Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00481

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Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Arts & Entertainment ....................................................Page 10A Weekly Roundup ...........................................................Page 12A Free Gas .......................................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Pamper Your Pooch photos ..........................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Outdoors .........................................................................Page 6B Water Ways ......................................................................Page 7B Thinking Outside the Boook ............................................Page 8B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 9B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 9B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13B Travel .............................................................................Page 14BINDEX OBITUARIES Marilyn Joyce Dyer Jason William Martin Wendy Lee Strickland Shaw Tully Buddy Taff Jr. newsThe Wakulla Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 38th Issue Thursday, September 19, 2013 Wetlands repeal passes, 3-1County commissioners vote to repeal countys wetlands protection ordinancePHOTO BY AMANDA MAYOR e Wakulla County Sheri s O ce continued its annual observance of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks with a memorial that began at 8:46 a.m., to mark when the rst airplane struck the World Trade Center. e event included the singing of the Star Spangled Banner and color guards from both the sheri s o ce and the Wakulla High School NJROTC.Operation Santa gets underway with Farm Share GIVE-AWAY! Y Y See page 13A See page 13ARemembering 9/11By JANICE EAKINSpecial to The NewsDave Reynolds, or as he is fondly known Farm Share Dave, kicked off this years bulk donations with a sleigh of 12 pallets containing pillows, cleaning products, sweaters and lost and found clothes from Disney World. This is a wonderful way to kick off Wakullas Operation Santa and we appreciate the support Farm Share provides Wakulla families, said Bruce Ashley, President of Wakulla County Coalition for Youth (WCCY). Dave provided a truck load of non-perishable food to Operation Santa last year and provides fresh produce every month that supplies multiple food pantry locations in Wakulla County, Ashley said. Ashley, Gail Campbell, Director of Operation Santa, County Commissioner Ralph Thomas, Ray Gray and Terry Webster, from Wakulla County School Board, Layne Davis and Janice Eakin were all on hand to accept delivery when Mike Free from Farm Share delivered the donation. This is our fourth year and we are off to a great start, said Campbell. Last year we served over 275 families consisting of over 1,300 individuals. We expect the same need this year, if not greater. Turn to Page 5A By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net County commissioners voted 3-1 to approve the elimination of both county wetland policies pertaining to the 75 foot buffer zone, as well as the comprehensive plan standard for disturbance of wetlands essentially giving all wetland regulation responsibility back to the state and federal agencies. Commissioner Richard Harden was not present at Mondays meeting, so the agenda item came before four commissioners with two options. The rst option would have only addressed the buffer zone and variance allowances therein, which was the direction Chairman Randy Merritt had sought in June. The question tonight is, said Merritt, do we want to get totally rid of it or do we want to modify it to allow variances and take out isolated wetlands? The motion for option two was made by Commissioner Jerry Moore who prefaced by referring to his campaign, during which he said, I ran on the issue of sending the wetlands back to the state and I will stick with what I said. Commissioner Ralph Thomas seconded, but offered what he called a friendly amendment. He proposed that the board do away with the proposed text in policy 4.1 that referred to the countys requirement for site plan review where a development project is directly contiguous to wetlands, to which Merritt voiced agreement. Further discussion revealed that the boards vote for either option would mean that information would have to be provided to the state as a requirement for altering the countys comprehensive plan. Planning Director Luis Serna expressed some concern about the provision of such data as, he said, staff would have to prove the justi cation for buffer deletion after the county had previously already proved why it was needed. So the previous board spent time and effort proving that the 75-foot buffer was right and now were going to have to spend time and effort to prove why its wrong, said Merritt. Once its in your comprehensive plan you have to justify it to get it out. To that, Commissioner Thomas said that he couldnt see the state saying that Wakulla had to hold themselves to a 75 foot buffer if state rules didnt designate such standards. Before the vote was made, Commissioner Howard Kessler had made a motion to table the item and instead schedule a workshop concerning wetlands during which he said hed like to have state officials and other experts attend to educate the commission and public on the effects of issues related to their vote. Turn to Page 3ABy AMANDA MAYOR amayor@thewakullanews.netReforms made to the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) in 2012, which are scheduled to take place in early 2014, may mean a skyrocketing of ood insurance premiums for some in Wakulla County. Legislation passed in July 2012 extended the NFIP for ve years, and made several changes in relation to NFIP funding, flood mapping and flood mitigation. According to online reports, annual premium limits were raised from 10 percent to 20 percent and established the requirement for FEMA to submit a 10 year repayment plan for the programs debt to the U.S. Treasury debt which came largely from the hurricane season of 2005. These factors are what sources say will force premiums to go up, especially for those that are too low in the ood zone and losing their subsidies. The City of St. Marks is particularly concerned about how they are placed on the new FEMA ood map.At their city commission meeting on Thursday, Changes could see spike in ood insurance ratesSt. Marks is area most a ected by ood map, will ask Sen. Bill Montford to help St. Marks Mayor Chuck Shields Turn to Page 2A & Sammy & Sandy Tedder are inspired by nature in SopchoppyPage 10A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Page 1A Sept. 12, Billy Bishop updated the board on correspondence with Homeland Security as he has tried to challenge the data that they claim quali es St. Marks for the changes made regarding the city and the ood map. The citys ood plain, said St. Marks Mayor Chuck Shields, has been drastically increased from a 13 feet to 22 feet. Also, most of the town is going to be changed from an A zone to a V zone, Shields said, which means there will be no tolerance. You cant even put a storage shed on a V zone property without getting it up off the ground. Theres no past history that proves that anything like this is going to happen, he said. The claim by those responsible for the changes, claim that the biggest issue in St. Marks will be wave action. However, those in St. Marks claim that is false. In the past 150 years, Hurricane Dennis was the highest water we had but there was no wave action in St. Marks, Shields said. But the claim is that tidal waves are going to destroy anything below 22 feet a claim that is completely unwarranted according to Bishop. Were in the same zone as a house that is built directly on the beach, Bishop said, but pointed out that the city is at least six miles from shallow water or any type of threatening wave activity. Its going to hurt the city of St. Marks economically, City Manager Zoe Mans eld said. To get a business to build 22 feet in the air its not going to happen. Bishop expressed frustration that he met with of cials who agreed that trees would break any alleged wave action then pointed out that trees surround the city. Yet, he said, they continue to insist that their system is correct. As far as appealing or moving forward, the group discussed recruiting help through state Sen. Bill Montford, DTallahassee, as they have exhausted what they can do without the hundreds of thousands dollars it would take to gather the mass of data required for what FEMA would say is an of cial complaint. In addition to the issues that were raised at Thursdays meeting, citizens and businesses should also be aware of how their properties t into the Pre-FIRM and grandfathered NFIP rates, both of which are projected to be at least partially discontinued. According the Extension Disaster Education Network, a pre-FIRM rate refers to the discounted rate offered to those below that were built before 1975 or before the community received its rst Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM). These rates will be discontinued for business properties and other buildings that are not a primary residence. These rates will also expire with the expiration of the propertys policy. A grandfathered rate refers to an administratively granted discount to a building erected postFIRM, in compliance with a FIRM, and with a permit from the community, but a more recent FIRM shows the building to be at greater risk of ooding. Grandfathered rates will be discontinued, with premium increase toward actuarial rates being phased in over a ve-year period with 20 percent of the increases being added each year. The ve-year period begins on the effective date of the FIRM that identi es the increased risk. For more information on pre-FIRM and grandfathered rates you can visit eden.lsu.edu.Changes could see spike in ood insurance ratesSpecial to The NewsTwo at-large suspects wanted on suspicion of being involved in several Crawfordville vehicle burglaries are behind bars in the Wakulla County Jail, according to Wakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel. Aaron Franklin Swain Jr., 19, of Crawfordville and Riley Patrick Waters, 18, of St. Marks were arrested after WCSO detectives broke the case with the arrest of Daniel Alexander Faircloth, 19, of Crawfordville on Sept. 6. Swain turned himself in on Sept. 15. He was charged with two counts of burglary, two counts of larceny and two counts of credit card fraud. He is being held in the Wakulla Jail on a $28,500 bond. Waters was captured by the Leon County Sheriffs Office and turned over to WCSO deputies on Sept. 12 and transported to the Wakulla Jail. He was charged with three counts of burglary, three counts of larceny and two counts of illegal use of a credit card. He is being held with no bond. Faircloth faces 34 charges including burglary, larceny, retail theft and fraudulent use of a credit card. He remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $34,000 bond. Faircloth was arrested on Sept. 6. The three men are accused of entering unlocked vehicles in the Wakulla Gardens community of Crawfordville along with vehicles in the Dorothy Loop, Ridgewood Drive and Sam Smith neighborhoods in the eastern zone of the county. Faircloth was observed broken down on the side of a Crawfordville roadway earlier this month. When deputies offered assistance, they observed property inside the vehicle that matched the description of items stolen from a Dorothy Loop case. In addition, surveillance video obtained at a Crawfordville business connected the three teenagers to the use of a stolen credit card. Detectives are closing out paperwork on 17 cases in the Wakulla Station area based on the arrests as the investigation continues and additional charges are possible.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creels message to residents of the Wakulla Gardens community was Take back your community. The message was delivered during the rst in a series of Community Conversations that will be held in Wakulla County in the coming months. The first was held Tuesday, Sept. 10, at Pioneer Baptist Church. Get to know your neighbors, Sheriff Creel urged those attending the meeting. Be proactive. Call us and we will come. WCSO staff members attending the meeting included Creel, Undersheriff Trey Morrison, Capt. Randall Taylor, Capt. Chris Savary, Lt. Bruce Ashley, Lt. Andy Curles, Sgt. Billy Jones, Sgt. Mike Helms and Detective Clint Beam. Staff discussed safety tips to protect persons and property; crime statistics and how to avoid becoming a victim; traf c enforcement; road patrol activities; youth and community policing; vehicle burglaries and more. Take back your neighborhood together, Creel urged the group of approximately 70 residents. Remember the three Ls, said Capt. Taylor. Lights, Locks and the Law. Residents were also encouraged to contact the WCSO Dispatch unit when they are planning trips out of town so security checks can be provided by the Road Patrol Unit. A second Community Conversation is planned for the Wakulla Station area in mid-October.Two burglary suspects arrestedSheriff Creel meets with residents Aaron F. Swain Jr. Daniel A. Faircloth Riley P. Waters SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSheriff Charlie Creel meets with Wakulla Gardens residents as part of a Community Conversation. Buckeyes newest, green-powered turbine generator produces 12 megawatts and reduces fossil fuel usage equivalent to 200,000 barrels annually. Biomass provides 85 percent of the total energy requirement at our Taylor County facility.PERRY, FL

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. I know this board doesnt have the info it needs to move forward right now, he said. Im not interested in tabling this, said Thomas. But Im not opposed to a workshop. With discussion on the item slowing down, Moore seemed to try to allay what some have expressed as fear for developing on the countys wetlands. I will vote against anyone developing in wetlands every time, he said. The damage is only a perception. Thomas said that the ordinance is not the only way to protect the countys wetlands. When that petition comes to you, please think about it, he said and referred to the emotional plea that would come with the petition. On that note, Chairman Merritt reiterated his preference for option one that he had proposed in June as he said there is that chance that the referendum will get on the ballot and pass. Potentially, he said, if there is a lapse in time where the ordinance is deleted, then is re-established, lawsuits may ensue for the taking of peoples property. That is what really scares me about this, Merritt said. However the amended motion to approve option two as well as striking the language in policy 4.1 was passed by Merritt, Moore and Thomas voting for; Kessler voted against. In other matters before the board: County commissioners voted unanimously to approve the Tourist Development Councils recommendation to hire Sam Martin as their new director. The vote showed signs of wavering though, when Moore said hed rather see the new director be a county employee a stance that both he and Kessler had expressed when the board was determining whether to allow a contracted individual or not. Since there were only four commissioners at Mondays meeting, a 2-2 vote would have meant that the issue would backtrack. At Moores expression of an intended vote against the item, Kessler expressed interest in doing the same. Thomas, who is the elected of cial appointed to the TDC, expressed his pride in the direction that the TDC is helping the county to move in. State statute sets up the TDC, he said. That statute requires they meet once per quarter, but this TDC has met 32 times this year. They do work very hard and theres a lot theyve had to do in the absence of a director. With the motion at risk of dying, Jackie Youngstrand, there to represent the TDC, spoke. We have been without a director since February, she said. Lets move forward and lets get this director in place so that we can start working on our grants and start getting our advertising done. Moore, after expressing his reluctance, ended up saying that he would change his vote, followed shortly thereafter by Kessler. The item then passed 4-0. The board also voted to approve the proposed budget containing the amendment made at the Sept. 3 hearing, which allowed for a one-year allocation of $150,000 to the sheriffs budget. Merritt wanted to offer a compromise to the slightly controversial item, saying that the board could agree to make those funds available the sheriff couldnt make the proposed cuts happen. My concern is that weve been told that this is not a sustainable path, he said. Thomas, whos motion it was to approve the item, said hed really rather leave his motion as it stood. I say we give him a chance, he said. Kessler said that it wasnt about supporting the sheriff, but rather, it was about spending down reserves. This is wrong, Kessler said and mentioned that board members had received a letter from Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond urging them not to make the decision to spend reserves. However, the motion passed 3-1 with the lone dissenting vote cast by Kessler. Chairman Randy Merritt Richard Harden Howard Kessler Jerry MooreRalph Thomas FOR REPEAL. ABSENT, but supported repeal. AGAINST REPEAL. FOR REPEAL.FOR REPEAL.How county commissioners voted:Board votes to repeal wetlands ordinance, 3-1Special to The NewsThe Northwest Florida Water Management District Governing Board approved several agreements on Thursday, Sept. 12, that will allow the District to continue to focus on providing ood protection and improving water quality for the natural resources and communities of Northwest Florida. The rst, a revenue agreement with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, will allow the District to continue a monitoring program to assess water quality on major rivers and streams throughout the panhandle. The data is used by DEP and the District to develop and implement management strategies to improve water quality and minimize negative impacts on surface water resources. The District is grateful for the continued support of our state and federal partners as we work to ensure a clean and reliable supply of water for the people and environment of Northwest Florida, said Jon Steverson, Executive Director. The funds for this program, up to $121,000 for Fiscal Year 2013-2014, will be provided by DEP for the purpose of monitoring and improving surface water quality throughout the state. The District will collect water quality samples monthly from 26 river and stream sites, and biological habitat samples biannually from 24 sites Districtwide. Healthy Florida waterways are critical to our residents and visitors. Monitoring networks are an essential part of understanding their health, said Drew Bartlett, DEP Deputy Secretary for Water Policy and Ecosystem Restoration. The Governing Board also approved a revenue agreement between the District, City of Tallahassee and Leon County that will allow the District to continue a stormwater flow monitoring program. Under the agreement, the city and county will provide the District with approximately $164,000 to operate 53 surface and rainfall data collection stations that provide continuous records of rainfall and surface water discharges for the major drainage basins in the City and County. This data is used to design and implement important improvements in the stormwater drainage system. NWFWMD continues programs to protect water quality WAKULLA COUNTY / CITY OF ST. MARKS COMMUNITY RATING SYSTEM PROGRESS REPORT September 12, 2013 SEPT. 12, 19, 2013 In accordance with Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the following position to the Senior Management Service Class in the Florida Retirement System: Director, Parks & Facilities Management Notice for Interested Contractors/ Request for Qualications (RFQ) Single Family Capital Area Community Action Agency has federal funds for weatherizing residential homes in Leon, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jefferson, and Wakulla counties. Weatherization includes air in ltration reduction, insulation, repair/replacement of doors and windows, low-ow showerheads and compact uorescent light bulbs repair/replacement of heating/cooling systems and water heaters. Work will begin October 1, 2013 and must be performed under the supervision of a state licensed contractor. Current contractors must re-apply. A Pre-BID conference will be held on Wednesday, September 25, 2013, 9:00am-10:00am at the Tallahassee Dodge Chrysler Jeep Building, upstairs conference room; 3987 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304. The RFQ is due no later than 5:00pm, Tuesday, October 1, 2012. To attend the Pre-BID conference, request an RFQ, or for more information, contact Debbie Mabry, (850) 222-2043, fax (850) 942-2090, or debora.mabry@cacaainc.org.SEPT. 12, 19, 2013

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $19/6 mo. Out of County $44/yr. $27/6 mo. Out of State $47/yr. $28.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriffs Report for September 5, 2013 Sheriffs budget gets reprieve Lady War Eagles beat Rickards in district game; lose to Chiles Natural Wakulla: Skinks prey on insects, including roaches Deputies bust pot grow house Cut fiber optic line causes cell, internet outage on Wednesday Wakulla deputies foil Panacea burglary Four arrests made in residential burglaries thewakullanews.com Editor, The News: RE: Charles Hickmans Letter to the Editor in the Aug. 29 issue of The Wakulla News, Search for tourism director not proper. Since I am the Board of County Commissioners appointed representative to the Tourist Development Council, I would like to publically address Mr. Hickmans concerns. First I would like to thank him for acknowledging my prior statement, it is the commissions responsibility to assure all county policies are followed. This issue is certainly no exception. The board approved the hiring of an Independent Contractor for this position. When referring to Contractors, Mr. Hickman was correct when he said, In reality, they are a consultant. He also stated, it should have gone out for bids or quotes. While I appreciate his opinion, I have to disagree with his conclusion that the process should have gone out for bids. In the Wakulla County Purchasing Policy, Section 5.17(7) states, The requirement for competitive bidding procedures shall be waived for the purchase of: Consultant Services, other than those regulated by Florida Statutes Section 287.055. This position is clearly not regulated by state statute and is waived from the bidding process by local policy. The position will be part-time, 20 hours per week, and will not include county bene ts, including insurance. Through the advertising process, the TDC has been upfront with all applicants about the nature of the contractor position and bene ts. It is also important to note the county would likely have received no responses if we utilized a bid process, as Mr. Hickman suggested. Individuals seeking a part-time job are typically not familiar with the bid process. The method we chose was intended to create interest in the position and maximize responses. I hope this information will eliminate any concerns of wrongdoing or breach of ethics. Ralph Thomas County Commissioner District 1What the American Cancer Society can do for youHas commission lost their minds? Need reasonable debate on wetlands Resent spending tax dollars on airportTDC post was advertised to get responsesSupport local businessREADERS WRITE: Follow us onEditor, The News: Has the county commission LOST THEIR MINDS?! Im sure it has been made clear to them that the areas surrounding all wetlands, especially those critical fringes, are the very source of all that bounty from the bay, estuaries, rivers and the Gulf. The county has recently developed a program to promote the sale of seafood in Wakulla County. HA there soon wont be much local seafood to sell in Wakulla County as wetlands and their fringes are destroyed. If the citizens of Wakulla County dont march on the county commission and take strong proactive/protest against this foolishness, life as it has been known in Wakulla County for generations will end. John Hitron, PhD. CarrabelleThe writer is the former associate director of the FSU Marine Lab.Editor, The News: I want to ask my neighbors to support a local business. I have a 14 year old car with 200,000 mile that needed brakes. A Tallahassee tire store advertised brakes for $79.99 per axle. Five minutes of fast talk later the bill would have been $778. I called Charlie Grim of Lube Expert and he offered to do the required work himself. The total bill for brakes, rotors, and a new radiator was $269.78. PLEASE support one of our own, Charlie Grim and his crew at LUBE EXPERT. Thank you.. James Mark McGehee Crawfordville By MARJ LAWWakulla Cancer Support GroupWeve heard of the American Cancer Society. It has research programs, educational programs and programs to help people with cancer. So, do you have cancer? Do you know of services available to you? Does someone in your family have cancer? Does one of your friends or coworkers have cancer? Would you like to nd out how you can be supportive to that person? Do you know what the American Cancer Society can do for you? Tracey Thompson, Executive Director of the American Cancer Society of Tallahassee, invites everyone who is interested in nding out the answers to these questions to come to the Crawfordville United Methodist Church Fellowship Hall on Thursday, Sept. 19 for discussion and questions on services available to our residents. The meeting begins at 7 p.m. The American Cancer Society is dedicated to helping people who face cancer, and it has services to offer us. On Thursday, Tracey will talk about: the Road to Recovery, Reach to Recovery and Look Good, Feel Better. After her discussion, visitors are encouraged to participate in a question and answer period. Members of our local cancer support group have wanted to know more about ACS, said Marge Kinder, Leader of our local support group. We thank Tracey for providing valuable information on how ACS can help us. If you are interested, please join us on September 19th at the Fellowship Hall. We will be offering light refreshments and plenty of seating.Marj Law is a member of the Wakulla County Cancer Support Group.Editor, The News; The recent exchange on the preservation of the wetlands ordinance has been fascinating. On the one hand, there are contractors and businesses that rely on development for their livelihoods, they see the ordinance as an impediment to their continued employment and support of the local economy. On the other hand, there are genuinely concerned citizens that see what state government stewardship has achieved in the rest of Florida, and are trying to preserve the uniqueness and beauty of Wakulla County. What complicates an issue that could be resolved through reasonable debate and compromise are the mindless diatribes and character assassinations by selfserving publicists on both sides of the aisle. While there is nothing magical about a 75 foot buffer, neither will there be anything desirable about a future Wakulla County where the natural beauty has been ruined. What attracts people to this county is the blend of comfortable living and the abundance of nature. We need managed development to support the economy and services we rely on, but the development and value of the land will decline if we do not preserve one of the fundamental reasons people want to live here. Take a hard look at the basis for removing this ordinance, we need the golden eggs, but we do not want to kill the goose in the process. Kim Brock Crawfordville Editor, The News: As a Wakulla County taxpayer and voter living in the Ochlockonee Bay area I have some serious concerns about the Tarpine Community proposal to expand the airstrip adjacent to their community. This is not solely an issue for the residents of Ochlockonee Bay, but one for all of the citizens of Wakulla County. Let me explain why. In the last ve years Wakulla County spent some $150,000 in airport expenses using our tax dollars. Should there be an expansion of the airstrip using Florida DOT funds as proposed, ongoing recurring costs for maintenance and operations would increase and future storm damage could easily incur major infrastructure restoration costs in paved runway rebuilding, leakage from fuel storage, and hanger damage, and that is just for starters. Consultants conducting the airport master plan study estimate that routine annual maintenance costs far exceed proposed income from an increased number of users. I resent the use of my federal, state, or county tax dollars to serve the few residents who use the airstrip. Current airstrip usage figures are greatly exaggerated. I heard a total of two take-offs over the Labor Day weekend. The current airstrip is not generating tax income to the county as no usage fees are collected. If Wakulla County needed a county owned airport, why would reasonable men select a ood zone limited by two highways that serves a small locality in the far southwest corner of the county? The current airstrip is located in a ood zone and there are multiple de ned wetlands located on the property. The location is hazardous for iers and is forever limited in terms of future expansion. Its location does not serve the residents of Shell Point, St. Marks, Spring Creek, Medart, Wakulla, Crawfordville or Sopchoppy. People of these communities are all county taxpayers. If the county needed an airport supported with county tax dollars, centrally located properties in safe areas that allow for expansion would be the reasonable approach. With the TCC plan for ecotourism associated with their environmental institute, a publically owned airport located in the central part of the county would serve that initiative as well as county citizens. The proposed plan to expand the airstrip using state DOT funds will devalue adjacent waterfront property. Wakulla County does not have an overabundance of upscale residential neighborhoods to generate its tax base. Waterfront neighborhoods are limited to a handful. And yet, the proposed plan will crop mature trees, increase risk of flooding, and generate noise pollution for Ochlockonee Bay waterfront residences. Fortunately, county commissioners have proposed a 300 foot preservation buffer between the airstrip and Surf Road residences, a recommendation I wholeheartedly support. I was taught to love this county when I worked for Anita Townsend in the late 1960s and early 70s. My son married into an old Wakulla family, and chose to live here, paying taxes for the last 25 years. When I was able to buy my own Wakulla County property, it was a dream come true. But in the last year, my dream has been slowly taken. My view has been taken when the land purchased for the proposed airstrip expansion was stripped. My windbreak was taken. My natural protection for ooding was taken. My quiet peaceful quality of life is threatened. My property value is threatened, despite the amounts I have spent to improve my property and the neighborhood for Wakulla County. I ask. Would reasonable men devalue a waterfront neighborhood to incur the ongoing tax supported maintenance costs of a locally used hobby airstrip, located in a ood zone, where motorized wind sails take off and land? I believe reasonable men would turn the airstrip property over to the Tarpine residents allowing it to remain as it has for many years, a service to that small airstrip community. This truly is an issue of concern to all citizens of Wakulla County. Thank you, Marie E. Cowart Ochlockonee Bay

