hospital or local health department. Or, for only $5, an even better tool is the Five Wishes living will. Created by Aging with Dignity, a nonpro t advocacy organization, Five Wishes is a simple do-it-yourself document that covers all facets of an advance directive that will help you create a more detailed customized document. Legally valid in 42 states, to learn more or to receive a copy, visit agingwithdignity.org or call 888-594-7437. Five Wishes can also be completed online for free for a limited time at vewishes.org. GET LEGAL HELP If, however, you decide you would rather use a lawyer to draft your advance directive, look for one who specializes in estate planning and health care related matters. The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys (naela.org) and the National Association of Estate Planners and Councils (naepc.org) websites are good resources that have directories to help you nd someone in your area. Costs will vary depending on which state you reside in, but you can expect to pay somewhere between $200 and $500 to get one made. TELL YOUR FAMILY To insure your nal wishes are followed, its very important that you tell your family members, health care proxy and doctor so they all know what you want. You should also provide copies of your advanced directive to everyone involved to help prevent stress and arguments later.Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy Senior book. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior How to create a living will Special to The NewsThe L.L. Schendel Speech and Hearing Clinic, operated by Florida State Universitys School of Communication Science & Disorders (SCSD), recently expanded its services for the hearing impaired to include the programming of cochlear implants a service that previously had not been available in North Florida. While surgical candidates in North Florida must travel to Gainesville, Jacksonville or Atlanta to have the device implanted, patients can now visit SCSDs clinic in downtown Tallahassee for follow-up care. There are a lot of people in North Florida who are candidates, but are not implanted for one reason or another, said Selena Snowden, an associate in communication disorders and director of Audiology Services within the school at Florida State. The surgery is done on an outpatient basis and patients usually stay overnight at a hotel and are then checked by the physician the next day before they go home. Patients are given about month to allow time for healing before the device is turned on. Once everything is healed, you return to the facility for the initial programming and the device is turned on, Snowden said. The patient then has weekly follow-up visits for the next four to six weeks. At those weekly visits, the patient works with audiologists like Snowden to learn how to use the device. Snowden has received specialized training on the device from the Cochlear Corporation, a manufacturer of the device. A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound to a person who is profoundly deaf or severely hard-ofhearing. One part of the implant is surgically placed under the skin, while a second part sits externally behind the ear. The device allows sound to bypass damaged portions of the ear and directly stimulate the auditory nerve. Cochlear implants are different than hearing aids, which amplify sounds, and are used only after a patients hearing is no longer helped by those devices. FSU clinic now o ering cochlear implant programming Understanding Medicare premiumsBy RON POLLACK Families USA At the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiums? A: When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security bene t each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also re ect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same highincome bene ciaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can nd out if you qualify and apply online at www.socialsecurity. gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800-MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www. familiesusa.org/resources/ program-locator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, specifically Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a xed incomeand thats most peoplethis is encouraging news.Families USA is the national organization for health care consumers. We have advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. Ron Pollack is the Executive Director of Families USA. FAMILIES USA Before campaign season heats up, the Election ofce is offering a candidate workshop. Voters interested in running for public ofce can learn what it takes to become a candidate. The workshop is scheduled for Friday, December 6, 2013 from 1-4 PM at the Wakulla County Elections Ofce located at 3115-B Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville, Florida. The workshop is open to candidates, campaign managers, campaign treasurers, members of the public and anyone interested in running for ofce, whether they are a rst time candidate or a long-standing incumbent. The election laws are constantly changing, so it is important that candidates are familiar with the new legislation. The workshop focuses on fundamentals of becoming and being a candidate; while introducing participants to candidate qualifying, reporting, campaign nance and political advertising. Interested parties should register for the workshop no later than November 29, 2013. To register, please contact Joe Morgan at the elections ofce by calling (850) 926-7575 or by emailing jmorgan@mywakulla.com. The Candidate Workshop is free to attend.2014 ELECTION CANDIDATE WORKSHOP November 21, 28, 2013

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 9BFrom Page 1B We would like to thank everyone who came out to help make this such a community success. As the holidays approach we will continue to provide food for those in need of a hot meal, or items to take home. Again this year we will be hosting our Annual Free County Wide Thanksgiving Dinner on Tuesday Nov. 26 from 4 to 7 pm. Stop by for a hot Giving Thanks meal, music and some good home hospitality. The center will be closed for Thanksgiving on the 28th and 29th. Just in time for Halloween, the Wakulla Wigglers broke out some fun and spooky tunes to dance for the seniors. The lights were low, the room was decorated in black and white with festive lights, and the music was perfect. They danced to the theme from Ghost Busters, The Monster Mash, and a swinging tune called Elvira. The Wakulla Wigglers are a line dancing group that meets at the center for practice on Monday at 1:30pm and Wednesday at 2:00pm. If you would like to learn line dancing come by on Mondays at 1:30 and join in the fun. Our party theme this month was Happy Falloween a little Black and White and outside the box. The decoration consisted of a black and white pallet with a splash of orange and purple. You can only imagine what we did with a large assortment of black and white fabric, black spray paint and grapevines, and a large roll of white paper and more black paint. We asked that everyone dress in black and white, and they sure did. We had spooky, elegant, funny, and a s apper in red. If that wasnt enough, Wendy and Glendas kitchen staff created a delicious black and white meal with black and white cupcakes with an eyeball on top. There was a cake walk with black, white, and orange cake prizes, and Joan Vaillancourt donated six black, white and orange crocheted scarves for raf e prizes. It may sound a little over the top, but it was elegant and fun all at the same time. Thank you everyone for participating and making this such a fun event. November will be dressed in those beautiful fall colors we all love. Please come and visit our center. We are open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. We serve lunch daily at noon but you can always come earlier and enjoy our activities. Our food pantry supplied by Farm Share and Second Harvest is open for pick up on Wednesdays and Fridays from 12:30 to 2 p.m. If you are a senior who is 60 or older and are homebound and would like to make an appointment with our Meals on Wheels program, you may call Pat or Angel at 9267145 ext 223. Also you can stop by and pick up a calendar of events and join in the fun. All donations are tax deductible and go to our Meals on Wheels, and other senior programs provided through the center. You can also nd us on Facebook at WakullaSeniorCenter.In October, seniors observed Breast Cancer Awareness, distributed free food, and dressed up for Falloween Volunteers who helped with the food distribution, above, and unloading the Second Harvest truck, left. Wakulla Wigglers in their fall colors. Lassie Williams and Virginia Davis with pink cupcakes. Costumes included a scream mask, a apper, and a skeleton. WAKULLA COMMUNITY CHORUS In Handels MESSIAH Directed By Reba Mason Featuring a Cast of 60 Singers and Instrumentalists SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8 3:00 PM Sopchoppy United Methodist Church 10 Faith Ave. -Free AdmissionReception In Fellowship Hall Immediately Following WAKULLA COMMUNITY THEATRE Presents Walkers Welcome!For Additional Information:Race Director: Susan Jones, 850-566-7584 or bluewatersusan@gmail.comSend Registration Form with check payable to: Race packets will be available Go to GulfWinds.org to Download the Registration Form in 6-year age groups.Awards: Date: Pre-race registration starts at 7:00 a.mPlace and Course: Entry Fee:Race starts at Wakulla Senior Center and nishes at the same location. Includes Race Shirt $15.00 No shirt OptionPost-race Refreshments: Thank you for your support!Wakulla Senior Center and Meals on Wheels

