Wakulla news

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Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00482

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Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Senior Citizens ..............................................................Page 10A Weekly Roundup ...........................................................Page 12A Free Gas .......................................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Coastal Cleanup photos ................................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Outdoors .........................................................................Page 5B Water Ways ......................................................................Page 6B Thinking Outside the Boook ............................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B Travel .............................................................................Page 12BINDEX OBITUARIES Fred V. Harrison Dorothy Vickers Logue Dennis Frank Wilson newsThe Wakulla Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 39th Issue Thursday, September 26, 2013 PHOTO BY AMANDA MAYOR GIVE-AWAY! Y Y See page 13A See page 13ABuilding his own casketNew director hired for tourist development councilSam Martin of Tallahassee is selected for post to head TDC By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Some might call it morbid, others could call it a labor of love, but Patrick Langston decided it just made sense. After recently enduring not only the loss of his wife, but the cost of her casket when she passed away, Langston decided he didnt want to put such a burden on the shoulders of his three children when he goes. So, a few weeks ago, he began building his own casket. My wifes service cost me $11,000, he says. $9,000 of that was spent just on a casket. The cheapest possible option, Langston says, was $8,500. I asked the funeral home if it was all right, he says. So, why not? According to Langston, a completely handmade wooden casket like the one hes built would cost around $23,000. Thats without the wooden bottom like this one has, he says. Traditionally, he says, a casket has an open bottom to which there are straps attached under a blanket that the person is laid upon. But his is completely enclosed. To date, the casket lacked only the decals and a few staples needed to finish attaching the lining. Langston, who has been keeping track of all receipts from his purchases during the project, has spent a grand total of $105.83. Someone asked me if I was crazy for doing this, he says, then laughs and points to his totaled receipts. It may be a little morbid, but its going to save my kids a lot of trouble when the time comes. Choosing what Langston pegged as lightweight, yet strong and durable wood, he constructed his casket out of juniper, which he had already in his shed from when he and his wife had built a log cabin in the Tennessee mountains 15 years ago. Lined with material he picked out himself and held together with gorilla glue and 200 stainless steel screws, the completely handmade structure stands about 20 inches tall, is six and a half feet long and almost 28 inches wide. He sanded the wood and stained the exterior with three coats of polyurethane. The lid opens in two places and he plans to attach carrying handles made of thick rope in the proper places. Its not quite nished, he says, as he plans to customize his cof n even further by placing an air mattress inside and putting decals on each side one of a dolphin, red sh, deers head and a deer jumping a fence. All the things I like to do and see outside just for some decoration, Langston says. Nobody will have another one like it. Its one of a kind. Langston and his wife, Dannie Oliver, were married 53 years when she passed away in July. She was born in St. Marks, he in Smith Creek. Turn to Page 2A By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Out of the 14 who were interviewed for the recently advertised Tourist Development Council Director position, four were interviewed. Of those four, two were called back for a second interview but in the end, the person chosen was Sam Martin. Martin, who resides in Tallahassee, declined to give an interview or make any comments until he has of cially been placed in the director position. However, Martin did express excitement and eagerness to serve the needs of Wakulla Countys tourist development should he be named to the job of cially. At the Sept. 16 county commission meeting, an agenda item passed 4-0 by the board, which gave the TDC permission to move forward with offering Martin a contract. On Sept. 19 the council held a meeting to discuss and construct the contractor employment agreement that would be extended to Martin. The basis of the contract came from the previous directors agreement, to which the council went through and amended what they saw t. TDC members expressed the importance of clearly identifying the director as a contractor, not as a county employee, which is what Commissioners Howard Kessler and Jerry Moore had expressed preference for when they both voted against hiring a contractor in July. At that meeting, the board had approved the option that said that the director would be employed part time at a total of 20 hours per week and earn $22,880 annually. Chairman Randy Merritt had also clari ed that the position would not include bene ts, insurance or other special compensations and that the county would be responsible for writing grants. Commissioner Ralph Thomas con rmed that grant writing and administrative tasks would be the responsibility of the county. All of which was af rmed at the TDC as they discussed the new contract. The contract designates that the director will be responsible for his own insurance, and clearly outlines the speci cs required by the county. It also identi es compensation to be an annual amount of $22,880, which will be paid in monthly installments according to county payroll procedures. Turn to Page 3A Patrick Langston with the homemade cof n hes built for himself, saying he didnt want to burden his family with the cost of a casket.After enduring shock at the cost of a casket to bury his wife, Patrick Langston decided to build his own Shepard Accounting is Chamber Business of YearPHOTO BY WILLIAM SNOWDENWakulla Chamber of Commerce President Tammie Bar eld presented the Business of the Year Award to Shepard Accounting and Tax Services Jessica Revell, Lorra Phillips and Mitzi Rye. The awards banquet was held Thursday, Sept. 19, at the senior center. Shepard Accounting was chosen for its community involvement and service from among 18 local businesses up for the award. We will have a complete list and photos of winners in next weeks Wakulla News, on the Chamber page. COASTAL CLEANUP C C C C L L L L L E E E E A A N N N N N N N N U U U U U U U P P P P P P P P Photos, Page 15A Photos, Page 15A Panhandle Pizzaria Panhandle Pizzaria Panhandle PizzariaAcross from Ace Hardware Crawfordville 745-8797Now Offering DINE-IN SERVICE!Join us in our NEW DINING ROOM for Italian Food including Youll love our Spaghetti, Chicken Fettuccini, Baked Ziti, Lasagna, and Baked Eggplant. Plus our famous Subs & Salads. LUNCH Mon-Sat 11-2. Great Specials & By the Slice!!!HOT!!! Pizza, Pastas, and Beer & Wine.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Page 1A The rst time they met, he says, was as infants as his mom would take him over to her moms house to visit and would lay them both in the same crib to sleep. But it wasnt until much later in life that we even knew that happened, he says. They of cially met on a blind date that was set up by a mutual friend. From napping together as babies, to hitting it off as teenagers, some 70 years later, Langston nds himself looking back on a lifetime of partnership and love. He shared pictures of his bride throughout the years, and the cabin they built amidst the mountaintops. It sits 2,225 feet up in the air, he says of the cabin. The air is sweet and the breeze is wonderful. Langston explains that hed go up there permanently, but the sentimentality of 54 years in his Crawfordville house, coupled with the six replacements hes had on his right knee, keeps him close to home. Langston describes life now, though, as lonely. Its just one of those things that happens with age I suppose, he says of the gradual loss of family members and good friends. Luckily, he says, he has the company of Rastles, a 7-year-old Bichon Frise whom he has had since he was a puppy. He sleeps right up against my leg and barks at any suspicious noise at night, he says. Hes been good company. As for the project he has undertaken in building his own casket, Langston says that it has been a good distraction. It keeps me busy.Local man building his own casketSpecial to The NewsPanhandle residents nally have a legal and ethical opportunity to give back exotic pets that have outgrown their owners ability to care for them. Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Commissions Exotic Pet Amnesty Day is coming to North Florida for the rst time since the program was established in 2009. Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park in Fort Walton Beach will host the family-friendly event on Saturday, October 5th, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Wakulla County is supporting the effort as a way to protect the fragile estuarine environment of the Big Bend. GSML hopes to draw the attention of capital-region residents who need a way out of exotic pet ownership. Maybe the 12-foot reticulated python scares the new girlfriend, or the once cute and tiny African monitor lizard just ate the cat. Before the Amnesty Day program, many exotic pet owners would unburden themselves by setting the animal free to wreak havoc on native ecosystems. Releasing exotic pets is a major pathway by which exotic species nd their way into native habitats, says Graham Northup, Gulfariums reptile specialist. Florida ranks rst in the world for invasive reptiles and amphibians, according to a 20-year study that identi es 56 non-native species as established in the states ecosystems. Non-native animal species compete for food and shelter, often overtaking the native species and replacing them. FWCs Exotic Pet Amnesty Day provides pet owners with a more ecologically-sound, and legal, option. A major focus of Amnesty Day is the adoption of relinquished exotic pets by people who are trained in caring for them. Anyone with knowledge and desire for owning an exotic pet is encouraged to apply. Free registration is required for potential adopters. Forms can be downloaded at myfwc.com/nonnatives. We are looking for adopters with the knowledge and expertise to care for exotic pets, says Jenny Novak, who coordinates FWCs Exotic Pet Amnesty Program. We expect quite a few nonnative animals to be turned over at the Exotic Pet Amnesty Day in Fort Walton Beach, so we want to make sure we have safe homes for them. Exotic Pet Amnesty Day is a free event that will give visitors a chance to handle exotic animals and learn about their habits and needs. Family-friendly activities include GSMLs SeaMobile touch tanks that provide a hands-on experience of the native creatures found along Floridas Gulf Coast, demonstrating the importance of properly caring for exotic pets. AMANDA MAYORPatrick Langstons casket in his workspace. While the two terms are used interchangeably, the main difference between a cof n and a casket is essentially just the shape. The term cof n has been used to describe a container that holds dead bodies for burial since the early 16th century. The shape of a cof n typically resembles the shape of a body and has six or eight sides. It is wider at the top for the shoulders and gradually decreases in width toward the opposite end where the feet are placed. The word casket was originally used to describe a box used to store jewelry and other small valuable items before coming to have an additional meaning somewhat synonymous with cof n around the mid-19th century. It is thought that the word casket was adopted as a substitute word for cof n because it was deemed less offensive. The shape of a casket was thought to be less dismal because it did not depict the shape of a dead body. Both cof ns and caskets can be customized in a variety of ways, include things such as jewels, engravings, pockets to hold pictures and trinkets for the deceased, and any other specialized details. The word cof n is derived from the Greek word kophinos, meaning basket. When a cof n is used to transport a deceased person, it can also be called a pall, a term that also refers to the cloth used to cover a cof n. Cof ns/caskets can cost up to $50,000 or more, depending on the bells and whistles a person wants to include. The external material from which the cof n or casket is constructed from, the workmanship, and the interior fabric are the main factors that influence the price. Cof ns are most often made from wood or metal, and the quality of the material impacts the price. In addition, cof ns can be inscribed with the name of the deceased or with messages from their friends and family. They can also be decorated with jewels or artwork and include internal pockets to hold personal items. While most cof ns are made of wood or metal, they can also be made of other materials such as berglass. Some even include a glass cover which enables permanent viewing of the body. In 2000, casket sales reached their peak, only to experience a continuing decline since then, especially during the down-turned economy. People looking to save either sacri ce the bells and whistles of a high end casket or cof n, or choose to forgo a traditional burial in favor of cremation. Either way, in the past ten years, fewer and cheaper cof ns have been sold and sales continue to decline, forcing casket and cof n makers to expand business into other areas. The external details of a coffin, which may include handles, designs, crosses, symbols, etc. are called ttings or cof n furniture. The use and design of fabric on the inside of the cof n is called trimming the cof n. SOURCE: www.todayifoundout. com.Whats the difference between a cof n and casket?Exotic Pet Amnesty Day coming to North Florida A weekend to get away, have fun and be treated like a Diva!Relax By The Pool Shop Til You Drop Cocktails Hors doeuvres Massage & More! Abitare Paris Salon Alpaca Magic Citrus County Jazzercise Citrus Pest Management Clementines Boutique Complete Family Dentistry Connollys Sod & Nursery Connors Gifts Cotton Club Crystal Automotive Group Electric Ends Hair Studio Everyones Massage Frame Design Genesis Womens Center Georgieos Hair Design Goldiggers & Gunslingers Health & Wellcare Services Himalayan Salt Room Ideal Health Inverness Health & Wellness Jewelry by Ms. Nettee Juice Plus Karma Upscale Resale La Te Da Boutique Ledger Dentistry Lillian Smith Mary Kay M Hair Studio & the Spa at M Mamas Kuntry Kafe The Little Glass Shack Mes Mer Eyes New Concepts Hair Salon New Empire E-Cigs Nick Nicholas Ford Off the Cuff Origami Owl Amber Park Avenue Salon Playtime PinUp Photography Scentsy Silipada Design Specialty Gems Suncoast Dermatology The Garden Shed The New Image Med Spa Thirty-one Gifts Timber Lane Chiropractic Tinas Hair Salon Tobacco Prevention Fl Health Touch of Glass by Susan Unique Lingerie Vault Jeans Vernon Martin Salon Virgilio Insurance Whalen Jewelers Zen Zone MassageVisit these vendors during the show. Call 800-632-6262to reserve your room & tickets www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com www.chronicle-online.com/divanight October 12, 6 9 PM1 Night Stay & 2 General Admission Diva Tickets$138*Limited Availability. Taxes not included. 000G0AN 9301 Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL *For tickets only go to Chronicle site listed below

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Special to The NewsBeginning Oct. 1, Wakulla County will begin a petroleum cleanup at the current site of the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Chambers and the Wakulla County Tax Collectors Of ce. The buiding is located between High Drive and Arran Road, behind the courthouse. Safety zones will be established and clearly marked around the work site so that access to these of ces will not be interrupted. The source of the petroleum contamination was a single 1,000 gallon UST tank container and dispenser installed in the 1980s for dispensing unleaded fuel when the sheriffs of ce and jail was located at the site. In April 1991, fuel was no longer dispensed from this location and a formal tank closure and removal was performed in January 1992, at which time petroleum contamination was discovered. An investigation into the limits of the contamination was initiated in 2005, under the supervision of the Department of Environmental Petroleum Cleanup Program, which con rmed petroleum related compounds continued to be present in the soil and groundwater. Monitoring and reporting of this site have been ongoing. The fuel additive methyl tert-butyl ether, or MTBE, migrated off of the property and reached the stage where DEP mandates site cleanup. MTBE was added to gasoline to replace lead. It is not a carcinogen but can impact the taste and odor of drinking water. There is a drinking water well operated by the City of Sopchoppy to serve the Crawfordville area located across High Drive less than 100 yards from the contaminated site. Jim Stidham and Associates, a firm specializing in petroleum cleanups, has been monitoring the situation and will perform the petroleum cleanup. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners covered at least $100,000 of the cost of investigating and monitoring this project since the contamination was identi ed with $400,000 from DEPs Petroleum Clean-up Program. It is anticipated that the county will continue to manage the project and expend at least another $200,000 over the next two years. For more information, please contact Sheree Keeler, Wakulla County Intergovernmental Affairs Director at (850) 926-0919 ext. 705.Cleanup slated to begin in October Contamination located at Commission Chambers, Tax Collectors O ceFrom Page 1A The new director will be evaluated after a year, at which time salary will be discussed according to the revenue brought in by the TDC during the year. The director will also be responsible for giving quarterly reports containing updates for the Board on minutes of prior council meetings, expense reports, communications and marketing efforts. According to the proposed contract, the directors scope of work will include a broad scope of coordinating, planning, promoting, acting as a liaison with many different agencies and groups as well as the community as a whole, preparing budgets and acting as a representative on statewide tourism issues. Also, the director will be expected to follow the policies and procedures established both by the county commissioners and the TDC. After making all necessary changes, the council plans to submit the proposed contract to the Board and intends for there to be an agenda item requesting its approval at the Oct. 7 commission meeting. In order to make that deadline, the council discussed the need to both turn the contract into the county attorney and sit down to discuss the contract with Martin by Sept. 27. Chairman David Moody will be responsible for contract negotiations with Martin. The hope expressed by the council is to have their new director in place as soon as possible as they have been without one since February and, according to discussion held at the last board meeting, the council has roughly half a million dollars in grant funding that is waiting to be put to good use.New director hired for county TDC 1. James Billingsley, Tallahassee Not Interviewed. 2. Bruce Brown, Tallahassee Not Interviewed. 3. Patricia Carrico, Panacea Not Interviewed. 4. Kenneth Clineman, Crawfordville Not Interviewed. 5. Patricia Collins, Panacea One Interview. 6. Janet Carol Compton, Tallahassee One Interview. 7. Timothy J. Devlin, Crawforville Not Interviewed. 8. Ray Gray, Crawfordville Not Interviewed. 9. Loretta Lawrence, Crawfordville Not Interviewed. 10. Sam Martin, Tallahassee Two Interviews, selected to fill position. 11. Teresa Mercer, Crawfordville Not Interviewed. 12. Ramsay Parham, Ochlockonee Bay Two Interviews. 13. Charles D. Prout, Crawfordville Not Interviewed. 14. Hugh Taylor, Crawfordville Not Interviewed. information from TDC.Applicants for Tourist Development Council Directors Position Notice of Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment Transmittal Public Hearing Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 9263695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com. SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS. Notice of Public Hearings Concerning Rezoning of Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing and Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com. SEPTEMBER 26, 2013the Magnolia Gardens Subdivision Notice of Public Hearings The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, October 14, 2013, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, November 4, 2013, beginning at 6:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony.Concerning an Application for Variance Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record les may be viewed at the County Planning Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing and Voice Impaired at 1-800-9558771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com.SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 OCTOBER 3, 2013 SECOND READING OF ORDINANCE 13-04 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ST. MARKS SETTING GUIDELINES FOR PURCHASE BY THE CITY; AND PROVIDING FOR AN EFFECTIVE DATE.The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Interested parties may inspect ordinance at 788 Port Leon Drive and be heard at the meeting. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Ofce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.SEPTEMBER 26, 2013

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $19/6 mo. Out of County $44/yr. $27/6 mo. Out of State $47/yr. $28.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriffs budget gets reprieve Sammy & Sandy Tedder: the couple are inspired by nature along the Sopchoppy River Wetlands repeal passes, 3-1 Operation Santa gets underway with Farm Share FROM THE DOCK: The water is clearing and reds are biting STREET BEAT Remembering 9/11 Two burglary suspects arrested thewakullanews.com Real information needed on wetlands Intimidation isnt the American Way ank you to person who returned purse Wetlands protections should be preservedWetlands ght akin to civil rights struggleREADERS WRITE: Follow us on Editor, The News: To the honest person who turned my purse in at Winn-Dixie last Thursday evening, Sept. 19, THANK YOU! I was in such a hurry only to rush home and realize my purse was missing. I called WinnDixie hoping to hear they had my purse but when I picked it up I was so thankful to see that everything was just as I left it. It is such a blessing to know that there are still good people in the world. Thanks Again, Terri Mercer Crawfordville Editor, The News: I am writing to address the headline of Sept. 19, Wetlands Repeal passes, 3-1. While the article was straightforward, the headline was misleading. Our wetlands ordinance was not repealed; the vote was to pursue repeal, which in itself is a scary thought, but we still have time to save our wetlands ordinance and maintain local control of our future. Otherwise, well be eating our seed corn. When a farmer starts eating his seed corn, the corn he saves for the next planting season, hes in trouble. Also a business depleting inventory and not replacing it, troubles coming. And when a county, so dependent on water and wetlands, whose very name means Mysterious Waters, makes a move towards eliminating local wetlands protection, that countys in trouble. Seed corn, you know. Everyone knows the bundle of bene ts we get from the wetlands. If we keep local control, they will feed us and take care of us. Otherwise, its a crap shoot. The irony and hypocrisy over this issue is incredible. Everyone pays lip service in favor of the wetlands, then votes to abandon local oversight? Organizations and individuals who should be supporting the wetlands are not speaking out. Well, the time for lip service is over. It is literally (or littorally?) a life or death situation for our county. Which way do we want to go more of the same with no infrastructure, more ooding, growing pollution, less hurricane protection and less value to our land and homes? Or something else? Our future depends on clean and abundant water. Consider this alternative: A county with water-based tourism, commercial shing, sight-seeing, sport shing, seafood restaurants, with protected wetlands to soften the blows of hurricanes, lter our waters to the Gulf, to help with inland and coastal ooding and more. That futures dependent on wetlands. Were at a crossroads. This is our Edmund Pettus Bridge moment. When Afro-Americans were denied the right to vote in the 1960s, they tried to march from Selma to Montgomery. A man was killed, people were turned back by a few in a corrupt attempt to limit citizens participation. They didnt want all people to have a vote, a say in their future. AfroAmericans had to ght for their right to vote, as the Wakulla Wetlands alliance is doing now ghting to allow the citizens a vote on our future. But now our commission fails to support putting the current wetlands referendum on the ballot. They are refusing citizen input as much as those people blocking that bridge. And when political discussion devolves into a George Wallace stand-in-the-door moment, when a group of citizens, seeking to discuss public policy were kept out of a public building by a one man here, somethings bad wrong. And now that the commission has revealed its true core by not allowing citizens a referendum opportunity, thats bad wrong. To discuss and speculate on commissioners motives, how much money each one will make or their own personal nancial gain from repeal is a waste of time. What is important is that citizens have the ability to vote. But commissioners denying full citizen participation by referendum is wrong. Once again, a small group is refusing to allow citizens a say in their own future. Lets not eat our seed corn. Lets get the wetlands ordinance on the ballot. And let all commissioners know that their reelection and their one cent sales tax will also be on that ballot this next November and we will not forget their actions in