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $19/6 mo. Out of County $44/yr. $27/6 mo. Out of State $47/yr. $28.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriffs budget gets reprieve Sammy & Sandy Tedder: the couple are inspired by nature along the Sopchoppy River Wetlands repeal passes, 3-1 Operation Santa gets underway with Farm Share FROM THE DOCK: The water is clearing and reds are biting STREET BEAT Remembering 9/11 Two burglary suspects arrested thewakullanews.com Real information needed on wetlands Intimidation isnt the American Way ank you to person who returned purse Wetlands protections should be preservedWetlands ght akin to civil rights struggleREADERS WRITE: Follow us on Editor, The News: To the honest person who turned my purse in at Winn-Dixie last Thursday evening, Sept. 19, THANK YOU! I was in such a hurry only to rush home and realize my purse was missing. I called WinnDixie hoping to hear they had my purse but when I picked it up I was so thankful to see that everything was just as I left it. It is such a blessing to know that there are still good people in the world. Thanks Again, Terri Mercer Crawfordville Editor, The News: I am writing to address the headline of Sept. 19, Wetlands Repeal passes, 3-1. While the article was straightforward, the headline was misleading. Our wetlands ordinance was not repealed; the vote was to pursue repeal, which in itself is a scary thought, but we still have time to save our wetlands ordinance and maintain local control of our future. Otherwise, well be eating our seed corn. When a farmer starts eating his seed corn, the corn he saves for the next planting season, hes in trouble. Also a business depleting inventory and not replacing it, troubles coming. And when a county, so dependent on water and wetlands, whose very name means Mysterious Waters, makes a move towards eliminating local wetlands protection, that countys in trouble. Seed corn, you know. Everyone knows the bundle of bene ts we get from the wetlands. If we keep local control, they will feed us and take care of us. Otherwise, its a crap shoot. The irony and hypocrisy over this issue is incredible. Everyone pays lip service in favor of the wetlands, then votes to abandon local oversight? Organizations and individuals who should be supporting the wetlands are not speaking out. Well, the time for lip service is over. It is literally (or littorally?) a life or death situation for our county. Which way do we want to go more of the same with no infrastructure, more ooding, growing pollution, less hurricane protection and less value to our land and homes? Or something else? Our future depends on clean and abundant water. Consider this alternative: A county with water-based tourism, commercial shing, sight-seeing, sport shing, seafood restaurants, with protected wetlands to soften the blows of hurricanes, lter our waters to the Gulf, to help with inland and coastal ooding and more. That futures dependent on wetlands. Were at a crossroads. This is our Edmund Pettus Bridge moment. When Afro-Americans were denied the right to vote in the 1960s, they tried to march from Selma to Montgomery. A man was killed, people were turned back by a few in a corrupt attempt to limit citizens participation. They didnt want all people to have a vote, a say in their future. AfroAmericans had to ght for their right to vote, as the Wakulla Wetlands alliance is doing now ghting to allow the citizens a vote on our future. But now our commission fails to support putting the current wetlands referendum on the ballot. They are refusing citizen input as much as those people blocking that bridge. And when political discussion devolves into a George Wallace stand-in-the-door moment, when a group of citizens, seeking to discuss public policy were kept out of a public building by a one man here, somethings bad wrong. And now that the commission has revealed its true core by not allowing citizens a referendum opportunity, thats bad wrong. To discuss and speculate on commissioners motives, how much money each one will make or their own personal nancial gain from repeal is a waste of time. What is important is that citizens have the ability to vote. But commissioners denying full citizen participation by referendum is wrong. Once again, a small group is refusing to allow citizens a say in their own future. Lets not eat our seed corn. Lets get the wetlands ordinance on the ballot. And let all commissioners know that their reelection and their one cent sales tax will also be on that ballot this next November and we will not forget their actions in subsequent elections. When our commission fears the citizenry so much, somethings up. Hugh Taylor CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: In recent meetings and in print all but one of our current commissioners have been willfully misleading the public, these inaccuracies show disregard for the community. Sadly, the misinformation and/or ignorance have led to a motion that directs staff to remove all wetlands protections from the comprehensive plan. It is a grave mistake to sacri- ce the long-term sustainability of our community for the short-term windfall pro ts of a few. This is not about any one project in the wetland buffer but about the accumulated cost these projects will have on our local ecology. It is about loss of current and potential sustainable jobs as opposed to a few short-term jobs. As a community we must rally to oppose these changes. We can no longer take for granted that we are lucky enough to live in the fourth most ecologically diverse area of the country. For most of us, this variety of species may not seem important, but in fact it provides many of the bene ts our community enjoys: hunting, fishing, bird watching and other nature based industries. It is also expected to provide a growing numbers of jobs from ecological tourism, which will be enhanced by TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute. Wetlands and isolated wetlands are a key part of these activities. Outdated thinking was that Florida wetlands were low quality land that just needed to be converted to more productive uses. Science has shown that they provide many important environmental purposes: 1) Functioning wetlands clean and lter water coming from the uplands, 2) Functioning wetlands provide breeding grounds and habitat for many commercially important species 3) Functioning wetlands are the only home for many rare plant and animal species. Wetlands also enhance our communities with social values through 1) protecting out shorelines from erosion 2) providing storage areas for water to reduce ooding 3) provide diversity and beauty to our landscapes. Even ponds that dry up on an annual basis are the breeding ground of unique frogs and salamanders who eat insects and are in turn eaten by species higher on the food chain. While no single pond is important, the function of the aggregate is to support larger and more diverse communities than would exist without them. The current 75-foot buffer (four pick-up trucks bumper-to-bumper) protects these wetlands from the direct impact of development and its degradation by materials used or disturbed in our daily activities. Seventy- ve feet is insigni cant for a reasonably sized property. The claim that property rights have been violated is misleading, if the land was platted and purchased prior to the 1995 comp plan, a variance is already available. Buyers purchasing after that date purchased knowing the uses allowed and paid a price reflective of these protections. The wetlands ordinance did not change the protections; it gave the county a mechanism to enforce them and a way to provide variances from them when appropriate. The wetland protections do have an impact on developers who want to parcel up their land into the smallest parcels possible, since a parcel subdivided today must be large enough to keep construction outside of the 75 foot buffer. With the proposed changes, building right up to the edge will be possible, and drastically change the appearance of coastal development in this county. Based on current state law, once this change is made, it is almost impossible to reinstate. The TCC environmental center, soon a part of our county, provides the perfect catalyst to change our model for development and growth. Development is good and necessary, but lets grow and enhance our community with vision for the communal good as opposed to windfall pro ts for a few individuals. Get involved to help protect our community. Encourage development that bene ts and maintains a landscape supportive of full range of environmental possibilities and avoid South Floridas degraded landscapes. Let your commissioners know that you dont support their decision to roll back protections to bene t those who knowingly purchased with the current rules in place. There will be no do-overs on this issue get involved; speak out; sign petitions; or we lose our chance to leave a legacy that we can be proud of. Chuck Hess CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: It is a patriotic pity that people are using intimidation to stop registered voters from signing petitions for a 2014 referendum on Wakulla County wetland protection. Intimidation, as a tactic, is mighty desperate, nevertheless, there it was, in black and white in the Wakulla News Letters to the Editor on Sept. 12, when a writer told readers that he had been advised voters names would be part of a public record if they signed petitions. Of course petitions are public records, along with names and addresses of all of us when we register to vote. Public records even show when and where we cast our votes. Is that a reason not to vote? The way its done in the United States of America is no secret voters, and no secret petitions for a referendum. When elected of cials refuse to listen to the people, a voter petition referendum, or whatever you want to call it, expresses the public voice of the people. And, by the way, petitions in a democracy are nothing new. Theyve been around since 400 B.C., or so, in Athens, Greece, and the USA has a long history of using them. Remember 1978, when California voters approved Proposition 13, The Peoples Initiative to Lower Taxes? State lawmakers refused to lower taxes, so people circulated petitions, got enough signatures to put Prop 13 on the ballot, and then voted overwhelmingly to cut their taxes. Now, thats just plain American. For those who might not be aware, Wakulla County could have avoided the wetlands petition drive altogether if commissioners were more in tune with democracy. They have the power to put the wetlands issue on the ballot, but four of the commissioners refused. Why they refused is still an unanswered question. Unless they change their minds, here we are: Protecting Wakullas wetlands is up to the people to circulate petitions, and it wont be easy. About 5,600 Wakulla County signed petitions are needed, and I, for one, am proud to sign one. Im even prouder to circulate the petitions. If you want to be a part of this drive, or simply sign a petition, email the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance at wakullawetlandsalliance@gmail.com, or call me: 509-9859. Dana Peck PanaceaEditor, The News: Everywhere, including in the paper, on social media, and at various events around town, there has been some talk about Wakulla wetlands and the wetlands petition. One thing however that I have not seen is credible information stating the reasons why the wetlands people feel that the county ordinance is better than the states statute. In some ways it appears that there is an elitist attitude among the wetlands people that it is their way or the highway. This is not meant to be derogatory but if Wakulla County is going to take all the potential nancial risks (i.e., potential litigation costs), is going to restrict voters rights by demanding government by unanimous vote (5-0 commission vote) or by referendum (written months, sometimes years, in advance of the vote), and is potentially taking on the power to tell people where and what they can build it seems that there would be more speci c and solid information in the public arena as to why this ordinance is better than state law. Being allowed to build with a 0 foot buffer zone under the state statute is a false argument as the state does not allow this except under the most exigent of circumstances yet this is the primary argument being given to the less informed voter. In fact this one particular argument is being presented in such a fraudulent way that it appears to be designed to incite fear or panic in the voter. I have gone to the Facebook pages that are run by the wetland people and they are glossy and emotion based. Oh, sure you can nd information that is one-sided and is intended to be harmful to someone who does not agree with them i.e., the position of Gov. Scotts administration (who, arguably, has done more for Florida natural resource protection than previous governors) or gives opinion pieces that protect their point of view. For instance, one of the Facebook sites insinuates that four of our county commissioners do not want us to have clean drinking water. To quote: Florida was rated as one of the top ve worst states for drinking water quality. Ask your Wakulla County commissioners why they want to degrade the quality of our drinking water? Who pro ts from that? Not the citizens. This is obviously neither fair nor true but it is there with no way to counteract the argument since that media page is controlled by people associated with the Wetlands Alliance. Seemingly they will not allow either facts or opposing points of view on that site so again the voice of the people is suppressed (although they will claim they are the voice of the people and they stand for transparency). Facts are crucial in any argument but we are only seeing supposition, misguided compassion, a lack of legitimate comparison between two legitimate policies (state and local), insinuation (minus recent concrete evidence) that there has been and will be great harm done to the wetlands if placed under state ordinance, accusation that four of the county commissioners are personally bene ting from a repeal of the county ordinance (personal destruction tactics are so sad), and opinion being thrown out as fact. As a person who has seen the damage that referendums can cause I urge all voters to hear both sides of the issue before signing a petition. A signature is not retractable and often it is better to take a wait and listen approach before deciding too quickly to sign something that can not be undone. James Grey Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Whats your earliest childhood memory?SUE TAFT EntrepreneurDancing with my dad! I was around 4 years old. I had on a pink owery dress my mom had made for me and I had pigtails in my hair. KAREN LAKE Jewelry designerI was planting Big Boy tomatoes in the garden with my granny and I remember asking her if we could plant some Big Girl tomatoes, She thought that was funny! WILLIE JEFFERSON St. Marks PowderRunning around naked from my mom while she was trying to put my diaper on. They were cloth diapers back then. ROOSEVELT LOWERY Masonry subcontractorBeing in the hospital when I was 5 years old... We had a good (burn) pile and we were roasting sweet potatoes in the re. My leg caught on re and I started running. SAM McGREW Owner, Dreams Day CareI got bit by a snake. It bit me on my toe when I was about 6 years old. The ambulance came... I was scared... I thought they were going to cut my toe off. Compiled by Lynda KinseyFrom Page 1AEach year families needing a helping hand share what they need the most and, of course, what theyd like Santa to bring them. Our hearts almost break when a child asks Santa to bring them food, shoes, or a bed to sleep in, instead of asking for toys. We see things like this on the news and in movies, but when you realize these needs are right here in our community, living or maybe more appropriately existing just down the street, it makes us realize how Operation Santa can brighten and bene t our neighbors lives. We want to make sure every child has a Christmas gift. Layne Davis, Volunteer Coordinator, with help from her daughter, Eliza Davis, shared that donations from the community are already coming in and approximately 40 volunteers have signed up. Harriett Rich was our rst pick up of the year with a great assortment of like new clothes. Last year over 110 individuals volunteered their time and 100+ groups and businesses participated in some way, Layne Davis said. In a couple of weeks we will have collection boxes in businesses around Wakulla County and we look forward to them lling up over and over. A list of the collection box locations will be posted on Operation Santas Facebook page and announced in The Wakulla News. Call Layne Davis at (850) 519-2140 to learn more about volunteer opportunities. Many businesses have also stepped up. Just to name a few: Stow-A-Way, Nads and North Point Center have donated storage space. Best Western donated 20 TVs and Badcock will be providing furniture and mattresses. Denita Lambou of Big Rocket Studios provided graphic design services and created a beautiful new logo and signs. Richard Russell, Manager of Wal-Mart is excited to once again support Operation Santa in any way they can. The Caring Tree, which was a huge community giveback last year, will be put up the day after Black Friday. Russell is interested in having a cookout in front of the store, a pictures with Santa Day and is also working on a grant from Wal-Mart. As you prepare for Christmas, you may be cleaning out closets and going through your childrens toys. Please keep in mind that someone might love to see that like new toy or clothing under their Christmas tree. Heres how you can help: Adopt a family, or two, or three call Gail at 926-3526. Challenge your child or grandchild to select a like new toy(s) they no longer play with to give to a child that has no or few toys and place them in one of the collection boxes. Encourage family, friends and co-workers to join together to adopt a family. Volunteer; we have many jobs that need helping hands and youll nd yourself surrounded by friends. Donate funds for our volunteers to buy needed items not donated. Ask your youth group, church family or civic organization to volunteer and assist in collecting needed items. In past years volunteers entered individual family information in spreadsheets and worked many, many hours to sort out what each family needed and then sort through the donations, said Janice Eakin, who is working with Mindy Waters from Tribridge, to develop a web-based system for WCCY Partners to enter their referred families into a database. This database will help streamline the process volunteers go through to match a familys needs with available donated items. Also, it will point out what items WCCY may not have and need to be sought in the community. This should reduce the number of volunteer hours normally spent on these activities. Eakin also shared that information about WCCY programs will be distributed to the community via Facebook, WCCYs website (wakullacoalition.net), a monthly newsletter and articles in the The Wakulla News. To find Wakullas Operation Santa Facebook page, search for Operation Santa Crawfordville. The newsletter is published and distributed via email and is published on the FB page. The direct link to last months newsletter which provides information about the volunteer opportunities is http://conta. cc/13FbwQH. Monetary donations may be mailed to Operation Santa, P.O. Box 1688, Crawfordville FL 32327 or made via PayPal to Wakulla Operation Santa. For monetary donation questions, please contact Gail Campbell at (850) 926-3526. WCCY Partners include school teachers/guidance counselors/resource officers, churches, Wakulla Citizens Senior Center, Healthy Families Program, Christ Church Anglican and state agencies for Children and Families, Department of Health, and Juvenile Justice, among others. The window for partners to refer families is Oct. 1 through Oct. 31. Operation Santas SANTA DAY is Saturday, Dec. 14. We need our community to rally behind us again this year, said Ashley. We appreciate all past supporting businesses and individuals and we hope to have additional supporters this year.Operation Santa gets underway with Farm Share delivery SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRay Gray, Terry Webster, Layne Davis, Mike Free, Janice Eakin, Bruce Ashley and Ralph Thomas with a Farm Share delivery on Monday, Sept. 16. 000FR47 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the LOCAL SAVINGS.850-385-60471700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR Charlotte Faith to hold Holy Ghost revival Charlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple will be holding a Miracle Holy Ghost Revival on Sept. 19, 20, and 21 at 7:30 p.m. nightly. Guest speaker will be Prophet Michael Turner from Connecticut. Charlotte Faith is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road. Pastor is Bishop Alice Williams. Rocky Mount Church to hold pre-program on FridayRocky Mount Church of Christ, which is located at 58 Dogwood drive in Crawfordville, will be having a preprogram for their pastors appreciation on Friday, Sept. 20, at 7:30 p.m. Elder Fredrick Bell and Thessalonia Missionary Baptist church will render service. Everyone is invited to attend. Pastor Appreciation Day at Panacea Full GospelPastors Appreciation Day will be held at Panacea Full Gospel Assembly on Sunday, Sept. 22, starting with a service at 11 a.m. and continuing. Come join us in worship and fellowship. There will be a guest speaker with dinner and fellowship to follow. Special singing after dinner. Many Hats Festival to be held at Harvest FellowshipHarvest Fellowship Church will be at Many Hats Festival on Oct. 12 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. featuring arts & crafts, live bands, food and face painting. The event will also feature a hat contest for the prettiest, sportiest, biggest, smallest, yesteryear, most unusual, weirdest, patriotic, sci, and best overall. There will be prizes for each category. Please wear your favorite hat even if you are not entering the hat contest. Interested vendors should call (850) 926-4798 or email revfredl@yahoo. com. St. Elizabeth announces Holiday Craft SaleSt. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church will hold a Holiday Craft Sale on Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please create your inventory and call Nickey Lepp no later than Oct. 16 at 926-9750 for more information.Church Briefs Its my mess and I love itBy JAMES L. SNYDER In our house, we have a rule that has enabled us to live at peace with one another for over 42 years. That rule is simple, Dont mess with my space and I wont mess with your space. I must admit some rather close calls have challenged that relationship during those years. I will not say from which side of the house it came from; just that it was not my side of the house. It must be quite dif cult for someone like the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage whom, I must confess is a neat freak, and Yours Truly who is just a plain old messy freak. My wife cannot relax if there is something out of place. On occasion, I will catch her glancing in the direction of my space and I know exactly what she is thinking. I do not always know what she is thinking, because that would be very taxing on my thinking machine. I know exactly what she is thinking. She wants to clean up my mess. Do you need any help tidying up your of ce? I know it is a ploy for her to get her organizing paws on my things and arrange them so I cannot nd anything I want when I want it. Although it may not look like it to her, I am quite organized. I guess we have a different idea when it comes to organization. When I go to the cupboard in the kitchen, I know everything will be in its place. In the bathroom, the same thing goes. Everything is neatly put in its place. She knows where everything is and everything is where she wants it. Well, maybe not quite everything. There are those issues with me. To make matters worse, she has this idea of cleaning the house on a regular basis. Do you know how annoying it is to hear the vacuum cleaner running when trying to take a nap? Like clockwork, our vacuum cleaner takes its weekly, if not more, run throughout the house. Do you know how much electricity it takes to do that on a weekly basis? If I had to choose between dirt and electricity, I would choose dirt every time. My space is just a little bit different. I like to think of my space as actual living quarters. It may look like a mess to some Philistine, but I can assure you everything has a place and everything is in its place. I can find what I want when I want it, which is the only thing that really matters. If I cannot nd what I need when I need it then I do not really need it. Life is that simple when you accept messy as a lifestyle. Just recently, my wife suggested that perhaps she could help me organize my office space. I just scowled at her and said, Dont mess with my space and I wont mess with your space. She smiled one of those sympathetic smiles she gives everyone she thinks does not know what is going on in the world. Quite frankly, I do not need to know what is going on in the world. All I need to know is what is going on in my world and I have several piles in my of ce I can consult on that topic. All offers to help me tidy up my mess go unheeded. I like my mess because it is my mess. I made it, I am proud of it and I love it. I have grown quite uneasy as of late. Every time I go away I come back to nd some new remodeling project completed in our house. I am beginning to think she watches too much of This Old House. I spent a week in California only to come home and nd the kitchen completely remodeled. Now, as I think the plan was, I do not know where anything in the kitchen is. All the old cupboards have been replaced by newer and bigger cupboards. I am afraid at this point to raise any kind of an objection. After all, we do have that my space/your space policy and I really do not want to jeopardize that in any fashion. My basic concern is this; I fear when I go for a week and come back my space will be so completely remodeled and organized that I will not recognize it and will not be able to nd anything I need. What would I do then? If I compliment her on her remodeling jobs, it might make her con dent about doing more remodeling jobs which may spill over into my space. Can you imagine how awful it would be? It would be a sad day if I came home from some trip and found my mess completely gone. What would I do with my life? I would have to start life all over again and you know how expensive that is. It is tough married to a x up guru; then again, I suppose it is just as hard to be wedded to a mess up guru. I have one concession in this area. David said it so well, Purge me with hyssop, and I shall be clean: wash me, and I shall be whiter than snow (Psalms 51:7 KJV). God specializes in cleaning up messes and preparing people like me for heaven. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Emmaus Road to perform SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEmmaus Road, a Southern Gospel quartet from Dalton, Ga., will perform at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church at Sunday, Sept. 29, at 6 p.m. Everyone is invited to this free concert. The church is located at 165 Friendship Church Road in Medart.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 7AJason William Martin, 41, of Crawfordville and previously of Monticello, passed away Sept. 10, 2013, after a long battle with cancer. He was born in Tallahassee. He is survived by his loving wife of 19 years, Jennifer Martin; two sons, Jared and Tyler Martin; his father, William Martin, of Monticello; and a large extended family. He was predeceased by his mother, Kay Martin. Jason was a devoted leader of the Youth Group at Lake Ellen Baptist Church in Crawfordville. He was an employee of many years with Cornerstone Tool and Fasteners of Tallahassee. His hobbies included being an avid Florida State Fan and spending time with family and friends. There are many people who loved and cared for Jason, including his Church Family at Lake Ellen. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Youth Group at Lake Ellen Baptist Church, 4495 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327 or Covenant Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road, Suite 102, Tallahassee FL 32308. Visitation was held Thursday, Sept. 12, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church. Funeral services were held Friday, Sept. 13, 2012 at 11 a.m. at Lake Ellen Baptist Church. Burial will be private. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements. (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com). Wendy Lee Strickland Shaw, 41, of Wakulla, passed away peacefully surrounded by her family and close friends. She was born January 1, 1972, to Wendell and Evelyn (Roberts) Strickland. She attended local schools graduating from Rickards High School in 1989, and went on to study at Tallahassee Community College and Florida State University where she received her undergraduate and Masters degrees in 1999. She was a member of First Baptist Church of Woodville and contributed her talents by returning every year to teach Vacation Bible School. Wendy touched many in her career of teaching special needs students. While at Fort Caroline School in Jacksonville, she received the Teacher of the Year. Wendy loved family, friends, people with special needs, travel, girls weekends, all things FSU, Disney/Epcot and bling. Cooking was a passion and nothing made her more happy than when she prepared a special meal for family and friends. She made many special friends and memories through her years as a Girl Scout. She, along with her sister, was an avid movie buff who had a movie quote for any situation that may arise. Wendy loved Florida State University sports and travel but above all that she loved her family and friends. She is survived by her mother, Evelyn Roberts Strickland; her sister, Sherry Strickland Kendrick (Jeff); her babies, niece Lynley and nephews Seth and Wyatt Kendrick; aunts and uncles, Lee Moulton (Gary), Linda Roberts, Donna Commander (Bill), Ronny Strickland (Kay), Johnny Strickland (Debbie), Maria Jo Ham (Bill); cousins, Kristin Commander, Erik Roberts, Kyle Commander, Laura Mattox, Karla Dicks, Kaitlyn Strickland, Aaron Strickland; foster sisters, Kelly, Rose, and Chelsea. She is also survived by her TayTay, Taylor Belyew, an autistic child for whom she cared for many years. Additionally, she leaves behind her cat of 14 years, Tatetanna. Wendy was predeceased by her father, Wendell Strickland, her uncle, Theron (Pete) Strickland and her maternal and fraternal grandparents. Visitation was held Friday, Sept. 13, 2013, at First Baptist Church of Woodville from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. A Celebration of Life was held at 11 a.m., Saturday, Sept. 14, 2013, at First Baptist Church Woodville. A private burial will be held at St. Marks Cemetery in St. Marks. The family wishes to thank friends and family for their prayers, owers, cards, meals and overall support during her illness. A memorial fund has been established to help with the medical costs associated with her illness at Giveforward. com Wendy Shaw Memorial Fund. Obituaries Marilyn Joyce Dyer Jason William Martin Wendy Lee Strickland Shaw Tully Buddy Taff Jr.Marilyn Joyce Dyer, 72, of Carrabelle, passed away on Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. She was born in Carrabelle and had lived there her entire life. She was a member of First Assembly of God in Carrabelle. She loved going to the Senior Citizens Center. She was a loving mother and grandmother and loved the Lord and her Church. Visitation was held Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2013 from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at First Assembly of God Church, 307 W. 3rd St., Carrabelle FL 32322. Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, Sept. 18, at 3 p.m. at First Assembly of God Church in Carrabelle. Burial will follow at Evergreen Cemetery. Survivors include two children, Andy William Dyer and Sarah Dyer Goggins of Crawfordville; two sisters, Mildred Bagwell of Tallahassee and Laura OSullivan of Clarksville; three grandchildren, Charles Goggins (Stephanie) of Orange Park, Jimmy Goggins of Carrabelle and Andrew McCord of Crawfordville; She was predeceased by her husband, Andrew Jackson Dyer; her parents, John Roy and Alice Stratton OSullivan; two brothers, John OSullivan and Willard OSullivan; a sister, Allie Mae Hennings. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements. Tully Buddy Taff Jr., of Crawfordville, died at his home on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013. Buddy was born April 15, 1930 and is a Wakulla County native. He retired from the City of Tallahassee and served in the National Guard for 32 years. Visitation was held Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Monday, Sept. 16, 2013 at 10 a.m. at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. Survivors include one brother, G.W. Taff; and four children, Carol, Darryl, Lisa and Tully Taff; nine grandchildren, Jeffery, Lee, Kevin, Chelsi, Matthew, Brittnee, Ashley, Eric and Brandon; and nine great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Iris Brantley Taff. The family would like to thank Big Bend Hospice. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel assisted the family with arrangements 850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com).Marilyn Joyce Dyer Tully Buddy Taff Jr. Jason William Martin Wendy Lee Strickland Shaw EmployFlorida.com 1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Come join us in Worship and Fellowship Saturday Sept. 22, 7 p.m. PANACEA FULL GOSPEL ASSEMBLY SERVICE WILL START AT 11AM AND GO UNTIL.

