Wakulla news

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Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00480

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Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 CentsPublic Notices ..........................................................Pages 2A, 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Green Scene .................................................................Page 10A Green/Health & Fitness .................................................Page 11A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 14A Free Gas .......................................................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 2B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 5B Weekly Roundup ..............................................................Page 8B Thinking Outside the Boook ............................................Page 9B Classi eds ......................................................................Page 10B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13B Travel .............................................................................Page 14BINDEX OBITUARIES Melvin Levon Harrell Sr. Dorothy Mae Hunt newsThe Wakulla Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 37th Issue Thursday, September 12, 2013Winning catch By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net On Sept. 3, the Board of County Commissioners held the rst of two public hearings on the proposed budget for the 2013-14 scal year, voting 5-0 to approve the proposed millage rate at 8.5 and 4-1 to move forward with the budget but with one revision. Commissioner Ralph Thomas thanked County Administrator David Edwards and Chief Deputy Clerk Greg James for their hard work saying that he was comfortable with budget, with the exception of the proposed $150,000 cut to the Sheriffs budget. We have a brand new sheriff, he said. Hes taken responsibility for the budget and the people have elected him to do that. I think we should give him a chance to do his job. Commissioner Thomas said that the sheriffs of ce did contribute money from their rainy day fund to help the county and that there is still the obligation to pay that back. He proposed that the board vote to grant the sheriffs fund the $150,000 as a credit to that amount owed. That way, said Thomas, hell have that $150,000 that hes asking for and were settling a portion of that debt. Conversation between the commissioners and county staff revealed that the countys debt with the sheriffs of ce is currently at about $300,000 an amount that would virtually be paid off after the sheriffs of ce roof x that the county was planning on doing in the next year, according to Edwards. However, Thomas proposal would mean that instead of the county paying back the sheriffs department based on jail bed revenue percentages, the county would be pulling money from its reserves and putting it into the sheriffs fund at the risk of losing that investment if jail bed revenues dont improve in the next year. In a separate interview with James and Edwards, it was revealed that, if the number of ICE inmates, which has been low for the past two years does not pick up, the sheriffs fund is looking at a de cit of about $1 million by the 2018-19 year if cuts that Edwards said are critical are not made. Chairman Randy Merritt said that he trusted the judgment of Edwards and James and that he was supporting what had been proposed for the budget originally. But Commissioner Richard Harden said that he would be in favor of propping up or granting the sheriffs of ce a grace period of one year only, meaning hed be in favor of the cuts being made in the 2014-15 and 2015-16 years rather than the upcoming. Understand this, said Edwards. The sheriffs fund balance will have a projected $434,000 in reserves if they reach their $2.5 million goal in jail bed revenue for this year. That means that at the end of next year, we will have $149,000 in that fund thats all. Which means, said Edwards, that in the next year, even with a $150,000 cut the sheriffs fund will go in the hole. But its up to you, he told the board. Commissioner Howard Kessler expressed disappointment that the conversation had gotten that far. He commended staff for their transparency and efforts when it came to such an elaborate budget process. But, he said, I think were losing track of what our administrator has put out as the reality of the budget situation that we continue to nd ourselves in. He said that he believed the county should be actively trying to avoid insolvency, saying that they were driving the sheriff into bankruptcy by taking the proposed action referring to it as kicking the can down the road. The further you kick this can down the road, said Kessler, the harder its going to be to get out of this hole. Thomas acknowledged the importance of the fund balance and the situation its in, pegging prior boards who didnt follow their fund balance policy as the reason why it doesnt have the roughly $5 million that it currently should. Turn to Page 3ASheriffs budget gets reprieve$150,000 in departmental cuts for sheri s o ce wont be demanded by county commission this yearSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies foiled a Panacea business burglary by arresting a 45-yearold Crawfordville man at 12:02 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. David Paul Funderburke, 45, was charged with burglary, possession of burglary tools, grand theft and driving while license is suspended or revoked. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Lt. Jimmy Sessor responded to a burglary in progress call at Mikes Marine Supply in Panacea. The suspect was allegedly observed leaving the establishment and driving on U.S. Highway 98 toward Crawfordville. The deputies conducted a traf c stop south of Medart and discovered Funderburke bleeding heavily from his right leg. The suspect reportedly told deputies that he cut himself on a boat propeller which was discovered in the back of the vehicle. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston went to the establishment and discovered a window broken outby a brick and piece of wood. Other similar bricks, pieces of wood, gloves and a ski mask were recovered inside the suspects vehicle. A 20 horsepower boat motor was returned to the owner. It is valued at $2,900. The case investigation continues. Deputy Anthony Paul also investigated.PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Wakulla has been eagerly awaiting any sign of movement from the federal government in relation to the distribution of RESTORE Act funds. But on Thursday Sept. 5, that sign may have been obtained as the county received a draft of the Department of Treasurys rules as they pertain to the distribution of RESTORE Act funds to the affected counties. According to Wakullas Director of Governmental Affairs, Sheree Keeler, once the settlement amount is determined, the rules are going to govern how the money gets form the Treasury to the counties. One of the most important things to note, Keeler said, is that the BP settlement is not nished yet. According to online reports, under the Clean Water Act trial, there are three parts. The first, which took place in February of this year, was to determine the liability of BP and others involved. The second phase of the trial is scheduled for later this month and will focus on the ow rate of the oil, while the third, scheduled in 2014, will consider damages. Keeler said that after reviewing the rules, she determined that the county will have to develop a plan on how they are going to spend the money. The plan will have to be in accordance to the RESTORE Act and the newly received rules.Turn to Page 3A e Wakulla War Eagles pulled out a last-minute win over the visiting Navarre Raiders on Friday night at J.D. Jones Stadium. Navarre scored a touchdown with 22 seconds remaining in the game, putting them up 21-20. But the War Eagles marched down the eld and wide receiver Keith Gavin made this leaping catch in the corner of the end zone to score the go-ahead touchdown with 4 seconds left. See the full story in Sports, Page 1B.Wakulla deputies foil Panacea burglary David Paul FunderburkeCounty receives draft of RESTORE Act rules Sheriff Charlie Creel GIVE-AWAY! Y Y See page 15A See page 15AStudents attend SEEK See page 10A See page 10A

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Just $32 per year in Wakulla County $44 per year in Florida $47 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Cant Cant access access The The Wakulla Wakulla news ews online online content? content? Subscribe Subscribe today and today and get full get full access! access!Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of ce deputies arrested two 18-year-old males, a 14-year-old female and a 16-year-old male in connection with two residential burglaries in the Wakulla Gardens community of Crawfordville on Wednesday, Sept. 4, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. The incidents were reported at 2:09 p.m. and 3:17 p.m. and the cases were completed at 4:22 p.m. Michael Wren Highsmith, 18, of Crawfordville was charged with two counts of burglary, two counts of criminal mischief, two counts of grand theft and resisting arrest without violence. Dylan Shane Hartsfield, 18, of Crawfordville was charged with one count of burglary, one count of criminal mischief, two counts of grand theft and resisting arrest without violence. The female juvenile was charged with two counts of burglary, two counts of criminal mischief, two counts of grand theft and resisting arrest without violence. The male juvenile was charged with two counts of burglary, two counts of criminal mischief, two counts of grand theft and resisting arrest without violence. A residential burglary was reported by a victim on W.F. Magers Road who stated she lost $1,255 worth of jewelry, a computer, medications, binoculars and electronics. An air conditioning unit was damaged in the burglary following a forced entry. Damage to the home was estimated at $150. A second residential burglary was reported nearby on Summer Brooke Lane where the victim stated she lost a computer, electronic games, alcohol, electronics, a rearm, computer and other miscellaneous items valued at $4,880. A forced entry was observed at the home and damage was estimated at $600. A concerned citizen reported spotting four suspicious teenagers in a nearby pasture attempting to conceal themselves from view. Sgt. Billy Jones and Detective Rob Giddens observed the two subjects and caught Harts eld and Highsmith following a foot pursuit in the pasture. The two juveniles were secured by Deputy Mike Zimba and Lt. Brent Sanders without incident. Nearly all of the stolen property from both homes has been recovered. Highsmith remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $41,500 bond while Harts eld remains in jail under a $36,000 bond. The two juveniles were transported to juvenile detention in Tallahassee for processing.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Narcotics Unit served a search warrant on a Crawfordville residential address Wednesday, Sept. 4 and made a felony arrest after discovering an extensive marijuana growing operation, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. Lance Joseph Grabill, 32, of 48 White Oak Drive in Crawfordville was arrested for cultivation of marijuana. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Narcotics Unit detectives conducted an undercover operation involving Grabill for more than two years before discovering the grow house in a structure next to his home. Inside the grow house detectives discovered 71 marijuana plants in various stages of growth as well as marijuana plants drying inside a closet. Detectives removed the plants along with several thousand dollars worth of growing equipment including lights, fans and air filters and firearms were also discovered. A canine was loose inside the grow house at the time WCSO detectives opened the structure. The marijuana plants that were seized ranged in size from approximately one foot tall to four feet tall. The plants were growing in two different sections of the grow structure. Following the arrest of Grabill, detectives disassembled the growing operation and seized the plants and equipment. The estimated valued of the marijuana plants was $75,000. The Grabill arrest represents one of the largest marijuana busts in Wakulla County in several years. Additional charges are pending as the case investigation continues.Four arrests made in residential burglaries Dylan Shane Harts eldMichael Wren HighsmithDeputies bust pot grow house FILE PHOTONoah Posey to be honoredStaff RepotLocal restauranteur, seafood processor and businessman Noah Posey will be honored for his outstanding contributions to Wakulla County with the 2013 Distinguished Citizen Award at a banquet sponsored by the Rotary Club of Wakulla. The event is set for Tuesday, Oct. 15, at the senior center from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tickets are $50. Scheduled speakers at the event include Bill Versiga, president of the Coastal Optimist Club; former Sheriff David Harvey; and Bernie Sloan, retired dean at the University of Alabama. Please email wakullarotary@hotmail.com to reserve your seat, purchase your ticket or sponsor a table for the event. Noah Posey. PHOTO BY WCSOMarijuana plants reportedly found growing inside the White Oak Drive house. Lance Joseph Grabill General Fund 8.5000 General Fund Special Revenue Funds Capital Project FundsEnterprise FundsTotal All Funds Taxes: Millage Per $1,000 95% Ad Valorem Taxes 8.5000 1,077,772 7,236,199 8,313,971 Sales, Use, U lity & Fuel Taxes 1,867,338 1,140,118 1,814,542 4,821,998 Licenses and Special Assessments 41,000 1,112,724 1,153,724 Intergovernmental Revenues 4,780,791 2,911,340 3,925,936 90,909 11,708,976 Charges for Services 1,561,648 3,017,870 3,815,969 8,395,488 Fines and Forfeitures 30,563 40,079 70,642 Miscellaneous Revenues 57,990 25,628 1,005,500 1,089,118 Total Revenues Sources 9,417,102 15,483,958 5,740,478 4,912,378 35,553,916 Transfers In 98,392 581,461 297,500 632,564 1,609,917 Fund Balances Carried Forward 794,804 1,768,993 1,876,316 476,775 4,916,888 Total Revenues, Transfers & Fund Balances 10,310,298 17,834,411 7,914,294 6,021,717 42,080,721 General Governement 3,026,118 27,400 75,000 3,128,518 Public Safety 2,257,864 11,818,723 702,557 14,779,143 Physical Environment 178,920 20,000 105,262 4,810,801 5,114,983 Transporta on 5,950 1,952,446 4,726,913 6,685,309 Ec onomic Environment 42,999 2,382,695 2,425,694 Human Services 607,390 47,956 655,346 Culture and Recrea on 893,484 514,839 712,559 2,120,882 Court Services 55,000 200,819 255,819 Debt Service 213,969 725,285 613,386 1,552,640 Total Expenditures Uses 7,067,725 17,178,846 7,047,576 5,424,187 36,718,334 Transfers Out 3,068,259 169,766 650,900 579,530 4,468,454 Fund Balances Reserves 174,315 485,800 215,818 18,000 893,933 Total Expenditures, Transfers & Fund Balances 10,310,298 17,834,411 7,914,294 6,021,717 42,080,721 Final Budget Summary Wakulla County, Florida Fiscal Year 2013/2014Es mated Expenditures: Proposed Millage Levy Es mated Revenues: BALLOT SUMMARY: To Wakulla County, Florida, Supervisor of Elections Petition Form to Hold Ballot Referendum to Decide If Ordinance Ensuring Local Protection for Wakullas Wetlands Will Be EnactedFor more information contact: Victor W. Lambou, Chairman, WWA at 850-9254477; David Damon, Vice Chairman, WWA at 850-251-4166; James Hennessey, Treasurer, WWA at 850-926-9519; Sue Damon, Steering Committee Member, WWA at 850-926-3318; or Howard Kessler, Steering Committee Member, WWA at 850228-9641.Notice of SubmissionSEPTEMBER 12, 2013 NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on September 16, 2013 at 6:01 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider Adopting the FY2013/2014 Final Budget & Millage Rate. This is the second of two required public hearings.IIf a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Office at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla. com.SEPT. 12, 2013

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From Page 1A According to Keeler, the county would be meeting in the next week to review the rules line by line to determine what they mean for Wakulla. Right now, the draft is available for public review and feedback for a period of 60 days, after which the county will have to submit a formulated response containing the communitys feedback as a whole, along with any questions the county has to the U.S. Treasury. The way the rules are written, Keeler said, it sets it up like a federal grant program. Which means that we would have to enter into an agreement as far as our plan for spending funds and certifying that those expenditures are in compliance with the RESTORE Act. In addition, she said, there will be allowable and nonallowable expenditures, expense reporting and goal-oriented projects the outcomes of which will have to be reported on. Theres always the possibility that the federal government could get so much feedback that they tweak the rules, Keeler said. However, if the rules stand as they are today, the county will not just receive one big check. Rather, allocations will be awarded after rst going through an application process much like what must be done in order to receive a grant. As far as moving forward, Keeler said, were going to have to bring everyone back together and discuss what direction to go in now. Meaning, what can we use that weve already done and what is new that we need to make happen. Once the government receives all feedback which can come from anyone across the country though there are ve gulf states that will be receiving funding after the allotted 60 days, Keeler said, it will take that, assimilate it and then formulate where to go from there as far as a nal draft of rules is concerned. It could be, she said, that they may put the nal draft out for another 60 day comment period. In other words, a timeline for expectation of nal rules is unclear. But were excited about this, Keeler said. Its de nitely a step in the right direction. The RESTORE Act which, in long form, stands for the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States Act, was passed in July of 2012 by President Obama and designates that 80 percent of all Clean Water Act penalties be paid by those responsible for the 2010 gulf oil disaster to those directly affected by the spill. That 80 percent allocation will be broken up into ve different pots of money, each pot designated for speci c purposes. Pot number one, which will contain 35 percent of RESTORE Act funds, will be divided equally between the ve states affected by the oil spill: Ala., Fla., La., Miss., and Texas. Fla.s seven percent share will be divided two ways. Counties that are classi ed as non-disproportionately affected will divvy up a 25 percent share, while the eight that are labeled as disproportionately affected will divvy up 75 percent of the states share. As a county labeled as one of the eight (the others being Escambia, Santa Rosa, Okaloosa, Walton, Bay, Gulf and Franklin), Wakulla will receive 4.943 percent of the 75 percent. Although the allocation may seem small, depending on the outcome of the settlement trial, expectations are that Wakullas portion could reach tens of millions of dollars. A breakdown of settlement dollar possibilities compared to Wakullas distribution shows that if the settlement is as low as $1 billion, Wakulla will receive just over $2 million. A settlement of $10 billion puts Wakullas share at more than $20 million and a settlement of $20 billion means the county will receive $41.5 million. Under the RESTORE Act, the money that Wakulla receives can be used for the following types of projects: Restoration and protection of natural resources, ecosystems, sheries, marine and wildlife habitats, beaches, and coastal wetlands of the Gulf Coast region. Mitigation of damage to sh, wildlife, and natural resources Implementation of a federally approved marine, coastal or comprehensive conservation management plan, including sheries monitoring Workforce development and job creation Improvements to state parks in coastal areas affected by Deepwater Horizon spill Infrastructure projects bene ting economy or ecological resources, including ports Coastal ood protection and related infrastructure Planning assistance Promotion of tourism, including recreational shing Promotion of consumption of seafood harvested from the Gulf Coast region www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. From Page 1A But, he said, I think we need to give the sheriff a chance to do what he was elected by the people of this county to do. Before the final vote Edwards reiterated that, if the jail bed revenue goes away, youve just taken that $150,000 and ushed it down the toilet, he said. You never chase a revenue, but thats what yall are trying to do here. Kessler implored fellow board members to reconsider. This year is such a critical year, he said. When you put that $150,000 in this direction, that means other things arent going to get funded. He questioned how long it had been since county employees had gotten raises and how long has it been since needed things have not been acquired? Before the board put the item to vote, Merritt said that hed much rather see us follow David, but Im not going to vote against the budget. The item, with Thomas proposed amendment to grant the sheriffs budget a one-year grace period, passed 4-1 with Kessler casting the vote against. The budget will come back before the board on Sept. 16 complete with the recent amendment for the second and final public hearing before it becomes of cial.Sheri s budget gets reprieve County receives draft of RESTORE Act rules SEPT. 13, 2013The City of St. Marks has tentatively adopted a budget for scal year 2013-2014. A public hearing to make a FINAL DECISION on the budget AND TAXES will be held on Tuesday, September 17, 2013 at 5:10 p.m. at 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, Florida SEPT. 12, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGWakulla County will hold a public meeting on Monday, September 16, 2013 at 10:00a.m. or shortly thereafter. The sole purpose of this meeting will be to discuss the County applying for a grant under the Florida Recreation Development Assistance Program (FRDAP) during the 20142015 funding cycle. The applications are due September 30, 2013. The grant application includes improvements to the Community Center Park Phase I. Wakulla County will hold the meeting at the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Building at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. The public is invited to attend.Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Boardof County Commissioners Administration Ofce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.com SEPT. 12, 19, 2013 In accordance with Section 121.055, Florida Statutes, Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners intends to designate the following position to the Senior Management Service Class in the Florida Retirement System: Director, Parks & Facilities Management Notice for Interested Contractors/ Request for Qualications (RFQ) Single Family Capital Area Community Action Agency has federal funds for weatherizing residential homes in Leon, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Jefferson, and Wakulla counties. Weatherization includes air in ltration reduction, insulation, repair/replacement of doors and windows, low-ow showerheads and compact uorescent light bulbs repair/replacement of heating/cooling systems and water heaters. Work will begin October 1, 2013 and must be performed under the supervision of a state licensed contractor. Current contractors must re-apply. A Pre-BID conference will be held on Wednesday, September 25, 2013, 9:00am-10:00am at the Tallahassee Dodge Chrysler Jeep Building, upstairs conference room; 3987 W. Tennessee Street, Tallahassee, FL 32304. The RFQ is due no later than 5:00pm, Tuesday, October 1, 2012. To attend the Pre-BID conference, request an RFQ, or for more information, contact Debbie Mabry, (850) 222-2043, fax (850) 942-2090, or debora.mabry@cacaainc.org.SEPT. 12, 19, 2013 WAKULLAS FLOODPLAINFlooding can threaten at any time of the year from various sources. Wakulla County regulates construction and development in the oodplain to ensure that buildings will be protected from ood damage. All developments in the oodplain, not just construction of buildings, need permits. Filling and similar work are prohibited in certain areas, so check with the Planning and Community Development Department before you begin a project to build, ll or otherwise. Should unauthorized development in the oodplain be witnessed by a citizen, they can report it to the Countys Code Enforcement Ofce at (850) 745-7760. It is also important to know that houses in the oodplain that are substantially damaged by events such as re or ood must be repaired to new construction standards. This includes elevating the structure to or above the base ood elevation when it is repaired. Damage is considered to be substantial when the cost of reconstruction equals or exceeds 50% of the buildings market value. When damage of this type occurs to a structure and repairs are necessary, visit the Planning and Community Development Department for a Development Permit Application to begin your permitting process. A recorded warranty deed and site plan, showing the improvements/repairs to the property, will be required to complete this Application. Once obtained from Planning and Zoning, the Development Permit Application should be submitted to the Building Division for permitting. Depending upon the types of work performed additional materials will be requested from the Building Division and/or other Departments to complete the permitting of repairs to the structure. Applicable fees are due for Development Permit Applications and Building Division permits, unless otherwise waived by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners for widespread storm damage. An important protection measure in regards to ooding is ood insurance. Homeowners insurance policies do not cover damage from oods, so obtaining a ood insurance policy can help you should you experience a ood. Since Wakulla County and the City of St. Marks participate in the National Flood Insurance Program, you can purchase a separate ood insurance policy in these areas. This insurance is backed by the Federal government and is available to properties that have been previously ooded. Dont wait for the next ood to buy insurance protection. In most cases, there is a 30 day waiting period before National Flood Insurance Program coverage takes effect. Also, consider obtaining contents coverage if it is not already included in your current insurance policy. Contact your insurance agent for more information on rates and coverage. For further information on these topics contact the Planning and Community Development Department at (850) 926-3695. SEPT. 12, 2013 BUDGET SUMMARY City of St. Marks Fiscal Year 2013-2014