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.comDid you know?When you shop with local merchants more of your money stays closer to home; suppor ng your local parks, recrea on centers, libraries and other things that make this community a great place to live. Shopping local can s mulate and help restore a poor economy!Local ownership means that important decisions are made locally by people who live in the community and who will feel the impacts of those decisions. Your dollars spent in locally owned businesses have three times the impact on your community as dollars spent at national chains. When shopping locally, you simultaneously create jobs, fund more services through sales tax, invest in neighborhood improvement and promote community development.Locally owned businesses create more jobs locally and, in some sectors, provide better wages and bene ts Locally owned businesses build strong neighborhoods by giving back to the community, linking neighbors, and by contributing more to local causes.Shop local and keep your local dollars circulating in your home town! Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Now Selling Name Brand Tires!Cooper, Goodyear, BF Goodrich, Maxxis, Uniroyal, Hankook, Pirelli, Omni, Milestar, Kumbo, Toyo, Nexgen, Nankang, Falken, Westllake. Now Selling Name Brand Tires! Cooper, Goodyear, BF Goodrich, Maxxis, Uniroyal, Hankook, Pirelli, Omni, Milestar, Kumbo, Toyo, Nexgen, Nankang, Falken, Westllake.2WD Alignment$49.95**not valid with any other offer. Oil Change $29.99 850-926-83502235 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL 32327Locally Owned and OperatedMV 60575 Licensed & Insured*On most cars Expires January 31, 2014 *On most cars Expires January 31, 2014 Like Us On We Can Take Care of ALL Your Alignment Needs! We Do It ALL! P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i STOW AWAY MARINELooking for the perfect gi for that special angler in your life ? L oo k in g f or t h e p er f ect g i f or PLEASE SHOP LOCAL!!926-BOATWWW.STOWAWAYMARINE.NETAt the corner of Spring Creek Hwy. & Hwy 98 Calcua T-shirts, Caps, Boston Whaler Gear, Fishing Poles, Tackle, Sunglassesa New Boat?! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM Like us on facebook WHITE ELEPHANT MALL15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant 9263338 We wish you and your family a Happy ThanksgivingFull of Good Food, Love, Family & Peace!THESE LOCAL BUSINESSES INVITE YOU TO SHOP SMALL SATURDAY, NOV. 30

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 11B For that Special & Unique Gift:Lots of educational gifts & toys for children & adults. We have a great selection of natural history Books for all ages, books by Jack and Anne Rudloe, beautiful jewelry, home decor, prints, cards, ornaments. We have added many items to our collection. Great Stocking Stuffers Too! Open: Mon. Fri. 9am 5pm www.gulfspecimen.org Gulf Specimen Marine Lab Aquarium Your generous support helps us to continue our mission to educate and inspire. S S Visit the Gift Shopat Open 7 Days St. MarksRIVER CANTINA We Have The Best Hamburgers Around Call for FREE registration925-9908Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire DepartmentPrize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade 7th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 6 @ 6 p.m. St. Marks g g Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish If you cant Join us Anyway! 18 Holes of Golfwith Lunch850-697-9606www.stjamesbay.com 50% OFFREGULAR PRICE: Bags ........S ALE $299 R eg: $5.95Pints ........S ALE $995 R eg: $19.95Quarts ...S ALE $1595 R eg: $35.95Over 4000 units to choose from, When theyre gone theyre gone!While supplies last.Variety of fresh and salt water plas c baits reg. $4 and up now only 99 a pack GULP SALE! GULP SALE!Select We have the largest selection in North Florida and competitive prices too! Over 3000 rods & reels in stock a d d d a a d d d d l o o o o r r r r i d F F l l We ha v e t he l a a r g g g e e s s t t t s s s s s s s s s e e e e e e e e e l l l e e e e e e e e e c c c c c c c c c c t t t t i i i i o o o o n n n n n n n n i i i i i n n n n N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N N o o o o r t t h h F F F F F F F F F F W We h a v e t h h e l a a r g g g g e e g e e s s s s s t t s s s s s s e e e e e e e e l l e e e e e e e e e c c c c c c t t t t i i i i o o o o n n n n n n n i i i i i i n n n n N N N N N o o r t t h h h F F F F F l l o o o r r r i i i d d d d a a da d d d d d d d lor i i i d d d l Fl hhl l l l l l l hFl We have t h e lar ge s t s s s s s s e e e e e e l l l l l l l l e e e e e c c c c t i i o n n n n i i n N N N N N N o r t h h h h F F F F F F F F l We e h h a v e t h h h e l la a r g g e e s t s s s s e e e e l l l l l l l l l l l e e e c c t i i i o n n n n i i i n N o r t h h F l F l l Fl F l o r i i i i i i i i d d d a Come Register for Weekley Drawings to be held EVERY FRIDAY IN DECEMBER! (NO PURCHASE NECESSARY) 850-984-5501Sunday Thursday 5:30am To 7:00 pm Friday & Saturday 5:30 am To 8:00 pmPrices are while supplies last No rainchecks! We have the Best Prices on Live and Frozen Bait Around! LYs (menhaden) 5lb box $3.95 Everyday. As always free spooling with purchase of any line. full line of & & 20qt 250qt Coolers! YETI COOLERS COOLERS COOL ER S &1321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida GIFT CARD Panacea, Florida $399AND UP! $ $ $ Remember to Shop Localy this Holiday Season

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.com Meet with Builders, Lenders, Landscapers, Porch, Garage and Deck Experts and Custom Home Entertainment ProfessionalsPlan Now to Visit Us for Our Annual Extravaganza! 850-576-3007 850-576-3007 HOME CENTERWAYNE FRIER WAYNE FRIER 33849 BLUE STAR HIGHWAY MIDWAY, FLCome In and See Steve Daniels or Jeff Davis Hwy 20I-10GeddieAenon Church Rd.W. Tenn. (Hwy 90) Exit 192 Exit 19 2 MON-FRI 8-7 SAT 9-6 SUN NOON-5 Drive A Little Drive A Little Save A Lot! Save A Lot! Photos For Illustration Purposes Only W W e Have the Widest Selection of Manufactur e Have the Widest Selection of Manufactur ers and Models at the Best P ers and Models at the Best P rices in the Southeast rices in the Southeast Locally Owned and Operated Since 1995 by Randy BoxRandy Box, Owner VOTED VOTED # # 1 1 IN IN SERVICE SERVICE AF AF TER THE TER THE SALE SALE Y Y ear Af ear Af ter Y ter Y ear ear 112113 See Us Onlin See Us Onlin e At: T e At: T allahasseeW allahasseeW ayneFrierHomes.com ayneFrierHomes.com *W.A.C. 20 yrs 10% Dn @ 6.99% APRHOME CENTER : T T ALLAHAS ALLAHAS SEE SEE WAYNE FRIER WAYNE FRIER SOMETHINGforEVERYONE SOMETHINGforEVERYONEPerfect for Those Just Starting Out or Retirees Looking To Downsize. Our Single Wide Homes Are Equipped With All The Amenities INCL INCL UDES DELIVER UDES DELIVER Y Y SETUP SETUP SKIRTING, STEPS, A/C, HEA SKIRTING, STEPS, A/C, HEA T T Starting Under $25,000 $25,000 WeAreNorthFloridasMODULARHOMEHEADQUARTERS WeAreNorthFloridasMODULARHOMEHEADQUARTERSCustom Design Your Dream $49 $49AS LOW ASEngineered to Withstand up to180 MPH Winds Meets All City and County Codes L L ess Than ess Than Half the P Half the P rice rice of Site Built of Site Built SQ. FT. per mo. per mo.Our Double Wide Models Give You Room to Grow With 3 Bedroom/ 2 Bath Models $33900 $33900Start at INCL INCL UDES DELIVER UDES DELIVER Y Y SETUP SETUP SKIRTING, STEPS, A/C, HEA SKIRTING, STEPS, A/C, HEA T T We are the Oldest Independent Dealer in the Area For a ReasonWe put our CustomersAs An Owner-Operator, I Can Pledge to You the Absolute BEST PRICEBEST QUALITYBEST SERVICERandy Box NEEDS AHEAD OF PROFITS NEEDS AHEAD OF PROFITS When We Build on Y When We Build on Y our L our L and and Y Y our L our L and is Y and is Y our Down P our Down P ayment ayment $ $ 0 DOWN 0 DOWN WE HAVE SEVERAL WE HAVE SEVERAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE PROPERTIES AVAILABLE IN AND AROUND IN AND AROUND WAKULL WAKULL A A COUNTY COUNTY Huge 4 Bedroom, 2 Bath with Fireplace on 3 Beautiful Acres Just Minutes From the Gulf MO MO VE-IN READ VE-IN READ Y! Y! CALL CALL TODA TODA Y! Y! Shop Multiple Manufacturers All at One Location

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 13BFrom Page 1BI thought to myself those folks working over the hot cookers are some really cool people that love Wakulla County and its senior citizens. Crawfordville had been water ballooned! Splashed with information about the services and activities we provide each day at the center. Our next event was held in Ochlockonee Bay in front of the old Oaks Restaurant and the fish were donated to the center by none other than R. H. Carter, former director of the Wakulla Senior Center. Donnie Sparkman always takes a lead on cooking mullet and xins to help support senior citizens. Once again, he rounded up Mr. and Ms. Gerald Metcalf, Brad Harvey, Martin Mitchell, James Burke, Norman Peak and Charles Tully to cook sh. Also, guess who showed up again? The Nichols family. What a team of people, some of Wakullas nest doing what they do; giving of themselves and their time and never hesitating to make the offer! Thank you all for a very successful fish fry in Ochlockonee Bay and for all of the people who purchased dinners. Our Board and Friend-raising Committee assisted in this event and fun was had by all and money was donated to the senior center. Well, it was time to move down to Sopchoppy and give it a good splashing with our water-ballooning idea. Sopchoppy just happens to be the worm-grunting capitol of the world and my old stomping grounds when I was a shirttail boy! Maxie Lawhon, Bobby Porter (AKA Bad Bob), one of our directors, and their team of expert castnetters, took up the lead, and caught the fish so they would be fresh. The Nichols family once again stated they wanted to be a part of this event and stepped up to the plate (or to the cookers, more correctly) and the event at the old Railroad Depot was on. Who showed up to help? None other than County Commissioner Richard Harden. He rolled up his sleeves and asked; what do you want me to do! He served