subsequent elections. When our commission fears the citizenry so much, somethings up. Hugh Taylor CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: In recent meetings and in print all but one of our current commissioners have been willfully misleading the public, these inaccuracies show disregard for the community. Sadly, the misinformation and/or ignorance have led to a motion that directs staff to remove all wetlands protections from the comprehensive plan. It is a grave mistake to sacri- ce the long-term sustainability of our community for the short-term windfall pro ts of a few. This is not about any one project in the wetland buffer but about the accumulated cost these projects will have on our local ecology. It is about loss of current and potential sustainable jobs as opposed to a few short-term jobs. As a community we must rally to oppose these changes. We can no longer take for granted that we are lucky enough to live in the fourth most ecologically diverse area of the country. For most of us, this variety of species may not seem important, but in fact it provides many of the bene ts our community enjoys: hunting, fishing, bird watching and other nature based industries. It is also expected to provide a growing numbers of jobs from ecological tourism, which will be enhanced by TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute. Wetlands and isolated wetlands are a key part of these activities. Outdated thinking was that Florida wetlands were low quality land that just needed to be converted to more productive uses. Science has shown that they provide many important environmental purposes: 1) Functioning wetlands clean and lter water coming from the uplands, 2) Functioning wetlands provide breeding grounds and habitat for many commercially important species 3) Functioning wetlands are the only home for many rare plant and animal species. Wetlands also enhance our communities with social values through 1) protecting out shorelines from erosion 2) providing storage areas for water to reduce ooding 3) provide diversity and beauty to our landscapes. Even ponds that dry up on an annual basis are the breeding ground of unique frogs and salamanders who eat insects and are in turn eaten by species higher on the food chain. While no single pond is important, the function of the aggregate is to support larger and more diverse communities than would exist without them. The current 75-foot buffer (four pick-up trucks bumper-to-bumper) protects these wetlands from the direct impact of development and its degradation by materials used or disturbed in our daily activities. Seventy- ve feet is insigni cant for a reasonably sized property. The claim that property rights have been violated is misleading, if the land was platted and purchased prior to the 1995 comp plan, a variance is already available. Buyers purchasing after that date purchased knowing the uses allowed and paid a price reflective of these protections. The wetlands ordinance did not change the protections; it gave the county a mechanism to enforce them and a way to provide variances from them when appropriate. The wetland protections do have an impact on developers who want to parcel up their land into the smallest parcels possible, since a parcel subdivided today must be large enough to keep construction outside of the 75 foot buffer. With the proposed changes, building right up to the edge will be possible, and drastically change the appearance of coastal development in this county. Based on current state law, once this change is made, it is almost impossible to reinstate. The TCC environmental center, soon a part of our county, provides the perfect catalyst to change our model for development and growth. Development is good and necessary, but lets grow and enhance our community with vision for the communal good as opposed to windfall pro ts for a few individuals. Get involved to help protect our community. Encourage development that bene ts and maintains a landscape supportive of full range of environmental possibilities and avoid South Floridas degraded landscapes. Let your commissioners know that you dont support their decision to roll back protections to bene t those who knowingly purchased with the current rules in place. There will be no do-overs on this issue get involved; speak out; sign petitions; or we lose our chance to leave a legacy that we can be proud of. Chuck Hess CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: It is a patriotic pity that people are using intimidation to stop registered voters from signing petitions for a 2014 referendum on Wakulla County wetland protection. Intimidation, as a tactic, is mighty desperate, nevertheless, there it was, in black and white in the Wakulla News Letters to the Editor on Sept. 12, when a writer told readers that he had been advised voters names would be part of a public record if they signed petitions. Of course petitions are public records, along with names and addresses of all of us when we register to vote. Public records even show when and where we cast our votes. Is that a reason not to vote? The way its done in the United States of America is no secret voters, and no secret petitions for a referendum. When elected of cials refuse to listen to the people, a voter petition referendum, or whatever you want to call it, expresses the public voice of the people. And, by the way, petitions in a democracy are nothing new. Theyve been around since 400 B.C., or so, in Athens, Greece, and the USA has a long history of using them. Remember 1978, when California voters approved Proposition 13, The Peoples Initiative to Lower Taxes? State lawmakers refused to lower taxes, so people circulated petitions, got enough signatures to put Prop 13 on the ballot, and then voted overwhelmingly to cut their taxes. Now, thats just plain American. For those who might not be aware, Wakulla County could have avoided the wetlands petition drive altogether if commissioners were more in tune with democracy. They have the power to put the wetlands issue on the ballot, but four of the commissioners refused. Why they refused is still an unanswered question. Unless they change their minds, here we are: Protecting Wakullas wetlands is up to the people to circulate petitions, and it wont be easy. About 5,600 Wakulla County signed petitions are needed, and I, for one, am proud to sign one. Im even prouder to circulate the petitions. If you want to be a part of this drive, or simply sign a petition, email the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance at wakullawetlandsalliance@gmail.com, or call me: 509-9859. Dana Peck PanaceaEditor, The News: Everywhere, including in the paper, on social media, and at various events around town, there has been some talk about Wakulla wetlands and the wetlands petition. One thing however that I have not seen is credible information stating the reasons why the wetlands people feel that the county ordinance is better than the states statute. In some ways it appears that there is an elitist attitude among the wetlands people that it is their way or the highway. This is not meant to be derogatory but if Wakulla County is going to take all the potential nancial risks (i.e., potential litigation costs), is going to restrict voters rights by demanding government by unanimous vote (5-0 commission vote) or by referendum (written months, sometimes years, in advance of the vote), and is potentially taking on the power to tell people where and what they can build it seems that there would be more speci c and solid information in the public arena as to why this ordinance is better than state law. Being allowed to build with a 0 foot buffer zone under the state statute is a false argument as the state does not allow this except under the most exigent of circumstances yet this is the primary argument being given to the less informed voter. In fact this one particular argument is being presented in such a fraudulent way that it appears to be designed to incite fear or panic in the voter. I have gone to the Facebook pages that are run by the wetland people and they are glossy and emotion based. Oh, sure you can nd information that is one-sided and is intended to be harmful to someone who does not agree with them i.e., the position of Gov. Scotts administration (who, arguably, has done more for Florida natural resource protection than previous governors) or gives opinion pieces that protect their point of view. For instance, one of the Facebook sites insinuates that four of our county commissioners do not want us to have clean drinking water. To quote: Florida was rated as one of the top ve worst states for drinking water quality. Ask your Wakulla County commissioners why they want to degrade the quality of our drinking water? Who pro ts from that? Not the citizens. This is obviously neither fair nor true but it is there with no way to counteract the argument since that media page is controlled by people associated with the Wetlands Alliance. Seemingly they will not allow either facts or opposing points of view on that site so again the voice of the people is suppressed (although they will claim they are the voice of the people and they stand for transparency). Facts are crucial in any argument but we are only seeing supposition, misguided compassion, a lack of legitimate comparison between two legitimate policies (state and local), insinuation (minus recent concrete evidence) that there has been and will be great harm done to the wetlands if placed under state ordinance, accusation that four of the county commissioners are personally bene ting from a repeal of the county ordinance (personal destruction tactics are so sad), and opinion being thrown out as fact. As a person who has seen the damage that referendums can cause I urge all voters to hear both sides of the issue before signing a petition. A signature is not retractable and often it is better to take a wait and listen approach before deciding too quickly to sign something that can not be undone. James Grey Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Whats your all-time favorite movie?PATRICIA BARRSNo occupation at this timeThe Hot Chick. Real good movie! It has Rob Schneider and the girl from The Notebook. MIKE GAUGER Teacher at Wakulla HighThe Godfather. Its a classic! CAROL METCALF Roo ng salespersonThe Bucket List. I asked my mother, who was terminally ill, if she had a bucket list. Over the last few months of her life we worked on hers. She went to the beach as much as she could. JAMIE ORR HousewifeA Walk to Remember. Its a love story, and the lesson to be learned from the movie is to not judge a book by its cover. CHRIS WILKINS St. Marks PowderShane from around 1951 or It is the all time perfect western. It took George Stevens two years to edit for release. For its time some things about the movie were pretty cutting-edge. Compiled by Lynda KinseySpecial to The NewsZeke the dog was spending this work day next to one of his favorite people in the world. Wakulla County Animal Control Of cer (ACO) Bonnie Brinson nursed Zeke back to health with some help from Crawfordville veterinarians. Now he is enjoying life at home or visiting the Wakulla County Animal Shelter. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce investigation into locating the suspect who shot the young dog in late May has concluded and closed with all leads exhausted. But caring members of the community continue to make sure that Zekes life rebounds from a rough start. On May 30, Zeke was found injured on the side of Gays Drive in Crawfordville. A passing motorist noticed the bloodied puppy struggling for his life on the road. Animal Control Of cers responded to the call and discovered the black and tan Shepherd mix with open wounds, covered in eas, ticks and mange, emaciated, with gunshot wounds and a rear right leg compound fracture and a fractured left tibia. Approximately one month later, Zeke had reconstructive surgery at Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital in Crawfordville and more medical evaluation and physical therapy at the University of Florida Small Animal Hospital in Gainesville. During the weeks that followed, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office opened a case investigation to attempt to locate the person who shot Zeke and left him to die. Detective Randy Phillips conducted scores of interviews and collected a folder full of documents as the investigation progressed. But in the end Detective Phillips exhausted all his leads. Concerned citizens viewing the media coverage of the injured animal contributed $600 toward a reward for information leading to the arrest of the shooter. With leads exhausted the donors requested that the money they donated be given to Dr. Norm Griggs and Shepherd Springs Animal Hospital for their outstanding work in helping Zeke regain his mobility. Dr. Griggs said he will use the monetary donation to assist other injured animals that Brinson brings his way in the coming months. She is inspiring to all of us, said Dr. Griggs as he and fellow practice veterinarian Dr. Julia Whited accepted the check. Zeke continues to make progress toward a normal dog life. He happily bounds around on his rebuilt legs. He has amazing control of the back leg that suffered the most damage. He is active, runs, plays and swims in a pool during time spent with the Brinson family at home. Were still hoping to adopt him, said Brinson. Hes such a good dog. The male dog is less than one year old and shows no ill will toward humans despite the attempt to kill him. Veterinarians will continue to monitor Zekes legs and if he outgrows his damaged hind leg, the leg could be amputated. However, Brinson reports that the coverage of Zekes health has received a great deal of media attention and a Chicago company has offered to fit Zeke with a prosthetic leg if necessary. Zeke was 16 pounds when he was rescued and now weighs 40 pounds. When I saw him struggling and walking only on his two front feet I knew he had the willpower to live, said Brinson. He is a wonderful dog and he will make someone a fantastic companion. I cannot believe that someone was cruel enough to shoot a puppy like this, said Sheriff Charlie Creel, a dog lover with two of his own at home. It is tragic and disgusting. Hopefully someone will have the courage and conviction to talk and we can nd out who did this. The closed case will be reopened if additional information is obtained.Zeke, the shot dog, recovering but no criminal charges SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAnimal Control Of cer Bonnie Brinson with Zeke. 000FQJ9 JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped Jasmine choose a career path and land a job she loves.You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida.JASMINE GREENMonitor Support Technician, Shands HospitalEmploy Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol.1-866-FLA-2345EmployFlorida.com

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By DR. BETSY GOEHRIGChaplain Ed Lyon wears many hats of ministry and is fondly known around Wakulla County as the Singing Chaplain. He wears the full-time hat of chaplain with Big Bend Hospice, with his of ce located at 2889 Crawfordville Hwy, in Crawfordville. He has served with Hospice since 2007. Big Bend Hospice, licensed since 1983, provides expert health care, encouragement, hope, compassion and companionship to people with a limited life expectancy so that they can complete personal goals and nd spiritual and emotional peace. Each patient is provided with a care team composed of the patients own physician, a hospice nurse, home health aide, family support counselor, music therapist, chaplain and trained volunteer. Big Bend Hospice provides care in the patients own home, in a nursing home or assisted living facility, in the hospital or in Hospice House. They support the patients family, providing comfort, support and counseling. Big Bend Hospice serves Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla counties in Florida. For information: www.bigbendhospice. org. Ed has also worn the hat of Minister of Music since 2007 at Cairo First United Methodist Church, located at 318 South Broad Street in Cairo, Ga. His primary responsibility is with the 11 a.m. Traditional Worship Service with oversight for all of the music programs in the church including chancel choir, handbell choir, childrens choir, youth choir, contemporary worship, casual worship, seasonal services (i.e. Christmas). Prior to serving as Minister of Music in the First United Methodist Church in Cairo, he served as Minister of Music at the First Baptist Churches in Bradfordville, Tallahassee, and St. Petersburg. Ed is a fully-ordained minister in the Baptist Church. In addition to his music ministry, he has performed weddings, baptisms, funerals, communion and has preached. He has provided pastoral care through visitation to hospitals, homes of the sick, nursing homes and assisted living. Turn to Page 7A Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR How fast the shades of summer have faded By JAMES L. SNYDER Am I getting old or is time passing faster than it used to? It seems I just settle down to do something and before I know it, it is over. Back in the day, a minute had 60 seconds. An hour had 60 minutes. A day had 24 hours. Oh, for those good old days. I am not exactly sure how many seconds a minute has or how many minutes an hour has because he goes by so fast I cannot keep track. Technology has taken over and I for one object. For example, I like looking at my wristwatch and seeing the second hand slowly tick around the dial. Now, we have cell phones with a digital clock. Unlike these digital clocks, all they tell me is what time it is right now. I like to look at a wristwatch and get a whole view of time: past, present and future. I know that a week does not have seven days anymore. I set out on Monday with high hopes of getting something accomplished during the week and by the time I clear my throat, it is Friday afternoon. Where did all that time go? Years ago, the Beatles had a song called Eight Days a Week. Nowadays it is more like three days a week yesterday, today and tomorrow! Today is tomorrows yesterday and I am not exactly sure how to keep up anymore. By the time I get to tomorrow, I forgot what I was supposed to do today. Then, when I get to today, I cannot remember what I did yesterday. I used to plan a whole week of activity, now that luxury is yesterdays news, or is it tomorrows headlines? I like summer, which may explain why it goes so fast. Maybe I should take a chapter from Murphys Law and say I do not like summer, then it would drag by a without end in sight. Interestingly, the thing I like to do the most goes by so quickly, that which I hate doing drags on for centuries. Which has me thinking maybe I should not voice what I like or do not like? One thing I like about summer, when I can catch my breath and enjoy it, is the fact that it is made up of those lazy, hazy days I enjoy so much. Not having a schedule, not having a deadline, not having anybody telling me what I should or should not do. Ah, those crazy, lazy days of summer. The fact that I did not get much done during the summer is no big deal. If anybody asked me if I got anything accomplished, I just said, Hey, its summer. Relax. I will get to it eventually. Well, eventually has caught up with me and it is called winter. The difference between summer and winter is that during the summer, you can get away with doing nothing but in the winter, there is nothing you can get away with. During the winter, my wife will remind me of all the things I was supposed to do during the summer and that now I have to do because winter is a coming. More is expected from a person during the winter months that during the summer. I object very strenuously to this kind of attitude. Of course, this attitude comes from the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. She has the idea that winter, or at least the beginning of winter, is the time to clean up everything. By everything, she is including the garage. Now that summer is over and the lawn does not need to be mowed anymore, I can, according to her logic, transpose that energy into cleaning up things. Then she will confront me with a favorite saying of hers, Cleanliness is next to godliness. One of these days, when I get up the courage, I am going to ask her to show me where that verse is in the Bible. I kind of think a person can be too clean, like squeaky clean. My favorite saying is, Laziness is next to everything. Perhaps that is why I like summer so much. There are shades of laziness that can only be exploited in the good old summertime. Some people, like the one who shares a residence with me, thinks that laziness is a very negative thing. This person honestly believes that if she is not doing something all the time she is lazy. Something good can be said about being lazy. You get to savor a moment of non-activity. The thing I like so much about summer is the activity you do do is only the activity that you want to do like sitting on the back porch, drinking a glass of lemonade, which is what summer is all about. Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived, understood this concept very well. He says, To everything there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven, (Ecclesiastes 3:1 KJV). Time goes by so quickly that a person hardly has enough time to really appreciate the time that they have.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Emmaus Road adds concert SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEmmaus Road, a Southern Gospel quartet from Dalton, Ga., will perform at Panacea First Baptist Chuch on Saturday, Sept. 28, at 6 p.m. and at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church at Sunday, Sept. 29, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited to this free concert. Panacea First Baptist is located at 38 Otter Lake Road in Panacea. Friendship Church is located at 165 Friendship Church Road in Medart. Preacher feature: Chaplain Ed Lyon HEAVENS TO BETSY

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From Page 6A He has had a particularly extensive ministry with senior adults. Another hat that Ed has worn for many years is that of teaching college music. He has spent the past nine years at Troy University in Troy, Ala., teaching a music appreciation online course. Ed had previously retired from college teaching, having taught 30 years at Chipola College in Marianna, at Thomas College in Thomasville; at Ouachita Baptist University at Arkadelphia, Ark.; and Samford University in Birmingham, Ala. Eds education and training includes a Doctor of Music from Florida State University, a Master of Sacred Music from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, and a Bachelor of Arts in Religion Samford University. Ed had initially prepared to be a medical doctor and went through college as a biology major, changing to a music major in his fth year. He has been a musician since he was 5 and always had a pull toward ministry, particularly music ministry. His philosophy since early on was that no matter how small the church, music ministry will grow the church. At Bradfordville Baptist, there were 25 members with ve in the choir when he began. When he left after 13 years, there were 100 in choir and 1,500 in the congregation. He often sings hymns with the patients, plays violin, or plays piano if theres one in the home he visits. He views the hymns as such an important part of our spirituality. He has especially seen the powerful use of hymns with those who have advanced dementia. With one patient who had been non-responsive, he sang Jesus Loves Me and witnessed tears streaming down from her eyes. Also as part of what he does, Ed provides chaplaincy services to the community, of ciating at funerals for those in the community who dont have a church. Families stay on his patient list for 13 months after the death of a loved one. Hospice provides chaplain services to all patients, but its the persons choice. Some say no, that they have a pastor and the chaplain doesnt need to come. But the chaplain is not trying to supplant the pastors work. The chaplain does different ministry. The chaplain by de nition is also interdenominational, interfaith he meets the persons where they are, and he has had patients of various faith backgrounds. He has learned a lot from serving a Buddhist patient. He also learned a lot when serving a Catholic priest Ed told him, Teach me how to minister to Catholics. He found this to be a blessing to him and was very meaningful. In addition to music, he also uses poetry, the Bible, books of other faiths, stories, and devotionals. A big part of Eds job, besides patient and bereavement care, is serving as Chaplain for the Big Bend Hospice Team. The Team remembers patients whove died during past week through a tag burning ceremony. Every week, Ed does a devotional at the beginning of their team meeting for encouragement and spirituality, to help them minister to patients. Ed helps lead the yearly interfaith service of remembrance that is held at Hudson Park, for any losses, not just Big Bend losses. It will be held on Dec. 1st this year. Ed considers the best part of his job is being invited into peoples homes and walking through dif cult and devastating times, being there when God calls a person home. He considers it a very holy moment. People ask him, How do you do that? He answers, Its a privilege. The most challenging time in his life came when he decided to divorce. His mother was a strong Southern Baptist and he remembered her saying with his brothers divorce that she would rather see him dead than divorced. He worried about this being grounds for leaving the church. In the death of his marriage, he learned what grief was. The healing process took a long time ve years. Before his mother died, she came to peace with his divorce and remarriage, as she could see how he had become a ful lled person. His wife Mary McMahan has been part of the healing, and he feels they are divinely ordained to be together. Ed and Mary, a nurse with Big Bend Hospice, live in Crawfordville. They have two grown sons and six grandchildren. A scripture that has been especially meaningful for Ed is Philippians 4:13, I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.The Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 7ADennis Frank Wilson, 68 of Smith Creek, passed away on Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2013 in Tallahassee. He served his country honorably in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam era. He worked as an electrician and in a commercial ice business in Panacea. He was an avid sherman, and enjoyed shing on the Ochlockonee River with family and friends. He also enjoyed gardening and travel. A celebration of life will be held on Saturday, Sept. 28, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Mount Elon Baptist Church, 2416 Smith Creek Road in Sopchoppy, followed by a reception in the church hall. Survivors include his loving wife, Jane; beloved daughters, Sherry Wilson of Havana and Susan (Steve) Pichard of Quincy; grandchildren, Jordan Clifton, Casie, and Cody Pichard of Quincy; sisters, Judy Osgood of Zephyrhills, Joyce (Danny) Nance, and Wanda (David) Magee of Zolfo Springs; brothers, Ronald (Patricia) Wilson of Wauchula, and Donald (Cheryl) Wilson of Hagerstown, Md.; and many nieces, nephews and great nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents Frank J. and Lenora Ann Wilson. Culleys Meadowwood Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements, 850-877-8191.Fred V. Harrison, 81, of Cairo, Ga., passed away at his home with his family by his side on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. He was born on Sept. 20, 1931, in Cairo, Ga., to the late Buddy and Ellie Poppell Harrison. On Jan. 17, 1954, he married Geraldine Lee Harrison, who survives. He served his country in the U.S. Air Force. He was a retired minister who enjoyed ministering to the nursing home community of Tallahassee. He also enjoyed spending his days working on the hay farm. He was a member of Pine Hill Baptist Church. The family received friends at Clark Funeral Home in Cairo, Ga., on Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. Funeral services were held on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013, at Pine Hill Baptist Church in Cairo. Rev. Charles Parker of ciated. Interment was in Pine Hill Cemetery. Active pallbearers were Wayne Cannon, Ralph Donaldson, Christopher Harrison, Matthew Harrison, Danny Lee, and Wayne Windham. Honorary pallbearers were members of the Pine Hill Brotherhood. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of Southwest GA, 114A Mimosa Drive, Thomasville GA 31792. Survivors include his wife, Geraldine L. Harrison of Cairo, Ga.; sons, Rodney Harrison and Kenneth Harrison (Michelle), both of Cairo, and Stanley Harrison of Crawfordville; grandchildren, Christopher Harrison of Tallahassee, Matthew Harrison of Cairo; and a brother, Charlie Harrison of Rocky Mountain, N.C.Obituaries Fred V. Harrison Dorothy Vickers Logue Dennis Frank WilsonDorothy Vickers Logue, 92, died on Sept. 18, 2013 in Winter Park. Survivors include numerous siblings, children, grandchildren, and greatgrandchildren. Funeral services were held on Sept. 24, 2013 at Bonnett Pond Cemetery in Medart at 11 a.m. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to the American Macular Degeneration Foundation. Arrangements by Osceola Memory Gardens.Dorothy Vickers Logue Dennis Frank Wilson Fred V. Harrison Preacher feature: Chaplain Ed Lyon Chaplain Ed Lyon Payment Enclosed Bill MeSign up online Promo Code: FALL Clip, complete and mail to:A Year For e BEST Local News, Events, Coupons and More!Expires 10/31/13. In-County Only3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 Call 1-877-401-6408 fax: 850-926-7102TheWakullaNews.com The Wakulla newsName Address City State Zip Phone E-Mail Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Car loans that can save hundreds are catching on. The word is out! State Farm Bank has great rates to save you money, without all kinds of hidden fees to take your money. Thats borrowing better. GET TO A BETTER STATE. CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. *Potential savings may vary based upon individual circumstances. Consult your agent for more details. 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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySavannah Grace made her appearance on June 17. She weighed in at seven pounds and ve ounces. Her proud parents are Dallas (Hodge) and Ryan Edmondson of Crawfordville. Maternal grandparents are Martha Bailey of Crawfordville and Richard Hodge of Alligator Point. Paternal grandparents are Judy Edmondson of Moultrie, GA and Ronald Edmondson of Crawfordville. Great grandparents are Lacy Sanders of Crawfordville, and the late Fred Bailey; the late Bonnie Livingston and the late Paul Hodge from Jacksonville. The late Shirley & Louis Edmondson and the late Pauline and Billy Smith, both from Moultrie, GA.Birth announcementHappy rst birthday to Jaylin Lee Johnson born Sept. 19. He is the son of Ariel McKenzie and Jefferey Johnson Jr. Jaylins maternal grandparents are Vicki Franklin McKenzie and Davius McKenzie. His paternal grandparents are Patricia and Jefferey Johnson Sr. Maternal great-grandparents are Zora and Johnny Franklin and paternal great-grandparents are Christine and John Johnson Sr. Jaylin celebrated his birthday with a party with friends and family. Jaylin Johnson turns 1 Special to The NewsOur Optimist Club is getting ready for the annual Fashion Show Extravaganza and Auction set for Thursday, Oct. 10 at 6:30 p.m. at the Moose Lodge in Panacea. Dinner will be served at 7 p.m. This is our most important activity of the year because the money earned goes to fund the scholarships given to Wakulla High seniors each year through the Wakulla Academic Boosters. If you havent attended before, this is a really fun event. We will be modeling clothing from The Little Black Dress, Crums Mini Mall, Maurices and Walmart. Our theme this year is Coastal Paradise. Come see the fabulous fashions available right here in our own backyard! In addition, we have a live auction with terri c items that are up for bid. Commissioner Jerry Moore will be the auctioneer. There are great deals to be had and a lively, competitive atmosphere. Not only that, but you could win one (or more) of our fabulous raffle prizes!! Businesses and organizations can get special recognition by sponsoring a table. Sponsor tables include tickets for 6 people and are available for $250. Individual tickets are $30 and can be purchased from an Optimist Club member. To get your tickets (or make a donation), just call and let us know how many you want. You can also drop by Centennial Bank and see June Vause or Jared Richardson. In Panacea, see Noah or Sherrie Posey Miller at Poseys Steam Room or Dr. Quill Turk at Dentistry By The Sea for tickets. Additional tickets will be available at the door but seating is limited. We promise you will be well fed, properly entertained, and very glad you came. Please help us support these scholarships.Special to The NewsThe Big Bend Sierra Club hosted leaders from the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance on Thursday, Sept. 12 at the Historic Amtrak Railroad Meeting Room. Members were introduced to Sierra Club program leaders and then listened to a call for support from the BBSC members. Speakers for the program were Dr. Howard Kessler, Wakulla County Commissioner, and Victor Lambou, Wakulla Wetlands Alliance founder and spokesperson. Dr. Kessler gave some historic background about the wetlands and "isolated" wetlands buffers which have been previously used by the Planning and Zoning Committee in Wakulla County. Recently, some action occurred concerning removing the 35 foot buffers which has put wildlife and plant species at risk. Isolated wetlands especially were being targeted as areas that no longer need protection, which is an unacceptable position for citizens concerned with environmental preservation. Isolated wetlands are seasonal and serve as habitats for wetlands salamanders, migrating birds, butterflies, and other native species. According to Victor Lambou the Wetlands Alliance is now collecting signatures on a petition to get wetlands protection legislation on the ballot for the November General Election in 2014. The petition is asking for local control and protection for Wakulla County's wetlands. The Alliance is urging the Sierra Club and other environmental organizations to support their petition. Thirty percent of Wakulla County's registered voters' signatures are needed for the petition. This is about 5,000 residents of Wakulla County. Sierra Club members and others were asked to write letters to the County Commission as well as to local newspapers to express their support for wetlands protection and legislation. You can reach the WWA at P. O. Box 427, Crawfordville, Florida, 32326. For more information on the Big Bend Sierra Club activities go to < orida.sierraclub.org/ bigbend>. Renowned springs expert Jim Stevenson also spoke of the importance of the Wakulla Springs Basin Protection Zone which works to preserve the purity of the waters near and in this zone. According to Dr. Kessler, "the more you protect your property the more it is worth." If the Florida aquifer is polluted and the wetlands are not preserved for future generations, we will have failed in our mission to turn over to our children the thriving, living wonders of the Wakulla environment. Big Bend Sierra Club Group Chair, Holly Parker, also introduced Samantha Sexton, local representative from the PEW Charitable Trusts. Ms. Sexton spoke about PEW's project to protect the ocean food web by asking for BBSC to support legislation asking lawmakers to limit the amount of forage sh being hauled out of local waters. According to Ms. Sexton's materials "Failing to protect the foundation of the ocean ecosystem can put our marine resources at risk." You can nd more information at PEW Charitable Trusts, , if you want to get involved in this project. Other activities discussed were the upcoming International Coastal Clean-up Day, September 21st. The public was encouraged to go to their favorite coastal spot with their family and friends and clean up or go with St. Marks Wildlife Refuge volunteers. Registered volunteers collected trash along the St. Mark's Lighthouse Road and ended up at the lighthouse for a trash weigh-in and a tee-shirt. Also mentioned was the upcoming St. Marks Wildlife Refuge "Monarch Festival" in October when the monarchs are migrating through St. Marks. You can come to the refuge during "Operation Migration" this fall to see the fabulous whooping cranes. For more information on St. Marks Wildlife Refuge go to stmarksrefuge.org.Big Bend Sierra Club hosts Wetlands Alliance Commissioner Howard Kessler Special to The NewsThe Ochlockonee Bay VFD had their 3rd annual chili cook-off on Saturday September 21st. All were welcome to vote on their favorite chili. The evening started out with a social hour with snacks and good conversation. Then the main event kicked off with the chili samples. Due to other events the turnout was small, but the firemen and rst responders didnt lack in their chili performance! There were 8 entries, ranging from ground beef to shredded beef, sausage, mushrooms, and spicy to mild. After very stern concentration from our patrons and full tummies, everyone was entitled to vote, and for the rst time ever there was a tie! Congratulations to Chief Bill Russell and First Responder Debra Fults for the tied best chilies of 2013. This is a great way to get our community together and get to know our volunteers who are looking out for our community. Our next event is our annual prime rib dinner December 14th. What a great way to celebrate the holidays and our dedicated volunteers!Optimist Club fashion show slated for Oct. 10 Ochlockonee Bay VFD chili cook-o a success, next event Dec. 14 October Is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthTheWakulla News Pink Paper Day Thursday, October 3The Wakulla News will be IN THE PINK on Oct. 3 when the entire newspaper will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT as part of the fight against breast cancer. Some of the proceeds from advertising, special tribute opportunities, subscriptions sales and donations in conjunction with the Oct. 3 PINK PAPER will go to the We Can Foundation a nonprofit organization.Be a part of this special promotion and take advantage of these Great Rates!(850) 926-7102 Pick up the same ad during October for 10% Off.Special Rate IncentivesFull Page..... .......................$400 Half Page............................$300 Quarter Page.....................$125Full Color Add 25% $40 Minumum. ONLY$40.00Pick up your ad for the rest of the October for ONLY $25.00 each!2x3(3.389x3) LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsSuperintendent Bobby Pearce welcomed a panel of athletic experts to Wakulla County on Wednesday as part of the designated staff development day. Pearce emphasized to Wakulla coaches, We need to make sure were doing everything in our power to prevent injuries. Our students safety and well-being is of utmost importance. Rick Williams, TOC athletic trainer and facilitator adds, Coach Bowden once said, Dont ask a dog to do a trick he cant do. The more correct a program design and execution, the more successful the program and the lower the incidence of injury. The starting line-up of the All-Star presenters for Wakullas coaches included: Rick Williams, Tallahassee Orthopedic Center athletic trainer athletic training and sports medicine Mickey Andrews, Retired FSU Defensive Coordinator The role of a coach Davey Young, TOC Physical Readiness & Injury Prevention Dr. Scott Barkhart, TOC neuropsychologist Concussions Dr. Tom Haney, FSU team doctor, athletic injuries Randy Oravatz, FSU retired athletic trainer Mickey Andrews, retired FSU Defensive Coordinator, shared experiences from his time as a player and coach with Paul Bear Bryant and Bobby Bowden. He emphasized, My prayer for you as coaches is that you never lose the desire to make a positive difference in the lives of kids. What you do, as coaches, is important it is key to our future. Coach Andrews also noted, Until you change hearts, attitude wont change. You cant be great at anything if you look for shortcuts. Do not compromise your standards. Dr. Team Haney added, Our goal is to make sure our student athletes are able to play ball now, and later with their kids and grandkids. Do not put your players health at a detriment. Andrews said, When you start comprising your standards, you create greater problems. When I played for Coach Bear Bryant I had to prove myself every day. Even though FSU football was well represented, all sports were emphasized throughout the training. Cardio vascular progression, physical readiness, injury prevention, peer/parent pressure and concussions were topic themes. TOC and CHP executives, as well as Taylor County coaches also attended. Coach Andrews told Wakulla coaches, Id give up every championship ring I have just to make a positive difference in the life of one more kid. What an opportunity you all have as coaches. WHS Football Coach Scott Klees shared, That was by far the best in-service I have ever attended. It was very informative and organized. I appreciate the opportunity afforded to all of us. FSU Football is looking forward to the reunion scheduled for the Syracuse Game on November 16, 2013. To quote Mickey Andrews, Thats going to be a great time. School district hosts athletic trainers, doctors and retired coaches for trainingWakulla coaches at training.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Special to The NewsWhen early elementary math teachers ask students to explain their problemsolving strategies and then tailor instruction to address speci c gaps in their understanding, students learn significantly more than those taught using a more traditional approach. This was the conclusion of a yearlong study of nearly 5,000 kindergarten and first-grade students conducted by researchers at FSU. The researchers found that formative assessment, or the use of ongoing evaluation of student understanding to inform targeted instruction, increased students mastery of foundational math concepts that are known to be essential to later achievement in mathematics and science. Their results corroborated those of two earlier pilot projects indicating that implementation of the Mathematics Formative Assessment System (MFAS) can markedly improve academic performance in mathematics. The ndings further suggested that MFAS may help close the gender gap that often develops by third grade. The results of the most recent study conducted in schools across Florida are exciting, said Laura Lang, principal investigator who directed development and testing of MFAS. The randomized eld trial showed that students in K-3 classes where teachers used MFAS were well ahead of other students taught by teachers using more traditional approaches. As one of the elementary principals of a participating school put it, MFAS is a real game changer in terms of student engagement and success in math. MFAS was created through the efforts of researchers at the Florida Center for Research in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (FCRSTEM) who received $2.9 million in competitively awarded grant funds from the Florida Department of Educations Race to the Top program to pursue the project. MFAS is fully aligned with the Common Core State Standards adopted in Florida and many other states. The randomized field trial was conducted in partnership with 31 schools and 301 teachers in three Florida districts across the state one urban, one suburban and one rural. Schools were randomly assigned to either the MFAS treatment group or to a group that used a more typical approach to math instruction. Comparing average annual gains in math on nationally normed tests to the results, learning was accelerated when teachers integrated MFAS in their day-to-day instruction. In kindergarten, we can infer that students learned at a rate equivalent to an extra six weeks of instruction, Lang said. In rst grade, the gains were even greater two months of extra instruction. It was as if we extended the school year without actually adding any more days to it. In constructing MFAS, Lang and her team drew upon research demonstrating that the learning of mathematics is facilitated when teachers gain deeper insights into what their students already know and are able to do as well as what students do not know and are unable to do. Teachers gather these insights through careful observation and by engaging students in discussions of their mathematical thinking. Formative assessment is a process, not a test, Lang said, and feedback is a key element. The approach enables teachers to address each childs instructional needs. Teachers can avoid holding back those who are ready to advance, while ef ciently helping those who are struggling. This contrasts sharply with current practice in many elementary classrooms. Based on our classroom observations over the past four years, teachers typically rely heavily on a math textbook to guide the planning of day-today instruction and often provide students feedback only on whether their answers are correct, Lang said. Teachers integrating formative assessment in instruction not only ask students to do math tasks but also to explain their reasoning and to justify their solutions. As a result, teachers are better equipped to identify misconceptions, determine gaps in understanding and adjust their instruction accordingly. Students play a key role in the formative assessment process. MFAS actively engages students, encouraging them to monitor and regulate their own learning. Students also evaluate each others work and provide productive feedback, working as a team. MFAS also has potential long-term effects on closing the gender gap in mathematics, Lang said. Studies show that even though both boys and girls enter school with a fundamental number sense, by the third grade boys tend to do better in mathematics. The results of a pilot study conducted in secondand third-grade classrooms suggest that, in classrooms where MFAS was used, by third grade the girls showed no statistically significant difference in mathematics achievement from boys, according to Mark LaVenia, methodologist on the MFAS team. However, in classrooms with more conventional instruction, girls continued to lag behind boys in math achievement. The Mathematics Formative Assessment System is comprehensive. It includes mathematics tasks and rubrics as well as lesson study resource kits, all available at no cost online at http://www.cpalms.org/ Resource/mfas.aspx. Five online introductory modules are also available, four for teachers and one for administrators and math coaches. FSU study shows new teaching method improves math skills, closes gender gap in young students We listened to our Communities. Now we want to share how Tallahassee Community College will move forward to meet community needs.You are invited to attendTallahassee Community College Strategic Plan Events These open forum events are an opportunity to discuss TCCs future, including the possibility of adding a 4-year degree at the College. Your feedback is vital to this conversation.Join us at:Wakulla County on October 1 at 5:30 p.m. TCC Wakulla Center, located at Centennial Bank Building 2932 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville Refreshments will be served. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate LifeDid you see Nik Wallenda walk the wire over the Grand Canyon? That is a perfect analogy of what we do at the senior center. We are more than just geriatric care managers, more than psychotherapist, and we are certainly not an old folks home. Strangely, many seniors avoid the center because they seem to attach some stigma to the name senior citizen. I dont want to go around all those old folks, some state. Many fail to recognize the commitment of the center to help those 60 and over to help them with the joys and routines of their lives, allowing them to age at home. I call this walking the wire. Its what we do! Some of our seniors 80 and older are involved in a balancing act called life. I watched on the Discovery Channel last week as Nik Wallenda walk a two-inch round cable over the Grand Canyon. As I edgily watched him on the wire my mind drifted back to the center and a number of seniors who are just assuredly walking a wire as many different unexpected, unmanageable, and unimaginable life conditions try to take them from their wire walking adventure. The wire in this analogy is life itself! The canyons unpredictability is an additional emotional balancing act that most of us do not have to deal with; winds of multiple unexpected doctors visits, the heat of prescription cost are rising up from the canyon gusting like the 40-50 mile per hour winds Wallenda experienced on the wire. The optical illusions Wallenda experienced was the bouncing cable he was walking on, the hanging weighted pendulums swinging in opposite directions and the stationary walls of the canyon became an issue he had not planned for and caused him to momentarily lose focus. So many issues, so many things moving in the lives of our seniors distort their vision, cause them to lose focus. Just like Wallendas daddy helped him refocus, we at the center are here to help seniors regain their focus and concentrate on the important and needed things in their lives. The canyon would have been certain death for the daredevil and so the canyon represents the same effect for the senior that the gorge did for Wallenda. We are all striving and some are even struggling to stay on the wire knowing the ravine is one step away. Life is the wire, death is the canyon, the senior in this scenario is the daredevil (dare-angel) so what is the senior center in this scenario? We are the balancing pole! We are the voice of calm assurance that they can do it. Keep walking. We meet with our seniors to discuss their challenges, we train them for the upcoming event in this weeks walk and prepare a strategy to help them succeed. At times the meetings take place here at the center, other times, we travel to their homes and help them develop a strategy with their children and caregivers how best to stay on the wire. Its a consultation but its so much more I prefer to call it a family visit as we engage as many family members as possible so that everyone understands the plan. What most organizations call in-home assessments we call family planning for wire-walking! Not only do we identify their life care basic needs, we identify the various resources to help meet those needs. We tend to the medical needs of the senior by calling in other health care professionals to join the team as a support group; we monitor all the resources that are brought to bear so that the senior doesnt stumble on the wire. If you have a senior parent and you have been trying to cope with all these efforts and you feel like youve done your best but feel that just a bit more is needed; call the senior center. Turn to Page 11AWalking the wire over the Grand Canyon THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director By MICHELLE HUNTEROf the Senior CenterSome days we beat to a different drum at the center and other days we nd a new beat. We were honored to have Kent Hutchinson, of Tallahassee, bring a new experience to the center in the form of a drumming circle. He brought in 45 drums and everyone in the dining room sat in a circle to participate. It lasted about an hour and the room was transformed into mesmerizing vibration. Even though most of the participants had never played a drum before, Kent had them all drumming in unison even as the rhythms changed. August said hot so we had a Caribbean Beach Party to cool off. Beach attire was the dress code for the day, and as always we love a reason to dress up. There were hats and shorts, sunglasses and beach dresses, ip- ops, beach balls and a hula-hoop contest. Even some of the gentlemen got in on the hulahoop contest. The only thing missing was the beach and some sand, but we sure had fun anyway. What better time than the middle of August to have an ice cream social? The social was sponsored by Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Facility. Karen Henry and Tom Bently of Eden Springs helped serve ice cream with all the toppings. They chose from several avors of ice cream, sherbet, chocolate, caramel and strawberry syrups, nuts, crushed cookies, bananas, peaches, M&Ms, and whipped cream to top it off. Thank you, Eden Springs, for such a yummy treat. Elvis was in the building when the Wakulla Wigglers performed to honor his birthday on Aug. 16. They were all dressed in white with gold, silver and colored scarves, as Elvis did during his performances. They danced to a medley of Elvis music and the seniors joined in to sing along. If you are interested in line dancing, stop by the senior center on Mondays at 1:30 p.m. for beginners line dancing class. The Wigglers also perform several times a year for events in Hudson Park and other locations. Come join the fun! The pergola just outside the center was named the Raymond and Harriet Rich Pergola in a dedication ceremony on Aug. 22. Many of the seniors and staff were in attendance as Maurice Langston said a few words about the joy of having such an area to relax in, and thanked them for building the pergola. The area is enjoyed by the seniors from the center and also the apartments next door. The trees, owers, and garden area near the structure are maintained by the Iris Garden Club. There are many plants in the area that attract butter ies, and this year the seniors were on caterpillar patrol as they watched them turn into butter ies. We are also growing fresh herbs in the garden which Wendy uses as she prepares lunch every day at the center. Thank you, Ray and Harriet, and Iris Garden Club. The first Thursday of every month at 10:30 a.m. we enjoy gospel music performed by Charles and Joan Smith, Rick Tittle, Jerry Peck and others who join in to entertain us. Many of the songs are good ol favorites of the seniors as they will sing along. Turn to Page 11A SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKent Hutchinson leads a drum circle at the senior center. 