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Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $19/6 mo. Out of County $44/yr. $27/6 mo. Out of State $47/yr. $28.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriffs Report for September 5, 2013 Cherbourg, France gateway to Normandy No-swim advisory has been lifted for Mashes Sands and Shell Point beaches Wetlands petition draft turned in Church Briefs: Revival at Charlotte Faith, Many Hats Festival, St. Elizabeth Craft Sale County budget includes cuts PSC warns of bill scam Promise Land offers help thewakullanews.com Follow us on Editor, The News: If this is a democracy, citizens should be allowed to vote on whether or not Wakulla County can keep its Wetland Ordinance. Four county commissioners should not be allowed to decide our future. Its good that theres a dialogue going, in the end it will be positive. In the meantime, I offer this section of our book to given citizens more information on the value of our coastal marshes and interior wetlands and why we should preserve them. Following is a partial chapter from our book, Shrimp the Endless Quest for Pink Gold by Jack and Anne Rudloe, published FT Press in 2010. The big aw in managing the wetlands to produce shrimp and other seafood is that managers cannot protect the wetlands from real estate developers or from pollution. Its easy to beat up on the small commercial shermen, but land use is controlled by wealthy, powerful politicians and real estate developers, some of whom are political appointees sitting on the sheries councils. Its been shown again and again that when land speculators move in, wetlands and shrimp diminish and sheries collapse. When developers seal off the land from the sea with seawalls as one study in Texas has shown, they rob the shrimp and other marine life of organic materials and diatoms that occur in the marsh-mangrove interface. Then shrimp landings drop catastrophically. Two and a half times as many brown shrimp and fourteen times more white shrimp were found along a natural shoreline than along a bulkheaded shoreline in one study. Another scientist at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service stated that the loss of organic material along bulkheads in Florida, Louisiana and Texas dropped shrimp down to one eight of their normal population. Dams, causeways, impoundments and storm water drains all cut down on shrimp population, according to their studies. But all they did was study it. Politics and money trump science, and they couldnt stop it. The unrelenting beat of dredge, drain and reclaim still goes on to create the real estate dream, a bulkheaded sea wall and a manicured grass lawn. People want to improve their property and make it look clean and neat, not wild so they can boost their real estate values. Florida has led the nation in obliterating its wetlands. One study by the state, using global satellite positioning, showed that 86 percent of the mangroves from the Indian River to St. Lucie Inlet are gone. Developers in Tampa Bay on the Gulf Coast gobbled up 81 percent of their marshes and mangroves and Jacksonville chewed up over twelve miles of riverside marshes of the States largest estuary to make way for shipping ports, housing and commerce. Its estimated that 78 percent of Floridas residents now live in coastal areas and natural wetlands and sh are con ned to postage stamp sized parcels. Seawalls and buildings have replaced mangrove swamps depriving shrimp and other marine forms of food and shelter giving them no place to grow. Even the people who make their living from the sea often dont get it. Pompano sherman on the Florida east coast took jobs destroying the marshes of Lake Worth, working for the developers when shing was poor. After the marshes and mangroves literally went down the tube (dredge pipelines) the ounder, mackerel, whiting, crabs and shrimp vanished and the shing industry collapsed. This continues to happens and will go on until the wetlands are truly protected. Jack Rudloe Panacea Editor, The News: Two letters to the editor in last weeks issue, one by Commissioner Ralph Thomas, suggested that the truth about the wetlands buffer issue is elusive and that supporting the proposed referendum by petition would be illadvised or even detrimental to our community. Neither letter offered any real facts to support their claim. Commissioner Thomas did cite one example of development that would fit the construction or alteration criteria needed to invoke state law in rejecting a proposed home construction project with no buffer at all. Unfortunately, he never did say what kinds of projects would be approved under the law in the absence of the local ordinance. Neither letter did anything to clarify the issue but they did sound scary enough to move the average citizen to reconsider their most reasonable opinions. So much empty drama just to convince us that we the people dont need to exercise our right to vote on this issue, or to even suggest the possibility by signing a rightfully circulated petition. Who are these poor, encumbered families who are so harmed by the wetlands buffer ordinance that they require the full weight of four elected officials to forward their cause? How is the law keeping them from exercising their civil rights? How, exactly, does a development buffer harm anyone? Apparently, this disenfranchised segment of our coastal communities, the stewards of our shores and our delicate ecosystem, must be suffering greatly through their inability to encroach on our wetlands but how? Let them come forward and tell us about their speci c development needs. I want to hear about the projects that they cant complete because of the buffer ordinance and the hardship imposed upon them by the law. In other words, I want to know the facts. Ive lived and loved in this county for 22 years but Im originally from South Florida, so Ive seen the sad results of poorly regulated development. It starts with a favor that becomes a precedent, then its just the way things are done. Before long the taxpayers are paying through the nose to clean up somebody elses mess. You want scary? Well, there it is. So, if were gonna forfeit the protective and enriching qualities of our wetlands to serve the personal needs of a small segment of our community, Id rather hear the details from a needy, entitled neighbor than from a bureaucrat with a hidden agenda. Let them come out from the shadows cast by the development-minded lawmakers who are championing their cause and factually reassure us that pursuit of their personal property rights wont interfere with the rights that are guaranteed to us all. Then, lets vote on it. John Palumbo Crawfordville In the front page story Wetlands petition draft turned in that appeared in last weeks edition of The Wakulla News, it was reported that 8,501 voters were recorded at the polls. However, it should say that there were 18, 501 active voters in the previous election. We regret the error.CorrectionEditor, The News: The American promise is the right to vote. It is important that Wakulla County citizens have the right to vote on the way they want to see their community grow. There is good growth, and there is very bad growth. Previous county commissioners put into place a wetlands ordinance that protected our ground water from pollution, that minimized ooding, that was meant to protect our drinking water, that helped prevent shoreline erosion and that attempted to protect our sheries. Now, county commissioners want to change our wetlands ordinance so that new buildings can be built right up to the water without buffers, and build in sensitive places that they could not have built in before. Ask yourself why do these commissioners want to do this? This does impact you, no matter where you live in this county. A petition drive has started to allow you, the voter, the right to vote on how you want to see Wakulla grow. Think on it. Read about how important wetlands are, and learn what happens to communities that do not take care of their water resources. Look at Tampa and South Florida, they are already running out of water. There is a meeting open to those who want to help protect Wakulla County, this Thursday, Sept 12, at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla Public Library. I encourage you to attend, if you want to preserve Wakulla County for future generations. Remember, the worst thing that we can do is to do nothing at all. Sue Damon Shell Point Editor, The News: I know that Wakulla County is involved in a debate about our wetlands. Wetlands are an important issue but I have problems with having the new regulations voted in by the wetlands referendum. There could be problems that many of us would not like. First of all from what I understand if a change to the referendum needs to be accomplished we must have 100 percent of our county commissioners to agree to the change. If 100 percent of the county commissioners do not agree with the proposed change, future changes have to be done via another referendum. If we have a major issue that becomes one of those unexpected consequences from passing regulations via a referendum, what would we do if that issue is a major problem and we cannot get 100 percent support from our county commissioners? Another concern of mine is that we would have at least two government agencies involved with one issue. I am a rm believer of less government and it seems when more than one government agency is involved with an issue there is a lot discord between the agencies that are involved. I have been advised that anyone who signs a petition has the possibility of their signature to become public knowledge through the Supervisor of Elections Of ce. Many people may not really like their name being at the publics disposal even when an issue is a major concern to them. It seems that the State of Florida has a fascination with referendums. Does anyone remember last years amendments to the ballot. Issues that are important to our state or county deserve attention but I rmly believe that we elect our politicians to make those decisions not us having referendums or amendments added to the ballot. Many of last years Amendments were the result of our politicians taking the easy way out and passing their responsibility to the people that voted them into of ce. I wholeheartedly believe if changes need to be made on the issue of wetlands, it should be done in Tallahassee, not in each and every county that wants to get involved with those issues. Sincerely, Garland W. Burdette Crawfordville Editor, The News: Its that time again. Friends Furr Life. The Leon County Humane Society, will be collecting dog and cat foods and supplies to be distributed to all of the outlying areas which includes Wakulla County Senior Citizens again this year. It is their sixth annual distribution and all in the past have been a great success. This year there is a greater need for cat food. In Crawfordville, there are three donation drop sites, Ace Hardware, The Pet Stop, and Crawfordville Animal Hospital. Ashley Feed on Highway 61 is another donation drop spot. Thank you all in advance of this great event. Kathryn Wilsonkatsanctuary2012@gmail.comMore debate on the wetlands ordinanceMeeting set on petition drive Who is harmed by wetlands bu er? e importance of wetlands Concerns about wetlands referendum Lose more than gain by signing petition Friends Furr Life drive underwayREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: One of the letters in last weeks Wakulla News caused me to stop and think. It was a letter about signing a petition that is being circulated regarding Wakulla wetlands. I know that sooner or later someone will ask me to sign the petition but I do not see how it will help our county. As I understand it, over the past few years the wetlands complaint have been, at various times, under both the county ordinance and the state statute. During this time there have been no major complaints that I can remember regarding wetlands violations. In fact, the wetlands violation most often cited is a failed housing development in Panacea that goes back a dozen years. The shing has been neither better nor worse as a result of which authority has been permitting the wetlands, the tourism seems to have been about the same (were not keeping two hotels full), our restaurants are not being lled by visitors but by locals, and those buildings that are closed across the county are closed because of the economy (except in Panacea where a lot of it goes back to another referendum, the net ban). So when I think of signing a petition for a vote 14 months from now on an ordinance that cannot be changed between now and then, I believe that would be losing more than they would be gaining by signing a petition. Mitch Hampton Crawfordville

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This weeks question: Whats your lucky number?ROBYN SCHIEVE Owner, That Hair Place3 I was born on May 13. I am the 13th grandchild. The rst time I went to Vegas, I won on Black 13 at the roulette table. MICHELE KEY Keith Key Heating & AirMy lucky number was 3, since that was the number of individuals in my family. But now that son is getting married... my lucky number is 4. ROBBIE GEMMILL RetiredIts 9. Its my husbands birthday. JEFF JONES AssemblerI really want to comment on the wetlands ordinance, but OK. I have two older brothers and two younger brothers so my lucky number is 3. JOHN WATSON Elevator manI havent found it yet! Compiled by Lynda KinseyBy JO ANN PALMERof KWCB At 9 a.m. on Saturday, Sept. 21, hundreds of volunteers from Wakulla, Leon, Jefferson and Franklin counties will converge on the beaches, marshes, roads and rivers of Wakulla County to clean up trash and debris. These volunteers will be participating in the 28th International Coastal Cleanup hosted locally by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful (KWCB). Volunteers are here for this annual event because of their common interest in the environment and a desire to help our community. They will be counted as part of the 500,000 other volunteers worldwide who will collectively gather and properly dispose of more than 10 million pounds of trash, making a global difference in one day. KWCB works all year long to remove trash and debris from our roadways and waterways. We identify the sources of the debris while educating our citizens to change the behaviors that allow it to end up on our roadways and reach the ocean in the rst place. Unfortunately, trash still arrives. Volunteers spend a morning picking up everything from cigarette butts and food wrappers to lost shing nets and major appliances. Trash travels to the ocean by way of storm drains and waterways and endangers wildlife, beachgoers and our delicate environment. The ve major sites for the 2013 cleanup will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands, St. Marks River Park and Bottoms Road in Panacea. Volunteers can either proceed directly to the site of their choice or come directly to Woolley Park in Panacea. At any of the sites, you will sign in and be directed to an area to clean. You can sign up in Panacea and find out more information on all the sites. You do not have to be familiar with the sites to participate. Volunteers can find out more information and sign up early by sending an email to helpkwcb@gmail.com. The rst 500 participants will also receive a complimentary T-shirt. Even though this is hard, hot work, we know it is so important and we appreciate everyone coming out to support this great effort. We challenge you to get your group together, get registered and come prepared on Sept. 21. You should wear comfortable shoes such as tennis shoes, a hat, gloves, sunscreen and insect repellent. Bags will be provided. Registration is available for a group or individual by sending an email to: helpkwcb@ gmail.com. If you have any questions, call the of ce of KWCB at (850) 745-7111. This years Coastal Cleanup will be Sept. 21 000FQJ9 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the LOCAL SAVINGS.850-385-60471700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO When Gambling is No Longer a Game 888-ADMIT-IT(888-236-4848)24-HOUR | CONFIDENTIAL HELPLINE MULTILINGUAL | SE HABLA ESPAOLwww.gamblinghelp.org

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 11:30 and 3:00 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 OUT TO PASTOR Charlotte Faith to hold Holy Ghost revival Charlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple will be holding a Miracle Holy Ghost Revival on Sept. 19, 20, and 21 at 7:30 p.m. nightly. Guest speaker will be Prophet Michael Turner from Connecticut. Charlotte Faith is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road. Pastor is Bishop Alice Williams. Many Hats Festival to be held at Harvest FellowshipHarvest Fellowship Church will be at Many Hats Festival on Oct. 12 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. featuring arts & crafts, live bands, food and face painting. The event will also feature a hat contest for the prettiest, sportiest, biggest, smallest, yesteryear, most unusual, weirdest, patriotic, sci, and best overall. There will be prizes for each category. Please wear your favorite hat even if you are not entering the hat contest. Interested vendors should call (850) 926-4798 or email revfredl@yahoo. com. St. Elizabeth announces Holiday Craft SaleSt. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church will hold a Holiday Craft Sale on Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please create your inventory and call Nickey Lepp no later than Oct. 16 at 926-9750 for more information.Church Briefs Fifty shades of grey suitsBy JAMES L. SNYDERI guess I am one of those old-fashioned guys still wearing a suit. I have been wearing a suit and tie for as long as I can remember, which really isnt saying a great deal. Not much I can remember these days, which is one of the advantages of growing older. When the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage grills me about some incident that did or did not happen, I can always rely on the good old faithful, I just cant remember! Well, she stammers as she stares at me, but dont let it happen again. My problem is I cannot remember what I am supposed to remember so how can I remember not to let it happen again? (Sigh.) So, my memory is not quite up to par in many areas. One area has to do with my suits. There is only one thing I do not like about my suits. I have several suits that I wear on a rotating basis. Naturally, they all look alike so nobody knows I am rotating my suits. The secret to rotating suits is to have an assortment of ties, but make sure those ties do not look alike. I have enough ties that I do not have to wear one for up to three months. I have a bright pink tie I wear twice a year and every time I wear it, several people ask me if I got a new necktie. I always smile and nod in the af rmative. Why spoil a good moment? The negative side of wearing suits is occasionally you have to replace them. There are all sorts of reasons why a suit needs to be replaced. One is that you grow out of it or it grows out of you. Either way the suit has to be replaced. Another reason is that something happened to the suit and there is some tear necessitating the whole suit being replaced. The key here is not to let my wife know that there is a small tear in my suit. The moment she discovers the slightest tear in one of my suits she begins her plan of having that suit replaced. For me, a tear is simply a tear. If it is in the rear of my suit jacket, I do not see it so it is no concern to me. If other people are inconvenienced by a small tear in the back of my suit coat, let them replace the suit. I can deal with all kinds of tear oddities about my suit. Not so in the case of my wife. Even a slightly worn spot on my suit coat, begins her thinking of replacing it. Believe me; I try to hide it as much as possible to keep it from the ever-piercing eyes of my wife who sees through everything, even things that are not there. Just recently, despite my attempts to conceal the issue, my wife spotted a small tear on my suit coat. It happened to be my favorite suit coat. I can recall exactly when and how the split occurred. I kept that information away from my wife as long as I possibly could now I had to pay the piper. Early Monday morning we were off to the mens store to purchase another suit. The whole way there, I was thinking of all the other things I could be doing at this time. Being the gracious and humble husband I am, I yielded to the prompting of my wife and we were off to the mens store. As soon as we walked in, we were greeted by a young man to whom my wife said, Were here to buy a suit. I gured I better step in before the conversation got out of control. Were looking for a grey suit. I understand, said the young man as he thoughtfully pulled at his chin looking down the long row of suits. And what color grey are you looking for? Say what, I said. What color grey are you looking for? He repeated. As far as I was concerned, grey was grey and that was the color I was looking for. Nonetheless, I was in for a surprise. We have a variety of grey suits. There is a charcoal grey. Light grey. Dark grey. He went on and on about the variety of grey colors in his shop. If I heard correctly, according to him, there were at least 50 shades of grey. Believe me, there was not anything romantic about that! All I wanted was a grey suit. To me, grey is grey is grey. I do not want my suit to be a fashion statement. In fact, I want my suit to be silent and say nothing at all. We walked out of the mens store with a new suit and my wife had a wonderful smile on her face. I on the other hand, had a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach realizing just how much this grey suit cost me. I have a new appreciation for what the apostle Paul said. That he would grant you, according to the riches of his glory, to be strengthened with might by his Spirit in the inner man (Ephesians 3:16 KJV). It is not the outside that really matters, but the inside of a man. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. By ETHEL SKIPPERWhile following God, all of us face tests of faith. Although these trials may vary in form, one thing is certain God is faithful. Time and again. In the Word of God, we learn of Gods faithfulness so many times. Abrahams test of faith is no exception. When Abraham was 100 years old, Sarah gave birth to Isaac, who ful lled Gods promise that he would have an heir. Sometime later when the boy had gotten older, God tested Abrahams faith by commanding him to sacrifice Isaac his son. Only moments before Abraham was about to kill Isaac, an angel called to Abraham and announced he had passed Gods test he had demonstrated his fear of the Lord and willingness to do anything the Lord required. Abraham is released from the commandment to kill Isaac, and God provides a substitute for the sacrifice a ram caught in the thicket by its horns, which Abraham offered to the Lord. Afterwards, an angel delivers another message in which God vows to bless Abraham and multiply his descendents, who will in return bless the world. Thanks to everyone for your concern and prayers while I was in the hospital. I am blessed. It was a test of my faith in God knowing He would do what He promised. As He continues to heal my body, pray with us. Happy birthday to Mrs. Mary J. Kelly, Eddie Branner, Solomon Allen, Mother Mary Bell, Crystal Green, and Helly Richardson. Our prayer this week goes out to all the sick and shut-ins, those in hospitals, nursing homes, prison, the homeless, all in need of prayer everywhere. Let us bless those we come in contact with and love one another.We all face tests of faith BUCKHORN NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 7A Buck Gerrell, 86, died Friday, Sept. 6, 2013 in Crawfordville. He served in the U.S. Army and was a Korean Veteran. Graveside services were held on Tuesday, Sept. 10, 2013 at 10 a.m. at Beth Page Cemetery. Family received friends on Monday, Sept. 9, 2013 from 6 to 8 p.m. at Beggs Funeral Home, Apalachee Parkway Chapel, 3322 Apalachee Parkway, in Tallahassee. Survivors include his children, Evelyn Hires, Benny Gerrell, Priscilla (Arnold) Green; his stepchildren, Harold Schiffer, JoAnne Beltramo, and Ilene Schiffer; brother, Fred Jerrell; ve grandchildren; and ve greatgrandchildren. He was predeceased by the love of his life, Alfina Quattrocchi; his parents, Ben and Minnie Gerrell; and his sister Onzell Warren.Obituaries Marilyn Sandy Campbell Buck GerrellMarilyn Sandy Campbell, 74, died on Aug. 14 of natural causes at her home in Crawfordville. She was born in Philadelphia on June 9, 1939 but found her way to Miami and eventually to the North Florida area. She was a loving, resourceful, funny, adventuresome spirit. She will be sorely missed. Marilyn Sandy Campbell Buck Gerrell By DR. BETSY GOEHRIGWhile I was in Tallahassee Memorial Hospital recently for surgery, one of my nurses who knew I was a pastor said, God bless you to me as she nished her shift and prepared to leave. I asked her how its said in her native language, knowing she was from Tanzania, in East Africa. She shared that in Swahili, it was Mungu akubariki May God bless you. She wrote it for me on the message board in my room, and with curious interest, each of my nurses and other medical staff learned it while I was there recuperating. I began to think about this phrase which is spoken, in some form or another, around the world. When I was in regional ministry, I traveled throughout Florida to over 100 Disciples congregations, composed of various cultures and races, with various languages. In Spanish, its Dios te bendiga. Another common Hispanic phrase is, Vaya con Dios meaning Go with God. In French, God bless you is Dieu vous benit. In Haitian-creole, its Bondye beni ou. The one thing that each person of another language spoke to me in English as they greeted me while visiting their congregation, even if they knew no other English, was God bless you accompanied by a hearty hug or handshake. When traveling in other parts of the world, on the other side of the globe, I have also witnessed this common desire to bless one another with Gods love. I realize that being in ministry, people will speak of things that relate to who I am and what I do. But I also believe that many people around the world still yearn for a relationship, a blessing, a presence of the Almighty and desire that for others. People desire Gods blessing, which is not some magical cure-all or favoritism, but some divine touching of their lives. For those of us who went to Sunday School as young children, one of the first things we learned is God is love. Its still one of the truest and most important lessons we can still learn as adults, particularly in how we relate with others. Some may feel we have overused the phrase, God bless you, and dont want to hear it as we go about our daily business. Reaching out with Gods love and blessing is not about imposing our faith upon another. Its simply about living in relationship with others in loving ways because we are people of faith. Do our lives reflect this in the way we deal with others? Do others sense a blessing from God because they have been in our presence? May God bless you. Mungu akubariki.The Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church.Special to The NewsCovenant Hospice is sponsoring a one-day grief support camp called Camp Monarch from 9:30 am to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Oct 5. This is a unique camp for children and adolescents ages 5-15 who have experienced the loss of a loved one. The camp will be held at Tallahassee Junior Museum and is free to all participants. The camp includes lunch and snacks for participants. The deadline for registration is Sept. 26. To register, call Bobbie Massey, LCSW or Erik Persson, LCSW at (850) 575-4988 or email bobbie.massey@covenanthospice.org.Camp Monarch grief camp for children God bless you is heard around the world HEAVENS TO BETSY BEREAVEMENTBy TRACY RENEE LEEMany people say that marriage is the hardest part of life. It is not. Surviving the death of your beloved requires more work, deeper suffering, and greater endurance than marital bliss ever asked from anyone. Surviving your beloved is excruciating and arduous. Experts in the study of grief have expressed theory upon theory to aid survivors through this journey. The fact remains however, that theory is not fact. In searching for a yellow brick road to recovery, you must realize, as did Dorothy and her cohorts, that you already possess the strength and ability to survive. Identify your strengths and cultivate them. Utilize your abilities and realize that you are the only one capable of surmounting your grief. From this point forward, it is your job to continue onward without the companionship of your beloved. You must rede ne your role in a myriad of lifes situations as your own provider, your own protector, and your own strategist. If your loss is recent, it will take some time before you are able to embark on your proactive road to recovery. Centuries ago, society required survivors to wear black for one year after the death of their loved ones. From this tradition, we wonder, does it take only one year to recover from the loss of a lifetime of love? Grief is the price we pay for the gift of love. I wish I could tell you that one year of grief is all that you will suffer. I cannot. If you loved your spouse with the depth of your soul, grief may forever be your unwelcome companion. Tracy Renee Lee is a funeral director, author and freelance writer. Please follow my blog at http://pushinup-daisies.blogspot. com/ and Twitter account @PushnUpDaisies, visit my website www.QueenCityFuneralHome.com or read my book Pushin Up Daisies for additional encouragement and information.Losing your beloved Providers from the TMH Family Medicine Residency program see patients in your health department on a regular basis. Our experienced physicians and nurse-midwives provide personalized healthcare to women before, during and after pregnancy. We proudly deliver babies at the TMH Womens Pavilion, the only hospital in the region with a Newborn ICU. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment, call us at (850) 926-0400. COMPLETEPrenatal Care IN WAKULLA C OUNTY Having a bay? Want pregnancy care close to home?Florida Department of Health Wakulla County 48 Oak Street Crawfordville, FL 32327 Car loans that can save hundreds are catching on. The word is out! State Farm Bank has great rates to save you money, without all kinds of hidden fees to take your money. Thats borrowing better. GET TO A BETTER STATE. CALL ME TODAY FOR MORE INFORMATION. *Potential savings may vary based upon individual circumstances. Consult your agent for more details. 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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Tanner Barrett turns 1Tanner Lee Barrett celebrates his rst birthday on Sept. 13. He is the Derrick and Allison Barrett of Crawfordville. Tanner has a big sister, Taylor, a 5th grader at Crawfordville Elementary. His grandparents are Ralph and Debby Brooks of Crawfordville, Donnie and Iris Barrett of Chaires and George Fasthoff and Lisa Vince of Tallahassee.Local woman named top volunteer of international organizationMary Applegate of Crawfordville was named the 2013 top volunteer of UCT (United Commercial Travelers), an international nancial services membership organization focused on volunteer service, at the organization's recent annual convention. Applegate has been an active and dedicated member of Fort Myers, Florida Council 900 since 1997. According to her fellow members, she is an energetic UCT advocate who puts in countless hours each year giving back to the community everything from supporting Special Olympics, the Boy Scouts and 4-H to donating blood to blood banks, getting involved with recycling programs and clean-up projects, and supporting local food banks and art programs. "I volunteer because its what I love to do and I was raised to give service to those in need," Applegate explained. "The rewards for volunteering my time and energy are the thanks and appreciation I receive from those I help. Being involved with UCT has provided me with a number of ways to get involved in helping others. There have been times when I've truly felt that I helped change someones life and thats a wonderful feeling." Giving back to the community has always been a family affair for Applegate. Both her mother, Ann Glabere, and father, Carl Peltzer, are UCT members and active volunteers. Glabere, in fact, received UCT's top volunteer award in 2001. "What Mary does is truly remarkable," Glabere said. "She is an individual who is always giving of herself, and she's a great asset to our organization and the people she serves. She cares about making life better for others and people respond positively to that." Within UCT, Applegate has served through both the local and regional lines of office and has served on numerous committees. A devoted wife and mother, she is also a social worker with Habilitation Management Services in Tallahassee. About UCT UCT is a non-profit nancial services membership organization with nearly 70,000 members in the U.S. and Canada. Members work to enhance their communities through community service, charitable fundraising and helping those in need. Members decide on a local basis which causes and charities to support and how to best meet the needs of their communities. Visit www.uct.org to learn more.By Sherri Kraeft Wakulla County 4-H AgentEach September, 4-H Clubs all around the country and the world begin meeting after a summer of camps, shows and activities; Wakulla County 4-H is no different. We are proud to have made it through an exciting summer season taking 67 youth to Camp Cherry Lake, having 26 youth attend our day camp programs and recruiting nine new shooting sports volunteers for our Shooting Sports Club. As a youth development organization that depends on community support in many ways, we would like to take this opportunity to thank our 138 valued volunteers who act as community club leaders, fundraisers, Wakulla County 4-H Association members, supporters, and judges. We would also like to thank our generous monetary supporters including Capital City Bank, S.W.A.T, Publix, Hardees, Drs. Carey and Jones, Capital City Youth Services and Free Wheelin Band. While youth who are involved in the Wakulla County 4-H Program are supported by the community, volunteers are at the heart of the program. Research indicates that when youth participate in opportunities for decision making and are supported by caring adults, social and academic development of youth is evident within their own families. Within the Wakulla County 4-H program, this partnership between youth and caring adults is fostered through the community club environment. Community clubs gather and meet usually once per month, share in an educational activity related to a project area, socialize with their peers and plan their next activities, fundraisers or community contributions. If youth or adults are interested in nding out more about the Wakulla County 4-H program, please feel free to contact the Wakulla County Extension Of ce at 926-3931. For a full list of community clubs and volunteer opportunities, please go to our website at Wakulla. ifas.u .edu or Like us on Facebook at Wakulla County 4-H. Sherri Kraeft, the 4-H Extension Agent can be reached in the of ce at 926-3931 or at sjkraeft@ u .edu and is happy to answer questions about the program or other volunteer opportunities.Wakulla County 4-H Kicks Off New 4-H Year Special to The NewsOn May 3, a graduation ceremony was held in honor of Savary Academys 2013 Senior/Graduate, Jeffery Deal. Since enrolling at Savary Academy as a struggling freshman, Jeff began to excel academically and completed his high school credits within three and a half years. During his senior year, Jeff was dual-enrolled at Tallahassee Community College and received a Bright Futures Gold Seal Scholarship. He was accepted into the paramedic program at Tallahassee Community College and began classes on Aug. 26. Jeff is a wonderful example of how a student who is struggling, socially or academically, can turn things around and gain a positive direction in their lives. Savary Academy is very proud of Jeff and wishes him all the continued success that life has to offer! Savary Academy is a locally owned/operated private school in Crawfordville offering students an individualized curriculum to earn a standard high school diploma. Students are also encouraged to dualenroll in a college or trade program during their nal year so that they will be able to transition easily after graduation. Savary Academy participates in the McKay, Step Up For Students and Bright Futures Scholarship programs. For more information on Savary Academy, call 926-9977 or visit the website at www. savaryacademy.com. Deal graduates Savary Academy Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Independent Doctor of Optometry edgardneroptical@yahoo.com E d Ga r Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardners Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools School Special to The NewsWith the job market currently demanding highly educated workers that can reason, think outside the box and problem solve, continuing your education after high school is more important than ever. According to the US Bureau of Labor, the level of education and the average weekly earnings, in 2011, were as follows: Some High School, No Diploma $451; High School Graduate $638; Some College, No Degree $ 719; Associate Degree $768; Bachelors Degree $1,053; Masters Degree $1,263; Professional Degree $1,665; Doctoral Degree $1,551. College/vocational school experience also includes other benefits besides potentially higher earnings, such as meeting new people, making new friends, taking part in new opportunities to explore your interests, and experiencing success at a higher educational level. Taking the American College Test (ACT) or the Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) is the first step in enrolling for the college of your dreams. Each college has its own test score requirements on the ACT and/or the SAT, so be sure you know what score you are expected to meet or exceed before you take the test. The tests are offered several times per school year in various locations. ACT testing will be offered at WHS on Oct. 26 and Feb. 8. The SAT will also be offered on the WHS campus on Oct. 5 and March 8. You must preregister to be eligible to take either/both tests. WHS looks forward to our students achieving above the state levels, as the 2013 graduates did on the ACT. ACT and SAT information can be found online at www.actstudent.org or sat.collegeboard.org or by calling the WHS Guidance Depatment at 926-2221. Honor Court On Sept. 9, WHS changed the honor court system. The new honor court will be made up of the top 20 seniors with the highest grade point average, including the valedictorian and the salutatorian. Past honor courts were made up of the top 12 scoring students and also included the valedictorian and the salutatorian. Special to The NewsSuperintendent Bobby Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dedication and loyalty each of these individuals give to the children of Wakulla County and the creative enthusiasm hey display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Tina Martindale, September Teacher of the Month, has been teaching first grade students at Shadeville Elementary School since August 2000. Prior to teaching at Shadeville, Martindale taught second and third grade in Leon County. Originally from Cedar Rapids, Iowa, she jumped at the opportunity to attend college in Pensacola, Florida at the University of West Florida where she met her husband and soon thereafter moved to Tallahassee. Martindale was elated when selected to teach at Shadeville. She adds, How many people can say they love to go to work each day? I enjoy teaching my brighteyed rst graders each day as well as working side-byside with the Shadeville Team. Not only is Martindale certified in elementary education but she is also a recipient of the Early Childhood National Board Certi cation and has completed the State reading endorsement. She contributes to the school team as a member of SAC, PTO, Technology Committee, team leader and FAIR trainer. She shares, Always put forth your best effort in everything you do. Shadeville Principal Susan Brazier describes Martindale as a highly effectiveness professional educator. Brazier adds, She is a master facilitator of classroom management and sets the highest standards for her students while providing creative opportunities. Wakulla High School has selected Missy Rudd, English teacher, as their September Teacher of the Month. Rudd has dedicated seven years of service to the students at Wakulla High School. Prior to teaching she worked 20 years with state government and the private section as a trainer. She shares, I am so thankful Mr. Crouch decided to hire me. I love being back in the County, working in the best school system in Florida, and teaching Wakullas next generation of leaders. Mrs. Rudd attended and/or graduated from Sopchoppy Elementary, Wakulla High School, Tallahassee Community College and Florida State University. Following students as they progress in the world after their graduation brings her great delight. She adds, I love helping student learn to advocate both for themselves and the community. Each student brings a unique perspective to a classroom. Bringing that individualism to light provides great learning opportunities. Rudd stays involved. She has either served or is currently serving on committees such as the accreditation committee, school advisory council, district advisory council, and the reading leadership team. She sponsors the rotary-interact club and is the WCTA President. WH Principal Mike Crouch adds, Missy Rudd has a great deal of enthusiasm. Her students know she cares about them. She goes above and beyond normal expectations attending many of the extra curriculum activities throughout the year. She is a leader among many of our younger teachers who go to her for advice. Even though she has re ned her teaching skills, she is always seeking ways to improve. It is a point of pride for me that I hired Mrs. Rudd. She is a successful teacher. Wakulla School District Food Service Department has selected Kathleen Newton as the September Employee of the Month. Newton was promoted to cafeteria manager in 2010, following two years as the food service resource manager and ve years as a food service worker. Ms. Newton graduated from the Wakulla Education Center with her GED and ten years attended Tallahassee Community College where she received her AA degree. Not only does Newton enjoy the kids she also enjoys the ladies in the kitchen. She adds, We have fun while we work and it makes the day go by quickly. One of my favorite activities is the Welcome Back Breakfast and Lunch we prepare for all district employees in August of each year. It makes me proud to work side by side with such wonderful people. Ms. Newton has been a member serviced as a chairperson with the Wakulla School Food Service Association for the past seven years. Food Service Director Gail Mathers adds, Mrs. Newton is an optimistic positive individual who views challenges as opportunities. She does an outstanding job managing 14 employees and feeding a student body of 1,200 every day. Because she is willing to learn and go above and beyond the call of duty, her kitchen delivers the very best. Her dedication, loyalty and commitment to both the students and school system is very much appreciated. Tina Martindale Kathleen Newton Missy Rudd September Teachers, Employee of the Month recognized ACT and SAT Information you should know Friday f September 27 7:00pm 9:30pm 4679 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FLwww.EdenSpringsRehab.comEden Springs Nursing and Rehab( 850 ) 926-7181u Private Rehab Suites tu Physical Therapy t u Stroke Specialist tCome by for a tour and see our facility and services! REHABRECOVERENJOY LIFE! Everyone is invited to attend theFourth Annual Senior PromMardi Gras 2013! A Well-Kept Secret Where Youll Experience The Personal Touch. SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringJodi OsborneHer name was drawn fromThank you so much for Offering this program. We have lived here a short time and now we will get to take a taste of the town. OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Congratulationsank You So Much! Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Coastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken nt Eat DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC August 2013 Winner C C MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW!