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityFNPS field trip slated for Sept. 28Special to The NewsPlease join us Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge for a presentation by KWCB President-Elect, Steve Cushman. Steve is one of the key people leading Wakulla County into the industry of Aquaculture. His visions and community trust are leading the way to a bright and sustainable seafood industry here in the Wakulla Community. Following a presentation outlining this unique and exciting method of farming, there will be a question and answer opportunity for the audience to ask questions. Aquaculture is nding its place in seafood industries all over the world. Our overwhelming demand for seafood is having a notable impact on our seas. Aquaculture is a way we can begin to maintain our supply of seafood and the jobs our seas have provided for hundreds of years. Oysters will be the main focus of the presentation as Wakulla has some of the richest waters for aquaculture in the Gulf. There will be samples of farm-raised oysters for attendees. Steve is looking forward to presenting this important information and discussing the great bene ts aquaculture will bring to Wakulla County. Wakulla County contributes millions of dollars to the overall Florida economy. These numbers will increase and spill over into the world economy when what we are developing for sustainable seafood is nurtured and developed locally. For more information, contact KWCB at helpkwcb@gmail.com. The public field trip Fall Wildflowers of the Panacea Sandhills will be held on Saturday, September 28, by the Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society. The free guided walk in St. Marks Nat. Wildlife Refuge will start at 10 AM at the Refuge parking strip on Otter Lake Road just west of Panacea. It will last about two hours. Participants should provide themselves sun protection, drinking water, and insect repellent if desired, and wear shoes comfortable for walking a mile. A standard liabilities release will be required at the site. All particulars are available from chapter eld trip coordinator Dr. George Weaver at 850-5103288. This will be the third and final event held by Sarracenia in concert with Viva Florida 500 (the States quincentennial observance) and Panhandle in Bloom. Happy rst birthday to Ka'Nyus Quintin Hines. He is the son of Isiah Hines III (Buck) of Crawfordville and Lequila Lowery of Tallahassee. Maternal grandparents are the late Helen Allen and Michael Lowery. Maternal great-grandparents are the late Eddie Lee Webster and Sally Webster and Brad and Ruth Lowery. Paternal grandparents are Isiah Hines, Jr and Linda Godbolt. Paternal great-grandparents are Dorothy and William Burney, Benjamin Sr and Rosa Godbolt, and Alberta and Isiah Hines Sr. We love you very much! Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Green Drinks event will be held Sept. 24Special to The NewsPlease join the family of Verlie Page Sweatt for a benefit barbecue dinner on Friday, Sept. 27 from 5 p.m. until 8 p.m. Verlie Page is the daughter of Bronson and Lauren Sweatt. She was born in February, six weeks prematurely, at Shands Hospital in Gainesville where she spent the rst two months of her life in the Shands NICU, enduring two surgeries. She has been home for ve months, attending weekly occupational, physical, and speech therapies, along with her specialist appointments in Tallahassee and Gainesville. Next month, Page and her family will be returning to Shands Hospital for Pages open heart surgery. The doctors have told her family to prepare for at least a 2-3 week recovery in Gainesville. The Sweatt family is in need of help with medical, travel, and lodging expenses associated with her heart surgery. In order to offset these costs, Pages family is hosting a bene t barbecue dinner. The award winning competition barbecue team Boog-A-Lou Smoke Crew will be smoking boston butts for a delicious pulled pork dinner. The barbecue plates will include pulled pork sandwiches, baked beans, and coleslaw. The dinner will take place at 4340 Crawfordville Highway, just south of the Wakulla County Public Library in Medart. Feel free to stop by on the way to the WHS home football game and dine inside or carry out. In addition, by preorder only, the Sweatt family and friends will deliver lunch barbecue plates to local businesses, schools, and groups. If your business or group would be interested in pre-ordering lunches, please contact Lauren Sweatt at 2513401. The suggested donation is $8 per plate, but any and all donations are greatly appreciated. Barbecue bene t for Sweatt family slated for Sept. 27Special to The NewsWakulla Democratic Party Chair Rachel Pienta announced today that the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee will hold a panel forum on the role of wetlands in Wakulla Countys ecosystem. Pienta said, There has been much heated debate about the role of a wetlands ordinance and how it impacts possible development and the environment impact. Our panel will provide fact based perspectives on our existing wetlands and the realities of planning and permitting for development in Wakulla County. Moderated Panel Discussion, with time for audience submitted questions will be held on Tuesday, Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library located at 4330 Crawfordville Highway. Doors open at 6:30 and refreshments will be served. The event is free and open to the public. The panel will be moderated by Palaver Tree Theatre Director Herb Donaldson. Pienta said, Herb will serve as the panel moderator and his team will be taping the program for later web and radio broadcast. To submit questions ahead of time, please submit questions via email to drpienta@gmail. com. All questions will be reviewed before the moderator poses the question to the panel members. For additional information, visit www.wakullademocrats.org.Panel forum on wetlands is to take place on Sept. 24 KaNyus Hines turns 1 Friday f September 27 7:00pm 9:30pm 4679 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FLwww.EdenSpringsRehab.comEden Springs Nursing and Rehab( 850 ) 926-7181u Private Rehab Suites tu Physical Therapy t u Stroke Specialist tCome by for a tour and see our facility and services!REHABRECOVERENJOY LIFE! Everyone is invited to attend theFourth Annual Senior PromMardi Gras 2013! A Well-Kept Secret Where Youll Experience The Personal Touch. SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringJodi OsborneHer name was drawn fromThank you so much for Offering this program. We have lived here a short time and now we will get to take a taste of the town. OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Congratulationsank You So Much! Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Coastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken nt Eat DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC August 2013 Winner C C MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Independent Doctor of Optometry edgardneroptical@yahoo.com E d Ga r Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsVFW Post 4538 congratulated two local students for being both the local and district winners of the 2012-13 essay competitions. Melissa Gentry won the Voice of Democracy audio/essay. Jillian Richardson won the Patriots Pen essay. By winning the local, then the district, they became eligible to compete in the National competition. Each year, students across the country participate in VFWs educational scholarship competitions. In 2012-13, nearly $3 million dollars in scholarships and incentives were awarded. VFW is now accepting entries for the 2013-14 scholarship competitions. Students dont miss your chance to get in on the action. VFWs Voice of Democracy and Patriots Pen essay competitions are dedicated to promoting patriotism among our nations youth. Students are asked to submit an essay in response to a question or statement on a subject which prompts them to consider how democratic ideals and principals apply to their lives. This years Voice of Democracy theme asks student to explain, Why Im Optimistic About Our Nations Future. The Voice of Democracy scholarship competition is an audioessay competition open to students in grades 9-12. Students are asked to record their statement in response to the theme and submit their entry to their local Posts. The national winner will receive the $30,000, T.C. Selman Memorial Scholarship Award. The Patriots Pen competition is open to students in grades 6-8. This year, students are asked to reflect on the statement, What Patriotism Means to Me. The national winner will receive a $5,000 award. The deadline for submissions to VFW Post 4538 is November 1, 2013 for these scholarships. Entry forms and information is available at www. vfw.com or call VFW Post 4538 at 926-4538. Local students win VFW essay contestPearce receives statewide certi cationSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Superintendent Bobby Pearce was presented a certi cate of completion for the Florida Association of District School Superintendents (FADSS) Florida Superintendent Special Certi cation Program. This special certi cation program is implemented in accordance with Section 1001.47(4), Florida Statutes and State Board of Education Rule 6A-1.551, FAC. The certificate was presented to Superintendent Pearce by FADSS President Dan Boyd, FADSS Chief Executive Of cer Bill Montford and Florida Education Commissioner Pam Stewart on Friday, September 13 at the FADSS fall conference. The Special Certi cation Program is an extensive training program designed speci cally for Florida Superintendents that includes training in School Law, School Finance, Collective Bargaining, the Superintendents Leadership Role in Improving Student Achievement and Core Concepts of Leadership. In addition, the superintendent is required to satisfactorily complete the Florida Superintendents Examination to demonstrate a rm understanding of the information and knowledge presented through the training course. Superintendent Pearce should be commended for his efforts to expand and build upon the skills and knowledge necessary to lead the school system in todays challenging and complex society, said Montford. Wakulla County School District is fortunate to have a leader like Superintendent Pearce who is committed to public education and to the continuous growth and enhancement of their own leadership skills in order to better serve their school system, Montford said. Superintendent outlines new opportunities for studentsSpecial to The NewsWakulla County public school students have even more opportunities to prepare for their futures, to be a part of the safety and security of their classmates, and to give back to their community, according to Superintendent Bobby Pearce. I want every student to leave our school system not only with a great education, but also with the ability to act as a good citizen in our community and in our world, he said. A few of the recently implemented opportunities include: Increased Tallahassee Community College Dual Enrollment Courses at WHS. Wakulla High School now offers six different TCC courses on the WHS campus, three per semester. English and History courses are offered as full classes. In addition, distance learning equipment that links WHS with TCC Engineering Manufacturing courses facilitates the participation of WHS students with TCC college credit classes. Without this innovation, students would have to drive to Tallahassee to be a part of the actual classes. Comprehensive Guidance Services at WHS. The WHS Guidance Department is physically being renovated to increase services to students and parents by making it a One Stop Shopping Center that will house the Assistant Principal of Curriculum, the Career Specialist, the registrar, the school counselors, and a licensed clinical social worker. Guidance has increased the number of dates the American College test (ACT), Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) and the Postsecondary Education Readiness Test (PERT) will be hosted on the WHS campus. Increased Career and Technical Education Opportunities at Middle and High Schools. A partnership with Wakulla School District, Lively Technical Center, Super Lube and CarQuest enabled the opening of the rst Wakulla Technical Center satellite program, Automotive Service Technology. This program provides WHS students hands-on instruction in automotive areas that can lead to industry certi cations. In addition, all of the CTE programs, formerly known as vocational, are attached to industry certi cations that students can use to work straight out of high school to earn a better wage than they would without certi cations. Other industry certification programs include Riversprings Middle, Wakulla Middle, and Wakulla High Schools Computing for College and Careers (Microsoft certi cations). At WHS, there are programs in Accounting, Culinary, Digital Design, Web Design, Carpentry, TV Production, the Medical Academy, and the Engineering Academy, which all have industry certifications tied to them. Safety and Security of Students. All Wakulla students are participating in cyber-safety trainings throughout the school year. In addition, middle school girls are being offered a voluntary program sponsored by the Girl Scouts on BFF Be A Friend First, which teaches students leadership skills and how to be a part of the cyberbullying solution by setting a good example. Superintendent Pearce has also worked closely with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce to make sure that the School Resource Officers are on middle and high school campuses and available to all the schools at all times during the school day, increasing law enforcement presence during the student day. Opportunities to Give Back to the Community. Students are being encouraged to be involved in giving back to their community as they have been involved in Thanksgiving canned food drives, Operation Santa, Coastal Cleanups, etc. Wakulla School District has dedicated September to Students Supporting Senior Citizens raising money and awareness for Wakullas senior citizens. Notes Pearce, I look forward to continue working with the schools and the community to create even more opportunities for our students. It is the whole child that we are concerned with, both in and out of the classroom. Special to The News Tallahassee Community College has received $398,556 in grants from the Florida Department of Education (FDOE) to provide adult education and family literacy programs in Leon, Gadsden and Wakulla counties. The one-year awards include: $85,515 to provide General Education Diploma (GED) services in Leon County; $136,466 to provide GED services in Gadsden County; $28,711 to provide English literacy and civics education services in Gadsden County; $117,352 to provide GED services at correctional facilities in Gadsden County; and $30,512 to provide GED services at correctional facilities in Wakulla County. The focus of the TCC Adult Education program is to improve basic reading, writing and computing skills for individuals preparing for the GED exam and seeking to improve their workforce skills. Instruction is provided on the main campus at TCCs Gadsden and Wakulla county service centers and at off-campus sites in collaboration with community partners. The funds will be managed by TCC Division of Workforce Development and will allow TCC to serve nearly 600 individuals in the three-county area. We are looking forward to addressing the adult education needs that exist in Leon, Gadsden and Wakulla counties, said Kimberly Moore, vice president of workforce development. The grant program is funded through the federal Workforce Investment Act Title II: Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. This measure will provide supplemental funds for adult basic education, high school subjects, English as a second language, citizenship, English literacy and civics education, said Harriett Abrams, adult education program coordinator. Grantees must gather information on the learners, take attendance, assess their progress and measure other objectives to prove students are completing and learning the coursework. The money may be used for teacher salaries, textbooks, instructional supplies, facilities maintenance, childcare and transportation for learners. For information about participation in these programs, please contact the TCC Division of Workforce Development at (850) 2018760 or at workforce@ tcc.fl.edu.TCC receives $398,556 in adult education grant awards WITH SPECIAL GUESTMOLLIE LYNNESopchoppyOpry.com Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information ALSO APPEARINGMr. Country Johnny CallowayPRESENTSSOUTHBOUND BAND BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW!

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com & By JENNY ODOMSpecial to The NewsAs if hollowed out of an old cedar stump, raised high above the Sopchoppy River bank, the home of artists Sammy and Sandy Tedder is lled with the rich, natural world that surrounds it. Sammy is a musician, producer and craftsman. Sandy is a potter and musician. These occupational labels seem incomplete. In this treehouse, the lives of these two artists are woven together by the wind, river, and animals that live among them, deep in the forrest. On a humid September afternoon, a slight breeze in the air, Sandy Tedder stands at the top of the exterior staircase that leads to an open deck with a worn, thick picnic table. She is dressed in blue jeans, and a close tting lavender top. Her wavy, silver hair ows like a river rippling down her back. Her cheeks are pink from the sun. She steps down a couple of stairs and points to a rough line drawn on the railing. This is how high the water came last year during the ood, she says about the historic ood that occurred in June 2012. Records indicate the water level was 28 feet above the river. Its hard to imagine water rising so high and flowing through the woods that on this day are peaceful and serene, with background music provided by cicadas. Upon entering the house, Sammy Tedder rises from a grey sectional sofa that hugs the corner. He is tall with snow-white hair and a kind smile. He wears blue jeans, a khaki shirt, and soft brown suede oxfords. He has large, strong hands and a deep, southern voice. The space is lled with exquisitely displayed musical instruments, artifacts and landscape paintings. Two well-used saxophones rest on stands. Hand-carved flutes are placed in a ceramic vase as if they were a bouquet. Native drums of various sizes and styles are grouped on the oor, surrounding a desk. Didgeridoos are hung in a row, with more utes, behind the couch. All are neatly arranged in a vision of circles, with detail and care. Tucked within the instruments is a desk with a laptop, hard-drives, some recording equipment, and a keyboard. Stacks of CDs are arranged on another small desk. The Tedders will celebrate 30 years together in October. It would be hard to nd any bigger fans other than the two for each other. They lived, and worked in Tallahassee for years, and slowly began to acquire property along the Sopchoppy River. In 1989 they built the house, using it as their weekend getaway for over a decade. Then, in 2003 they moved in, making this their fulltime residence.SAMMYS MUSICSammy, a Leon High School graduate, began playing the saxophone at age 11. In high school, he was selected as one of two musicians from the state to represent Florida in the rst-ever McDonalds All-American High School Band that plays annually in the Macys Thanksgiving Day parade. An honor for a young talented musician, although in retrospect, a star just beginning to shine. After high school Sammy attended Florida State University and studied music for a few years. During this time he played with various bands. The 8 of Us in college, then he was part of two touring groups, LaBamba and River Breeze, popular fusion, jazz and rock bands. They toured the Southeast playing at resorts and opening for musicians such as B.B. King, Jimmy Buffett, Jean-Luc Ponte, Herbie Mann, Minnie Ripperton, George Benson, Leon Russell, Percy Sledge and Edgar Winter. We were a great dance band, Sammy says of River Breeze. We could really get rocking. Sammy began composing and recording his own music around 1994, after producing an album for Mercury Records for Tom T. Hall called Songs from Sopchoppy. WORK WITH PAM LAWSMost recently, besides recording a new CD of his own music, Sammy has been recording music by Pam Laws, a well-known Tallahassee based jazz singer. In 1986 the two toured the USSR together on a cultural exchange to promote perestroika through American music. She (Laws) grew up in the south, in the black church, and she came to me wanting to do a spiritual CD based on her childhood experiences, Sammy says. You know, back then it was all a capella, with hand clapping. There were no instruments. He began studying in-depth about African American music and slave music, which is where gospel and jazz all began long ago. I have about six books on the subject, and Ive been learning about the history of the music we are recording, he says. Some of the songs we recorded are from the 1600s, and never really written down. These songs just developed in the fields and churches. He went to Laws home in Tallahassee and recorded her singing, as well as her telling stories about growing up, and the power of the music she learned. Currently he is mixing her voice recordings with instruments he plays, many of them his own and handmade, along with his own voice, and some guest musicians. It is scheduled for a fall release. Last summer Sammy was featured on The Wakulla Summer Sunday, a radio program produced by Palaver Tree Theater. You can listen to it on YouTube WakullaSunday. During the interview, Sammy describes music as visual. To me music is imagery. When I listen to music I have images in my mind. Its usually great big landscapes with big skies and clouds and birds ying in and out, he says. And so, it gives my music that extra layer of imagery. Around 2005 Sammy met Elam Stolzfus, a local documentary filmmaker, through their mutual friend Natalie Provo, who Sammy and Sandy describe as a connector of people. Sammy had been recording nature sounds, in the woods and on the river, and one day Natalie drew upon her intuition. She was our good friend, and she was on one of her many outings, staying over on St. George Island one night, Sammy tells the story. She found out that a lm crew was going to be out lming the nesting sea turtles early in the morning. So she decided to sleep on the beach so she wouldnt miss getting to meet the crew. As the sun rose, here comes this lady walking up with blankets wrapped up all around her blowing in the breeze, he smiles. It must have been a sight to see. Natalie passed away in 2010, but she made an important connection between two artists that lead to a meaningful working relationship. Sammy has created soundtracks for documentaries produced by Stoltzfus, and travelled with his crew during lming for Apalachicola River: An American Treasure and The Big Cypress Swamp: The Western Everglades. He weaves together sounds of nature with traditional and non-traditional musical methods. Richly layered, some songs are slow and ethereal, others are ripe with strong rhythms and beats. The mix is diverse. MAKING INSTRUMENTSBesides being an accomplished and well-respected musician, Sammy makes most of the instruments he plays, and uses, to record. He harvests River Cane from the Sopchoppy and Apalachicola Rivers to make utes. He nds large cedar stumps and hollows out logs to make native drums, and uses bamboo to make didgeridoos. Early in his career, and wanting to expand his knowledge and to learn to play other instruments, Sammy decided to take ute lessons. At the time, Sandy was an accomplished utist and she was taking on a few students. She was impressed with his talent, and his tenacity. He came to take ute lessons years and years ago. He was the student that wouldnt go away, she says with a smile. So, I made him play ute duets for hours and hours. He eventually got up the nerve to ask her out. Ironically, their rst date was on the water. Our rst date was in nature, a canoe trip with friends. He tipped over the canoe during that trip, she smiles. We laughed and laughed about it then and now. I read music, says Sandy, but Sammy, he plays by ear. He is so, so talented. She is the real artist between us. She is so good, says Sammy. Sandy has played the flute, and other instruments on his recordings. She picks up an Udu that she made from clay and plays it. An Udu is an African percussion instrument that looks like a large jug with a hole in the front and top. Its sound is rhythmic and bouncy. Im lucky when she decides to play for me, says Sammy. Im honored that he invites me to play, Sandy says in return. The mutual adoration between them is refreshing. SANDYS POTTERYBesides being a classical utist, Sandy is also an accomplished potter. Her work is detailed and precise. She walks to the dining room table, that is also used as a workspace. Laid out are various nished pieces, and some plaster castings. Sandy describes what inspires her work.Turn to Page 15ATedderSammy & Sandythe couple are inspired by nature along the Sopchoppy RiverSammy TedderYou can purchase CDs online and nd out more about Sammy Tedder at www.SammyTedder.com. Downtown Books in Apalachicola carries Sammy Tedders CDs for purchase. Sandy Tedder You can nd the pottery and artwork of Sandy Tedder twice a year at Sopchoppys Worm Gruntin Festival and Christmas in Sopchoppy Festivals. You can also nd her wolf track pottery at the International Wolf Centers shop, online at the www.wolf. org/wolves. PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOM/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSandy Tedder demonstrates a deer hoof rattle, and Sammy Tedder works in the recording space, in the home they share along the Sopchoppy River. Artists of WakullaArtists of Wakulla is a monthly feature that highlights an individual artist living and working in Wakulla County. If you are an artist, or know an artist, who is interested in being featured, please contact Jenny Odom at jenny@iggyart.com.Sammy Tedder plays one of his handmade utes.Sandy Tedder demonstrates Sammys drums. Sandy Tedders wolf track pottery.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 11AEditors Note: John Roberts provided this remembrance of St. Marks family life by Sandra Cotton Brewer.By SANDRA COTTON BREWERSpecial to The NewsOur dad, Julius B. Cotton Jr. grew up in St. Marks and later joined the U.S. Navy and was honorably discharged in 1945. He was married to my mother, Jeanette Harrell Cotton. I was about 3 years old by the time he returned home from the war to St. Marks and to his lovely wife. He quickly decided that in addition to building our rst home, his No. 1 daughter needed some serious discipline. He began acquiring lots of tools for the tasks at hand in building our house on Shell Island Road. Well guess what? These tools were about the neatest things to me Id ever seen and I loved watching him work with them. Hed leave and go back to work for three weeks, as he was an engineer on a boat. While he was gone, I would have been in his toolbox again. He knew right away upon his return, that No. 1 daughter was at it again, as he would nd screwdrivers and hammers out in the yard, knowing he had put them up safely before leaving. The sailor came out in his language then. He would be so mad, and mother would say, Dont talk like that in front of your daughter. Hed pick up the rst thing he would lay his hands on and give me a good spanking for ruining his tools. Id forget soon enough about the discipline and was just drawn back to those tools in the chest. Thus, the stories began with the little green men he had put in the toolbox. He let me know that if that toolbox lid was ever opened, those little green men had little hammers too, and they would be whacking some knuckles as soon as that lid opened. That slowed me down for awhile. Id stand by that big tool chest and wonder how the little green men kept so quiet in there! You know a lock would have solved the problem which most of us would do today. But youve got to remember we grew up in some hard times. Every spare penny went toward nails, screws, and tools, etc., for building the house and food for the table. After our home was completely built we had to haul water for cooking and drinking for several months. But we did have indoor plumbing! Dad was a rm believer in not buying anything until you had the cash to pay for it. Until then you just did without. Childhood friends were a treat for me. Ralph Oliver was one of my rst playmates and neighbor. He was about my age. I remember when dad was discharged from the Navy and was able to come home to us, running over to tell Ralph and his mother that I have a dad too! Shortly after dad came home from the Navy, along came my little sisters, Cynthia and Joan. He had his hands full, not to mention my sweet mother. The two little ones, 13 months apart, were idyllic to him because they didnt bother his tools. But, they were nding other adventures to get into. When I was 6 years old, it became tooth pulling time and his favorite entertainment! Hed get a big roll of string and tie one end around my tooth then tie the other end to the front door knob. Then hed giggle and say Tell me when youre ready for me to slam the door, and mama get the bucket because shes going to bleed like crazy. That scared me to death. Its funny what you remember from childhood but Dad was terri ed of a snake. I remember late one afternoon when a snake fell out of an oak tree that was in our yard and it landed right on his shoulders and the back of his neck. He screamed and Im sure went for a gun, but rst he most likely had to change his pants! Mother was terrified of ddler crabs. For those of you who dont know what that is, its a little crab creature who lives around water and mostly on land. Dad would spend a day shing in the Gulf, and on his way home from the dock he would pick up a ddler, put it in his pocket and bring it home. He always whistled a little tune walking home from the boat dock that was at Wash Landing. I still remember that little tune. Wash Landing was near the San Marcos de Apalache State Park. We simply called it the Old Fort back then before it became a state park. Id run inside the house and tell mom that daddy was close I could hear his whistle and shed get so excited that he was coming in for dinner. Shed busy herself setting the table and when he came in the house hed go up to her and give her a little kiss, then pull that ddler out of his pocket and put it on her shoulder. Needless to say, that didnt earn him any points with mom. Wash Landing had a dock for a few boats which was close to our house in St. Marks. I made many a trip with dad by boat at Christmas time down river near the old fort to cut a cedar tree. Wed bring it back to the house to decorate. I was told by my grandmother that in prior generations women would take their dirty laundry to Wash Landing to wash in the river. I think that was where I actually learned to swim. I remember in those childhood days having many dinner table episodes of family disfunctioning. I hated milk and would always cause a spill during a meal. Then Id get the knuckle thump on the head from dad. My sister, Joan, hated eggs as a child and daddy just kept making her eat more and more. Pretty soon her little face looked like it was going to explode! She never swallowed them. Soon the tears would come along with him fussing about her needing to eat so she wouldnt be so skinny. Mother was paranoid about skinny kids. She didnt want anyone thinking we didnt get enough to eat around her table. My sister, Cynthia, just wanted to make everyone happy. She ate everything they gave her and mother was really proud! She had one daughter that looked normal to her because she had some flesh on her bones. If any readers know who the person is to the left of Ms. Georgia Lynn, let us know. As years progressed, dad eventually mellowed some and began to nd the humor in life. The best fun came when we could do more things with him. When I was about 8 years old I loved the times hed take me hunting and hed say, Walk right behind me in my footsteps, and dont move until I tell you to. The worst thing was I couldnt TALK! It would scare the squirrels or turkeys away. There would be a time during the day that dad and I would sit by a tree and then hed start telling some of his great stories. I loved them. He was always telling us kids what a wonderful mother we had, and how much she sacrificed for us. Every father should do that, and vice-versa. I loved the shing trips most with my dad out to the bay, or the flats, as they were referred to a lot. Many times these trips were miserable, but I was always willing to take the chance. You were either freezing at 4 a.m. going down the river to the bay, or during a bad squall. Many times that old tarpaulin felt good around my shoulders he kept under the bow. Other times I was burning up under the hot sun and no winds. You know, all of us just dealt with it! It was an adventure with a Great Adventurer at the helm of the boat. He would smoke those hand-rolled cigarettes and grin like a Cheshire cat when he was shing on the bay. He was a happy man! I remember catc hing those shiners for bait and him paying me a penny apiece for them. He would always take everyone of them off my hook for me. My lunch on those trips were usually Graham crackers and peanut butter. Anything made with mayo wouldnt work in the hot sun out on the water. Hed have us a soft drink in the cooler, usually the same cooler where the sh were that we caught. Oh man, I hated sh slime all over my cold RC Cola! Yuck! Hed just laugh and say wash it in the bay, honey. He knew Id drink it anyway. He taught us much about hard work in our adventures and not to complain. Though, I was a slow learner in that regard. Whoever went shing with him had to help clean the sh. That was usually around 8 or 9 at night outside at the faucet where he had a water hose and a makeshift table where we would clean those speckled trout and rock bass. Our bodies would be covered in mosquitoes! We couldnt eat dinner until the work was done and it was shared by all. Then wed all enjoy the wonderful fried sh and hushpuppies that mom would cook. I have never, to this day, had a hushpuppy as good as my mothers were. Another thing I treasure about dad is that what little time he had to share of himself when he was home, and that was very seldom, he did try to give his three girls and his grandchildren all great memories and much, much fun when they visited. Im sure they had their favorites, but you know none of us would have ever known it.In and around St. Marks with our dad, Julius B. Cotton Jr. Julius B. Cotton Jr. as a boy. The only picture I have of Ralph, from about 1947, with Ralph Oliver, Carole Ann Ladd, and Sandra Cotton Brewer. One picture from the past I treasure is of my grandparents, mother and Ms. Georgia Lynn swimming, most likely at the St. Marks Lighthouse. From left, Leta Cotton, Jeanette Cotton, Georgia Lynn, unidenti ed woman, and J. B. Cotton Sr. Red Clay Footprints By John RobertsSpecial to The NewsThe Sopchoppy Oprys 3 season is winding down with just four more shows to go, but the talent just keeps on rolling in! Look who will be South Bounds guest at the Sept. 28th show Miss Mollie Lynne! Mollie will perform with South Bound Bands own lead vocalist Mr. Country Johnny Calloway and rest of the band! This will be one of best shows of the season. The beautiful and talented Mollie Lynne, 27, is an Opry favorite and has done guest appearances at numerous local festivals, fundraisers, and bene t functions throughout the Big Bend. She has been performing professionally in Tallahassee and around Florida for the past eight years to a loyal and ever-expanding fan base! Mollie has a soulful country blues voice, plays guitar and has a growing repertoire of original songs. Already in her young career, she has performed in Nashvilles Gaylord Opryland Resort, opened for Rhonda Vincent & Rage at the Perry Forest Festival and, in 2005, Mollie was invited to Dallas where she entertained at the Phi Theta Kappas National Convention and appeared on the same bill with such notables as Patty Labelle, Rudy Gatlin of the Gatlin Brothers Band and Rudy Giuliani! Mollie says one of her most memorable performances came when she was invited to perform at Ruth Eckerd Hall before the Martina McBride/ Billy Dean Concert in Clearwater. You can learn more about Mollie Lynne and her new album release at www.myspace.com/ mollielynne. The rst hour of music always features the Oprys own popular house band, South Bound. A premier classic country group, South Bound has performed 150-plus shows with 40 different band members over a span of 13 years on the historic Sopchoppy Auditorium Stage. The talented musicians currently in the band have carried it to a whole new level in classic country music: Wayne Martin, ddle; Larry Bullock, steel guitar; Reggie Bradley, electric bass/vocals; Lamar The Wildman Brock, percussion/vocals; Bill Gay, lead guitar/vocals; Johnny Mr. Country Calloway, rhythm guitar/vocals. They play (and sing) a style of classic country that is the envy of every band in the area. A great bunch of guys who have a passion for classic country and enjoy performing for all their fans at the Sopchoppy Opry. Johnny Calloway will host the South Bound portion of the show on Sept. 28. The show starts at 7 p.m. Its going to be a fun time for all! Fans are encouraged to come early on show date, pick up tickets then enjoy a meal, sandwich or a world class dessert in the Opry Caf! The box of ce & caf open at 5:30 p.m. All caf items are reasonably priced so the whole family can have dinner before the show. Net proceeds from the Opry shows are used to match state historic preservation grants available via the Florida Division of Historical Preservation. The restoration project is a joint effort of the Wakulla County School Board and the SHS Alumni Association. All contributions to the restoration project are tax deductible and volunteers are welcome. Tickets for the Opry are $10 and may be reserved by calling the Opry tickets of ce at 962-3711. Mollie Lynne will headline Sopchoppy Opry Sept. 28 Mollie Lynne performing.