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From Page 10AMusic is such a favorite thing that goes on here at the center as we enjoy the Pickin n Grinnin Band every Tuesday and Friday at 10 a.m., and there many others that come in to share their music with us. Health and medical topics are something we educate on as often as possible to keep everyone informed and up to date. This month April Hammond from the Epilepsy Foundation spoke about living with Epilepsy and how to stay safe, helping others with the disease, and what the Foundation can do for those who have it, and those that are caregivers. Steve Eichler, an occupational therapist from Eden Springs, gave a presentation and demonstration on living with Arthritis and ways to make life easier if you have it. He brought in many tools that can help those with arthritis get through their daily activities with less pain and strain on the affected joints. He discussed doing activities during the time of day you have less pain and feel more rested, and not in time of exhaustion. Planning ahead seems to be the key to getting more done in a day. Grace Keith, community educator from the Wakulla Health Department is here twice a month to teach Diabetes Support. She helps the clients who have diabetes and need to keep up with all the changes that go on, and give motivation to those that need to keep on track. She checks their blood sugar and gives them constant reminders why the results are what they are. For those living with Diabetes it can be a constant struggle to keep up with it, but it helps to have someone there to support you, and Grace does a wonderful job with the seniors. Thank you, April, Steve and Grace for helping out with this support. There are many more activities that go on here at the center, so stop by and pick up a calendar of events. You can also nd us on Facebook at this link https://www.facebook. com/WakullaSeniorCenter, or go to your Facebook page and type in Wakulla Senior Center in the search box. Click on the like button and you will get all our posts and keep up with what is going on here. Any questions please call the center at 926-7145 ext. 221. You can also pick up a brochure on all the other services that are provided through the Wakulla Senior Center. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 11AFrom Page 10A Terry Wallenda, Niks father was on the start side of the canyon and coached his son along the journey on the cable, he was a voice of reassurance. At the center, we are not the coach, we are the voice of reassurance; remember, we at the center are the balancing beam, the pole that works to keep the whole team connected with each other and the senior to the wire, keeping them from losing their balance. Perhaps, your aging parent has become; Irritable and blames you for everything that goes wrong Doesnt want to be alone and wants you present every waking and walking moment. Obsessed with health problems, some which are real and some which are only perceived. Remember, to a senior, perception is reality! Makes irrational or completely unreasonable demands of you and you are struggling to meet those demands. Hostile, negative and even critical of you while you walk your wire beside them attempting to lovingly coach them along and care for them as best you can. If you are experiencing any of these problems with an aging parent it may be time for you to come to the senior center and let us help you. While it may be a high stressed battle for you, its our delight to help you with a plan to keep on keeping on. We can help them traverse the tight-wire, avoid the dangers of the chasm, while taking the rhythm or the bounce out of your own tight-wire enabling you to walk with your life more focused. The senior center is a rejuvenation station for senior citizens and for many, during the day, this is their home away from home and they feel at home. Face it, you are not going to change many, if any, late life behaviors. Therefore what you cannot change you must manage but you dont have to manage it alone; put a team together and let us at the center be a part of your team. We can stop the vicious, angry, blame, guilt and frustration merry-go-round that youre riding and bring calm to the wire you are walking. I remember when I started grade school in Sopchoppy. I was scared as I had lived a sheltered but wonderful life in Smith Creek. My mother picked up on my anxiety and decided she would go with me for three mornings until I felt at ease in the new environment. With her insight, I made new friends and could not wait to catch the big yellow school bus to my new school. The transition was smooth. If you decide to bring your parent here to the center, may I suggest that you come with them for about three visits, have lunch with them, participate with them in activities and on the third day when you pull up, they will be able to take it from there. They will have made a few new friends, will have been introduced to beading, yoga, music, cards, dancing, brain games or just sitting and socializing with folks at their table. You may not know this but for senior citizens we are the most happening place in the county. We help the senior maintain good physical and mental health. Our need for a social life does not cease to exist at a certain age. The desire to enjoy life doesnt fade or wane and perhaps grows stronger than any other time in our lives. Loneliness after the passing of a spouse, less frequent visits from a busy family, and the physical limitations that may prevent getting out on a regular basis are not uncommon for seniors. Our activities calendar at the center is jammedpacked with a full schedule of social activities. The senior identi es what they like to do and we let them do it as everyone wants to do their own thing. After all, if the senior has to depend upon you for transportation, and human contact, youre going to be tired and they are going to be depressed because instead of a feeling of independence they have the full weight upon them of being dependent. No one at any age likes that feeling. Our center provides transportation to the senior center and returns the senior home safely and we are proud to be able to do so. While the senior center is not a county entity, Wakulla County is a partner and is a county that cares for and loves its seniors and helps the center is this important endeavor. If your senior citizen can climb aboard (with help from our drivers) our van or use our wheel chair lift (with assistance from our drivers) to get on-board, they feel like they have lightened your burden as they feel they are a burden to you. Many seniors still have their driver license and pull up to the center daily. Again, this is all about the need and feeling of independence and freedom. The Wakulla Senior Center even schedules health screenings. Recently we held a health fair and opened it up to the public and people of all ages. We have provided u shots, glucose screenings, blood pressure checks, balance testing, hearing testing, eye testing, and weight and weight loss counseling. Needless to say it was a spectacular event. These screening and treatments benefit seniors by providing early detection of health problems and increasing their chances for longevity. There is a vast difference between needs and wants. The senior center can help meet needs and we even throw in a few wants along the way. Life is a journey not a jump! As Nik Wallenda got near to the end of his journey over the Grand Canyon, he sprinted to the opposite side of the canyon on the wire, relieved, calm, comforted, pleased and thankful. The rst thing he did at the beginning of his walk was to pick up the 45 pound balancing pole. The last thing he did before exiting the wire was to set the pole aside. Mission complete, job well done, on to the next walk on the next wire. The senior center is the support team and the beam that balances. We can help, we want to help and we would be honored to help you or your loved one. The only thing you have to do is to pick up the balance beam and you can do that by calling us at 926-7145.T.W. Maurice Langston is executive director at the Wakulla Senior Citizen Center.Walking the wire over the Grand Canyon In August, seniors had a drum circle, etc. Harriet and Raymond Rich in the pergola.PHOTO BY LYNDA KINSEYCounty Commissioner Richard Harden with some fried mullet at the senior centers community sh fry in Sopchoppy. More community sh fries are planned throughout the county. Fashions for the Caribbean Beach Party at the senior center. Sopchoppy sh fry 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! 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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 20 If there was a theme to the nal full week of summer in Florida politics, it was staying put. Former Chief Financial Of- cer Alex Sink, whose potential match-up against former Gov. Charlie Crist in a Democratic gubernatorial primary was the source of endless speculation, decided to stay put as a private citizen. Interim Education Commissioner Pam Stewart got the go-ahead from the State Board of Education to stay in the position on a more-permanent basis. And the week even included a cameo by the Dream Defenders, who know nothing if not how to stay put. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement, in fact, unveiled a policy aimed at making sure no one would stay put quite so well in the future. But the week also included a hint of transition, as the Capitol awaited the return of lawmakers for the rst committee meetings in preparation for the 2014 legislative session. SINKING OUT OF THE RACE Aside from the even more farfetched speculation that U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson might jump into the Democratic primary, or a belief that former state Sen. Nan Richs campaign could catch re, Sink seemed like the only formidable obstacle to Crist sewing up the partys nomination to take on Gov. Rick Scott. Sinks decision not to run was the latest step in what has become the Republican-turnedindependent-turned-Democrats now seemingly inevitable march to the nomination. Crist is now the odds-on favorite to wrap up the partys 2014 nod should he jump into the race, something almost everyone expects to happen as soon as next month. In deciding against a bid, Sink who lost to Scott in 2010 in one of the narrowest gubernatorial elections in Florida history said she plans to focus on the nonpro t foundation she created to help young entrepreneurs. After careful consideration, I have decided that the best way for me to make a positive and lasting impact on our state is to continue the work weve started together, she said in an email. I plan to continue my involvement with the Florida Next Foundation, working to build a state of innovation and inspiring the next generation of young Florida leaders. And of course I am going to be supporting candidates who I believe share my vision that Florida can be a state of opportunity for all of its citizens. Crist issued a statement with the grace of a front-runner being careful not to annoy a liberal base that still views him with suspicion. I loved working with Alex on the Florida Cabinet and Im sure it wont be the last time we work together, he said in an email. Florida needs Alex Sink and Im excited about whats happening at her Florida Next Foundation. And Rich, whose quixotic campaign has drawn little attention to its effort to provide a more orthodox Democratic alternative to Crist, quickly made a play to try to draw some of Sinks support. Rich said the narrowing eld sharpens the differences between her and both Scott and Crist. It will give Florida voters a clear choice between someone who has life-long core Democratic values and a commitment to working families and the middle class versus either one of them, Rich said. THE SOMEWHAT PERMANENT EDUCATION COMMISSIONER No campaign was necessary for Pam Stewart to drop the interim from her title as education commissioner. After taking over the job as a placeholder for the second time in about a year, Stewart was tapped by the State Board of Education to make the position her own. Sometimes, timing is everything, and the time seems to be right now for Pam, board member Barbara Feingold said at the meeting where Stewart was appointed. She takes the job amid jockeying over the future of education in Florida and signs that Scott will soon issue an executive order aimed at quieting conservative fears over the states participation in the Common Core Standards, education benchmarks developed by a group of governors and education of cials. I appreciate the support of the board and I can assure you I am cognizant of the times we are in and the critical nature of the work, Stewart said in a statement released after the vote. Ive spent 32 years in public education and I remain fully committed to the students of Florida. This is the time to look forward and get this critical work right for our students. How permanent the new job is for Stewart remains to be seen. She is the fourth noninterim commissioner to serve under Scott since he took of ce in 2011. Scott pushed out Commissioner Eric Smith, who was on the job when the governor assumed of ce, and backed the appointment of Gerard Robinson, only to see Robinson undermined by the botched rollout of school grades. Tony Bennett Robinsons successor avoided problems with the release of Florida school grades. But he was tripped up by reports indicating he pushed through changes to the grading system in Indiana that bene ted a contributors school when Bennett was the elected superintendent of public instruction in that state. Tensions about Common Core between supporters of former Gov. Jeb Bush and those supporting Scott appear to be growing. State Board of Education member Kathleen Shanahan ripped into Scott on Tuesday morning for skipping an education summit he called recently and for failing to consult board members on the executive order. He should have sent a recommendation to the state board for action, Shanahan said. She added that Scotts actions were embarrassing for him. MS. SOBEL GOES TO WASHINGTON (AS DOES MR. HUDSON) Florida made its presence felt in the debate over the federal health-care law this week, with two lawmakers traveling to D.C. to debate the measure before Congress and the Obama Administration making moves addressing some of the concerns that Scott and the state Cabinet have raised about the law, commonly known as Obamacare. State Sen. Eleanor Sobel, DHollywood, and state Rep. Matt Hudson, R-Naples, appeared before a joint meeting of the U.S. House Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Health Care and Entitlements and the U.S. House Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation, and Regulatory Affairs to offer different assessments of the law. Sobel, who serves as vice-chairwoman of the Senate committee tasked with managing Floridas reaction to the law, highlighted the Legislatures decision to forgo Medicaid expansion despite the 25.3 percent of Florida residents who are uninsured. And she noted Scotts decision to ban outreach counselors known as navigators from the grounds of county health departments. This is a desperate attempt to prevent access for those who need health insurance the most, Sobel said. Hudson, Sobels House counterpart, saw things differently. Medicaid expansion is wrong for patients and taxpayers, he said. Medicaid is already a problem across the nation. Access is limited, and outcomes are poor. The only randomized control trial of Medicaid ever conducted found no improvements in health when compared to the uninsured. Meanwhile, administration of- cials announced the strengthening of security measures for data submitted to the navigators by people seeking insurance under the law. Attorney General Eric Holder, Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius and Federal Trade Commission chairwoman Edith Ramirez met with senior White House of- cials and several state of cials Wednesday before unveiling the new plans. Today, we are sending a clear message that we will not tolerate anyone seeking to defraud consumers in the Health Insurance Marketplace, Sebelius said in a statement Wednesday. Scott quickly took credit for the Obama administrations attention to the security issues, which Scott raised in a letter to congressional leaders on Monday. Whenever the federal government forces a brand new program this big to move this fast, mistakes are made --just as we saw last week in Minnesota, Scott said in statement Wednesday. An employee of the state health exchange in Minnesota mistakenly sent an e-mail containing about 2,400 insurance agents personal data to a man applying to become a navigator. But White House of cials insisted the security measures were par t of the plan all along. STORY OF THE WEEK: Former Chief Financial Of cer Alex Sink announced she will not run for governor in 2014, possibly paving the way for former Gov. Charlie Crist to win the Democratic nomination. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Although Mr. Brooks wish to obtain treatment for the ailing feline is understandable, the elements of the defense and the plain language of the jury instruction compel us to the conclusion that a claim of necessity is not available as a defense to a DUI charge in Florida when the asserted emergency involves the threat of harm to an animal instead of a person. Appeals Court Judge Douglas Wallace, in an opinion on the case of Christopher Brooks, who had raised a necessity defense to the DUI charge, arguing that his friends cat was fatally ill and he was attempting to get it to a veterinary clinic.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Running (or not) in placeBy SLIM RANDLESSure was good to see Jimmy back from the Middle East last week. He looks good in that uniform too. He was running all over the place for a few days, visiting everyone he knows, but he nally came in to the Mule Barn and sat at the philosophy counter, headquarters of the world dilemma think tank, to be with us. Must be good to be home, Doc said. You bet, Jimmy said. But it isnt the same as it was. We thought about that. Thought back over the year hed been gone. A few new babies born, a few old-timers gone to rest. Oh yes, they nally filled that pothole in front of the drugstore. But that was about it. What do you mean it isnt the same, Jimmy? This is going to sound funny to you guys, he said, but all that time over there, I kept thinking about how nice it was going to be to get out in the woods at night again with Ed Lakey and the dogs and go coon hunting, you know? It was so hot over there, I tried to remember what it felt like to wear Carhartt coveralls and feel that cold night air and hear those hounds bawling and running down along the river. Oh man, that was one of the things that kept me going. He looked at us and his mind came back home there for a minute. Of course, I missed you guys, too. Thought about you a lot. Well, sure you did, Doc said. Anyway, Jimmy said, I got home and the rst thing I did well, almost the first thing I did was call Ed and tell him I needed to get in the woods, and how about he throws those dogs in the truck, you know, and well go hunting? He told me he was sorry, but he didnt have a single hound any more. Had to quit coon hunting for good. Well, you know Ed. He lives to go hunting with those dogs, so I asked him what happened. He said his wife was upset at him for spending so much time with those dogs and not with her. She said he loved those dogs more than he loved her and she told him either the dogs would have to go or she would. So Ed said, Doggonit, Jimmy. I ipped a coin and the dogs lost. Brought to you by Home Country Minute with Slim Randles. Ask your local television stations for time and date. HOME COUNTRYJimmys home from the Middle East The Wakul la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com -Janet

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comOn Friday, Sept. 13, Joel Walker of Panacea reported an animal incident. Walker woke up to nd nine chickens and a goat killed in his pen. Dogs entered the pen by digging under the fence. Deputy Stephen Simmons spoke to the neighbor and dog owner about the animals. The animal value loss to the Walkers was $480. The case was turned over to Animal Control Officer Mark Carter. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office this week:THURSDAY, SEPT. 12 Michael Boxberger of Crawfordville reported the theft of berglass columns from Funky Fiddler in Panacea. The four columns are valued at $800 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Tammy Bowdry of Crawfordville reported a grand theft and burglary. The victim reported that her checkbook was stolen and an unauthorized charge was observed on her bank account. The charge originated from a phone service and was valued at $290. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Sgt. Ryan Muse, Deputy Ward Kromer and Detective Derek Lawhon were investigating a potential suspicious person call when they came upon Justin Wade Cheshire, 18, of Crawfordville. The teenager reportedly granted law enforcement permission to search his vehicle and marijuana and drug paraphernalia were observed inside the vehicle. Cheshire was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. The marijuana weighed 1.4 grams.FRIDAY, SEPT. 13 On Sept. 13, Deputy Stephen Simmons observed a motorist in Panacea driving 49 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone. A traf c stop was conducted and the driver failed to produce a valid driver license. Daniel Edward Devaney, 49, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked, third or subsequent conviction. A warning was given for excessive speed and failure to provide registration. Deputy Mike Zimba also investigated. Christie Scarborough of St. Marks reported a credit card offense. Two unauthorized charges were discovered on the victims bank account. The charges were valued at $200 at a gasoline station in Texas. Sgt. Ray Johnson and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. Steven Posey of Crawfordville reported recovering a rearm and holster. The handgun was located off Shadeville Highway 10 feet from the holster. The rearm was fully loaded. The weapon was not reported as stolen but was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as found. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Timothy and Erika Pearce of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A wallet was stolen out of one of the family vehicles and a handgun was stolen from a second vehicle. Both vehicles were left unsecured. The rearm was entered into the NCIC/FCIC data base as stolen. The victims observed an unauthorized charged on their bank account. The Leon County Sheriffs Office arrested a 21-year-old Tallahassee man on weapons charges and recovered the Pearce rearm. The Tallahassee man was observed walking in a Leon County neighborhood wearing a ski mask prior to his arrest. Suspects have been identified in the case. Deputy Roy Gunnarsson and Detective Clint Beam investigated.SATURDAY, SEPT. 14 John Harper of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Two unauthorized transactions were observed on the victims bank account. The transactions were valued at $852 in Northern Ireland. Sgt. Lorne Whaley investigated. Annie E. Boyd of Panacea and Robin A. Fogt of Rockmart, Ga. were involved in a minor traf c crash at Levy Bay Road and Satilla Avenue in Panacea. Both vehicles were operable after the crash and no injuries were reported. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Sharron Chattin of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim discovered the residence in disarray. The home was left unsecured while the victim attempted to move to a new home. The missing items included lawn equipment, tools, electronics, drum cymbals, clothing and baby items valued at $1,486. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Michael Dudley of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the loss of his wallet and a knife from his unsecured vehicle. The wallet, contents and knife are valued at $192. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Jennifer Brown of Panacea reported a residential burglary at the Lighthouse Motel in Panacea. The victim had $220 removed from her apartment. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. A 44-year-old Panacea woman reported being attacked by three bulldogs. Wakulla EMS was treating the victims injured leg and wrist when Lt. Mike Kemp arrived on the scene. Animal Control Officer Mark Carter seized the animals for the required quarantine period.SUNDAY, SEPT. 15 Edward Franklin Gainous, 68, of Crawfordville was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked and attached tag not assigned after a traffic stop. Sgt. Lorne Whaley conducted the traf c stop over a traffic safety issue and determined that Gainous had ve previous DWLSR citations. The tag on the vehicle was assigned to a trailer. A counterfeit $20 bill was reported at Burger King in Crawfordville. The counterfeit $20 bill was observed during a change-out of a register. The bill was seized and turned over to the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Several out-of-county juveniles were given trespass warnings for Wakulla Springs State Park. The juveniles were mooning river boat guests as they passed them on the Wakulla River. The juveniles agreed to leave the park. Ina Ecklund of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An individual telephoned the victim about creating a web site for her business. The victim provided the caller with bank information and later she discovered an unauthorized charge for $1,495 on her account. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated.MONDAY, SEPT. 16 Deborah Seale of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received noti cation from the IRS that her tax return was delayed. The victim became suspicious because she did not have any reason to expect information regarding a tax return. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Brandon Lee Nichols, 19, of Sopchoppy was allegedly clocked at 67 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks conducted a traf c stop and smelled the strong odor of marijuana emitting from the vehicle. A search of the vehicle reportedly yielded drug paraphernalia. Nichols was given a notice to appear in court for possession of drug paraphernalia and a traf c citation for unlawful speed. Kristen Shef eld of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed an unauthorized transaction on her bank card. The transaction was valued at $155 at a big box store in New York. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Devin Alan Anderson, 18, of Tallahassee was allegedly observed driving 65 miles per hour in a 45 mile per hour zone on East Ivan Road. Anderson reportedly swerved into Deputy Alan Middlebrooks lane and the deputy conducted a traffic stop. Drug paraphernalia and marijuana was allegedly discovered during the investigation and Anderson was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Traf c citations were also issued for excessive speed and careless driving. Deputies Ward Kromer, Richard Moon and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated a WCSO inmate work crew member turning off a gasoline valve at the county work yard. County staff changed the lter of the gas pump and made other adjustments before discovering that the pump valve had been turned off. The work crew inmate admitted to switching off the control valve. He was presented with a $115 bill for the new lter and labor and agreed to pay the cost in lieu of possible charges. Arielle Kirk of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim was cleaning her vehicle and discovered a GPS unit and telephone cord, valued at $225, missing from the vehicle. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Nathaniel Harris, 41, of Monticello and a trustee at the Wakulla County Jail was arrested for introduction of contraband into a correctional facility. Inmate Harris was found to have tobacco and a key in his possession while cleaning the administrative portion of the facility. Lt. Danny Deal, Sgt. Ray Johnson and Deputy Katie Deal investigated. Angela Lariviere of Crawfordville reported the theft of cash from her purse. The victim lost $60 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Jean Hindle of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed three suspicious charges on her bank card from Arizona and Utah. A second credit card had six suspicious charges from Texas, Arizona and Utah. Additional suspicious charges were reported on a third bank card for a total fraud of approximately $2,000. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated.TUESDAY, SEPT. 17 Charles Edward Packowski, 32, of Tallahassee was charged with driving while license is suspended or revoked. Sgt. Ryan Muse reportedly observed Packowski pass him at a high rate of speed on Highway 363. The vehicle was allegedly traveling at 72 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone. A traf c stop was conducted and it was determined that Packowski was a habitual offender. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Donna Strickland of Double A Storage in St. Marks reported a criminal mischief. A lock was cut off a storage shed. A suspect has been identi ed. Damage was estimated at $10. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Drew Cook of Crawfordville reported a grand theft to a vehicle. Computer related equipment was stolen from a county school district vehicle. The vehicle was unsecured. A person of interest has been identi- ed. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Jason Paul Harper, 33, of Crawfordville was issued a traf c citation for attached tag not assigned. Sgt. Ryan Muse conducted a traf c stop due to the tag not being registered to any vehicle. The tag was seized as evidence and Harper was assigned a court date. Michael Montgomery of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to acquire a loan through an internet website. He was instructed to pay a loan processing fee through a money pack card and then pay a wire transfer fee for a wire transfer. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Joanne Dodson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported that jewelry was stolen from her purse while she was attending a gathering. The lost property is valued at $2,650. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Naudia Nell Delozier, 28, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed cutting merchandise open with a box cutter and placing items in her purse. A compact disc player, ribbon and electronics, valued at $56 were recovered. The suspect reportedly resisted efforts to be handcuffed. She was charged with larceny, trespassing after warning and resisting an of cer without violence. With three other convictions for petit theft, the shoplifting charge will be enhanced to a felony. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Marshall Taylor and Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated.WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 18 George Griffin of Sopchoppy reported the theft of pottery from his establishment. A planting pot, valued at $200, was stolen from the victims business entrance sign. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Jeffrey Bird of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim was alerted to 15 unauthorized charges on his bank card and was unable to determine where the card was located. The charges totaled $691. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. William Usherwood of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to his rental property. The victims rental property suffered six broken windows from being damaged by rocks. A sliding glass door was also damaged. Damage was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Tempie Sailors of the Wakulla County Clerks Office reported two prank telephone calls. Citizens complained that someone claiming to work in the courthouse would assist the citizens with outstanding tickets. Neither citizen who was contacted fell for the fraud. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Jonathan Adams of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag. The tag was taken from a trailer at his residence. The tag is valued at $40. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Jason Paul Harper, 33, of Crawfordville was arrested for attached license plate not assigned after Deputy Alan Middlebrooks observed the vehicle in Crawfordville. Due to previous dealings with Harper, Deputy Middlebrooks knew the subject had been stopped for driving with a tag attached not assigned on Sept. 17 by Sgt. Ryan Muse. Sgt. Muse gave the subject a notice to appear in court. Deputy Sean Wheeler assisted at the scene and transported Harper to the Wakulla County Jail. Shelby Sandler of Tallahassee reported the theft of a cooler from his vehicle in Crawfordville. The cooler was taken out of the bed of the truck. The cooler was secured with a cable which was broken. The cooler is valued at $30 and the damaged cable is valued at $10. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,063 calls for service during the past week.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies arrested a 25-year-old Orlando man in connection with a business burglary on Woodville Highway on Sept. 19, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. Travis William Nichols was arrested on four counts of burglary, four counts of larceny and one count of criminal mischief. Money and Sons Automotive reported a burglary of the business establishment and of vehicles parked on the property. A forced entry was discovered at the business. Computer equipment, vehicle keys and a checkbook were stolen from the business and suspect information was obtained from the victim. A short time later, the Leon County Sheriffs Of ce received a tip that the criminal activity had taken place at the business. The tip described missing items that matched those taken from Money and Sons Automotive. While WCSO and LCSO law enforcement officials were discussing the investigation, Leon County units spotted the suspect on Woodville Highway in Leon County. Mutual assistance was initiated between the agencies and the suspect was detained. All of the stolen property was recovered at the arrest scene and turned over to the victims. A radar detector and a vehicle scanner were stolen out of two vehicles in the automotive yard. Nichols remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $26,500 bond. Detective Clint Beam, Deputy Scott Powell, Detective Cole Wells and members of the LCSO investigated.Burglary suspect arrested Travis William Nichols HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 15ACOASTAL CLEANUP Hundreds of volunteers turned out for Keep Wakulla County Beautifuls annual Coastal Cleanup on Saturday, Sept. 21. Richard Russell and Bruce Ashley cook hot dogs for volunteers. Volunteers show with bags of trash picked up from the countys beaches. Young volunteers receive T-shirts for their hard work. Volunteers scour the beach at Mashes Sands picking up debris. Signing up volunteers in the rain at Mashes Sands.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMore photos online at thewakullanews.com 1. Clubhouse107 East Green St., Perry Kickstands up at 11:AM2. Ouzts Too7968 Coastal Hwy., Newport3. Skybox Sports Bar2581 Crawfordville Hwy. 4. Captain Seaniles4360 Crawfordville Hwy, 5. Ouzts TooTHE END EVERYONE WELCOME JOIN IN THE FUN!!!!! Live Band 4 6 PMAMVET RIDERS OF PERRY $10 a Hand Each Hand Gets Dinner Tickets SATURDAY SEPT. 28Dedicated and Very Patriotic Group who have the Utmost Respect for our Nation. our Flag, and our Military Past, Present and Future. We provide Community Service, and do different things to honor our Veterans.Any Questions or Wish to Donate Call ROB at 954-695-2978Sponsored in part bySign up at AMVETS Clubhouse in PERRY or Join at any Stop in WAKULLARafe at ALL STOPS and END WE ARE HEREFOR YOU For more Information and to Schedule a Portfolio ReviewTrustYourPlan.comBob Beargie, Wealth Advisorbob.beargie@raymondjames.com 850-562-6702Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS.The Raymond James Wealth Advisors at Gulf Winds are ready to help you create a Life Well Planned. Conveniently located in Crawfordville, we offer the nancial strength of Raymond James and the reliability of being local. If you would like to get started with your nancial plan, or if you just need a second opinion, give us a call. We are here for you.1447 Mahan Drive Tallahassee, FL 32308 The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2013 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA & AUCTION AT THE MOOSE LODGE IN PANACEA Thursday October 10 2013 6:30pm Modeling 7:00pm Dinner please join us for Modeling Clothing from The Little Black Dress Crums Mini Mall Maurices Wal-Mart TICKETS $30.00 eachPurchase your tickets today by calling Elena Myhre, Chairman 850-321-5976 Jo Ann Daniels, Secretary 850-509-7630 all proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County studentsCoastal Paradiseor drop by and see June Vause or Jared Richardson at Centennial Bank in Crawfordville, Noah Posey or Sherrie Posey Miller at Poseys Steam Room Panacea

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comTo be falsely accused is insulting at the very least and usually destructive in a variety of ways. Friendships are destroyed and reputations are ruined by the spreading of disinformation, no matter of the intent. Joan of Arc and the defendants at the Salem Witch Trials are an excellent example of this circumstance where rumors become truth. As the alleged offences were repeated the intensity and severity of the deeds became exaggerated and absurd, and this new found truth condemned the innocent. Fortunately, Wakulla County has not been subject to the hysteria which would produce witch trials and public incineration of those adjudicated guilty. There has, however, been an oft repeated myth about a native causing widespread suffering and expense. Goldenrod, the common late summer-early autumn wildflower, is frequently blamed for the onset of hay-fever symptoms. Sneezing, itchy and watering eyes, and the necessity to purchase tissue and antihistamines is all blamed on this wild- ower. The real culprit, however, is ragweed, another Wakulla County native plant, but with muted blooms which pale when compared to the goldenrod. Unfortunately, at least for the goldenrod, they both bloom at the same time and goldenrods blooms are much easier to identify and blame. Goldenrod pollen is too heavy and sticky to be blown far from the owers, unlike ragweed which is typically wind pollinated. There are people who have an allergic reaction to goldenrod, but they must have very close contact with the blooms before symptoms begin. Goldenrods are proli c late season producers of nectar and pollen which supports a variety of insects, including European honeybees. There are over 100 members to this plant genus which is in the aster family in the northern hemisphere and South America. This wildflower took on strategic value during World War I as a possible source for natural rubber. The con ict restricted access to the rubber plantations in Southeast Asia which placed a burden on the burgeoning auto and truck industry. Thomas Edison was one of the key scientists who developed a process to extract usable rubber from readily available materials in the west. Edison used the common goldenrod to produce rubber and examples may still be seen at his winter home in Fort Myers. Edisons horticultural skills helped develop a 12-foot tall plant with the potential to produce 12 percent rubber by volume of plant material. Only the goldenrod leaves contained the rubber producing compound. The rise of the Japanese Empire prior to World War II hastened the development of synthetic rubber, which became commercially practical in 1940. After the war, goldenrod ceased to be a cultivated crop and returned to its status as a brilliant harbinger of autumn. Goldenrod currently serves as a host for a variety of caterpillars which later become butter ies and moths. This years generous supply of rain has insured an ample growth of goldenrod plants in the pasture and on fencerows countywide. Several cultivars of goldenrod have progressed beyond the classi cation of weed to become named shrubs with identi able features. To learn more about goldenrods in Wakulla County, visit the UF/IFAS Wakulla County website at http://wakulla.ifas.u edu or call 850-926-3931. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Goldenrod: falsely accused of causing hay fever Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe pollen from goldenrod, above and below, is actually too heavy and sticky to be blown far from the owers and cause hay fever symptoms. The likely culprit is ragweed, which is wind pollinated. Buckeyes newest, green-powered turbine generator produces 12 megawatts and reduces fossil fuel usage equivalent to 200,000 barrels annually. Biomass provides 85 percent of the total energy requirement at our Taylor County facility.PERRY, FL

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles dominated the Taylor County Bulldogs 20-14 in a non-conference game last week. But it was a game that shouldnt have been as close as it was, with Wakulla having more talent in the skilled positions. Wakulla was up 20-0 in the third quarter and should have had more points, including a 75-yard touchdown pass called back for a penalty. But the Bulldogs were tough and scrappy and refused to give up capitalizing on Wakulla mistakes to get back in the game late and even threaten to go after the win in the fourth quarter. And there was the War Eagle defense, keeping the Bulldogs out of the end zone a couple of times where a score seemed imminent. But mistakes gave Taylor County the ball twice deep in Wakulla territory inside the 10 and even the War Eagles couldnt hold out forever. With Taylor County threatening to steal a win in the nal minutes, Wakulla settled down with a methodical time-consuming drive with 4 minutes in the game to run out the clock and seal the win. The bad news: the War Eagle lost Keith Gavin to a broken leg on a defensive play.Turn to Page 3BSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Water WaysALMANACPage 6BConfessions of a frequent flier mile collectorTravel by Linda Carter, Page 12BFishings goodFrom the Dock, Page 5B sports news and team views SportsCROSS COUNTRY FOOTBALLTeams compete at Alligator Lake InvitationalWar Eagles limp out of Perry with winWakulla overcomes turnovers, penalties to beat Bulldogs 20-14 Wakulla running back Monterious Loggins scores the rst of two touchdowns against Taylor County.NEXT GAME: The War Eagles host East Gadsden at Reynolds Stadium on Friday, Sept. 27, at 7:30 p.m. WILLIAM SNOWDEN By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach After an off week from racing last week, the Wakulla High School cross country teams returned to action on Saturday, Sept. 21, at the Alligator Lake Invitational in Lake City. The local harriers joined over 1,600 other runners as they negotiated the relatively at, fast course that will also be the site of this years Regional Meet. BOYS RACE RESULTS The day began with the boys team competing in the Boys Varsity Race against 18 other schools. Albert Smythe and Aaron Smith were the lead runners for the local squad from the beginning and methodically worked their way up in the eld of over 160 runners. By the nish, Smythe had opened a small gap on Smith and charged through the nish line in a new personal record of 17:23, in seventh place. Smith, just rounding back into form from a nagging injury, put on a charge of his own and nished in 11th place, in a season best time of 17:40. Freshman Bryce Cole ran a strong, controlled race to nish as the third WHS runner, also in a new personal record of 18:15. Alan Pearson (18:31, PR) and Travis Parks (19:11, SB) rounded out the scoring for the team. The boys team nished in fth place overall. It was obvious from the results that the whole team took advantage of their week off to work hard and improve on their conditioning as every team member either set a new all-time personal record or set or tied their season-best (SB) time. Those setting new PRs included Smythe (17:23), Cole (18:15), Pearson (18:31), Graysen Rudd (20:03), Colton McCully (20:04), Evan Guarino (20:30), Riley Welch (21:35), Nick Emerson (22:15), Connor Whit eld (22:16), Logan Cook (22:41) and William Thomas (29:00). Those recording new or tying season best times were Smith (17:40), Mitchell Atkinson (19:53), Lane Williams (19:16) and Tyler Westcott (23:51). GIRLS RACE RESULTS Because of the early start time and the fact that the top three girls would not be making the trip, it was decided to run the six remaining girls in the JV Race. Like the boys, the local girls showed that they too had taken advantage of the off week, as all went out and set either new PRs or SBs. The two most impressive performances were turned in freshman Haleigh Martin and Emily Lawrence. Martin led the local girls with a new PR time of 23:43, an improvement of 1:39 over her previous best mark and Lawrence ran to new PR of 24:48, an improvement of 2:19. Senior Kayla Webbe, who had missed all the previous races and a lot of training due to illness, was nally able to return to action and ran a great race, nishing second for the team in the good time of 23:53 and sophomore Connie Lewis notched a new PR of 23:57 and was the third scorer for the team. Freshman Alissa Anthony was the nal scorer and set a new PR of 27:24, while Freshman Veronica Buckland, just coming back from an injury that has kept her from training for the last three weeks, still managed to run a new PR of 31:23. The girls team nished sixth of 14 teams. Both teams should be back to full strength next weekend and will compete in the Dolphin Dash in Panama City, hosted by Mosley High School, with the rst race set to go off at 8 a.m. central time. The game against district rival Godby High School, originally set for Friday, Oct. 4, has been reset for Thursday, Oct. 3, at Cox Stadium in Tallahassee. Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce said that the Godby game had to be reset because of a scheduling conflict at Cox Stadium. The Wakulla-Godby game is the rst district game of the year for both teams. Last year, Wakulla won the district and went undefeated in the regular season, but lost to Godby in the second round of the playoffs. Godby went on to win the state 5A title. Godby is still ranked No. 1 in the state in division 5A, with district rival Rickards ranked seventh and Wakulla ranked eighth. Wakulla is scheduled to face Rickards on Nov. 1 at Reynolds Stadium. William Snowden Godby game moved to Oct. 3 At Townsend's Nads Mini Storage,59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit A32 or brought to the Yard Sale( ) before Friday afternoon www.wakullawildlife.org For more information about FWMA visit our website: 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission D ed i cated to t h e r escue & r e h ab ili tat i o n o f in ju r ed a n d o r p h a n ed wil d m a mm a l s a n d b ir ds GIANT YARD SALE Thurs Sept 26th 8am 3pm (Set Up) Fri Sept 27th 8am 3pm Sat Sept 28th 8am 1pm Sponsored in part by NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 SCALLOP SEASON IS SCALLOPSEASON IS DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Offer Expires Spept. 30, 2013850926-3212*10%OFFANY PURCHASEMAKING ROOM FOR CHRISTMAS STOCK*Must present original coupon from printed newspaper only. As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Sept. 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Sept. 27 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Saturday, Sept. 28 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Sept. 29 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Sept. 30 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Oct. 1 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.Wednesday, Oct. 2 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 4911684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsM onday, Oct. 7 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, Oct. 14 PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. M onday, Oct. 21 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. M onday, Nov. 4 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Nov. 12 PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers.Weekly meetings Special EventsThursday, Sept. 26 CAPITAL CITY TO THE SEA TRAILS second round of public workshops for Wakulla will be held in the commission chambers at 6 p.m. Friday, Sept. 27 4th ANNUAL EDEN SPRINGS SENIOR PROM will be held from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at 4679 Crawfordville Highway. This years theme will be Mardi Gras. Please call 9267181 if you need more information. Saturday, Sept. 28 SOPCHOPPY OPRY will take place in the Sopchoppy High School auditorium at 7 p.m. Performers will include the South Bound Band, Mollie Lynne and Mr. Country Johnny Calloway. Tickets are $10. For more info call 962-3711. FWMA GIANT YARD SALE will be held at Townsends Nads Mini Storage located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. All donations are greatly appreciated and can be dropped off at Unit A32 or brought to the yard sale (before Friday afternoon). For more information about FWMA visit our website at www.wakullawildlife.org. 100 percent of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission. AMVET RIDERS OF PERRY POKER RUN will begin and end at Outzs Too, 7968 Coastal Highway with stops at Skybox Sports Bar and Captain Seaniles in between. There will be a live band from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. at Ouzts Too accompanied by a raf e (at all stops) and an auction at the end. Please call Rob at 954-695-2978 with any questions or to donate. Everyone is welcome to attend. Monday, Sept. 30 WOMEN CAN RUN! workshop will continue at Raymond C. Sittig Hall, 301 S. Bronough Street in Tallahassee from 5:30 p.m. until 7. Learn what you (or future candidates that you believe in) should be doing now to prepare for a run. There is no cost to attend. Light refreshments provided. Contact (850) 222-2747 if you have any questions about the event or want to register. Tuesday, Oct. 1 FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF JUVENILE JUSTICE presents the Of ce of Prevention Road Tour: Our Children, Our Future and community conversation. The event will take place at the public library from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m. DJJ Secretary Wansley Walters will be present. TCC TOWNHALL MEETING aimed at sharing how TCC will move forward to meet community needs will take place at 5:30 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center, located at Centennial Bank Building 2932 Crawfordville Hwy. Refreshments will be served.Upcoming EventsSaturday, Oct. 5 NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at 11 a.m. at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol. com. BENEFIT DINNER FOR MISS BETTY DOVER will take place from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. and will cost $10. The event will be held at the Panacea Moose Lodge and will feature Mexican food, a 50/50 raf e and live entertainment by John Smith. Please call Cricket at 745-8656 if you have any questions. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY will hold a Chinese auction located at 475 Arran Road beginning at 6 p.m. There will be a large variety of items to choose from. Join us and help support our veterans! For more information please call (850) 510-5786. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK GIVEAWAY will take place at the Public Library from 9 a.m. until noon. Please come out and support your Library at our fundraiser. Thousands of books, audio, video, and more. Proceeds bene t childrens programs at the Library. Donations are welcome, or become a member of the Friends of the Library. Thursday, Oct. 10 COASTAL OPTIMIST FASHION SHOW and auction will take place at the Moose Lodge in Panacea at 6:30 p.m. Dinner will be served at 7 p.m. Commissioner Jerry Moore will be the auctioneer. Proceeds will go toward funding scholarships given to WHS seniors. For more information see page 8A. WAKULLA COUNTY SHERIFFS OFFICE will host a community conversation from 6:30 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Station United Methodist Church, 1584 Old Woodville Highway. This meeting is open to the public and will offer tips to secure your home, vehicle and property. Sept 26 Oct 3 EDEN SPRINGS SENIOR PROM Eden Springs 7 p.m. 9:30 p.m. FWMA GIANT YARD SALE Townsends Nads Mini Storage 8 a.m. 3 p.m. SOPCHOPPY OPRY Sopchoppy High School Auditorium $10 7 p.m. TCC TOWNHALL MEETING TCC Wakulla Center 5:30 p.m.FridaySaturdaySaturdayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net Dear Wakulla County Historical Society Members and Friends, The Wakulla County Historical Society will be holding a fun-filled evening as we celebrate the 22nd Annual Meeting of the WCHS. Our dinner meeting will be held Tuesday, Oct. 8 at the Wakulla County Senior Center. We will gather at 6 p.m. to allow time for renewal of your membership and pay for your dinner (please pay separately for dinner and dues.) We will have a selection of historic books and other items from the Museum and Archives Gift Shop so plan to shop early for Christmas. Special guests are Amy and Joan Alderman, featuring fantastic music, storytelling, and art. The dinner cost is $25.00 per person and will include shrimp, steak, baked potato, rolls, salad and dessert. RSVP by Thursday, Oct. 3 by calling the Museum at 926-1110 or by email to 24research@gmail.com, if no answer, please leave a message with your name and the number in your party. We will vote on our new slate of of cers at the annual meeting. Following are the nominations for 2013/2014: Executive Of cers: President, Cathy Frank; Vice-President, Betty Green; Vice-President for the Heritage Village Park, Murray McLaughlin; Treasurer, Terri Gerrell; and Secretary, Arlene Vause. Board of Directors: Carolyn Harvey, Cal Jamison, Terri Johnson, Scott Joyner, Gayla Kittendorf, Mary Ann Laird, Tanya Lynn, Mark Perrin, Anne Stewart, Helen Strickland, and Sandra Vidak. Associate Directors: Brent Thurmond, Clerk of Court, Lynn Thompson, Attorney at Law, Randy Lewis, AIA Architect, Richard Harden, Wakulla County Commissioner, Nancy Speigner, Centennial Bank. WCHS Board Members are required to be dedicated to promoting the goals of our society, current membership dues, and the willingness to contribute your valuable time to various projects. WCHS is engaged in a comprehensive effort to achieve our goals as set forth by our mission statement: Formed in 1991, WCHS is a non-profit corporation in Wakulla County, Florida. Our purpose is to collect, interpret, preserve, and exhibit the heritage of Wakulla County and surrounding areas. We re ect the events which have shaped our lives through educational programs, collections, interpretive displays, and research. Vital to our success is positioning WCHS as a premier organization recognized as essential in the ber of our community, and to play an important role in making every effort to document and collect history of Wakulla County and our area to showcase it in the most effective ways. The WCHS board would like to af rm its commitment of service to our members, Wakulla County, and the surrounding area residents. Over the past year we have made great strides and want to say thank you to all our volunteers. We couldnt have made these great strides without you. Your contribution is priceless. It has been an honor to serve as your president. I am passionate about historic preservation, and am excited to see what we will accomplish during the 2013/2014 year. What are you waiting for? Come join us! It is going to be a wonderful year. We encourage your participation and support. I look forward to seeing you at the annual meeting for one of the most entertaining annual meetings we have ever planned. With Warmest Regards, Cathy Gray Frank WCHS PresidentWCHS annual dinner and meeting on Oct. 8

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 3Bsports news and team views SportsBy AMY LEESpecial to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles played in two tournaments last week in Tallahassee. On Tuesday, Sept. 17, the ladies were at Golden Eagle Golf Course playing against Maclay and John Paul II High Schools. The team placed third with an overall score of 237. The individual scores had Kenzie Lee placing 3rd with a score of 49 and Micahlyn Jeziorski placing 4th with a score of 54, Rachel Woofter scored a 66 and Alyssa Stokely scored 68. On Thursday, Sept. 19, the ladies played at Capital City Golf Course against Chiles, Leon, and Franklin County high schools. Wakulla scored an overall team score of 233. Kenzie Lee and Micahlyn Jeziorski tied for second along with Franklin County player Melanie Collins with individual scores of 49. Rachel Woofter scored a 66 and Alyssa Stokely scored 69. This week the ladies play Tuesday at Hiliman Golf Course and Thursday at Killearn Country Club.VOLLEYBALL MIDDLE SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALL GOLFBy SHANNON JAMES SMITH RMS Athletic DirectorThe Riversprings Middle School volleyball team improved to 9-0 with three victories last week. The Lady Bears started the week off right by beating an outstanding Trinity Catholic squad. The victory against Trinity was the rst that Coach Smith can recall. Trinity usually puts a blemish on RMSs near-perfect seasons. This was not the case last week. The Bears traveled to Quincy on Tuesday and notched another victory. Then on Thursday the Bears traveled down Highway 98 to compete against the Wakulla Middle School Wildcats. The Bears started slow but recovered quickly. The Bears defeated the Wildcats 25-10 and 25-3 behind outstanding serving and fundamental play. The Ladys B-Team also played well defeating Stars Academy, Quincy and Wakulla Middle. Great job ladies! By SALLY WHEELERSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, Sept. 14 the War Eagle volleyball team competed in the Mosley High School Invitational tournament where they ended the weekend 2-2, 5-5 regular season. The War Eagles lost to Bob Jones High School from Alabama and Fort Walton Beach High. This put Wakulla in the Bronze division which they won after defeating Sneads High School and Choctawhatchee High. Tournament leaders were Shannan Wood with 14 kills, 13 blocks and 10 aces; Taylor Lawhon with 13 kills and 3 blocks; and Marina Petrandis with 13 kills, 10 digs and 2 aces. Caylee Cox contributed with 6 aces, 10 digs and 7 blocks. Albrey Sorrell had 9 digs on the day. After winning the Bronze division in the tournament the War Eagles stayed hot beating the Maclay Marauders on Tuesday, Sept. 17. The War Eagles started out losing the rst set 21-25, but fought back and won the next two sets 25-14 and 25-22. The match continued to be exciting as Wakulla fell in the fourth set 15-25, but nally took the match in the fth set winning 15-11. Stats leaders included Wood with 10 kills and 7 blocks, Haley Brown with 9 kills and 5 aces, Petrandis had 7 kills and 6 digs and Cox had 32 assists, 3 aces, and 6 digs. Sorrell led with 9 digs and Tamia Potter contributed 4 blocks for Wakulla. It was a bittersweet win for the Lady War Eagles after losing to Maclay in the pre-season tournament. The War Eagles had a different outcome when they faced the Lincoln Trojans on Thursday, Sept. 19 losing in 3 straight sets. Shannan Wood continued to lead Wakulla in kills with 9, Haley Brown had 5. Petrandis, Potter, and Brown each had 2 aces. Wood and Petrandis had 4 blocks. Brown had 10 digs, Sorrell and Petrandis each had 9 digs. Wakullas overall record is 6-6 (2-0 District play) and will be back in action on Thursday, Sept. 26 at Rickards. Players of the WeekFELEIPE FRANKS Quarterback 13 of 21 passes for 200 yards and a touchdown. HUNTER HURST Defensive lineman 3 solo tackles, 5 assists and a sack, graded 90 percent KEITH GAVIN Punt returner Had two returns one 85, one 70 yards that put Wakulla inside 10O enseDefenseSpecial Teams Sponsored by 850926-1011Your Home Town Realtor From Page 1BHead Coach Scott Klees said after the game that losing Gavin is a big loss. Hes the kind of player you dont replace with another player, it takes a whole team. Gavin, a receiver and punt returner, was playing defensive safety and was injured on a Taylor County touchdown late in the fourth quarter. Klees said his team is young in some areas and they make mistakes sometimes. But the offensive line got better throughout the game, Klees said. Im pleased with their progress. Coaches were focusing on Wakullas 12 penalties for 110 yards and four turnovers in the game. One of the most painful penalties was a 75-yard Feleipe Franks to Jordan Franks bomb in the third quarter for an apparent touchdown that would have put the game away at 27-0, but was called back for an illegal shift penalty. Without the penalty, if the touchdown had counted, Klees said, The game was over at that point. Even with the play taken off the board, the two Franks brothers had good games: Jordan, a senior, had eight catches for 192 yards, and younger brother Feleipe, a sophomore, was 13 of 21 passing for 200 yards and a touchdown. Running back Monterious Loggins had a great game, Klees said, carrying the ball 14 times for 62 yards and two touchdowns. NEXT UP: EAST GADSDENThe War Eagles face the East Gadsden Jaguars at home on Friday, Sept. 27. They are by far the most talented, and by far the biggest team weve faced, Klees said. We really have to play well to win, he said. We cant turn the ball over and make mistakes with them and still expect to win.Lady War Eagles win division at Mosley; beat Maclay; fall to Lincoln Riversprings remains undefeatedLady War Eagles play two tourneysBy JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Bears picked up a desperately needed win on the gridiron last Thursday, as the travelled to Franklin County to take on the Seahawks. RMS was able to play their young players for a good portion of the game, which the Bears won 34-6. Riversprings was paced by their running game, with strong performances turned in by Hezekiah Gross, Easton Lawhon, and Chris Beverly. Gross rushed for 2 touchdowns of 20 yards and 50 yards respectively. Gross also had a 35 yard scoring run that was called back on a penalty. On defense the Bears were led by Easton Lawhon, who had 5 tackles and 2 assists. Devonta Holton also pitched in 3 tackles. The Seahawks were shutout for most of the contest, but scored late in the game. Although we played a little better, we still have a long way to go, RMS coach Jacobs said. We still have to learn to do all of the little things right. We have yet to play a mistake free game, so the good news is we can still get better. Riverspirngs will get a chance for a lot of improvement, as they have a couple of weeks to prepare for their next matchup, an Oct. 8 game at perennial powerhouse Marianna Middle School. The game will be at 6 p.m. central time.Riversprings Bears pick up rst win War Eagles limp out of Perry with win PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSPunt returner Keith Gavin prepares to return a kick 85 yards, down inside the Bulldog 10. Late in the fourth quarter, playing defensive safety, Gavin broke his leg and is out, probably for the year. 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By TIM LINAFELT It shouldve been an easy sack. Instead, Jameis Winston turned it into the nest highlight of his young career. With eighth-ranked Florida State holding a 12-point advantage midway through the second quarter of its eventual 54-6 win over Bethune-Cookman, Winston and the Seminoles drove to the Wildcats 11-yard line, looking to score the games rst offensive touchdown. Facing a third-and-10, Winston received a shotgun snap and immediately was besieged by defensive end LeBrandon Richardson to his blind-side and blitzing defensive back Theodore Howard to his right. But rather than take a sack and settle for a second eld goal, Winston spun across his body and around to his left right into the arms of the 6-2, 255-pound Richardson, who immediately latched onto the quarterbacks jersey. Winston then sidestepped, easily tossing Richardson to the ground conveniently into Howards path then sprinted to his left and, with middle linebacker Tavaruz Dantzler now in his face, fell to the ground while ring a perfect strike to a leaping Kelvin Benjamin. Benjamin jumped over cornerback Thomas Finnie, gathered the ball and landed in the end zone for his rst touchdown of the season. I watched him throw the guy off and at rst I was just laughing, said receiver Kenny Shaw. Because if you know Jameis, its just funny. But, then again, it was a hell of a play. ESPNs TV broadcast deemed Winstons effort a SportsCenter Top-10 nominee. It might not, however, be a hit in the lm room.During his post-game press conference, FSU coach Jimbo Fisher said that Winston, who nished 10-of-19 for 148 yards, shouldve called a hot route and adjusted the play to make for an easier throw to an open receiver. But with a defender on him as soon as he received the snap, Winston let his instincts take over. And even as he was running for his life, Winston knew that hed be hearing about his mistake once he and Fisher reviewed the game lm. I was like Oh man, I messed up, Winston said. So now Ive got to do something. So at least I can throw a touchdown while Im going to get yelled at in the lm room. Bad read or not, even Fisher couldnt deny that Winston made an outstanding athletic play. And Fisher is well aware that sometimes, when a team brings pressure, a quarterback has to do some improvising. Youve got to give him some freedom, Fisher said. When people come at you in blitzes, either their band is playing or your band is playing ... We like playing like that. And Winstons teammates like watching plays like that. FSUs defense has enough going on between possessions that it rarely provides time to watch what the Seminoles offense is doing. But, this time, some of the defenders couldnt help but sneak a peek. I mean, were not supposed to, so, technically, no, I didnt see it but I de nitely saw it, linebacker Telvin Smith said with a big smile. It was a great play. That just shows his focus and dedication to score. Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 thewakullanews.com By MARTY COHEN It was his coming out party, so to speak, a strong performance in which he nally put his stamp on the offense as the starting quarterback. It was Game Three last season, a 37-20 triumph over Tennessee in Knoxville, a game in which then-sophomore quarterback Jeff Driskel guided the visiting Gators to an impressive road victory, thanks to both his arm and legs. Florida entered the contest 2-0 but wasnt exactly running roughshod over defenses, scoring 47 points in victories over Bowling Green and Texas A&M, picking up a combined 672 yards. But Florida exploded, at least in Gator terms these days, against a hapless Vol defense, piling up 555 yards in a bravura big-play showing by the offense. There was an 80-yard run out of the Wildcat by Trey Burton, followed by a 75-yard catch-andrun on a short hitch pass by Frankie Hammond, a pair of long touchdowns that illustrated the depths Tennessees defense had sunk. Toss in the nest pass Driskel threw all season, a beautiful corner route to Jordan Reed under duress that resulted in a 23-yard touchdown, and the Gators left Rocky Top all smiles in a comfortable 37-20 win, scoring 24 points in the nal 18-plus minutes. It was the rst time I really took over a game, Driskel said when asked to recall last years win over the Vols. We played well as a team, didnt turn the ball over at all, and played well against a really good team. Were going to have to do that again this Saturday. It was a tight game, I think we went in at halftime losing (yup, 14-10), we came out and really poured it on in the second half, had a bunch of big plays. I remember it being a lot of fun, beating Tennessee is always fun. We had some big runs and big catches, some turnovers from the defense that was it. Driskels 219 passing yards was a career high that stood until the Gators last game, the disheartening setback at Miami, where he shattered his personal mark by throwing for 291 yards. But the yardage was immaterial to the mistakes, two costly interceptions in the Red Zone and a fumble that led to Miamis nal touchdown. Si times the Gators dented the Miami 20-yard line, only to score twice for nine points. Not good enough. The shaky, sloppy afternoon was eerily reminiscent of another turnoverplagued game that denied the Gators a chance for a ring last year, the numbing 17-9 loss to Georgia in Jacksonville where the Gators committed an unsightly six turnovers. I think his con dence is ne obviously he forced one ball in there, that he knew he should have thrown the ball out of the endzone and kicked, played for the points there, head coach Will Muschamp said. Jeff had a, we call it a disco route to Quinton Dunbar that he missed a little bit (a wide-open short slant in the front of the endzone that preceded his first interception), was high on that and it probably would have been a touchdown. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&MThe Rattlers have a bye week.#20 Florida at KentuckySaturday, Sept. 28 at 7 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPNU. Boston College at #8 Florida StateSaturday, Sept. 28 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ABC/ESPN2 or ESPNU. DRISKEL HOPES DRISKEL HOPES TO RECREATE TO RECREATE VOL MAGIC VOL MAGICFlorida State quarterback Jameis Winston evades defensive end LeBrandon Richardson and blitzing defensive back Theodore Howard during a bad read that turned into a touchdown.Junior quarterback JEFF DRISKEL scored Floridas rst touchdown against Miami on an easy run off right tackleJameis Winston: Bad read turns into another touchdownPHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 5Boutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsTo dry fire or not to dry fire?The shings good, and weather should clearWell weve been in another one of those wet patterns again, but it looks like its gonna clear up for the weekend. The water around Shell Point is starting to clear up some and hopefully the rains we had wont change that. Fishing reports from the Keaton Beach area continue to be good. Lots of trout are being caught from three to ve feet of water on live pinfish under a cork, the Gulp and top water lures. My neighbor across the street said a friend of his that has a house on the Suwannee said a lot of big trout are being caught down there. Problem is getting sh under 20 inches. Now thats a problem to have. He said they are being caught on the Gulp and a lot of people down there still sh the sinking Mirrolures. Fishing at St. Joe Bay has been real good for reds but trout fishing has been on the slow side. Plenty of ounder are being caught in the potholes on the ats using grubs and live bait. I havent heard anything about the Econfina area but before making the drive down there, I would contact JR at the Aucilla River Store. Talking on Friday morning with a fellow heading over to sh the Dog Island Reef and he said shing there was very good. Plenty of trout, Spanish, jacks, blues and reds were being caught on the Gulp and live shrimp. Fishing around Shell Point continues to be good. Capt. David Fife continues to catch reds and trout around the bars using live minnows, though he is starting to throw more and more top water baits as the water cools down. Mark and Louise Prance have their son and his girlfriend down from north Georgia and they have been dodging the rain showers. On Friday they caught six reds and four ounder shing live bait around the oysters bars near Shell Point. Capt. David Fife, Capt. Luke Frazier, Capt. Kent Taylor and myself went out last Wednesday and, as happens so often, the wind blew all day. It was calm for a week up until then. We managed to catch seven nice trout and a couple of nice reds including a 28-inch sh. Everything was caught on live shrimp. We drifted an area I had never shed before but David said would probably be holding sh this time of year. He was right. I had a charter on Friday and shed that area and had 19 trout. All were caught on live shrimp. We managed one keeper red, two Spanish and a flounder also and the biggest red ever put in my boat, which was caught around an oyster bar. It measured a little over 33 inches long. Kevins Red Trout Shootout was held last weekend and the team of Pop came in with 5 trout weighing 11.06 pounds to take first place. The team of Sims/ Hill took second with 10.55 pounds and team TNA Stick nished third with 10.32 pounds. The largest trout of the tournament was caught by team M$M and weighed 4.82 pounds. The largest red caught weighed 7.37 pounds and was caught by team Myhometownfishing. com. Something that has been hard to nd for me is someone in our area to repair rods and reels but I nally found someone. Mike Flowers, who lives off Spring Creek Highway, repairs both and also makes custom rods. He can be reached at 926-2120. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 From FWC NewsThe recreational harvest of red snapper will open Oct. 1 in state and federal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. In state waters, which are from shore to 9 nautical miles in the Gulf, the season will remain open through Oct. 21, closing on Oct. 22. In federal waters, which are from 9 nautical miles out to 200 nautical miles, the season will remain open through Oct. 14, closing on Oct. 15. These supplemental recreational red snapper seasons are for 2013 only. The minimum size limit in state and federal waters is 16 inches, and the daily bag limit is two per harvester, per day. There is a zero daily bag and possession limit for captain and crew on forhire vessels. Anglers are required to use circle hooks and dehooking devices when shing for any reef species, including red snapper, in Gulf of Mexico state and federal waters. The requirement to use venting tools in federal waters was removed on Sept. 3. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will consider adopting similar changes at a future meeting. The intent of these rules is to help conserve shery resources by increasing the chances for a sh to survive after being caught and released. Learn more about red snapper by visiting MyFWC.com/Fishing and clicking on Saltwater and Recreational Regulations.By MARJ LAWDry ring a gun means you pull the trigger when you know there is no bullet either in the chamber or in the magazine. In fact, the magazine might be out of the gun altogether. Right off the top of my head, I can think of three good reasons not to dry re a gun. One, its bad manners. You just dont pick up someones gun and pull the trigger. Even if you ask to see the gun, it doesnt mean youre allowed to pull the trigger. So, dont. The second reason not to dry re someone elses gun is that there may still be one bullet in the chamber even if the magazine is out of the gun. Some guns are able to re without their magazines. Imagine setting off a gun by accident while youre pointing it any which way! Be safe. Dont pull that trigger. The third reason is that, potentially, you can do serious damage to the gun. Serious and expensive damage. This is what can happen: Modern guns are either rim re or center re guns. On a rim re gun, the ring pin hits the rim of the bullet when its in the chamber. Notice that the circular back of the bullet has a flat surface. When the ring pin hits the rim of that at casing, it causes the primer inside the bullet to ignite, pushing the bullet out of the guns barrel. If there is no bullet in the gun, that firing pin will be pushed forward until it hits something and that something will have to be a spot on the inside frame of the gun. The force of this whomp can damage either the ring pin or the gun itself. Or both. Now, if youve only damaged the firing pin and not the hammer, in some guns you can replace that ring pin. However, in other guns, the ring pin is a part of the hammer, which means youd have to replace the entire hammer. Most people cannot replace the hammer and will have to go to the gunsmith. Inside the gun, dry ring can cause the ring pin to whomp a chip in the chamber where the bullet is usually seated. Now, if the bullet doesnt seat properly, the best that can happen is a failure to re. The worst that can happen is that the ring pin can damage the brass casing of the bullet if the bullet is not seated properly. It could simply explode inside the gun. That may not be reparable. And it can be very dangerous to the shooter. One good reason to be wearing safety glasses! If you have a vintage center re gun, you can see the ring pin. Pull back the hammer. There it is. The old cowboy guns are center re guns. Again, you can damage the hammer and the ring pin both if you dry re. A chipped ring pin can pierce and ignite the primer of the bullet, allowing hot gases back in the face of the shooter. Better to practice pointing in a safe direction saying Bang Bang Bang! than to dry re that revolver. Newer center re wheel guns have the ring pin as part of the frame. Theres a spring in the pin so that it doesnt damage the frame of the gun or the firing pin. You can dry re these. A gun seller or owners manual will tell you if you may dry re. A whole lot of new guns are dry- reable. Jus t out of interest, how do you tell a center re gun from a rim re gun? A way to tell center re guns is to look at their bullets. These have a slightly raised circle in the center of the back of the bullet. This is the primer that the hammer hits. Now, how do you practice dry ring a gun? At the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Range, weve learned that there is a safe way to tell if a gun is truly empty of bullets. Always ask if you can see the gun if it belongs to someone else. Always keep the barrel of the gun pointed down range toward the targets. Whether it is yours or it belongs to someone else, always check to make sure there is no bullet in the gun. If youre holding a semi automatic, make sure you drop the magazine if it is not already dropped. Jack that slide and look in the chamber and barrel of the gun to make certain there is no bullet. If you are holding a revolver, inspect the wheel of the gun for bullets. Empty it. If you have a modern gun that allows for dry ring, now you can do so. If you are not certain, or if your gun does not allow for dry ring, here is what you can do: Purchase snap caps for the caliber of your gun. These have the appearance of bullets, but they have springs inside, so the ring pin is not damaged when you shoot. Snap caps dont go anywhere. They stay in the chamber, unless you jack the slide on an autoloader. They are great for practice. They wont hurt the gun. My bottom line is that I never dry re, unless I have a snap cap in the gun. The money you save by not damaging a gun can go a long way to purchasing a new one. Isnt that a good excuse to expand your collection?Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid shooter in retirement HOME ON THE RANGESpecial to The NewsSaturday, Sept. 28, is the 20th anniversary of National Public Lands Day, and the end of Take A Child Outside week. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge welcomes you to celebrate by joining volunteers of all ages to help outdoors, sprucing up the refuge. A free pancake breakfast from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. begins the day, sponsored by the St. Marks Refuge Association. A short presentation on fall activities at the refuge with staff will follow. Next, visitors may head to one of the following: Families in Nature program on Freshwater Fun with Ranger Heather Bevis, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free. Removing exotic torpedo grass from Plum Orchard Pond behind the Visitor Center from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Come ready to be muddy and wet. Cleaning up the pollinator gardens down at the picnic area from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Bring gloves and clippers. At 1:30 p.m, a short dedication will be held at the Headquarter Pond all access to nature trail, down by the picnic area. Representatives from the refuge and Florida Disabled Outdoors Association will speak brie y and interpretive trail walks will be conducted by volunteer Ken Clineman. Funds for trail renovations were provided by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and entrance fees. Remember, all national public lands offer free entry for National Public Lands Day. Come ride down Lighthouse Road and see the amazing wildflowers and butter ies! For additional information, contact refuge staff at 850/925-6121. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA snap cap for dry ring, a rim re cartridge and center re cartridge. Gulf red snapper opens recreationally Oct. 1 in state and federal waters Refuge celebrates connecting families to nature on Saturday, Sept. 28