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Green Scene Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com60 students attend this years SEEK Conference By LYNN ARTZSpecial to The NewsTeenagers from across Florida journeyed to Wakulla County in July to attend the 2013 SEEK environmental conference. Nearly 60 high school students (sponsored by dozens of garden clubs) attended one of two four-day conference sessions based at Wakulla Springs Lodge. SEEK (Save the Earths Environment through Knowledge) is an annual statewide conference sponsored by the Florida Federation of Garden Clubs. Both conference sessions included the activities that have made this an outstanding, life-changing experience for students in previous years. Despite almost daily rains in July, no SEEK activities had to be canceled. Conference participants explored the salt marshes of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and visited the Apalachicola National Forest to learn about the longleaf pine ecosystem that once dominated the southeast. They stood inches away from a red-cockaded woodpecker that was captured for banding, and then released and marveled over vast meadows of pitcher plants. As part of learning about Karst hydrogeology and springs protection, participants in both groups hiked to see the sinkholes and swallets (disappearing streams) at Leon Sinks, swam in the cool waters of Wakulla Spring (a rst magnitude spring), enjoyed a boat ride over the spring vent and the headwaters of the Wakulla River, and canoed on the river as it owed to the Gulf. The canoe adventures included close encounters with manatees and many wildlife sightings. The touch tanks and fascinating critters at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab delighted the students as always. A presentation on Florida black bears included entertaining videos of bear behavior. A presentation on Floridas owls included live examples of each species. Conference participants calculated their carbon footprints, visited FSUs LEED Platinum off-grid, zero emissions building (OGZEB), and toured Marpan Recycling, the only Class 3 recycling facility in the state. Marpan successfully recycles 68 percent of the construction and demolition debris, used mattresses and furniture, and such that it receives. As a service project for the Park, SEEK participants collected litter and recyclables near the upper bridge. They also kicked back and enjoyed the ambiance at local restaurants. This is the sixth year that SEEK has been held in Wakulla County and the seventh year that Lynn Artz has coordinated the conference. For more information, please contact Lynn Artz (850) 320-2158, lynn_artz@ hotmail.com, or visit SEEKs webpage at ww.ffgc.org. Students on a eld trip to the St. Marks Wildlife Refuge.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSEEK CONFERENCE: Clockwise from above, a group of the students who participated; star- sh at the Gulf Specimen touch tanks; on a tour boat at Wakulla Springs; a service project cleaning up a roadway; visiting a swallet at Leon Sinks.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 11AAfter a very successful, enthusiastic meeting of county volunteers, the Green Living Expo 2014 will be a reality. During this meeting we brainstormed on educational workshop topics, a location, additional activities to be held in conjunction to the event and vendor selection. Committees were formed to address the organizational details. Two important decisions were made: the event will be held on April 26, and it will be held at TCC Wakulla in Crawfordville. With its location near Hudson Park and other meeting facilities, the group felt it would be perfect. We determined that we would proceed with three tracks of educational workshops: Coastal Sustainability, Food Security and Nutrition, and Water Conservation. Through the Education Workshop Committee, these categories will be developed to meet the needs and interest levels of a variety of persons who wish to know more about the environment and how to live more sustainably. The committee will be locating innovative and knowledgeable practitioners and educators to assist with the presentations and vendors to display their product lines. The Green Living Expo speaks to the very nature of the county we live in sustainable living practices that will allow the beautiful Wakulla County environment to remain for generations to come. It takes a great deal of work to hold an event like this. Please consider being a part of the planning team or by serving on a committee. Because there are so many aspects of the planning, volunteers can determine how much they want to invest. You can be as involved as you chose to be. Many of the things could be completed without ever having to attend a meeting! The next Green Living Expo planning meeting is scheduled for Sept. 23 at 6:30 p.m. at TCC Wakulla I hope to see you there. SEWING SKILL UP-DATE Come join a group of people with varying degrees of expertise who want to learn/refresh their sewing skills. The group will again gather on Sept. 26 at the Extension Of ce at 6:30 p.m. and plan to learn/review basic sewing skills by making a table runner. Go to your fabric storeroom (yes, I know many of you have them!) and select two coordinating fabrics. Men and women of all ages attended our last workshop and many agreed that they wanted to learn more. Class size is limited so call 926-3931 today to get all the details and/or to enroll. COOKING WITH DIABETES WORKSHOP Our Cooking Schools have certainly been a success. It is such fun to cook, learn and dine together. If you have diabetes, eating right and managing your calories and carbohydrate intake can be challenging. Learn practical ways to plan and prepare nutritiously balanced meals at home without adding extra sugar, sodium or fat. Anyone who is overweight, has pre-diabetes, type-2 diabetes or just wants to cook healthier is encouraged to attend. This workshop will be taught by Amy Mullins, Leon County Extension, who is a registered dietician and Kristin Jackson, Jefferson County Extension. Join the cooking school participants to learn more about eating healthy and taste test recipes in this hands-on workshop. It will be held on Oct. 14 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the extension of ce. To cover the materials, including food, a $15 payment is requested while no one will be turned away if unable to nancially assist. Preregistration is necessary. Call 926-3931 to enroll. Shelley Swenson is UF/ IFAS FCS Agent III. She can be reached at 926-3931.GREEN SCENE By LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSONThe heat and humidity have taken its toll on most garden plants in Wakulla County. Whatever was left was attached by a bumper crop of caterpillars and grasshoppers. There is one heat hardy, insect resistant vegetable plant which is continuing to bloom and produce. Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) plants are still delivering the tasty pods which are the basis for numerous Southern side orders and gumbos. The origins of this widely popular vegetable are claimed by several cultures in south Asia and western Africa. The term okra is a modi cation of a tribal Nigerian identi cation for this vegetable. The rst written records of okra occurred in Egypt about 1,000 years ago. It proved to be a consistently long season crop with tolerance for a variety of soils and satisfactory yields. The vegetables popularity assured it travelled both east and west along trade routes to reach new cultures and a variety of applications. By the mid-600s okra had reached the Western Hemisphere being brought to Brazil by the way of Portuguese sailors. Within 60 years okra was being grown in the American colonies. Even Thomas Jefferson made note of its successful production in Virginia. Today okra is an important vegetable crop in Miami-Dade County which annually grows 1,000 to 1,500 acres and sold nationwide for the fresh market. Yields of this handpicked crop range to more than 1,000 bushels per acre and it is the only crop which is harvested there 12 months a year. While usually grown as an annual in Wakulla County, some warmer regions grow okra as a perennial. It is in the same plant family (Malvaceae) with cotton and hibiscus which are also grown both as annuals or perennials, depending on the latitude of the planting. Locally grown okra will remain productive through the autumn. It will sustain frost injury when temperatures drop below freezing. From a nutritional and health standpoint, okra is low in calories, fat and cholesterol free. It is an excellent source of vitamins A and C and ber. Okra is slippery when boiled, but is especially popular with served with tomatoes. It is also fried with corn meal or pickled for use as a garnish or in salads. When shopping for fresh okra or deciding when to pick from the garden, select pods which are two to three inches long, rm to the touch, are bright green and unblemished. Fresh okra will store well in the refrigerator for two to three days, retaining its peak quality. The okra variety in the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension demonstration garden is Clemson Spineless. It is a commonly produced open pollinator variety and quite popular in the Southeast. To learn more about growing okra in Wakulla County, contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u edu/. Visits to the demonstration garden are welcome from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays.Planning underway for Green Living Expo in AprilDid you spend all summer taking your kids from one activity to another, or just trying to keep them busy and occupied? Did you nd yourself sitting and watching them play because you didnt have the energy to join them? Well, now that school is back in session its YOU time! What better way to start the new season than by starting to build some healthy habits for yourself? Use the new schedule to your advantage. Go to the gym try a new class or a new workout. Theres a lot of people doing the same thing, you might make a new friend or two. Working out with a friend is a great way to burn calories and catch up on each others lives at the same time. Plus, you forget how hard youre working when you have a friend working alongside you! And although it sounds like an oxymoron, working out will actually give you more energy. Even if the gym is not for you, or youre just not ready to make that commitment, make an effort to do SOMETHING. Walk, bike, dig out those old exercise videos or go buy a new one. Find new ways to incorporate healthy eating into yours, and your familys lifestyle. Experiment with new vegetables, or new ways to cook your favorites. A few healthy habits slowly added to your lifestyle are hardly noticeable as you are starting them, but can add up to a slimmer, healthier you by the time next summer rolls around. Who knows, you may spend next summer doing fun, healthy activities along with your kids!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.I know, I know, there she goes again writing about the breath. Well, this is important stuff read on, go ahead, read on! Breath is Life. It grows because thats nature! Cells exhale and inhale. They give birth to new cells according to memory, in the miracle of creation, that we so often oversee when rapt in inner dialogue. I was always striving for more, seeking to please, as we all do when we forget who we are. A few years ago, I began a daily pranayam practice. Prana is the breath, or life force. It is pure energy which gives and sustains all life in whichever state it presently resides. Exhale is letting go. Inhale is receiving. Within this binary, we have all that we need. Pranayam is the art, science and way of wakeful living. The breath is the hub of all that we are, think and do. It provides access to the mind and its deepest recesses. Pranayam, or yogic breathing practices, enable us to voyage in a steady vessel, to new territories, in order that we may continue to expand in harmony with our ever growing universe. Breathing practices are combined with asanas (postures and stances), mudras and bandhas (seals and locks), to regulate a balanced flow of prana or chi, within the mind-body. Energy cultivation is simply the art of relaxing in to our natural state of meditation. This is pure beingness, where the doer acts in accord with the divine script, for the good of all other actors in this play. Pranayam teach us that life ows into and out of us, via the breath. This leads to awareness of being, intention and positive acts. When I gaze over my shoulder, I see that all I ever needed came to me. There was no need for effort on my part. Effort always drained me, as it arose from a place of fear and clutching for personal gain. Exercise 1. Exhale Heavy Inhale Light A wonderful key to the breath is to LET GO with the exhalation. When you breathe out you are re-leasing your life. You are letting go. This takes no effort. As you breathe out, allow your body-mind to feel heavy, as though it is moving downwards, with the gravitational pull of the earth. Give yourself to your breath. Exhale Heavy with the feeling of letting go at the end of a busy day, or putting down a load of heavy shopping. How do you feel when you do this? Inhalation As you breathe in, allow your body-mind to feel light, as though it is lifting upwards away from the earth. See the effect of trying both of these extremely simple ideas. When you are heavy and grounded, you feel stable and calm. When you are light and buoyant, you feel free and uplifted. The interplay of these two opposing forces, exhale-gravity and inhalelevity, brings them together, like two atoms in nuclear fusion. Exercise 2. Now add this formula to your breath When breathing out, you are aware you are breathing out. When breathing in, you are aware you are breathing in. This awareness of the present moment gives rise to being, in which we see that all is as it is meant to be. These two exercises prove to us that our breathing has a direct relationship with our outlook and that our outlook affects our breathing. If I think I feel light as I inhale, then my thoughts are also playing a lead role in the process. Whether we are inhaling or exhaling, we are aware of how relaxed we feel. This facilitates even circulation and distribution of blood and oxygen within the joints, connective tissues, organs and glands. If we are not feeling relaxed we become aware of this. Without effort to change anything, we return awareness to the breath. As you progress and combine your intention, breath exercises and limbering practices, relaxation and vitality are sure to come.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher at Studio 88 Dance Productions. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140. By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING HEALTH & FITNESS PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Okra Okra In the garden now: In the garden now: Experience the joy of breath YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Kids are in school its YOU time! GET FITBy GENA DAVIS Beginner / Moderate every Saturday from 10 am to 11 amat Studio 88 Dance Productions 12 Towles Rd., Crawfordville, FL 850-926-6088 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to