every person who came through the line from the rst person to the last and then helped break down the tents. Since that time, Commissioner Harden has agreed to take his raise as county commissioner and donate it to the Senior Centers for Meals on Wheels. He had been donating and sponsoring events prior to his salary increase, but now monthly, he pulls in and presents us with a check to help seniors in Wakulla. Thank you, Mr. Harden. The event in Sopchoppy was ever so successful and we want to thank all of the folks who stopped in and purchased their dinners and those who just stopped by to give a generous donation to the center. Thank you all and thank you each! Next stop: Shell Point, here we come! The re department opened up their site to us and said, Yall come on in! R. H. Carter once again reached into his back pocket and said, The sh are on me. Wow! Ive never seen a man more dedicated to senior citizens and to Wakulla County. Thank you, Mr. Carter. The cookers were roaring with a blue flame. The grease was also bubbling. The corn meal was applied to the sh with salt and pepper. The rst one dropped into the pot and the frying sound was like music to our ears. The aroma of a mullet frying makes me homesick. The crowd began to build as the mullet was served. The folks are in the VFD at the table eating and visiting with us. What a wonderful community event. Mr. Sparkman, Mr. Burke, Mr. Harvey, Mr. and Ms. Metcalf, Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Peak and Mr. Tully manned the cookers and fryers. Thank you all for the hard and hot work. Thank you Shell Point for showing up and supporting our water-ballooning effort and for supporting the Meals on Wheels and the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Our next stop will be in the beautiful City of St. Marks in the spring. We look forward to our trip to St. Marks and dining with the folks down that way. Its cold outside as I write this, but its warm inside the senior center. We have as a guest today, Kent Hutchinson, our drumming circle facilitator. Its a special day for me because the staff bought me my own djembe drum as a birthday gift. Thank you, ladies! Its a beautiful hand-carved African drum made of mahogany, and cords holding the goat-skin stretched top in place. Drop by the Senior Center and let me show you the drum these ladies purchased for me. They are so sweet. Im a blessed man to work with them. In closing, if you need a little drummer boy this Christmas, call me!T.W. Maurice Langston is the executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Water ballooning Wakulla Above and below, volunteers at work cooking at sh fry fundraisers. R.H. Carter with Commissioner Jerry Moore placing signs for the sh fry in Shell Point. Drummer Kent Hutchinson leads the drumming circle, with Maurice Langston playing the drum he was given for his birthday. BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW! Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org LOCAL SAVINGS.850-385-60471700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Brian C. EnglishChFC CLTC / Senior PartnerWilliam F. VersigaFinancial Representative(850) 926-7487 3119-B Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FL 32327 R

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.com The Wakulla News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comAlong Apart Array Bread Busier Changed ComfortConsiderableDraws Enter Entry Erase Error Express Fifth Finer Fruit Generally Harsh Ideal Irons Ketchup Kinds Knives Mental Mercury Needles Nines Ninth Organized Planned Range Rates Rhyme Sadly Sails Scarf Secure Shake Skill Smash Spray Success Tunnels Types Visit Walks Wheel Whose Wings The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 15B THE TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCILIS SEEKING AMEMBER The Tourist Development Council (TDC) is seeking one (1) volunteer to serve a four (4) year term. The TDC was established for the purpose of promoting and facilitating travel to and within Wakulla County for the benefit of its economy, residents and travel/ tourism industry. The member must meet the following criteria: must be a resident of Wakulla County; & must be from a tourism industry and shall own or operate tourist related business. Interested persons should submit a cover letter explaining their interest in serving on the TDC along with a resume or other statement of relevant experience which includes the persons name, address, telephone number, and email address no later than Friday, December 20, 2013. Please e-mail your information to Virginia Dekle at vdekle@my wakulla.com or by U. S. Mail at Post Office Box 67, Panacea, Fl. 32346. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE HELPWANTED PT Bus DriversCoast Charter School St. Marks 850-925-6344 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 $100 each for FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES FROM WAKULLA COUNTY THAT BEGIN WITH THE NUMBER 65 for years 1943, 1949, 1950, 1951,1954,1955. Up to $2000 for any Florida Wakulla porcelain license plate dated 1911-1917 Any condition accepted, so long as they are readable. Jeff Francis 727 424 1576 email gobucs13@aol.com MEDART3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking. References required. $600mo., $400/Security no inside pets (352) 493-2232 SOPCHOPPY Downtown2/1 Close to Grocery Stores Singlewide, $550.REVELLE REALTY 850-962-2212 5Br 2Ba DWMH $950 + Sec Dep. 4Br 2Ba DWMH $800 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1000 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TWNHS $850. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TWNHS $850. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $850 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $825 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $800 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $775 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $775 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650 + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $660 + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $650 + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $500 + Sec. Dep. RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSpecializing in Wakulla Co. Florida Big Bend Realty NOW OPEN!14 Medallion Lane(Next to Gulf Coast Lumber) No Long Term Contracts or Hassleswww.facebook.com/oridabigbendrealty www.WakullaInfo.comFull Service Real EstateNights & Weekends Call Us! Susan Jones, Realtor 566-7584 Check out this little Piece of Paradise! Property located on beautiful Lake Ellen in a tucked away cove. 2BR/1.5BA with screened in front porch overlooking the lake. One of Wakulla Countys nest areas. Great shing, wildlife and water for any boating activities. Great weekend getaway or home site. Call for more information. a 142 Lake Ellen $85,000 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o d d e e e e r r n n E q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t t o H e C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f t t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Re-StoreShadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351 Coastwise.homesandland.comCoastwise Realty,Inc. 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FLYears of Excellent Service!DAVID HOOVERTOP PRODUCER 850 519 7944dhoover2@hotmail.com Congratulations The Wakulla News 51 Friendship Lane on Pigotts PondBeautiful new construction. 4 bedroom home, 1.5 acres in private setting on Pigotts Pond. Home features hardie board type siding, rocking chair front porch and rear covered porch plus open deck. Vacant and ready for new owner. Priced at $169,500 30 Lake Ellen Circle Charming Home with elegant vaulted ceiling, gorgeous hardwood oors, custom built wood cabinets throughout. Large kitchen features custom marble top center island, eat-in bar and formal dining room. Within walking distance to Lake Ellen. Priced at $164.900 ACREAGE FOR SALE located off Spring Creek Hwy. Buildable and Sub-dividable. $66.000 for 10 acres Elaine Gary (850) 509-5409

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Page 16B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.com WAKULLALive in a beautiful Wakulla River neighborhood w/access to the community docks, boat ramp & park. Upscale 2 br 1 1/2 ba home situated on a secluded wooded lot. The house includes a 2 car carport, wraparound porch, hardwood floors, 6 burner Jenn-Aire stove, fireplace, skylights, ceiling fans thru-out w/d hook-up in a huge storage area. $875. mnth + $900.dep sml pets considered 850-926-4217 Alligator Point2BR/1BA, With Screened Porch, & Deck. $550/month and $550 Security (850) 926-4133 FLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDO LIQUIDATION SALE! Brand new 2BR/2BA 1,690sf luxury condo only $149,900 Originally under contract for $365,000. Near downtown Orlando & all theme parks/attractions. Must see. Call now 877-333-0272, x 173 BLUE RIDGE MOUNTAIN BARGAIN! 25 acres only $84,900. Beautifully wooded rolling mountaintop terrain, backs up to national forest. Enjoy stream, abundant wildlife, spectacular views, trails throughout. Paved rd frontage municipal water, utilities -all completed. Excellent financing. Call now 866-952-5303, x 83 TENN. LAND BARGAIN WITH FREE BOAT SLIP! 1.70 acres meadows overlooks 140 acre Nature Preserve, streams & ponds. Only $19,900. 6.1 acre hardwoods Only $27,900. FREE boat slips. Excellent financing, little down. Call now 1-877-888-0267, x446 Live in Care Giver for your loved ones, Excellent References Call Joyce Ann (local res.) 850-661-1312 5020-1205 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE UNDER FICTITIOUS NAME LAW PURSUANT TO SECTION 865.09, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of Talk O the Town Deli located at 2500-C Crawfordville Highway, in the County of Wakulla, in the City of Crawfordville, Florida 32327 intends to register the said name with the Divisions of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, Florida. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 18th day of November, 2013.Frances Casey Lowe (registered agent) Published (1) time, November 28th, 2013 in The Wakulla News 5971-1128 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE COMPLAINT TO: Knight Protective Services, Case No: 201108527/B 2200273 An Administrative Complaint to impose an administrative fine has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. November 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2013. 5002-1128 TWN vs. Meadows, Carl R. 65-2013-CA-000291 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 65-2013-CA-000291 DIVISION: WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. CAROL R MEADOWS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: CARL R MEADOWS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 10 WOOD STORK DRIVE, PANACEA, FL 32346 CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENT ADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLA County, Florida: LOT 40, OF PORT PANACEA VILLAGE, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, AT PAGE 90, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 5004-1128 TWN vs. Hoevet, Rebecca Ann 2012-CA-000080 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE No: 2012-CA-000080 DIVISION PHH MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. REBECCA ANN HOEVET A/K/A REBECCA A. HOEVET, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated on or about October 11, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2012-CA-000080 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PHH Mortgage Corporation, is the Plaintiff and Rebecca Ann Hoevet a/k/a Rebecca A. Hoevet, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 12th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 17 BLOCK L, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 54 LANCE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-3027 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the LisPendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 29 day of October, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk 5011-1128 TWN vs. Herring, Telisa D. 65-2012-CA-000184 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000184 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. TELISA D. HERRING A/K/A TELISA HERRING A/K/A TELISA DENISE HERRING A/K/A TELISA DENISE DICKEY; et. al, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment dated October 23, 2013 entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2012-CA-000184, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida, wherein NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC is Plaintiff, and TELISA D. HERRING A/K/A TELISA HERRING A/K/A TELISA DENISE HERRING A/K/A TELISA DENISE DICKEY; DEXTER ALLAN DICKEY; UNKNOWN TENANT #1 N/K/A SHONDELLA CROOKS, are Defendants. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT, will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at front lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 5 day of December, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 5, BLOCK 41, WAKULA GARDENS UNIR 5, A SUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 1634 LOWER BRIDGE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on November 4, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff:Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 1701 West Hillsboro Blvd, Suite 3 07, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442Telephone: (954) 354-3544, Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 November 21 & 28, 2013. 5015-1205 TWN Vs. Buckhorn First LLC. 2012-CA-00170 Notice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2012-CA-00170 CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, Plaintiff, v. BUCKHORN FIRST, LLC, EDDIE FRANKLIN, HELEN FRANKLIN, JOHNNYFRANKLIN, FREDDIE FRANKLIN, BUCKHORN VILLAGE HOMEOWNER ASSOCIATION, INC. and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT T O CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 12, 2013, in Case No. 2012-CA-00170, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC is the Plaintiff and BUCKHORN FIRST, LLC, EDDIE FRANKLIN, HELEN FRANKLIN, JOHNNYFRANKLIN, FREDDIE FRANKLIN, and BUCKHORN VILLAGE HOMEOWNER ASSOCIATION, INC. are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the first floor front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida 32327 at 11:00 a.m. on December 19, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: See Attached Exhibit A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: November 12, 2013 BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court [Court Seal] BY:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Garvin B. Bowden, Esq. Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 EXHIBIT A Begin at a concrete monument marking the Southwest Corner of the Southeast Quarter of Section 4, Township 5 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 89 degrees 17 minutes 01 seconds East 1254.42 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 00 degrees 16 minutes 44 seconds West 668.16 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 89 degrees 25 minutes 02 seconds East 131.52 feet to a rod and cap lying on the Southwesterly maintained right of way line of Otter Creek Road; thence run along said maintained right of way line as follows: North 49 degrees 16 minutes 00 seconds West 82.08 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 51 degrees 29 minutes 50 seconds West 164.83 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 45 degrees 57 minutes 47 seconds West 62.67 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 40 degrees16 minutes 26 seconds West 57.76 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 40 degrees 44 minutes 22 seconds West 116.84 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 39 degrees 39 minutes 37 seconds West 126.50 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 36 degrees 04 minutes 24 seconds West 58.79 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 28 degrees 04 minutes 03 seconds West 61.83 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 11 degrees 56 minutes 15 seconds West 8.81 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said maintained right of way line run South 64 degrees 54 minutes 09 seconds West 52.70 feet; thence North 54 degrees 52 minutes 38 seconds West 16.99 feet; thence North 71 degrees 24 minutes 33 seconds West 36.19 feet; thence North 69 degrees 49 minutes 20 seconds West 43.88 feet; thence South 81 degrees 18 minutes 05 seconds West 30.46 feet; thence South 81 degrees 18 minutes 05 seconds West 34.41 feet; thence South 62 degrees 53 minutes 29 seconds West 64.69 feet; thence South 20 degrees 03 minutes 09 seconds West 56.33 feet; thence South 31 degrees 53 minutes 49 seconds West 80.79 feet; thence South 34 degrees 43 minutes 07 seconds West 6.44 feet; thence South 64 degrees 54 minutes 09 seconds West 625.23 feet; thence South 00 degrees 22 minutes 31 seconds East 137.95 feet to a concrete monument; thence South 00 degrees 17 minutes 01 seconds East 670.48 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. LESS AND EXCEPTTHE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO-WIT: Lot 15, Block A, of BUCKHORN VILLAGE, a subdivision according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 10, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. LESS AND EXCEPTTHE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY, TO-WIT: Lot 7, Block B, of BUCKHORN VILLAGE, a subdivision according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 5, Page 10, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Published in THE WAKULLANEWS, November 28 & December 5, 2013. 5016-1205 TWN Vs. Maziarka, Edwin Jr. Case No. 12-278 -FC Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO.12-278-FC UCN: 652012CA000278XXXXXX REVERSE MORTGAGE SOLUTIONS, INC., Plaintiff, vs. EDWIN ROMAN MAZIARKA, JR.; ET AL. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT T O CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated November 12, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12 278 FC UCN: 652012CA000278XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Reverse Mortgage Solutions, Inc. is Plaintiff and EDWIN ROMAN MAZIARKA, JR.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARYOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST ANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, 11:00 a.m. on the 19th day of December, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF SECTION 2, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN WEST 171.71 FEET TO THE EASTERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF THE OLD S. A. L. RAILWAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 22 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY1273.79 FEET TO A1 INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 22 DEGREES 20 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY131.94 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #219), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN NORTH 68 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 282.84 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 68 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 13 SECONDS EAST 172.48 FEET TO ACHISELED X IN TOPOF ACONCRETE HEADWALL, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. 