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 13 In recent years, when they would hear the reports of lagging revenue and growing expenses, lawmakers would send a warning to agencies, special interests and anyone else listening: Dont ask for more money. It isnt there. The warnings arent quite as dire this time, but the House and Senate budget chairs are still sending a similar message despite an $845.7 million projected surplus. The money might be there, but its not time to go on a spending spree. That would at least seem to indicate that something is going to have to pay for the $500 million tax cut that Gov. Rick Scott is pitching across the state on a campaign-style swing less than a year ahead of the real thing, when he would presumably talk again about the $500 million tax cut. Meanwhile, the campaign trail proved to be tricky for Attorney General Pam Bondi after she admitted asking the governors of ce to move an execution that conflicted with her campaign kickoff. And the state said goodbye to a man all too familiar with walking the trail. READ MY LIPS: TAX CUTS MUST BE OFFSET Scott spent much of his week zig-zagging the state to push for a tax whose details he doesnt yet know. The governor has already said he will devote $500 million to reducing taxes and fees in his budget for the year that begins July 1, but has said he will solicit advice on how to get to that number. That meant a four-day, ve-city swing that took Scott to West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Tampa and Orlando. The Its Your Money Tax Cut Tour coincided with the week when lawmakers heard a presentation on how much extra money they will have for the next budget. Right now, the number sits at $845.7 million, when high-priority items and a $1 billion reserve are factored in. But despite the extra funding much of which is onetime money legislative leaders are urging caution when it comes to big spending items. Like $500 million tax cuts. Obviously the widely reported surplus is good news for Florida, House Budget Chairman Seth McKeel, R-Lakeland, said in a statement. But despite our healthy surplus, it is not cause for dancing in the streets. The Florida Legislature has made fiscally responsible decisions that have helped to improve Floridas bottom line and I suggest that we not lose sight of our scal principles as we move forward. Senate Budget Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, sounded the same notes. In order to fund new priorities, initiatives, things that our constituents feel are important in 2013 and 2014, were going continue to have to have the discipline to review previous expenditures that were important to legislators who were duly elected in the 1990s and in 2000 and 2010, Negron said. But the GOP was likely to go along with Scotts idea in the end, particularly in an electionyear session, which means the concept will probably make it into next years budget. Democrats are already savaging the proposal, saying that it amounts to taking money that could be used on education and funneling it to the well-off. Instead of touting taxpayer giveaways that favor wealthy special interests and the politically connected, Governor Rick Scott and Republican legislative leaders should focus on the needs of working families, said House Minority Leader Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale. Rather than gimmicks, its time that Floridas leaders get serious about better funding for public schools, community colleges and universities. BONDIS SCHEDULING CONFLICT Attorney General Pam Bondi, meanwhile, found herself in a controversy that made it all the way to the Rachel Maddow Show the week after it was revealed that she asked Scott to change the date of an execution because of a scheduling con ict with her campaign kickoff. On Sept. 6, the News Service of Florida reported that the execution of death row inmate Marshall Lee Gore had been rescheduled from Tuesday, Sept. 10 to Oct. 1 because of Bondis campaign event. By Monday, Bondi was already forced to say that she was wrong to ask Scott to push the date back to accommodate the event. As a prosecutor, there was nothing more important than seeing justice done, especially when it came to the unconscionable act of murder, Bondi said in a release. I personally put two people on death row and, as attorney general, have already participated in eight executions since I took of ce, a role I take very seriously. The planned execution of Marshall Lee Gore had already been stayed twice by the courts, and we should not have requested that the date of the execution be moved, Bondi added. For his part, Scott said he wasnt aware of why the attorney general had asked for Gores death to be delayed We set the date, the attorney generals of ce asked for a postponement, so we went along with that, Scott responded when asked Monday if he thought the reason for the delay was proper. We try to comply with when other Cabinet members ask for some thing. We try to work with them. Gore, whose sanity has been the focus of efforts to block the execution, was convicted of killing two women in 1988 in MiamiDade and Columbia counties. Gores death warrant is for the murder of Robyn Novick, whose body was found in March 1988 in a rural area of Miami-Dade. By the end of the week, Democrats who have yet to round up an of cial challenger for Bondi were already using the event to try to slam both the attorney general and the governor. The Florida Democratic Party said it has submitted an openrecords request for Scott, Bondi and several of Scotts top aides to turn over anything dealing with the delay in the execution. Pam Bondi has demonstrated astoundingly bad judgment, putting partisan politics ahead of the most serious duty she has as Attorney General. But we know thats not the full story, said Joshua Karp, a party spokesman, in a press release. Governor Rick Scott has refused to answer questions about his of ces involvement in this gross breach of the public trust, directing all inquiries back to Pam Bondi. Also on the hot seat this week was Rep. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg, who is in line to become the next Democratic leader in the House but is facing some calls to step aside. Rouson, who already wasnt unanimously supported by the caucus, ran into trouble most recently when two Democratic Party staffers were red for helping him set up a separate fundraising arm for House Democrats. Top party of cials worried about a lack of fundraising coordination, and Rouson backed down. But on Friday, the current House Democratic leader, Rep. Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale, called a caucus meeting for later this month to clear the air and let Rouson try to make his case for remaining leader-designate. FAREWELL TO SHAW There were also some notable comings and goings in the world of Florida politics, including the death of longtime congressman Clay Shaw. Shaw, a Republican who served a mostly moderate coastal district from 1981 to 2007, died Tuesday at the age of 74 after a battle with lung cancer. Shaw won in 1980, as President Ronald Reagan easily defeated the incumbent Jimmy Carter, and was also a part of the GOPs Contract with America that powered a congressional takeover in 1994. Shaw, whose accomplishments included efforts to implement the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration plan, work on the 1996 Welfare Reform Act and introducing the Missing Childrens Act of 1982, was mourned by Republicans and Democrats. Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam, who served six years in the House with Shaw, called him a great advocate and public servant whose greatest love was always his family. And U.S. Rep. Lois Frankel, DFla., also praised Shaw. I will always fondly remember Clay Shaw from my time as mayor of West Palm Beach, as someone who you could work with in a bipartisan manner and as a true gentleman, she said. Shaw was unseated in 2006 by Democrat Ron Klein as part of a Democratic wave that temporarily ended GOP control of the House. Also this week, Jerry McDaniel announced he would retire Dec. 31 from his position as budget director, which he held under both Gov. Rick Scott and former Gov. Charlie Crist. He will be replaced by Cynthia Kelly, a former top House and Senate budget staff member who has since 2010 worked as director of the Division of Administrative Services at the Florida Department of Environmental Protection. And Jan Ignash, vice chancellor and chief academic of cer for the State University System, was of- cially tapped Thursday to be interim chancellor until the Board of Governors can nd a permanent replacement for Frank Brogan. Ignash is not expected to apply for the permanent position. STORY OF THE WEEK: Legislativ e leaders called for caution about an $845.7 million surplus as Gov. Rick Scott toured the state touting his proposed $500 million tax cut. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Im asking, before a person be judged and convicted in a rush to judgment, for the opportunity to appear in front of the caucus and lay out the strategy.--Rep. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg, on calls for him to step aside from House Minority Leader-designate.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Dont spend it all in one placeBy DAVID WHITEAll wines are appropriate for all seasons. Theres nothing wrong with enjoying a simple white or crisp ros in the winter, and big reds work all year long. But our diets change with the weather. Just as we look forward to watermelon and freshfrom-the-garden tomatoes in the summer, we crave soups, stews, and roasts in winter. So our go-to wines change, as well. As the fall begins, I nd that Im craving a light red with virtually every dinner. Cru Beaujolais almost always does the trick, as its vibrant acidity and freshness offer a refreshing pairing for September dishes. If youre scratching your head, then youre probably thinking about Beaujolais Nouveau, the easy drinking, fruity wine that oods ashore every November. Both styles hail from Beaujolais, a region in France sandwiched between Burgundy and the northern Rhone, home to some of the worlds most prestigious vineyards. And both are produced with Gamay, a thin-skinned grape marked by bright red fruits that traces its lineage to Pinot Noir and an obscure white called Gouais Blanc. But unlike Beaujolais Nouveau, Cru Beaujolais is serious; the wines can offer wonderful depth and complexity and age for decades. And right now, theyre extremely well priced. As Maggie Hoffman, the drinks editor at Serious Eats, explained last year, [Cru Beaujolais] offers some of the best value in red wine that you can nd its seriously well-made, balanced, food-friendly, delicious, and evocative of place, and its way underpriced. Consumer confusion helps explain why Cru Beaujolais is undervalued. Ever since Georges Duboeuf introduced his Nouveau to the U.S. marketplace three decades ago, Americans have associated Beaujolais with the mass-produced, gimmicky plonk that sells by the truckload every November. Beaujolais Nouveau has certainly improved in recent years, but the whole concept still seems silly; its bizarre to celebrate Beaujolais new harvest with cheap wine that has been own across the world. Consumer preference also explains why Cru Beaujolais is underappreciated. When consumers think of light wines, they tend to think of whites and ross. For Americans, especially, a light red is an oxymoron -reds are supposed to be dark, powerful, and served alongside steak. Cru Beaujolais hails from one of ten small villages in the northern part of this French wine region. Just as Napa Valleys sub-appellations think Stags Leap, Oakville, Howell Mountain, and the like boast of special growing conditions, so do these ten villages. Good wine shops should stock wines from Fleurie, Morgon, Moulin--Vent, and other Beaujolais crus. Most Nouveau is produced in southern Beaujolais. That said, many artisanal producers are working to change the reputation of the south by keeping yields low, rigorously sorting their grapes, avoiding manipulation in the cellar, and making real wines. Their bottlings are worth seeking out, especially if you have a trusted wine merchant to help guide you. Once upon a time, oenophiles everywhere knew that Beaujolais could produce some of the worlds most complex, aromatic, and lively wines. The region still produces gorgeous wines, but theyre mostly ignored. So before word gets out, be sure to stock your cellar.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com, which was named Best Overall Wine Blog at the 2013 Wine Blog Awards. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. WHITES WINESCru Beaujolais: Fresh, perfect for early fall -Janet

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comOn Sunday, Sept. 8, Eldon Theodore Hicks, 31, of Panacea was arrested for driving while license suspended or revokedhabitual offender, attached tag not assigned and resisting an of cer without violence. WCSO responded to Hicks on the side of the road in Panacea physically ghting with bystanders trying to keep him from driving off. Hicks was observed walking in and out of traf c shaking his fists at vehicles driving by. Hicks attempted to run from Sgt. Ryan Muse during the arrest process but was captured a short distance away. Florida Highway Patrol Troopers assisted at the scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: THURSDAY, SEPT. 5 Juleah Evans of McDonalds in Crawfordville reported a battery. A male subject drove up to the drive through window and attempted to use a credit card to purchase food. The credit card was declined. The subject, who has been identi ed, allegedly spit on the victim and drove off. A trespass warning will be processed for the suspect as well. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Sharon Carraway of Sopchoppy reported a residential burglary. A locked box containing a large amount of jewelry and cash was stolen. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Billy Metcalf, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Detective Josh Langston investigated. Mark Huebner of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A motorcycle, valued at $1,200, was stolen from the victims property. A suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Store staff observed Mary Rae Mahler, 20, of Tallahassee placing merchandise in her purse. The suspect also placed jewelry on her nger and paid for a folder at check-out, but not the other items she had in her possession. Mahler was charged with retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. The items recovered, pencils and jewelry, are valued at $29. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Detective Clint Beam investigated. Shanequa Hines of Crawfordville reported the theft of a cellular telephone. The victim threw a football party at her home and the phone was reported missing at that time. The phone is valued at $250. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. Meghan Williams of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television, valued at $1,010, was stolen from her home. A suspect has been identi- ed and the television was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Eric Hemby of St. Marks reported a criminal mischief. The victims window was broken by a rock. Damage is estimated at $300. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. SATURDAY, SEPT. 7 Daniel Lavon Gilley, 29, of Havana was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked after being observed failing to stop at a stop sign at the Leon County line. A traf c stop was conducted and it was determined that the subject had a suspended license for failure to pay traffic fines. The subject was labeled as a habitual offender. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Jenny Hatcher of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A rearm was stolen from the victims home. The rearm is valued at $400 and entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Ronni Denise Allor, 61, of Crawfordville was observed concealing items in her bag and inside a shopping cart. She passed the last point of sale without paying for all of the items. Food and miscellaneous items, valued at $75, were recovered. Allor was issued a notice to appear in court for retail theft. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Ruby Collins of Panacea reported discovering a camera and camera bag in the middle of U.S. Highway 98. The camera was valued at $150 and was turned into the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. SUNDAY, SEPT. 8 Donald Joshway Smith, Jr., 40, of Monticello was stopped for speeding on U.S. Highway 98 traveling 67 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone. A traf c stop was conducted and it was determined that Smiths driver license was suspended as a habitual offender. Smith was arrested for DWLSR and held at the Wakulla County Jail for two warrants out of Leon County. LCSO said they would extradite. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Wal-Mart officials turned lost and found property over to the WCSO. Several credit cards, driver licenses and medical records were found inside the store and turned over to the WCSO. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Sonya Kimbrell of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary to her shed. Heath Lathaniel Blackburn, 44, of Woodville was observed inside the shed collecting tools. The property owner asked the suspect to leave the scene to which he refused. Blackburn was charged with burglary and trespassing. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. MONDAY, SEPT. 9 Salvah Mohorne of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle decal from her tag. The decal is valued at $20 and Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Michael Gainous of Tallahassee reported a theft of vehicle parts. The victims vehicle was involved in a traffic crash in Tallahassee and was towed to a Crawfordville individual for repairs. The vehicle owner checked on the vehicle and discovered that a tag and tire were missing and the vehicle had not been repaired. The value of the missing property and repair money is $1,830. A suspect has been identi ed. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Dale Rushton of the City of Sopchoppy reported damage to a city re hydrant. The hydrant was damaged by a mower and tractor in Crawfordville. The damage caused water to leak from the hydrant. Damage was estimated at $2,000. There was no criminal intent to damage the hydrant and no charges were led against the tractor operator. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Timothy Holman of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Someone used the victims bank card to make three unauthorized charges at a Wal-Mart in Key Largo. The charges totaled $483. Deputy Jerrold Finney investigated. A Crawfordville resident reported receiving threatening and harassing phone communication on his cellular telephone. The communication threatened damage to the victims vehicle and harm to relatives. A suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. TUESDAY, SEPT. 10 Monica Colette Easton, 42, of Tallahassee was stopped in Crawfordville for unlawful speed. During the traf c stop Deputy Gibby Gibson had reason to believe the driver may be under the in uence of alcohol or narcotics. After field sobriety exercises were administered, the suspect was searched. A ask containing an alcoholic beverage was discovered along with a plastic bag containing marijuana. The marijuana weighed .9 grams. She was charged with DUI, possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and issued a traf- c citation for excessive speed. Sgt. Danny Harrell, Lt. Sherrell Morrison and Deputy Alan Middlebrooks also investigated. Laura Dukes of Crawf ordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported 13 unauthorized charges on her bank card in Brazil. The 13 charges totaled $178. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Andrew Haubrick of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A boat motor was stolen from the victim while it was being repaired. The motor is valued at $300. The case and suspect information was forwarded to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 11 Karen Harper of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim was alerted to five suspicious charges on her bank card from Brazil. The charges totaled $337. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Brittany Gowdy of Crawfordville reported the theft of jewelry from her home. A person of interest was identified. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Ashton Tyer of Crawfordville reported the theft of her dog. The yellow Labrador retriever was taken from the victims property. The dog is valued at $500. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. April Marie Victoriana, 39 of Crawfordville was issued a criminal traf- c citation for unassigned tag attached to a vehicle following a traffic stop. Sgt. Ryan Muse observed an expired tag on the vehicle and determined that the tag was on the wrong vehicle. The tag was seized. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,131 calls for service during the past week.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportSpecial to the NewsWakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel retired K-9 Gunny at a ceremony in the WCSO Emergency Operations Center Friday, Sept. 13. The ceremony included a bone shaped cake, dog biscuits, chevrons for being promoted to sergeant and time to play with his training toys. Gunny was handled by Lt. Ronald Mitchell and will become a family pet now that he is no longer a service dog. During his career Gunny was trained and certi ed for search and rescue and narcotics operations. He began working Dec. 31, 2006 and retired on Sept. 13. Now we can do things like walk in the park, said Lt. Mitchell. Things he couldnt do as a service animal. Lt. Mitchell and Gunny were recognized as the 2011-2012 Florida Missing Childrens Day Jimmy Ryce K-9 Trailing Team of the Year after locating a young boy who was lost in a wooded area near Wakulla Beach. Another proud moment for Lt. Mitchell was when Gunny helped locate an elderly Alzheimers patient who walked away from her home during a cold winter night. There is no doubt in my mind that she would have perished that night, Lt. Mitchell said of the victim.K-9 Gunny retires SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLt. Ronald Mitchell, Gunny and Sheriff Creel. FAAST, Inc. presents a training workshop on the individualized education program (IEP) planning process inclusive of transition planning, 504 reasonable accommodations, ADA auxiliary aids and services, and assistive technologies leading to post secondary education and employment WHEN WHERE Saturday Morning September 21, 2013 9:00 am 11:00 am (EST) FREE DAY PARKING WHO TO CONTACT Melanie Quinton 1-888-788-9216, ext. 107 / 850-487-3278, ext. 107 Cell: 850-766-3733 Email: mquinton@faast.org Steve Howells, FAAST Executive Director (ext. 102) Email: showells@faast.org We are pleased to present a comprehensive training workshop on the IEP planning process inclusive of transition planning, 504 reasonable accommodati ons, ADA auxiliary aids and services, assistive technologies, and support services leading to em ployment. The experienced trainer sponsored by FAAST, Inc. will be Ms. Connie Serafin with expertise as a client advocate and paralegal. We will be offering comprehensive training materials and self -help resource guides designed to help children with disabilities and their families, advocates, educat ional professionals, and other interested parties. Although there is no charge for this training opportunity, we do ask that participants RSVP to pre-register as space will be limited FAAST is funded by the U.S. Rehabilitation Services Administrati on and the FL Department of Education Division of Vocational Re habilitation Four Points by Sheraton Tallahassee Downtown 316 West Tennessee Street Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 422-0071 Mee ng Room: Bronze Ballroom (Lower Lobby) 3333 West Pensacola Street Building 100, Suite 140 Tallahassee, FL 32304 For more information, visit www.faast.org Voice (850) 487-3278 TDD (877) 506-2723 Toll-Free (888) 788-9216 Fax (850) 575-4216 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the

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From Page 10AI love nature. I love being outdoors and taking long walks in the woods around here, she says. Sandy grew up in the Midwest, left school before graduating and hitchhiked around the country. She ended up in Tallahassee in the late s. When she rst moved there she lived in a Chickee Hut, a native Seminole dwelling, built by her friend Barry Wood. Always drawn to the earth, and its offerings, Sandy likes to learn by doing. She is primarily a self-taught potter and musician, although she took some private lessons along the way. You learn by practice. I never had formal training, but I had good teachers, she states con dently. For years she created utilitarian pottery, re ning her skills, creating handsome pots, cups, bowls, platters and more recently, slabs with imprinted animal tracks. I have been seeing (wild animal) tracks for years, and then a few years ago I decided to start making plaster casts of some of the tracks Id nd, she says. I have a little kit that I can take out to the woods when I nd a good track, Sandy informs. It takes about two hours for the plaster to dry. Then its ready. It is a passion she says, I have a closet full of them. After collecting these casts of wild cats, bears, alligators along with smaller animals like rabbits, armadillo and raccoons, one day a thought came to her. I decided to start pressing the plaster tracks into the clay, she states, And now I use them consistently in my pottery. A visitor from Minnesota saw her track pottery and contacted her about doing some pieces for the International Wolf Center, a wolf rescue operation. They sent her plaster casts of wolf tracks, and now she creates pieces they sell in the store, and online shop, to support the work done to save the wolves. Sammy built her studio, a small, screened-in space on stilts that is set apart from the house. It holds her wheel, kiln and shelves for nished pieces, greenware and kiln rests. This space wasnt so lucky during the ood last year, she says with regret. I was lucky that I didnt lose it, but I had to completely rewire my kiln. And so she did. Add electrician to her skill set. The Tedders, in their woods along the Sopchoppy River, have found the place they want to be. The art they create is their humble expression. It is simply a reflection and documentation of the rhythms and imprints of the place they share and love. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 15APAMPER YOUR POOCHArtist Pro le: Sammy & Sandy Tedder By PETRA SHUFFSpecial to The NewsOur Pamper your Pooch event held Saturday, Sept. 14, had lots of participants and volunteers. CHAT of Wakulla, Inc. thanks all of our volunteers and students that helped at Pamper your Pooch this past Saturday, including our elected of cials Sheriff Charlie Creel, Supervisor of Elections Henry Buddy Wells, Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, and commissioners Ralph Thomas and Howard Kessler. Our local veterinarians Dr. Faith Hughes, Heidi and Reed Guhrt, and owner of Canine Clips Carla Manor deserve a special thanks for giving up their free Saturday to take care of nail clipping, micro chipping, and the less pleasant task of anal gland expression. We very much appreciate the donation of all natural doggie treats from Purrs and Waggs, and the pet pillows sewn by Patricia Applegate, items that made pampering the pooches complete! The baked goods donated by Karen and Andy with Karens Kitchen & Bakery were a special treat! And of course this event would not have been successful without the support of our residents that brought their pooches out for a pampering. We had a lot of fun, and hope to see you all again in the spring. CHATs Petra Shuff and County Commissioner Ralph Thomas bathe Boo Radley, a 4-year-old black pug owned by Marilyn Lawhon. Lawhons husband was mullet shing at Alligator Point when the dog came running up to him. Boo had been found by a woman who already had four Jack Russells and she offered Lawhon the dog. Wakulla High School Interact and AVID students earn community service hours as they wash Bill Russells chocolate lab named Choco. The students are Tamara Arnold, Meagan Black and Nikki Christian. Snicker, a chihuahua and Jack Russell mix, was not very happy being washed by Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman and Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells. Snicker is calmed as hes sprayed down after trying to bite two of Wakullas constitutional of cers. Youth Coalitions Gail Campbell, Sheriff Charlie Creel, and CHATs Heide Clifton and Anne Van Meter. PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . n t

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com The autumn equinox is Sunday, Sept. 21. It is the of cial beginning of fall as the sun continues its daily retreat into the southern sky and the northern hemisphere repeats its regular annual tilt away from solar exposure. The equinox is calculated based on the equators day and night length. Given Wakulla Countys place on the earth, the night will not be longer than the day until the evening of Thursday, Sept. 26, when the night will be one minute longer than the day. The official equinox date is the time-honored mass market method of notifying humanity to be on the lookout for cooler weather. This knowledge of the planets seasonal cycle was recorded by the earliest cultures and likely predates written records. The creatures and plants which populate the woods, swamps and pastures of Wakulla County need no notice from the almanacs editors to recognize weather changes are underway. All are preparing in their own way for the inevitable dormant season with short days, reduced food, and lower temperatures. Late summer fruit, berries and nuts are in full production. Yaupons, sparkleberries, dogwoods, pines, persimmons, oaks, hickories and many more have a nutritional offering for any wild creature with space in their stomach or cheeks. The animal population is packing on the calories and weight in anticipation of leaner times soon to be here. All instinctively know it is time to eat, and eat some more. The plants and trees provide this cornucopia as a way to prepare their progeny for the next growing season. Most of their output is consumed by birds, mammals and insect, but a small percentage of seed will survive to expand the species range and replace winter losses. Bright orange persimmons, red dogwood and holly berries, and blue beautyberries use their distinctive color and shape to attract birds and animals. In exchange for a free meal, some of the seed in the fruit is relocated. Wakulla Countys insects are diligently preparing for winters onslaught. While most will not survive the rst frost, a percentage of their eggs persist and pupa will emerge next spring. Likely the most popular late summer/early autumn insects are butter ies. The most commonly known are relatively large and brightly colored, but many are small and unembellished without distinctive features. This has been a good year for butterflies in Wakulla County. The ample rains provided excellent forage for caterpillar phase of their life cycle, though there were many complaints about damage to shrubs and gardens. Some butter ies, particularly the monarch and cloudless sulphurs, will migrate south to warmer latitudes. Many will remain in Wakulla County laying their eggs in the most hospitable environment possible. Under ideal conditions butter ies will produce several generations in the warm season. Eggs laid late in the year will enter a dormant phase with the onset of cold weather, but emerge the following spring. Other short-lived insect, such as stinkbugs, handle the winter differently. During cold weather, young stinkbugs will hibernate in leaf litter or under tree bark until the onset of warmer temperatures. Their two-month long life is put on hold until the weather warms up. They then return to being quick reproducing pest. To learn more about the change of seasons in Wakulla County, contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or follow us on http://wakulla.ifas. u .edu, or on Facebook under wakullaextension or on Twitter at wakullaext. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.The equinox is upon us, bringing changes Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWild persmimmons, above, a stinkbug, below right, and a longwing and wasp, below left. COASTAL CLEANUP SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 21 9:00 a.m.:00 noon HEADQUARTERS Woolley Park in Panacea CALL FOR VOLUNTEERS Upcoming events THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS St. Marks Wildlife Refuge Lighthouse Road (CaptainRanger David Moody) Shell Point at the Pavilion (Captains Paul & Tina Johnson) at the boat launch (Captain Marc Dickieson) Mashes Sands at the park area (Captain Ann Lazar) St. Marks at the city park (Captain Chris Perry) Free COMMEMORATIVE T-SHIRT AND LUNCH *Coastal Cleanup quali es for community service BRIGHT FUTURES HOURS Keep Wakulla County BeautifulFREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLICTuesday, September 24 6:30 p.m. Wakulla Springs Lodge SPEAKER KWCB President-Elect, Steve Cushman OYSTER FARMING IN WAKULLA COUNTY Air Con of WakullaGulf Coast Lumber and SupplyFLAG Credit UnionCook Insurance AgencyPublix City of St. MarksWakulla County Senior Citizens CouncilRay & Linda BolesCentennial Bank Paul G. Johnson & AssociatesThe Wakulla Area TimesRotary Club of Wakulla County Harrison Bail BondsMs. Alice VeasmanDon & Hanna HendersonRays Kayaks & Excursions, LLC. Steve is one of the key people leading Wakulla County into the industry of Aquaculture. His visions and community trust are leading the way to a bright and sustainable seafood industry here in the Wakulla Community. Following a presentation outlining this unique and exciting method of farming, there will be a question and answer opportunity for the audience to attendee can ask questions. Aquaculture is nding its place in seafood industries all over the world. Our overwhelming demand for seafood is having a notable impact on our seas. Aquaculture is a way we can begin to maintain our supply of seafood and the jobs our seas have provided for hundreds of years. Oysters will be the main focus of the presentation as Wakulla has some of the richest waters for aquaculture in the Gulf. There will be samples of farm-raised oysters for attendees. Steve is looking forward to presenting this important information and discussing the great benets aquaculture will bring to Wakulla County. Wakulla County contributes millions of dollars to the overall Florida economy. These numbers will increase and spill over into the world economy when what we are developing for sustainable seafood is nurtured and developed locally. For more information, contact KWCB at helpkwcb@gmail.com.

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By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netThe final score of Friday nights match up against the Marianna Bulldogs ended up being 27-6. However, with three turnovers in the red zone and a fumble by Wakulla that was returned by Marianna for an 83 yard touchdown, one might argue that the score should have been at least 45-0. In the first half the team made it inside the red zone ve times and only came out with seven points. Weve got to get better about taking advantage of those situations, Head Coach Scott Klees said. Wakullas offense, Klees said, took a stop back compared to their previous game against Navarre as far as production, though he assures theyve been working hard to get better for next week. As for his special teams performance, Klees says they have some work to do as well. With a punt that only went for 1 yard and a missed extra point, the War Eagles will be looking to improve not just this week but throughout the season. Klees commended his defense, though, saying, our defense played tremendous. Im very happy with what we saw from them. GAME RECAP During the rst drive of the game, Wakulla found themselves opting to go for a fourth down conversion a decision that proved bene cial as Malik Thomas managed to gain a rst down on a carry that was followed shortly thereafter by a run into the end zone by sophomore quarterback Feleipe Franks. With a successful extra point kicked by Franks, the War Eagles were up 7-0 early in the rst quarter. Wakullas defense then held the Bulldogs, forcing them into a fourth and one situation in which they opted to punt. A penalty on Wakulla for running into the kicker caused possession to stay with Marianna, resulting in a rst down. Turn to Page 4BSection B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Water WaysALMANACPage 7BSnorkeling in the CaribbeanTravel by Linda Carter Page 14BWheres the fall weather?Capt. Jody Campbell From the Dock, Page 6B sports news and team views SportsGOLFWakulla grad is male player of year at FSUWar Eagles beat Marianna, 27-6Wakulla wins despite three turnovers in the red zone Wakulla quarterback Feleipe Franks crosses the plane of the goal line for a touchdown.NEXT GAME: The War Eagles travel to Perry to play the Taylor County Bulldogs on Friday, Sept. 20, at 7:30 p.m. DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Offer Expires Spept. 30, 2013850926-3212*10%OFFANY PURCHASEMAKING ROOM FOR CHRISTMAS STOCK*Must present original coupon from printed newspaper only. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 SCALLOP SEASON IS SCALLOPSEASON IS As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning, Probate Business Planning & Incorporations Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Real Estate Transactions Title InsuranceCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney NOW OPEN10AM 7PM Mon-Fri9AM 4PM Sat2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926 Special to The NewsSpencer Smith, a 2010 graduate of Wakulla High School, is swinging his way to success at Florida State University in the Professional Golfers Association (PGA) Golf Management Program. Having earned the programs Male Player of the Year Award, he will be immortalized on the programs Wall of Fame at FSUs Don Veller Seminole Golf Course in Tallahassee. Smith earned the Male Player of the Year Award for being the male program major who accumulated the highest number of tournament points during the 2012-2013 academic year. In addition to his success on the green, he was recently elected by his peers to Florida States PGA Golf Management Student Club Executive Board as its tournament co-director. The clubs executive board plans and organizes club-sponsored events and activities that bene t the golf management program and its students. Spencer has the purest golf swing of any student that I have ever seen, said Don Farr, director of FSUs professional golf management program, He is very genuine and highly professional for someone his age. We recently met with his golf pro at Sebonack and they are very happy with him there. Currently, Smith is completing a six-month internship at the Sebonack Golf Club in Southampton, N.Y., which hosted the 2013 U.S. Womens Open in June. Sebonack was ranked No. 39 in the 2013-14 listing of Golf Digests 100 Greatest Golf Courses in America. Smith is aiming toward his dream of becoming a PGA Class A golf professional in a unique program at Florida States Dedman School of Hospitality. He is earning a bachelors degree in hospitality management with a major in PGA golf management. One of only 19 programs accredited by the PGA in the U.S., it enables students to acquire hospitality business skills while they satisfy supplemental PGA requirements a player ability test, 16 months of PGAapproved internships and several PGA workshops. After four and a half years of coursework and internships, graduates are on their way to managing top worldwide clubs and resorts or to following other career paths within the golf and hospitality industries. The program boasts a 100 percent graduate placement rate. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpencer Smith hitting a drive off the ninth hole at Sebonack Golf Club in Southhampton, N.Y. PHOTO BY KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS At Townsend's Nads Mini Storage,59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit A32 or brought to the Yard Sale( ) before Friday afternoon www.wakullawildlife.org For more information about FWMA visit our website: 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission D ed i cated to t h e r escue & r e h ab ili tat i o n o f in ju r ed a n d o r p h a n ed wil d m a mm a l s a n d b ir ds GIANT YARD SALE Thurs Sept 26th 8am 3pm (Set Up) Fri Sept 27th 8am 3pm Sat Sept 28th 8am 1pm Sponsored in part by

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Sept. 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Sept. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Saturday, Sept. 21 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Sept. 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Sept. 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Sept. 24 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.Wednesday, Sept. 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 4911684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsMonday, Sept. 23 RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at the public library at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 24 HISTORIC PRESERVATION COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting in the commissioners administrative conference room at 4 p.m. M onday, Oct. 7 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, Oct. 14 PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. M onday, Oct. 21 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers.Weekly meetings Special EventsThursday, Sept. 19 WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will sponsor guest speaker Tracie Thompson at Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. Thompson is the executive director of the American Cancer Society in Tallahassee. She will be speaking on What the American Cancer Society can do for you. You do not have to be a patient to attend come nd out how you can be supportive to family and friends. For more information please call 926-6050. TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP MEETING will take place from 4 p.m. until 5 p.m. at the public librarys main meeting room. For any questions or information, please contact Tonya Hobby, Tobacco Prevention Specialist for Wakulla County at 850.926.0400 ext. 217. FULL MOON CLIMB at St. George Lighthouse will take place from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. Please contact the Lighthouse gift shop at 927-7745 for reservations or more information. Friday, Sept. 20 WAKULLA SENIOR CENTER will host a community sh fry at the railroad station in Sopchoppy from 4 p.m. until 6 p.m. Cost is $8 per plate of mullet, hushpuppies, baked beans, potato salad, cookies and tea. Tickets and donations are tax deductable. All proceeds support the Wakulla Senior Center Mealson-Wheels program. Saturday, Sept. 21 1LOVE PLAYING FOR CHANGE event will be held at Ouzts Too from 3 p.m. until 8 p.m. This is an international event featuring gatherings of music lovers around the world as they gather to watch performances, concerts, and events that promote peace and positive social change. Donations will be accepted in support of the Playing For Change Foundations free music education programs that serve children and their communities around the world. 2013 COASTAL CLEANUP will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at 9 a.m. The ve major sites will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands, St. Marks River Park and Bottoms Road in Panacea. Find out more information and sign up early by emailing tohelpkwcb@ gmail.com. WAKULLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY plans to hold its annual fundraiser yard sale and we are in need of articles to sell. We need housewares, decorating items, tools, yard items, books, videos, almost anything you have to donate. Please make sure the items are undamaged, clean, and complete. We are not going to sell clothing or shoes this year. If you have items, please contact either Helen at 933-6888 or Tanya at 508-0881 and they will arrange to meet you at the old Crawfordville School lunchroom to accept the donations. WAKULLA COUNTY HORSEMANS ASSOCIATION will begin its show season on Sept. 21 at the Wakulla County Equestrian Center. Registration will begin at 10 a.m. Exhibition will start promptly at 11 a.m. $100 added ($20 entry; 70/30 payback) 3D Cloverleaf Jackpot will start at noon. We will have concession on site! Come out and enjoy a day at our wonderful facility. Contact Jim at 509-0555 or Katrina at 933-0056 if you have any questions. Tuesday, Sept. 24 KEEP WAKULLA COUNTY BEAUTIFUL will be hosting their quarterly Green Drinks event at the Wakula Springs Lodge at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 TCC FREE HEALTHCARE JOB FAIR will take place from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. This is a great opportunity to nd a job, so bring your resume and dress to impress. This event is offered at no charge to TCC students and community members. For more information, go to www.tccfuturelink.com/events or call (850) 201-9970. Thursday, Sept. 26 CAPITAL CITY TO THE SEA TRAILS second round of public workshops for Wakulla will be held in the commission chambers at 6 p.m. Upcoming EventsSaturday, Sept. 28 SOPCHOPPY OPRY will take place in the Sopchoppy High School auditorium at 7 p.m. Performers will include the South Bound Band, Mollie Lynne and Mr. Country Johnny Calloway. Tickets are $10. For more info call 962-3711. Sept 19 Sept 26 FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE Our Friday Night Movie this week is the sequel to the worldwide blockbuster Star Trek reboot of a couple years back. Starring Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto, Bennidict Cumberbatch, among many others, this PG-13 (sci- action & violence) tells the tale of when the crew of the Enterprise is called back home, they nd an unstoppable force of terror from within their own organization has detonated the fleet and everything it stands for, leaving our world in a state of crisis. With a personal score to settle, Captain Kirk leads a manhunt to a warzone world to capture a one man weapon of mass destruction. As our heroes are propelled into an epic chess game of life and death, love will be challenged, friendships will be torn apart, and sacri ces must be made for the only family Kirk has left: his crew. Doors open at 6:45 for the 7 p.m. show. NEW DOCUMENT STATION AT WCPL! As I mentioned a couple of weeks back, with the help of Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (the library co-operative were a part of), we now have a state of the art, self serve, document station at the Library! By using the easy to use touch screen technology, you can now fax, scan directly to email without having to log-in to one of our public computers, scan to your tablet/ Smartphone/usb drive, and make copies, with many more options on the horizon. Were excited to be providing this new technology to our community and encourage all who have a need to come and try it out. We are the rst library in the area to have this service and we thank Wilderness Coast for allowing us to provide this at no cost to WCPL. COMPUTER CLASSES START BACK IN OCT. & VIVA FLORIDA WAKULLA TIME CAPSULE With our computer instructor back in town we will be offering computer classes again beginning Oct. 1. In addition to classes in basic computer skills, iPad, and Skype. There will be a 5 class series on building a time capsule which will end with the preparing of Wakulla Countys Viva Florida time capsule. The State Library of Florida sent a time capsule to every public library in the state in honor of the year long Viva Florida celebration of the 500th anniversary of the discovery of Florida. More details on this program will be available later but we encourage all who have an interest in preserving not only Wakulla Countys history as well as your own familys, in addition to those who want to learn and increase your computer skills to take advantage of these free classes. The class schedule is available on our website www.wakullalibrary.org, at our front desk, and on our Facebook page so please sign up today. All classes require early registration so give us a call at 926-7415 or stop by to register at the front desk. By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News... FULL MOON CLIMB St. George Lighthouse $15 7 p.m. SENIOR CENTER FISH FRY Sopchoppy railroad station $8 4 p.m. 6 p.m. 1LOVE PLAYING FOR CHANGE Ouzts Too 3 p.m. 8 p.m. KWCB GREEN DRINKS EVENT Wakulla Springs Lodge 6:30 p.m.Thursday FridaySaturdayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 3Bsports news and team views SportsSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Horsemans Association held its 2013 Awards Banquet on Saturday, Sept. 14. Winners for this season were: Small Fry Division: 1st place Katie Lynn Wright; 2nd place Callee Sims. Pee Wee Division: 1st place Jordan Chunn; 2nd place Chace Sims. Youth Division: 1st place Alyssa Chunn; 2nd place Aimee Hoagland. Junior Division: 1st place Todd Porter; 2nd place Samantha Dunaway; 3rd place Emma Donaldson; 4th place Laurie Lambert. Adult Division: 1st place Alicia Porter; 2nd place Bailey Russom; 3rd place tie between Kay Cordle and Amber Hodges; 4th place Katrina Cochran. Novice Division: 1st place Mandy Chunn; 2nd place Austyn Hodges; 3rd place Robin Rudy; 4th place Marie Morales. The clubs 2013-2014 show season will start Saturday, Sept. 21. All shows are held at the Wakulla County Equestrian Center located on Lawhon Mill Road. The shows will start at noon with a $100 added Cloverleaf jackpot race! The public is invited to come and watch.By ALAN ROSS Its not been the best of weeks for NASCAR. In the immediate aftermath of the regular-season finale at Richmond a week ago Saturday night, shame and ignominy were visited upon the Cup series, when the fix was allegedly put on by Michael Waltrip Racing (MWR), which reportedly ordered one of its team cars to intentionally spin and bring out an outcome-altering caution a move that benefited one of the MWR drivers. (For more on that controversy see the commentary below.) But leave it to NASCAR to think nothing of asking its rain-soaked patrons at Chicagoland Sunday to endure not only a 90-minute delay to start the race due to bad weather but a subsequent ve-hour-and-10-minute red- ag eternity that suspended the race restart until almost 9 p.m. Chicago time. The 11-hour overall odyssey of the race itself came down to a late caution that split the eldhalf came in, half stayed out, with most of the pit rowers taking just two tires. Matt Kenseth and Kyle Busch set out for the checkered flag on the restart with 23 laps left. Kenseth, pushed by Kevin Harvick, eventually opened up a one-second lead over Busch with seven laps to go, and thats the way it ended: Kenseth, Busch, Harvick. Outliers Dale Earnhardt Jr. and Joey Logano both retired early with engine troubles, nishing 35th and 37th respectively. Kenseth takes an eight point lead over Kyle Busch into Race 2 of The Chase this Sunday at New Hampshire. THE RICHMOND FINAL-CAUTION FLAP: Early last week, it looked like NASCAR was about to hugely blow the right decision in the sportshaking uproar that came out of the nal caution at Richmond two weeks ago. While appropriate measures were taken against Michael Waltrip Racing for the alleged fixed caution, which still has not drawn an admission by Clint Bowyer, the sanctions that axed MWRs Martin Truex Jr. from the field and annexed Ryan Newman were laudable. But that only righted one of two wrongs. That still left one deserving driver, Jeff Gordon, out in the cold. Gordon was in the process of driving himself into The Chase when that infamous yellow ew with eight laps to go. But when the race resumed, with the cars now bunched together, Joey Logano edged him out for the Chase spot, and the whole issue of what was fair seemed to be occulted by the bigger picture at the immediate front of the eld, where Newman was involved. What was fair would have been to freeze the nish of the race right at the nal caution point, which would have placed Gordon in the nal show along with Newman. It took them nearly a week to come around to addressing the unfairness of Gordons situation. Thankfully, NASCAR went a little further and made the right call, adding Gordon at the last moment to The Chase field prior to Chicagoland.Alan Ross has authored 29 books on sports history. You can e-mail him at alanross_ sports@yahoo.com. Sportland 2013 THE COOL DOWN LAP Kenseth wins rain-marred Chicagoland Chase race By AMY LEESpecial to The NewsLast week the Lady War Eagles Golf Team participated in two tournaments. On Tuesday, the team played at Southwood Golf Course with John Paul Catholic II, Leon, and Rickards. The team overall score was 232 placing the team in third place. Individual scores for Wakulla had Kenzie Lee placing third overall with a score of 50, and Micahlyn Jeziorski placing fourth with a score of 51. Alyssa Stokley scored a 56 and Rachel Woofter scored 65. On Thursday, the team played at Golden Eagle Golf Course with Maclay, and Lincoln. Wakulla scored a 233 coming in second behind Maclay. Individual scores had Kenzie Lee placing second overall with a score of 50 and Micahlyn Jeziorski tied for third with a score of 52. Rachel Woofter scored a 65 and Alyssa Stokley scored a 68. This week the ladies play Tuesday at Golden Eagle and Thursday at Capital City Golf Courses.GOLF FOOTBALLLady War Eagles compete in two tournamentsRMS Bears drop a game to Taylor County BulldogsSPECIAL TO THE NEWSHORSE RIDING BASEBALLHorsemans Association presents 2013 awardsSpecial to The NewsThe Riptide Travel Team went undefeated in Lake City Tournament last week. The team consists of, front row, Mathew Posey, Joseph Parsons, Justin Bryan, Logan Bruner, Fisher Lawhon, Colby Tabb. Back row: Trent Langley, Noah Gelabert, Broedy Poppell, Trevor McCulley. The team coaches are Mark Bryan, Gregg Boutwell, and Russell Bryan. Riptide undefeated at tourney By JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachThe RMS football team was on the road once again last Thursday, this time travelling to Perry to tangle with the Taylor County Bulldogs. In a game plagued by special teams turnovers, the Bears fell to the dogs by a score of 34-2. We had only ve possessions the entire game, and four of those were in the rst half, RMS Coach Jacobs said. The Bears opening possession showed promise, when RMS drove down inside of the Taylor County 15 yard line. That drive ended when the bulldogs intercepted an errant RMS pass. Taylor County didnt waste any time parlaying the turnover into points, when they scored a touchdown two plays later. Because of the plethora of turnovers, RMS offense stayed on the sideline and its defense stayed on the eld. The fatigue of the defense was evident, as the Taylor County aerial assault relentlessly attacked the worn down Bear defense. The loss dropped RMS record to 0-3, the rst time ever in Coach Jacobs tenure as head coach. This is uncharted waters for me, the coach stated. We just have to work a little harder and be a whole lot smarter. Riversprings will be back on the eld Thursday, Sept. 19, when they take on the Seahawks of Franklin County in Carrabelle. Staff ReportThe 2013 Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament will be held Thursday, Sept. 26, at Seminole Golf Course in Tallahassee. The cost is $450 per three-man team, or $150 per player. Registration is at noon for the 1 p.m. shotgun start. The format is select a shot. For more information, contact Josh Brown at 528-6385, Windy Jones at 519-6663, or Steve Brown at 570-3910.Houston Ta Golf Tournament set for Sept. 26

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From Page 1BOn fourth and about three, the Bulldogs almost completed a pass to convert, but it was broken up by the War Eagles defense. An unsuccessful drive by both teams followed, ending the first quarter. The pace picked up some in the second quarter as Bryan Nichols picked up about eight yards on rst and 10, and then completed another pass on the next play to gain the rst down. Quarterback Feleipe Franks then passed to Corion Knight who made a leaping catch to gain another first down on Mariannas 32 yard line. On third down and about ve, Franks completed a pass to older brother Jordan Franks for another rst down at the 17. However, hopes for another Wakulla touchdown were extinguished by an interception in the end zone. Mariannas next possession was unsuccessful, forcing them to punt to Keith Gavin who ran the ball in to the Bulldogs 34 yard line. With first and 10, a penalty on Wakulla for holding would result in the loss of 10 yards, putting them on the 44 yard line. On second and long, Franks found Gavin at the 29 yard line and then a Franks to Franks completion resulted in a gain of about seven and a rst down. The War Eagles threatened to score again with second down and four on the 16 yard line, but a fumble on the play was picked up by Marianna. Another fumble by Wakulla came during their next possession with eight seconds left in the rst half. The War Eagles tried to convert on fourth down and goal, but a turnover in the red zone was run in for a Marianna touchdown. A blocked kick kept the War Eagles up 7-6 at the end of the half. For the kick-off at the start of the third quarter, Feleipe Franks kicked the ball into the end zone for a touchback. On third and ve the Bulldogs gained a first down on the 31 yard line, but on the following third and 10 pressure by the War Eagles defense would force Mariannas quarterback throw it away. Wakulla scored again with 6:06 left in the third when Monterious Loggins carried the ball into the end zone. The extra point kicked by Franks was good, putting the score at 14-6. An interception made by the defense would put the ball back in Wakullas possession quickly, leading to a Franks to Franks connection on third down for a touchdown. With three seconds left in the third the score was 21-6. During the War Eagles first possession in the fourth quarter, Marianna recovered a fumble made when quarterback Franks was caught unprepared for the snap. However, a later fumble by the Bulldogs on a third down put the ball back in the hands of the Eagles. The last drive of the game proved successful for Wakulla as a pass was completed to Gavin on third down and the fourth touchdown by Wakulla was made by Malik Thomas carry. The final score was 27-6. UP NEXT: TAYLOR COUNTY The War Eagles will take on Taylor County High in Perry on Friday, Sept. 20 at 7:30. Of the match up Klees said, They are very well coached. Not only that but, according to Klees, the Taylor County Bulldogs have a few players, including a receiver, who are already looking to sign with division one schools. They are very talented. Well have to be at the top of our game if were going to pull out a win, said Klees. Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 thewakullanews.comPlayers of the WeekJORDAN FRANKS Receiver 7 catches for 126 yards and a touchdown. ANDREW BROWN Safety 10 tackles, blocked extra point kick, graded 90 percent KEITH GAVIN Punt returner Had punt returns for 65 and 45 yardsO enseDefenseSpecial Teams Sponsored by 850926-1011Your Home Town Realtor War Eagles beat Marianna, 27-6 KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS KEN FIELDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWar Eagle receiver Jordan Franks makes a reception in heavy traf c. Running back Malik Thomas running the ball, leaping over a blocker. October Is Breast Cancer Awareness MonthTheWakulla News Pink Paper Day Thursday, October 3The Wakulla News will be IN THE PINK on Oct. 3 when the entire newspaper will be printed on PINK NEWSPRINT as part of the fight against breast cancer. Some of the proceeds from advertising, special tribute opportunities, subscriptions sales and donations in conjunction with the Oct. 3 PINK PAPER will go to the We Can Foundation a nonprofit organization.Be a part of this special promotion and take advantage of these Great Rates!(850) 926-7102 Pick up the same ad during October for 10% Off.Special Rate IncentivesFull Page..... .......................$400 Half Page............................$300 Quarter Page.....................$125Full Color Add 25% $40 Minumum. ONLY$40.00Pick up your ad for the rest of the October for ONLY $25.00 each!2x3(3.389x3) Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 5BBy MARTY COHENMIAMI GARDENS Still drenched in sweat, Jon Harrison summed it up succinctly: I cant give it to Miami. Its on us. The Florida center wasnt being defiant, wasnt talking trash, just spoke the undeniable truth following last Saturdays agonizingly ugly 21-16 loss to Miami at Sun Life Stadium. Yes, the Hurricanes celebrated at the conclusion of the contest, and then celebrated some more, and will likely begin banging the drum about how theyre back. Whatever, to the victor goes the spoils, but frankly, Miami didnt do much to come out on the winning end. The Hurricanes basically sat back and gladly let the Gators implode. One of the worst clichs in sports is we shot ourselves in the foot, when describing opportunities lost due basically to poor execution. Well if thats the case, Floridas offense had a lot of gurative amputees leaving the locker room. Five turnovers, including three in the Red Zone, simply wasnt going to get it done at any level against any opponent. An inability of a team that prides itself on physical, power football, to pick up a few inches on fourth down deep in the opponents territory wasnt going to get it done. Its somewhat remarkable because so many of the numbers from this game would indicate complete domination by Florida. The Gators out-gained the Canes 413 to 212, yielding just an incredible 69 yards in the nal three quarters. At one point, the home side went more than 28 minutes without picking up a rst down. The hosts punted nine times (punter Pat ODonnell, who averaged 49.0 yards after getting one blocked, was the Canes best player), went 1 for 11 on third-down conversions, rushed for a mere 50 yards on 28 attempts, held the ball for just 21:40, and on and on . It all didnt matter. All the positive thingsFlorida accomplished Saturday afternoon didnt matter. Five turnovers theres no reason to sugarcoat it, the Gators gave this one away, plain and simple. Its going to be a hard one to digest, and to make matters worse, the Gators have two weeks to stew over this before getting back on the eld to begin SEC play against Tennessee. In the aftermath of the numbing setback, the players said all the right things. Still a long season ahead. No pointing fingers. Have to learn from it and get better, etc., etc. All this is true, but from a psychologicalstandpoint, this one will linger. Even with a lot of the same players, every season is new and what happened in the past wont alter this years results. But beginning at Texas A&M, with a strong secondhalf comeback in Game Two, the 2012 Gators fostered a belief that they would prevail in the end, that they were stronger and would make plays in the second half. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gatorsBy TIM LINAFELTFor all that he accomplished in Florida States season-opening win at Pittsburgh, Jameis Winston did it all without having to face much in the way of adversity. It turns out he might be pretty good at that too. With 11:31 to play in Florida States eventual 62-7 victory over Nevada, Winston had completed only two of his rst ve pass attempts, failed to lead the offense into the end zone despite having rst-and-goal at the 1 and, even worse, had just thrown the rst interception of his young career. The Wolf Pack then scored to take a 7-3 lead, sacked Winston for an 11-yard loss on the rst play of FSUs ensuing drive, and had the 73,847 in attendance at Doak Campbell Stadium wondering if the team theyd seen on Labor Day had merely been a mirage. As he stood on the sideline contemplating his next move, Winston felt a tap on his shoulder and turned around to nd his head coach, Jimbo Fisher. He didnt give me a long speech. He didnt give me a lecture, Winston said. He just said Go higher. Here it is. Adversity is here. What are you going to do? Winston responded by going higher. And farther. And faster. Rather than wilt under the heavy expectations of a rst-time home crowd and the pressure that might come with trailing an opponent from the Mountain West Conference as any normal freshman might reasonably be expected to do Winston instead rebounded with an offensive performance that, in some ways, was every bit as impressive as his debut. Starting with a possession that began on his own 8-yard line near the end of the second quarter, Winston and the Florida State offense engineered nine consecutive scoring drives that amounted to 59 unanswered points over the games nal 35:54. What I liked about it was he made a mistake and he didnt get gun shy, Fisher said. He went right back into it and started making throws and making plays. After his interception, a ball that slipped out of his hand and sailed high and into the arms of Nevadas Bryson Keeton, Winston didnt throw another incompletion. He finished the game on a 13-for-13 run that accounted for 184 yards and two touchdown passes. By the time he exited the game midway through the third quarter, Winston had completed 15 of 18 passes (83.3 percent) for 214 yards and three touchdowns (two passing, one rushing). The way we practice and how Jimbo coaches, its all about adversity, Winston said. Its all about facing adversity. Me as a quarterback, Coach Fisher and Coach (Randy) Sanders are always pounding on me, pounding on me, saying Youve got to go to the next play. Adversity, you cant live on that. Youve got to keep going. Through two games, Winstons stats read like a Madden NFL box score. On rookie mode. Hes completed 40 of 45 passes good for a sterling 88.9 completion percentage for 570 yards. Hes accounted for eight of FSUs 13 touchdowns (six passing, two rushing). And, including the interception he threw against Nevada, has had only three of his pass attempts the season even hit the ground. Presented with those numbers, Jimbo Fisher smiled and said, He needs some work. That may be true, but its hard to imagine Winston throwing any prettier passes than he did during FSUs offensive charge in the second quarter. He threw a high, tight spiral to Kenny Shaw who had his facemask yanked while running his route in the corner of the end zone for a 24-yard touchdown that put FSU back on top after falling behind 7-3. When the throw came, I was like Dang, thats a pretty good throw, Shaw said. After FSUs defense forced a three-and-out with less than two minutes to go in the half, Winston struck again with a 19-yard sideline pass to Christian Green that was threaded between two Wolf Pack defenders, then followed that up with a 24-yard touchdown pass to a leaping Rashad Greene. It was a tough throw, Green said. It looked like the safety and the corner were there, but he made a heck of a throw and all I had to do was catch it. All tight balls that he stuck in windows and made real nice plays on, Fisher said. In a schedule that includes road trips to Clemson and Gainesville, Winston will certainly be challenged more than he was here tonight. But it was still his rst real taste of a challenge, his first real mistake of a throw and his rst real home game in front of fans painfully anxious to watch him meet or exceed the nearly impossible standard that he set for himself. So far, hes passed every test. The season-opener was probably a little more fun for me, Winston said with a smile. When youre at home, people love you then theyre like Hey, come on now. Youre still at home. Asked about his accomplishments so far, Winston deftly de- ected praise away from himself and onto his teammates, receivers and offensive linemen chief among them. He insists that, as long as the team is winning, hell never spend much time evaluating his own performances. Victories are team. Losses, thats always the quarterback, Winston said. I think I was just born like that. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Florida A&M at Ohio StateSaturday, Sept. 21 at noon.The game will not be aired. Tennessee at #19 FloridaSaturday, Sept. 21 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on CBS. Bethune Cookman at #10 Florida StateSaturday, Sept. 21 at 6 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN3. AFTER LOSS TO AFTER LOSS TO MIAMI, ITS MIAMI, ITS Jameis Winston shakes a fans hand after FSUs rst home game at Doak Campbell in which the Seminoles trounced Nevada, 62-7. Florida Coach Will Muschamp.Jameis Winston overcomes adversity by going higherPHOTO BY COLIN HACKLEY GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 thewakullanews.comWeve decided to title this article An Endangered Phenomenon, as my friend, my love, my Patty suggested it as the title, and Ive agreed with her. To start off Ive always had a passing interest in butterflies/ moths-lepidoptera, and like most of my readers soon learned the difference between the spectacular Tiger Swallowtail, and the drabber (but no less impressive) Monarch, and it is the latter we shall discuss. I say we, for though Im a novice on this subject, Patty Murray is an expert. Shes studied butter ies of the world for years, and photographed over 40 species of them going through their entire life cycles, from super tiny eggs through caterpillars into the pupa, and then to the lovely creatures we see itting or utterbying us on warm days. It is her knowledge passed onto me that is the foundation of this article. I feel it is more hers than mine, and she deserves the credit. She is a professional nature photographer, having her own agent, and has sold many of her photos of these lovely winged insects for years. It all started this last spring when she was down visiting me. As hard as we tried, we could not nd a Monarch. Then this summer while I visited her in New Jersey we failed to see any as well! Pattis yard is a magnet for butterflies as shes planted numerous owering plants that are especially attractive to numerous species, and that includes the various milkweed plants that Monarchs are particularly attracted to. Then I returned to Wakulla County in midAugust, and even down here Ive failed to see one, not even in the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge where theyll have their annual Monarch Festival the last week end of October! Is the phenomenom of migrating Monarchs about to end? To start off these creatures weigh roughly halfgram (1/56 of an ounce), and are true insects having six legs. For years no one knew where thy disappeared in the winter, then nally in 1975 a professor named Dr. Urquhart was tipped off by locals in the Michoacan state of Mexico that he could nd them in the winter in the Mountains there at roughly 10,000 feet. To Dr. Urquharts surprise there were roughly a billion wintering there by roosting on Oyamel Fir trees. At last it was known they wintered south of the U.S.! In the 1980s Patty and her sister Betty visited their wintering area and were numbed by the thousands upon thousands they saw, clouds of them hovering around these r trees, those that had died lay like fall leaves upon the ground an unbelievable spectacle!This small ephemeral insect migrates up to 2,000 miles each fall. The Monarchs in the eastern U.S. y from as far north as Canada to mountain sites in Mexico. There are no experienced Monarchs to follow on these migrations. The Monarchs making this journey, all moving south, are four generations removed from the previous wintering population. As days lengthen in Mexico and weather warms the Monarchs that have been in a state of reproductive diapause or a nonbreeding state become more active. Mating begins in the wintering colonies usually sometime in February, then, beginning in March, the Monarchs depart these colonies and begin to move north. As these long-lived individuals this generation of Monarchs lives from 8 to 9 months reach the southern states the females lay eggs on various milkweed species. Their lives now nished, most die. The next generation moves further north as the temperatures warm and the population normally grows in numbers. This is when conditions are good. The lives of these later generations last between a few days to a month. Monarchs have always been plagued by dangers during their lives. Predators such mantids, assassin bugs, ambush bugs, and spiders, especially crab, wait on or near owers, well camou aged and concealed they pounce on an unsuspecting Monarch as it drinks nectar. Patty found a female Praying Mantis resting on the owers of a Butter y Bush one early fall when Monarchs moved through her yard. The mantis contentedly remained on a single ower cluster for several days until the blooming period ended. Later she discovered the wings of ve Monarch butter ies on the ground under this spot. Parasitoids such as Tachinid Flies and Braconid Wasps attack Monarch caterpillars. They lay their eggs on the caterpillars. When these eggs hatch the larvae burrow inside the caterpillars and feed until they are ready to pupate. Some years parasitoids are more common than others. Monarchs, especially the caterpillars, are vulnerable to highly contagious viruses, which can decimate individuals grouped close together on milkweed. Then there is a common protozoan which is widespread and can weaken or kill Monarchs. Monarchs also encounter other hazards new to them, including the growing of genetically modi ed corn for the production of ethanol in the Midwest that is resistant to herbicides is destroying the milkweed plants that the Monarchs need for reproduction. The herbicides protect the corn, but devastate the Monarch host plants. As more and more acreage is put into this type of production, the Monarch habitat shrinks. Continual development in other areas of the country diminish host plant habitat. Extremes of weather, especially droughts can also play havoc with Monarch reproduction. In the Oyamel Fir Forests of Mexico a threat to the Monarch wintering sites occurs when locals cut the forest. A thinning of the rs thick growth changes the temperature dynamics of the forests that protects the wintering Monarchs from environmental extremes. Storms that once were minor now can cause catastrophic mortality. Every year a census is taken of the area of r trees occupied by the clustering Monarchs. This past year researchers recorded less than three ares of coverage, the lowest ever. In the 1990s, the Monarchs spread across many acres. A sign at the Rosario Reserve proclaimed the presence of 35 million Monarchs. In 1991 Patty and Betty tagged 4,000 butter ies. There was no need to chase or capture individuals. They stood in place, reached out and casually plucked a Monarch from a branch. Then the Monarchs took ight on a sunny day they lled the sky like a blizzard of orange snow akes. One butter- y they tagged on this visit didnt play by the known rules, reaching the southern states and dying. Professor Urquhart, for whom they tagged the Monarchs, informed Patty that one of their tagged individuals had been found unexpectedly in a park in New York. What a migration! Monarch caterpillars feeding on milkweed have immunity against ingested toxic heart poisons (cardiac glycosides) that they sequester in their bodies. During transformation (Pupa or chrysalis stage) these poisons are incorporated in the adult Monarchs. Although thought to provide protection from predation from birds, two species Black-backed Oriole and Black-headed Grosbeak in the Mexican wintering sites regularly feed on the Monarchs without adverse effects.outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsAre migrating monarchs an endangered phenomenon?Weathers hot, but people are out on the water Nature Quest BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHWhere is our fall weather? Pretty hot this past weekend but it didnt keep people off the water. Mike Falk Jr. was out Sunday morning and said it looked like someone was having a shing tournament though I did not hear of any planned. Mike fished with his 6-year-old son Carson and they got their limit of reds and released about six or seven. They used live shrimp under a cork and on the bottom and Carson caught a 26 inch red using a Cotton Cordell Rattlin Red n. They caught their sh on the hour of the rising tide. Capt. David Fife shed last Tuesday and caught his limit of trout and reds. He caught the reds on minnows on the bottom and caught the trout on a white Gulp under a Cajun Thunder. He said he released quite a few trout. On Sunday David took some buddies from North Carolina and they caught some nice trout, reds and ounder. He was shing around the oyster bars near Oyster Bay and was using live minnows. Three of the trout were 20 plus inches. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart and he said he hadnt been in several weeks but keeps up on whats going on at the Ecofina with Capt. James Burke and others who sh down there. He said shing is extremely slow down there right now. The water is still extremely dirty and there is a lot of oating grass. I talked with JR and he said the same thing about the Aucilla. He did say a few sh are starting to be caught but its still pretty lousy. Both Randy and JR said there had been a sh kill from the Aucilla down past the Econ na. The only thing affected have been hardhead cat sh, some ounder and bait sh. JR was told it was a fungus on the bottom that was depleting the oxygen. Years ago we had the same thing at Shell Point. I shed one day and we caught our limit. Went back the next day and couldnt even get a bite. I noticed cat sh up on the top dying and for weeks you could go and not get a bite. I guess that is the same thing they are encountering down there. Hopefully its clearing up since a few sh are being caught. Harrison King went diving out of Carrabelle Saturday with some friends and he said they had another great day. They shot nine gag grouper, a few red group, hog snapper and some black snapper. They were diving in 40 to 60 feet of water. I shed with Dr. Jim ONeil and party on Saturday and we had one red, one big ounder and six nice trout. We missed three good reds and threw back probably 30 trout and a pile of small jacks and blue sh. On Sunday I went out for a few hours on the last of the falling tide on the same spot we shed on Saturday. There was good water movement and there was bait everywhere and Spanish, trout, blue, jacks and lady sh were busting in them everywhere you looked. I caught and released probably 40 trout and about 15 would have been legal. Also had two nice Spanish and I dont know how many small jacks. They are out there feeding on glass minnows and pelicans and small terns were diving everywhere. I caught sh on the Gulp under a Cajun Thunder, a straight jig and gulp and a Rattlin Redfin. When the tide quit they quit. Just a couple more weeks til snapper season. It will be open for two weeks starting Oct. 1. Glen Peel said they were out on an overnight trip and threw back red snapper that would have weighed over 15 pounds. He said they caught some real big grouper and Glen caught his rst sail sh ever trolling for dolphin. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCarson Falk with a 26 inch red he caught using a Cotton Cordell Rattlin Red n. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & DogsOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed 570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 7B This past week say a lot happening in the tropics and was a great reminder to everyone to be mindful of the ever-changing conditions. We are entering into the busier times of the hurricane season and need to remain alert and not let our guard down. A quick look at our recent history is evidence that even a tropical storm can cause signi cant damage! It never hurts to be prepared for the worst while hoping for the best. While this may seem like we cover the same things each year, and sometimes more than once, it is in most peoples nature to think that we have been spared so far, and there is no need to be overly prepared. The recent flooding in Colorado has brought to the forefront just how important our safety is and how much we are lucky to have more than a few minutes warning when a hurricane, tropical storm or depression is heading our way. You can download the National Weather Service preparedness brochure from http:// www.nws.noaa.gov/ om/hurricane/pdfs/ hurricane_safety.pdf. Another area we have been fortunate in this year is the safety of boaters in the region. This does not prevent us from training and preparing for the worst. As last weeks article highlighted, we strive to remain sharp and ready if and when the call comes. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident preparedness can make the difference! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Muscle memory. Have you ever observed someone who is learning to drive a car? I can say that the people I have watched seem to suffer from sensory overload. Theyre almost constantly moving the steering wheel to compensate (or over compensate) for the cars position between the lines on the road. All the while watching dashboard gauges, some more important than others, watching mirrors, taking directions from the co-pilot, and hopefully not driving up on the sidewalks. Now fast forward a few months (or years) and that same person can be found talking on the phone, eating, and driving simultaneously. That multi-tasking behavior may be ill-advised but its a reality today and an example of how we manage complex skills. In time we build knowledge, skill, muscle memory, and comfort, often with a measure of complacency. If you want to get technical most of what we do is the result of what we call muscle memory. Walking for example is something we have over-trained ourselves to do. Most people do not consciously think in order to walk, it just happens. When you do something over and over you effectively train your muscles and brain to do that task without thinking it. Various studies have been done and the number of times it takes depends on the muscles involved and the complexity of the task. In diving, muscle memory is extremely important to ones safety and ef ciency underwater. We see new divers fumbling for things like pressure gauges or the BCDs power in ator. After as few as 10 or 15 dives it becomes second nature for them to reach for those tools when wanted. With experience, divers work to reduce the complex idiosyncrasies that plague our sport. I see no shortage of problems that our customers are trying to solve; even seasoned divers are still working out things as they continue to make more and more complex dives. Tech divers are advised to never dive a new con guration before rst testing it for new complications in a pool. What Im getting at is that divers fresh out of basic scuba class might think twice before picking up a spear gun or a camera or getting into cave diving or rebreathers. You need to let your brain sort out new skills to build comfort and muscle memory on the scuba basics like monitoring cylinder pressure, donning equipment, and maintaining neutral buoyancy. When these tasks are second nature, they no longer become distracting factors to your adventures. You are now free to experience the underwater world stress free. When you make major equipment changes like a new BC or regulator, moving from single cylinders to back-mount doubles, side-mount (one cylinder worn on each side of the body), or rebreathers, there are new muscles memories to develop too. Thats why Gregg and I spent the afternoon in the pool, working with a new rebreather platform called the Prism2. We made a series of changes to the unit and needed to test them in a controlled environment before rolling off a boat or exploring a cave. And we found problems with solutions that will now alter our con guration design! Its a learning experience, a retraining of your body, and we embrace it enthusiastically.Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Like us on newsThe WakullaUnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting Living with VISION LOSS? special microscopic or telescopic glasses can help you see better. Even if you have been told nothing can be done you owe it to yourself to seek a second opinion. Dr. Roderick FieldsToll Free: 866-771-2040www.SouthernLowVision.com Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: Joint and Muscle soreness Arthritis Back aches THG-13902 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Sep 19, 13 Fri Sep 20, 13 Sat Sep 21, 13 Sun Sep 22, 13 Mon Sep 23, 13 Tue Sep 24, 13 Wed Se p 25, 13 Date 3.9 ft. 2:29 AM 3.9 ft. 3:00 AM 3.9 ft. 3:29 AM 3.9 ft. 3:55 AM 3.8 ft. 4:21 AM 3.7 ft. 4:48 AM 3.5 ft. 5:19 AM High 0.4 ft. 8:39 AM 0.2 ft. 9:21 AM 0.2 ft. 10:00 AM 0.2 ft. 10:38 AM 0.4 ft. 11:17 AM 0.6 ft. 11:59 AM 0.9 ft. 12:50 PM Low 4.2 ft. 2:59 PM 4.0 ft. 3:40 PM 3.9 ft. 4:20 PM 3.6 ft. 4:59 PM 3.4 ft. 5:39 PM 3.1 ft. 6:24 PM 2.8 ft. 7:20 PM High 0.7 ft. 9:04 PM 0.9 ft. 9:35 PM 1.1 ft. 10:04 PM 1.3 ft. 10:32 PM 1.5 ft. 11:00 PM 1.7 ft. 11:33 PM Low Thu Sep 19, 13 Fri Sep 20, 13 Sat Sep 21, 13 Sun Sep 22, 13 Mon Sep 23, 13 Tue Sep 24, 13 Wed Se p 25, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 2:21 AM 2.9 ft. 2:52 AM 3.0 ft. 3:21 AM 2.9 ft. 3:47 AM 2.9 ft. 4:13 AM 2.8 ft. 4:40 AM 2.7 ft. 5:11 AM High 0.3 ft. 8:50 AM 0.2 ft. 9:32 AM 0.1 ft. 10:11 AM 0.2 ft. 10:49 AM 0.3 ft. 11:28 AM 0.5 ft. 12:10 PM 0.7 ft. 1:01 PM Low 3.1 ft. 2:51 PM 3.0 ft. 3:32 PM 2.9 ft. 4:12 PM 2.7 ft. 4:51 PM 2.5 ft. 5:31 PM 2.3 ft. 6:16 PM 2.1 ft. 7:12 PM High 0.5 ft. 9:15 PM 0.7 ft. 9:46 PM 0.8 ft. 10:15 PM 1.0 ft. 10:43 PM 1.1 ft. 11:11 PM 1.2 ft. 11:44 PM Low Thu Sep 19, 13 Fri Sep 20, 13 Sat Sep 21, 13 Sun Sep 22, 13 Mon Sep 23, 13 Tue Sep 24, 13 Wed Se p 25, 13 Date 3.6 ft. 3:05 AM 3.7 ft. 3:36 AM 3.7 ft. 4:05 AM 3.6 ft. 4:31 AM 3.6 ft. 4:57 AM High 0.4 ft. 9:43 AM 0.2 ft. 10:25 AM 0.2 ft. 11:04 AM 0.2 ft. 11:42 AM 0.4 ft. 12:21 PM 1.4 ft. 12:04 AM 1.5 ft. 12:37 AM Low 3.9 ft. 3:35 PM 3.8 ft. 4:16 PM 3.6 ft. 4:56 PM 3.4 ft. 5:35 PM 3.1 ft. 6:15 PM 3.4 ft. 5:24 AM 3.3 ft. 5:55 AM High 0.6 ft. 10:08 PM 0.8 ft. 10:39 PM 1.0 ft. 11:08 PM 1.2 ft. 11:36 PM 0.6 ft. 1:03 PM 0.8 ft. 1:54 PM Low 2.9 ft. 7:00 PM 2.6 ft. 7:56 PM High Thu Sep 19, 13 Fri Sep 20, 13 Sat Sep 21, 13 Sun Sep 22, 13 Mon Sep 23, 13 Tue Sep 24, 13 Wed Se p 25, 13 Date 3.0 ft. 2:13 AM 3.1 ft. 2:44 AM 3.1 ft. 3:13 AM 3.0 ft. 3:39 AM 3.0 ft. 4:05 AM 2.9 ft. 4:32 AM 2.8 ft. 5:03 AM High 0.4 ft. 8:18 AM 0.2 ft. 9:00 AM 0.2 ft. 9:39 AM 0.2 ft. 10:17 AM 0.4 ft. 10:56 AM 0.6 ft. 11:38 AM 0.9 ft. 12:29 PM Low 3.2 ft. 2:43 PM 3.2 ft. 3:24 PM 3.0 ft. 4:04 PM 2.8 ft. 4:43 PM 2.6 ft. 5:23 PM 2.4 ft. 6:08 PM 2.2 ft. 7:04 PM High 0.7 ft. 8:43 PM 0.9 ft. 9:14 PM 1.1 ft. 9:43 PM 1.3 ft. 10:11 PM 1.5 ft. 10:39 PM 1.7 ft. 11:12 PM 1.8 ft. 11:52 PM Low Thu Sep 19, 13 Fri Sep 20, 13 Sat Sep 21, 13 Sun Sep 22, 13 Mon Sep 23, 13 Tue Sep 24, 13 Wed Se p 25, 13 Date 3.9 ft. 2:26 AM 4.0 ft. 2:57 AM 4.0 ft. 3:26 AM 4.0 ft. 3:52 AM 3.9 ft. 4:18 AM 3.8 ft. 4:45 AM 3.6 ft. 5:16 AM High 0.4 ft. 8:36 AM 0.2 ft. 9:18 AM 0.2 ft. 9:57 AM 0.3 ft. 10:35 AM 0.4 ft. 11:14 AM 0.7 ft. 11:56 AM 1.0 ft. 12:47 PM Low 4.2 ft. 2:56 PM 4.1 ft. 3:37 PM 3.9 ft. 4:17 PM 3.7 ft. 4:56 PM 3.4 ft. 5:36 PM 3.1 ft. 6:21 PM 2.9 ft. 7:17 PM High 0.7 ft. 9:01 PM 1.0 ft. 9:32 PM 1.2 ft. 10:01 PM 1.4 ft. 10:29 PM 1.6 ft. 10:57 PM 1.8 ft. 11:30 PM Low Thu Sep 19, 13 Fri Sep 20, 13 Sat Sep 21, 13 Sun Sep 22, 13 Mon Sep 23, 13 Tue Sep 24, 13 Wed Se p 25, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 2:29 AM 3.0 ft. 2:46 AM 3.1 ft. 3:04 AM 3.2 ft. 3:25 AM 3.2 ft. 3:51 AM 3.2 ft. 4:22 AM 3.2 ft. 5:00 AM High 0.9 ft. 8:01 AM 0.7 ft. 8:42 AM 0.6 ft. 9:23 AM 0.5 ft. 10:03 AM 0.5 ft. 10:45 AM 0.6 ft. 11:34 AM 0.6 ft. 12:33 PM Low 3.2 ft. 2:55 PM 3.1 ft. 3:47 PM 3.0 ft. 4:37 PM 2.9 ft. 5:28 PM 2.8 ft. 6:23 PM 2.7 ft. 7:24 PM 2.6 ft. 8:35 PM High 1.1 ft. 8:33 PM 1.3 ft. 8:58 PM 1.5 ft. 9:22 PM 1.7 ft. 9:45 PM 1.8 ft. 10:12 PM 1.9 ft. 10:48 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 19 Sept. 25First Oct. 11 Full Sept. 19 Last Sept. 26 New Oct. 41:13 am-3:13 am 1:39 pm-3:39 pm 7:29 am-8:29 am 7:41 pm-8:41 pm 2:03 am-4:03 am 2:28 pm-4:28 pm 8:30 am-9:30 am 8:19 pm-9:19 pm 2:53 am-4:53 am 3:18 pm-5:18 pm 9:30 am-10:30 am 8:59 pm-9:59 pm 3:42 am-5:42 am 4:07 pm-6:07 pm 10:28 am-11:28 am 9:40 pm-10:40 pm 4:31 am-6:31 am 4:56 pm-6:56 pm 11:25 am-12:25 pm 10:23 pm-11:23 pm 5:20 am-7:20 am 5:45 pm-7:45 pm 12:18 pm-1:18 pm 11:09 pm-12:09 am 6:09 am-8:09 am 6:34 pm-8:34 pm 1:09 pm-2:09 pm 11:56 pm-12:56 am Best Better Better Average Average Average Average7:24 am 7:37 pm 7:42 pm 7:30 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:24 am 7:35 pm 8:20 pm 8:31 am 7:25 am 7:34 pm 9:00 pm 9:31 am 7:25 am 7:33 pm 9:41 pm 10:29 am 7:26 am 7:32 pm 10:24 pm 11:25 am 7:26 am 7:30 pm 11:10 pm 12:19 pm 7:27 am 7:29 pm 11:57 pm 1:10 pm99% 94% 87% 81% 74% 68% 61%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 thewakullanews.com The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comAcquaintedAgent Alone Anchor Armed Barks Breast Claim Cooperated Cutting Disco Earned Easel Evenly Fiddle Flames Funnel Handed Herds Humans Icicle Ideal Insure Ireland Kites Lawns Likely Linen Media Nearer Nests Ointment Outcome Pulse Reindeer Rides Routine Sandwich Seemed Shame Skill Sneezed Stables Steel Stops Tired Treat Trees The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 9B Spy Todays New Ads 49 Tower Road, Panacea, Wakulla County 3 bedroom 2 full bath home with new carpet and paint, just off 98. Built in 2009 with a 1/2 acre lot, deck and one car garage. Move in ready! Call Danielle at 1st Choice Real Estate 850-8937221 1stchoicehouses.com Are You a Licensed Contractor?Want to help train the next generation of workers? TCC seeks a Program Coordinator for its Trades/ Industrial/Green program. Interested applicants should visit www.tcc.fl.edu to apply. DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 TURN KEY SPECIALTY Sandwich Shop fo r Sale owner retiring, well est. clientele, just walk in and take over! email: gfurdock@gmail.com Boat Mfg Co. Auction 9-28-13 On Site: 9am, 122 N Cedarview Terrace Inverness, FL34453. New & antique, boats & motors, tools & equip. For details go to: www .dudleys auction.com ab1667 10%bp CRAWFORDVILLEHUDSON PARK Sept 21st, 8am-1pm Wakula County Historical Society Fundraiser MEDARTFriday 20, Sat. 21, & Sunday. 22 7AM-3PM 60 Evalee Road, near Rec Park in Medart Price to sell quickjly Dining Room, Liv. Rm. Bedroom Furniture household items & clothing. PANACEASaturday 21, 8a-2p HUGE SALE Childrens clothing, furniture, Business Equipment and MORE 1612 Coastal Hwy. 98 Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. Pet Stop (850-926-7949) www. happyjackinc.com Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. Ace Hardware (850-926-3141) www. happyjackinc.com MEDART2BR, 2BA, Very Nice, Fenced yard,, 10 Acres central Heat/Air, ceiling fans, No pets or Non smoking firm $600/month + dep. 850-545-0126 N Crawfordville4/2, 2000 sq. ft. on 12 acres, very private, $950. mo. pets considered, horses ok, 850-519-3228 WAKULLA2BR/1BASW, on 5 acres of land, newly repainted, Hardwood floors & fireplace $650/mo + deposit (850) 556-1729 Wakulla GardensSpacious 2/2 SWMH Open Floor Plan $595/mo + deposit.(850) 524-4090 LAKE ELLEN LAKEFRONT 3 lots w/ 14 wide mobile home, 2 bd/1 bath, lg screened porch overlooking lake, by boat ramp, (850) 576-2695 Wakulla Gardens $50,000 Home of Merit 3 bedroom 2 bath on two lots Call 850-273-9435 CRAWFORDVILLE2/1 with fireplace, deck, gas stove, AC/Heat $750 1st & last $60 monthly for water, Mysterious Waters (850) 926-7538 Ochlockonee Baytwo homes available 3BR/3BAhome on canal, screened porch, garage/workshop, boatlift -$1075/month or 2BR/2BAhome on Bay, carport and storage shed $1000/month. First/Last/Deposit. References required. Call Carol Odell, Century 21 Silver Coast Realty, 850-984-5007 CrawfordvilleRoom w/ Private bath and kitchen access. $300 month plus utilities. Spring Creek Hwy and Lower Bridge Rd area. (757) 353-1304 49 Tower Road, Panacea, Wakulla County 3 bedroom 2 full bath home with new carpet and paint, just off 98. Built in 2009 with a 1/2 acre lot, deck and one car garage. Move in ready! Call Danielle at 1st Choice Real Estate 850-8937221 1stchoicehouses.com FOR SALE:2 Bdrm., 1 Bath House On 2 Acres 2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing Available with Easy Terms. WAC Call 855-847-6807. OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM 84 Mt. Beasor Rd Sopchoppy 1 BR/1 BA House on Sopchoppy River. New interior, big screened porch. $79,000 (850) 524-1026 ABSOLUTE AUCTION Sept 21 Sewanee, TN 230 Acres in 3 Tracts and 14 Bluff/View Tracts 800-476-3939 www.targetauction.com TNAU #6650 TN #260531 Volunteer Land Consultants, LLC AUCTION Pensacola Area Real Estate Live and Online September 26th 10 am Auction will offer several local properties in online catalog for viewing/pre-bidding www .CottonAuctions Appraisals.com www .AuctionPensaco laRealEst ate.com AB2529 AU3284 SL3191177 211 Northeast 4th Street, Chiefland, FL BANK OWNED ABSOLUTE AUCTION 6,400+/-SF of space in 2 Buildings on 1.16 Acres. One vacant single family home and a second bldg. used as a daycare facility. Inspect: Sept. 30th @ 11 AM Onsite Auction with Webcast bidding on October 2nd @ 3 PM Local contact: Julian Howell, 877-980-9565. More info at www.auctionEbid.com FLBKR#CQ1029847 Auction MGMTCorp. Jeb@auctionEbid.com Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 LARGE ACREAGE AT LOW PRICES! 65 Acres for $1500 Per Acre. Panoramic Mountain Views and Creeks. Located on Keith Springs Mountain in TN. Call 877-282-4409 75 WOODED ACRESoff Bloxham Cut-off. 2 miles east of HWY 20, adjacent to Freeman Creek. Across from National Forrest. $3000/per acre. Will divide into 30 and 45 acre track. (850) 576-2695 Chevrolet91 Caprice Classic less than 100k miles runs good, leather seats, pwr windows & tilt steering, cruise control, needs minor repairs, great body $2500. 850-421-6050 5883-0919 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name Notice under Fictitious Name Law. pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned, desiring to engage in business under the fictitious name of: Sundance located at 2510 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, in the County of Wakulla, intends to register the said name with the Division of Corporations of the Florida Department of State, Tallahassee, FL. Dated at Crawfordville, FL, this 13 day of Sept., 2013. /s/ Neda Sue Taft Owner September 19, 2013. 5872-0919 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WAKULLA COUNTY FUEL FOR COUNTY VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT Invitation to Bid No. ITB #2013-18 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: September 4, 2013 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed bids for ITB 2013-18, WAKULLA COUNTY FUEL FOR COUNTY VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT will be received until 2:00 p.m. on Friday, September 27, 2013. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please direct all questions to: ADMINISTRATIVE: Deborah DuBose, Wakulla County BOCC Phone:850.926.9500 x 707 FAX: 850.926.0940 EMail: ddubose@mywakulla.com TECHNICAL Brent Pell, ESG.,Inc 340 Trice Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 Office(850) 926-7616 E-mail: bell@esginc.net ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com on Wednesday, September 4, 2013, or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on that same day. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate during the selection process on the basis of age, sex, familial status, race, national origin or handicap status. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact the Purchasing Office at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Randy Merritt, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Director, Employee Support Svcs. September12 & 19, 2013 5874-0912 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE 10/7 sale date NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction, for towing and storage, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & P Towing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at: 2170 Crawfordville Hwy, Lot 1 Crawfordville, Florida on 10/07/13 at 9:00 a.m. on the following vehicle(s): 2008 Chevy Vin# 2GCEC19C881111346 2004 Chrysler Vin# 1C3EL46X34N363124 September 19, 2013 5882-0926 TWN vs. St. James, Ewan Case No. 08-00124 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 08-00124 DIVISION THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWABS INC. ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-IOM3, Plaintiff, vs. EWAN ST. JAMES, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 21, 2013, and entered in Case No. 08-00124 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which The Bank Of New York Mellon fka The Bank Of New York As Trustee For The Certificateholders CWABS Inc. Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-IOM3, is the Plaintiff and Ewan St. James, Camelot Townhome Owners Association, Inc., Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., Unknown Spouse of Ewan St. James n/k/a Ann Marie St. James, are defendants, the Wakulla County Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 10 day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 45, CAMELOT SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA.. A/K/A 3-D GUINEVERE LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netA-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m m e n n t t to He C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED PAINTING AND LAWN SERVICE850-570-1687 850-296-5854 R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED A MarkNet Alliance Member AU 479, AB 296 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Details Visit RowellAuctions.com 270 Pruett Road, Eastpoint, FloridaSelling by Order of the U.S. Bankruptcy CourtOffered Online at RowellAuctions.comBidding Ends, Tuesday, Sept. 24th @ 2 p.m. RowellAuctions.comBeautiful Apalachicola Bay View Lot Beautiful Apalachicola Bay View Lot~ Subject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature ~-Fantastic 2.65 Acres Fishermans Paradise -Located near the foot of the St. George Island Bridge -Outstanding Views Overlooking Apalachicola Bay -Property Features Majestic Oak Trees & Great PondIn Co-Op with: Helen Spohrer, CCIM | (850) 899-1262 Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty Years of Excellent ServiceCongratulations PEGGY FOXTOPPRODUCER AUGUST2013 WWW.REALESTATEWAKULLA.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 850 524 4294peggyfox94@comcast.net 3BR 2BA Hs $850mo + Sec Dep 3BR 2BA TwnHs $850mo + Sec Dep 1BR 1BA Hs $550mo + Sec Dep RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerOne Stop Real Estate Of ce2655 B Crawfordville Hwy Downtown CrawfordvilleSTORAGE RENTALSAVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 thewakullanews.com 5866-0919 TWN Vs.Parker, Brittany R Case No. 65-2012-CA-000037 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000037 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: 5870-0919 TWN Vs. Graham, Benjamin Case No. 652008CA000118FCXXXX IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652008CA000118FCXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF SECURITIZED ASSETBACKED RECEIVABLES LLC TRUST2004-D01, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-DO1 Plaintiff, vs. BENJAMIN F GRAHAM A/K/ABENJAMIN GRAHAM, LLYNN GRAHAM, ANYAND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 3rd day of October 2013, at 11:00 AM at Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 1, 2 and 3, in Block 47, of Wakulla Gardens Unit Five, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 2nd day of August, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF Timisha J. Brooks,Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E,Orlando, Florida 32812,(407) 381-5200 September 12 & 19, 2013 5871-0919 TWN Vs.Santos, Melvin Case No. 65-2011-CA-000338 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000338 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. MELVIN SANTOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELVIN SANTOS; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATIONDefendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOTS 7 AND 18, AND THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 8 AND EAST 1/2 OF LOT 17, BLOCK 28, GREINER`S ADDITION OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 16 BREWSTER RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale on October 3, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5th day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200,St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. September 12 & 19, 2013 5876-0926 TWN vs. Kane, Georgia L. Case No 13000236CAAXMX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL ACTION CASE NO.: 13000236CAAXMX CITIBANK, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR GSR MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-AR2, Plaintiff vs. GEORGIA L. KANE, et al, Defendant(s) NOTICE OF ACTION FORECLOSURE PROCEEDINGS-PROPERTY TO: GEORGIA L. KANE: ADDRESS UNKNOWN BUT WHOSE LAST KNOWN ADDRESS IS: 42 ANN CIR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Residence unknown and if living, including any unknown spouse of the Defendant, if remarried and if said Defendant is dead, his/her respective unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, creditors, lienors, and trustees, and all other persons claiming by, through, under or against the named Defendant; and the aforementioned named Defendant and such of the aforementioned unknown Defendant and such of the unknown name Defendant as may be infants, incompetents or otherwise not sui juris. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property to-wit: THE FOLLOWING REAL PROPERTY SITUATED IN THE COUNTY OF WAKULLA, STATE OF FLORIDA: LOT 5, BLOCK A, HAMMOCK WOODS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 6 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. more commonly known as: 42 ANN CIR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 This action has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defense, if any, to it on the Plaintiff`s attorney, FLORIDA FORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC, whose address is 601 Cleveland Street, Suite 690, Clearwater, FL 33755, on or before 30 days after date of first publication, response due by October 19, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of the Circuit Court either before service on Plaintiff`s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of this Court on the 29 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Court, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk September 19 & 26, 2013 CA13-02556/TB 5877-0926 TWN vs. Michalski, Marc Case No. 65-2012-CA-000339 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000339 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. MARC R. MICHALSKI; AMY L MICHALSKI; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated August 8, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000339, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and MARC R. MICHALSKI; AMY L. MICHALSKI; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 10 day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 28,CAMELOT, A SUBDIVISION A PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 8 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com September 19 & 26, 2013 12-06839 JPC 5878-0926 TWN Vs. Braswell, Harry 2013-CA-000073 Re-Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2013-CA-000073 GENERATION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff(s) vs. HARRY BRASWELL, et al., Defendant(s) RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order or Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 6, 2013, and entered in Case No. 2013-CA-000073 of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein GENERATION MORTGAGE COPANY is the Plaintiff and HARRY BRASWELL; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HARRY BRASWELL; and REBA BRASWELL; and UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF REBA BRASWELL; and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ON BEHALF OF SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; and UNKNOWN TENANT #1; and UNKNOWN TENANT #2 are the Defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL, at 11:00 a.m. on the 17 day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order of Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 22, BLOCK B OF GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 77 & 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA IF YOU ARE A PERSON CLAIMING A RIGHT TO FUNDS REMAINING AFTER THE SALE, YOU MUST FILE A CLAIM WITH THE CLERK OF COURT NO LATER THAN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU FAIL TO FILE A CLAIM, YOU WILL NOT BE ENTITLED TO ANY REMAINING FUNDS. AFTER 60 DAYS, ONLY THE OWNER OF RECORD AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MAY CLAIM THE SURPLUS. DATED at Wakulla County, Florida this 20 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk, WAKULLA County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, WAKULLA County, WAKULLA COUNTY CLERK OF COURT, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL, 32327 -County Phone: 850-926-0905 TDD 1-800-955-8771 or 1-800-955-8770 via Florida Relay Service. September 19 & 26, 2013 678280.005066/nporter 5879-0926 TWN vs. Martin, Suzanne Case No. 65-2012-CA-000048 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000048 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. AS SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. SUZANNE MARTIN A/K/A SUZANNE O. MARTIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUZANNE MARTIN A/K/A SUZANNE O. MARTIN; MICHAEL MARTIN A/K/A MICHAEL S. MARTIN; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL MARTIN A/K/A MICHAEL S. MARTIN; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION SEVEN (7), TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST AND RUN EAST 305 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN NORTH 360.5 FEET TO THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF STATE ROAD NO. 267, THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 58 MINUTES EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY LINE OF THE RIGHT OF WAY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 267 A DISTANCE OF 208.83 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 352.9 FEET THENCE WEST 208.7 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, IN SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST. A/K/A 3611 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthoushouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM, on October 17, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 22 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk 5880-0926 TWN Vs. Drake, Karen W. Case No. 65-2012-CA-000008 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000008 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. KAREN W. DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY GRINER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KAREN W. DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY DRAKE A/K/A KAREN WORLEY GRINER UNKNOWN TENANT 1; UNKNOWN TENANT 2; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SUNTRUST BANK Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLA County, Florida, described as: LOTS 62 AND 63, OF BLOCK 14, OF WAKULLA GARDENS, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA a/k/a 156 CHOCTAW ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327-2725 at public sale on October 10, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5 day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200,St. Petersburg, FL 33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARY INJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771 September 19 & 26, 2013. 5881-0926 TWN vs. Pafford, Terry D. Case No. 65-2011-CA-000370 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000370 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. TERRY D. PAFFORD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TERRY D. PAFFORD; CARRIE R. PAFFORD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARRIE R. PAFFORD; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 40, THE GROVE PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS FO WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 248 SAND PINE TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthoushouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 at 11:00 AM, on October 10, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 5 day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 19 & 26, 2013 94966-T Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 (813) 221-9171 facsimile eService: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. September 19 & 26, 2013 11-67877 THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Director of Courts, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 at 850-926-0315 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. September 19 & 26, 2013 112665 ajp FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-9-CA CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company Plaintiff, v. COASTAL BLUE WATERS PROPERTIES, LLC, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: GREG SMITH AKA ALVAH MCGREGOR SMITH 11208 HUTCHINSON BLVD., APT. 104, PANAMA CITY BEACH, FL 32407 and any unknown parties who are or may be interested in the subject matter of this action whose names and residences, after diligent search and inquiry, are unknown to Plaintiff and which said unknown parties may claim as heirs, devisees, grantees, assignees, lienors, creditors, trustees or other claimants claiming by, through, under or against the Said Defendant(s) either of them, who are not known to be dead or alive. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to enforce and foreclose a Mortgage and to foreclose any claims which are inferior to the right, title and interest of the Plaintiff herein in the following described property: LOTS 5, 6, 7, 11 & 12, BLOCK 30; LOTS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, BLOCK 35; LOTS 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11, 12, BLOCK 37; LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK 39; LOTS 4, 5, 11, 12 & 13, BLOCK 40; LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 BLOCK 41; LOTS 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, BLOCK 42; LOTS 1, 2, 3, BLOCK 43 OF PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS, UNIT 1, A SUB AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 5, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on: Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is: ADAM CERVERA, ESQUIRE Becker & Poliakoff, P.A., Alhambra Towers, 121 Alhambra Plaza, 10th Floor, Coral Gables, FL 33134 on or before thirty (30 ) days from the date of the first publication, and to file the original of the defenses with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter. If a Defendant fails to do so, a default will be entered against that Defendant for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and the seal of said Court August 9, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (Court Seal) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, as Deputy Clerk September 19 & 26, 2013 5875-0926 TWN vs. Coastal Blue Waters Properties LLC 13-9-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2nd JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 42 Francis Avenue (Panacea) 3/2 doublewide mobile home. $700 mo. $700 security deposit. No smoking, no pets. Panacea in Tarpine 3/2 1,612 sq.ft. No smoking, no pets. $1,200 mo. $1,200 security deposit. Available now! 3143 Shadeville Hwy, near Wakulla Station, 3BD/2BA house, No smoking, no pets. $900 mo. $900 security deposit. Available Sept. 1st. 14 Cutchins Court, 3 BD/2BA Doublewide. No smoking, no pets. $700 mo. $700 security deposit. Available Sept. 15th. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!Bay View River Home 6 River Cove 2BR/1BA, Ochlockonee Bay, near boat ramp. $550.mo. 7 Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA CHA, Carport, 1 Car Garage. $630 mo. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550 mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $950 mo.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 11B5863-0919 TWN Vs. Crosby, John W. Case No. 13-141-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 13-141-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA39828 Plaintiff, v. JOHN W. CROSBYA/K/AJOHN WAYNE CROSBY, LAURAM. CROSBYA/K/ALAURAMARGARETCROSBY, GREATSENECAFINANCIALCORPORATION d/b/a GREATSENECAFINANCIALCORP.,DODGE ENTERPRISES, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN W. CROSBYA/K/AJOHN WAYNE CROSBY LAURAM. CROSBYA/K/ALAURAMARGARETCROSBY YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Wakulla, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: Commencing at the intersection of the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane and the Southern boundary of Pecan Street, as per map or plat of Hudson Heights, Unit 4, recorded on Page 38 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Thence run Southerly along the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane 450 to the 5864-0919 TWN Vs.Jones, Joseph B. Case No. 65-2012-CA-000056 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000056 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCAITION Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH B. JONES; DANAN. JONES; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure datedJuly 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOTS 64 & 65, BLOCK 17, WAKULLAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 152 RENEGADE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2709 at public sale on October 3, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5th day of August 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. September 12 & 19, 2013 5865-0919 TWN vs. Barksdale, Jo Royster, Case No. 12-368-CANOS Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-368-CA CADC/RADCVENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company Plaintiff, v. JO ROYSTER BARKSDALE, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 19th day of June 2013 and entered in Case No. 12-368-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CADC/RADC Venture 2011-1, LLC is Plaintiff, and Jo Royster Barksdale, et. al. are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the courthouse located at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 am on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A APERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN SIXTY(60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. BECKER & POLIAKOFF, P.A.,Attorneys for Plaintiff Alhambra Towers,121 Alhambra Plaza, 10th Floor Coral Gables, Florida 33134,Phone: (305) 262-4433; Fax: (305) 442-2232 By:/s/ Adam Cervera, Esq., Florida Bar #81679 Primary: acervera@becker-poliakoff.com,secondary: cpons@becker-poliakoff.com Secondary: cgarcia@becker-poliakoff.com EXHIBIT A Property Appraises # 12121-000: The South 10 feet of Lot 11 and North-half of Lot 10 of Block C Unit No. 2 West Point Subdivision of Live Oak Island, as per map or plat thereof, recorded on page 21 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. ALSO: Property Appraisers # 12121-000: Astrip of land 5 feet wide all of the way across the Northerly side of the South-half of Lot 10 of Block C of West Point Subdivision of Live Oak Island, **(Unit No. 2)*** as shown by plat of record on page 21 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. ALSO: Property Appraisers # 12121-000: Commence at the Southwest comer of Lot 11, Block C, Unit No. 2 of West Point Subdivision of Live Oak island, as per map or plat thereof, recorded on page 2 I of Piet Book I of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and run thence North 15 degrees 39 minutes East along the Westerly boundary of said Lot No. 11 a distance of 10.0 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING From said POINT OF BEGINNING, run thence South 74 degrees 21 minutes East, parallel with the South boundary of said Lot 11 a distance of 113.08 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of Live Oak Island Road, thence leaving said right-of-way, run North 72 degrees 49 minutes 49 seconds West 113.12 feet to a point on the Westerly boundary of said Lot No. 11, thence run South 15 degrees 39 initiates West along said Westerly boundary of Lot No. 11, a distance of 3.0 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, ALSO: Property Appraises # 12118-000: Lot 7, Block C of West Point Subdivision of Live Oak Island, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 19 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. ALSO : All of Lot 10, Block A and a portion of Lot 11, Block A, of Panacea North a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 7 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and also Lots I, 3, and 5 of a plat of Lands of W. E. Smith, Panacea Springs, Florida said lots being in the North side of Georgia Avenue (now Otter Lake Road ) and being in Section 24, Township 5 South, Range 2 West said Plat of Land being on record in Deed Book 6, Page 149 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Begin at an iron rod and cap( marked # 7160) marking the Northwest comer of Lot 10, Block A of Panacea North a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book I, Page 7 of the Public Records of Wakulla County Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East along the North boundary of said tot a distance of 153.75 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of U. S. Highway No. 98 thence leaving said North lot boundary run South 00 degrees 58 minutes 59 seconds West along said Westerly right-of-way boundary 150.02 feet to a concrete monument (marked # 2919) marking a point of intersection with the Northerly right -of-way boundary of Otter Lake Road, thence leaving said Westerly right-of-way boundary not North 85 degrees 44 minutes OD seconds West along said North right-of-way boundary 336.98 feet to an iron rod and cap (malted # 7160), thence leaving said Northerly right-of-way boundary run North 02 degrees 02 minute 26 seconds East 156.52 feet to an iron pipe, thence run South 85 degrees 47 minutes 23 seconds East 179.16 feet to a concrete monument (marked # 2919 ), thence run South 01 degrees 58 minutes 29 seconds East 18.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING Containing 1.16 acres more or less. September 12 & 19, 2013 LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2719 at public sale on October 10, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5th day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200,St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. September 12 & 19, 2013 5867-0919 Case 13-74 CPTWN Est. of Yates, Thomas Ray, NTC IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-74 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS RAYYATES Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of Thomas Ray Yates, deceased, File 13-74 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is September 12, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative:Olivia Yates 116 Magnolia Ridge,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 12 & 19, 2013 5868-0919 Case 13-76 CPTWN Est. of Carter, Beatrice, NTC IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-76 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF BEATRICE CARTER Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of Beatrice Carter, deceased, File 13-76 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the co-personal representatives and the personal representativesattorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is September 12, 2013.Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327, 850) 926-8245 Co-Personal Representatives:Mary Carter Murphy73 Elie Carter Lane, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Elex Hiram Carter 29 Elie Carter Lane, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 12 & 19, 2013 5862-0919 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Seminole Self Storage LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDASTATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON 5843-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 053 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2245Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10478-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 7 LOT 16 OR 1 P 157 & OR 50 P 278 Name in which assessed JOE VINCENT WOOD said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5844-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 055 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2548Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-121-122-11977-089PARADISE VILLAGE SHELL POINT UNIT 1 LOT 89 OR 52 P 96 & OR 99 P 522 Name in which assessed BETTY J BRAUN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5845-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 054 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2444Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-086-188-11586-06CWILDWOOD ACRES PHASE II BLOCK C LOT 6 OR 134 P 706; OR 134 P 861; OR 176 P 223 OR 179 P 753; OR 480 P 615 Name in which assessed DANA LYNN HANSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certifi5846-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 056 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #675 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:01-6S-02W-147-03576-C04TARPINE BLK C LOT 4 OR 59 P 50; OR 67 P 480-492 OR 523 P 202 Name in which assessed PANACEA COASTAL PROP INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this16day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5847-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 057 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1502Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-035-008-06918-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1 BLOCK 7 LOT 56 OR 2 P 192; OR 121 P 984; OR 228 P 366 OR 495 P 364; OR 517 P 728; OR 574 P 454 Name in which assessed SCOTT E & KATE STRATTON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5848-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 058 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1052Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:17-3S-01W-318-04457-D23LINZY MILL S/D LOT 23 BLK D OR 744 P 87 Name in which assessed THE PINNACLE GROUP OF THE PANHANDLE LLC & CONLIN JOHN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5849-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 059 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2258Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10508-000GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 17 LOTS 2,3,4,5,6,7,13,14 & 15 AND A PORTION OF LOTS 1, 8 THRU 12 DB 58 P 510; OR 121 P 202 Name in which assessed R.E.M. DEVELOPERS, LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5850-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 060 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2259Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10508-002GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 17 A PORTION OF LOTS 1,8,9,10,11 & 12 OR 521 P 861; OR 548 P 165; OR 205 P 184; OR 337 P 643 Name in which assessed R.E.M. DEVELOPERS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5851-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 061 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2251Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10505-025GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 13 LOT 1 & E 1/2 OF 2 DB 31 P 405; OR 50 P 277; OR 104 P 337; OR 179 P 190 OR 190 P 150; OR 523 P 866 Name in which assessed TARPON IV LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5852-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 062 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2253Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10506-021GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 13 LOT 21 & E 1/2 OF 20 DB 31 P 405; OR 50 P 277; OR 104 P 337; OR 179 P 187 OR 196 P 153; OR 519 P 327 Name in which assessed TARPON IV LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINIWAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTYOF: ANGELACRUM HAYDEE CESAR Before the sale date of September 27, 2013 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. September 12 & 19, 2013 cateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 Norther boundary of a new street known as Walnut Street, thence run Easterly and at right angles to the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane and along the Northern boundary of Walnuts Street 518 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street and the Easterly boundary of Cypress Street. Thence continue in the same direction along the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street 194 feet to an iron pipe which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From the POINT OF BEGINNING run thence Northerly and parallel to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 225 feet to an iron pipe, thence run Easterly and at right angles to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 97 feet to an iron pipe, thence run Southerly and parallel to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 225 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe on the Northern boundary of Walnut Street, thence run Westerly along the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street and at right angles to the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane, 97 feet, more or less to the POINT OF BEGINNING, and being situate in the E1/2 of Lot No. 76 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; together with a 1999 Redman mobile home ID#FLA14613828A& FLA14613828B. Commonly known as: 80 HARVEYPITMAN STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 22nd day of August, 2013. CLERK OF COURT By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203 Tallahassee, FL32312, Counsel for Plaintiff September 12 & 19, 2013 Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1234 56789 101112 13 14 15 16 17 18 1920 21 22 23 24 25 262728 29 30 31 32 33343536 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 4546 47 48 495051 52 53 54 55 565758 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 Across 1. Deli spread 5. "The Chronicles of Narnia" author C. S. 10. On the ___ (fleeing) 13. Salt Lake City's state 14. "___ to Hold Your Hand" 15. Journalist Pauley 16. "Cheers" regular 17. Bother 18. Pitching successes 19. Rajiv Gandhi's mother 21. Causes great anguish 23. Copycat 25. English noblewoman's address 26. Order in the court? 29. "What did I tell you?" 30. Former Russian ruler 31. Sisters 33. Prima donna's favorite numbers 37. Prefix with space or plane 38. Lacking originality 40. Dog name 41. Thanksgiving table item 43. List-ending abbreviation 44. Half a sestet 45. Greek goddess of the dawn 47. Republican symbol 49. Prepare leftovers 52. Anti-flooding device 53. Of the heavens 55. "The Governator" 59. Element #26 60. So far 62. Brainstorm 63. Pulitzer-winning musical of 1996 64. ___ Island (Connecticut neighbor) 65. Laundry amount 66. Actor Billy ___ Williams 67. "Green Eggs and Ham" author 68. Blows a fly Down 1. 1936 Pasteur portrayer Paul 2. "This must weigh ___!" 3. Three feet 4. Electrician's favorite TV show? 5. Connective tissue 6. She bleats 7. Electrician's verbal shrug? 8. Fascinated by 9. Weather map features 10. Actress Dern 11. Put in one's two cents? 12. Like a teen's room, stereotypically 15. Electrician's favorite movie? 20. Brazilian city, familiarly 22. Even scores 24. Get accustomed 26. Party type 27. Consumer 28. Silents star Theda ___ 32. Like an old joke 34. Pre-euro money 35. Chief Norse god 36. Chimney sweep's covering 39. Puts on a pedestal 42. "___ place or mine?" 46. Obsolete weaponry 48. A pop 49. Out there 50. "___ Grows in Brooklyn" 51. Avignon's river 54. Late tennis star Arthur 56. Stench 57. King of Shakespeare 58. Pops 61. Bradley and MeeseEach puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 234 456 7189 38 27 94 5683 68 49 971 7962 00 9 HometownContent 816 2935 7 4 493875216 275641839 384 529167 169387452 527164983 638 412795 952738641 741956328 MAYO LEWIS L UTAH IWANT JA NORM GETTO OU INDIRA TORTUR MIMIC MILA SUBPOENA SEE TSAR NUNS SOL AERO TRITE FI GRAVY ETAL TR EOS ELEPHA WARMUP LEVEE ETHEREAL ARNO IRON ASYET ID RENT RHODE LO DEE SEUSS ER

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 26, 2013 thewakullanews.com Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop DinnerEl Jalisco Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans Grilled Chicken Pita with sideSKYBOX Lunch for 2 order from menu Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9771NEW KITCHEN HOURS 11AM TIL MIDNIGHTCALL IN OR DINE IN Come Have Come Have With Us! With Us!DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE850-926-9771 Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant P leasure Seeking ?Park yourself in front of a plate of Offer starts Oct.1 PUMPKIN PANCAKES But don't wait... when the night begins to fall on Halloween... it's too late... ...they'll be gone. M wuuaahhhaaahah!2669 Crawfordville HwyDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-4329mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 9264329 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.comWin One Meal from Every Restaurant! Winner Debra Wellsdrawn from El Jalisco in Crawfordville Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the the EATIN path EATIN path OFF OFF the theConfessions of a frequent ier mile collectorBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsI have to admit I cant even make a simple purchase without rst considering the best possible point returns. This may sound strange to anyone who does not collect points, but there is a whole different world for those who know a world where free nights in ve star hotels, and rst class plane tickets are things that you can experience without having to oat a loan. Companies value their loyal travelers, and they offer extra perks to those special guests. Even if you are not a frequent traveler you should get a loyalty number with hotels, airlines and rental car companies if you think youll use their services. Marriott offers loyalty members promotions like stay two nights and the third is free. If you were already staying somewhere, why not take part? Better still, may hotels have branded credit cards. Some of these credit cards come with an offer of status with the hotel for their annual fee, or even free nights. Many times, the free night is worth more than the cost of the credit card. Other perks may include late checkout, free breakfast, or some amenity such as bottled waters, fresh fruit, or cookies. Free night can be inexpensive like Radissons 9,000 points at a less expensive property, or pricey like Hiltons 100,000 plus points. Each chain has sweet spots where the redemption is a great value like Hiltons Conrad Hotel, in the Maldives, or Priority Clubs Willard, in Washington, DC. For a smaller number of points you can often upgrade your paid stay to a suite or a club level room. Club level rooms offer many bene ts such as breakfast, snacks, beverages, and evening cocktails, and a lounge area to mingle or work in. In an expensive city this can be a huge money saving tactic. Rental car companies have gotten into the loyalty business as well. Some member offers have included a free night after two rentals. Because youve essentially pre-registered, the time savings when you pick up your car, and with some companies the ability to choose your own car makes joining worthwhile. Airlines have different types of frequent flier programs. Some points programs are based on a dollar value, while others are based on a chart that is determined by the individual airline. In addition to your points there is co-pay, covering taxes, fees and fuel surcharges, which varies widely between airlines. When it is time to redeem your points, just search the airlines website for free flights that meet your parameters. While most folks redeem their points for a round trip coach ticket in the US, this is not the maximum value for your points. British Airways is inexpensive for short trips like Tallahassee to Miami for 4000 points plus a $15 copay, but expensive for Europe at 100,000 points in business class plus an $1100 copay. Instead choose United business for100, 000 points and $100 copay. The best award of all is American Airlines Explorer Award, which allows you multiple ights in a region for not much more than the points redemption for a round trip ticket. Whole websites are devoted to how to get extra points thorough things like credit cards, home purchases, home sales, mortgages, satellite TV service, bank accounts, debit cards, investment accounts, dining and even shopping at the stores you already frequent. Sites like www. millionmilesecrets.com, www.thepointsguy.com, and www.freefrequent yermiles.com offer a great overview. Now that you recognize why people collect points, just be aware of the other constant. Over time the value of those miles will be depreciated, often without notice. So make a plan, earn your points, and then enjoy the trip of your dreams.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www. luxurycruise-travel.com. BREAKFAST AT MYRA JEANSexactly the early bird, breakfast there starts at 8:30 a.m., Monday Friday, and at 8 a.m. on the weekend. They switch over to their lunch menu at 11 a.m. Breakfast entrees include strawberry and whipped cream pancakes, the huge steak and cheese omelette, biscuit and sausage gravy and my personal favorite, their homefries. At Myra Jeans, the homefries begin as humble whole potatoes. They chop em up on a at grill with fresh onions and bell peppers and a bit of salt & pepper. Then they leave em alone till they brown up just right. Sounds good, eh? Try Tif es Skillet: A pile of these tasty taters covered with two eggs, country fried steak and white gravy. It comes with toast or biscuit and goes great with Myra Jeans hot coffee or what the heck a glass of champagne. Myra Jeans = A Happier You! Since the 1980s, Myra Jeans has been preparing the grits, frying up the bacon and pouring plate sized pancakes for the good people of Wakulla. Not The Nuttings Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 Page 13B 1. GEOGRAPHY: The Khyber Pass connects which two nations? 2. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of food is a nectarine? 3. MUSIC: In what Rod Stewart song does he say he really should be back at school? 4. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What kind of animal also is known as a gnu? 5. HISTORY: When did the Cuban Missile Crisis occur? 6. LANGUAGE: What is meant by the term lingua franca? 7. ANATOMY: Where is the uvula in the human body? 8. FAMOUS QUOTATIONS: What comedian observed, Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time? 9. LITERATURE: Which poets 1928 book was titled Good Morning, America? 10. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Which presidents face is on the $100,000 bill? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Afghanistan and Pakistan 2. Peach 3. Maggie May 4. Wildebeest 5. October, 1962 6. Common language 7. Suspended from the soft palate 8. Steven Wright 9. Carl Sandburg 10. Woodrow Wilsons Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 19, 2013 thewakullanews.comTop islands for snorkeling in CaribbeanBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsExperience the magic of the under sea world. Take a glass bottom boat and marvel as the sea life darts past, completely oblivious to the world above them. Fish in multiple brilliant colors, and unusual shape; brain coral; stag horn coral; sponges; sea fans; the shapes and colors are as varied as a landscape. Its incentive enough to don mask, ns and snorkel for the total immersion experience. Located off the coast of Honduras, Roatans snorkeling is second to none. Find your way to the West Bay Beach, and rent a chair near the In- nity Resort. Slip in to the glass clear water. Navigate around the coral, and be rewarded for your perseverance with giant schools of blue tangs dancing in the currents. Drift aimlessly, discovering something new at every turn. Plentiful and close in, the sh and coral here delight, this is paradise. In Bonaire, you need only wade in to discover the colorful reefs. Encircled by a national park to a depth of 200 foot, this island is made for snorkeling. Putt across the bay to Little Klein Bonaire, and be rewarded with mesmerizing reefs, just steps from shore. Pack a picnic, and plan to spend a whole day. Walk the whole island in four hours but be sure to pack plenty of water, as there are no stores. Ideal for drift snorkeling, simply paddle out past the reef and let the current draw you along the islands edge. Relaxing and extensive, the reefs will amaze you. Volcanic Dominicas beaches are covered with softball size rocks. While not great for walking or sunbathing, the exceptional for crystal blue water is great for snorkeling. Accessible from shore, dont miss Champagne Reef. Here tiny bubbles of volcanic sulphur gas dance continuously skyward in the caressing tropical waters. Curious blue damsels dart by, as the waves slowly roll toward shore. Grand Caymans most popular activity is not snorkeling. Instead, for a once in a lifetime experience try swimming with the stingrays. Paying attention to instruction counts here. Hold the squid carefully to avoid the stingrays teeth. Feel the suction as the gentle rays slurp squid from your hand. With up to a four-foot wingspan these rays can be enormous. Combine Sting Ray City with a snorkel trip for a perfect afternoon. With visibility of up to 150 feet, Grand Cayman has near perfect conditions. Graced by several cays Belize is a top snorkel destination. The best, Laughing Bird Cay, is a 40-minute cruise from the town of Placenia. Named after the bird once nested here, it has been protected since 1981. Discover a tropical paradise, swaying palms, gentle breezes, and easy beach access. Sorry, you cant stay, as this National Park has no facilities. Spend your time paddling slowly passed sea life, and think you may have found paradise.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 2904058 or www.luxurycruise-travel.com PHOTOS BY LUXURY CRUISE TRAVEL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCoral, above, and sh, below and below left, seen on snorkeling trips in the Caribbean. The Wakulla Coastal Optimist Clubs2013 ANNUAL FASHION EXTRAVAGANZA & AUCTION AT THE MOOSE LODGE IN PANACEA Thursday October 10 2013 6:30pm Modeling 7:00pm Dinner please join us for Modeling Clothing from The Little Black Dress Crums Mini Mall Maurices Wal-Mart TICKETS $30.00 eachPurchase your tickets today by calling Elena Myhre, Chairman 850-321-5976 Jo Ann Daniels, Secretary 850-509-7630 all proceeds go toward scholarships for Wakulla County studentsCoastal Paradiseor drop by and see June Vause or Jared Richardson at Centennial Bank in Crawfordville, Noah Posey or Sherrie Posey Miller at Poseys Steam Room Panacea *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and renances. Renances and used car purchases 2006 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. A weekend to get away, have fun and be treated like a Diva!Relax By The Pool Shop Til You Drop Cocktails Hors doeuvres Massage & More! Abitare Paris Salon Alpaca Magic Citrus County Jazzercise Citrus Pest Management Clementine s Boutique Complete Family Dentistry Connollys Sod & Nursery Connors Gifts Cotton Club Crystal Automotive Group Electric Ends Hair Studio Everyone s Massage Frame Design Genesis Womens Center Georgieos Hair Design Goldiggers & Gunslingers Health & Wellcare Services Himalayan Salt Room Ideal Health Inverness Health & Wellness Jewelry by Ms. Nettee Juice Plus Karma Upscale Resale La Te Da Boutique Ledger Dentistry Lillian Smith Mary Kay M Hair Studio & the Spa at M Mamas Kuntry Kafe The Little Glass Shack Mes Mer Eyes New Concepts Hair Salon New Empire E-Cigs Nick Nicholas Ford Off the Cuff Origami Owl Amber Park Avenue Salon Playtime PinUp Photography Scentsy Silipada Designs Specialty Gems Suncoast Dermatology The Garden Shed The New Image Med Spa Thirty-one Gifts Timber Lane Chiropractic Tinas Hair Salon Tobacco Prevention Fl Health Touch of Glass by Susan Unique Lingerie Vault Jeans Vernon Martin Salon Virgilio Insurance Whalen Jewelers Zen Zone MassageVisit these vendors during the show. Call 800-632-6262to reserve your room & tickets www.PlantationOnCrystalRiver.com www.chronicle-online.com/divanight October 12, 6 9 PM1 Night Stay & 2 General Admission Diva Tickets$138*Limited Availability. Taxes not included. 000G0AE 9301 Fort Island Trail, Crystal River, FL *For tickets only go to the Chronicle site listed below.