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 thewakullanews.com Sadly, we have had a great mentor and a great man cross the bar this past week. Below are excerpts from his obituary. Col. William E. Crouch Jr., U.S. Army (Retired) passed away on Thursday, Sept. 19, 2013 in Panama City. Bill was born in Laurel, Del., on May 28, 1928. He attended Laurel High School and enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps after graduation in 1946. Bill was selected to attend the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, N.Y., and graduated in 1951. While at West Point, he met the love of his life, Betty Jane (BJ) Macaulay, whom he married after graduating and being commissioned as Second Lieutenant. Bill served with distinction during his 30 year Army career. He concluded his military career in 1981 as Commander, U.S. Army Aviation Development Test Activity in Fort Rucker, Ala. He continued to work with Army Aviation as a member of industry until his retirement in 1993. Upon retirement Bill and BJ moved to Panama City Beach and, although a long time boat owner, Bill decided he needed to take a boating safety course to learn more about boating. One thing led to another and he joined the Flotilla 19 of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary in Panama City Beach. He started out as an instructor and shortly thereafter was appointed as Flotilla Finance Of cer. Other staff assignments included Personnel Services Of cer and Communications Services Officer. His leadership positions included service as Flotilla Vice Commander, Flotilla Commander, Division Vice Captain, Division Captain, District Rear Commodore and District Vice Commodore, and in 2007 he was elected Commodore of the Coast Guards Eighth District Coastal Region, with responsibility for all Auxiliary activities from the Arizona / New Mexico state line to St. Marks, and covering all or part of eight southern states. Bills contributions to Boating Safety and the Auxiliary were extensive, and he received numerous awards, including the prestigious Martin S. Herz Award for inspirational leadership in early 2013. He continued to be active as an instructor and advisor until his passing. He is survived by his wife of 62 years, children and grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on Saturday Sept. 28, 2013 at Kent-Forest Lawn Funeral Home at 2 p.m. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to the Wounded Warriors Project (4899 Belfort Road, Suite 300, Jacksonville FL 32256) in his name. Col. Crouchs remains will be interred at Arlington National Cemetery with military honors for his service to the nation at a later date. Those who knew Commodore Crouch have lost a great friend and mentor. The following was sent in by Bob Asztalos: This past weekend, in a milestone, the Coast Guard Auxiliary returned to Apalachicola. On Sunday, Bob Asztalos, Raye Crews, Fran Keating, Dave Rabon and Mark Rosen from Flotilla 12 sailed out of St. George Island and patrolled up the Apalachicola River past the towns waterfront. Many patrons of the waterfront restaurants waved to the unusual sight of Coast Guard Auxiliarists in their area. At one time the waters between St Marks and Apalachicola had a vibrant Coast Guard Auxiliary program providing the public with patrols, boating safety training and boat inspections. Unfortunately, the string of flotillas established along the Gulf Coast in the early days of World War II has slowly shrunk. In the late s there were four active otillas east of Panama City (Carrabelle/St. George, Chipley, Shell Point and St. Marks). In the last decade all of those otillas, except St. Marks, ended operations, including the St. George Flotilla in the early 2000s. That is why the sight of Auxiliarists patrolling the Apalachicola waterfront was such an uncommon sight to the diners. The remaining St. Marks Flotilla has taken over the areas of responsibility for those defunct otillas. We have patrolled in Shell Point, Carrabelle, the St George/Apalachicola area, as well as our home waters of St. Marks. Our hope is that those oldtimers in Apalachicola sitting on the docks enjoyed seeing the red, white and blue emblem of the Auxiliary again plying their waters. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident you are the one who can make a difference! If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux. net.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Pressure Gauge? We Dont Need No Stinkin Pressure Gauges Last week I talked about how building muscle memory can help make you a safer, less stressed, and more ef cient explorer underwater. Things like checking pressure and depth are second nature. But what do we do with this information? Why is the information important? The more experienced I get the more I question why things like time, depth, and pressure actually mater on a minute-by-minute basis. I suppose we can call this complacency but I dont feel that way at all. For example, I know I can use a single aluminum 80 scuba cylinder for over two hours at an average depth of 30 feet. Checking my cylinder pressure every minute is pretty much pointless and extremely distracting. Now I dont dive single cylinders very often so I usually have complete redundancy on board in typically four to six cylinders of breathing gas. Since I have a good feeling for how much gas is used at common average depths its not unheard of for me to not check pressure but about every 20-30 minutes. Having depth and time on my wrist is a convenient way to monitor my air pressure without actually reaching for a gauge. You can argue about leaks, I have had them and its pretty obvious when something blows. Gregg, with his rebreather, is checking cylinder pressure even less. In fact almost not at all unless there is a problem or leak detected. Even with such small cylinders, usually about 20 cubic feet each, his rebreather can run for hours and not run low. His primary concern is a value called PPO2 or the partial pressure of oxygen he is breathing. This he checks every minute or two but if he is distracted with a task underwater the values are still visible on a heads up display. Because rebreathers are perfect nitrox mixing machines and they can run for many hours underwater even depth is much less of a concern, so long as the diluent gas is suitable. Depth is often a primary concern for divers. It becomes a xation out of either fear or adventure. All too often I hear We arent going to dive deeper than. and I usually tell people depth doesnt matter. Your equipment choice, for more or less recreational depths, doesnt really matter. Gear that keeps you alive at 60 feet will do the same at 120. When you venture much outside of recreational depths there is only a concern because of the additional (or specialized) equipment you must carry, speci cally breathing gas. The issue of decompression is another frequently monitored threshold in diving. Decompression shouldnt scare you but you should be aware of it. Every dive is a decompression dive and so long as you have the available breathing gas to complete the obligation then what else matters? Take a course in decompression diving and it will shed some light on this taboo topic. Watching your dive computer every few seconds to get every second on the bottom but not push into mandatory decompression can be more dangerous than staying longer and doing the deco. After all, we paid for the fuel to get to the dive site so why not do a little decompression and spend as much time underwater as possible? If we know the average depth of a dive site, the amount of gas available or PPO2 for the rebreather guys, and have a way to measure time then the rest is almost redundant. This allows for much greater ef ciency when completing an underwater task and reduces overall task loading. Shek Exley proved that even a watch isnt relevant if you can keep a calm head. He completed a lengthy decompression by counting seconds in his head when he lost use of his time piece. Later Shek died exploring this same cave, Zacaton, to nearly 1,000 feet. Building experience at your favorite dive sites and in your favorite equipment con guration will help you to estimate remaining air supply or remaining time before hitting decompression. This can be a handy tool if a dive computer stops working mid dive or a pressure gauge sticks. These things happen, dont let them ruin the experience.Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting Commodore Crouch Sherrie Alverson and Commodore Crouch Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Sep 26, 13 Fri Sep 27, 13 Sat Sep 28, 13 Sun Sep 29, 13 Mon Sep 30, 13 Tue Oct 1, 13 Wed Oct 2, 13 Date 3.0 ft. 12:10 AM 3.3 ft. 12:46 AM 3.4 ft. 1:17 AM High 1.9 ft. 12:13 AM 2.1 ft. 1:12 AM 2.1 ft. 2:44 AM 2.0 ft. 4:26 AM 1.7 ft. 5:39 AM 1.3 ft. 6:30 AM 1.0 ft. 7:11 AM Low 3.3 ft. 5:56 AM 3.1 ft. 6:52 AM 2.9 ft. 8:39 AM 3.0 ft. 10:45 AM 3.2 ft. 11:53 AM 3.4 ft. 12:41 PM 3.6 ft. 1:22 PM High 1.1 ft. 1:59 PM 1.2 ft. 3:29 PM 1.2 ft. 4:51 PM 1.1 ft. 5:50 PM 1.0 ft. 6:33 PM 0.9 ft. 7:07 PM 0.9 ft. 7:38 PM Low 2.7 ft. 8:38 PM 2.7 ft. 10:12 PM 2.8 ft. 11:23 PM High Thu Sep 26, 13 Fri Sep 27, 13 Sat Sep 28, 13 Sun Sep 29, 13 Mon Sep 30, 13 Tue Oct 1, 13 Wed Oct 2, 13 Date 2.3 ft. 12:02 AM 2.4 ft. 12:38 AM 2.6 ft. 1:09 AM High 1.4 ft. 12:24 AM 1.5 ft. 1:23 AM 1.5 ft. 2:55 AM 1.4 ft. 4:37 AM 1.2 ft. 5:50 AM 1.0 ft. 6:41 AM 0.7 ft. 7:22 AM Low 2.5 ft. 5:48 AM 2.3 ft. 6:44 AM 2.2 ft. 8:31 AM 2.2 ft. 10:37 AM 2.4 ft. 11:45 AM 2.6 ft. 12:33 PM 2.7 ft. 1:14 PM High 0.8 ft. 2:10 PM 0.9 ft. 3:40 PM 0.9 ft. 5:02 PM 0.8 ft. 6:01 PM 0.7 ft. 6:44 PM 0.6 ft. 7:18 PM 0.6 ft. 7:49 PM Low 2.0 ft. 8:30 PM 2.0 ft. 10:04 PM 2.1 ft. 11:15 PM High Thu Sep 26, 13 Fri Sep 27, 13 Sat Sep 28, 13 Sun Sep 29, 13 Mon Sep 30, 13 Tue Oct 1, 13 Wed Oct 2, 13 Date 2.8 ft. 12:46 AM 3.0 ft. 1:22 AM 3.2 ft. 1:53 AM High 1.7 ft. 1:17 AM 1.9 ft. 2:16 AM 1.9 ft. 3:48 AM 1.8 ft. 5:30 AM 1.5 ft. 6:43 AM 1.2 ft. 7:34 AM 0.9 ft. 8:15 AM Low 3.1 ft. 6:32 AM 2.9 ft. 7:28 AM 2.7 ft. 9:15 AM 2.8 ft. 11:21 AM 3.0 ft. 12:29 PM 3.2 ft. 1:17 PM 3.4 ft. 1:58 PM High 1.0 ft. 3:03 PM 1.1 ft. 4:33 PM 1.1 ft. 5:55 PM 1.0 ft. 6:54 PM 0.9 ft. 7:37 PM 0.8 ft. 8:11 PM 0.8 ft. 8:42 PM Low 2.5 ft. 9:14 PM 2.5 ft. 10:48 PM 2.6 ft. 11:59 PM High Thu Sep 26, 13 Fri Sep 27, 13 Sat Sep 28, 13 Sun Sep 29, 13 Mon Sep 30, 13 Tue Oct 1, 13 Wed Oct 2, 13 Date 2.6 ft. 5:40 AM 2.5 ft. 12:30 AM 2.7 ft. 1:01 AM High 1.1 ft. 1:38 PM 2.0 ft. 12:51 AM 2.1 ft. 2:23 AM 1.9 ft. 4:05 AM 1.7 ft. 5:18 AM 1.3 ft. 6:09 AM 1.0 ft. 6:50 AM Low 2.1 ft. 8:22 PM 2.4 ft. 6:36 AM 2.3 ft. 8:23 AM 2.3 ft. 10:29 AM 2.5 ft. 11:37 AM 2.7 ft. 12:25 PM 2.8 ft. 1:06 PM High 1.2 ft. 3:08 PM 1.2 ft. 4:30 PM 1.0 ft. 5:29 PM 0.9 ft. 6:12 PM 0.9 ft. 6:46 PM 0.8 ft. 7:17 PM Low 2.1 ft. 9:56 PM 2.2 ft. 11:07 PM 2.4 ft. 11:54 PM High Thu Sep 26, 13 Fri Sep 27, 13 Sat Sep 28, 13 Sun Sep 29, 13 Mon Sep 30, 13 Tue Oct 1, 13 Wed Oct 2, 13 Date 3.1 ft. 12:07 AM 3.3 ft. 12:43 AM 3.5 ft. 1:14 AM High 2.0 ft. 12:10 AM 2.2 ft. 1:09 AM 2.3 ft. 2:41 AM 2.1 ft. 4:23 AM 1.8 ft. 5:36 AM 1.4 ft. 6:27 AM 1.1 ft. 7:08 AM Low 3.4 ft. 5:53 AM 3.1 ft. 6:49 AM 3.0 ft. 8:36 AM 3.0 ft. 10:42 AM 3.3 ft. 11:50 AM 3.5 ft. 12:38 PM 3.7 ft. 1:19 PM High 1.2 ft. 1:56 PM 1.3 ft. 3:26 PM 1.3 ft. 4:48 PM 1.2 ft. 5:47 PM 1.0 ft. 6:30 PM 1.0 ft. 7:04 PM 0.9 ft. 7:35 PM Low 2.7 ft. 8:35 PM 2.7 ft. 10:09 PM 2.9 ft. 11:20 PM High Thu Sep 26, 13 Fri Sep 27, 13 Sat Sep 28, 13 Sun Sep 29, 13 Mon Sep 30, 13 Tue Oct 1, 13 Wed Oct 2, 13 Date 3.1 ft. 5:46 AM 2.8 ft. 12:17 AM 2.8 ft. 12:45 AM 2.9 ft. 1:08 AM High 0.7 ft. 1:46 PM 1.9 ft. 12:57 AM 1.9 ft. 2:36 AM 1.8 ft. 4:01 AM 1.6 ft. 5:04 AM 1.4 ft. 5:54 AM 1.1 ft. 6:36 AM Low 2.6 ft. 9:49 PM 3.0 ft. 6:45 AM 2.8 ft. 8:00 AM 2.8 ft. 9:28 AM 2.8 ft. 10:53 AM 2.8 ft. 12:04 PM 2.9 ft. 1:05 PM High 0.7 ft. 3:00 PM 0.8 ft. 4:05 PM 0.8 ft. 4:59 PM 0.8 ft. 5:44 PM 0.9 ft. 6:22 PM 1.0 ft. 6:55 PM Low 2.7 ft. 10:53 PM 2.7 ft. 11:41 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 26 Oct. 2First Oct. 11 Full Oct. 18 Last Sept. 26 New Oct. 46:58 am-8:58 am 7:22 pm-9:22 pm --:-----:-1:57 pm-2:57 pm 7:45 am-9:45 am 8:09 pm-10:09 pm 12:45 am-1:45 am 2:41 pm-3:41 pm 8:32 am-10:32 am 8:55 pm-10:55 pm 1:37 am-2:37 am 3:23 pm-4:23 pm 9:18 am-11:18 am 9:41 pm-11:41 pm 2:29 am-3:29 am 4:02 pm-5:02 pm 10:04 am-12:04 pm 10:26 pm-12:26 am 3:22 am-4:22 am 4:38 pm-5:38 pm 10:49 am-12:49 pm 11:11 pm-1:11 am 4:16 am-5:16 am 5:14 pm-6:14 pm 11:34 am-1:34 pm --:-----:-5:12 am-6:12 am 5:50 pm-6:50 pm Average Average Average Average Average Average Good7:27 am 7:28 pm --:-1:58 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:28 am 7:27 pm 12:47 am 2:43 pm 7:29 am 7:25 pm 1:38 am 3:24 pm 7:29 am 7:24 pm 2:30 am 4:03 pm 7:30 am 7:23 pm 3:23 am 4:40 pm 7:30 am 7:22 pm 4:17 am 5:15 pm 7:31 am 7:21 pm 5:12 am 5:51 pm55% 49% 43% 37% 31% 25% 18%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 7B The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comAdmit Alike Alive Asked Banned Bridges Cheap Choir Chunks Civil CollarConsiderablyContributions Dif culty Drily Endure Enemy Event Facts Fellow Geese Grace Guide Harbor Kicking Lasts Learn Luxury Maple Massive Needing Origin Plays Potion Rapid Riding Roman Sailing Saved Scenery Sheer Shocked Sorrow Spaces Spain Stirs There Untie Wipes The Wakulla News

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 thewakullanews.com py Todays New Ads OCHLOCKONEE BAYYouth Yard Sale52 Coastal Hwy at the Old Oaks Restaurant parking lot. Sat Sept 28 from 8:00-1:00. Lots of household and collectible items. One Acre Lot w/Well Septic & Utility Pole off Wakulla Spring Rd HWY61 $15,500 (850) 421-2205 Stop scratching & gnawing. Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch No More, apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet... Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703 (www.happy jackinc.com) Are You a Licensed Contractor?Want to help train the next generation of workers? TCC seeks a Program Coordinator for its Trades/ Industrial/Green program. Interested applicants should visit www.tcc.fl.edu to apply. CRST offers the Best Lease Purchase Program! SIGN ON BONUS. No Down Payment or Credit Check. Great Pay. Class-A CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call: 866-390-0117 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Need Carpet/Vinyl Installerspls call 850-670-4211 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 TURN KEY SPECIALTY Sandwich Shop fo r Sale owner retiring, well est. clientele, just walk in and take over! email: gfurdock@gmail.com REFRIGERATOR W/ ICE MAKER G.E. WHITE SIDE BYSIDE 2DEEP21.5 WIDE 5HIGH $300.00 352-382-0009 AUCTIONS -Roofing Company Liquidation, Online Auction Only, Bid September 17 thru September 26, Items Located in Maryland & Florida. Motleys Auction & Realty Group, 804-232-3300, www.motleys.com, VAAL#16. CRAWFORDVILLE122 Crestwood Drive. Multi-Family Yard Sale. Teen & womens clothing, household items, linens, some furniture, craft items, childrens items,and much much more. OCHLOCKONEE BAYYouth Yard Sale52 Coastal Hwy at the Old Oaks Restaurant parking lot. Sat Sept 28 from 8:00-1:00. Lots of household and collectible items. Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. Ace Hardware (850-926-3141) www. happyjackinc.com Stop scratching & gnawing. Promote healing & hair growth. Stamp out ITCHAMCALLITS! Shampoo with Happy Jack Itch No More, apply Skin Balm add Tonekote to diet... Ashley Feed & Hardware (850) 421-7703 (www.happy jackinc.com) CRAWFORDVILLEComing in October, 2BR/2BA on 5 acres. Summer Wind subdivision. 3 miles south of Woodville. $775 month.(850) 574-4354 MEDART4BR, 2BA, Fireplace, Central Heat/Air, Washer/Dryer hookup, on 1 acre Across from elementary school. $895.mo., $700 dep (850)926-2955 Wakulla GardensSpacious 2/2 SWMH Open Floor Plan $595/mo + deposit.(850) 524-4090 Ochlockonee Baytwo homes available 3BR/3BAhome on canal, screened porch, garage/workshop, boatlift -$1075/month or 2BR/2BAhome on Bay, carport and storage shed $1000/month. First/Last/Deposit. References required. Call Carol Odell, Century 21 Silver Coast Realty, 850-984-5007 Ochlockonee Baytwo homes available 3BR/3BAhome on canal, screened porch, garage/workshop, boatlift -$1075/month or 2BR/2BAhome on Bay, carport and storage shed $1000/month. First/Last/Deposit. References required. Call Carol Odell, Century 21 Silver Coast Realty, 850-984-5007 WAKULLAConvenient Location 3/2, large corner lot wooded buffer, porches, CHA, appls include washer & dryer $700/mo+ security Brenda Hicks Realty (850)251-1253 49 Tower Road, Panacea, Wakulla County 3 bedroom 2 full bath home with new carpet and paint, just off 98. Built in 2009 with a 1/2 acre lot, deck and one car garage. Move in ready! Call Danielle at 1st Choice Real Estate 850-8937221 1stchoicehouses.com 168 Chicopee 2 bdrm home w/huge family room. Tile wood laminate, kitchen appliances including fridge. Privacy fenced back yard for kids and/or pets. $68,650 Contact Penny McKinney|McKinney Properties,LLC @ 850-926-9991 Realtor. FOR SALE:2 Bdrm., 1 Bath House On 2 Acres 2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing Available with Easy Terms. WAC Call 855-847-6807. Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 211 Northeast 4th Street, Chiefland, FL BANK OWNED ABSOLUTE AUCTION 6,400+/-SF of space in 2 Buildings on 1.16 Acres. One vacant single family home and a second bldg. used as a daycare facility. Inspect: Sept. 30th @ 11 AM Onsite Auction with Webcast bidding on October 2nd @ 3 PM Local contact: Julian Howell, 877-980-9565. More info at www.auctionEbid.com FLBKR#CQ1029847 Auction MGMTCorp. Jeb@auctionEbid.com Bank Approved Sale. Smith Lake Alabama. Deep Dockable Home Sites from $59,900 (Take Virtual Tour @ LiveLakefront.com). 26 Prime Lake front lots ordered sold October 12th. Buy at pennies on the dollar -all must go! Open or wooded level throughout to the waters edge. Make an early appointment. Banks loss -Your gain! Dont miss this. Its unbelievable land at an unbelievable price -Call now for early appointment! 1-877-448-6816. Blue Ridge Mountain Land Liquidation! 1.37 acres, national forest access, only $9,800. Was $74,900. Hardwood setting, breathtaking mountain/ valley views. Mild climate, Tremendous 4 season recreation. Paved rds, UG utilities, water. Excellent financing Call 1-866-952-5303, x21 UNRESTRICTED ACREAGE ON CUMBERLAND PLATEAU! 50-89 Acres Starting at $78,000. Heavily Wooded, Minutes from 4 State Parks & TN River. Call 877-282-4409 75 WOODED ACRESoff Bloxham Cut-off. 2 miles east of HWY 20, adjacent to Freeman Creek. Across from National Forrest. $3000/per acre. Will divide into 30 and 45 acre track. (850) 576-2695 75 WOODED ACRESoff Bloxham Cut-off. 2 miles east of HWY 20, adjacent to Freeman Creek. Across from National Forrest. $3000/per acre. Will divide into 30 and 45 acre track. (850) 576-2695 One Acre Lot w/Well Septic & Utility Pole off Wakulla Spring Rd HWY61 $15,500 (850) 421-2205 Sell Your Classic! Get top dollar for your classic car at Lake Mirror Classic Auto Auction in Lakeland, Fl on October 19th! Call 1-800-257-4161 M.E. Higgenbotham, FL Lic# AU305AB158 5884-0926 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Christian radio station WUJC will be holding a public meeting at St. Marks Volunteer Fire Dept., on Thursday, October 3rd at noon. This is a general meeting that will address public issues, and any questions or concern s about CSN International The public is invited t o attend. September 26, 201 3 5889-1003 TWN vs. McGlohon, Frankie LCase No. 652012CA000290CAXXXX NOFS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION, CASE NO.: 652012CA000290CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION 5890-1003 TWN Vs. Bassin, Donna J. Case No. 2012-000207-CANOS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 2012-000207-CA GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, 7360 S. Kyrene Road, Tempe, AZ 85283, Plaintiff, v. DONNAJ. BASSIN, and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DONNAJ. BASSIN, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment to Re-Establish Lost Instrument and Foreclosure Mortgage entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: EXHIBIT A. WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999, GENERALMANUFACTURED HOUSING, D6648, 24 x 52 MOBILE HOME, SERIALNUMBER:GMHGA1229923967AB. Commonly known as: 1345 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 10th day of October, 2013. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at the Northwest corner of Lot 1, Block of Wakulla Gardens. Unit 3, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book I, page 43 or the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 71 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds East 212.56 feet to a I inch iron pipe. thence run North 18degrees 54 minutes 01 seconds West 122.37 feet to a re-rod (marked #6475) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 18 degrees 55 minutes 03 seconds West 181.38 feet to a. re-rod (marked #6475) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of County Road #S-368, thence run North 86 degrees 49 minutes 22 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary) 132.50 feet to a rod (marked #6475). thence run South I8 degrees 54 minutes 22 seconds East 145.92 feet to a re-rod (marked 6475). thence run South 71 degrees 18 minutes 03 seconds West 127.51 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING The above desribed parcel being a portion of those lands as described in Official Records Book 22. page 196, Official Records Book 22. page 197, Official Records Book 37,page 477 and Official Records Book 66, page 764 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. September 26 & October 3, 2013 5891-1003 TWN Vs. Bassin, Donna J. Case No.12-438-CANOS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 12-438-CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANY, AS TRUSTEE ON BEHALF OF ACE SECURITYCORP. MANUFACTURED HOUSING TRUST, SERIES 2003 MH1, ASSET-BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, acting by and through GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, as Servicing Agent 7360 S. Kyrene Road Tempe, AZ 85283, Plaintiff, v. DONNAJ. BASSIN A/K/ADONNACHAMBERS BASSIN, SANTANAM. BASSIN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SANTANAM. BASSIN, JOHN T. GAY, and THE UNKNOWN PARTYIN POSSESSION OF 1347 DR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR MEMORIALROAD, formerly known as 1347 LOWER BRIDGE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN THAT, pursuant to Plaintiffs Final Summary Judgment to Reform Deed and Foreclose Mortgage entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows, to wit: SEE EXHIBIT A; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2000 GENERALMOBILE HOME, MODELNUMBER GC54471, SERIALNUMBER GMHGA4219924599A&B. Commonly known as: 1347 DR MARTIN LUTHER KING JR MEMORIALROAD, formerly known as 1347 LOWER BRIDGE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327. at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 11:00 AM (EST), on the 10th day of October, 2013. If you are a subordinate lien holder claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the Clerk of Court no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim, you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. Notice to Persons With Disabilities: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrators office not later than seven days prior to the proceeding. (Court Seal) Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at the Northwest corner of Lot 1, Block of Wakulla Gardens, Unit 3, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book I, page 43 or the Public Records of Wakulla County. Florida and thence run North 71 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds East 212.56 feet to a 1 inch iron pipemarking the POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 71 degrees 18 minutes 30 seconds East 147.45 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919) thence run North 18 degrees 53 minutes 17 seconds West 262.72 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919) lying on the Southerly right-of-way boundary of County Road #S-368, thence run South 86 degrees 53 minutes 32 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 20.80 feet to a rod (marked #6475), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 18 degrees 54 minutes 22 seconds East 145.92 feet to a re-rod (marked 6475), thence run South 71 degrees 18 minutes 03 seconds West 127.51 feet to a re-rod (marked #6475), thence run South 18 degrees 54 minutes 01 seconds West 122.37 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING The above described parcel being a portion of those lands as described in Official Records Book 22, page 196, Official Records Book 22. page 197, Official Records Book 37, page 477 and Official Records Book 66, page 764 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. September 26 & October 3, 2013 6 NINE GABLES, CRAWFORDVILLEGreat family home on 4 landscaped, fenced acres in excellent location. 