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After a couple of weeks checking out the coast of Washington State, plus a short visit to Victoria, British Columbia, Patti and I left the Olympics and northern Washington and drove south to the Cascades and its volcanic peaks. Considered potentially the most dangerous volcano in the U.S., Mount Rainier sits southeast of Seattle. Right now, Mt. Rainier is basically inactive, but there are stirrings underground. When Mount Rainier becomes active, and it could be sooner than later a pyroclastic eruption along with the lava, mud, melted snow and ice, plus other debris forming a rapid moving lahar or mud ow could be devastating to Seattle and its environs. Mount Rainier is a relatively young volcano have formed 500,000 years ago. Nearby Cascade volcanoes Mount Hood, Mount Adams, and well known Mount St Helens, our last stop are considerably older, arising 12 million years ago. Today the area is a sleeping powder keg. We spent a good hour driving up to the sub-alpine meadows of Mount Rainier, its lodge and well-thought-out visitor center at Paradise. Three times we made this trip from our camp site at Cougar Rock. From the Visitor Center we hiked up through some of the most breath taking sub-alpine meadows to the beginning of the snow elds. Patti was enthralled with the endless expanse of blooming flowers blanketing the landscape. A kaleidoscope of colors danced in front of us. Our eyes feasted on the brilliant red and magenta of Indian Paintbrush, deep blue of lupines, calming pink of Mount ain Heather and Rosie Spirea, striking yellows of buttercups, shimmering white of Pearly Everlasting and Avalanche Lilies and more. One persons comment about the area: A trip to Paradise is going to heaven before you die. And then there is the quote from John Muir in 1889 after his visit to the area: The most luxuriant and extravagantly beautiful of all the alpine gardens I ever beheld in all my mountain-top wanderings. This quote is inscribed on the steps that lead to the Paradise trails. While walking the trails we heard many other accolades from visitors: This is the best hike in the world, and I have never seen any place as beautiful. A woman from Ohio stood in awe as she looked around her. There is nothing like this where I live, she said. I nally got some photos of a Hoary Marmot and her two young playing above their den right next to path. The marmot feasted on the lovely owers as she lumbered through the meadows. We, of course, had to keep our feet on the paths so as not to destroy the plants. Patti envied the marmots. Day after day the sun shone, the sky was a deep cobalt blue, and the temperature mild and balmy a bit unusual in Washington state. We timed our trip perfectly. We never wanted to leave. I was especially interested the rst day in the vans that pulled into the visitor center parking lot. They were filled with eight to 12 hardy looking folks, plus a leader or owner of a mountaineering business. The fellow would direct everyone for perhaps 30 minutes on how to position their backpacks so as to be fairly comfortable, and then off they would go up the trails to the distant snow peak. I got my spotting scope out a couple of hours later and could see perhaps 20 tiny human specks stomping their way up a snow slope roughly four miles away. I could also barely make out Camp Muir, their overnight base. The next day some would hike up to the summit at 14,411 feet, and then return to be picked up. Flowing down the mountains side I saw the Nisqually glacier with that chalky blue in its curvasses. One section reached a sharp drop off and so a good part of it had sheared off. Directly above this suspended remaining glacier, one day with my scope, I was stunned to see 10 mountain climbers slowly making their way above the area where the glacier had cracked and an avalanche, of course, had followed. My God, I thought, if the glacier were to disintegrate again they would all be swept off the mountainside to their deaths. I could not believe what I saw!! The strength and stamina of these younger folks, backpacking to the summit, sleeping in the snow elds, left us feeling aged. In my younger years I would have been above the timberline, very invigorated and humbled as I looked over the world below. But not now. As they say, My get up and go has done got up and went! As our climate warms the glaciers on Mount Rainier are only remnants of what they were 50 years ago. The Nisqually glacier used to ow almost to todays parking lot. Now it is a long hike to reach it. We made a brief day trip to the Portland, Ore., Zoo, which was disappointing. Being from southern California, Pattis standard is the worlds best, the San Diego Zoo and Safari Park. We ended the trip spending two days checking out the west and the east sides of Mount St. Helens. You will recall it erupted on May 18, 1980, sending columns of ash 15 miles above the summit. Looking at the miles of mountain base that had been sheared clean by the explosive event I was numbed to the core. Trees ve miles from the blowout were cremated in the 680F degree temperature. Then for miles the mountain slopes had millions of attened trees, and nally 19 miles away from the blast zone the trees stood, scorched sentinels to natures fury. The eruptive force moved over a smaller foothill down into Spirit Lake once a prized resort area and caused the lake water to splash over 800 feet up the opposite shoreline sweeping thousands and thousands of trees into the lake. Thirty-seven years later they still oat, perhaps a million, in a huge log jam over a mile across. Deposited debris raised the level of Spirit Lake 200 feet. The mud ow or lahar that moved down the mountain reached the Columbia River 50 miles away. The destruction was unprecedented. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsVisiting Washington State part 3The water is clearing and reds are biting Nature Quest BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHFall may not be in the air quite yet but you cant tell the sh that. They are starting to make some big moves. The Spanish are heading back south and following huge schools of bait. Trout are moving back onto the ats and around the oyster bars. The water temperature is hovering around 82 degrees and shouldnt get any warmer than that. The color of the water has changed and its still off-colored but doesnt look like day old coffee. Rain chances for next week seem to be slim and if we dont get any large amounts of rain should start clearing even more. Fortunately the grass seems to have moved offshore and now its possible to sh topwater plugs, which both trout and reds love this time of year. Good reports are coming from St. George around Bob Sikes Cut and the Dry Bar off of St. Vincent. Some big reds are moving into the cut and sheepshead and ounder are also biting very well. Turkey Point Shoals is starting to clear and trout, reds and Spanish are being caught. Also look for reds on the high tides around the many docks along Hwy 98 from Summer Camp to Lanark Village Store. Gold spoons, live bait or top water baits should work. Fishing around Keaton Beach is very good right now and trout are hitting the Gulp under a cork or shed with just a lead head and of course they are hitting the live pin- sh under a cork. Most sh are coming from 4 to 8 feet of water. Capt. David Fife continues to catch nice reds around the oyster bars between Shell Point and Piney Island. Live mud minnows or small mullet are working very well. He is also catching some nice trout and big ounder while shing for reds. Mark and Louise Prance shed Monday evening for a couple of hours and caught two nice ounder and a couple of trout, plus bunches of lady sh and blue sh. They used a chartreuse grub and white Gulp. Thursday I shed with Lynn Artz and her husband Jim Hilyer. They took their son Chase who had just celebrated his 14th birthday on Wednesday. Its always nice to fish with good people and this was a great morning of shing. Chase limited out on trout and reds and had one real nice flounder. The ght he liked best was a big ol stingray. Chase goes to school in Utah and loves all types of sports and was a very good fisherman. I had met Jim before but knew nothing about him. When you spend ve hours on a boat with someone you learn a little about them. On Sunday I went out for a couple of hours and found trout on the ats and some nice reds and ounder around the bars. I released a 5-pound trout, which I caught on live shrimp. There was bait everywhere and before quitting I tied on a 60-pound leader and small silver spoon and got strikes on every cast. There are a lot of small jacks, lady sh and Spanish feeding on the minnows. The minnows are small so you need to use a small lure. On Sept. 22, the Kevins Fine Outdoor Gear and Apparel Seatrout Shootout will be held. Entry fee is $50 per angler and it pays 10 places. Top cash prize goes to the person with the largest 5 sh stringer of trout. For more information you can call (850) 5280553 or go to www.seatroutshootout.com. Its like Capt. Luke Frazier said in the Wakulla Times, Youre not gonna catch em sitting on the living room couch watching television. Remember, snapper season opens on Oct. 1 and there are a lot of people preparing for that day. Know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL SPECIAL TO THE NEWSChase Hilyer with his catch. By JIM TURNERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 5 Hunters may be required to have licenses when tracking any game on public lands in Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is considering a proposal to go before state lawmakers next year that would require hunters to have licenses for each species of wildlife they intend to pursue on public lands. Fish and Wildlife Executive Director Nick Wiley said Thursday during a meeting in Pensacola that the proposal was initially considered for hunting hogs, the second most hunted species in Florida after white-tail deer, but expanded in part for general safety concerns of people using public lands. Currently, a license is not required to hunt hogs and most wildlife on public lands. A question remains how the proposal will be accepted politically, which is why Wiley said the details still need to be eshed out. It doesnt seem like youd have a problem if it was tied to safety, said Commissioner Ronald Bergeron. People can be on public land hunting without a safety course, whether for hogs or pythons. Lane Stephens, executive director of the Allied Sportsmens Associations of Florida, said the proposal may be more acceptable for lawmakers and hunters than an effort a year ago when the discussion was to change the designation of hogs, which could have made it more dif cult to hunt hogs. My organization, I think, we would fully support (the current proposal), you should have a hunting license if youre out with the public, Stephens said. The Fish and Wildlife proposal would require the hunting licenses to be acquired on a species-byspecies basis. The fiscal impact is anticipated to be small. Fish and Wildlife of cials believe most people who hunt now on public lands already have licenses to hunt other game or believe that licenses are already required. Looking ahead to the 2014 legislative session, the commission may also ask lawmakers to allow those who violate certain boating laws to take the mandatory safety course online.Licenses for hunts on public lands? Commercial Residential & Mobile HomesRepairs Sales Service All Makes and Models( 850 ) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 rr s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCatshBurgers & DogsOpen Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & Wed 570-1004 & MoreHuttons SeafoodHwy. 98 next to fruit stand www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 13A Practice makes perfect and that is what many of our members were working on this past weekend. Coming up in October, two of our coxswains and several of our crew are scheduled to become requali ed. This occurs every three years and is a way to not only keep us sharp, but also make sure that we are able to perform duties that may be necessary when out on a patrol. Bob Asztalos sent in the following recap on the training day. Like any other uniformed services, training is a major aspect of the Coast Guard Auxiliary. While we would be very happy if we never had to use lifesaving skills, part of our mission is to sharpen rescue at sea procedures and to keep practicing them to remain sharp. That is what the members of Flotilla 12 did on Saturday. Bob Asztalos was coxswain along with Mike Harrison and Dave Rabon. Tim Ashley was coxswain along with Steve Hults and Fran Keating. Two facilities and crews went out of St Marks with the goal of practicing assistance at sea skills. The two crews independently performed search patterns normally used when we receive a report that a boat has sank and/or there is a person in the water. Skillful piloting using well thought out search patterns along with alert lookouts are necessary if we are to nd a person in a big ocean. After practicing the search patterns, the crews practiced towing each vessel in both open ocean and in the close quarters of the St Marks River. While towing looks easy it must be performed with skill to avoid further damage of a boat and the safety of the people on both boats. Lastly, they practiced man overboard drills. Quick action is necessary once a person falls overboard because they can be swept under or away with swift currents. While we are happy at the end of a patrol that is uneventful, we are all content in the knowledge that if we are called upon to render assistance at sea, our skills are sharp and we are ready for the call. Thanks to Fran Keating for the pictures! As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident a little practice can go a long way! a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Whats next with the lion sh? This summer we had increased reports of lion sh invading our shing grounds! Search the Internet for Eradicate and Lion sh and you will be overwhelmed with documentary articles, YouTube, and anxious plans to reduce this explosive population. Lion sh (Pterois volitans/miles) is a beautiful, but toxic-spined aquarium sh that has escaped into our wild and with few natural predators, taken over the Caribbean, Bahamas, Atlantic Coast of the U.S. and now the Gulf of Mexico. Two years ago we rst reported nding this invasive species in 105 feet depth off Cape San Blas. They are now commonplace in deeper water off our shore, and will soon move closer to shore. Our customers are posting video of their exploits killing large numbers found on local reefs and ship wrecks. http://nas.er.usgs. gov/taxgroup/ sh/lion shdistribution.aspx In a recent article on reef health at speci c survey sites, Lad Akins at Reef.org stated, Between 2008 and 2010, the combined biomass of 42 reef species declined by 65 percent, on average, across the study reefs due to lion sh predation. Presentations last year at the FSU Marine Lab on lion- sh research in the Bahamas documented the destruction of healthy reef communities as these apex predators (in competition with grouper and snapper) moved in. So what can be done? We could create a market for the sh and thus a demand at restaurants and sh markets. There are lion sh cookbooks in print already. The sh will need to get big enough to harvest, at which time they will have done the greatest harm to the reef inhabitants. The larger sh are found in deeper water, where fewer people frequent. We could exert intense eradication pressure on selected popular dive sites in an effort to keep their numbers low. New collecting technology is coming to better protect the collecting diver, such as small tripoint spear guns, protective gloves and solid see-through holding bags. The Florida International University Scuba Club (http:// uscubacats.wordpress.com/dive-for-a-cause/ lion sh-eradication-initiative/) has organized a lion sh hunt complete with rules and prizes in South Florida. They combine the hunt with a sh fry of their catch of the day. Lion sh Eradication Certi cation from SDI is available in Panama City Beach on Oct. 20-22 for under $400. Become quali ed to safely handle these beasts as injury is both painful and can be severe. If the risk is so high, why bother? Information is slowly coming out that a focused effort can make a difference. Removing 20 lion sh on a single dive equates to saving approximately 300,000 juvenile sh over a one-year period, Dr. Dayne Buddo remarked recently, pointing out that one lion sh is capable of eating 20 juvenile sh in one feeding event, and they normally feed twice per day. In-water monitoring has shown a reduction in the numbers of lion sh at key locations around the island studied. Researchers have also seen good results from the catch data from the shermen, as they have reported a reduction in the lion sh catch, reported Dr. Dayne Buddo of the University of the West Indies Discovery Bay Marine Lab. One of our customers suggested a reward for collecting a predetermined number of lion sh, such as a tag permit for a Goliath Grouper. Let us know what you think and how can you assist.Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Crew on Dave Rabons boat. Retreiving a person in the water practice. Heading out from the river. Preparing the heaving line. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Sep 12, 13 Fri Sep 13, 13 Sat Sep 14, 13 Sun Sep 15, 13 Mon Sep 16, 13 Tue Sep 17, 13 Wed Se p 18, 13 Date 3.4 ft. 12:36 AM 3.6 ft. 1:19 AM 3.7 ft. 1:56 AM High 1.7 ft. 12:36 AM 2.0 ft. 1:42 AM 2.0 ft. 3:14 AM 1.9 ft. 4:51 AM 1.5 ft. 6:07 AM 1.1 ft. 7:06 AM 0.7 ft. 7:55 AM Low 3.8 ft. 6:34 AM 3.6 ft. 7:47 AM 3.5 ft. 9:34 AM 3.7 ft. 11:14 AM 3.9 ft. 12:27 PM 4.1 ft. 1:24 PM 4.2 ft. 2:14 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:23 PM 0.5 ft. 3:50 PM 0.4 ft. 5:10 PM 0.3 ft. 6:14 PM 0.3 ft. 7:06 PM 0.3 ft. 7:51 PM 0.5 ft. 8:29 PM Low 2.9 ft. 8:58 PM 2.9 ft. 10:30 PM 3.1 ft. 11:43 PM High Thu Sep 12, 13 Fri Sep 13, 13 Sat Sep 14, 13 Sun Sep 15, 13 Mon Sep 16, 13 Tue Sep 17, 13 Wed Se p 18, 13 Date 2.5 ft. 12:28 AM 2.7 ft. 1:11 AM 2.8 ft. 1:48 AM High 1.3 ft. 12:47 AM 1.4 ft. 1:53 AM 1.5 ft. 3:25 AM 1.4 ft. 5:02 AM 1.1 ft. 6:18 AM 0.8 ft. 7:17 AM 0.5 ft. 8:06 AM Low 2.8 ft. 6:26 AM 2.7 ft. 7:39 AM 2.6 ft. 9:26 AM 2.7 ft. 11:06 AM 2.9 ft. 12:19 PM 3.1 ft. 1:16 PM 3.1 ft. 2:06 PM High 0.4 ft. 2:34 PM 0.4 ft. 4:01 PM 0.3 ft. 5:21 PM 0.2 ft. 6:25 PM 0.2 ft. 7:17 PM 0.3 ft. 8:02 PM 0.4 ft. 8:40 PM Low 2.2 ft. 8:50 PM 2.2 ft. 10:22 PM 2.3 ft. 11:35 PM High Thu Sep 12, 13 Fri Sep 13, 13 Sat Sep 14, 13 Sun Sep 15, 13 Mon Sep 16, 13 Tue Sep 17, 13 Wed Se p 18, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 12:19 AM 3.1 ft. 1:12 AM 3.3 ft. 1:55 AM 3.5 ft. 2:32 AM High 1.6 ft. 1:40 AM 1.8 ft. 2:46 AM 1.8 ft. 4:18 AM 1.7 ft. 5:55 AM 1.3 ft. 7:11 AM 1.0 ft. 8:10 AM 0.6 ft. 8:59 AM Low 3.5 ft. 7:10 AM 3.4 ft. 8:23 AM 3.3 ft. 10:10 AM 3.4 ft. 11:50 AM 3.6 ft. 1:03 PM 3.8 ft. 2:00 PM 3.9 ft. 2:50 PM High 0.5 ft. 3:27 PM 0.5 ft. 4:54 PM 0.4 ft. 6:14 PM 0.3 ft. 7:18 PM 0.3 ft. 8:10 PM 0.3 ft. 8:55 PM 0.4 ft. 9:33 PM Low 2.7 ft. 9:34 PM 2.7 ft. 11:06 PM High Thu Sep 12, 13 Fri Sep 13, 13 Sat Sep 14, 13 Sun Sep 15, 13 Mon Sep 16, 13 Tue Sep 17, 13 Wed Se p 18, 13 Date 2.6 ft. 12:20 AM 2.8 ft. 1:03 AM 2.9 ft. 1:40 AM High 1.7 ft. 12:15 AM 1.9 ft. 1:21 AM 2.0 ft. 2:53 AM 1.8 ft. 4:30 AM 1.5 ft. 5:46 AM 1.0 ft. 6:45 AM 0.7 ft. 7:34 AM Low 3.0 ft. 6:18 AM 2.8 ft. 7:31 AM 2.7 ft. 9:18 AM 2.9 ft. 10:58 AM 3.0 ft. 12:11 PM 3.2 ft. 1:08 PM 3.3 ft. 1:58 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:02 PM 0.5 ft. 3:29 PM 0.4 ft. 4:49 PM 0.3 ft. 5:53 PM 0.3 ft. 6:45 PM 0.3 ft. 7:30 PM 0.5 ft. 8:08 PM Low 2.3 ft. 8:42 PM 2.3 ft. 10:14 PM 2.4 ft. 11:27 PM High Thu Sep 12, 13 Fri Sep 13, 13 Sat Sep 14, 13 Sun Sep 15, 13 Mon Sep 16, 13 Tue Sep 17, 13 Wed Se p 18, 13 Date 3.4 ft. 12:33 AM 3.6 ft. 1:16 AM 3.8 ft. 1:53 AM High 1.9 ft. 12:33 AM 2.1 ft. 1:39 AM 2.2 ft. 3:11 AM 2.0 ft. 4:48 AM 1.6 ft. 6:04 AM 1.1 ft. 7:03 AM 0.7 ft. 7:52 AM Low 3.9 ft. 6:31 AM 3.7 ft. 7:44 AM 3.6 ft. 9:31 AM 3.7 ft. 11:11 AM 4.0 ft. 12:24 PM 4.2 ft. 1:21 PM 4.3 ft. 2:11 PM High 0.5 ft. 2:20 PM 0.6 ft. 3:47 PM 0.5 ft. 5:07 PM 0.4 ft. 6:11 PM 0.3 ft. 7:03 PM 0.4 ft. 7:48 PM 0.5 ft. 8:26 PM Low 3.0 ft. 8:55 PM 3.0 ft. 10:27 PM 3.2 ft. 11:40 PM High Thu Sep 12, 13 Fri Sep 13, 13 Sat Sep 14, 13 Sun Sep 15, 13 Mon Sep 16, 13 Tue Sep 17, 13 Wed Se p 18, 13 Date 3.4 ft. 6:13 AM 2.6 ft. 12:29 AM 2.7 ft. 1:03 AM 2.7 ft. 1:30 AM 2.8 ft. 1:52 AM 2.8 ft. 2:12 AM High 0.5 ft. 2:26 PM 2.1 ft. 12:13 AM 2.1 ft. 2:34 AM 1.9 ft. 4:22 AM 1.7 ft. 5:33 AM 1.4 ft. 6:29 AM 1.1 ft. 7:17 AM Low 2.6 ft. 11:16 PM 3.3 ft. 7:15 AM 3.2 ft. 8:38 AM 3.1 ft. 10:13 AM 3.2 ft. 11:42 AM 3.2 ft. 12:57 PM 3.2 ft. 1:59 PM High 0.5 ft. 3:53 PM 0.4 ft. 5:03 PM 0.4 ft. 5:59 PM 0.5 ft. 6:47 PM 0.7 ft. 7:28 PM 0.9 ft. 8:03 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 12 Sept. 18First Sept. 12 Full Sept. 19 Last Sept. 26 New Oct. 47:14 am-9:14 am 7:43 pm-9:43 pm 12:09 am-1:09 am 2:18 pm-3:18 pm 8:12 am-10:12 am 8:42 pm-10:42 pm 1:07 am-2:07 am 3:15 pm-4:15 pm 9:11 am-11:11 am 9:39 pm-11:39 pm 2:08 am-3:08 am 4:07 pm-5:07 pm 10:08 am-12:08 pm 10:36 pm-12:36 am 3:13 am-4:13 am 4:56 pm-5:56 pm 11:03 am-1:03 pm 11:30 pm-1:30 am 4:17 am-5:17 am 5:41 pm-6:41 pm --:-----:-11:56 am-1:56 pm 5:23 am-6:23 am 6:22 pm-7:22 pm 12:22 am-2:22 am 12:48 pm-2:48 pm 6:26 am-7:26 am 7:02 pm-8:02 pm Average Average Average Average Average Better Best7:20 am 7:45 pm 2:19 pm 12:10 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:20 am 7:44 pm 3:16 pm 1:08 am 7:21 am 7:43 pm 4:08 pm 2:09 am 7:21 am 7:42 pm 4:57 pm 3:14 am 7:22 am 7:40 pm 5:42 pm 4:19 am 7:22 am 7:39 pm 6:23 pm 5:23 am 7:23 am 7:38 pm 7:03 pm 6:27 am47% 54% 62% 69% 77% 84% 91%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comOn Sept. 3, Deputy Alan Middlebrooks was on traf- c patrol on Crawfordville Highway when he observed a vehicle traveling 48 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone. A traf c stop was conducted and the deputy suspected that the motorist was under the in uence. Sobriety exercises were conducted and Thomas Joseph Burgess, 22, of Crawfordville was charged with DUI. Marijuana was discovered while deputies searched the suspect at the Wakulla County Jail and he was charged with introduction of contraband into a detention facility. Burgess was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and refusing to provide a breath sample. While in the holding cell, the suspect became aggressive toward the deputy who used force to gain control of the situation. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy Anthony Paul also investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: THURSDAY, AUGUST 29 Julia Strange-Seale of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered that someone used her bank card to create a $212 charge at a store in Maryland. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Thomas James March, 36, of Crawfordville, Tre Allen McCullough, 21, of Crawfordville, Michael Lance Skinner, 21, of Crawfordville and Elisha Jerime Tilley, 18, of Crawfordville were charged with criminal mischief in the Wakulla County Jail. The four men were in a holding cell that was damaged. Detention deputies discovered a damaged video telephone system as well as a damaged conventional telephone system and graf ti on the walls. Damage was estimated at $619. Detention Deputy Scott Delbeato, Lt. Lindsay Maxwell, Detention Deputy Kenneth Miller and Detention Deputy Kelly Mosley investigated. Christy Peacock of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim was driving in Panacea when she left the vehicle on Coastal Highway. The victim left the vehicle unsecured and $425 worth of property was stolen including a cell phone and miscellaneous items. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Willie Mae Rosier of Crawfordville reported finding two bicycles on neighboring property. The bikes were transported to the WCSO Property and Evidence Division until the owners can be located. The bikes are valued at $500. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. A Crawfordville juvenile reported recovering drug paraphernalia at his home. The items were turned over to Deputy Ward Kromer to be turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. Kathleen Elizabeth Taylor, 45, of Crawfordville was arrested for grand theft at Wal-Mart. Loss Prevention staff observed the subject placing merchandise inside her handbag. She passed the last point of sale without paying for the items. Clothing, video games and knives were taken with a value of $543. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. Ray Johnson of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag from his utility trailer. The victim renewed his tag but when he went to place the decal on the tag he noticed it was missing. The tag is valued at $50. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. Erin Ashley Petrucelli of Crawfordville and Lauralee Alexa Holcomb of St. Marks were involved in a traf c crash at Spring Creek Highway and Shadeville Road. The crash took place at a traf c signal. There were no injuries. Lt. Mike Kemp investigated. FRIDAY, AUGUST 30 Deputy Stephen Simmons observed a vehicle pull out in front of him with an expired tag. The deputy determined that Tony Angelo Taglaris, 51, of Panacea did not possess a valid driver license. He was charged with driving while license is suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction. Sgt. Lorne Whaley also investigated. Courtnie Maxwell of Crawfordville reported the possible theft of her wallet. The wallet and contents are valued at $80. Lt. Brad Taylor investigated. John Brown of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A firearm and ammunition, valued at $70, were reported missing from the victims vehicle. The vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Jessica McKenzie of Panacea reported the theft of a dog. Two suspects, who have been identi ed, took the animal while it was outside the victims home. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Louise Krueger of Crawfordville reported a fraud. An unauthorized charge was observed on the victims bank account for $150. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Charles Spencer Slattery, 28, of Homosassa was involved in a one vehicle traf c crash at the 4800 block of Bloxham Cutoff Road. The victims truck hydroplaned off the road in bad weather striking a power pole. The power pole broke and landed on top of the truck. There were no injuries. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. Deputy Ward Kromer responded to a traffic crash at Highway 267 and Canopy Lane. A vehicle was observed in a ditch and the driver was identified as Cesar Miguel Membreno-Valdez, 35, of Tallahassee. The driver was unable to provide a valid driver license and was charged with operating a motor vehicle with no license. Later, it was determined that the drivers license expired in February 2010 and the charge was amended to driving with an expired license, more than six months. The Road Patrol Unit was busy with calls due to the bad summer weather. There were several trees reported down along with some power lines. The traf c crash that resulted in a broken power pole on Bloxham Cutoff was repaired by Duke Energy in less than four hours. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Jessica Ryan of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. The victim loaned her vehicle to a friend who never returned it. Later, the vehicle was located off Old Woodville Highway inoperable with the keys in it. The vehicle was damaged when it was discovered. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. SATURDAY, AUGUST 31 Caleb Grant Clemons, 21, of Crawfordville was stopped for having an expired license plate. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks and Deputy Richard Moon determined that the driver was in possession of marijuana. The driver turned over marijuana to the deputies and was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of marijuana less than 20 grams. The marijuana weighed .8 grams. Bert Crenshaw of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from his home. A person of interest was identi ed. The medications are valued at $8.50. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Ryan McCallister King, 31, of Crawfordville was charged with aggravated battery and felony battery by strangulation after Deputy Ian Dohme responded to a 911 hangup call. Deputy Dohme discovered a female victim with multiple marks on her body including her neck. The suspect was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Stephen Simmons also investigated. Kenneth E. Fields of Crawfordville and Tonya L. Logan of Crawfordville were involved in a two vehicle traf c crash at 968 Woodville Highway. There were no injuries and minor damage. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 John Coulliette of Crawfordville reported the theft of a decorative wishing well from his home. The property is valued at $150 and was taken during the night. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Deputy Stephen Simmons assisted the Florida Highway Patrol with an incident at the St. Marks Boat Ramp. A vehicle sank in the water while trying to load a boat. A wrecker responded to the scene and pulled the vehicle out of the water. Martha Heuring of Blue Water Realty Group reported a criminal mischief in Crawfordville. A rental home was observed with pry marks on the front door. Damage is estimated at $100. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Tammy Moore of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim lost her purse while attending a family function. The purse was left inside an unsecured vehicle. The purse and contents are valued at $239. Four unauthorized transactions were observed on the victims bank account. The transactions were valued at $68 and took place in Crawfordville. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Lance Holley of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim r eported the theft of two wallets and sunglasses from his vehicle. The wallets and contents were valued at $190. The victim also reported unauthorized charges on his bank card at Wal-Mart stores in Crawfordville and Tallahassee. The charges were valued at $449. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Ben Arnette, 63, of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c stop in Crawfordville. Deputy Stephen Simmons conducted a traf c stop after not observing a license plate displayed. It was determined that the subjects driver license was not valid from a previous driving while license is suspended or revoked (DWLSR) incident. Arnette was charged with DWLSR second or subsequent conviction. He was given a traf c citation for not having a tag.MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 Christopher Jason Thomas, 37, of Crawfordville was involved in a traf c stop due to not having a valid license plate displayed. Thomas was discovered to be operating the vehicle without a valid driver license as a habitual offender. The license plate was seized. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Patricia Mitchell of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The vehicle was entered and rummaged through. The victim has not determined if anything is missing from the vehicle. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Corbon Smith of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary after a Crawfordville man reported nding the victims billiard cue case in a Crawfordville roadside ditch. The victim discovered his vehicle was ransacked. The cues and case are valued at $570. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. Deputy Scott Powell observed a vehicle traveling 51 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone on U.S. Highway 319. A traf c stop was conducted and it was determined that Kashif Dominique Roundtree, 25, of Tallahassee did not possess a valid driver license. It was determined that Roundtrees license was suspended since 2009 and he was charged with driving while license is suspended. Lt. Brent Sanders also investigated. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 3 Principal Mike Barwick of Wakulla Middle School reported a school trespassing following a confrontation between students. A parent of one of the students went inside the school facility and confronted the second juvenile student and also made a racial comment toward African American students while on campus. A trespass warning was issued for Ryan Aaron McMahon, 34, of Crawfordville in connection with the incident. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated along with WMS Assistant Principal Tolar Grif n. David King of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Three suspicious charges were observed on the victims bank account totaling $177. Two of the charges originated in Florida and the third originated in Georgia. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Asset Protection staff at Wal-Mart reported a retail theft. Jessica Lauren Sorenson, 20, of no known address, was observed opening merchandise in the sporting goods department. The subject allegedly concealed the merchandise under her clothing and passed the last point of sale without stopping to pay. A compact air soft hand gun, valued at $70, was recovered. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Kathryn Murphey of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to her rental property. A broken window and damaged door were discovered at the home. Damage was estimated at $125. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. SRO Deputy Nick Boutwell investigated a complaint from an 11-yearold female student regarding the theft of her shoes from physical education class. A 12-year-old male student admitted to taking the shoes which are valued at $50 and were recovered. The male student received a Juvenile Civil Citation and 32 hours of community service and instructions that further conduct that resulted in disciplinary action would create a transfer to Sopchoppy Second Chance School.WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4 Deputy Scott Powell investigated a dog shooting on Fisher Creek Drive in Crawfordville. A male subject reported that he and his dog have been attacked by another dog on two occasions. During the second attack, the male subject shot the attacking dog. A female who owns the shot dog contacted WCSO and Wakulla County Animal Control was also called to the scene. The female was able to take her dog for non-life threatening medical treatment. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Telisa Runyan of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Ten unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank card. The transactions totaled $707 and were conducted all over Florida. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Telisa Runyan of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Items were discovered missing from her vehicle and shed. Music CDs, cigarettes and a phone charger, valued at $130, were removed from her unsecured vehicle. Tools and shing equipment was removed from her shed. The items are valued at approximately $425. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Kimberly Crum of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief to a relatives automobile at Wakulla High School. Punctures were observed in two tires. The damage was created by a knife. Damage to the tires was valued at $300. Deputy Mike Zimba and SRO Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,275 calls for service during the past week.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportWakulla County Sheriffs Office detectives used a DNA sample secured at a Crawfordville crime scene to link a suspect to a burglary that occurred on Aug. 10, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. Travis Anthony McCullough, 20, of Crawfordville was arrested Aug. 15 and charged with three felonies and a misdemeanor including grand theft of a rearm, grand theft, burglary and criminal mischief. A male and a female victim on Arran Road reported the theft of jewelry, rearms, ammunition, a rearm scope, and U.S currency, valued at approximately $4,000. A forced entry was reported at the residence and at an adjoining shed. During the course of the investigation, detectives discovered defecation on the oor of a shed that had been broken into. Blood was also discovered at the crime scene. DNA samples were submitted to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for analysis. Damage to the home was estimated at $300. Detectives received an anonymous tip that McCullough was responsible for the burglary and was walking around with stolen property. The three rearms were hidden at a shed at a vacant home in the Wakulla Gardens area. On Aug. 13, a search warrant was served on Travis McCullough where DNA samples were taken from the suspect. The samples taken from McCullough were sent in for state analysis and matched the samples taken at the burglary scene. Detectives recovered the stolen firearms as well as the jewelry at the abandoned shed. Additional arrests are anticipated.DNA links suspect to burglary case WCSORecovered items from a recent burglary. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 15A Announced September 26 Week #1 Winner Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________ in Woodville9382 Woodville Hwy., Woodville421-9000 Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 850-926-2281 Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________& & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & T T T an l l l l es T a l l l l & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T T es s es s n g n g n n n n n g g g g T an g g g l l l es T a Tan a n g g g l l l e g l e g ng T a T a s s s s s s l e l e s e s e e T T T T T & & & & & & & & & & & & Barber Shoppe & COLORING / FOILING / PERMS & WAXING B a a r b & HAIR STYLING & BARBER CUTS2543 Crawfordville Hwy Ste 5 850-926-4282 Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________19 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville850-926-9355 (WELL) Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________10 Preston Circle, Crawfordville Hwy850-926-4350 Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________1305 Coastal Hwy., Panacea850-984-2933 Coastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken 1321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida850-984-5501Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________ Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________ 2235 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 850-926-8350 Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________3361 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville850-926-5559 GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc. GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc. Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________in Woodville 9141 Woodville Hwy, Woodville850-421-5295 GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc. GULF COAST Lumber & Supply, Inc. Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________2837 Coastal Hwy., Medart850-926-4737 Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________3334-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville S 850-926-6020 Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________3096 Coastal Highway, Medart 850-570-1004Huttons Seafood & More Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________Food-n-Fill2616 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville850-745-8687 Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________2120 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville850-926-8886 LindysChicken Since19687locations Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________2481 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 850-274-8000 Modern Communications Modern Communications s UNLIMITED NO CON TRACT$3995 PER MO. Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________2669 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville850-926-7530 Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________3016 Crawfordville Hwy,Downtown Crawfordville850-926-7949 P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFo s For all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________60 Rose Street, Sopchoppy 850-962-2231 Sopchoppy Grocery Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________2655-C Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 850-745-8730 TALLAHASSEE~LEONFederal Credit Union Next to Myra Jeans Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________27 Azalea Dr Unit E, Crawfordville850-926-6020 2 Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon Name ___________________________________________ Address _________________________________________ Phone ___________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 850-926-7102 Name ____________________ Address __________________ _________________________ Phone ____________________ E-Mail ___________________33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville850-926-7145 N N N A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A One Lucky Winner will be selected Each Week for 8 Weeks!JUST REGISTER AT THESE FRIENDLY BUSINESSES OFFICIAL COUPONS MUST BE DEPOSITED IN-STORE TO WIN! 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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comThere are some inevitable facts associated with living in Wakulla County and, for that matter, North Florida. For natives and long-time residents these facts seem obvious. For more recent transplants there is an epiphany when the apparent realities are recognized with a degree of startled amazement. This moment of awakening is sometimes predicated upon acknowledgment of a painful truth. Yes, summers are hot and electric bills will be higher. It is true weeds will grow faster and higher than grass in a lawn. Granted, there are large roaches in Florida, even though some people insist on politely calling them palmetto bugs. Luckily there is a solution close at hand for controlling these insects which are generally regarded with painful acknowledgement as disgusting and repulsive. The Southeastern five-lined skink is a common lizard and the most common skink species in Wakulla County, but it is infrequently seen. They are, by local standards, a large lizard with the potential to reach eight inches in length. The body background color is usually gray, brown, or black with ve white or yellowish stripes running the length of this reptile, two on each side and one centered down the back. It has short legs, a sleek body and a deceptively listless appearance. At a distance of several yards it is easily viewed, seemly dozing without a care in the world. Let a roach, any variety will do, or other tasty insect pass close by and the skink becomes a polychromatic blur in pursuit of its next meal. Southeastern fivelined skinks prey on a wide variety of insects, spiders, other invertebrates and occasionally engage in cannibalism when the situation requires, but they are especially fond of roaches. While occasionally seen in the open, these reclusive and shy lizards are most often encountered in leaf litter, beneath logs or under the bark of decaying trees. When pursued, these lizards generally sprint for the nearest tree or brush pile and can be quite dif cult to capture. These young skinks have a bright blue tail with a metallic sheen. On adult males the stripes usually fade and are replaced by reddish or orange coloration around the head, but their scales retain the reflective luster. The bright colors are hard to disguise in the wild for both juvenile and adult Southeastern ve-lined skinks. If attacked, these skinks will detach their tails when restrained, distracting the predator and allowing the lizard to escape. These skinks are sometimes referred to as scorpions and are believed to have a venomous tail or a toxic sting. This is not true, but there are some scientists who speculate these skinks have an offensive taste to some predators. During the summer female southeastern ve-lined skinks lay a clutch of up to 15 eggs in moist soil or decaying wood. They demonstrate an unusually high level of parental care by attending the eggs until they hatch. In communal nests females alternate foraging and guarding of the nests so the eggs are continually guarded. When the eggs hatch, the young are ready to eat and roaches are on the menu. To learn more about skinks and other lizards in Wakulla County, contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at (850) 926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Skinks prey on insects, including roaches Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Southeastern ve-lined skink has the potential to reach eight inches in length, and can appear deceptively listless seemingly dozing without a care in the world. Let a roach, any variety will do, or other tasty insect pass close by and the skink becomes a polychromatic blur in pursuit of its next meal. A weekend to get away, have fun and be treated like a Diva!Relax By The Pool Shop Til You Drop Cocktails Hors doeuvres Massage & More! 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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Scouting offers lessons to last a lifetimePage 6BIs a cruise for you?Travel by Linda Carter Page 14BLady War Eagles beat Rickards, lose to ChilesVolleyball, Page 4B sports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach Normally, the local cross country teams are returning to the high school at noon on a Saturday, but this past weekend they were just getting on the bus to travel to Bishop Kenny High School in Jacksonville to compete in the ultra-competitive Katie Caples Invitational. The WHS runners joined over 1,000 other high school runners and 53 teams from all over Florida, as well as from some of the top programs from Georgia and Alabama. The runners were split up into six different races, with the elite boys and girls races not starting until well after dark. This fact alone makes these races unique and a once in a season experience. The races are run around the perimeter of the school and portable lights are used to supplement the schools xed lighting so that the runners can see to navigate the three loop course. Running after dark, in arti cial lighting was a new experience for the local teams and something they will talk about for the rest of the season. The JV boys were the rst WHS runners to race and, as a whole, found the course to their liking. Over 430 runners participated in this race. Nine local boys ran, with all nine recording season best times. These included Riley Welch (22:45), Connor Whit eld (23:17), Justin Goates (23:36), Toby Jordon (23:43), Nick Emerson (23:46), Logan Cook (24:33), Tyle Westcott (25:04), Alex Smythe (28:01) and William Thomas (34:18). The varsity girls were the next group to run and our local girls all ran strong races, but lacked a fth runner to record a team score. Individually, they were led once again by senior captain Margaret Wiedeman (22:16), who was also individually recognized for nishing in the top 20 overall. She was 15th. Lydia Wiedeman was the second local nisher, running a season best time of 22:59, and nishing in 29th place after unleashing a withering nishing kick over the last 200 meters and passing four other runners. Connie Lewis was the next WHS nisher, running a season best time of 24:27 and Marlee Kelly ran very consistently to also run a season best time (27:22). The next to go, was the Elite Girls race, which included a good portion of the very best female runners in the state. In fact, the rst place Florida teams from 1A, 2A, 3A and 4A schools were all in this race, along with many of the other top 10 schools. WHS runner Madison Harris was entered as an individual in this race in order to expose her to the highest level of competition possible. After getting totally cutoff about 150 meters into the course and signi cantly boxed in, Harris spent the rest of the race steadily picking off other runners. At the 3/4 mile mark, she was in approximately 45th place, but continued to pass people until entering the last 200 meters in 15th place. At that point, she hit the track and showed why she is considered one of the best 800 meter runners in the state, by unleashing a devastating kick and passing three other runners, to nish in 12th place in a new personal record time of 19:58. Turn to Page 3BCROSS COUNTRYTeams compete at Bishop KennyBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net The Wakulla War Eagles pulled out a lastsecond win last week, with wide reveiver Keith Gavin making a leaping catch in a corner of the end zone for the winning touchdown to send the home crowd into an ecstatic uproar. Wakulla sealed the deal with a two-point conversion thrown by Franks ending the game with a score of 28-21. Afterwards, Head Coach Scott Klees shared what he thought was the best part about the game: Our character, he said. With 22 seconds left and down by 6, they didnt hang their heads. A lot of teams as young as them would have, but they didnt do that and it paid off. Klees said he was very pleased with a lot of areas of his teams performance. He was complimentary of his defense, although he said, they still have a long ways to go. But were de nitely working hard, he said. GAME RECAP The game between the War Eagles and the Navarre Raiders looked at first as if Wakulla might have a fairly easy run of it as a Franks to Franks connection early in the first quarter to gain a rst down was followed shortly thereafter by a MaLik Thomas run into the end zone for a touchdown less than five minutes into the game. A successful extra point kicked by Feleipe Franks put the score at 7-0. Navarre then took over on the 20 yard line, but a sharp-looking Wakulla defense forced a fumble that was recovered by Caleb Fell putting the War Eagles on the 35. However, a fumble put the ball back in Navarres hands. On the Raiders second down, Kieryn Parsons broke up a pass, but a ag thrown revealed a pass interference resulting in a rst down for Navarre. The Raiders, at third and about four, couldnt convert, forcing them to punt, which was broken up by a great effort on the part of the War Eagles. But with the rst quarter coming to an end, a Wakulla fumble put Navarre in good scoring position. An impressive catch by a Raiders receiver put them near the end zone, but the quarter ended before they could score. Less than two minutes into the second, Navarre managed a rst and goal position and a toss up to the back of the end zone resulted in a completion and a ag on Wakulla for defensive holding. Navarres kick was good to tie the score 7-7. During Wakullas next possession a long toss by Franks was caught by Keith Gavin to convert a third and six into a first down, putting the War Eagles near the end zone. Another completed pass between the two resulted in Gavins scoring Wakullas second touchdown of the night and a good kick by Franks put the score at 14-7 with 6:35 left in the rst half.Turn to Page 3BWar Eagles show character in winWakulla earns win in the nal seconds over Navarre PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla linebacker Daniel Sanders, playing with a cast on a broken hand, brings down a Navarre runner.NEXT GAME: The War Eagles travel to Marianna to play the Bulldogs on Friday, Sept. 13, at 7 p.m. DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Offer Expires Spept. 30, 2013850926-3212*10%OFFANY PURCHASEMAKING ROOM FOR CHRISTMAS STOCK*Must present original coupon from printed newspaper only. IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSOPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. 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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Sept. 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Sept.13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 5451853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Saturday, Sept. 14 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Sept. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Sept. 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Sept. 17 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.Wednesday, Sept. 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 4911684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsMonday, Sept. 16 COUNTY PUBLIC MEETING will be held at 10 a.m. at the BOCC administration building to discuss application of a grant under the FRDAP during the 2014-2015 funding cycle. COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Sept. 17 COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the BOCC administration building. M onday, Oct. 7 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, Oct. 14 PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. M onday, Oct. 21 COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers.Weekly meetings Special EventsThursday, Sept. 12 THE SIERRA CLUB will host its September meeting on Wakullas Watershed at 6:30 p.m. at the Amtrak Station community room. 918 Railroad Ave. in Tallahassee. Join our speaker Victor Lambou and other key wetlands protection leaders of Wakulla for a discussion on the potential reversal of protective measures. For more information email scbigbend@ gmail.com or call 566-4552. Friday, Sept. 13 WAR EAGLE FOOTBALL is scheduled to play at Marianna at 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14 FLORIDA PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY NETWORK together with the University of West Florida, the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement and the Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee will host a Public Archaeology Day at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement from noon until p.m. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is located in Sam Atkins Park in Blountstown, Fla. Have your personal artifact collections identi ed by archaeologist! This event is free and open to the public! For more information, contact Barbara Hines at bhines@uwf.edu or the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement at info@panhandlepioneer.org. Tuesday, Sept. 17 THE IRIS GARDEN CLUB will meet at the public library at 1 p.m. Everyone is invited to attend the program on Weeds or wild owers. THE SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the public library. Guest Speaker Churck Hess will present Listening to birds: what woodpeckers tell us about forest management. The program observes the shifting baseline of conditions in uencing management of the great longleaf pine forest. The public is cordially invited. Social time with refreshments for all will precede the meeting. Thursday, Sept. 19 WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will sponsor guest speaker Tracie Thompson at Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. Thompson is the executive director of the American Cancer Society in Tallahassee. She will be speaking on What the American Cancer Society can do for you. You do not have to be a patient to attend come nd out how you can be supportive to family and friends. For more information please call 926-6050. FULL MOON CLIMB at St. George Lighthouse will take place from 7 p.m. until 8:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. Please contact the Lighthouse gift shop at 927-7745 for reservations or more information. Upcoming EventsSaturday, Sept. 21 2013 COASTAL CLEANUP will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at 9 a.m. The ve major sites will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands, St. Marks River Park and Bottoms Road in Panacea. Find out more information and sign up early by emailing tohelpkwcb@gmail. com. WAKULLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY plans to hold its annual fundraiser yard sale and we are in need of articles to sell. We need housewares, decorating items, tools, yard items, books, videos, almost anything you have to donate. Please make sure the items are undamaged, clean, and complete. We are not going to sell clothing or shoes this year. If you have items, please contact either Helen at 933-6888 or Tanya at 508-0881 and they will arrange to meet you at the old Crawfordville School lunchroom to accept the donations. Wednesday, Sept. 25 TCC FREE HEALTHCARE JOB FAIR will take place from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. This is a great opportunity to nd a job, so bring your resume and dress to impress. This event is offered at no charge to TCC students and community members. For more information, go to www.tccfuturelink.com/ events or call (850) 201-9970. Friday, Sept. 27 4th ANNUAL EDEN SPRINGS SENIOR PROM will be held from 7 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. at 4679 Crawfordville Highway. This years theme will be Mardi Gras. Please call 926-7181 if you need more information. Saturday, Sept. 28 FWMA GIANT YARD SALE will be held at Townsends Nads Mini Storage located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. All donations are greatly appreciated and can be dropped off at Unit A32 or brought to the yard sale (before Friday afternoon). For more information about FWMA visit our website at www. wakullawildlife.org. 100 percent of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission. THE NATIONAL PARKINSON FOUNDATION will present their Parkinson Disease A to Z Symposium at the Four Points by Sheraton (formerly Round Holiday Inn Downtown) in Tallahassee. NPF is pleased to offer this exciting educational opportunity for those with Parkinson disease or those interested in learning more about it. Enrollment is limited so please RSVP by Sept. 20 by calling 850-364-0230, emailing joan@npfnorth orida.org or visit www.npfnorth orida.org. Saturday, Oct. 26 HOLIDAY CRAFT SALE will be held at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. We wish to showcase local craft persons in our community. Space will be available, free of charge, to any one wishing to sell items they have created themselves. Please create your inventory and call Nickey Lepp, no later than Oct. 16. Lepp can be reached at 926-9750 for more information or to reserve your space. Sept 12 Sept 19 WHS vs. MARIANNA at Marianna 7 p.m. IRIS GARDEN CLUB HOSTS WEEDS OR WILDFLOWERS Public Library 1 p.m. FNPS HOSTS CHUCK HESS Public Library 6:30 p.m. FULL MOON CLIMB St. George Lighthouse 7 p.m.FridayTuesdayTuesdayThursday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net A photo of the FWMA yard sale held in 2010.FILE PHOTO