363, THENCE RUN NORTH 15 DEGREES 16 MINUTES 27 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY131.97 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #732), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 68 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 186.06 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 131.51 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. BRENTTHURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438, Fort Lauderdale, FL33339 1438 Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com November 28 & December 5, 2013 1257-121374 BWM 5017-1205 TWN Vs. Blount, Debra 2013-CA-000229 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR GADSDEN COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2013-CA-000229 UCN: 652013CA000229XXCICI GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, A FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH BLOUNT A/K/A DEBRA M. BLOUNT; RONALD BLOUNT A/K/A RONALD J. BLOUNT; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, PURSUANT TO THE JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS: LOT 6, OF THE WOODLANDS OF WAKULLA, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK2, PAGE 104-105 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGHEST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR CASH, ON DECEMBER 19, 2013 AT 11:00AM AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, Fl 32303, 850.577.4401 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711. DATED: NOVEMBER 12, 2013 CLERK OF THE COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk November 28 & December 5, 2013 5019-1205 TWN vs. Farmer, Beatrice 65-2011-CA-000247 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO: 65-2011-CA-000247 ONEWEST BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER; SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; L.C. FARMER; LESSIE FARMER; EDDIE FARMER, JR.; BRENDA FORBES; WILMA HALL; UNKNOWN TENANT; WILMA HALL AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER; IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY, Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Resetting Foreclosure Sale dated the 12th day of November, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000247, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein ONEWEST BANK, FSB is the Plaintiff and UNKNOWN HEIRS AND OR BENEFICIARIES OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT L.C. FARMER LESSIE FARMER EDDIE FARMER, JR. BRENDA FORBES WILMA HALL WILMA HALL AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE ESTATE OF BEATRICE FARMER UNKNOWN TENANT(S); and IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY are defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the, FRONT DOOR OF WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326, 11:00 AM on the 12th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT A ATTACHED HERETO. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850-577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 12th day of November 2013. (SEAL) BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk Of The Circuit Court By: /S/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Submitted by: Choice Legal Group, P.A. 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120, Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365,Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARY E-MAIL FOR SERVICE PURSUANT TO FLA. R. JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com 09-80788 EXHIBIT A A portion of lands as descried in Deed Book 5, Page 678 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida being more particularly described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of the West Half of Lot 77 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 209.22 feet; thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 134.22 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831} for the Point of beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 75.OO feet to an iron rod with cap{LS #5831; thence run North 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds West 75.00 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831); thence run North 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds East 75.00 feet to an iron rod with cap (LS #5831 ); thence run south 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 75.00 feet to the Point of Beginning containing 0.129 acres, more or less. Together with a 20 foot access easement described as follows: Commence at the Northeast comer of the West Half of Lot 77 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds Eat l-89.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning continue South 17 degrees 55 minutes 32 seconds East 20:00 feet; thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West 134.22 feet to an iron rod With cap (LS #5831); thence run North 17-dcgrecs 55 minutes 32 seconds West 20.00 feet; thence run North 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds .East 134.22 feet to the Point of Beginning. November 28 & December 5, 2013 09-80788 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in the The Wakulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 4 day of November, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. November 21 & 28, 2013. F 13011387 Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a specia l accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordina tor not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakull a County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone : (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Serv ice. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Craw fordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. November 21 & 28, 2013. 11-93267 Long-Term & Vacation RentalsLet us put our Experienced Management Team to Work for You!40 Imaginary Lane Magnolia Gardens. 3BR/2BA. 1,400 sq. ft. heated and cooled. Like new house in very private area. $850.mo. 28 Endeavour Drive 3BR/3BA completely furnished house. Home is 2,440 sq. ft., has hardwood oors, 4 car carport, boat slip, community club house and pool. $2,000 mo. No smoking, No pets. 240 oak St. Across form Azalea Park, Crawfordville. 3BR1BA includes washer & Dryer. 25 E Georges Lighthouse Point Overlooking Ochlockonee Bay in gated community w/pool. 2BR/2BA Condo, hardwood oors, washer & Dryer. $950. mo. No Smoking, No Pets. 56 Blue Heron 3 BR/1BA Walking distance to Mashes Sands Beach. $700. Mo. 2BR/2BA Marina Village Mashes Sand Rd. 2 Story Condo # B5. Fully Furnished, washer/Dryer, Community Pool, Boat Slip w/ Lift. $1,200 mo. 695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2BR/2BA Marina Village, 2 Story Condo. Washer/Dryer, Pool, Boat Slips. No Smoking, No Pets! $1,100. mo. Ochlockonee BayRealtyWakulla CountyFranklin CountyNEED TO RENT YOUR HOUSE?146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 850-984-0001 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 99 Comanche Trail 3/2 $925 mo., $925 security deposit. No smoking, No pets. Avail. Dec. 1, 2013 42 Francis Avenue (Panacea) 3/2 Doublewide mobile home. $700 mo. $700 Deposit. No smoking. No pets. 3143 Shadeville Hwy, near Wakulla Station 3/2 house. $850 mon. $850 security Deposit. No smoking. Pets w/ approval and pet fee. 32 Hideaway 3/2 $1,300 mo., $1,300 security deposit. No smoking, No pets. 16 Parkside Circle 3/2 $1,300 mo., $1,300 security deposit. No smoking, No pets. Avail. Jan. 1, 2014, possibly by mid Dec. 26 B Old Courthouse Square 2/2. $750 mo., $750. Deposit. No smoking, No pets. Avail. Dec. 1, 2013 26 C Guinevere 3/2. $800 mo., $800. Deposit. No smoking, No pets.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 17BBrain Teaser 1234 5678910 111213 14 15 16 1718 19 20 2122 232425 26 27 282930 31 32 333435 36 3738 39 40 4142 43 4445 4647 48 4950 51 5253 54 55 5657 585960 61 62 63 64 65 66 Across 1. They're often covered with baby food 5. "The Human Comedy" author 11. Sporty British car, for short 14. Lazing about 15. "My Favorite Year" star Peter 16. Cousin of org, com, and net 17. "Rebel Without a Cause" actress 19. Fish eggs 20. Eliot's "___ Marner" 21. 1984 World Series champs 23. "Ms." founder Gloria 26. John, Paul, George, and Ringo 27. Route to the roof 28. In need of calories 31. Sigourney Weaver flick 32. Not too shabby 33. Latvia's capital 36. Get benched 37. Oklahomans 40. Sought office 41. Sarcastic laugh 43. Barney's buddy 44. Rainbow or lake, e.g. 46. Made shine 48. Medal metal 49. Underworld figure 51. Doesn't just brush 52. What some graduate with 54. Bias 55. Billy Joel's "Don't ___ Me Why" 56. "Clue" suspect 61. Forego folding 62. Relaxed, on base 63. Goad 64. Blow it 65. Decades, to centuries 66. Kitty comment Down 1. Recycling container 2. Ore. neighbor 3. Diner order 4. Coast 5. Big water heater 6. 2010 action m ovie, with "The" 7. Meteorologist's predictions 8. Lion's home, maybe 9. Bunches 10. Giving up 11. Best Actor of 1990 12. Love to pieces 13. Shot in the dark 18. Content of some closets 22. Teri of "Young Frankenstein" 23. Cut drastically, as prices 24. Shire of "The Godfather" movies 25. Archie's mate 28. Gave an edge to 29. "Previously owned," in ad-speak 30. Neither here ___ there 32. Achy 34. Bandage material 35. Primes the pot 38. Not working 39. Pungent 42. Wheels 45. Speaker's platform 47. Prepare a disk for data 48. Turns the music way up 49. Step 50. Unfortunate fellow 51. ___ and blood (kin) 53. Spot 54. "ER" command 57. D.C. figure 58. Before 59. This may be inflated 60. Improved partnerEach puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. 