4 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, formal living room, spacious family room w/replace and built in bookcases. Nice size kitchen w/ all appliances and bar. Split bedroom plan. Master bedroom has walkin closet and French door leading to an inviting, large screened porch and deck. Backyard is your own private oasis w/ 20x40 saltwater pool, enchanting Koi pond with bridge and gorgeous landscaping. Pole barn and green house. Out building w/power, ac, and cook area. 2 car detached garage with attached breezeway. Security system and solar powered gate. Reduced price of $199,000! Hosted by Lynn Cole`Eddinger. Directions: Heading south on Crawfordville Hwy., take left at McDonalds (Wakulla Aaron Road), Home on left at corner of Wakulla Aaron & Nine Gables. COASTWISE.HOMESANDLAND.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, Sept. 29 1-4PM 3BR 2BA Hs $850mo + Sec Dep 3BR 2BA TwnHs $850mo + Sec Dep 1BR 1BA Hs $550mo + Sec Dep RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerOne Stop Real Estate Of ce2655 B Crawfordville Hwy Downtown CrawfordvilleSTORAGE RENTALSAVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co. Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e r r n n E q q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m m e n n t t t o H e C C C ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f t t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED PAINTING AND LAWN SERVICE850-570-1687 850-296-5854 R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 9B SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION Plaintiff, vs. FRANKIE L. MCGLOHON, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated September 10, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652012CA000290CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACOUNTY, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE, LLC SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, is Plaintiff, and FRANKIE L. MCGLOHON, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 10 day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 11, Block B, HAMMOCK WOODS, according to the plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 6 of the Public Records of WAKULLACounty, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: September 19, 2013 Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road,Ft. Lauderdale, FL33309 Tel: 954-462-7000,Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Heather J. Koch Phelan Hallinan, PLC Heather J. Koch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89107 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact:Danny Davis,Court Technology Office,Office of Court Administration,301 S Monroe St, Rm 225,Tallahassee, FL32303. 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 26 & October 3, 2013 PH # 33022 5876-0926 TWN vs. Kane, Georgia L. Case No 13000236CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000236CAAXMX CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2, Plaintiff vs. GEORGIA L. KANE, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: GEORGIA L. KANE: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 42 ANN CIR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: THE FOLLOWING REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF WAKULLA, STATE OF FLORIDA: LOT 5, BLOCK A, HAMMOCK WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: 42 ANN CIR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff`s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTOR5877-0926 TWN vs. Michalski, Marc Case No. 65-2012-CA-000339 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000339 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. MARC R. MICHALSKI; AMY L MICHALSKI; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 8, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000339, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and MARC R. MICHALSKI; AMY L. MICHALSKI; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 10 day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 28,CAMELOT, A SUBDIVISION A PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com September 19 & 26, 2013 12-06839 JPC 5878-0926 TWN Vs. Braswell, Harry 2013-CA-000073 Re-Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2013-CA-000073 GENERATION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. HARRY BRASWELL, et al., Defendant(s) RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 6, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2013-CA-000073 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein GENERATION MORTGAGE COPANY is the Plaintiff and HARRY BRASWELL; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HARRY BRASWELL; and REBA BRASWELL; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF REBA BRASWELL; and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; and UNKNOWN TENANT #1; and UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, BLOCK B OF GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 77 & 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 20 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, WAKULLA County, WAKULLA COUNTY CLERK OF COURT, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. September 19 & 26, 2013 678280.005066/nporter 5879-0926 TWN vs. Martin, Suzanne Case No. 65-2012-CA-000048 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000048 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. SUZANNE MARTIN A/K/A SUZANNE O. MARTIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUZANNE MARTIN A/K/A SUZANNE O. MARTIN; MICHAEL MARTIN A/K/A MICHAEL S. MARTIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL MARTIN A/K/A MICHAEL S. MARTIN; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUAR5880-0926 TWN Vs. Drake, Karen W. Case No. 65-2012-CA-000008 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000008 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. KAREN W. DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY GRINER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KAREN W. DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY GRINER UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SUNTRUST BANK Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOTS 62 AND 63, OF BLOCK 14, OF WAKULLA GARDENS, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. a/k/a 156 CHOCTAW ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2725 at public sale on October 10, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5 day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200,St. Petersburg, FL 33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771 September 19 & 26, 2013. 5881-0926 TWN vs. Pafford, Terry D. Case No. 65-2011-CA-000370 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000370 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TERRY D. PAFFORD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TERRY D. PAFFORD; CARRIE R. PAFFORD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARRIE R. PAFFORD; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 40, THE GROVE PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS FO WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 248 SAND PINE TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthoushouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM, on October 10, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 5 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 19 & 26, 2013 94966-T 5882-0926 TWN vs. St. James, Ewan Case No. 08-00124 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 08-00124 DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS INC. ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-IOM3, Plaintiff, vs. EWAN ST. JAMES, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE 5885-1003 TWN v. Penton, Amber Case No. 652012CA000028CAXXXX NOFS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 652012CA000028CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, AMBER R. PENTON, ET AL., DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 18th day of July, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652012CA000028CAXXXX, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 A.M. on the 10th day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 17, OF BLOCK 12, OF WAKULLA GARDENS, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1-800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerks number is included on each county page. Dated this 5th day of August, 2013 ______________________________ Clerk of The Circuit Court Wakulla County Clerk of Court By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (Circuit Court Seal) Michael Bruning, Esq.Florida Bar#: 37361 Connolly, Geaney, Ablitt & Willard, PC. The Blackstone Building,100 South Dixie Highway, Suite 200 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Primary E-mail: pleadings@acdlaw.com Secondary E-mail: mbruning@acdlaw.com Toll Free: (561) 422-4668,Facsimile: (561) 249-0721 Counsel for Plaintiff September 26 & October 3rd, 2013 File#: C301.1099 5888-1003 TWN vs. Raflowski, William J. Case No.2009-CA 000063 NOS PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 2009-CA-000063 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., Plaintiff, vs. WILLIAM J. RAFLOWSKI; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WILLIAM J. RAFLOWSKI; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 5, WAKULLA SPRINGS ACRES, A SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 103, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. To include a: 1996 Hickory, VIN GAFLS35A10651HH21 and 69416623 1996 Hickory, VIN GAFLS35B10651HH21 and 69416624 A/K/A 220 SHADEVILLE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthoushouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM, on the 17th day of October, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the8 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 26 & October 3, 2013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 21, 2013, and entered in Case No. 08-00124 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which The Bank Of New York Mellon fka The Bank Of New York As Trustee For The Certificateholders CWABS Inc. Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-IOM3, is the Plaintiff and Ewan St. James, Camelot Townhome Owners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., Unknown Spouse of Ewan St. James n/k/a Ann Marie St. James, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 10 day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 45, CAMELOT SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.. A/K/A 3-D GUINEVERE LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. September 19 & 26, 2013 11-67877 TER OF SECTION SEVEN (7), TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST AND RUN EAST 305 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 360.5 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267, THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 267 A DISTANCE OF 208.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 352.9 FEET THENCE WEST 208.7 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST. A/K/A 3611 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthoushouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM, on October 17, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 22 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 19 & 26, 2013 112665 ajp 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 32 HideAWay Lane3 BR/2 1/2BA on 1 Acre. $1,300. Mo., $1,300 Dep. No Smoking. No Pets. 42 Francis Avenue (Panacea) 3/2 doublewide mobile home. $700 mo. $700 security deposit. No smoking, no pets. Panacea in Tarpine 3/2 1,612 sq.ft. No smoking, no pets. $1,200 mo. $1,200 security deposit. Available now! 3143 Shadeville Hwy, near Wakulla Station, 3BD/2BA house, No smoking, no pets. $900 mo. $900 security deposit. Available Sept. 1st. 14 Cutchins Court, 3 BD/2BA Doublewide. No smoking, no pets. $700 mo. $700 security deposit. Available Sept. 15th. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!695-5C Mashes Sands Rd. 2 BR/2BA 2 Story Condo. Washer/Dryer, Pool, Boat Slips. No Smoking, No Pets! $1,100. mo. Bay View River Home 6 River Cove 2BR/1BA, Ochlockonee Bay, near boat ramp. $550.mo. 7 Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA CHA, Carport, 1 Car Garage. $630 mo. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550 mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area, Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $950 mo.

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1234 56789 10111213 14 15 16 1718 19 20 21 22 2324 2526 27 28 29 3031 32 3334 35 363738 39 40 41 4243 44 45 46 47 48 495051 52 5354 55 5657 5859 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 Across 1. Lucy's hubby 5. Japanese seafood dish 10. After-shower application 14. Original sin site 15. "The Cherry Orchard" playwright Chekhov 16. Length times width 17. Hollywood's nickname 19. Marty Feldman's "Young Frankenstein" role 20. Paula of 59-down fame 21. Yes, in France 22. Companionless 23. Church official 25. Nonstick stuff 27. Excommunication candidate 29. Haifa's land 32. Did a cobbling job 35. Japanese wrestling 36. Funny Stewart 39. Picket-line participant 41. Groom's garb 42. Perlman of "Cheers" 44. Surround 46. Oklahoman 48. Dinnerware washer 52. Later 55. Layers 56. Beast of burden 58. Architect I. M. ___ 60. Bridge seats 61. Tiny bit 62. Being in charge 64. Ardor 65. One-way sign symbol 66. Model Macpherson 67. With competence 68. Crystal of country music 69. Twosome Down 1. Disengage 2. Like many mushrooms 3. "Return to ___" (Elvis song) 4. Underwriter 5. Mineo of movies 6. Second word of the golden rule 7. Thickset 8. "Deal or No Deal" name 9. Bed-and-breakfast 10. Clothes pros 11. Golden Fleece seeker 12. Russian revolutionary Trotsky 13. Part of TLC 18. Authority-exercising groups 22. Bundy and Yankovic 24. Water reservoir 26. "Semper ___" (Marine's motto) 28. It grows in ears 30. Ostrich look-alike 31. Bagel topper 33. Tyler of "The Incredible Hulk" 34. Supplemented, with "out" 36. PSAT takers 37. Exclamation of surprise 38. Of newborns 40. Roll-call list 43. Deviation from the norm 45. Put into words 47. Greek vowel 49. How bad decisions may be made 50. Hun honcho 51. Caught one's breath 53. "Carmen," for one 54. Fatigued 56. Ms. Minnelli 57. Leopold's partner in crime 59. "American ___" 62. Jet ___ 63. Farm femaleEach puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 23 4 5 673 489 3 958 12 5687 512 746 92318 00 9 HometownContent 719 2638 4 5 265847391 438159726 374 925618 681734259 592618437 843 596172 157482963 926371584 DESI SUSHI TALC EDEN ANTON AREA TINSELTOWN IGOR ABDUL OUI ALONE CLERIC TEFLON HERETIC ISRAEL RESOLED SUMO JON STRIKER TUX RHEA ENVELOP SOONER DISHRAG NOTNOW STRATA LLAMA PEI EASTS IOTA LEADERSHIP ZEAL ARROW ELLE ABLY GAYLE DYAD NEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by October 19, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 29 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Court, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk September 19 & 26, 2013 CA13-02556/TB 5875-0926 TWN vs. Coastal Blue Waters Properties LLC 13-9-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-9-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company Plaintiff, v. COASTAL BLUE WATERS PROPERTIES, LLC, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: GREG SMITH AKA ALVAH MCGREGOR SMITH 11208 HUTCHINSON BLVD., APT. 104, PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL 32407 and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant(s) either of them, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Mortgage and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: LOTS 5, 6, 7, 11 & 12, BLOCK 30; LOTS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, BLOCK 35; LOTS 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, BLOCK 37; LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK 39; LOTS 4, 5, 11, 12 & 13, BLOCK 40; LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 BLOCK 41; LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, BLOCK 42; LOTS 1, 2, 3, BLOCK 43 OF PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, UNIT 1, A SUB AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written de5886-1003 TWN est. of Timothy Gardner, File no. 13-70CP, NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO. 13-70CP IN RE: ESTATE OF TMOTHY GARDNER a/k/a TIMOTHY MARK GARDNER, deceased NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of TIMOTHY GARDNER a/k/a TIMOTHY MARK GARDNER, deceased, whose date of death was April 22, 2013; File Number 13-70CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representative=s attorney are set forthe below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent=s estate, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedent=s estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFT ER THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is: 9/26/2013. BARRON & REDDING, P.A. /s/ Brian De. Leebrick /s/ James Foster Davis Florida Bar #172634 Personal Representative PO Box 2467, Panama City, FL 32402 6401 Oakshore Drive, Parker, FL 32404 (850)785-7454 Primary: bleebrick@barronredding.com Secondary: ddonopria@barronredding.com ATTORNEYS FOR PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE September 26 & October 3, 2013 5887-1003 TWN est. of Moody, Virginia Lynne, File No. 2013CP24, NTC PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 2013 CP 24 IN RE: ESTATE OF VIRGINIA LYNNE MOODY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of VIRGINIA LYNNE MOODY, deceased, whose date of death was January 1, 2013, has been filed in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is Clerk of Circuit Court, Probate Division, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy.Crawfordville, FL 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. ALL INTERESTED PERSONS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against the decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is September 26, 2013. Attorney For Personal Representative:Personal Representative: /s/JEREMY E. COHEN /S/LARRY D. MOODY Fla. Bar No. 011391399 Monocoupe Circle 1435 Piedmont Drive East, Suite 110Panacea, FL 32346 Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 907-9700 September 26 & October 3, 2013 fenses, if any, to it on: Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is: ADAM CERVERA, ESQUIRE Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., Alhambra Towers, 121 Alhambra Plaza, 10th Floor, Coral Gables, FL 33134 on or before thirty (30 ) days from the date of the first publication, and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court August 9, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, as Deputy Clerk September 19 & 26, 2013

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 Page 11B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where does the greatest tide change on Earth occur? 2. SCIENCE: What is the largest cell in the human body? 3. LANGUAGE: What is an elixir? 4. ART: Who painted The Judgment of Paris? 5. ENTERTAINERS: Who did Fred Astaire marry in 1980? 6. HISTORY: How long did The Hundred Years War between England and France last? 7. ADVERTISING SLOGANS: What product has been advertised as the San Francisco treat. 8. LITERATURE: What was the real name of the British author who penned Animal Farm under the name George Orwell? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Who was known as The Singing Cowboy? 10. TELEVISION: What was the name of the company where George Jetson worked in The Jetsons? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. The Bay of Fundy in Eastern Canada. The difference between low and high tide can be as great as 55 feet. 2. The ovum 3. A cure-all 4. Peter Paul Rubens 5. Jockey Robyn Smith 6. 116 years 7. Rice-A-Roni 8. Eric Arthur Blair 9. Gene Autry 10. Spacely Space Sprockets Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideSKYBOX Lunch for 2 order from menu Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9771NEW KITCHEN HOURS 11AM TIL MIDNIGHTCALL IN OR DINE IN Come Have Come Have With Us! With Us!DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE850-926-9771 Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant P leasure Seeking ?Park yourself in front of a plate of Offer starts Oct.1 PUMPKIN PANCAKES But don't wait... when the night begins to fall on Halloween... it's too late... ...they'll be gone. M wuuaahhhaaahah!2669 Crawfordville HwyDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 9264329 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.comWin One Meal from Every Restaurant! Winner Debra Wellsdrawn from El Jalisco in Crawfordville Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the theConfessions of a frequent ier mile collectorBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsI have to admit I cant even make a simple purchase without rst considering the best possible point returns. This may sound strange to anyone who does not collect points, but there is a whole different world for those who know a world where free nights in ve star hotels, and rst class plane tickets are things that you can experience without having to oat a loan. Companies value their loyal travelers, and they offer extra perks to those special guests. Even if you are not a frequent traveler you should get a loyalty number with hotels, airlines and rental car companies if you think youll use their services. Marriott offers loyalty members promotions like stay two nights and the third is free. If you were already staying somewhere, why not take part? Better still, may hotels have branded credit cards. Some of these credit cards come with an offer of status with the hotel for their annual fee, or even free nights. Many times, the free night is worth more than the cost of the credit card. Other perks may include late checkout, free breakfast, or some amenity such as bottled waters, fresh fruit, or cookies. Free night can be inexpensive like Radissons 9,000 points at a less expensive property, or pricey like Hiltons 100,000 plus points. Each chain has sweet spots where the redemption is a great value like Hiltons Conrad Hotel, in the Maldives, or Priority Clubs Willard, in Washington, DC. For a smaller number of points you can often upgrade your paid stay to a suite or a club level room. Club level rooms offer many bene ts such as breakfast, snacks, beverages, and evening cocktails, and a lounge area to mingle or work in. In an expensive city this can be a huge money saving tactic. Rental car companies have gotten into the loyalty business as well. Some member offers have included a free night after two rentals. Because youve essentially pre-registered, the time savings when you pick up your car, and with some companies the ability to choose your own car makes joining worthwhile. Airlines have different types of frequent flier programs. Some points programs are based on a dollar value, while others are based on a chart that is determined by the individual airline. In addition to your points there is co-pay, covering taxes, fees and fuel surcharges, which varies widely between airlines. When it is time to redeem your points, just search the airlines website for free flights that meet your parameters. While most folks redeem their points for a round trip coach ticket in the US, this is not the maximum value for your points. British Airways is inexpensive for short trips like Tallahassee to Miami for 4000 points plus a $15 copay, but expensive for Europe at 100,000 points in business class plus an $1100 copay. Instead choose United business for100, 000 points and $100 copay. The best award of all is American Airlines Explorer Award, which allows you multiple ights in a region for not much more than the points redemption for a round trip ticket. Whole websites are devoted to how to get extra points thorough things like credit cards, home purchases, home sales, mortgages, satellite TV service, bank accounts, debit cards, investment accounts, dining and even shopping at the stores you already frequent. Sites like www. millionmilesecrets.com, www.thepointsguy.com, and www.freefrequent yermiles.com offer a great overview. Now that you recognize why people collect points, just be aware of the other constant. Over time the value of those miles will be depreciated, often without notice. So make a plan, earn your points, and then enjoy the trip of your dreams.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www. luxurycruise-travel.com. BREAKFAST AT MYRA JEANSexactly the early bird, breakfast there starts at 8:30 a.m., Monday Friday, and at 8 a.m. on the weekend. They switch over to their lunch menu at 11 a.m. Breakfast entrees include strawberry and whipped cream pancakes, the huge steak and cheese omelette, biscuit and sausage gravy and my personal favorite, their homefries. At Myra Jeans, the homefries begin as humble whole potatoes. They chop em up on a at grill with fresh onions and bell peppers and a bit of salt & pepper. Then they leave em alone till they brown up just right. Sounds good, eh? Try Tif es Skillet: A pile of these tasty taters covered with two eggs, country fried steak and white gravy. It comes with toast or biscuit and goes great with Myra Jeans hot coffee or what the heck a glass of champagne. Myra Jeans = A Happier You! Since the 1980s, Myra Jeans has been preparing the grits, frying up the bacon and pouring plate sized pancakes for the good people of Wakulla. Not The Nuttings Like us on newsThe Wakulla