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 3Bsports news and team views SportsPlayers of the WeekFELEIPE FRANKS Quarterback 16 of 24 for 241 yards, 3 TDs and a 2point conversion BRYSON BEVERLY Lineman 8 tackles, 2 sacks, graded 91 percent ETHAN DAVIS Led the team in tacklesO enseDefenseSpecial Teams Sponsored by 850926-1011Your Home Town Realtor By EDDIE METCALFWMS CoachThe Wildcats opened the season with their county rival, the Riversprings Middle School Bears, with the game format that saw the 6th graders playing the rst quarter, 7th graders playing the second quarter and the starters playing the second half. The Wildcats 6th graders dominated the rst quarter with a good running game and a stingy defense. Keyshawn Greene carried the ball two times for 34 yards and a touchdown, and Lyric Oaks had one carry for 8 yards. The offensive line, lead by Hunter Nichols, Andrew Carter and Chandler Crum, controlled the line of scrimmage and the Wildcats 6th grade defense held the Bears to -4 yards in the quarter. The second quarter saw the Wildcats score threetimes, and started with a 24 yard touchdown run by Dorian Allen on the rst play of the quarter. The Bears fumbled on their rst possession, and wide receiver Rawn Brooks scored a few plays later on an 8 yard pass. Later in the 2nd quarter, Malik Rollins intercepted a pass and returned it 33 yards for the nal Wildcat score of the quarter. The Wildcat 7th grade defense held the RMS 7th grade offense to -11 yards of total offense. The domination continued in the second half with the Wildcats out gaining the Bears 161 yards to 84. The Wildcat offensive line, lead by 8th graders Zac Boone, Taylor Williams, Jacob Robison, Blake Goldin and 7th grader Hunter Reeves, allowed Athan Dempsey to rush 5 times for 110 yards and 2 touchdowns, and Cephus Greene to add another touchdown and have 4 carries for 42 yards. Austin Geiger ran the ball 2 times for 9 yards, and Michael McKenzie-Brown completed an 8-yard touchdown pass. Gabe Barwick also intercepted a pass in the Wildcats 50-8 win. In week two of the season, the Wildcats beat the Seminoles of Florida High 30-0 in a weather delayed mudfest. The Wildcat defense, lead by Jacob Robison, held the Seminoles to just 21 total yards, and the Wildcat offense rushed for 239 yards and passed for 20. Athan Dempsey lead all rushers with 68 yards and a touchdown on 6 carries, DJ Reynolds had 50 yards and a touchdown on 2 carries and Cephus Greene rushed 6 times for 41 yards and a touchdown. Greene also had an awesome 43 yard touchdown called back for an illegal blocking penalty. Dimonte Riles added a 27 yard run and Dorian Allen completed his only pass attempt for a 13 yard completion to Rawn Brooks. The Wildcats next game is at home against Madison County on Tuesday, Sept. 10. The Wildcats will return home on Sept. 24, at 7 p.m. and face Blountstown after playing Havana Middle school on the road on Sept. 17. Come out and support the WMS Wildcats.MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLWMS Wildcats are o to 2-0 start this seasonRiversprings looks better despite lossBy JOEY JACOBSRMS CoachThe Riversprings Bears were left with more questions than answers after their season opening game against arch-rival Wakulla. RMS hoped to emerge from their next contest, a Sept. 3 matchup with Tolar, with some answers. Although the Bears came up short, 16-14, a few questions were answered for RMS. The RMS offense got on the board rst, powered by the tough running of 8th grade running back Kody Zanco. Zanco would lead all rushers, nishing with 84 yards on 15 carries and a touchdown. Most of Zancos yardage came in the rst half. The second half seemed to belong to the thunder and lightning combo of 8th grade running backs Hezekiah Gross and Chris Beverly. Gross powered his way to 70 yards on 6 carries and a touchdown, while Beverly chipped in 64 yards on 4 carries. Although the Bear offense had a sizeable advantage in yards produced, they also had 6 turnovers, two of which led to both Tolar scores. The Bears were led defensively by Kody Zanco, who had 8 tackles and 5 assists. Chris Beverly added 5 tackles, while Caleb Carter levied 4 tackles of his own. RMS new defensive coordinator Trey Thaxton said, The defense made a great improvement from the rst game. We played a bend but dont break D, with Zanco and Darrius (Wilkins) pressuring the back eld most of the night. Despite losing the game 16-14, the RMS coaches could see a little progress. According to head coach Joey Jacobs, We played a whole lot better in most areas of the game. Now we just have to be committed to getting better every week. Alluding to the Sept. 12 matchup at Taylor County, coach Jacobs added, Our commitment will de nitely be tested when we play Taylor. The Taylor County game will be in Perry at 6 p.m. War Eagles show character in winFrom Page 1BHer time was only one second off Margaret Wiedemans school record time of 19:57. She was also recognized individually for nishing in the top 20. The nal race of the night was the Elite Boys race and, for the first time ever at a large invitational meet, the WHS boys were seeded in this division. This was a compliment to our boys and how far they have advanced the program, and also gave them a chance to run against many of the best runners in the state. Albert Smythe and Aaron Smith led the way for the local team, with Smythe opening a small gap on Smith in the last 300 meters of the race and nishing in a new personal record of 18:38. Smith, recovering from a nagging injury, ran strong throughout the race, finishing in 18:46. Freshman Bryce Cole, running his rst of cial high school cross country race, was the third WHS runner, nishing in 19:31. He was followed by Mitchell Atkinson (19:53), Alan Pearson (20:10), Travis Parks (20:21), J.P. Piotrowski (20:22), Colton McCully (21:23) and James Story (22:31). Overall, the boys nished in 21st place. The WHS teams have an open date this weekend and will compete next at the Alligator Lake Invitational in Lake City on Sept. 21.Cross Country competes at Bishop Kenny From Page 1BThe following possession by Navarre resulted in third down and nine, but a sack made by Jordan Franks forced the Raiders to punt. Then, a ag thrown for pass interference on Navarres defense converted Wakulas third down into a rst, but an unsuccessful series forced a War Eagles punt which was returned for a touchdown with 21 seconds left, tying the score at 14-14. Wakulla broke the tie with ve minutes left in the third on a pass to Jordan Franks that was taken to the end zone for a touchdown. An unsuccessful pointafter put the score at 20-14. The War Eagles then went to work on defense as they put heavy pressure on Navarre. Bryson Beverlys first of two sacks brought the Raiders to a fourth down situation, forcing a punt. Wakulla then took over on the 44 yard line. With pressure placed on Feleipe Franks by the Raider defense on a second down, Franks found his brother for a completion, but a penalty put them at third down. An interception thrown by Franks followed, but Navarre was unable to make anything happen before the end of the third quarter. On third and seven, Wakullas Beverly and Hunter Hurst team up, sacking the Raiders quarterback. Navarre decided to go for it on fourth down, but could not convert. With second and five from the 36 yard line, a Franks to Franks completion picked up a rst down and on second and eleven, a completion by Gavin picked up four yard, putting Wakulla at third and seven. The War Eagles gain ve yard when a false start penalty on Navarre put them at third and two and Thomas carried the ball for a rst down with 6:24 left in the game. On the following third down and three, Bryan Nichols picked up a rst down, but a ag on the play put them back to third and ten where an impressive catch was made by Jordan Franks, but it wasnt enough for the rst down. Navarres possession followed. A sack made by Fell, followed by an incompletion brought up third down, but a completed pass wasnt enough for a Raiders rst down. With 1:22 left in the game, Navarre succeeds in getting a rst down with a completed pass that was followed by another in the end zone for a touch down. A good kick put the Raiders ahead by one with a score of 21-20. An onside kick attempt by Navarre was unsuccessful as it was picked up by Wakullas Andre Brown, giving the War Eagles a rst and 10 at the 5 yard line. A pass was then completed by Antonio Morris with 17 seconds left followed by an incompletion to Franks. On the War Eagles third down and 13 seconds left in the game, Frank managed to find Gavin who made a leaping catch in the end zone for the winning touchdown. NEXT UP: MARIANNA This week, on Friday Sept. 13, the War Eagles will take on the Marianna Bulldogs at Marianna at 7 p.m. PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCaleb Fell makes a fumble recovery. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the T H ES H O PGREATBICYCL E 3624 Woodville Hwy., 1/2 mile south of the Fairgrounds SALES SERVICE PARTS RENTALS ADULT TRIKES850-402-0545