1 23 435 63578 3 47 9186 215 52 613 379 6825003-1128 TWN Vs. Hoffman, Kimberly J. 2012-FC-000275 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-FC-000275 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY J. HOFFMAN; MICHAEL T. HOFFMAN, II; UNKNOWN TENANT 1: UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 5 day of December, 2013, at 11:00 AM at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property sit5010-1128 TWN Vs. Ronson, Terrin B. 2012CA000152 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 2012CA000152 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. TERRIN B. RONSON; DEBORAH L. RONSON A/K/A DEBORAH L. BULLOCK-RONSON; SPRINGBROOK HOMES ASSOCIATION, INC.; SUNTRUST BANK Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on October 23rd, 2013, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 12, OF SPRINGBROOK FARMS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 118-120, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 200 DOGWOOD FOREST ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, on December 12, 2013, beginning at 11:00 AM. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Dated this 23 day of October, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A., 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL 33716 EFILING@DCZAHM.COM, Fax No. (727) 539-1094 IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. November 21 & 28, 2013 617120648 5013-1205 TWN Vs. Braswell, Harry Case No. 2013-CA-000073 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2013-CA-000073 Division No. GENERATION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. HARRY BRASWELL, et al., Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order dated November 12, 2013, and entered in Case No.2013-CA-000073 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein GENERATION MORTGAGE COMPANY is the Plaintiff and HARRY BRASWELL; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HARRY BRASWELL; and REBA BRASWELL; and UNKNOWN SPOOUSE OF REBA BRASWELL; and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPENT; and UNKNOWN TENANT #1; and UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 19th day of December, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, BLOCK B OF GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 77 & 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this12th day of November, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk GILBERT GARCIA GROUP P.A. Attorney for the Plaintiff(s) 2005 Pan Am Circle, Suite 110, Tampa, Florida 33607 (813)443-5087, Fla. Bar#44613 678280.005066/nporter November 28 & December 5, 2013 5014-1205 TWN Brock, Elwood Case No. 13-159-CA ANOS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CASE NO. 13-159-CA UNITED NATIONAL BANK, Plaintiff, vs. ELWOOD C. BROCK, MIMI L. BROCK, FINANCIAL FEDERAL CREDIT INC. n/k/a PEOPLES UNITED EQUIPMENT FINANCE CORP., WAKULLA BANK, a dissolved Florida banking corporation, GEORGIA CENTRAL BANK, DEIDRE A. FARRINGTON d/b/a FARRINGTON LAW OFFICE, UNIFUND CCR PARTNERS, G.P., FINLEY MCMILLAN, JEAN B. MCMILLAN, SWAIN POOLS & SPAS a/k/a SWAIN POOLS & SPAS, LLC, BRIAN GRAF, and AMERIS BANK, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment entered in the above-styled cause on the 16th day of September, 2013, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on the 19th day of December, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. (Eastern Time), at the Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, and set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to-wit: Lot Number 15 of Unit 4 of Panacea Shores, a subdivision of a part of Mashs Island as shown by plat of said subdivision of record on Page 34 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Court, on this 27th day of September, 2013. (SEAL) Clerk of Court,Wakulla County, Florida By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk November 28 & December 5, 2013 5018-1205 TWN vs. Brett, Malcolm 65-2011-CA-000145-CAAX-MX Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000145-CAAX-MX IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC, A DELAWARE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AS SERVICER FOR CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, TRUSTEES OF MALCOLM BRETT, DECEASED; REID BRETT, HEIR; PAMELA BRETT, HEIR; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC AS NOMINEE FOR FIRST NLC FINANCIAL SERVICES, LLC DBA THE LENDING CENTER; WAKULLA BUILDER, LLC; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLY EXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANY GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 19, BLOCK G, SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 113, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL. 32327 at 11:00 oclock, A.M., on December 12, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 13th day of November, 2013. (SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. November 28 & December 5, 2013 5006-1128 TWN Bonislawsky Jr., Joseph Stanley 13-CP-000079 AXMA Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File Number: 13-CP-000079 AXMA IN RE: ESTATE OF JOSEPH STANLEY BONISLAWSKY, JR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of JOSEPH STANLEY BONISLAWSKY, JR., deceased, whose date of death was March 11, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The personal representatives name is below. The personal representatives attorneys name and address is below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 21, 2013. Personal Representative: Brian Bonislawsky 8511 Benidorm Ave., Law Vegas, NV 89178 Attorney for Personal Representative: Phillip A. Baumann, P.A. 201 E. Kennedy Blvd., Ste 830, PO Box 399, Tampa, FL 33601-0399 November 21 & 28, 2013. 5007-1128 TWN Close, Boyd Wallace 13000072CPAXMX Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13000072CPAXMX IN RE: ESTATE OF BOYD WALLACE CLOSE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Boyd Wallace Close, deceased, whose date of death was January 25, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court ON OR BEFORE THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is November 21, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Patricia Close Barton 408 N. Peachtree Parkway, Peachtree City, GA 30269 Attorney for Personal Representative: /s/Jana McConnaughhay Florida Bar No. 0995487 Email Addresses: jana@mclawgroup.com, michelle@mclawgroup.com Waldoch & Mc Connaughhay, P.A. 1709 Hermitage Blvd, Suite 102, Tallahassee, FL 32308 Telephone: (850) 385-1246 November 21 & 28, 2013. 5008-1128 TWN Pope Jr., Glenn Garfield 13000090CPA Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13000090CPA PROBATE DIVISION IN RE ESTATE OF GLENN GARFIELD POPE, JR., Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS TO ALL PERSONS HAVING CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE : The administration of the estate of GLENN GARFIELD POPE, JR., deceased, File Number 13000090CPA, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is WAKULLA County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal 5012-1205 TWN Pope, Nancy Kay 13-103-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 13-103-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NANCY KAY POPE, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of NANCY KAY POPE, deceased, whose date of death was October 14, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 13-103-CP, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be serve must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: NOVEMBER 28, 2013. Personal Representative: J. WYATT POPE, JR. 32 Vatican Way, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: ROBERT A. PIERCE, Florida Bar No. 0175399 Ausley & McMullen, Post Office Box 391, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 (850) 224-9115 bpierce@ausley.com spelham@ausley.com November 28 & December 5, 2013. 5009-1128 TWN Crawfordville Self Storage 12/7 sale PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, Dec. 7, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: CHARLES GOLDMAN EVELYN GREEN TIMOTHY WHITE Before the sale date of Dec. 7, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordvill e Hwy., before 10:00 a.m. Nov. 21 & 28, 2013. uate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 5, Block N, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, as per Map or Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 4 day of November, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk November 21 & 28, 2013. representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claim with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is November 21, 2013. ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. DATED this 14th day of November, 2013. Personal Representative: JANICE POPE 86A ALLEN HARVEY ST. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: SHAWN P. GOLETZ, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No. 0338450 Smith, Thompson, Shaw, Minacci & Coln, P.A. 3520 Thomasville Road, Fourth Floor, Tallahassee, Florida 32309 Tel: (850) 893-4105 Fax: (850) 893-7229 Email: shawng@stslaw.com November 21 & 28, 2013. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 157 8243 9 6 489376215 263915478 635 498721 791532864 842761953 528 649137 314257689 976183542 BIBS BALZAC JAG IDLE OTOOLE EDU NATALIEWOOD ROE SILAS TIGERS STEINEM NAMES LADDER HUNGRY ALIEN SOSO RIGA SIT SOONERS RAN HAHA FRED TROUT BUFFED BRONZE PLUTO FLOSSES HONORS SLANT ASK MISTERGREEN SEE ATEASE URGE ERR TENTHS MEOW

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Page 18B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.com 1. U.S. PRESIDENT: Who was the only president to be married in a White House ceremony? 2. ANATOMY: How many chromosomes do human beings have? 3. TELEVISION: What popular 1970s U.S. sitcom was based on an earlier TV series in the United Kingdom called Till Death Us Do Part? 4. LITERATURE: What is the name of the family in John Steinbecks The Grapes of Wrath? 5. LANGUAGE: What is a carapace? 6. MOVIES: Who played the dead friend in The Big Chill, although his scenes were cut from the final movie? 7. INVENTIONS: Who invented the cowboy hat? 8. GEOGRAPHY: What is the ancient name for Japans capital Tokyo? 9. COMICS: What is the name of the news correspondent in Doonesbury? 10. ENTERTAINERS: What famous actors last words were, Ive never felt better? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Grover Cleveland 2. 46 (23 pairs) 3. All in the Family 4. The Joads 5. A hard shell covering an animals back, like a turtle 6. Kevin Costner 7. John Batterson Stetson 8. Edo 9. Roland Hedley 10. Douglas Fairbanks Sr. Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 19B 850-421-3714 Over 33 Years of ExperienceNEW CONSTRUCTION COMMERCIAL RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL SERVICE WORK REMODELING WIRING MOBILE HOME SERVICE Made From Scratch BiscuitsTMMake It Easy To Rise And Shine! US Highway 319 Crawfordville, FL 32327 Offer valid through 12/15/13 at participating restaurants.Offer available during regular breakfast hours. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. Hardees Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved. $129 $229SAUSAGE & EGG BISCUITplus taxOR TWO FORplus taxCOOK, SHOP, WRAP, DECORATE. 2013 Hardees Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved. Great Breakfast! Great Breakfast! OPEN Thanksgiving 6:00am 11:00amOPEN Black Friday6:00am 11:00pm99BISCUIT N GRAVYTM$129 $229BACON, EGG & CHEESE BISCUITplus taxOR TWO FORplus taxFREEMAPLE SAUSAGE, EGG & CHEESE BISCUITWITH PURCHASE OFMAPLE SAUSAGE, EGG & CHEESE BISCUITAT REGULAR PRICE But Start With A Offer valid through 12/15/13 at participating restaurants.Offer available during regular breakfast hours. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. Hardees Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved. Offer valid through 12/15/13 at participating restaurants.Offer available during regular breakfast hours. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. Hardees Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved. Offer valid through 12/15/13 at participating restaurants.Offer available during regular breakfast hours. Not valid with any other coupon, offer, discount or combo. Coupon must be presented and surrendered before ordering regardless of discounts redeemed. Only original coupon accepted. Limit 2 discounts per coupon. Customer must pay any sales tax due. Cash value 1/100 of 1. Not for sale. Hardees Restaurants LLC. All rights reserved. plus tax 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . n t NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 Youve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out the Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe Wakuulanews Special to The NewsWakulla County Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce heard from Maurice Langston, Executive Director of the Senior Citizens Center, that the center was faced with losing about $17,000 from state and other budget cuts this year. This money meant the difference in maintaining the Meals on Wheels program at the level it was last year for Wakulla senior citizens in need of this service. Superintendent Pearce then rallied Wakulla School District students, teachers, and staff to make up some of that de cit. He declared September Schools for Seniors month and challenged each school to conduct a drive to see how much they could raise. Knowing that schools rose to the challenge of friendly competition with each other as well, he offered the top three schools per student average a contribution to their Student Government, along with pizza parties. With a goal of raising $10,000, Wakulla students and faculties raised $9,500. Wakulla High School Drama teacher Susan Solburg then offered to hold a Variety Show next February and donate the proceeds to make up the rest. Winning the top prize with the most money raised was Riversprings Middle School, followed by Crawfordville Elementary and Medart Elementary. Every school contributed. This kind of generosity and concern for our senior citizens and our community in general is as important as any other concept we can teach our students, stated Superintendent Pearce. I was happy but not surprised that our children, faculties, parents, and community members rose to the occasion to help our valued elders. This is an effort we can be proud of as a community that takes care of its own. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSenior Citizens Center Director Maurice Langston accepts a check at Riversprings Middle School from RMS students, Dean of Students Louis Hernandez, Student Government Sponsor Marlene Adams, and Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce.Wakulla students and faculties raise funds for senior citizensSpecial to The NewsFor Americans 65 and older, falling down can be the worst thing to happen to them, according to statistics from the National Council on Aging: One in three seniors experiences a signi cant fall each year. Every 18 seconds, a senior is admitted into an emergency room after losing balance and hitting the ground. Every 35 minutes, an elderly person dies from a fall the leading cause of death for seniors. The projected cost in health-care expenses for 2020 due to fall-related injuries in the United States is $55 billion, says Karen Peterson, a therapist with multiple certifications, and author of Move With Balance: Healthy Aging Activities for Brain and Body, (www.MoveWithBalance.org). Shes also the founder and director of Giving Back, a nonpro t organization that grows and spreads programs that support senior health. Its important for seniors to keep moving and learning, thats what helps improve balance and coordination, and even helps build new neural pathways, says Peterson, who emphasizes the cognitive importance to her workout programs. Peterson says a fun, social program of games and activities that include exercises speci cally designed for seniors helps them address multiple issues, including those that tend to keep seniors sedentary which only lessens their strength and balance. Last year, her program was independently evaluated from Hawaiis Department of Heath, which found a statistically signi cant reduction in falls from seniors 38 percent. It also won the MindAlert Award from the American Society on Aging. Peterson suggests these moves, which address many different areas of the body: The cross-crawl: After various light warmups, begin with the basic cross-crawl, which focuses on the fundamentals of balance. March in place, lifting the knees high. At the same time, reach across and touch the lifted knee with the opposite hand or elbow; alternate and keep going. This can be done sitting, standing or lying down. Once any of these exercises are mastered, Peterson says, participants should continue to challenge themselves. For even greater balance work, and to exercise the vestibular system, close your eyes and count backwards from 100 by threes. Its not fun if youre not conquering a challenge, she says. Her book includes several challenges for each exercise. Forward toe-touch dancer: To improve motor skills, physical coordination and cognition, there are many dance exercises that are appropriate for seniors. If needed, use a chair for assistance. Place your feet shoulder-width apart. Now, simultaneously extend your left foot and your right arm forward. Keep your left toes pointed down, touching the oor; or for more dif- culty, maintain the toes a few inches off the oor. Repeat this move with your left arm and right foot. Hold each pose for several seconds, and increase holding time. Sensory integration the arrow chart: Look at an arrow chart and call out the direction indicated by each individual symbol. Then, thrust your arms in that direction; in other words, say and do what the arrow indicates. For an additional challenge, do the opposite of what the arrow indicates. Side-step walk: Walk sidestepping bring your right foot across the left and step down three to ve inches away from the left foot, ankles crossed. The closer the feet, the harder it is to balance. Alternate crossing the foot in front and then behind the other foot as you move along; repeat several times, then do the same with opposite feet. As a bonus challenge, try a reading exercise from a vision card, designed for stimulating the brain/ visual system, while sidestepping. The cat jump: This activity is practice in case of a fall; the muscle memory of the movement will be etched in your body. Bend your knees in a squat. Jump a little off the ground with both feet, and land softly, like a cat, without jarring your body. Repeat until you are con dent in your ability to prevent a spill. Research shows that most falls are preventable, Peterson says. These and other exercises, performed regularly, are a great way to achieve safety and a revitalized lifestyle.Move it or lose it5 moves to put seniors back in the game

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Page 20B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.com The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................50 classrooms/newspapers .........$800/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr Wakulla High School ................50 classrooms/newspapers .........$800/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center.......................20 newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Lynda Kinsey at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year.YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible.For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program.Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor of STOP Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the t op -ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2013. Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage are HMO plans with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus and Preferred Advantage depends on contract renewal. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p .m., sev en days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_DP 533 CMS Accepted 10122013 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd November 29 December 2 Dec ember 3 December 13 December 27 Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQASpecial to The NewsWakulla County FireRescue Fire Explorers traveled to south Florida recently to compete in a state-wide competition. One of the WCFR Explorers placed fourth out of 84 competing in individual competitions. Several events were held to present the same type of scenarios faced by re ghters during training and real life response. Hoisting hose, victim rescue, high rise procedures were just some of the scenarios they faced at the Fire Explorer Challenge hosted at Indian River State College in conjunction with the Great Florida Fire School. The group from Wakulla traveled the longest distance for the event. Explorers Reid Tilley, Jimmy French and Dustin Colvin made the two day trip this year. Wakulla County Fire Chief Mike Morgan congratulated them for all the hard work in preparing for the competition as well as the good showing in the competition. WCFR Explorers held fundraising events to provide money for the trip. Wakulla County United Fire ghters matched the amount raised to assist with expenses. The Explorer group is considered a recruitment tool to attract young people to the Fire Rescue and EMS eld. Members training on re ghting and emergency medical response subjects each month. Once a member, a youth can sign up for ride-along programs to accompany on-duty crews as they respond to actual emergencies. They can witness crew in action and assist on scene in a limited capacity. Volunteer Fire ghters and off duty employees provide the leadership for the group. Any Wakulla County youth from eighth grade through high school is eligible to participate. Please contact jtillman@ mywakula.com or call Fire Rescue Headquarters at (850) 745-8698. Wakulla Fire ghter Explorers Reid Tilley, Jimmy French and Dustin Colvin at the Fire Explorer Challenge in Indian River.PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpecial to The NewsFrom January to September, 128 reports of babies dying due to unsafe sleep have been called in to the Florida Abuse Hotline. In an increased effort to prevent these tragedies, rst responders, government agencies, state officials, community organizations and medical professionals have come together to implement The Safe Sleep Campaign. Wakulla Fire-Rescue and Marianna Fire Department recently volunteered to serve as dropoff locations for new pack n play (portable cribs) donations. These locations are in addition to the previously established location at the Tallahassee Fire Department. Local Healthy Starts will distribute pack n plays to families and organizations in need. The public is encouraged to donate new pack n plays to designated locations. Parents in need of a crib for their baby should not contact the donation locations, but get in touch with a community organization such as Healthy Start. Emergency first responders go into our communitys homes to help families in their time of need and are witness to these tragic unsafe sleep deaths, said Northwest Region Managing Director Vicki Abrams. Through this partnership, free resources and information are brought directly to the home to encourage families to practice safe sleep. Local pack n play drop-off locations now include: Wakulla Fire-Rescue, 320 Trice Lane in Crawfordville. Marianna Fire Department, 4425 Clinton St. in Marianna. Tallahassee Fire Department, Station 1, 327 North Adams Street in Tallahassee. Another way local fire, law enforcement, EMT and child welfare responders are participating in the campaign is by distributing Safe Sleep printed materials to families. Many of cers are also taking free online continuing education courses provided by the campaign showing how rst responders can identify unsafe sleep situations and take preventative measures. Although many parents sometimes want to create a beautiful sleeping environment complete with soft bedding, fluffy pillows, plush stuffed animals and bumper pads, such an environment may prove dangerous to an infant not yet at an age where they are able to move their head to ensure a clear airway. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that babies sleep ALONE, on their BACKS and in a CRIB. Cribs should be clear of items like blankets, pillows, stuffed toys, strings/cords, sleep positioners and bumper pads. Babies should sleep in their own cribs, as the risk of infant death is 40 times higher for babies who sleep in adult beds. More information about the campaign is available at www.my families.com/safesleep, including videos, designated drop-off locations, free resources and a full list of partners. Wakulla Fire ghter Explorers place fourth in state-wide competition North Florida First Responders step up to save infants lives Babies sleep safest ALONE, on their BACKS and in a CRIB

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 Page 21B $22 Million SOLD in 2013850-926-8777 WWW.BLUEWATERREALTYG.COM WWW.BLUEWATERREALTYGROUP.COMProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate Ed Brimner 284-4390 Mike Jarmon 445-7988 Lydia Wessinger 566-1278 Amy Jarmon 445-7978 Carla Hunter 445-6550 Jerry Peters 566-4124 Susan Jones 566-7584 Jeff Dora 218-1314 Elaine Gary 509-5409 LeeAnn Mathers 459-2202 Bill Starling 661-1771 Eric Mercer 766-3484 Kristin Campbell Staff Jan Hughes Ofce Assistant Sherry Dudley Of ce Administrator Kai Small 519-3781 Becky Moore 294-8653 Cristy Rivers 519-9039 Cheryl Swift 766-3218 Debbie Kosec 566-2039

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Page 22B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Wednesday, November 27, 2013 thewakullanews.comBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsIn 1864, the failing Confederacy placed its hope in a last ditch defense of Atlanta centering on Pine Mountain, Ga. The two week battle against two full Union Corps was fraught with logistical problems. Youd never know that today. As you travel north along Highway 27, pine trees and at land eventually gives way to rolling hills. Soon you enter the foothills of the Appalachian Mountains. Here the elevation change brings a change of scene. History abounds. You can drive across a real covered bridge, built in the 1840s. The Imlac Covered Bridge over the Red Oak Creek is located near Pine Mountain. Today, Pine Mountain is home to Callaway Gardens, which began as the 2,500-acre home of Carlson and Virginia Callaway. Opened to the public in May 1952, discover something new every season. Admission begins at $18 for adults and $9 for children. Special events are $25 adults and $12.50 children. You can be part of Georgias evolving history by visiting the Fantasy in Lights which includes 8 million twinkling lights. The mesmerizing light and sound show currently includes 15 separate scenes. On display from Nov. 15 through Dec. 30, prices range from $16 to $24 per adult, and childrens rates are between $8 and $12. Tickets purchased day of show cost more. Callaway mesmerizes in the spring when more than 20,000 native and cultivated azaleas bloom. A kaleidoscope of colors ranging from pale pinks to fuscia, and orange to purples dot the landscape. Known as Celebrate Spring, this impressive display runs from March 1 through April 30. Balloons dot the sky on Labor Day Weekend for the Sky High Hot Air Balloon Festival. Listen to live music, see classic cars, run in the 5K race and triathlon, or just enjoy being a spectator. Year round the butter y garden delights visitors in one of North Americas largest glass enclosed conservatories. More than 50 species of butter ies from around the world are on display. From spring until fall stop by on Thursdays at 10 a.m. and learn how to attract butter ies to your garden. You can get close to nature like those Confederate soldiers merely by renting a bike, or bringing your own and pedaling the 10 miles of bike trails. Hiking enthusiasts will enjoy the seven miles of nature trails as well. Additional sports include golf, tennis, shing, and boating. In this historic area you can also visit Warm Springs, Ga. The Little White House, home of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, was purchased here due to its proximity to purported healing springs. While the springs still exist today, they are no longer available for public use. Visitors to The Little White House State Historic Site can experience the house much as it was when Roosevelt left, and even dip their hands in a fountain containing the same 88-degree mineral water. Open daily from 9 a.m. until 4:45 p.m., admission is $10 for adults, youth $6, children. When you are nished soaking up the history stroll leisurely through the downtowns of Warm Springs and Pine Mountain, browsing the many stores and antique shops. No matter the season there is plenty for the whole family to enjoy.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www. luxurycruise-travel.com.Stroll through Pine Mountain and Warm Springs Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideSKYBOX Lunch for 2 order from menu Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9771NEW KITCHEN HOURS 11AM TIL MIDNIGHTCALL IN OR DINE IN Come Have Come Have With Us! With Us!DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE850-926-9771 Catering Available! Open 7 Days 2669 Crawfordville HwyDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE Book Your Holiday Gathering in the Myra Jeans Party Room! 926-7530 Restaurant 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 9 2 6 4 3 2 9 9 2 6 4 3 2 9 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.comWin One Meal from Every Restaurant! Winner Peggy H Harlandrawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the PHOTOS BY CALLAWAY GARDENS PHOTOS BY KARE THOR OLSENScenes from Callaway Gardens Festival of Lights: Santas workshop, above, and Christmas Tree Lane, right. Roosevelts Little White House in Warm Springs, Ga.