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports By SALLY WHEELERAssistant CoachThe Lady War Eagles are rolling right into their season with one win last week on Thursday against District foe Rickards improving their season record to 2-2 (1-0 Districts). Wakulla Highs Varsity Volleyball team was defeated by the Lawton Chiles Timberwolves in three sets earlier in the week on Tuesday. The Timberwolves, who are a very strong team with three Division I commits, defeated the Lady Eagles 12-25, 15-25, and 1925. Although, the scores may be deceiving as the Lady Eagles played tough defensively and had strong communication and teamwork. Senior Shannan Wood stepped up leading the Eagles with eight kills. Junior Haley Brown had seven kills and Sophomore Taylor Lawhon had three kills and three blocks. Marina Petrandis had 8 digs for Wakulla along with Albrey Sorrell. Also contributing to the defense was Haley Brown with six digs. Caylee Cox and Brittany Hope each had four digs. Wood and Sorrell each had an ace. Two days later the War Eagles got ahead in district play by defeating Rickards in three sets 25-14, 25-9, and the nal was 25-21. The War Eagles served up 20 aces, Shelby Lenk had 5, Brittany Hope and Caylee Cox each had 4. Cox also contributed 20 assists on the day. Leading with kills was Tamia Potter with eight, Shannan Wood had six, and Taylor Lawhon had 3 as well as Jessica Waltman. Brittany Hope and Waltman each had ve digs. At the net with six blocks was Tamia Potter. The Eagles hope to up their district record on Tuesday, Sept. 10, when they play Suwannee at home at 5:30 and 7 p.m. Then continuing their season campaign they will face Leon on Thursday away.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Lady War Eagles volleyball team.VOLLEYBALLLady War Eagles beat Rickards in district game; lose to ChilesBy AMY LEESpecial to The NewsThe Lady War Eagles traveled to Hilaman Golf Course last week to play in a tournament with Franklin County, Florida High, and Lincoln. The War Eagles placed third in the tournament with a team score of 244, Franklin County scored 239, Florida High 240, and Lincoln posted no team score. Individual scores for Wakulla were-Micahlyn Jeziorski 54, Kenzie Lee 56, Alyssa Stokley 66, and Rachel Woofter 68. The ladies will play this week at Southwood with John Paul Catholic and Leon and later in the week at Golden Eagle with Maclay and Lincoln. GOLFLady War Eagles finish third in tourney at HilamanStaff ReportThe 2013 Houston Taff Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament will be held Thursday, Sept. 26, at Seminole Golf Course in Tallahassee. The cost is $450 per three-man team, or $150 per player. Registration is at noon for the 1 p.m. shotgun start. The format is select a shot. Prizes will be awarded to top three teams in each of four ights. Mulligans are $20 per player with a limit of four. There is also an opportunity for sponsorships at the golf tournament, with Gold Sponsors at $1,000, Silver at $750, and hole sponsors at $200 for green and tee. The tournament is sponsored by Centennial Bank and Seminole Boosters. For more information, contact Josh Brown at 528-6385, Windy Jones at 519-6663, or Steve Brown at 570-3910.Houston Ta Memorial Scholarship Golf Tournament set for Sept. 26Salvation Army to host golf tournament at Killearn featuring FSU womens golf team By SHANNON SMITHRMS Athletic DirectorThe Riversprings Lady volleyball team opened up their season by competing in the rst annual Bearpaw Classic volleyball tournament. The Bears performed in a dominating fashion. The RMS A team went 4-0 in the tournament never allowing more than 13 points to be scored on them. The RMS B team was 3-1 and nished in second place. The RMS C team, which was composed of splitting up the B team went 2-3 and finished fourth. Coach Smith and Coach Butler were pleased with the Bears performance in their rst outing. The Bears would like to congratulate Wakulla Christian School on their third place nish and North Florida Christian School on participating in our rst ever volleyball tournament. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Riversprings Lady Bears volleyball team with their trophies.Riversprings opens season with win at Bearpaw ClassicSpecial to The NewsThe Salvation Army of Tallahassee is hosting the rst annual Hope For Kids fundraiser Golf Tournament scheduled for Monday, Sept. 16 at Killearn Country Club. All net proceeds from the Hope For Kids tournament will be used to support youth programs of The Salvation Army, including several existing character building programs for children of all ages, the community Music and Arts Camp for disadvantaged children, and a developing after school performing arts program, scheduled to begin early next year. All youth programs are open to any child in The Salvation Armys service area of Leon, Gadsden and Wakulla counties. The tournament features FSU Womens Head Golf Coach Amy Bond and the FSU Womens Golf Team. The goal of the tournament is to raise funds for our mission to serve the needs of the children in all our communities, said Capt. Julio Da Silva, commanding of cer of The Salvation Army in Tallahassee. We serve all youth, from grade school through college age ministries. Sponsored by The Salvation Armys Advisory Board, the tournament is open to all local golfers. Registration begins at 11 a.m., followed by lunch and a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Tournament format is a four-person team bestball scramble. The entry fee includes range balls, lunch, golf, golf cart, prizes and hors doeuvres after play. Awards will be presented for closest to pin, putting contest, and hole-in-one contest. Players may set their own teams by listing the foursome members on the registration form. Committee will pair singles. For more information, please contact tournament director David Roberts at (850) 893-4414 or email him at: droberts@harvestinvestmentadvisors.com or contact the Salvation Army Of ces at 222-0304. The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 5BBy MARTY COHENLets face it, this is a rivalry based on historical implications only. Yes for 50 seasons, from 1938 to 1987 (except for 1943, when Florida didnt field a team due to the vagaries of war), Florida and Miami squared off every year. It was generally a bitter get-together, an annual meeting bathed in more enmity than encompassed any other foe on the Gators schedule. It has always been that way. Its been almost two decades since I wrote a book called Gator Tales, a light, s o m e w h a t breezy look at the history of Florida football. The research from the golden days reveals that the intense dislike between the fan bases of the two schools has been simmering for about 75 years. Heres an entry from Floridas student newspaper the Alligator, from back in November of 1939, following a 13-0 Gator road triumph over the Hurricanes: The city of Miami and townspeople showed plainly that they have a long way to go before Miami becomes a great football town. Students report that big, bad cops grabbed them when they attempted, in true Florida fashion, to show Miamians how to celebrate a football victory. Some reports say that Florida men, good and true, were thrown in the Bastille of the Magic City. Dont you just love old-time sports writing? Keep in mind this is almost 20 years before Florida introduced Florida State to college football. Anyway, it gets juicier heres an excerpt from the Nov. 9, 1951 Alligator: An era in Florida football is coming to an end right before our eyes. The traditional Georgia-Florida struggle is being replaced rapidly by the Florida-Miami game. Miami came on the sports scene later than Florida and has utilized its climactic advantage to climb toward the top rapidly. Florida has resented the climb. On the other hand, Miami has resented Gators past dominance of state football. Mix this together with the Miami attitude toward the Florida farmers and the Florida attitude toward Yankee sharpsters, and you have the ingredients of a red-hot football duel. Traditionally Georgia is the big game for the Gators, but it just doesnt rank with the Miami game in the basis of feelings on the opposing campus. As a New York native who came to UF some 35 years ago, I should probably be offended at ostensibly being referred to as a Yankee sharpster, but its actually pretty amusing. So you get the idea, with some frame of reference, where the feeling surrounding the Florida-Miami series emanates from historically. It has always been more of a fan-stoked rivalry, particularly from the Hurricanes perspective. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gatorsBy BOB FERRANTEChris Weinke had seen Jameis Winstons talents for the rst time in January 2012.Weinke was coaching at the Under Armor All-American game, and one of his players was Winston the nations top quarterback. Winston completed 8 of 9 passes for 178 yards, including a 75-yard touchdown pass, and was named the games MVP. That was my rst glimpse of him, Weinke said. I was excited about him back then. Fast forward 20 months to Monday night. Weinke, who won a national championship and a Heisman Trophy at Florida State, watched from his television Winstons stunning debut 25 of 27 for 356 yards and ve touchdowns (four passing and one rushing) in a 41-13 win over Pittsburgh. The numbers tell the story. A 92.6 completion percentage is almost unheard of for even an NFL All-Pro quarterback let alone a 20-year-old redshirt freshman making his college debut on the road in front of 65,000 fans. But it goes beyond the numbers. Winston showed a calm, composed demeanor. His poise in the pocket, his natural ability to be able to move around and keep his eyes down- eld, Weinke said. I was just very impressed with what he was able to accomplish in his rst game. Hes only going to continue to get better. The future is very bright. Winstons rst game came on a Monday night a primetime game with all of college football watching. He dominated the discussion on Twitter, prompting frequent updates about his consecutive completions (11 straight to start the game) and his statistics. Florida State fans enjoyed the show, especially after Winstons breakout performance (12 of 15 for 205 yards and two touchdowns) in the Seminoles spring game in April. But the hype grew through the summer and reached a fever pitch in the 10 days between Jimbo Fishers announcement that Winston would be the starter and Monday nights game. But Florida States quarterbacks from past years could appreciate Winstons performance more than perhaps any fan. Theyve all had to step on to the eld that rst time, nervous and anxious and trying to lead the team to a win. I would have loved to have a game like that in my college career, let alone my rst game, said former Florida State quarterback Danny McManus, who led the Seminoles to an 11-1 record in 1987. There have been some impressive rst starts for Florida State through the years. Danny Kanell threw for 341 yards and had ve touchdowns in a 49-20 win over Maryland in 1993. Dan Kendra threw for 281 yards and three touchdowns in a 1996 win over Wake Forest. And two years ago, Clint Trickett passed for 336 yards in a loss at Clemson. McManus is in a group of Florida State starters that had four touchdowns in his debut (vs. Tulane in 1985), including Charlie Ward (vs. Duke in 1992). Winston matched Kanells ve touchdowns and went 15 yards better. Take it easy on me man, Kanell said on Twitter. Save some of those records for me! Keep working hard and representing Noles on and off the eld #proud And rookie quarterback EJ Manuel chimed in on Twitter from Buffalo while watching his teammate from a year ago: On the edge of my seat watching J pick em apart #proud For McManus, the game con- rmed what he had seen in practice a few weeks back in Tallahassee. McManus lives in Venice, Fla., but scouts the state for potential Canadian Football League prospects for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats. Winston, of course, is likely bound for the NFL in the years to come. But McManus enjoys watching quarterbacks in practice and in games. What he saw was signi cant. Some guys their eyes get huge (in a game), said McManus, who threw for more than 50,000 yards in the CFL. But he was ne, he was calm. You see a young guy get into a game, things are sped up and then they try to speed up their play. And now the mechanics get all messed up. From what I saw in practice to what I saw in the game was exactly the same. And the situation on Monday wasnt pretty early on. Pitt had driven 80 yards to open the game and take a 7-0 lead. Florida States rst drive ended in a punt. But then a Jalen Ramsey interception set up the Seminoles at Pitts 24. Two plays later, Winston found Nick OLeary for a touchdown. Florida State would score on its next six drives, too. His ability to stay even keel throughout the course of the game was so impressive, Weinke said. You dont see that very often out of a young quarterback. What he was able to prove to people is that he has a great understanding of the offense. More times than not, young quarterbacks do not feel comfortable because they dont have a total grasp of the offense. He has a great understanding and knows where to throw the football. And he did it at a very high level. Very rare to see that in a young quarterback. Weinke and McManus agree that Winston possesses another trait. He is of course a dual-threat quarterback, someone that ran for more than 1,000 yards and 15 touchdowns as a senior at Hueytown (Ala.) High. But Winston felt the pressure in the pocket and used his legs to buy time to nd an open receiver. Not to scramble and run for daylight. A lot of guys being that young probably would have tucked it and ran away, McManus said. He just had to buy a half a second and he did that. Weinke has spent the past few years mentoring quarterbacks at the IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla. Hes worked with a long list of players that were preparing for their rst NFL season. But Weinke was also struck with Winstons pocket presence. That was one of the most impressive things, Weinke said. With young guys they get into panic mode. And when something is not perfect, their natural reaction is to tuck it and escape the pocket. I use the term working in a telephone booth. Thats the pocket for the quarterback. He was able to stay calm within the telephone booth and still be able to deliver balls very accurately while there was a lot of chaos around him. Hes a great athlete, he can make some plays with his feet. But his No. 1 attribute is his ability to process information and throw the ball with accuracy. Sometimes you dont see veteran guys thirdand fourth-year (college) guys be able to stay within themselves. Especially the rst game of the year. FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA FLORIDA gators gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Samford at Florida A&MSaturday, Sept. 14 at 2 p.m.The game will not be aired. #18 FloridaBYE WEEK#10 Florida State at NevadaSaturday, Sept. 14 at 3:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN.VS.VS. MIAMI MIAMIFSU quarterback Jameis Winston has impressed. Florida QB Jeff Driskel.Chris Weinke can appreciate Jameis Winstons talentPHOTO BY TRAVIS REGISTER GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comScouting offers lessons to last a lifetimeBy DAVID DAMONBSA Unit CommissionerIts that time of year again, when parents and students make choices about their school year activities how to fit all the after school programs into an already busy school and family calendar. Its impossible to t everything in, and choices have to be made. Consider a program that teaches life skills that your son can use their entire life. Ask yourself, can I tie a bowline knot if the need were to arise? Can I build a re to keep myself warm after getting lost in the woods? Can I perform CPR or basic lifesaving rst aid when in a situation where there is no cell phone service and no help coming soon? Am I independent enough and confident enough in my abilities to throw everything I need into a backpack, hike to some otherwise inaccessible natural setting and enjoy myself for the weekend. If you have been in Scouting, you could. Imagine the self con dence in knowing that the answer is yes to all of these questions, especially for a younger person starting out in life, preparing to tackle the adult world. Whether for recreation, or whether for survival, the Boy Scout programs available today teach our youth these skills and many many more, while helping to instill moral values that will guide them for a lifetime. One knot, one basic rst aid course, one camping trip or scout activity at a time. They learn to appreciate and respect nature and become responsible stewards of the environment, developing into responsible adult leaders for our future. No other program today can offer such a broad range of life lessons and skills for our youth. As an adult you may wish youd had a chance to learn these skills, well, you still can. As an adult volunteer or leader, working within the Scouting program, you too will be exposed to these programs. Its never to late to get involved and go to that summer camp you wish youd gotten to do as a kid, and its just as much fun to learn and experience Scouting as an adult, through your own children. Talk to any family involved in Scouting and they will have stories to tell of camping, and hiking and canoeing, and of the many Scout events. Stories from the time the canoe turned over in the wintertime, and of the Scout that woke up one morning, laying there in pain as he talked about the Brown Recluse spider that must have bitten him in the middle of the nightuntil he realized that the massive swelling was really a big wad of bubble gum stuck to his hand. As a parent youll hold your breath, but be proud as your son takes climbing at summer camp and scales a 50-foot tower, and then repels its walls. Then one day, when your son becomes an Eagle Scout, that is a memory youll never forget and a day that will change his life forever. Doors will open for your Eagle Scout, and hell realize one day, that getting him involved in Scouting, was one of the greatest gifts you ever given him. This is Scouting, join the fun and make memories that will last a lifetime, while learning skills that hell use for a lifetime. Cub Scouts is for boys starting in first grade, through fth grade.Boy Scouts is for Middle School and High School age young men. In Wakulla County there are a number of Boy Scout programs to choose from. Cub Scout Pack 5, Crawfordville. Contact Marcus Floyd at marcacs@hotmail.com, 9269961 Cub Scout Pack 8, Medart. Contact David Damon at davdam8@aol. com, 251-4166. Boy Scout Troop 5, Crawfordville. Contact Lambert West at cawlane@netzero.net, 9263868. Boy Scout Troop 8, Medart. Contact Alfie Boone at 294-2882 or David Damon at davdam8@ aol.com, 251-4166. PHOTOS BY DAVID DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 7BSpecial to The NewsThe September Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, Sept. 19. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 7:39 p.m. and the moon will rise at 7:44 p.m. on Sept. 19. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at (850) 9277745. Dear EarthTalk: What is the new documentary lm A Fierce Green Fire about and what does the title refer to? Gloria Howard Washington, DC A Fierce Green Fire is a new lm documenting the rise of the modern environmental movement from the 1960s through the present day. It premiered at last years Sundance Film Festival and will be playing at select theaters across the country beginning in September 2013. Educators, environmental groups and grassroots activists also will be showing the lm at small and large events from coast to coast over the course of the fall. Written and directed by Mark Kitchell, Academy Award-nominated director of Berkeley in the Sixties, A Fierce Green Fire (the lm) is based on the 1993 book of the same name by environmental journalist Philip Shabecoff. The phrase a erce green re refers to a longer passage in one of the seminal environmental books of the 20th century, 1949s A Sand County Almanac. In the famous Think Like a Mountain section of that book, author Aldo Leopold relates his experience as part of a predator extirpation team that shoots a wolf in the New Mexico desert: We reached the old wolf in time to watch a erce green re dying in her eyes. I realized then and have known ever since that there was something new to me in those eyes, something known only to her and to the mountain. I was young then and full of trigger-itch; I thought that because fewer wolves meant more deer, that no wolves would mean hunters paradise. But after seeing the green fire die, I sensed that neither the wolf nor the mountain agreed with such a view. Kitchells lm shows how this passage and other writings were instrumental in raising awareness about the importance of wise stewardship of the natural environment and as such played a crucial role in the re-birth of the environmental movement in the 1960s. Featuring ve acts, each with its own central story and character, the film depicts a central environmental conflict of each decade since the 1960s. The rst act, narrated by Robert Redford, focuses on David Brower and the Sierra Clubs battle to halt dams in the Grand Canyon in the 1960s. Act two, narrated by Ashley Judd, tells the story of Lois Gibbs and other Niagara Falls, New York residents struggle against pollution buried beneath their Love Canal neighborhood in the 1970s. Act three is all about Greenpeace and efforts by Captain Paul Watson to save whales and baby harp seals, as told by Van Jones. Chico Mendes and Brazilian rubber tappers take center stage in Act four, as narrated by Isabel Allende, in their ght to save their Amazon rainforest. Lastly, Act ve focuses on Bill McKibben, as told by Meryl Streep, and the 25-year effort to address the foremost issue of our time: climate change. Intertwined within these main stories are strands including the struggle for environmental justice, getting back to the land, and sustainability efforts in the developing world. The lm ends on an optimistic note, driving home the point that environmentalism is really about civilizational change and bringing industrial society into balance with nature and that each of us can make a difference with a little effort. Those interested in seeing the lm should check out the schedule of theatrical releases at the films website, afiercegreen re.com. The website also features more information on the lm and features historical photos of some of the scenes and events depicted in it. Anyone who wants to nd out more about the the makings of the modern environmental movement should be sure to see A Fierce Green Fire. GOT AN ENVIRONMENTAL QUESTION? Send it to: EarthTalk, c/o E/The Environmental Magazine, P.O. Box 5098, Westport CT 06881 USA; submit it at: www.emagazine.com/ earthtalk/thisweek/; or e-mail: earthtalk@ emagazine.com. Read past columns at: www. emagazine.com/earthtalk/archives.php. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www. emagazine.com). What is A Fierce Green Fire about? PHOTO: A Fierce Green FireA new lm by Academy Award-nominated Mark Kitchell, based on a 1993 book by Phil Shabecoff, documents the rise of the modern environmental movement from the 1960s through the present day. Pictured: Lois Marie Gibbs and other Niagara Falls, New York residents struggle against pollution buried beneath their Love Canal neighborhood in the 1970s. The documentary A Fierce Green Fire premiered at the Sundance Film Festival, and is about the environmental movement from the 1960s to today. Special to the NewsPilots with Operation Migration (OM) have been guiding new generations of captive raised Whooping cranes from Wisconsin to Florida since 2001. Cranes are produced at captive breeding centers and begin the imprinting process with costumed caretakers who carry puppets resembling adult Whooping cranes. By the time they are ve days of age they are comfortable spending time with the small aircraft, which will guide them on their 1200-mile journey in the fall. To comply with current FAA regulations, the aircraft used by OM must comply with the Special Light Sport Aircraft category. The planes currently being used do not t within this designation, so OM must replace their three existing aircraft, which will allow them to continue to introduce Whooping Cranes using the aircraftguided migration technique. To accomplish this, a crowdfunding campaign has been established in hopes that the public will help to make this acquisition a reality. The campaign features a video which describes the need and offers some perks to supporters who contribute to the campaign. Donors can give whatever amount they choose and receive a variety of bene ts ranging from a certi cate of appreciation (for a $50 donation) to ones name on the aircraft (for a $1,000 donation)! Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s. Today, there are only about 600 birds in existence, approximately 445 of them in the wild. Aside from the 106 birds in the Eastern Migratory Population, the only other migrating population of whooping cranes nests at Wood Buffalo National Park in northern Alberta, Canada and winters at Aransas NWR on the Texas Gulf Coast. If you are interested in conserving Whooping cranes and helping Operation Migration acquire the new aircraft, please visit: http://igg.me/ at/whoop. PHOTO BY JIM KEMP/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFull moon climb set at Cape St. George LighthouseOperation: Migration planning another trip with Whooping cranesOPERATION: MIGRATION/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAn ultralight aircraft guides Whooping cranes from Wisconsin to Florida.

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Sept. 6 It was a week of mysteries in Florida politics. What will the $500 million tax cut that Gov. Rick Scott promised look like? Nobody knows. Not even Scott. Where did Rep. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg, stand with his colleagues after the discovery of a previously-unknown campaign account he had set up? Nobody was really certain, just like few people outside of Rousons inner circle seemed to know about the account in the rst place. And a far more serious mystery continued to unfold about what happened years ago at the shuttered Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys. WHAT CAN I GET FOR $500 MILLION? Scott spent Wednesday making a variety of appearances at events that he said were about jobs. The last stop was at the grand opening of a Bass Pro Shops store in Tallahassee where NASCAR driver Tony Stewart, Miss Florida USA and a variety of hunting and shing celebrities stood alongside the governor on a parking-lot stage. But after his appearance at the event, Scott told reporters that his administration had not released details of one of his key initiatives for the 2014 legislative session a $500 million reduction in taxes and fees because Scott didnt know exactly what the details were yet. Instead, the governor said he was looking for feedback on how to continue his mantra of holding down the cost of living in Florida. So Im working with the House and the Senate to get everybodys idea, he said. I want to ask all of the citizens, what are their ideas? On Friday, the governor laid out a plan for doing just that. Scott said he would embark on an Its Your Money tour of the state to ask the citizens what he should propose in the form of a tax cut. Scott said he would visit West Palm Beach, Fort Lauderdale, Jacksonville, Tampa and Orlando to hear from those who had ideas on how taxes should be sliced. Meanwhile, the Florida Democratic Party took advantage of reports about the projected size of the state surplus to take a whack at the tax-cut proposal. An early nancial projection showed that the state could have a surplus of $845.7 million as lawmakers look to craft a budget for the coming scal year, which begins next July 1. But there are caveats, including the fact that $449 million of the surplus is considered onetime money, and all of the other uncertainties that accompany a projection for a scal year that is almost 10 months away. Nonetheless, Democratic Party Chairwoman Allison Tant hammered away, saying there was no way the state could cover the cost of the tax cuts and continued increases in spending on schools. Voters deserve to know just how much education funding will suffer because the governor wants a new talking point for his re-election campaign, Tant said. After over $1.3 billion in cuts from education, our kids cannot afford to fall victim to Rick Scotts political games again. WILL DEMS STILL WANT TO BE AFFILIATED WITH ROUSON? An already-challenging 2014 election cycle for House Democrats, who will be defending several freshmen in swing districts just as the six-year itch hits President Barack Obama, got a new speed bump when Rouson spent the latter part of the week mixing it up with Tant and other party leaders. It was an awkward position for a man who is set to lead House Democrats after the election. Party leaders discovered this week that, in August, Rouson had set up a fundraising body called the Florida House Democratic Caucus Affiliated Party Committee one of the leadership funds that Democrats had attacked when Republicans reinstated them in 2011. Tant fired two staffers involved in the brouhaha, prompting an angry email from Rouson to his House colleagues. This overreaction today by FDP is an example of why we must continue in this direction for the long term viability of our electoral success as a caucus, he wrote. In a private meeting with Allison Tant yesterday she could have discussed this matter but she chose a public forum to air an internal matter. It is the second public dustup between Rouson and fellow Democrats in less than three months. He faced heated criticism from two House Democrats at a caucus meeting in June, shortly before the partys annual fundraising gala. Most Democrats were cautious Friday, saying they wanted more time to figure out what was going on. There are a lot more questions than answers at this time, said Rep. Alan Williams, a Tallahassee Democrat who brie y ran against Rouson for Democratic leader before backing Rep. Mia Jones, D-Jacksonville. HELP WANTED Perhaps its not mysterious, but there are a still a handful of of ces around state government whose occupants are unknown. Among them: the internal watchdog at the statebacked Citizens Property Insurance Corp., a position that will ultimately be lled by Scott and the Florida Cabinet. Hector Collazo Jr., the inspector general for the Pinellas County clerk of court, and Thomas Raftery, a former member of the FBI who is now with the Delaware River Port Authority, received the most support from a three-member selection committee vetting the applicants. But all four names were sent to the Cabinet, including Bruce Meeks, a former member of the state attorney generals of ce who is now a partner with the law of ce of Roberts & Meeks in Tallahassee, and R. David Holmgren, a deputy inspector general for inspections and evaluations at the U.S. Treasury General for Tax Administration. I just assume that we do all four, give them (Scott and the Cabinet) the broader rather than the narrow, said committee member Tom Kirwin, the inspector general for the Department of Financial Services. There will be just one name for the job of interim chancellor of the State University System: Vice Chancellor and Chief Academic Of cer Jan Ignash. Board of Governors Chairman Dean Colson said he would recommend Ignash during a meeting next Thursday; she would take over temporarily for Chancellor Frank Brogan, who is moving to a similar job in Pennsylvania. And speaking of jobs, state Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, said this week that he will be looking for a promotion. Baxley intends to run for Senate in 2016. LOOKING FOR DOZIER ANSWERS Investigators also continued to try to uncover what happened at the Dozier school decades ago. A group of researchers from the University of South Florida announced Tuesday that they had nished the latest part of their work, exhuming the remains of two boys from halfcentury-old unmarked graves at the Panhandle reform school. The team will now try to identify the remains before returning in search of additional bodies. The two boys are among at least 50 sent to the school between 1900 and 1952 who were buried in unmarked graves, said Erin Kimmerle, a USF anthropologist who is one of the leaders of the excavation. Others have claimed the body count could top 100. The researchers intend to return in October or November to exhume bodies from unmarked graves in other locations on the once 1,400-acre campus that now sits closed behind chain link fencing topped with barbed wired. The state hopes to eventually sell the land. Identifying the bodies could be har der than nding them. As children, they didnt have direct descendants and the parents had their last known address over 50 years ago, Kimmerle said. So you really have to nd aunts and uncles, and then the cousins and go down a generation or two and nd where these people are living today. STORY OF THE WEEK: Rep. Darryl Rouson, D-St. Petersburg, faced criticism from fellow Democrats for setting up an af liated party committee to raise funds for the 2014 campaign, throwing into doubt whether he would remain the choice to lead House Democrats after the 2014 elections. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: We have a very glamorous and handsome and winsome cool black guy for president. I think theyre quite concerned whats going to happen when hes not on the ballot next time. I just dont want them to use this issue. What I saw him do is shift. They cant deliver on the hate crime from the Department of Justice so they pivoted and said lets go look at all these self-defense laws.--Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, explaining his thoughts on the reason President Barack Obama had allegedly politicized the states controversial Stand Your Ground law.WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Mysteries abound in Florida politicsBy SLIM RANDLESSeptember means pencils, books and teachers dirty looks for the youngsters, but it also means state fair season. Thats when the worlds largest zucchini squash is at its prime, of course. The farm animals are all shed off and shiny and cute, their horns polished to diamond-like perfection by hard-working and hopeful kids. The state fair is an annual pilgrimage of sorts, the fairgrounds another temporary home. We need to touch base with turkey legs, corn dogs and deep fried everything. We who sport gray in our hair, or no hair at all, can look with relief at that giant slingshot that shoots high school kids into a state fair orbit. Its a relief because no one expects us to do that. And when we were young enough to actually do that, thankfully, the diabolical state fair scientists hadnt invented the darn thing yet. Cruising around, you get to see everyone at their best. Best fair-type clothing. Best behavior. Best smiles. If you scowl at any point during a visit to the state fair, you either arent trying very hard or someone ran off with your date. And we make those little secret promises to ourselves too. You see, wed love to win a ribbon for making a quilt, or raising an animal, or taking a fabulous photograph or coming up with the best painting in the whole state. But not all of us can do those things. Maybe there should be some other categories for the rest of us, such as finding a parking spot close to the fairgrounds that doesnt cost $5. Practical things. Or how about a ribbon for not missing a days work all year? Or for being a nice guy and always letting other drivers change lanes in front of you. Somehow, though, we have to be content with just knowing we did those things, so we can feel like a state fair blue-ribbon winner inside. Join the conversation wherever you go. Good hearing keeps you connected with friends and loved ones. Call BELTONE at 1-866-867-8700 to schedule your FREE hearing screening.. HOME COUNTRYBack to school, sure, but its also time for fairs -Janet The Wakul la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 9B The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comAimed Amuse Aside Attic Brakes CrimeDesperatelyEdges Erase Error Exits Export Filmed Flask Former Hawaii Invite Irons Lions Might Mixes Moons Music No-one Nylon Orders Ought Owning Paper Paved Prevent Races Ratio ReformResponsibleRetire Roads Roman Rugged Silks Since Skirt Swear Understanding Untie Value Varied Walls Witch Posting date September 9, 2013 The Wakulla News

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PAINTING AND LAWN SERVICE850-570-1687 850-296-5854 R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Todays New Ads 75 WOODED ACRESoff Bloxham Cut-off. 2 miles east of HWY 20, adjacent to Freeman Creek. Across from National Forrest. $3000/per acre. Will divide into 30 and 45 acre track. (850) 576-2695 Chevrolet91 Caprice Classic less than 100k miles runs good, leather seats, pwr windows & tilt steering, cruise control, needs minor repairs, great body $2500. 850-421-6050 LAKE ELLEN LAKEFRONT 3 lots w/ 14 wide mobile home, 2 bd/1 bath, lg screened porch overlooking lake, by boat ramp, (850) 576-2695 Todays New Ads N Crawfordville4/2, 2000 sq. ft. on 12 acres, very private, $950. mo. pets considered, horses ok, 850-519-3228 OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM 84 Mt. Beasor Rd Sopchoppy 1 BR/1 BA House on Sopchoppy River. New interior, big screened porch. $79,000 (850) 524-1026 River PlantationSat Sept 14 8am-4pm Neighborhood wide yard sale. Outdoor dining set, fishing kayak, hammock with frame, accordion, bike rack for trailer hitch, antiques, tools, grandmas china, fishing rods, small appliances, linens and much more. Gate will be open call for info 850-508-2774 Apple I-Phone found at Alligator Point on 8/30 (850) 294-4252 Broken Hearted 56 yr old white male with great tan, non drinker, fun to be with. Looking for friendship, or possible romance.130 lbs, waist 28, athletic condition retired, sufficient income. Can you be her? Crawforville area would be best. (850) 508-8331 WANTED! (HAM Radio Equip.) Vintage or Modern, tubes, tube audio amps, speakers, test equip. call Ethan 775-313-2823 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE DRIVERS:Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. CALL: 888-880-5911 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Heavy Equipment Operator Training! Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators. 3 Weeks Hands On Program. Local Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. GI Bill Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 TURN KEY SPECIALTY Sandwich Shop fo r Sale owner retiring, well est. clientele, just walk in and take over! email: gfurdock@gmail.com MEDARTFriday 20, Sat. 21, & Sunday. 22 7AM-3PM 60 Evalee Road, near Rec Park in Medart Price to sell quickjly Dining Room, Liv. Rm. Bedroom Furniture household items & clothing. River PlantationSat. Sept 14 8am-4pm Neighborhood wide yard sale. Outdoor dining set, fishing kayak, hammock with frame, accordion, bike rack for trailer hitch, antiques, tools, grandmas china, fishing rods, small appliances, linens and much more. Gate will be open call for info 850-508-2774 PRO-FORM XP160 ELLIPTICALEXERCISER 10 Resistance Levels 11 Workout Programs Heart Rate Monitor $200.00 Call 352-382-3224 After 5PM Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. Pet Stop (850-926-7949) www. happyjackinc.com MEDART2BR, 2BA, Very Nice, Fenced yard, Security Gate, central Heat/Air, ceiling fans, No pets or Non smoking firm $600/month + dep. 850-545-0126 N Crawfordville4/2, 2000 sq. ft. on 12 acres, very private, $950. mo. pets considered, horses ok, 850-519-3228 WAKULLA2BR/1BASW, on 5 acres of land, newly repainted, Hardwood floors & fireplace $650/mo + deposit (850) 556-1729 Wakulla GardensSpacious 2/2 SWMH Open Floor Plan $595/mo + deposit.(850) 524-4090 LAKE ELLEN LAKEFRONT 3 lots w/ 14 wide mobile home, 2 bd/1 bath, lg screened porch overlooking lake, by boat ramp, (850) 576-2695 Crawfordville2/1 with fireplace, deck, gas stove, AC/Heat $750 1st & last $60 monthly for water, Mysterious Waters (850) 926-7538 Ochlockonee Baytwo homes available 3BR/3BAhome on canal, screened porch, garage/workshop, boatlift -$1075/month or 2BR/2BAhome on Bay, carport and storage shed $1000/month. First/Last/Deposit. References required. Call Carol Odell, Century 21 Silver Coast Realty, 850-984-5007 CrawfordvilleRoom w/ Private bath and kitchen access. $300 month plus utilities. Spring Creek Hwy and Lower Bridge Rd area. (757) 353-1304 FOR SALE:2 Bdrm. 1 Bath House On 2 Acres 2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing Available with Easy Terms. WAC Call 855-847-6807. OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4PM 84 Mt. Beasor Rd Sopchoppy 1 BR/1 BA House on Sopchoppy River. New interior, big screened porch. $79,000 (850) 524-1026 Best Business Opportunity!!!2400sqft building w/highway frontage on 319, next to the Library. Clean, freshly painted, large parking. Ready to move in! 850-926-2480 MINI FARMS JUST OUTSIDECHATTANOOGA! 10-25 Acres Starting at Only $56,000. Located on Signal Mountain. Ideal for horses and gentleman farming. Call 877-282-4409 75 WOODED ACRESoff Bloxham Cut-off. 2 miles east of HWY 20, adjacent to Freeman Creek. Across from National Forrest. $3000/per acre. Will divide into 30 and 45 acre track. (850) 576-2695 Chevrolet91 Caprice Classic less than 100k miles runs good, leather seats, pwr windows & tilt steering, cruise control, needs minor repairs, great body $2500. 850-421-6050 5872-0919 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WAKULLA COUNTY FUEL FOR COUNTY VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT Invitation to Bid No. ITB #2013-18 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: September 4, 2013 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed bids for ITB 2013-18, WAKULLA COUNTY FUEL FOR COUNTY VEHICLES & EQUIPMENT will be received until 2:00 p.m. on Friday, September 27, 2013. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please direct all questions to: ADMINISTRATIVE: Deborah DuBose, Wakulla County BOCC Phone:850.926.9500 x 707 FAX: 850.926.0940 E-Mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com TECHNICAL Brent Pell, ESG.,Inc 340 Trice Lane Crawfordville, FL 32327 Office(850) 926-7616 E-mail: bell@esginc.net ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com on Wednesday, September 4, 2013, or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on that same day. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate during the selection process on the basis of age, sex, familial status, race, national origin or handicap status. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact the Purchasing Office at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Randy Merritt, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Director, Employee Support Svcs. September12 & 19, 2013 5873-0912 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE 10/10 sale date NOTICE OF SALE Public Notice is hereby given that the C & P Towing will sell at Public Auction for towing and storage, pursuant to Florida Statutes section 731.78. C & PTowing reserves the right to accept or reject any and/or all bids. To be held at: 2170 Crawfordville Hwy, Lot 1 Crawfordville, Florida on 10/10/13 at 9:00 a.m. on the following vehicle(s): 1995 FORD P/U VIN # 1GNCS13W8SK215170 September 12 & 19, 2013 5869-0912 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Robert T. Barwick P.O. Box 492, Panacea, FL32346 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 September 12, 2013 5871-0919 TWN Vs.Santos, Melvin Case No. 65-2011-CA-000338 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000338 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. MELVIN SANTOS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MELVIN SANTOS; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATIONDefendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOTS 7 AND 18, AND THE EAST 1/2 OF LOT 8 AND EAST 1/2 OF LOT 17, BLOCK 28, GREINER`S ADDITION OF THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 2, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 16 BREWSTER RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale on October 3, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5th day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200,St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. September 12 & 19, 2013 Susan Jones, Realtor 566-7584 60 Mackery Court River home w/2.5+ acres on the Beautiful Ochlockonee River. Home features stone wood replace, hardwood oors & nice woodwork throught out. Screened porch & nice decking to sit and enjoy the peacuful river. Walk-out dock & boat lift. Perfect for entertaining! Great place for a weekend retreat or home. $325,000 44 Mill Hollow Immaculate 3BR/2BA pool home on 1.3 acre corner lot. Open spacious oorplan w/vaulted ceilings. Wood burning replace & wood oors in living area. Beautiful kitchen w/island bar & newer appliances. Spacious inside laundry/ mud room. Guest bathroom updated w/granite countertop & xtures. Heated & Cooled sunroom overlooking privacy fenced pool area. Beautiful & mature landscaping. $197,900 A MarkNet Alliance Member AU 479, AB 296 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Details Visit RowellAuctions.com 270 Pruett Road, Eastpoint, FloridaSelling by Order of the U.S. Bankruptcy CourtOffered Online at RowellAuctions.comBidding Ends, Tuesday, Sept. 24th @ 2 p.m. RowellAuctions.comBeautiful Apalachicola Bay View Lot Beautiful Apalachicola Bay View Lot~ Subject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature ~-Fantastic 2.65 Acres Fishermans Paradise -Located near the foot of the St. George Island Bridge -Outstanding Views Overlooking Apalachicola Bay -Property Features Majestic Oak Trees & Great PondIn Co-Op with: Helen Spohrer, CCIM | (850) 899-1262 Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty 3 BR 2BA SWMH $550 mo. Wakulla Realty850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerOne Stop Real Estate Of ce2655 B Crawfordville Hwy Downtown CrawfordvilleRENTAL PROPERTY AVAILABLESTORAGE RENTALSAVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.GIVE US A CALL, DROP IN OR VISIT US AT WAKULLAREALTY.COM Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net g Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 A-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 PAT GREEN S LAWN SERVICELocally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured T ree T rimming Stump Grinding Yard Maintenance Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 11B 5856-0912 TWN Vs.Weems, Richard Case No. 65-2010-CA000205 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000205 5857-0912 TWN Vs. Green, Kenneth 2012-CA-000439 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-CA-000439 522012CA000439XXCICI GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, A FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH O. GREEN; WANDA F. GROOVER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH O. GREEN; JOHN DOE; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, PURSUANT TO THE JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS: << SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON EXHIBIT X > AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGHEST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR CASH, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 AT 11:00 AM AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, Fl 32303, 850.577.4401 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711. DATED: JUNE 19, 2013 BRENT X. THURMOND,CLERK OF THE COURT (SEAL) By:/S/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk VESCHIO LAW GROUP, LLC, 2001 W. KENNEDY BLVD., TAMPA, FL 33606 (813)254-6666 LEGAL DESCRIPTION EXHIBIT X. Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 35, Township 2 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 89 degrees 35 minutes 21 seconds West 1563.54 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 00 degrees 22 minutes 55 seconds East 1465.07 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 89 degrees 35 minutes 31 seconds West 1072.46 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 00 degrees 42 minutes 30 seconds West 351.82 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 89 degrees 43 minutes 38 seconds East 1079.12 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 22 minutes 55 seconds West 349.30 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 8.66 acres more or less. Subject to a 15 foot wide ingress/egress and utility easement lying over and across the Westerly 15 feet described thereof. September 5 & 12, 2013 5859-0912 TWN vs. Carson Development Corp. Case No. 13-18-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-18-CA CRE VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. CARSON DEVELOPMENT CORP., a Florida corporation, and WAKULLA BUSINESS CENTER PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered on June 20, 2013, in that certain cause pending in the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CARSON DEVELOPMENT CORP., a Florida corporation, and WAKULLA BUSINESS CENTER PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, are the Defendants, in Civil Action Case No.: 2013-18-CA, I, Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the aforesaid Court, will at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, September 26, 2013, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property, situate and being in Wakulla County, Florida to-wit: Lot 2 of Wakulla Business Center, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded Plat Book 4, Page 17 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as Property). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: June 21, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk September 5 & 12, 2013 5860-0912 TWN Vs. Rivers, Jon Case #2012-CA-000380 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000380 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Jon T. Rivers and Christina Lin Rivers a/k/a Christina L. Rivers, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated August 1, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000380 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Jon T. Rivers and Christina Lin Rivers a/k/a Christina L. Rivers, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 26, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) 709.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH PARALLELTO THE WEST BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) 417.42 FEET, THEN TURN 89LEFT AND RUN EAST 208.71 FEET, THEN TURN 90LEFT AND RUN NORTH 417.42 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP, 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, THEN RUN WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY208.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING BEING IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH AROADWAYEASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS, EGRESS AND REGRESS AS GRANTED BYBEATRICE CARTER, AWIDOW, IN ROADWAYEASEMENT RECORDED JULY2, 1987, IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 132, PAGE 348, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 September 5 & 12, 2013 5861-0912 TWN Vs. Paugh, Matthew Case #2012-CA-000479 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000479 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Matthew G. Paugh a/k/a Matthew Paugh; Unknown Spouse of Matthew G. Paugh a/k/a Matthew Paugh; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated August 1, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000479 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Matthew G. Paugh a/k/a Matthew Paugh are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 26, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 72 AND 73, BLOCK 17, WAKULLAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida 5863-0919 TWN Vs. Crosby, John W. Case No. 13-141-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 13-141-CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank 201 S. Broad Street, P.O. Box 240, Cairo, GA39828 Plaintiff, v. JOHN W. CROSBYA/K/AJOHN WAYNE CROSBY, LAURAM. CROSBYA/K/ALAURAMARGARETCROSBY, GREATSENECAFINANCIALCORPORATION d/b/a GREATSENECAFINANCIALCORP.,DODGE ENTERPRISES, INC., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JOHN W. CROSBYA/K/AJOHN WAYNE CROSBY LAURAM. CROSBYA/K/ALAURAMARGARETCROSBY YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Wakulla, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: Commencing at the intersection of the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane and the Southern boundary of Pecan Street, as per map or plat of Hudson Heights, Unit 4, recorded on Page 38 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Thence run Southerly along the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane 450 to the Norther boundary of a new street known as Walnut Street, thence run Easterly and at right angles to the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane and along the Northern boundary of Walnuts Street 518 feet to a concrete monument marking the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street and the Easterly boundary of Cypress Street. Thence continue in the same direction along the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street 194 feet to an iron pipe which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From the POINT OF BEGINNING run thence Northerly and parallel to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 225 feet to an iron pipe, thence run Easterly and at right angles to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 97 feet to an iron pipe, thence run Southerly and parallel to the Eastern Boundary of Raker Lane 225 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe on the Northern boundary of Walnut Street, thence run Westerly along the Northerly boundary of Walnut Street and at right angles to the Eastern boundary of Raker Lane, 97 feet, more or less to the POINT OF BEGINNING, and being situate in the E1/2 of Lot No. 76 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida; together with a 1999 Redman mobile home ID#FLA14613828A& FLA14613828B. Commonly known as: 80 HARVEYPITMAN STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203, Tallahassee, FL32312, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 22nd day of August, 2013. CLERK OF COURT By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Timothy D. Padgett, P.A. 6267 Old Water Oak Road, Suite 203 Tallahassee, FL32312, Counsel for Plaintiff September 12 & 19, 2013 5864-0919 TWN Vs.Jones, Joseph B. Case No. 65-2012-CA-000056 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000056 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCAITION Plaintiff, v. JOSEPH B. JONES; DANAN. JONES; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure datedJuly 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOTS 64 & 65, BLOCK 17, WAKULLAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 152 RENEGADE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2709 at public sale on October 3, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5th day of August 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200, St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. September 12 & 19, 2013 5865-0919 TWN vs. Barksdale, Jo Royster, Case No. 12-368-CANOS Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-368-CA CADC/RADCVENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company Plaintiff, v. JO ROYSTER BARKSDALE, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 19th day of June 2013 and entered in Case No. 12-368-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CADC/RADC Venture 2011-1, LLC is Plaintiff, and Jo Royster Barksdale, et. al. are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the courthouse located at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 am on the 3rd day of October, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: SEE ATTACHED EXHIBIT A APERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN SIXTY(60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. BECKER & POLIAKOFF, P.A.,Attorneys for Plaintiff Alhambra Towers,121 Alhambra Plaza, 10th Floor Coral Gables, Florida 33134,Phone: (305) 262-4433; Fax: (305) 442-2232 By:/s/ Adam Cervera, Esq., Florida Bar #81679 Primary: acervera@becker-poliakoff.com,secondary: cpons@becker-poliakoff.com Secondary: cgarcia@becker-poliakoff.com EXHIBIT A Property Appraises # 12121-000: The South 10 feet of Lot 11 and North-half of Lot 10 of Block C Unit No. 2 West Point Subdivision of Live Oak Island, as per map or plat thereof, recorded on page 21 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. ALSO: Property Appraisers # 12121-000: Astrip of land 5 feet wide all of the way across the Northerly side of the South-half of Lot 10 of Block C of West Point Subdivision of Live Oak Island, **(Unit No. 2)*** as shown by plat of record on page 21 of Plat Book No. 1 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. ALSO: Property Appraisers # 12121-000: Commence at the Southwest comer of Lot 11, Block C, Unit No. 2 of West Point Subdivision of Live Oak island, as per map or plat thereof, recorded on page 2 I of Piet Book I of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and run thence North 15 degrees 39 minutes East along the Westerly boundary of said Lot No. 11 a distance of 10.0 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING From said POINT OF BEGINNING, run thence South 74 degrees 21 minutes East, parallel with the South boundary of said Lot 11 a distance of 113.08 feet to a point lying on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of Live Oak Island Road, thence leaving said right-of-way, run North 72 degrees 49 minutes 49 seconds West 113.12 feet to a point on the Westerly boundary of said Lot No. 11, thence run South 15 degrees 39 initiates West along said Westerly boundary of Lot No. 11, a distance of 3.0 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, ALSO: Property Appraises # 12118-000: Lot 7, Block C of West Point Subdivision of Live Oak Island, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 19 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. ALSO : All of Lot 10, Block A and a portion of Lot 11, Block A, of Panacea North a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 7 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and also Lots I, 3, and 5 of a plat of Lands of W. E. Smith, Panacea Springs, Florida said lots being in the North side of Georgia Avenue (now Otter Lake Road ) and being in Section 24, Township 5 South, Range 2 West said Plat 5866-0919 TWN Vs.Parker, Brittany R Case No. 65-2012-CA-000037 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000037 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRITTANYRACHELLE PARKER; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 24, BLOCK 22, WAKULLAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 187 ROCHELSIE RD., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-2719 at public sale on October 10, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 5th day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond,Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200,St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHA WELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL TDD 1-800-955-8771. September 12 & 19, 2013 5870-0919 TWN Vs. Graham, Benjamin Case No. 652008CA000118FCXXXX IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652008CA000118FCXXXX WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS OF SECURITIZED ASSETBACKED RECEIVABLES LLC TRUST2004-D01, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES SERIES 2004-DO1 Plaintiff, vs. BENJAMIN F GRAHAM A/K/ABENJAMIN GRAHAM, LLYNN GRAHAM, ANYAND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTS IN POSSESSION Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 3rd day of October 2013, at 11:00 AM at Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 1, 2 and 3, in Block 47, of Wakulla Gardens Unit Five, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 2nd day of August, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (COURTSEAL) ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF Timisha J. Brooks,Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E,Orlando, Florida 32812,(407) 381-5200 September 12 & 19, 2013 of Land being on record in Deed Book 6, Page 149 of the public records of Wakulla County, Florida and being more particularly described as follows: Begin at an iron rod and cap( marked # 7160) marking the Northwest comer of Lot 10, Block A of Panacea North a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book I, Page 7 of the Public Records of Wakulla County Florida, thence run South 89 degrees 54 minutes 13 seconds East along the North boundary of said tot a distance of 153.75 feet to an iron pipe lying on the Westerly right-of-way boundary of U. S. Highway No. 98 thence leaving said North lot boundary run South 00 degrees 58 minutes 59 seconds West along said Westerly right-of-way boundary 150.02 feet to a concrete monument (marked # 2919) marking a point of intersection with the Northerly right -of-way boundary of Otter Lake Road, thence leaving said Westerly right-of-way boundary not North 85 degrees 44 minutes OD seconds West along said North right-of-way boundary 336.98 feet to an iron rod and cap (malted # 7160), thence leaving said Northerly right-of-way boundary run North 02 degrees 02 minute 26 seconds East 156.52 feet to an iron pipe, thence run South 85 degrees 47 minutes 23 seconds East 179.16 feet to a concrete monument (marked # 2919 ), thence run South 01 degrees 58 minutes 29 seconds East 18.09 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING Containing 1.16 acres more or less. September 12 & 19, 2013 (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 September 5 & 12, 2013 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS 3143 Shadeville Hwy, near Wakulla Station 3BD/2BA house, no smoking, no pets, $900 per month with $900 security deposit Available Sept 1st. 14 Cutchins Court 3BD/2BA Doublewide, no smoking, no pets, $700 per month with $700 Deposit, Available Sept. 15th. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!7 Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA CHA, Carport, 1 Car Garage. $630 mo. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550 mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $1,050 mo.

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. RICHARD STEPHEN WEEMS; LONALISAWEEMS; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on June 20, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on July 24, 2013, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 11, OF DOE FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ATTACHED THERETO HAVING VIN #47620322GA, TITLE #66714392 AND VIN #47620322GB, TITLE #66714391. WHICH IS NOW RETIRED. a/k/a 9 WHITE TAILDR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-1644 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, on September 26, 2013 at 11:00 AM. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 25 day of July, 2013 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL33716 727-536-4911 phone / FAX 727-539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHAWELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALLTDD 1-800-955-8771. September 5 & 12, 2013 5824-0912 TWN Vs. Nelson, Terry Case No.13-109-CANotice of Action I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 13-109-CA GIBBS REALTY CORPORATION, a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. TERRY C. NELSON, CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, CLAYTON C. OAKS, SR., CHARLES W. MATHENY, III, as successor trustee under the Charles W. Matheny, Jr. Trust Agreement, OAKS PROPERTIES, INC., a Florida dissolved corporation, THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF EVALINDA LOBDILL, JESSICA STAR DUNCAN, ALLANA MOON DUNCAN LUQUETTE, SAVANNAH SKY SHEALY n/k/a SAVANNAH SKY GARNER, and BENJAMIN EAGLE DUNCAN, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF EVALINDA LOBDILL YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following real property in Wakulla County, Florida: Commence at the Northeast corner of Section 12, Township 6 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 11 minutes 10 seconds West 978.40 feet; thence South 17 degrees 57 minutes 40 seconds West 394.90 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly right of U.S. Highway 98 said point also lying on a curve to the right with a radius of 3337.79 feet, said point also lying on the Northerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 527, Page 370 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida said point being the POINT OF BEGININNG; thence leaving said Northerly Boundary line and said POINT OF BEGININNG run along said Westerly right of way line and said curve Southeasterly along the arc, thru a central angle 04 degrees 58 minutes 56 seconds, for a distance of 290.24 feet, chord of said arc being South 07 degrees 02 minutes 22 seconds East 290.15 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way boundary line run South 79 degrees 35 minutes 39 seconds West 318.88 feet; thence South 03 degrees 59 minutes 17 seconds East 76.02 feet to an iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of property described in Official Record Book 572, Page 375 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northwest corner run South 03 degrees 59 minutes 17 seconds East 100.04 feet to an iron pipe marking the Southwest corner of said property as described in Official Record Book 572, Page 375; thence leaving said Southwest corner run South 05 degrees 17 minutes 58 seconds East along the Westerly right of way of a 10 wide easement as described in Official Record Book 208, Page 424, in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida for a distance of 62.29 feet to an iron pipe marking the intersection of said Westerly edge of easement with the Northerly right of way of Surf Road also known as County Road #372 said point lying on a curve to the right, said curve having a radius of 1106.28 feet; thence leaving said Westerly edge of easement run along said curve and said Northerly right of way thru a central angle of 02 degrees 39 minutes 26 seconds, for an arc distance of 51.30 feet, chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 32 minutes 41 seconds West 51.30 feet to a 4x4 concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 183, Page 646, in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northerly right of way boundary line run along the Westerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record book 183, Page 646, North 05 degrees 57 minutes 37 seconds West 298.31 feet to an old axle marking the Northeast corner of said property described in Book 183, Page 646; thence leaving said Northeast corner run North 02 degrees 55 minutes 40 seconds West 258.66 feet to a 4x4 concrete monument lying on the North Boundary line of property described in official Record Book 527, Page 370 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence run along said Northerly boundary line North 85 degrees 48 minutes 59 seconds East 356.47 feet to the POINT OF BEGININNG, containing 2.92 acres more or less. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jack E. Kiker, III, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 4128, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-4128, on or before September 20, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. Dated this 8 day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk August 22 & 29 and September 5 & 12, 2013 5867-0919 Case 13-74 CPTWN Est. of Yates, Thomas Ray, NTC IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-74 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF THOMAS RAYYATES 5868-0919 Case 13-76 CPTWN Est. of Carter, Beatrice, NTC IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-76 CP IN RE: ESTATE OF BEATRICE CARTER Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of Beatrice Carter, deceased, File 13-76 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the co-personal representatives and the personal representativesattorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is September 12, 2013.Attorney for Co-Personal Representatives: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327, 850) 926-8245 Co-Personal Representatives:Mary Carter Murphy73 Elie Carter Lane, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Elex Hiram Carter 29 Elie Carter Lane, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 12 & 19, 2013 5862-0919 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Seminole Self Storage LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDASTATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON SEPTEMBER 27, 2013 at 1 1:00a.m AT 2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINIWAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTYOF: ANGELACRUM HAYDEE CESAR Before the sale date of September 27, 2013 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. September 12 & 19, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5843-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 053 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2245Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10478-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 7 LOT 16 OR 1 P 157 & OR 50 P 278 Name in which assessed JOE VINCENT WOOD said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5844-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 055 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2548Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-121-122-11977-089PARADISE VILLAGE SHELL POINT UNIT 1 LOT 89 OR 52 P 96 & OR 99 P 522 Name in which assessed BETTY J BRAUN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5845-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 054 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2444Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-086-188-11586-06CWILDWOOD ACRES PHASE II BLOCK C LOT 6 OR 134 P 706; OR 134 P 861; OR 176 P 223 OR 179 P 753; OR 480 P 615 Name in which assessed DANA LYNN HANSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5846-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 056 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #675 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:01-6S-02W-147-03576-C04TARPINE BLK C LOT 4 OR 59 P 50; OR 67 P 480-492 OR 523 P 202 Name in which assessed PANACEA COASTAL PROP INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this16day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5847-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 057 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1502Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-035-008-06918-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1 BLOCK 7 LOT 56 OR 2 P 192; OR 121 P 984; OR 228 P 366 OR 495 P 364; OR 517 P 728; OR 574 P 454 Name in which assessed SCOTT E & KATE STRATTON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5848-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 058 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1052Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:17-3S-01W-318-04457-D23LINZY MILL S/D LOT 23 BLK D OR 744 P 87 Name in which assessed THE PINNACLE GROUP OF THE PANHANDLE LLC & CONLIN JOHN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5849-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 059 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2258Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10508-000GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 17 LOTS 2,3,4,5,6,7,13,14 & 15 AND A PORTION OF LOTS 1, 8 THRU 12 DB 58 P 510; OR 121 P 202 Name in which assessed R.E.M. DEVELOPERS, LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5850-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 060 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2259Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10508-002GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 17 A PORTION OF LOTS 1,8,9,10,11 & 12 OR 521 P 861; OR 548 P 165; OR 205 P 184; OR 337 P 643 Name in which assessed R.E.M. DEVELOPERS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5851-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 061 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2251Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10505-025GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 13 LOT 1 & E 1/2 OF 2 DB 31 P 405; OR 50 P 277; OR 104 P 337; OR 179 P 190 OR 190 P 150; OR 523 P 866 Name in which assessed TARPON IV LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5852-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 062 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2253Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10506-021GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 13 LOT 21 & E 1/2 OF 20 DB 31 P 405; OR 50 P 277; OR 104 P 337; OR 179 P 187 OR 196 P 153; OR 519 P 327 Name in which assessed TARPON IV LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 Deceased. NOTICE T O CREDIT ORS The administration of the estate of Thomas Ray Yates, deceased, File 13-74 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE.ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is September 12, 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative:Olivia Yates 116 Magnolia Ridge,Crawfordville, Florida 32327 September 12 & 19, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Brain Teaser 12345 678910 111213 14 15 16 1718 19 20 2122 23242526 2728 29 3031 32 33 34 353637 38 3940 41 42 43 4445 4647 48 49 5051 5253 54 55 56 575859 60616263 64 65 66 67 68 69 Across 1. "Wheel of Fortune" host Pat 6. Fancy parties 11. ___ Solo ("Star Wars" ole) 14. In unison 15. Animal of the Andes 16. Driving force 17. Sun-Tzu's classic reatise 19. Prepare to fire 20. Space Shuttle org. 21. Alfalfa's sweetheart on The Little Rascals" 23. Slowpokes 27. Overly formal 29. Beatles song from "The White Album" 30. Some Arabs 32. Northern European anguage 34. Run casually 35. Lady's secret, perhaps 38. Lacking life 39. Word with mirror or graven 41. Off in the distance 42. Japanese currency 43. Petty quarrel 44. Type of kiss or pie 46. Rulers of the heavens 49. Exhausted 50. Stop sign's shape 52. Common cuisine 54. Soup base 55. Use a ewer 56. Eternity, seemingly 57. London landmark 64. ___-fi (literary genre) 65. Remove data 66. Tribe of Ontario and New York 67. Computer key 68. New-car nightmares 69. Wives of knights Down 1. Approached the bench? 2. Fireplace bit 3. Average guy 4. Santa ___, CA 5. Popcorn-to-be 6. Like some magazine covers 7. ___-Romeo (Italian car company) 8. Alan Dershowitz's field 9. Simon and Garfunkel's "I ___ Rock" 10. Canned fish 11. John Ritter TV show 12. Good at gymnastics, maybe 13. Desert wanderer 18. Road gunk 22. Will Smith role 23. Watergate figure G. Gordon ___ 24. Not in the dark 25. Bar order 26. Flippant 27. Big-city blight 28. Sioux shelter 31. Send to cloud nine 33. Conscious of, slangily 36. Chess and checkers, for two 37. Wear away, as a coastline 40. Principal 41. In the same family tree 43. Saw 45. "Shaken, not ___" (James Bond line) 47. Enjoy eggs 48. Sportscaster's info 50. Stout 51. Comfy shoes 53. Center 55. Annoying type 58. Mined material 59. Sickly pale 60. Lyricist Gershwin 61. Like romantic lights 62. Beaver Cleaver's exclamation 63. Curvy letter Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 23 4 451 2167 8 15 3629 948 3 576 518 7923 00 9 HometownContent 617 2385 4 9 483759162 259146387 748 921653 136875294 592463871 324 587916 965314728 871692435 SAJAK GALAS H ASONE LLAMA E THEARTOFWAR A NASA DAR LAGGERS STILT IWILL YEMENIS DANISH LOPE A DRAB IMAGE AF YEN SPAT ESKI DEITIES TIR OCTAGON CHINE BROTH POUR EON TOWERBRID SCI ERASE ERI ESC DENTS DAM

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 Page 13B 1. LANGUAGE: What does the phrase entre nous mean? 2. TELEVISION: What was the name of The Flintstones family pet? 3. AD SLOGANS: What product uses the advertising slogan, How do you spell relief? 4. MYTHOLOGY: Who was the Greek goddess of the hearth and home? 5. GEOGRAPHY: In which city would you find the famous Trevi Fountain? 6. MUSIC: Which recording artist had a 1970s hit with the song Crocodile Rock? 7. LITERATURE: What was Dorothy Parkers pseudonym? 8. MOVIES: Which blockbuster movie featured the character Jack Dawson? 9. CHEMISTRY: What is the Periodic Table symbol for silver? 10. COMICS: What is the name of the military base where Beetle Bailey and his friends reside? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Trivia Test Answers 1. Privately, between us 2. Dino 3. Rolaids 4. Hestia 5. Rome 6. Elton John 7. Constant Reader 8. Titanic (Leonardo DiCaprio) 9. Ag (argentum) 10. Camp Swampy Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 12, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comIs a transatlantic cruise for you?By LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsTransatlantic cruises have been attracting travelers for generations. Once the playground of the very rich, todays repositioning cruises are value priced. Debunk the myths, and discover that there is something for everyone. Even the most expensive cruise lines have relaxed dress codes. A tuxedo is not mandatory, and most nights are smart casual. Choose to dress up and enjoy the few formal nights or wear shorts to the casual dining caf. For the athletic, try a few laps around the track, Zumba, yoga, spinning or aerobics classes. Perhaps try an afternoon workout in the tness center. Learn the tango and the salsa with the ships dancers. Then cool down with an indulgent treatment in the spa. Choose intellectual pursuits with the enrichment series lectures. Photography, history, antiques, astronomy the lecturers and topics vary on each sailing. Take classes on the iPad. Or learn to speak a foreign language. The choice is yours. Make sushi, or learn how to cook the perfect steak at the cooking demonstrations. Better still take a cooking class on Oceanias Regatta. Discover your inner artist with watercolor or scrapbooking classes. On Celebritys Silhouette attend daily glass blowing demonstrations by the Corning Glass Institute. Read by the pool outdoors, or in the solarium. Enjoy a luxuriant soak in the whirlpool with views of the sea. Find a deck chair on the promenade and watch the world go by. On Royal Caribbean, families are never bored. Ice-skate, climb the rock wall, play a round of mini-golf, surf on the ow rider, play volleyball or basketball, stay as busy as you like. Need some alone time? Most cruise lines offer an excellent childrens program. For fun and games, attend the not so newlywed show, dancing with the of cers, guest talent show, or afternoon trivia contests. Catch a movie with Princess Cruises movies under the stars for a one of a kind experience. A daily schedule announces the lineup of activities. Entertainment is on tap day and night. By day listen to live jams by the pool, or acoustical guitar as you sip cappuccino. By night Broadway style shows dazzle, and musicians, singers, comedians, jugglers, and dancers are de rigueur. Featuring a variety of styles, there is live music all evening long, and a DJ in the club till the wee hours. Relax on your balcony as you nosh on room service. Up early, or sleeping late, breakfast is waiting. Grab a burger by the pool, or a fresh grilled salmon steak in the solarium on Celebritys Solstice class ships. Enjoy seated lunch on sea days, or simply choose a la carte meals in the caf. At dinner savor ve course gourmet meals. Dont forget room service is 24 hours. Last minute transatlantic cruises, known to repeat cruisers as TAs, can drop to as little as $35 per day, per person. Even with return airfare the per diem will often still be under $100. When you consider this includes food and lodging as well as transportation and entertainment, it is de nitely a bargain. As the last sea day rolls around, you will wonder where has all the time gone? PHOTO BY CUNARD CRUISESTransatlantic cruises are packed with activities for adults and children and the price for last minute cruises can be had for as little as $35 per day, per person. *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and renances. Renances and used car purchases 2006 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. Treat your pooch to a day at the Spa! SATURDAY,SEPT. 14th10:00 A.M. 3:00 P.M. Hudson Park Crawfordville Spa amenities include: All Natural Ingredients Aromatherapy Bubble Bath (lavender, vanilla, mint and more) Le Flea & Tick Spray Towel Drying PAWdecure Donations: $12 All amenities (flea dip included) $7 Regular bath only $5 Pet Photos (fall decorations & various costumes) $7 Anal Gland Extraction $25 Micro-chipping (includes registration of micro-chip) $15 Plush Pet Pillows CHAT of Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326 www.chatofwakulla.org A copy of the official registration CH-13163 and financial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. At Townsend's Nads Mini Storage,59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit A32 or brought to the Yard Sale( ) before Friday afternoon www.wakullawildlife.org For more information about FWMA visit our website: 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission Dedicated to the rescue & rehabilitation of injured and orphaned wild mammals and birds GIANT YARD SALE Thurs Sept 26th 8am 3pm (Set Up) Fri Sept 27th 8am 3pm Sat Sept 28th 8am 1pm Sponsored in part by LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt