Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00479

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T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 CentsStreet Beat ......................................................................Page 2A Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church/Obituaries ...........................................................Page 5A Community .....................................................................Page 6A School .............................................................................Page 7A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 8A Water Ways .....................................................................Page 9A Taking Care of Business ................................................Page 10A Weekly Roundup..............................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 13A Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 14A Thinking Outside the Book ...........................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 4B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 4B Comics .............................................................................Page 7B Travel ...............................................................................Page 8B INDEX OBITUARIES Melvin Levon Harrell Sr. Dorothy Mae Hunt Page 1B newsThe WakullaPromise Land is a local home church whose goal, says Hamel, Is to minister the love of Jesus Christ by meeting the needs of our community.Ž Through typical church services, spiritual support, prayer, discipleship, counseling and fellowship they aim to do big things for those around them. However, that list is only the beginning in terms of the ways Promise Land is active in the county. They run an emergency shelter, and provide emergency food assistance through a food bank that is open to the general public on the “ rst Wednesday of every month from 1 p.m. until 3 p.m. Promise Land also has a substance abuse recovery ministry for adult men, home furnishing assistance through their thrift store … which includes clothing, shoes, household trinkets, decorations and necessities. Outside the thrift store, a special barbecue lunch is held every Friday afternoon. The church plans to have the same thing that they provide, in terms of substance abuse recovery for men, available for women as well … anticipating a start date of January 2014. Additionally, a donation-based lawn care and handyman service is another way that the ministry assists the community, says Hamel. Men in the church will volunteer a few hours of their Friday or Saturday and spend time cutting peoples grass or “ xing things that need attention. The pastor says that through the efforts of his team, last year they were able to offer 2,196 families with emergency food as well as 7,350 nights of lodging were provided at their substance abuse recovery shelter for men, while an average of 20 individuals stayed on a monthly basis obtaining substance abuse recovery assistance. We also had 64 individuals publicly commit their life to Christ,Ž says Hamel. Just behind the football stadium at Wakulla High School, in the small plaza where the Dollar General stands, Promise Land is currently renovating a section of the building and plan to house a new sanctuary and youth center. We dont know all of the things that we will do there yet,Ž says Hamel, but some plans include providing youth-related intervention and prevention programs for at-risk youth, as well as to serve as a general gathering place for youth.Ž As the building is not yet up and running, nothing is set in stone, says Hamel, but the group plans to partner with different agencies around the county who might be able to provide valuable resources for Wakullas youth. Were also working with the sheriffs of“ ce and the school resource of“ cers,Ž Hamel says, to see what we might be able to do to help keep youth out of trouble and to make good decisions.Ž Through the churchs new central location, Hamel says they are also working hard to try and bring Celebrate Recovery into the county. The program, he says, is a Christ-centered, 12step recovery program. Currently, the biggest Celebrate Recovery that is nearby is in Tallahassee at Killearn Methodist Church, Theres nothing like it in the county,Ž he says, so were hoping to bring it to this area.Ž Promise Land also plans to provide help and services for veterans by establishing their own Veterans Home. We want to serve them by providing housing as well as the provision of spiritual, physical and mental services,Ž Hamel says. Turn to Page 3A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read Daily Our 118th Year, 36th Issue Thursday, September 5, 2013County budget includes cutsBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net According to County Administrator David Edwards and Chief Deputy Clerk Greg James, the proposed county budget for the fiscal year of 2013-2014 contains big changes. With the countys property value having obtained a 3.92 percent decrease over the past year, the overall budget has been affected, leaving county staff with no other option but to make cuts to compensate for its losses. There just hasnt been enough housing closeouts and new construction,Ž said Edwards. We believe its leveling out, but we need growth.Ž In order to outpace depreciation and to yield growth in ad valorem taxes, he said, the county needs about 75 homes built per year … a goal that is not currently being met. In an effort to wean the county off of its large dependence on ad valorem taxes, Edwards said they have succeeded in diversifying the countys revenue. Between ups and downs in the market as well as the attacks by the state legislature on how the counties can levy the ad valorem taxes,Ž said Edwards, it becomes very difficult to manage something efficiently when you have such huge swings.Ž However, Edwards said they have managed to do so through the Public Service Tax and the Communication Services Tax, adding about $2 million to the countys cash flow, helping to stabilize it. Last year, the county pulled the sheriffs funding out of the general fund and into its own with the creation of the sheriffs Fine and Forfeiture Fund. The fund, Edwards said, allowed them to monitor revenues and expenses more easily. Of that fund, 87 percent is made up of contributions from ad valorem taxes which, in the upcoming year, means a proposed budget amount of about $7.2 million. Turn to Page 2A Promise Land offers help Wetlands petition draft turned inBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net On Thursday, Aug, 29, Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells con“ rmed that he had received the initial draft of the petition from those who have promised to collect signatures aimed at saving the countys wetlands ordinance. Wells said that state statutes require an initial draft containing no more than 15 words in the title, followed by a 75-word summary, which must be turned into him. He said that he then checks that all the requirements are ful“ lled before he approves the document, whereby the group can then begin the formation of the of“ cial petition. Once Wells sees the “ nal draft and approves, the Wetlands Alliance will be allowed to begin their drive for signatures. Wells said that, according to the countys charter, the petition must earn the equivalent of 30 percent of the number of voters who turned out in the previous years election. In 2012, Wells said, 18,501 voters were recorded at the polls. This means that 5,550 signatures must be obtained in order to save the countys ordinance. Furthermore, of those 5,550 signatures, each of the countys voting districts must contribute by 30 percent. The hunt for signatures, said Wells, may last up to six months, at which time 10 cents for each signature will be charged … an amount required by the state for veri“ cation of each signature. If all requirements are ful“ lled, the referendum will be placed on the ballot, whereas the responsibility of the countys wetlands ordinance will shift from the county commission to that of the citizens who turn out at the polls. Turn to Page 3APHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYORPastor Glenn Hamel and his wife Vera in front of the ministrys thrift store.Ministry is active in providing services to community By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netThere is hope in Christ, and Promise Land Ministries Lighthouse is here for youŽ … that is what Pastor Glenn Hamel would like the citizens of Wakulla to know “ rst and foremost. County requests sheri reduce o ces budget by $150,000AMANDA MAYORDeputy Clerk Greg James and Administrator David Edwards look at the budget on their laptops. Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells The weekly barbecue outside the thrift store. W a r E a g l e s w i n War Eagles win S p o r t s Sports

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question: How many pets do you have?HOLLY WELLS VCA Animal ClinicSeven pets … we have three pit bulls, two Yorkies, a rat terrier and the rest are mutts. SHARI EVANS Teacher at Wakulla HighFour … three dogs and one cat. And a “ sh tank! They were all strays.Ž THEODORE LUFF StudentI have two. One is a Labrador with red nose pit-mix. his name is Jeter. The other is a Cockapoo and his name is Buster.Ž AUSTIN HILL StudentMy dogs name is Lilly. She is a Lab and red nose pit mix. When she licks your ear, instead of calling it a wet willy, we call it a wet Lilly.Ž CHRISTINE RUSSELL Digestive Disease ClinicI have Haus, a Beaglepit bull mix. He is a little hard-headed but a really sweet dog. The newest edition is Deacon … he is a Yorkie, and also very sweet and playful.Ž … Compiled by Lynda Kinsey From Page 1A The remaining portion of the fund is made up of the jail bed revenue, which is comprised of the $75 per inmate per day that the county receives for the inmates who are part of the Federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement program. The jail bed revenue portion of the sheriffs fund has been low for the past two years, said Edwards, which causes problems in terms of trying to manage ” uctuating revenue. Theres no consistency to that revenue and we have no control over the inmate population,Ž he said. So that makes it hard.Ž The two expenses that come out of the Fine and Forfeiture Fund are corrections and law enforcement. Of last years $5,168,000 law enforcement fund amount, James says the county is requesting that they cut it by $150,000 in the upcoming year. However, they say, those decisions lie solely in the hands of the sheriffs of“ ce. They can cut anything they want to,Ž said Edwards. We dont have any say in it and we dont want any say in it. That is purely their choice.Ž James explained that they recommended that the Sheriffs of“ ce take a $150,000 cut this year as well as an equal cut next year because, after looking at a “ ve-year budget projection, an average loss of about $300,000 will be obtained year after year. Were doing the same thing with each of the countys departments,Ž said Edwards. Were not treating the sheriffs department any different than anyone else, but what it boils down to is that theyre in their own fund and they need to work with us to make it work.Ž Unless the revenue can sustain itself, he said, the only two options left will be to either cut the ICE program and the funding that comes with it, or raise taxes … or a combination of the two. Its our fiduciary responsibility to not put money into something thats going to decline,Ž he said. Lets let it stabilize and then we can pump money into it, but until then we cant pump money into a black hole.Ž In terms of the general fund revenue, the county is anticipating that it will bring in an amount of about $8.2 million. However, due to recent legislation in which the state decided that it would fully fund the Florida Retirement System, the county has had to absorb about $296,000 in bene“ t increases related to the program, increasing the countys cost of government by about $71,000. Additionally, said Edwards, the general fund is also absorbing a $200,000 fuel cleanup project and a $247,000 roof “ x effort for the jail. Also, the Affordable Health Care Act is contributing to an increase in budget allocations for health care costs. With all of that and the revenues where theyre at,Ž said Edwards, these changes are critical. If things stay the way they are, it has the potential to bring the county to its knees.Ž All of that being said, taxpayers will not see an increase in taxes even though property values have declined. The county will be collecting 4.46 percent less than last year and, if commissioners pass the proposed budget as it stands, it doesnt plan to go to the roll-up millage rate. This is made possible, said Edwards, because the county has diversi“ ed its revenue.County budget includes cuts

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From Page 1A In issues relating to the petition, Commissioner Howard Kessler at the last board meeting on Aug. 19, had proposed in an agenda item that the threshold in the county charter be reduced from 30 percent. Kessler acknowledged that it wouldnt affect the current petition efforts because it couldnt be changed in time to relieve them of what Kessler called a huge burden. The board let the motion die, claiming there was no need or precedent for the alteration. Commissioner Richard Harden went so far as to call the 30 percent rule Commissioner Kesslers rule as Kessler was on the board when the rule was proposed and seconded the motion that contributed to its passing. At the end of the Aug. 19 board meeting, during the time when commissioners gave closing statements and announcements, Chairman Randy Merritt brought up a proposal that the board consider going back to his original proposal the one that had gotten this years wetlands ordinance talk rolling. He had proposed in June that there be the establishment of a variance procedure allowing property owners access inside the ordinances 75foot buffer zone. Within a month, Commissioner Harden had come back with the proposal to delete the ordinance from the countys comprehensive plan altogether under the premise that state rules, regulations and guidelines were suf cient enough to protect the countys wetlands. Both Merritt and Hardens proposals had passed 4-1 with the lone vote against coming from Kessler. Passionate arguments and viewpoints have come from sides both for the preservation of the ordinance and those who believe the state can do the job well enough. As of the 29th, Buddy Wells said he had not yet received the nal draft of the petition and therefore, signatures had not yet started being collected. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. City of Sopchoppy AUGUST 1, 29, SEPTEMBER 5, 2013PUBLIC MEETINGS TO ADOPT THE 2013-14 BUDGET OF THE CITY OF SOPCHOPPYThe City of Sopchoppy will hold two public hearings on Ordinance 2013-02, An Ordinance of the City of Sopchoppy adopting the operating budgets for the City of Sopchoppy for the 2013-2014 scal year. The rst public hearing, followed by the rst reading of Ordinance 201302, will be held Monday, August 12, 2013 at the regular meeting of the Council. The second public hearing and adoption of Ordinance, 201302 will be held September 9, 2013 during the regular monthly meeting of the City Council. Both meetings will begin at 6:30 p.m. and will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, Florida. A copy of the Budget may be viewed at City Hall from 8:00 a.m. 4:30 p.m. Monday thru Thursday and from 8:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m. Friday. If special assistance is needed to attend this meeting, please call the Clerks ofce at 962-4611 at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. 000FQJ9Wetlands petition draft turned in From Page 1AHe also hopes to establish a liaison who may help them to obtain their due bene ts. Its usually about a six month to a year process for them to receive things like pensions and disability funds, he says. We want to provide them a safe place to stay if they need it while theyre going through that process. Hamel says the church is ready to take on those efforts. They have everything the need including help from the Veterans Foundation and staff that is trained for the cause. However, the only thing missing is an actual home. If anyone knows of a home that can be donated please let us know, he says. As far as how many people work with the ministry, Hamel says its really hard to tell. We have so many volunteers and people who just pitch in, he says. Its a community project and volunteers are welcome and highly appreciated. It is de nitely not a one-man show. Future goals, says he says, include offering housing assistance to the mentally ill as well as families who are in need of help and single parents who have children. Those are all things we hope to work on in the near future. Hamel has been with Promise Land since June of 2001 and labels his favorite part about what he does as seeing lives transform seeing people who are hopeless find hope and a reason to live, he says. Hamel graduated from Wakulla High School in 1989 and resides in Crawfordville with his wife Vera and their seven children. For more information about the church and its ministry services, call 9263281 or visit the website at www.promiselandministries.org. Church services are broadcast live on the website, and are held at 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. on Sundays, as well as 7 p.m. on Wednesday nights. The church is located at 20 Church Road in Crawfordville. Promise Land o ers help Promise Land o ers help Work on a youth center near the high school, a Promise Land project.AMANDA MAYOR $50EERF DRAC SAG One Lucky Winner will be selected Each Week for 8 Weeks to receive a*Grand Prize Winner $100 Gas Card Look for the entry form in Thursdays Newspaper Enter as often as you would like New winner each week Grand Prize drawing from all entries at the end of the contest* Pick up your copy of the The Wakulla News Contest Begins Thursday, September 12 Must be over 18 years old and legal resident in our newspaper distribution area. No photo copies. Employees of the newspaper and their delivery agents are not eligible. GIVE-AWAY! NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on Sept. 11, 2013, at 5:30pm SEPTEMBER 5, 2013

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comWakulla County Schools support senior citizensreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $19/6 mo. Out of County $44/yr. $27/6 mo. Out of State $47/yr. $28.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Sheriff’s office cookoff • No swim advisory issued again for beaches • Football: War Eagles win season opener • Upper bridge closes for maintenance • Edwards tries to keep center moving forward • No swim advisory again for Shell Point, Mashes Sands • Sheriff’s Report for Aug. 22, 2013 • Natural Wakulla: Partridge Peas are blooming, a sign of summer’s end thewakullanews.com Follow us on Just because it sounds true... Sleep on it before you sign petition What would King advocate today? Time to pamper the pooches again Family says thank you for supportREADERS WRITE: By BOBBY PEARCEIt is the hope of the Wakulla County School System to instill in our students a desire to give back to our community by supporting one of our most treasured resources, our senior citizens. Wakulla Countys Senior Citizens Center provides many services such as Meals-onWheels, In-home Nursing Assistance, Utility Assistance and Housing Assistance. Unfortunately, the Center has incurred budget shortfalls for the upcoming year. This could have a very negative impact on our countys elderly … those who continuously provide for our community in so many ways. These are our mothers, fathers, grandmothers and grandfathers whose hard work, knowledge and history have created the foundation of our wonderful community. This is a great opportunity to show our love, appreciation and support! I think each choice we make causes a ripple effect. Building support for our senior citizens will teach valuable lessons that may not be found in a textbook. The Wakulla County School System would like to designate the month of September as Schools for SeniorsŽ month. During the entire month, all of Wakullas schools will be conducting drives to raise money to offset the costs of services for our senior citizens. Each school has come up with a fundraising activity that we hope all parents and students will participate in. The two schools raising the most money based on a per-student average will receive additional funds from the district to support their Student Government organizations, and pizza parties will be awarded to the top-earning grade levels or wings at each school. All Wakulla County citizens are encouraged to contribute what they can to this important cause. Please look for information coming home with your child about the speci“ c fundraising drives and opportunities taking place at his or her school. Please join our schools in doing whatever we can to make sure no senior citizen in our county goes without the services they need. Remember, TOGETHER we can make a difference in the lives of our very valuable Wakulla County citizens! Bobby Pearce is Wakulla County Superintendent of Schools. Editor, The News: Dont be fooled, just because it sounds true. You may have heard lately that state regulations allow a property owner to build right up to a wetland, with a 0 foot buffer. You may have heard someone ask, What is wrong with four of our commissioners and why would they allow this to happen?Ž You may have even asked that question yourself. When we hear such a statement that sounds true and is spoken with authority and conviction, it is easy to believe that it is true. Often times, there is more to the story. The person making the statement may not be intentionally trying to mislead us … maybe he just doesnt understand the whole truth. Here is the rest of the state buffer story. It is true that a 0 foot buffer is possible under state regulations, however a 0 foot buffer is not possible when secondary impacts exist. Section 10.2.7 (a) of the state Department of Environmental Protection/Northwest Florida Water Management District Applicants Handbook states you will have a secondary impact if you cause Adverse impacts to the functions of wetlands or other surface waters caused by construction or alteration.Ž I think we can all agree that building a house is considered construction or alteration.Ž If the construction or alteration will cause an adverse impact, it is not permissible to build with a 0 foot buffer. In fact, the state requires a buffer be established, with the average buffer being 25 feet wide. So the next time you hear someone say, removal of our local wetlands ordinance will allow people to build 0 feet from wetlands, ask them if that proposed construction or alteration will cause an adverse impact to the function of wetlands or other surface waters. If they answer yes, tell them they have nothing to worry about, state regulations will not permit such construction without a buffer. I encourage every citizen to seek and spread the whole truth. Please dont fall for the provocative sound bites. Ralph Thomas County Commissioner District 1Let’s give back!Editor, The News: This weeks 50th anniversary of Martin Luther Kings March on Washington is being observed with marches, speeches, and speculation on what causes Dr. King would embrace today. He would certainly continue to work for racial equality. But he would also likely advocate for a rapid withdrawal from Afghanistan, workers rights, gay rights, and animal rights. Yes, animal rights. Although he is best known for advocacy of racial equality, Dr. King opposed all violence, like the Vietnam War. And there is no greater violence than that perpetrated each day against billions of cows, pigs, and other sentient animals in Americas factory farms and slaughterhouses. The day before his assassination in 1968, Dr. King came to Memphis to champion the most oppressed human beings in America … African-American sanitation workers. Today, it would also be about the most oppressed living beings in America … animals raised for food, experiments, and entertainment. Although Dr. King never lived long enough to extend his circle of compassion, justice, and nonviolence to non-human animals, his wife Coretta Scott King, and his son Dexter Scott King did, by embracing the vegan lifestyle. A great way for us to honor the King legacy is to follow their lead. Charlie Wallace Crawfordville Editor, The News: The family of Wilie ShugŽ Harris would like to thank everyone for their prayers and support. Pastor and Deacon Skipper and church family with Skipper Temple Church of Christ Written In Heaven. Thank you, Pastor Franklin for your prayers and leadership also the community for coming to say their goodbyes for Shugs going home ceremony. Thank you all for the kinds words and support. I would also like to thank the kind woman at the Sopchoppy post of“ ce. May God bless you all. Thanks again, Irma & Michael Patzel Editor, The News: Many of you have recently been reading about a local issue that should concern all of us. It has to do with wetlands protection. As are many other factors, wetlands help to make life in Wakulla County, both attractive and unique. Although not the only issue, and perhaps not even the most important one, wetlands must be considered in the Wakulla vision. In many ways Wakulla is far better off than most coastal communities since nearly two-thirds of our land is owned by the state and federal goverments and can not be overbuilt, farmed or developed. But then the question becomes … are we regulating the remaining one third in a fair and reasonable way? Except in those situations where you have a one issue onlyŽ individual or group, fair and reasonable means “ nding the proper balance … a balance that represents the needs of the entire community. In the near future a group of residents calling themselves the Wakulla Wetlands Alliance (WWA) will be circulating a petition seeking the signatures of registered voters. Should the petition garner enough signatures a referendum will be placed on the November 2014 ballot that will layout a wetlands policy for our county. The ballot will require a yesŽ or noŽ response. If asked to sign such a petition, I urge you to consider whether a yesŽ or noŽ response really does make it possible to “ nd solutions that take into consideration the needs of all the people in Wakulla County … the farmer, the “ sherman, the builder, the business community, the property owner, the resident, the taxpayer -while providing reasonable protection of our natural resources. Indifference on this issue, or being a good guyŽ to the person with the petition clipboard, can potentially result in serious problems that are ultimately detrimental in developing a sustainable, balanced community. Make yourself a promise not to sign any petition until you are informed on BOTH sides of the wetlands issue. The petition will be around for seven months so you will have plenty of time to sleep on it.Ž Cynthia Webster Crawfordville Editor, The News: Its time to pamper the pooches again! Our popular fundraising event Pamper Your PoochŽ will be held on Saturday, Sept. 14 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Hudson Park in Crawfordville. Bring us your dirty pooches; they may even get washed by Sheriff Charlie Creel, Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman, Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells, or our Clerk of the Court Brent Thurmond … who have all volunteered their time! Dr. Hughes with VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital and Dr. Guhrt with Crawfordville Animal Hospital will be on hand to help with nail clipping, anal gland extractions, and micro chipping. Please see our ad on Page 8B in this weeks edition of The Wakulla News for speci“ cs. All proceeds go towards spay/neuter costs and medication to keep our furry friends at the adoption center healthy. So please bring your pooch out for a bath and support CHAT of Wakulla, Inc., and the Adoption Center! Please LIKEŽ us on Facebook CHAT of WakullaŽ to see pets for adoption and to read success stories, or search for us on Pet“ nder.com to adopt a homeless animal! The Adoption Center is located at 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville, and is open WednesdaySunday. Petra Shuff CHAT of Wakulla Pickles was adopted by a staffer at Vogue magazine and posted online.VOGUE.COM

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 5A Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville • 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 – 11:30 and 3:00 – 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 I wish we could all be California foils OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDERIt was my pleasure to take my “ rst trip to California. I heard many rumors about California and particularly the people there. Overall, my trip was a blessing and the people I met were truly wonderful. I did, however, have an illusion of California burst. You know how it is, you hear a lot about something or someone and much of what you hear you later “ nd out is not true. One of the “ rst things I discovered when I got to California was that they are not as progressive as I was led to believe. Everybody thinks California is way ahead of the rest of the country. I found it not to be so. Coming to California from Florida I discovered California is at least three hours behind Florida. This came as a shock to me. I could not believe people in Florida were ahead of people in California in anything. Truth cannot be denied when faced boldly. Also, I heard interesting rumors about the LA Freeway. Believe me, it is really nothing to boast about. The speed limit sign along the freeway said 65 mph. I guess that represents some of the comedy Hollywood is known for. Driving on the freeway, when I was moving, I almost hit 15 mph. For a state so concerned about global warming, they allow their cars to sit on the freeway doing nothing but blowing exhaust into the sky. In the state of Florida, an old geezer will not get in his car unless he can hit 70 mph, along with other things. I must admit those California people on the LA Freeway were very friendly indeed and much to my surprise, quite religious. All of them were greeting me in a very husky voice and then pointing me towards heaven. They actually were encouraging me to go to heaven. Of course, in all the anxiety of the LA Freeway, they got their “ ngers mixed up and instead of using the index finger, used another “ nger. That is beside the point. During my visit, friends took me to several Mexican restaurants. For the “ rst time in my life, I had what is called a taco. How they come up with these names I will never know. An interesting thing about a taco is that whoever prepares it, does not actually prepare it. When my taco came, it was all over my plate. There were little piles of this ingredient and that ingredient and then something folded up on my plate, which was the taco shell. What I was supposed to do was buildŽ my own taco. Never having done such a thing in my life I covertly glanced around to see how my friends were buildingŽ their taco. I tried to do the same. I got all of the ingredients on my taco shell, rolled it up, folded it and then looked around to see what I was supposed to do next. Is this “ nger food? Should I be using a fork or a spoon? I noticed everybody at the table picked up their taco as though it was “ nger food or maybe a sandwich. Actually, I am not sure what a taco really is. Therefore, not to be the odd guy at the table I picked up my taco and took the “ rst bite. The taco I built was rather cantankerous. As soon as I bit it, all the ingredients in that taco deserted the taco shell and went back to the plate. Now what was I supposed to do? As discreetly as possible, one of my friends at the table slipped me a fork. I do not know if you are supposed to eat a taco with a fork, but I did, so arrest me! On my last day, I went to my hotel front desk to see if I could “ nd another restaurant in the area for my last meal in California. I told the person at the front desk that I had eaten at some Mexican restaurants and was wondering if she could recommend a non-Mexican restaurant in the area. She smiled at me and said, S, seor.Ž She caught me off guard so I spun around but did not see any seniors behind me. I turned back and asked again if she could recommend a nonMexican restaurant. S, seor.Ž Again, I turned around and as true as I am telling this, there was nobody behind me, especially a senior. Then it dawned on me. She was speaking Spanish. After all, this is California. I understand that SiŽ is the Spanish word for the English word yes.Ž I did not let on, however, but I was slightly offended by her calling me a senior. All she had to do was just say yes, sir.Ž That would have made me happy. It is important to hear but more than important than that to hear the right thing. After all, some of the stuff we hear is not worth hearing let alone repeating. The apostle Paul set this down for us. So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the word of GodŽ (Romans 10:17 KJV). My faith is not based upon any rumor but upon the Word of God.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Dorothy Mae Hunt, 64, of Crawfordville, died Sunday, Aug. 24 in Crawfordville. She was a native of North Carolina and a longtime resident of Wakulla County. A celebration of life service will be held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 7, at 151 P.A. Sanders Road in Sopchoppy. Survivors include her children, Dawn Morgan (Wayne), Amy Lane, Ronald Kilgore; three grandchildren, and one great-grandchild. Professional services under the direction of Richardsons Tallahassee Chapel (850)576-4144.Melvin Levon Harrell Sr., 71, of Medart went to be with the Lord on Aug. 28, 2013. He was born in Medart and was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. He was retired from Waste Management of Tallahassee. Visitation was held Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2013 at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Burial will follow at Bonnett Pond Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society, 241 John Knox Road, Suite 100, Tallahassee FL 32302. Survivors include his children, Melvin Harrell Jr., Trina Harrell Flinkman, Randy Harrell and Melanie Harrell McCullers; two sisters, Irene Sanders and Grace Wells; 10 grandchildren, five great grandchildren and former wife and good friend, Halene Harts“ eld. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements.Melvin Levon Harrell Sr. Dorothy Mae Hunt  Charlotte Faith to hold Holy Ghost revival Charlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple will be holding a Miracle Holy Ghost Revival on Sept. 19, 20, and 21 at 7:30 p.m. nightly. face painting. Guest speaker will be Prophet Michael Turner from Connecticut. Charlotte Faith is located at 150 Brown Donaldson Road. Pastor is Bishop Alice Williams. Many Hats Festival to be held at Harvest FellowshipHarvest Fellowship Church will be at Many Hats Festival on Oct. 12 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. featuring arts & crafts, live bands, food and face painting. Interested vendors should call (850) 926-4798 or email revfredl@yahoo. com. St. Elizabeth announces Holiday Craft SaleSt. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church will hold a Holiday Craft Sale on Saturday, Oct. 26, 2013, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Please create your inventory and call Nickey Lepp no later than Oct. 16 at 926-9750 for more information.Church Briefs Obituaries SUNDAY SERVICES8:30 am Contemporary Worship 9:45 am Sunday School 11:00 am Traditional Worship 5 pm Discipleship Training 6 pm Evening ServiceWEDNESDAY NIGHT SERVICES6:30 pm RAs & GAs for elementary 7 pm Youth Adult Prayer-Bible Study3086 Crawfordville Highway (One block south of Courthouse)850-926-7896www.crawfordvillefbc.com Funeral Home, Inc. 551 West Carolina St. Tallahassee, FL 32301Gracious, Digni“ed Service224-2139Day or Night Pre-Arrangements Silver Shield Notary DARRELL L. LAWRENCE LINN ANN GRIFFIN J. GRIFFIN Licensed Funeral Directors STRONG & JONES 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Colton Cash Callaghan turns 1Colton Cash Callaghan celebrated his “ rst birthday on Aug. 26. Colton is the son of Mindy Trice and Eric Callaghan of Crawfordville. His maternal grandparents are John and Kaye Trice of Crawfordville and his paternal grandparents are Lou and Margy Callaghan also of Crawfordville. Coltons family wishes him a happy “ rst birthday with love.Coastal Optimist annual school supply drive was a successSpecial to The NewsThe Annual School Supply Drive sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club was a tremendous success. Due to the generous response from the community, the Optimists were able to provide boxes of school supplies and backpacks to eight Wakulla County schools. Thanks go to the following churches and businesses who donated and made donation boxes available for collections: Centennial Bank, Ochlokonee Bay United Methodist Church, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, Ameris Bank, Poseys SteamRoom, and Karens Kitchen and Bakery. Guidance counselors and teachers at each school will be able to give supplies to students in need. The Coastal Optimist motto is Friend to YouthŽ. The club meets on Thursdays at noon at Poseys SteamRoom and new members are always welcome. Special to The NewsU.S. Rep. Steve Southerland, II was presented with the Summer 2013 Champion of Seniors AwardŽ by The Grange … a national, nonpartisan grassroots organization that advocates on behalf of Americas rural seniors. Southerland received the award in recognition of his consistent record of leadership on behalf of Florida seniors during a ceremony at the Tallahassee Senior Center. I am honored to receive the Champion of Seniors Award because it re” ects my strong commitment to “ ghting for North and Northwest Florida seniors,Ž said Southerland. From Day One I have pledged to protect our seniors, and whether its my “ ght to preserve Medicare, improve access to affordable quality health care, or ful“ ll our promises to our veterans, thats a promise Ive always worked to keep.Ž Rep. Southerland has exhibited outstanding leadership in Congress to protect Medicare and ensure access to affordable prescription medicines and health care choices for seniors. He has de“ nitely earned this award and deserves our thanks,Ž said Grace Boatright, Legislative Director for The National Grange. About The Grange: Established in 1867, The National Grange is the nations oldest nonpro“ t, nonpartisan rural advocacy organization that advocates and educates on behalf of Americas farmers, ranchers, and other rural Americans. More information available atwww.nationalgrange.org Criteria for the award included: 1. Exhibiting outstanding leadership in Congress to protect Medicare, which is critical to millions of American seniors and their families. 2. Opposing across the board cuts made by unelected boards. 3. Ensuring access to affordable prescription medicines for seniors through the Medicare Part D program and opposing any efforts to implement price controls or similar measures that would lead to increases in premiums for seniors. 4. Demonstrating a continued commitment to protect the doctor/patient relationship for seniors and opposing any efforts that might weaken it in any way. 5. Preserving a vast selection of health care options for seniors so that they may choose the best plan for themselves and their families. 6. Representing senior constituents with individual issues before government agencies so that they receive the bene“ ts and services they have earned. 7. Supporting government services and necessary funding for senior programs in the Representatives district.Rep. Southerland honored by advocacy group for commitment to Fla. seniors Birth announcement Lucas Gage Largent was born on July 10 to parents Neil and Stephanie Largent. Lucas weighed seven pounds, three ounces and was 19 inches long. His maternal grandparents are Cathy Gale of Crawfordville and Larry Mills of Baton Rouge, La. His paternal grandparents are Gene and Irene Largent of Crawfordville. Lucas maternal great-grandparents are Ruby Porter and the late Barbara Cummins of Crawfordville. His paternal great-grandparents are Frank and Ann Largent of Palatka. He has a big sister, Jaiden Foss.Paper crusade for Shriners Hospitals is slated for Sept. 14On Saturday, Sept. 14, members of the Wakulla Shrine Club will be seeking donations to help support the Shriners Hospitals for Children. Shriners will be in the streets and at several business locations in Crawfordville. At this time we are treating over 35 children from Wakulla County in our Out Patients Program. All treatments to these kids are FREE, regardless of parents “ nancial status. The Shriners have 22 Burn and Orthopedic Hospitals in the U.S. and Mexico. Children receive care free of charge at all Shrine Hospitals. If you know of a child that Shriners may be able to help, please call 1-800237-5055 or Marzuq Shrine Temple in Tallahassee at 850-385-3010 for more information. Please be generous with your donations. FWMA giant yard sale is slated for Sept. 27, 28 Special to The NewsThe Florida Wild Mammal Association will hold a giant yard sale on Friday, Sept. 27 from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 28 from 8 a.m. until 1 p.m. Set up for the event will be taking place on Thursday, Sept. 26 from 8 a.m. until 3 p.m. The event will be taking place at Townsends Nads Mini Storage located at 59 Shadeville Road in Crawfordville. All donations are greatly appreciated and can be dropped off at Unit A32 or brought to the yard sale preferably Friday afternoon. For more information about FWMA visit our website: www.wakullawildlife.org 100 percent of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing the mission of the organization. ADULT ADMISSION $12 DOORS OPEN ONE HOUR PRIOR TO SHOW TIMEwww.discoverfantazia.comCRAWFORDVILLETUESDAY • SEPT 10Showtime: 7:00PMWakulla Co. Extension Arena 84 Cedar Ave. FREE TICKET ADMIT 2 CHILDREN 12 & UNDER PER PAYING ADULT.PARA DOS NINOS 12 ANOS O MENOS ACOMPANADO POR UN ADULTO PAGANTE. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse

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By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAIn the wake of conservative complaints that the nationwide "common core" standards could be the “ rst step toward a federal takeover of schools, a Republican lawmaker has “ led a bill meant to stop the initiative in Florida. Rep. Debbie May“ eld, R-Vero Beach, “ led House Bill 25 late Wednesday. The measure would require the State Board of Education to meet certain requirements before moving forward with the English and math portions of the standards and speci“ cally bar it from implementing common core in any other subject areas. Mayfield's bill would also require the state to pull out of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC, which is developing tests lined up with common core, and says the board "may not enter into or renew an agreement that cedes to an outside entity control over curricular standards or assessments." In an interview Thursday, Mayfield said the intent of the bill was to halt the new standards in Florida. "We need to stop common core going through," she said. "We don't need to be giving up state's rights." The standards, heavily promoted by former Gov. Jeb Bush, have divided the conservative movement about the way forward in education. Bush's allies say common core will continue the accountability movement that swept the nation in the late 1990s and early 2000s, often pushed by conservative governors. But opponents say the standards, developed by a partnership of governors and state school officials and promoted by the Obama administration, could eventually lead to federal control of the state's classrooms. The standards are not a curriculum, as they are sometimes described, but do lay out what students will be expected to know at each grade level. "We need standards, but we need to be the ones to set them ourselves," May“ eld said. House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Senate President Don Gaetz, RNiceville, have already pushed for the state to jettison PARCC and instead develop its own tests for common core. But they have not gone as far as May“ eld's bill, which would be considered during the 2014 legislative session. Gov. Rick Scott had interim Education Commissioner Pam Stewart convene a summit this week in Clearwater to consider several issues, including common core and PARCC. Scott was set to meet Thursday evening in Miami with Bush, State Board of Education Chairman Gary Chartrand and Sen. John Thrasher, a St. Augustine Republican who is close to Bush. Meanwhile, the League of Women Voters issued a statement Thursday calling for the state to implement common core. It was a rare foray into education policy for the voting-rights organization. "Let's ensure Florida joins the ranks of states who say 'yes' to higher expectations and an internationally recognized curriculum," league President Deirdre Macnab said in a news release. "Our children's futures depend on being a part of this national step forward." www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 7Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsThe Leader in Me is a schoolwide leadership development process for both students and staff membersof which The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People is a foundational piece. It integrates the timeless leadership principals into school culture, driving transformational results. Key skills that businesses and educators have identified as vital to the futures of todays students are developed within The Leader in Me process. These skills include: € Leadership € Accountability € Adaptability € Initiative and selfdirection € Cross-cultural skills € Responsibility € Problem solving € Communication € Creativity € Teamwork During the 2012-2013 school year faculty and staff members at Medart Elementary participated in a book study featuring The Leader in MeŽ by Stephen Covey. The book is an account of how an elementary school in Raleigh, North Carolina went from being on the brink of termination to being named the number one magnet school in America. In January, four Medart staff members traveled to a Leader in Me Symposium where they learned more about the program and visited several Lighthouse SchoolsŽ. Upon returning, the teachers and administrators began immediately to work on writing a grant so that they could implement this program in Wakulla County. In April they received word that they had been given a grant by the Franklin Covey Foundation. The grant would pay for training fees, the website, and the first years teacher and student materials. The next step was to train all faculty and staff members in The 7 habits of Highly Successful PeopleŽ. Teachers, paraprofessionals, office staff, food service workers, and bus drivers all volunteered three days of their summer to attend the training. Before you can teach something you really have to understand it well,Ž stated Jodie Martin, 5th grade teacher and current Wakulla County District Teacher of the Year. The three day inservice gave us a chance to delve deeply into how the 7 habits could benefit us in our own lives. It also gave us the opportunity to build relationships with other staff members that we would normally not ever come into contact with.Ž On Open House night students and their families were thrilled with the new wall murals depicting the 7 habits painted by the teachers, bus drivers, and paraprofessionals. Allison Green, parent of Medart Elementary second grader, Hayden Green, spent about a month this summer creating a stunning 8 x 8 foot mural of the Wakulla County version of the 7 Habits Tree. It includes a cypress tree with Spanish moss, manatees, herons, and an alligator among other things. During the first week of school every teacher read The 7 Habits of Happy Kids by Sean Covey, with their class and then led their students through fun activities to help them internalize the 7 habits. Principal Sharon Kemp states, Our students will gain skill sets that enable them to make good choices, get along well with others, and manage time wisely. We will also be providing opportunities for students to apply these principals with authentic leadership opportunities in the classrooms, in the school, and in our community. This will be done in a way that will improve student achievement, restore discipline and a character ethic in our classrooms and on our playgrounds.Ž Assistant Principal Belinda McElroy added that The Leader in Me could be summed up into one quote by the late Stephen Covey; Our goal is to communicate to our children their worth and potential so clearly that they are inspired to see it in themselves.ŽMedart Elementary becomes a ‘Leader in Me’ School May eld les bill to end Common Core Medart staff works on murals to illustrate The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. The “ nished product of one of the murals being painted at bottom left. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Her name was drawn from OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken n t Ea t Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Jodi OsborneAugust 2013 Winnerank You So Much! DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841 www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW! Ed Gardner, O.D.Eye Doctor located in the Crawfordville Wal-Mart Vision CenterCall today for more information or to schedule an appointment.( 850 ) 926-6206Independent Doctor of Optometry • edgardneroptical@yahoo.com E d Ga r Comprehensive Eye Exams $50Contact Lens Exams $90Dr. Gardner’s Returning Contact Lens Patients $50

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By KATIE PURCELLOf FWC Its 5 a.m. and Lt. Eric Hall is driving around the wooded grounds of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) training center at the Florida Public Safety Institute, just outside of Tallahassee. Hes checking to make sure the running trail is in good condition. As he approaches the flagpole in front of his of“ ce, he sees the group of FWC recruits lined up in formation. Though the sun has yet to rise, its already steamy and their matching gray T-shirts stick to their backs. He parks his truck and gets out, calls Right faceŽ and takes off at a trot. The recruits fall in behind the ex-Navy SEAL for their morning run, the sound of their shoes and their musical cadence calls the only sounds echoing through the quiet campus. After the 4-mile jaunt, they quickly shower and head to the chow hall for breakfast. The rest of the day is spent in the classroom going over boating laws and boat maintenance, but later in the week they will board a bus and head to the coast for some hands-on practice behind the wheel of one of their many vessels. Since FWC of“ cers are responsible for patrolling all of Floridas woods, including public and private lands, as well as its waters, they must be well-versed on a wide variety of information. Protecting our valuable natural resources calls for a broad knowledge of Floridas “ sh and wildlife and a mastery of a variety of technical skills … both physical and mental. Also, due to their jurisdiction and specialized equipment, FWC of“ cers are often the “ rst to be able to respond to boating accidents, missing boaters and lost campers, hikers and hunters. Each year, they save around 1,000 people during search-andrescue missions. To prepare for all of that, after obtaining their law enforcement certi“ cation in Florida through a 19-week basic law enforcement curriculum, FWC of“ cers have an additional seven weeks of specific training conducted by staff. For of“ cers who have already received their law enforcement credentials elsewhere, the FWC periodically conducts academies consisting only of the FWC-speci“ c portion. They train with their firearms, logging many hours on the range both day and night; meet some “ sh and wildlife species face to face, including alligators and snakes, and learn how to handle them. They practice loading and unloading boats with a trailer and operating boats in many different weather conditions. Training includes learning safe and efficient tactics for operating all-terrain vehicles and practicing with them in the woods of the academy campus. They also don protective gear and engage in specialized defensive tactic training drills to keep themselves and others safe. They practice detecting when people are boating and driving under the in” uence and learn how to follow a track left by someone in the woods. Additionally, the classroom time includes a focus on state and federal wildlife, “ sheries and environmental laws and learning “ sh and wildlife identi“ cation. If that seems like a lot … it is! FWC of“ cers are some of the most highly trained law enforcement professionals in the country. During their time at the academy, they eat, sleep, work out and study onsite, soaking up as much information as they can from staff and bonding with fellow recruits. To make it through this rigorous training and become an FWC of“ cer, it takes a highly motivated, hard-working individual who is passionate about protecting Floridas outdoor paradise and the people in it. Before being selected to attend the academy, applicants complete a state of Florida application and supplemental FWC application, attend a physical “ tness assessment session, must pass a background check and psychological evaluation and complete an interview. It takes a special kind of person to be a law enforcement of“ cer, and it takes a special kind of law enforcement of“ cer to be an FWC of“ cer. Think you have what it takes? The FWC is always looking for enthusiastic new members, especially in south Florida where high population rates make for some increased enforcement challenges. There are recruiters across the state to help you through the process. To learn more, visit MyFWC.com/GetInvolved and click on Law Enforcement Of“ cer.ŽKatie Purcell is FWC Division of Law Enforcement Community Relations Coordinator. Protecting ParadiseŽ provides a glimpse into the world of an FWC of“ cer. Finding lost hikers, checking boaters for safety gear and teaching children about “ shing and hunting are just some of the contributions they make. This feature focuses on different topics to help communicate with the public and foster the shared passion and teamwork that are vital to protecting Floridas people and beautiful natural resources for years to come. Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsI was about as far from home here in Wakulla County as one can get in the old 48 states. Patti and I in northwest Washington State. We had checked out the low tides for marine life near Lalaloch, walked part of a “ ve mile rock, sand and gravel bar straddled with massive Sitka Spruce logs called the Dungeness Spit, part of the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, plus visited the city of Victoria in extreme south British Columbia. From there we also went out whale watching on a large Zodiac craft … an experience we regretted as we saw few whales or any interesting behavior. During our “ rst week we also drove to Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park. There Patti had a blast photographing mountain meadow wild” owers. There were several species that she knew, having been there previously. She amazes me with her knowledge of the worlds plants … one of her interests. The Olympic Mountains are constantly rising as the offshore Juan de Fuca tectonic plate, moving east pushes against and dips under (subducting) the North American plate. This action causes the Olympics to rise. However, glaciers, rain and wind are counteracting this process and their erosional forces are wearing down the Olympics about as fast as they are thrust upwards. There are no volcanic mountains in the Olympics, but further south in Washington State in the Cascades Range volcanoes form a part of the ring of “ re. In the Olympic Mountains I managed to get a few photos of the Blacktailed Deer, a subspecies of the Mule Deer, but failed to see any Roosevelt Elk or the Olympic Marmot, an Olympic endemic species. Next we drove to the coastal town of Westport where, at 5 a.m. on Aug. 4, we met the crew and guides on board the 40foot boat, The Monte Carlo. Along with about 12 other folks, we planned to go straight west from shore for 40 miles into the Paci“ c. Our objective, seeing pelagic bird species, birds that live entirely at sea, often far from any shoreline that only return to land to nest. These are birds such as the albatrosses, shearwaters and petrels. Unfortunately the seas going out were quite rough. The captain nearly stopped the craft several times as we encountered six to eight foot high waves to miss plowing into the swells. Patti avoids boats unless a destination of interest makes it mandatory … like Antarctica … because of great sensitivity to sea sickness was forti“ ed with a prescription medicine from a medical doctor friend whose wife has the same problem. The medicine worked its magic and she was all right, except for the misery of the endless bouncing rough surf. The day, overcast, with poor light, along with the perpetual boat pitching us about made it very dif“ cult … impossible … to focus our binoculars. Yet, by the end of our trip, which was smoother returning, I had managed to see four new species of birds plus a number of beautiful Dalls or White” anked Porpoises … not dolphins. We dont have any porpoise off our coast. The Dalls Porpoises looked like small Orcas as they shot by the bow of the boat, occasionally leaping nearly clear of the water. In the three weeks we were in Washington State I identi“ ed about 75 species of birds, the number which I could see in one day in our Big Bend area. The northwest U.S. is not noted for its birds as a rule. So as not to bore you I will not list all the birds, but only those unique to the northwest and, of course, those pelagics we saw well. You might enjoy checking these out in a “ eld guide of North American birds. They are listed as I recorded them: Northwestern Crow, Gray (or Canada) Jay, Stellars Jay, White-crowned Sparrow, Glaucous-winged and Western Gulls, Black Oystercatcher, Rufous Hummingbird, Pelagic Cormorant, Pigeon Guillemot, Winter Wren, Darkeyed Junco, Audubons and Orange-crowned Warblers, Red-shafted Flicker, American Pipit, Black Brant, Herrmanns Gull, Marbled Murrelet, Black-capped and Chestnut-backed Chickadees, Spotted Towhee, Blackheaded Grosbeak, Pine Siskin, California Gull, Blue Grouse, Brants Cormorant, Common Murre, Black-footed Albatross, Northern Fulmar, Pinkfootedd, Flesh-footed and Sooty Shearwaters, Forktailed and Leachs Storm Petrels, Harlequin Duck, South Polar Skua, Parasitic Jaeger, Sabines Gull, Cassins and Rhinoceros Auklets, and Tufted Puf“ n.A return visit to Washington – part 2FWC o cers-to-be living the recruit lifeThe shing is still not real good Nature Quest BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHFishing is still not real good. Bad news is water color is that of threeday-old coffee which means the salinity level is still pretty low up close. Good news is the low tide took a lot of the ” oating grass way offshore and its not that bad inshore right now so its possible to “ sh topwater plugs. Spanish Mackerel are starting to make their migration back south and there are plenty of them around right now as well as a lot of blue “ sh. Because of the “ shy taste, a lot of people dont like eating Spanish or blues, but both make excellent “ sh dip when smoked. Spanish are pretty tasty if cooked on the grill. Place them skin down on the grill, spread a small amount of mayonnaise on meat and put whatever spices you like and cook until meat turns white. The mayonnaise will take out the “ shy taste. Capt. David Fife said one of his neighbors went out to Buoy 24 and caught some very big Spanish. On Thursday, I “ shed with the Rob Harrison party from Atlanta and we had six nice Spanish, one red and seven trout. We probably got cut off “ ve or six times by Spanish before I went to a 60-pound leader. We were using live shrimp and white Gulp. While reeling in a ladyfish I had what looked to be a 10-pound Spanish skyrocket out of the water trying to eat the lady“ sh. In 2000 one of my charters caught a 9pound Spanish and this one was bigger than that “ sh. On Saturday I took John Wall and his friend Brook from McDonough, Ga. We ended the day with “ ve reds and six ” ounder that we caught on live shrimp. Sunday morning I took Wayne Whitely from Lawrenceville, Ga., and we came in with three trout and 10 blues which he was gonna take home and smoke and make “ sh dip out of. Capt. David Fife caught some nice trout on topwater fishing around the oyster bars. He has also been catching plenty of reds to 26 inches using small mullet and mud minnows on the bottom. My neighbor, Mike Pearson, went out on Saturday morning and came in with their limit of grouper. He said they ran east and “ shed off the Econ“ na in about 30 feet of water. Dr. Phil Sharp went offshore with another doctor from Tallahassee and he said they went out to about 80 feet of water. He said in 30 minutes they were heading back with their limit of grouper and he said they threw back some big red snapper. Harrison King from Shell Point went out from Carrabelle on a dive trip and he said they shot a bunch of grouper, hog snapper, sheepshead and ” ounder. He said they dove in 35 and 80 feet of water. According to reports out of Keaton Beach, plenty of trout are being caught on live pin“ sh fished under a Cajun Thunder. Fishing around St. George also continues to be pretty good, especially in the cut. Look for ” ounder and sheepshead around the rocks and trout and reds in the channel. There is a lot of bait around right now though most of what we are seeing are glass minnows. Watch for the terns diving into them and youre probably gonna find feeding Spanish, small jacks, blue“ sh and of course lady“ sh. Remember, snapper season opens Oct. 1 and there are plenty of them out there. Remember to know your limits and be careful out there. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL PROTECTING PARADISE www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 9A I hope those who were able to enjoy Monday with family and friends enjoyed the extra rest and relaxation. If not Monday, then at least some time over the last week! According to the Department of Labors website, Labor Day, the “ rst Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country.  The “ rst Labor Day was celebrated in New York City on Tuesday, September 5, 1882 and was the efforts of the Central Labor Union. This workingmens holidayŽ became the “ rst Monday of September two years later in 1884 and was celebrated in most major industrial cities in 1885. The “ rst Monday in September became a legal holiday in 1894. Times have certainly changed since 1894. For the men and women in the Coast Guard Auxiliary, our jobs range from college students to professionals such as doctors and professors and government employees. Our work in the Auxiliary is done outside of our regular work. In addition to those in the Auxiliary, it is also important to remember those in the reserves and their families. They not only have a commitment to their employment, but have also made the continued commitment to be on call when needed to serve and protect all of us. While the holiday was established as a workingmans holiday, our men and women who serve do not often have the privilege to take a day off. This often leaves their family members to pick up extra duties in their absence. In our area, an extra day off from work often involves time out on the water boating or at least beachside. As summer draws to a close, it is always important to not forget to always keep safety “ rst. Sun screen, life jackets, awareness of your situations can save lives! As Sherrie says, Safe Boating is no Accident … a little extra labor can make the difference in your level of enjoyment out on the water. a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Finding my way back to the water Once upon a time, I was a diving goddess. A “ sh in the water, I would “ nd any and all excuses to “ nd some body of water, be it fresh or salt, and fall into it. Then the anticipated and dreaded happened, I went off to college. Exiled to Rhode Island I was far from the warm waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico. There I spent my weekends studying, giving myself neck cramps and back pain that follow me to this day. Gone were my sunny, warm days of cave diving in the woods, gone were the summer cruises where it was common to make three dives a day for weeks on end. Here I was trying to make something of myself beyond the “ sh that swam in my veins. Now it is seven years later, I am no longer the “ sh like teenager who wore nothing but bathingsuits for an entire summer straight. I am a woman grown, dreaming of being that kid once again. It is true that as children we all want to just hurry up and grow up, and as adults we just want something to remind us how to be kids again. This brings me to my topic, after years of being a landlocked mermaid, how do I “ nd my way back into the water again? I think that many of us “ nd ourselves asking this question, maybe you learned to dive in college, or on your honeymoon, or even as a kid yourself. Now you are asking yourself how do I “ nd my way back? How do I do dive tables again (or do I need to)? What kind of equipment is even used these days? Do I need to take a refresher course? To answer some of your questions, diving, like dive tables, are like riding a bike … itll come back to you quicker than you know! Refresher courses are not very helpful because it is just reminding you of something you already know, so take the next class that interests you, and there you can get basic practice under the watchful eye of an instructor. No, your certi“ cation never runs out, it is yours for life. Finally, a very interesting question indeed, how do you learn what kind of gear is even being used these days? Imagine this … you walk into a store, you are there by appointment and are greeted by the proprietor. The sitting area is welcoming with a pedestal to show off the latest merchandise. Is this a bridal boutique or maybe a custom car shop? How about a dive shop? Yes, a dive shop where you get the boutique VIP treatment with an educated guru in the latest toys with personalized attention to “ nd you your perfect dive kit. Notice that I didnt say this is the best, nor the most expensive, but the kit that “ ts you. Even if that is your own kit, the one from the 1980s. Imagine that, an experience where you get to play with the newest toys on the market and maybe “ nd that inner kid again, the one that wore nothing but a bathing suit for an entire summer.Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Nicole Stanton FWC NewsTwo premier recreational fisheries will soon have new protections in place, a measure aimed at ensuring that tarpon and bonefishs economic and fishing value remain for generations to come. Tarpon and bone“ sh become catchand-release only “ sheries beginning Sept. 1. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) approved these proactive management measures at its June 12 meeting in Lakeland. The catch-and-release proposal was adopted in recognition of the fact that the economic and “ shing values of bonefish and tarpon greatly exceed their value as food “ shes. The following changes will go into effect Sept. 1 in state and federal waters off Florida: All harvest of tarpon will be eliminated, with the exception of the harvest or possession of a single tarpon when in pursuit of an International Game Fish Association record and in conjunction with a tarpon tag. Tarpon tags will be limited to one per person, per year except for properly licensed charter boat captains and “ shing guides. Transport or shipment of tarpon becomes limited to one “ sh per person. There will be a one“ sh-per-vessel limit for tarpon. Gear used for tarpon will be limited to hookand-line only. Multiple hooks in conjunction with live or dead natural bait cannot be used to target or harvest tarpon, or to target bone“ sh. People will be allowed to temporarily possess a tarpon for photography, measurement of length and girth and scienti“ c sampling, with the stipulation that tarpon more than 40 inches must remain in the water. Tarpon regulations will extend into federal waters. The bone“ sh tournament exemption permit is eliminated. This exemption allowed tournament anglers with the proper permit to temporarily possess bone“ sh for transport to a tournament scale. To learn more about tarpon and bonefish, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on SaltwaterŽ and Recreational Regulations.ŽTarpon, bonefish become catch-and-release only after Sept. 1 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Sep 5, 13 Fri Sep 6, 13 Sat Sep 7, 13 Sun Sep 8, 13 Mon Sep 9, 13 Tue Sep 10, 13 Wed Se p 11, 13 Date 3.7 ft. 2:55 AM 3.8 ft. 3:19 AM 3.9 ft. 3:42 AM 4.0 ft. 4:07 AM 4.0 ft. 4:34 AM 4.0 ft. 5:06 AM 4.0 ft. 5:45 AM High 0.8 ft. 8:47 AM 0.6 ft. 9:22 AM 0.4 ft. 9:57 AM 0.3 ft. 10:35 AM 0.2 ft. 11:17 AM 0.3 ft. 12:06 PM 0.4 ft. 1:06 PM Low 4.0 ft. 2:52 PM 4.1 ft. 3:28 PM 4.0 ft. 4:06 PM 3.9 ft. 4:47 PM 3.7 ft. 5:33 PM 3.4 ft. 6:26 PM 3.1 ft. 7:33 PM High 0.5 ft. 9:10 PM 0.6 ft. 9:36 PM 0.7 ft. 10:04 PM 0.9 ft. 10:34 PM 1.2 ft. 11:08 PM 1.4 ft. 11:47 PM Low Thu Sep 5, 13 Fri Sep 6, 13 Sat Sep 7, 13 Sun Sep 8, 13 Mon Sep 9, 13 Tue Sep 10, 13 Wed Se p 11, 13 Date 2.8 ft. 2:47 AM 2.9 ft. 3:11 AM 2.9 ft. 3:34 AM 3.0 ft. 3:59 AM 3.0 ft. 4:26 AM 3.0 ft. 4:58 AM 3.0 ft. 5:37 AM High 0.6 ft. 8:58 AM 0.4 ft. 9:33 AM 0.3 ft. 10:08 AM 0.2 ft. 10:46 AM 0.2 ft. 11:28 AM 0.2 ft. 12:17 PM 0.3 ft. 1:17 PM Low 3.0 ft. 2:44 PM 3.0 ft. 3:20 PM 3.0 ft. 3:58 PM 2.9 ft. 4:39 PM 2.8 ft. 5:25 PM 2.6 ft. 6:18 PM 2.3 ft. 7:25 PM High 0.4 ft. 9:21 PM 0.4 ft. 9:47 PM 0.5 ft. 10:15 PM 0.7 ft. 10:45 PM 0.8 ft. 11:19 PM 1.0 ft. 11:58 PM Low Thu Sep 5, 13 Fri Sep 6, 13 Sat Sep 7, 13 Sun Sep 8, 13 Mon Sep 9, 13 Tue Sep 10, 13 Wed Se p 11, 13 Date 3.4 ft. 3:31 AM 3.5 ft. 3:55 AM 3.6 ft. 4:18 AM 3.7 ft. 4:43 AM 3.8 ft. 5:10 AM High 0.7 ft. 9:51 AM 0.5 ft. 10:26 AM 0.3 ft. 11:01 AM 0.2 ft. 11:39 AM 0.2 ft. 12:21 PM 1.1 ft. 12:12 AM 1.3 ft. 12:51 AM Low 3.7 ft. 3:28 PM 3.8 ft. 4:04 PM 3.8 ft. 4:42 PM 3.6 ft. 5:23 PM 3.4 ft. 6:09 PM 3.8 ft. 5:42 AM 3.7 ft. 6:21 AM High 0.5 ft. 10:14 PM 0.6 ft. 10:40 PM 0.7 ft. 11:08 PM 0.8 ft. 11:38 PM 0.2 ft. 1:10 PM 0.4 ft. 2:10 PM Low 3.2 ft. 7:02 PM 2.9 ft. 8:09 PM High Thu Sep 5, 13 Fri Sep 6, 13 Sat Sep 7, 13 Sun Sep 8, 13 Mon Sep 9, 13 Tue Sep 10, 13 Wed Se p 11, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 2:39 AM 3.0 ft. 3:03 AM 3.0 ft. 3:26 AM 3.1 ft. 3:51 AM 3.1 ft. 4:18 AM 3.1 ft. 4:50 AM 3.1 ft. 5:29 AM High 0.8 ft. 8:26 AM 0.6 ft. 9:01 AM 0.4 ft. 9:36 AM 0.2 ft. 10:14 AM 0.2 ft. 10:56 AM 0.3 ft. 11:45 AM 0.4 ft. 12:45 PM Low 3.1 ft. 2:36 PM 3.2 ft. 3:12 PM 3.1 ft. 3:50 PM 3.1 ft. 4:31 PM 2.9 ft. 5:17 PM 2.7 ft. 6:10 PM 2.4 ft. 7:17 PM High 0.5 ft. 8:49 PM 0.6 ft. 9:15 PM 0.7 ft. 9:43 PM 0.9 ft. 10:13 PM 1.1 ft. 10:47 PM 1.4 ft. 11:26 PM Low Thu Sep 5, 13 Fri Sep 6, 13 Sat Sep 7, 13 Sun Sep 8, 13 Mon Sep 9, 13 Tue Sep 10, 13 Wed Se p 11, 13 Date 3.8 ft. 2:52 AM 3.9 ft. 3:16 AM 4.0 ft. 3:39 AM 4.1 ft. 4:04 AM 4.1 ft. 4:31 AM 4.1 ft. 5:03 AM 4.0 ft. 5:42 AM High 0.9 ft. 8:44 AM 0.6 ft. 9:19 AM 0.4 ft. 9:54 AM 0.3 ft. 10:32 AM 0.2 ft. 11:14 AM 0.3 ft. 12:03 PM 0.4 ft. 1:03 PM Low 4.1 ft. 2:49 PM 4.1 ft. 3:25 PM 4.1 ft. 4:03 PM 4.0 ft. 4:44 PM 3.8 ft. 5:30 PM 3.5 ft. 6:23 PM 3.2 ft. 7:30 PM High 0.6 ft. 9:07 PM 0.7 ft. 9:33 PM 0.8 ft. 10:01 PM 1.0 ft. 10:31 PM 1.2 ft. 11:05 PM 1.5 ft. 11:44 PM Low Thu Sep 5, 13 Fri Sep 6, 13 Sat Sep 7, 13 Sun Sep 8, 13 Mon Sep 9, 13 Tue Sep 10, 13 Wed Se p 11, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 2:56 AM 3.0 ft. 3:12 AM 3.1 ft. 3:29 AM 3.2 ft. 3:50 AM 3.3 ft. 4:15 AM 3.4 ft. 4:47 AM 3.4 ft. 5:25 AM High 1.2 ft. 8:08 AM 1.0 ft. 8:40 AM 0.9 ft. 9:14 AM 0.7 ft. 9:52 AM 0.6 ft. 10:36 AM 0.6 ft. 11:33 AM 0.6 ft. 12:50 PM Low 3.1 ft. 2:38 PM 3.1 ft. 3:25 PM 3.0 ft. 4:15 PM 2.9 ft. 5:09 PM 2.7 ft. 6:13 PM 2.6 ft. 7:30 PM 2.5 ft. 9:10 PM High 0.9 ft. 8:31 PM 1.0 ft. 8:53 PM 1.2 ft. 9:16 PM 1.4 ft. 9:42 PM 1.6 ft. 10:10 PM 1.8 ft. 10:40 PM 1.9 ft. 11:15 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacSept. 5 Sept. 11First Sept. 12 Full Sept. 19 Last Sept. 26 New Oct. 41:18 am-3:18 am 1:41 pm-3:41 pm 7:22 am-8:22 am 7:52 pm-8:52 pm 2:03 am-4:03 am 2:27 pm-4:27 pm 8:18 am-9:18 am 8:27 pm-9:27 pm 2:50 am-4:50 am 3:14 pm-5:14 pm 9:17 am-10:17 am 9:04 pm-10:04 pm 3:38 am-5:38 am 4:03 pm-6:03 pm 10:16 am-11:16 am 9:44 pm-10:44 pm 4:29 am-6:29 am 4:55 pm-6:55 pm 11:16 am-12:16 pm 10:27 pm-11:27 pm 5:22 am-7:22 am 5:49 pm-7:49 pm 12:17 pm-1:17 pm 11:16 pm-12:16 am 6:17 am-8:17 am 6:45 pm-8:45 pm 1:19 pm-2:19 pm --:-----:-Best Better Better Average Average Average Average7:16 am 7:54 pm 7:23 am 7:53 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:17 am 7:53 pm 8:20 am 8:28 pm 7:17 am 7:52 pm 9:17 am 9:06 pm 7:18 am 7:50 pm 10:17 am 9:45 pm 7:18 am 7:49 pm 11:17 am 10:29 pm 7:19 am 7:48 pm 12:18 pm 11:17 pm 7:19 am 7:47 pm 1:19 pm --:--1% 5% 12% 19% 26% 33% 40%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from By PETRA SHUFFOf the ChamberWow, we missed one month of networking luncheons, and were hesitant to send out a last reminder considering we already had a record of 72 reservations. Many thanks to Bob Ballard, Bonnie Holub and Kathy Mackey for making TCC Wakulla Center available to us, and getting everything ready! It is a great venue for us to host our luncheons for restaurants that do not have the space to accommodate us and also their regular lunch crowd. Bob introduced fellow chamber member and member of the TCC Board of Trustees Frank Messersmith, and was proud to share that classes for the fall semester have started at the center. The Math class is 30 students strong and 18 strong for the composition course. Bob was also excited to share that the architect drawings for Wakulla Environmental Institute will be presented to the Board of Trustees in September, and he expects pouring the foundation shortly thereafter. Bonnie Holub informed about the Green Guide Program, which will teach you everything about local wildlife, flora and fauna, history, geology and archeology, business, and more. The course begins Tuesday, Sept. 3. The whole course, a bargain at $320, includes all of your class materials and certi“ cation. Or, if you prefer, you can register for individual classes and/or “ eld trips. Classes are $20 each and “ eld trips $40 each. To see a complete list of classes and “ eld trips, please contact TCC Wakulla Center at 922-6290. Mary Wallace introduced our caterer, Rob Nutting with Myra Jeans Restaurant, and Rob drew The Wakulla News editor William Snowdens name for the $66 cash prize. Rob served outstanding pot roast and gravy, green beans, corn, mashed potatoes, delicious home baked rolls, and cookies for dessert. If you missed the luncheon, or have never eaten at Myra Jeans youll have to visit the restaurant, especially for the roast beef. Adam Roland, our local representative for WTXL-TV introduced two new associates, Derek Wright and Eric Larson. For any television advertising, contact Adam at (850) 305-4122. Mary introduced her guest Melissa Champanyn with Florida Association of Insurance Agents, which serves the needs of insurance companies. Mali Rowe with Ed Gardner, O.D. introduced their new associate, Tim Babcock. Catherine Cameron invited Sonia Guerra, known also as blogger Bohemian Babushka, who amongst other things promotes Wakulla County to her audience. Harry Bosman had the pleasure of introducing his wife and business partner, Janet. Our new members for July were: Twinkle Toes Shoe Boutique, located in the North Pointe Shopping Center, 1626 Crawfordville Highway. Sarah sells fine quality womens, toddler and children footwear. Sarah has lived in Wakulla since 2001, and operated her store in Tallahassee for seven years before relocating her business to Crawfordville. We also had the pleasure of meeting Barbie Ryals and Susan Sparaldo with Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union, which merged with Score Federal Credit Union earlier this year, and is headquartered in Pensacola, Also introduced was David Tillman with engineering firm GPI Southeast. August members were Merchant Management Group, LLC, and Florida Association & Property Management. Zoe Mans“ eld, Ethel Jefferson and Mickey Cantner with the City of St. Marks prepared a lovely billboard collage for their presentation, and gave us some historical background. We all know that St. Marks is surrounded by the natural beauty of St. Marks Wildlife Refuge, and has a laid back atmosphere, with a lot to offer for the outdoor enthusiast. St. Marks has two parks, boat ramps, Fort San Marcos de Apalache, “ shing, canoeing and kayaking, and of course the St. Marks bike trail for cycling, skateboarding and jogging/walking. Plans are in the works for a park at the end of the bike trail which will include a butterfly garden, “ shing pond, a stage for entertainment, and a play area for the little ones. The city is also planning to connect the bike trail with a board walk along the St. Marks River to the St. Marks River Park, where you can visit the fort. St. Marks recently completed the commercial revitalization streetscape from City Hall to downtown St. Marks River including lighting, landscaping, benches, sidewalks. St. Marks is becoming a walking community.Ž In order to create jobs the city plans to develop 56 acres of industrial/commercial property, and constantly strives to improve the community. St. Marks is also home to the annual Stone Crab Festival, held Oct. 26. Be on the lookout for announcements for a special event in November, VIVA 500, including Seminole Indians landing at the fort in remembrance of the Trail of Tears. City Manager Zoe Mans“ eld drew Ameri“ rst Home Mortgage Co. for the October spotlight presentation. On behalf of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, Bruce Ashley thanked everyone for their support, and was excited to announce that the sheriffs of“ ce will be conducting Teen Drivers Education, and Distracted Diver Education courses at the High School, and also reminded of other events coming up that the Sheriffs of“ ce is actively involved in such as Optimist Club Fashion Show, Operation Santa, Green Wing Day, the 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony, and the Mullet Festival in October. Susan Schatzman invited everyone to the Wakulla Habitat for Humanity Fish Fry from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sept. 7 at the Re-Store, and Jo Ann Palmer announced the Coastal Cleanup on Sept. 21, and Hazardous Waste Day on Oct. 19. Jo Ann, who is also the chambers events chair, reminded everyone of the Business Excellence Awards Banquet Sept. 19, congratulating businesses nominated for consideration … with a record of 217 nominations received. Katelyn Widness with Kimley -Horn & Associates was present to speak about the Master Plan workshop, Capital City to the Sea, on Sept. 26 at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. We had 33 items in our drawing, including gift cards, ” ashlight, earrings, scarves, hummingbird and bird feeders and tons more. Thank you to the following for your contribution: Cook Insurance, Petra Shuff, Lionel Dazevedo, Cathy Cameron, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Jo Ann Palmer, Kim Campbell, WTXL-TV, Best Western Plus, FAIA, Revell Electric, Shepard Accounting and Tax Service, Susan Schatzman, Ed Gardner, O. D., Twinkle Toes Shoe Boutique, The Wakulla News, Root 319 Cuts and Color.Chamber networking luncheon hosted by TCC WakullaThe Chamber is here for local businessesBy TAMMIE BARFIELDChamber PresidentStudents are back in school now and fall is in the air. Well, maybe not in the afternoon air yet but de“ nitely “ rst thing in the morning. And when that first football game is played a nostalgic feeling of wanting to get back in school reappears. Your Chamber and Tallahassee Community College have just the “ x. Ed2go classes. If youre looking to learn new skills or to enhance existing skills, TCCs ed2go sixweek online classes may be the right “ t for you. And for Chamber members, theres no cost. Classes are offered in a variety of subjects including accounting and “ nance, business, computer applications, design and completion, health care and medical, language and arts, law and legal, personal development, teaching and education, technology, and writing and publishing. New instructor-led class sessions start every month and upon completing a course students receive an award of completion. We encourage our business members to take advantage of this unique privilege and bene“ t from expert instructors and the online learning experience. Call the chamber of“ ce for a schedule of available classes and get signed up right away. The Chamber also hosts workshops from time to time for professional enrichment. The workshops are generally related to business development or personnel relations in one way or another and are facilitated by organizations like the FAMU Small Business Administration, TCCs Workforce Development, or FSUs School of Entrepreneurship. Again, there is no cost for these workshops to Chamber members and the information gathered is invaluable. Coming in October, the Chamber is offering a Small Business Accounting & Tax Workshop scheduled for Oct. 30 from 3 to 5 p.m. This workshop will provide valuable insight into small business accounting and tax strategies. It is the perfect opportunity for small business owners to get access to accounting and tax strategies that can help ensure financial well-being. The workshop is designed to provide business owners with tools they can use every day to maximize efficiency and gain a better understanding of company “ nances. There will also be an opportunity to ask company-specific questions during the panel discussion. This workshop is free and open to all Wakulla area businesses. Nominee forms have been received from those businesses nominated for the 2013 Wakulla County Chamber Business Excellence Awards and the judges and committees are tabulating their results to determine winners in each of the categories. The categories this year are Chamber Business of the Year, Chamber Member of the Year, Environmental Stewardship Award, Start-Up Business of the Year, Non-Profit Business of the Year, and Wakulla Area Business of the Year. Owning or managing a business involves a lot of day-to-day problem solving and sometimes not so much re” ection on the impact our businesses really have on our local community. The Business Excellence Awards was established nine years ago to step back and recognize those businesses that stand out and have a positive impact in our county. The Chamber is again partnering with CenturyLink and Waste Pro this year to host an event to announce the winners and celebrate their achievement. An awards banquet is scheduled for Thursday, Sept. 19 at the Senior Center in Crawfordville. Call the Chamber of“ ce to get tickets or reserve your table. While the Chamber is a member-based organization and we encourage area businesses to get involved with their Chamber, our goal is to serve all of the business community by continuously improving the economic climate in Wakulla County and encouraging commercial networking among our business members and all area businesses. Relationships gained through business networking can be a vitally important resource for local businesses and it proves to strengthen our business community as a whole. Get involved with your Chamber and visit our local businesses in Wakulla County. Our businesses need community support just as our community needs our businesses. Its a win-win situation. For more information on classes, workshops, the awards banquet or getting involved with your Chamber, contact the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce of“ ce at wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com or call 926-1848. You can also visit our chamber website at wakullacountychamber. com.Tammie Barfield is president of the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce. WILLIAM SNOWDENChamber members gather at TCC Wakulla Center for lunch, catered by Myra Jeans. WILLIAM SNOWDENMickey Cantner, Zoe Mans“ eld and Ethel Jefferson of St. Marks tell Chamber members about city plans. PRESIDENTS MESSAGE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 11A Over 200 nominations were received this year, and nominee forms are now in the hands of our judges. We cant wait for the announcement of who will be walking away with an award for Chamber Business of the Year, Chamber Start-up Business of the Year, Chamber Non-Pro“ t Organization of the Year, Chamber Environmental Stewardship of the Year, Chamber Member of the Year, and new this year, Director of the Year. The awards banquet will be held Sept. 19 at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, be on the look lout for invitations. Nominees for consideration include: Start-up Business: Bay Leaf Market, Dickeys BBQ Pit, Panhandle Pizza, Rock Landing Marina, Stow Away Marine & More, That Place on 319, VapeZ Wakulla. Business of the Year: Ace Hardware, Air-Con of Wakulla, Auto Trim Design & Signs, City of St. Marks, Cook Insurance Agency Inc., Crawfordville Auto & Tire, Edwin G. Brown & Associates, ESG Operations, Hamaknockers, Kast Net, Ouzts Too Oyster Bar & Grill, Poseys, Shepard Accounting, Spring Creek Restaurant, Super Lube, Tallahassee Community College Workforce Development, The Wakulla News, Waste Pro. Non-Profit Organization of the Year: Big Bend Hospice, Big Brothers Big Sisters of the Big Bend, CHAT of Wakulla, Florida Wild Mammal Association, Friends of Wakulla Springs Park, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Live the Life, Palaver Tree Theater, St. Marks Refuge Association, UF/IFAS Wakulla Co. Extension Office, United Way of the Big Bend, Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, Wakulla County Historic Society, Wakulla County Senior Center, Wakulla Co. United Fire Fighters Association. Environmental Stewardship: Best Western PLUS Wakulla Inn & Suites, Friends of Wakulla Springs Park, FSU Coastal & Marine Lab, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Spring Creek Restaurant, Talquin Electric Cooperative, Wakulla Schoolboard/Medart Elementary School, Waste Pro, Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Chamber Member of the Year: Bill Russell, Dorothy White, Douglas Gove, Greg Porter, Jo Ann Palmer, John Shuff, Sharol Brown, Skip Young. Wakulla Area Business of the Year: Anytime Fitness, Bay Leaf Market, Blue Water Realty, Body Tek 24 Hour Fitness, CHAT of Wakulla, Crawfordville Auto & Tire, Karens Kitchen & Bakery, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Ouzts Too Oyster Bar & Grill, Panhandle Pizza, The White Elephant. Director of the Year: Jo Ann Palmer, John Shuff, Sharol Brown, Mary Wallace. S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight onBusiness B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Faircloth Automotive and AC Specialist: Joey Faircloth, owner of Faircloth Automotive, opened his doors seven years ago. The business relocated Aug. 1 to 2235 Crawfordville Highway across from Beef O Bradys, and held a ribbon cutting and Grand Opening Celebration Friday, Aug. 16. Joey has over 22 years of experience and is ASE certi“ ed. His business is locally owned and operated. Faircloth Automotive would like to thank all the citizens of Wakulla County who have trusted them over the last seven years with their vehicle repairs. Faircloth Automotive is privileged to have some of the best customers. Faircloth Automotive offers a full range of services, including alternators, batteries, brakes, a/c work, 4 wheel drive service, tires, front end work, motors, transmissions, oil changes, starters, tune-ups, water pumps, etc. on all cars and trucks, foreign and domestic. Faircloth Automotive also offers towing services to anyone needing assistance to transport their vehicle to the shop. They also provide shuttle service, if needed. Joey looks forward to serving you in the future. Please stop by or call (850) 926-8350. Hours of operation are weekdays 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturdays 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Also check out their website at www.fairclothautomotive.com. Name of owner: Members governed by a Board of Directors Tell us about your business (include unique facts and history): Since 1991 the Historical Society has aspired to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret the heritage of Wakulla County and its surrounding area. In 2009 the Old Jail (1949-1972) became home to the Historical Society. What services, products do you offer? The Historical Society facilitates a 3,000 SF Museum & Archives at 24 High Drive in Crawfordville, provides permanent and rotating exhibits, research and genealogy assistance, speakers and authors, columnists, historic tours, community service opportunities for students seeking Bright Futures scholarships, collects artifacts, folklore, local stories and pictures, publishes heritage books, and is developing the Heritage Village Park at a separate location in Wakulla County. All services are available to the public at-large and are free of charge (with the exception of fundraisers). What sets your business apart from the competition? The dedication of the members of Wakulla County Historical Society to preserve the history of those who settled Wakulla County before 1843, as well as those who will live here tomorrow for the bene“ t of future generations. What should the community/ customer expect when they visit your business? A warm reception by enthusiastic volunteers who act as docents, genealogists, and librarians for the plethora of information catalogued in Historical Society archives. How long have you been a Chamber member? Six years. Why did you join the Chamber? To become acquainted with local business people and to acquaint them with services offered by the Historical Society. What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? The Chambers annual events such as: Wild about Wakulla, Shop Local, and the annual Low Country Boil. Also, the Historic Old Courthouse is a natural curiosity to visitors of the Museum and our docents are pleased to escort tours. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? To encourage loyalty and support for local commerce and to achieve the most desirable and enjoyable community for all who live, work, and play in Wakulla County. If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Visit the Wakulla County Historical Society Museum & Archives on Courthouse Square, 24 High Drive, Crawfordville or 850/926-1110, or email 24research@gmail.com, or the website at www.wakullahistory.com during business hours which are Thursday/ Friday 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. until 2 p.m., or anytime by appointment. Additional comments: The history of Wakulla County is fascinating and Historical Society members seek opportunities to share it with others. Address: Post Of“ ce Box 151, Crawfordville 32326. Phone: 926-1110.Business: Wakulla County Historical Society Inc.WILLIAM SNOWDENRibbon cutting held for Faircloth Automotive t e x r ch ogy p eakh or s, h istoric u ni ty seru nities fo r kiBiht o are pl eased to e Whturr Business Excellence Nominees Scheduled workshop … Chamber of“ ce, 23 High Drive, Oct. 30, from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., Small Business Accounting & Tax Strategies. Come join our free workshop to gain valuable insight into small business accounting and tax strategies. This is the perfect opportunity for small business owners to get access to accounting and tax strategies that can help you ensure your companys “ nancial well-being. We designed this event to provide our fellow community members with tools they can use every day to maximize their ef“ ciency and better understand their company finances. Best of all, after learning the basics of small business accounting and tax strategies, attendees will be given the opportunity to ask company speci“ c questions during the panel discussion. SBDC will hold a drawing for one license for Quick Books Premier 2012. Link to register will be emailed and posted on our website in September. FREE and open to all businesses.Chamber Chatter New members: € Merchant Management Group, LLC … specializing in credit card processing € Florida Association & Property Management … specializing in Association Management Next Networking Luncheon … Oct. 23, at Riverside Caf, St. Marks, from noon to 1:15 p.m. Business Excellence Awards banquet and presentation … Sept. 19 at 6 p.m. at Wakulla Senior Citizens Center.Free workshop o ered on accounting and tax strategies Do you have the right insurance coverage?CENTRAL RIDGE INSURERS, LLC2535 N. Reston Terr., Hernando, FL(Next to Village Services on 486)Call Your Local Team Of Experts For A Free Analysis And Estim ate!352-527-0110n Home n Auto n Business n Financial Services000FOEV LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. 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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 30 … There were two summits that Gov. Rick Scott was involved in this week: the one he called and the one he attended. The one he called …to consider the states efforts to hold schools accountable and to make sure students are learning … didnt feature any policy announcements or dramatic plans. Instead, it was more of a gathering to try to get business leaders, educators and state of“ cials on the same page. The summit that Scott attended, though, featured the unveiling of a proposal that seemed like the latest plank in the governors emerging reelection platform. Speaking Friday to the kind of tea-party activists who propelled him to the Republican nomination three years ago, Scott served up tax relief and a hefty side of Charlie Crist-bashing red meat. Meanwhile, researchers with the University of South Florida prepared to excavate the site of the former Arthur G. Dozier School for Boys, with the potential for uncovering secrets that the local community would just as soon keep buried. Absence, in that case, is just “ ne with the local residents. Scotts speech Friday to the Defending the American Dream Summit,Ž held in Orlando by the tea party-aligned Americans for Prosperity, seemed to be his clearest step yet toward shoring up the conservative base he will need heading into a tough re-election campaign in 2014. His remarks included a pledge to slice $500 million in taxes and fees. This year, we are committed to returning even more money to the hard-working Florida families who earn it,Ž Scott said in his prepared remarks. I look forward to working with our friends in the Florida Legislature to make these tax cuts a reality.Ž Even without any speci“ c details on what the tax cuts would be, Scott seemed to already be well on the way to winning support from our friends.Ž House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Senate President Don Gaetz, RNiceville, quickly rallied around at least the idea of reducing taxes and fees … never a particularly hard sell in an election year. When you announce a tax cut, you can count on a hearty cheer from the Florida House of Representatives,Ž Weatherford said. Although we do not have the concrete numbers that the Legislature will use to write our budget next year, we are committed to funding our state priorities, which will include a signi“ cant tax cut for Floridians.Ž Gaetz even had an idea to offer: a $200 million-plus plan to cut motor-vehicle registration fees, an idea the Senate offered in 2013 in exchange for repealing a tax break for insurance companies. The idea didnt gain much traction in the House during the 2013 session, and Gaetzs statement Friday omitted any talk of an offset. The Senate will be happy to partner with Governor Scott and the Florida House on a tax relief proposal that will keep more money in the pockets of the hardworking Floridians who earn it,Ž Gaetz said. As one might expect, some Democrats were less impressed, and pointed out that Scott had delivered the speech in Orlando despite playing hooky at his own education summit earlier in the week. Instead of offering new ideas for educating our children, expanding access to health care, advancing womens rights, and protecting the right to vote, he doubled down on the same failed message of big giveaways to businesses at the expense of the middle class,Ž said Florida Democratic Party spokesman Joshua Karp. SUMMIT SCHOOL As for the education summit, the focus was less on deciding policies for Floridas public schools and more on gathering input as state of“ cials consider a range of issues related to the states accountability system. Among the topics covered were teacher evaluations, school report cards and how far the state should go with the nationwide common coreŽ standards and an associated group of tests. Already, there were signs of progress on school grades at least. Interim Education Commissioner Pam Stewart told reporters at the summit Tuesday that the State Board of Education will debate in October whether to extend for another year a plan to keep public schools from dropping by more than a letter grade on state-issued report cards. The state board has approved the safety netŽ on the report cards for two years now, most recently in July, as public schools implement common core, but in both cases the board was asked late in the process of calculating grades to approve the policy. I think when the board voted in the summer, I think it was always the intention that they take it up again when it wasnt such a quick turnaround, but they had time to be thoughtful about it and think about it and do it early. ... I think its important that our schools and school districts know what the rules are that theyre playing with as early as possible in the year,Ž Stewart said. The board voted for the policy by a narrow, 4-to-3 margin this summer, with some members criticizing it as a move to water down the state system. Meanwhile, in the latest sign of legislative opposition to common core, Rep. Debbie May“ eld “ led a bill late Wednesday aimed at shutting down the standards in Florida and pulling the state out of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers, or PARCC. That group is developing tests lined up with common core. We need to stop common core going through,Ž said May“ eld, R-Vero Beach. We dont need to be giving up states rights.Ž So far, legislative leaders have called only for the state to pull out of PARCC and create its own test lined up with the standards. DIGGING UP SECRETS Researchers with the University of South Florida prepared for Saturday, when they are set to begin excavating long-buried human remains from unmarked graves at the shuttered Arthur G. Dozier School in Marianna. The weekend work outside the Boot Hill section of the closed state-run reform school is expected to be the “ rst in a number of digs over the next year, according to University of South Florida spokeswoman Lara Wade-Martinez. USF has one year to complete the work at Dozier, which includes “ nding the location of any additional burials, the excavation of all human remains, DNA testing and analysis, and the re-internment of remains,Ž Wade-Martinez wrote in an email. Scott and the Cabinet approved the work earlier this month. Questions have arisen about whether boys who reportedly died of pneumonia and other natural causes were killed at the school, and some longtime Jackson County residents have expressed concerns about what effect exhuming bodies will have on the local economy and image of the community. I dont know of anybody who approves of it around here,Ž said Marianna resident Ken Stoutamire, whose family has been farming in the Panhandle since before Florida achieved statehood. It doesnt reflect good on Marianna. There is just Marianna and the boys school. The association is hurting us. And we need them to get out of here.Ž But Rep. Alan Williams, DTallahassee, said that for the families of those who died at Dozier the state must admit what happened, no matter how dark and how grim it may be.Ž In order to move forward you have to correct some of the past misgiving and missteps that the state has done under previous administrations,Ž Williams said. For now, though, the project will remain out of the public eye. The Legislature set aside $190,000 for the project, and USF researchers also received a $423,528 federal grant to help with the effort to search for reportedly unaccounted-for bodies of boys who died between 1900 and 1952. In an effort to be respectful to the families, to maintain safety, and to allow the excavation work to be conducted unhindered, this will be a closed research site,Ž Wade-Martinez said. STORY OF THE WEEK: A summit called by Gov. Rick Scott discusses the state of Floridas school accountability system, as state of“ cials move toward a decision on whether to drop out of a consortium developing tests related to the nationwide common coreŽ standards. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: My predecessor had made a name for himself by hugging president Obamas non-stop spending … and even hugging the President.Ž … Gov. Rick Scott, taking a shot at former GOP Gov. Charlie Crist, who is expected to run against Scott as a Democrat in 2014.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)A tale of two summitsBy DAVID WHITEWine enthusiasts are always looking for an experience thats completely arresting -a wine that stops you in your tracks, makes the room go silent, and just pulls you into the glass. Sometimes, those wines are expensive … perhaps opened at an extravagant wine dinner where everyone brings a bottle to impress. Other times, theyre ordered at a restaurant when one hands the list back to the sommelier, requests an adventure, and is blown away by the results. Im electri“ ed when these experiences happen with wines made by friends. Im hardly alone in this sentiment. A few weeks ago, Steve Matthiasson, a top vineyard consultant in Napa Valley and one of Food & Wine Magazines 2012 Winemakers of the Year, was asked about the wines that most excite him. Wines made by friends are number one,Ž he declared. If its made by a friend, it tastes better.Ž I “ rst met Steve and his wife last February over lunch at their small vineyard in Napa. I sought them out after enjoying their 2010 white blend at a restaurant in San Francisco, and after our lunch together, I became an evangelist for their wines. The Matthiassons entire portfolio is absolutely stunning. But itd be disingenuous to claim that emotion doesnt play a role in my appreciation for their wines. The fact is, theres an emotional component to wine appreciation … and that shouldnt be ignored. Emotion is why wines almost always taste better at a winery than they do at home. Its why enjoying a special bottle with a special someone is more meaningful than enjoying it alone. Its why a sommeliers recommendation is almost always a hit, especially if her passion is palpable. Just as emotion can make a wine taste better, it can also make a wine taste worse. In late August, one of Italys most famous winemakers, Fulvio Bressan, penned a racist tirade on Facebook against his nations “ rst black government minister. Outrage came quickly. Within days, the Italian reviewer at The Wine Advocate, the worlds most influential wine guide, announced that she would omit Bressans wines from future tastings. That decision, while laudable, wasnt necessarily needed … the racist comments spread far and wide across the world of wine. As wine writer Alder Yarrow wrote, Bressans wines will never taste the same again.Ž One can safely assume that most consumers agree with Yarrow. Over Labor Day weekend, one of my closest friends came to visit from Los Angeles with his “ ance. They brought me a bottle of Grenache from Beckmen Vineyards, a small winery located in Santa Barbara County. The reason? They visited Beckmen on their third date … and enjoyed a bottle of the winerys Grenache over lunch. Once my friend realized that he had met the girl he was going to marry, he promptly purchased several cases of the wine. How that Grenache tastes to others is irrelevant. Every time they open a bottle, theyll remember the butter” ies they felt for one another on their third date. And it will always taste delicious. David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com, which was named Best Overall Wine BlogŽ at the 2013 Wine Blog Awards. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. WHITE’S WINESWith wine, emotion matters -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 13A On Friday, Aug. 23, a patron of the County Line Bar was reported as carrying a concealed “ rearm. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated and Sgt. Muse conducted a traffic stop on Old Woodville Highway. A pistol was recovered in the suspects vehicle. The “ rearm was not secured and was loaded. The driver, Jason K. Smith, 30, of Havana, had an active warrant in Wakulla County and was arrested on the warrant. Smith was also arrested for carrying a concealed “ rearm. The “ rearm was seized and placed in the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Mike Zimba and FHP Trooper Andrew Stone also assisted the investigation. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: THURSDAY, AUGUST 22 €A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student was found to be in possession of marijuana when a small amount was located in his pocket at WHS. He was issued a civil citation for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson and Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € WCSO deputies successfully located Tre Allen McCullough, 21, of Crawfordville in connection with being wanted in a pending case. McCullough was located inside a Crawfordville home hiding in a bedroom closet. McCullough allegedly resisted efforts to arrest him and force was used to get him to comply. One of the arresting of“ cers asked the subject to quiet down as he was reportedly cursing deputies in the presence of children. McCullough allegedly threatened the detective with bodily harm and was charged with threatening a public servant and resisting arrest without violence. He was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Detectives Cole Wells, Clint Beam, and Derek Lawhon and members of the WCSO Narcotics Unit investigated. Deputy Gibby Gibson suffered a leg injury attempting to secure the subject on an earlier call. Sgt. Danny Harrell and Deputy Jeff Carroll investigated. FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 € Todd B. Dickson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A boat motor and vehicle stereo equipment were stolen from his home. The stolen property has been valued at $4,200. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Detective Derek Lawhon recovered nine gasoline containers and a lawn mower in the Wakulla Gardens area. The property owner was noti“ ed but determined that the property was stolen and did not belong to her. The items were seized and turned over to the WCSO Property and Evidence Division. Detective Clint Beam also investigated. € Douglas Morgan of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Sixteen unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account for a total of $2,965. The charges were created at a variety of locations in South Florida. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. SATURDAY, AUGUST 24 € A 17-year-old Tallahassee male was issued a notice to appear in court following a traf“ c stop in Crawfordville involving drugs. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks reportedly observed the juvenile fail to maintain his lane of traf“ c. A traf“ c stop was conducted and Deputy Middlebrooks allegedly smelled the odor of marijuana in the vehicle. The deputy allegedly discovered a marijuana pipe inside the vehicle. The smoking pipe was seized and the juvenile faces a misdemeanor possession of drug paraphernalia charge. € Dan Huntley of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief in Crawfordville. The victim reported that the cattle gate at Double Creek Plantation was damaged and left open. Damage to the gate was estimated at $500. It appeared a vehicle crashed into the gate. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. € Jack Alsup of Tallahassee reported a counterfeit bill at Economy Auto Salvage. The counterfeit bill was passed during the past week. It was seized by law enforcement. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. € Marsha Louise Billhimer, 58, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked … habitual offender. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston reportedly clocked the suspect operating a motorcycle at 70 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. A traf“ c stop was conducted and Billhimer was charged with DWLSR habitual and given a verbal warning for excessive speed. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks also investigated. SUNDAY, AUGUST 25 € Mandy Plympton McCranie, 37, of Panacea was involved in a single vehicle traffic crash at 2836 Coastal Highway in Panacea. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated and observed that the victims vehicle had left the roadway and flipped multiple times before crashing into a tree. The victim had nonlife threatening injuries and was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital by Wakulla EMS. Evidence at the scene led Sgt. Muse to conduct a DUI investigation. The investigation is ongoing. McCranie was the single occupant in the vehicle. Lt. Sherrell Morrison and Deputy Marshall Taylor also investigated. € Austin Luke Beck, 20, of Crawfordville was arrested for high speed ” eeing and eluding a law enforcement of“ cer and possession of narcotics equipment. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks conducted a traf“ c stop on Arran Road for excessive speed and reckless driving. Beck pulled over to the side of the road but accelerated rapidly before coming to a complete stop. The suspect was clocked at 89 miles per hour on Forest Highway 13. The suspect drove deep into the Apalachicola National Forest and a BOLO was issued. Later, the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce stopped the suspect at Capital Circle and Woodville Highway after investigating a disturbance involving Beck in Leon County. Drug paraphernalia was found inside the Becks vehicle, which was reportedly heavily damaged from the high speeds in the national forest. Beck was transported to the Wakulla County Jail after being transferred from LCSO custody to the WCSO. Sgt. Ryan Muse and Deputy Ian Dohme also investigated. € Kelly Barnett of Crawfordville reported the theft of two bicycles from her property. The bikes are valued at $200. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Christopher Edward Roskowski, 22, of Crawfordville was charged with possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana following a traf“ c stop in Crawfordville. The driver allegedly con“ rmed that he had marijuana in the vehicle and produced a bag containing 27.5 grams. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € A traf“ c stop was conducted on Christine Morris Sheena, 28, of Jacksonville for impeding the ” ow of traf“ c by driving 14 mph in a 55 mph zone. She attached an unassigned tag to the vehicle she was driving. She was issued a notice to appear for tag attached unassigned. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Tami Hurley of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Food and personal items, valued at $55, were removed from the home. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Sean Conan Crawford, 32, of Crawfordville was arrested for disorderly intoxication after Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated a disturbance. The suspect had allegedly damaged the door to a residence. Two juveniles were present at the time of the incident and the Florida Department of Children and Families was contacted. € A 22-year-old Crawfordville woman was charged with three counts of child neglect without great harm after leaving her three children unattended at a Crawfordville home. The children, two of them 1 year old and anothre who was 3, were left in a Wakulla Gardens home. A concerned citizen reported that the older child was walking around outside unattended for an undetermined amount of time. The inside of the home was in poor condition. The Florida Department of Children and Families was called to investigate and took custody of the children. The case was sent to the Criminal Investigations Division for additional investigation. MONDAY, AUGUST 26 € The WCSO Work Crew and Officer Roy Crum were working at the Wakulla County Public Library when a wallet was found. The owner could not be located and the wallet was placed in the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Donnie Boutin of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of a lawn mower from his home. The mower was parked near a shed and is valued at $800. Suspects have been identified. The mower was entered in the FCIC data base. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Robert Poor of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief at State Park Storage. A storage unit was broken into and a lock was damaged. A lock at a gate was also damaged. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Damage was estimated at $120. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. TUESDAY, AUGUST 27 € Deputy Richard Moon and Reserve Deputy Chad Wright were conducting a security check at Wal-Mart when they observed a man with his legs hanging outside a vehicle. The deputies conducted a welfare check and found Joel David Matson, 21, of Tallahassee asleep in the vehicle. Drug paraphernalia was allegedly observed in plain view and marijuana was also discovered in the vehicle. Matson was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotic equipment. € Billy Whitfield of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone entered the victims toolbox but it has not been determined if anything was stolen. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Rebecca Jose of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Electronic equipment, a GPS, video and other miscellaneous items were reported missing. The items are valued at $440 and the vehicle was left unsecured. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Sgt. Lorne Whaley investigated. € Meredith Brown of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Two GPS units were stolen from a vehicle that had been tampered with. The units are valued at $450 and the vehicle was left unsecured. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Shelly Langston of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Someone entered the vehicle and stole a pair of shoes which are valued at $100. The vehicle was left unsecured. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Joseph Aaron Ellis, 19, of Crawfordville was stopped by Detective Clint Beam who observed Ellis driving on the road. Detective Beam had previous knowledge that Ellis had outstanding warrants out of Leon County. A traf“ c stop was conducted and Detective Beam observed marijuana inside the vehicle. The marijuana weighed three grams and Ellis was charged with possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. The two active warrants from Leon County were for dealing in stolen property and defrauding a pawn broker. WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28 € Rosalind Besson of Crawfordville reported the theft of property from her home. A saw and trailer hitch were reported missing. The property is valued at less than $300. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Thomas Roddenberry of Tallahassee reported the theft of a cellular telephone in Crawfordville. A relative of the victim was charging the phone at a friends home when it was taken. It is valued at $300. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Tammy Loudner of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The vehicle was unsecured and two binoculars, valued at $70, were taken. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Christa Allen of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victims wallet was taken. The wallet and contents are valued at $95. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Larry Melton of Panacea discovered a lost cellular telephone. The owner has not been located and the phone was submitted to the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Vernon Cook of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Tools valued at $205 were taken from an unsecured vehicle. A shed on the victims property was also entered and an axe valued at $20 was taken. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 1,141 calls for service during the past week.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report At Townsend's Nads Mini Storage,59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit A32 or brought to the Yard Sale( ) before Friday afternoon www.wakullawildlife.org For more information about FWMA visit our website: 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission D ed i cated to t h e r escue & r e h ab ili tat i o n o f in ju r ed a n d o r p h a n ed wil d m a mm a l s a n d b ir ds GIANT YARD SALE Thurs Sept 26th ‘12 8am – 3pm (Set Up) Fri Sept 27th ‘12 8am – 3pm Sat Sept 28th ‘12 8am – 1pm Sponsored in part by HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Sept. 5 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Sept. 6 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Saturday, Sept. 7 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Sept. 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Sept. 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Sept. 10 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.Wednesday, Sept. 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 4911684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsMonday, Sept. 9  PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, Sept. 11  CODE ENFORCEMENT meeting will be held in the commission chambers at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, Sept. 17  COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 4 p.m. in the County Commissioners Administration Of ce. M onday, Oct. 7  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, Oct. 14  PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers.Weekly meetings Special EventsThursday, Sept. 5  THE MAGNOLIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society is pleased to present a program combining art and natural history at 7 p.m. at FSU’s King Life Sciences Building, Room 1024. Meetings are free and open to the public. Directions to the King Building and free parking can found at magnolia.fnpschapters.org.  THE WAKULLA GENEALOGY GROUP will meet at the Public Library beginning at 6:30 p.m. Plans for the next three meetings will be discussed along with a presentation by Kathy Schmidt who will talk about a 1918 wedding album that was donated to Goodwill in a hatbox and how the genealogy group helped to nd its owner. Please bring someone with you and see you then! Friday, Sept. 6  WAR EAGLE FOOTBALL will face Navarre High School at home at 7:30 p.m.  CELIA CAPUTI BOOK SIGNING will take place at Bay Leaf Market at 6:30 p.m. In Caputi’s debut novel, “She Dances the Tarantella,” 26-year-old Sophia Corbellini arrives in a city located in the southeastern extremity of the Italian “boot,” in the June heat with one suitcase, no return ticket, a smattering of Italian, and only a vague notion of her roots. Will unraveling the history of the tambourine and succumbing to her fascination with Vittorio, the one who plays it best, help her exorcise the memories that haunt her? Caputi is a professor of English at Florida State University and a resident of Shell Point. Saturday, Sept. 7  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at 11 a.m. at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol. com.  HABITAT FOR HUMANITY of Wakulla will be hosting a sh fry from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. The event will be held at Habitat ReStore located on Shadeville Highway. Donations in the amount of $5 per plate are requested. Please call 926-4544 for additional information.  PALAVER TREE AUDITION PARTY will take place at the Public Library from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. A monologue (or two) is requested but not required as there will be pieces available to read as well as snacks to munch. Monday, Sept. 9  WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES’ (WILD) Governing Board will meet on at 1:30 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, please call 997-7400. Tuesday, Sept. 10  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will resume its second Tuesday programs at the Public Library at 7 p.m.. This program will feature author Dale Cox of Jackson County Fla. Cox is a southern writer and historian based in the city of Two Egg, Fla. For more information about Cox’s work see, exploresouthernhistory.comand twoegg. blogspot.com. Upcoming EventsSaturday, Sept. 14  FLORIDA PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY NETWORK together with the University of West Florida, the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement and the Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee will host a Public Archaeology Day at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement from noon until p.m. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is located in Sam Atkins Park in Blountstown, Fla. Have your personal artifact collections identi ed by archaeologist! This event is free and open to the public! For more information, contact Barbara Hines at bhines@uwf.edu or the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement at info@panhandlepioneer.org. Saturday, Sept. 21  2013 COASTAL CLEANUP will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at 9 a.m. The ve major sites will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands, St. Marks River Park and Bottoms Road in Panacea. Find out more information and sign up early by emailing tohelpkwcb@gmail.com.  WAKULLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY plans to hold its annual fundraiser yard sale and we are in need of articles to sell. We need housewares, decorating items, tools, yard items, books, videos, almost anything you have to donate. Please make sure the items are undamaged, clean, and complete. We are not going to sell clothing or shoes this year. If you have items, please contact either Helen at 933-6888 or Tanya at 5080881 and they will arrange to meet you at the old Crawfordville School lunchroom to accept the donations. Sept 5 – Sept 12 FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE Our Friday Night Movie this week is the blockbuster hit “ lm based upon the classic F. Scott Fitzgerald novel The Great Gatsby. This PG-13 (for language, and some sexual content) film stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Tobey Maguire, among others and tells the story of Midwesterner Nick Carraway who is lured into the lavish world of his neighbor, Jay Gatsby. Soon enough, however, Carraway will see through the cracks of Gatsbys nouveau riche existence, where obsession, madness, and tragedy await. This “ lm from the director of Moulin Rouge, Australia, and the 1996 version of Romeo & Juliet, is full of great sights, sounds, and drama sure to entertain. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing. PALAVER TREE AUDITION PARTY As part of our ongoing partnership with Palaver Tree Theater to help promote and increase the theatrical arts in Wakulla County, were hosting their Audition Party on Saturday Sept. 7 from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. This is your chance to audition for the 6 events that Palaver Tree has coming up over the following months. While a prepared monologue if preferred its not required. Roles for teens through seniors are available so please come and show off your acting chops, or just come by and see what Palaver Tree is all about. For more specific information please go to palavertreetheater@gmail. com, or call WCPL at 9267415 and ask for me. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING The Wakulla County Historical Society will resume its second Tuesday programs and the September 10th program will feature author Dale Cox of Jackson County Florida. Cox is a Southern writer and historian based in the community of Two Egg, Florida. Born in Georgia, he is the author of a growing collection of books on Southern history and folklore, including critically acclaimed histories of three small Civil War battles, including The Battle of Natural BridgeŽ. Dales new book about Milly Francis is being released in September and will be available at the program. Please join us at WCPL on Tuesday the 10th at 7 p.m. for this informative program. COMPUTER CLASSES STARTING BACK UP With Deanna Ramsey back from her summer off, were again having our free computer classes at WCPL. While at this writing the schedule has not been “ nalized, please stop by, give us a call, or check our website www.wakullalibrary.org for the next round of classes. We offer classes, 100 percemt free of charge for everyone from beginners who have just taken their computer out of the box, to digital photographers, those interested in genealogy, to those who just want a refresher. Please come by and take advantage of this free program and help us invite Deanna back to WCPL!By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News... WHS vs. NAVARRE Wakulla High 7:30 p.m. HABITAT FOR HUMANITY FISH FRY Habitat ReStore 11 a.m. 2 p.m. PALAVER TREE AUDITION PARTY Public Library 1 p.m. 5 p.m. WCHS SECOND TUES. PROGRAM Public Library 7 p.m.FridaySaturdaySaturdayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 15A The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Abilities Alert Asked Award Badge Barked Comma Copper Dense Dirty Dismisses Dozen Drier Earned Easels Emotion Ended Exact Expense Fiery Flies Focus Gears Graph Guests Hadnt Honor Hoped Inches International Lakes Lofty Lungs MovedNeverthelessObtain Oldest Reeds Senses Spent Splits Steam Stood Studio Terror These Unload Waste Water The Wakulla News

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comOne persons trash is another persons treasure, or so the old saying goes. This is the rationalization used to justify frequent visits to the ” ea market or garage sales early Saturday morning. There are some acquisitions which defy logic and place stress on domestic bliss when the newly discovered gemŽ is returned home. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder certainly depends on the beholders perspective and patience. There are some castoff commodities which even the most compulsive hoarder will reject as too offensive. Fortunately, Wakulla Countys beetle population is not quite that sensitive. Dung beetles (Scarabaeinae), as the name suggests, utilize and feed on droppings left by animals. There is an apparent preference for the byproducts of herbivores, but even deposits left by omnivores will be processed and utilized. Worldwide, the dung beetle family has about 5,000 members and they reside on every continent except Antarctica. Wakulla Countys member is the Canthon imitator, commonly known as the tumblebug. These beetles are a partial solution of the important decomposition step for waste left by larger animals. While other insects and worms speed the breakdown of manures, only dung beetles distribute and bury the material in substantial quantity. These beetles collect dung by rolling it into a ball and moving it to a suitable nesting location. They are easily identi“ ed when working as they blindly push the ball with their hind legs while facing the opposite direction. The female lays eggs in the ball and the decaying dung warms the eggs during the incubation. When the larvae hatch they feed on the dung ball until they leave the nest and repeat the cycle. As one might guess, the dung beetles locate their nesting material by smell. Their re“ ned olfactory perception permits them to locate deposits over relatively great distance for a half-inch long insect. During periods when there are too many dung beetles or too few dropping, these beetles will rob dung balls from each other. Depending on the availability of material for the ball and the enthusiasm of the beetle, the dung ball can weigh up to 10 times the weight of the beetle. Fossil records indicate dung beetles have existed for at least 30 million years. While no preserved dung beetles have been found, paleontologists have recovered fossilized dung balls the size of tennis balls from that prehistoric epoch. Early recorded history in Egypt indicated dung beetles were well regarded and classi“ ed as a sacred creature. Some in that ancient culture believed there was a connection between the way the beetles rolled their dung balls and the way the sun rose. Over 4,000 years ago Khepri was included in the pantheon of Egyptian deities and was associated with the morning sun. He was pictured as a human with a beetle head or as the scarab beetle, a brightly colored dung beetle native to North Africa. Somewhat later dried dung beetles were used in East Asian folk medicine. The cure to several diseases was attributed to the presence of these dehydrated insects in the remedy. To learn more about dung beetles and other insects in Wakulla County, contact the UF/ IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Dung beetles make use of animal droppings Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA dung beetle rolls manure into a ball and moves it to its nest. The beetle faces the opposite direction and pushes the ball with its hind legs. The female lays eggs in the dung ball, and larvae hatch and feed on it. Special to The News Electric utility customers in Florida are targets of a scam involving fraudulent phone calls from individuals impersonating utility company employees. The Florida Public Service Commission is warning customers to beware of calls threatening immediate electric service disconnection and directing the customer to purchase a prepaid debit card to pay their bill. When the customer calls back the utility representative,Ž the scammer asks for the debit cards receipt number and PIN number, allowing access to the cards funds. In some cases, the scammers ask for the customers credit card information and numbers. Some thieves are using caller ID spoo“ ng, making it appear that the call originates from the customers utility company, and the scammers have become aggressive when their legitimacy is questioned. We want to ensure that Floridas electric utility customers are warned about unscrupulous scam artists who are trying to steal from them,Ž said PSC Chairman Ronald A. Bris. It appears that this fraudulent practice is targeting low-income households and small, privately-owned businesses, so there is an even greater urgency to alert customers to this scheme.Ž Reminders for electric utility customers: € Utility companies never ask for or require a prepaid debit card for bill payments. € Utility companies do not immediately disconnect delinquent accounts; customers receive several notices before disconnection. € Utility companies never call a customer seeking personal information or credit card numbers. € In the field, utility company employees carry picture identification badges. If you think you are a victim, immediately call your local police department and call your utility company: € Florida Power & Light Company customers should call in Miami-Dade 305-442-0388, in Broward County 954-797-5000, in Palm Beach County 561697-8000, and all other counties 800-226-3545. € Duke Energy Florida, Inc. customers should call 800-700-8744. € Gulf Power Company customers should call 800225-5797. Or contact the Florida Public Service Commission at 800-352-3442 or contact@psc.state.” .us. For additional information, visit www.” oridapsc. com.PSC warns of bill scam Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2012…2013.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 432 CMS Accepted 12112012 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQA August 9 August 23 September 13 September 27 October 11 October 14 October 16 October 24 October 25 *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and re“nances. Re“nances and used car purchases 2 006 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA.

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 Winston shines in season opener against Pitt In the Huddle, Page 3B Cherbourg, France Travel by Linda Carter Page 8B Lady War Eagles play well after rocky pre-season Volleyball, Page 2B sports news and team views SportsBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles won their season opener in dominating fashion on Saturday afternoon in Tallahassee, beating the Florida State High School Seminoles 37-14. The game, originally set for Friday night, Aug. 30, at Florida High, was cancelled because of lightning and re-set for the next morning. The weather on Saturday was clear, but it was hot and muggy. And there was a much smaller crowd in attendance and no Wakulla cheerleaders and neither of the schools bands. Head Coach Scott Klees said he was suprised at how well his team played. He said he knew the team had talent, but theyre a young team, and he was impressed with how they came together. For example, the War Eagles have “ ve brand new offensive linemen, Klees said, and they came out and dominated the line of scrimmage. Now we just have to keep getting better every week,Ž Klees said. The Wakulla offense was a machine, churning out 509 yards … equally divided between passing and rushing. Sophomore quarterback Feleipe Franks went 14 of 25 for 250 yards and two touchdown passes. And Wakullas rushing game amassed 259 yards on 33 plays, and accounted for three TDs. The leading rusher was Antonio Morris who carried the ball eight times for 104 yards and a TD. Monterrious Loggins had 12 carries for 70 yards, and Malik Thomas had three carries for 15 yards and two rushing TDs plus a touchdown pass on quick screen. Receiver Jordan Franks, older brother of quarterback Feleipe Franks, caught 7 passes for 150 yards. The Wakulla defense started out a little shakey at the beginning of the game, allowing Florida High to move the ball down the “ eld. But Klees credited Defensive Coach Grady Guest with making adjustments that settled down the defense. GAME RECAP Florida High won the coin toss and elected to receive the kickoff. The “ rst series for both teams ended with punts. On the Seminoles second possession, they mounted a drive that was aided by multiple penalties on Wakulla … two personal fouls and By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netA big crowd turned out for the season opening football game of the Wakulla War Eagles against the Florida State University High School Seminoles on Friday night, Aug. 30, at the Seminoles’ eld in Tallahassee, but the game was cancelled due to lightning. The stands on both sides of the eld were packed with fans, their bands and cheerleaders, before the game was set to start at 7:30 p.m. The teams were on the eld for pre-game stretches as a storm neared with visible lightning strikes south of Southwood, where Florida High is located, and coming from the north. At about 7:20 p.m., the teams left the eld for the locker rooms as the storm got nearer and the lightning got more frequent and a 30-minute delay was called. The lightning never let up and the storm worsened and by about 9:15 game and school of cials made the decision to cancel the game and re-set it for 11 a.m. the next day. On Saturday, the weather cleared, and the two football teams played the game on an extremely hot and muggy day. It was about 80 degrees at kick off, but the temperature quickly got into the mid-90s and there was no shade on the eld. Neither of the school bands was able to attend the Saturday game, nor were the Wakulla cheerleaders able to make it. While there were fewer fans in the stands on both sides of the eld, Wakulla’s fans were loud with their support – at one point even breaking out into an impromptu “Eagles! Eagles!” cheer.Game delayed by weatherBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Saturday, Aug. 31, after a night of severe thunderstorms and lightning, the morning dawned cloudy, but with no rain or lightning and the Wakulla High School cross country teams headed to Phipps Park north of Tallahassee to compete in the “ rst of“ cial cross country race of the 2013 season, the Cougar Challenge, hosted by Godby High School. Runners from eight other schools also gathered at the site to run the challenging off-road course. At 8 a.m., 71 girls toed the starting line and when the starting gun went off, the new season was underway. WHS senior Madison Harris, competing in her “ rst of“ cial high school cross country meet, immediately went to the front and challenged anyone to go with her. Only two runners, Meagan Giddens from Taylor County and WHSs Margaret Wiedeman tried to keep pace. Harris led by about 8 seconds at the mile mark and steadily built on the lead through the remainder of the race, “ nishing in 20:34, 34 seconds ahead of Giddens. (21:08). Wiedeman hung on gamely and “ nished in third place in a time of 22:13. Wiedemans younger sister, Lydia, ran a strong race, “ nishing in 23:09 in eighth place. Sophomore Connie Lewis was the next WHS runner to “ nish and ran well “ nishing in 24:50. Two freshmen runners, Haleigh Martin (27:27) and Emily Lawrence (27:58) completed the scoring for the local girls. Overall, the girls team “ nished in second place to perennial powerhouse Leon High School and collected their “ rst team trophy of the season. Three of the local ladies, Harris (1st), M. Wiedeman (3rd) and L. Wiedeman (8th) were individually recognized for “ nishing in the top 10 overall. The boys race went off at 8:40 a.m. and the Leon and Maclay boys immediately took control. WHS sophomore Albert Smythe was the only local runner close to the front at the mile mark and he fought hard to maintain his position throughout the 3.1 miles of hills and mud. Smythe ran a good time of 18:50 and “ nished in 13th place. Junior Alan Pearson (20:04) was the second WHS runner to “ nish. Rounding out the top seven for WHS were Mitchell Atkinson (20:13), J.P. Piotrowski (20:34), Travis Parks (20:59), Colton McCully (21:38) and James Story (22:12). WHSs top returning runner, Aaron Smith, dealing with a nagging injury, ran through the race and helped pace McCully and Story and top freshman Bryce Cole was held out due to a minor injury. A total of 20 WHS boys completed the race. Other “ nishers included Graysen Rudd (22:43), Evan Guarino (22:45), Riley Welch (23:36), Gil Damon (24:06), Toby Jordon (24:24), Riley Carrier (24:42),Connor Whit“ eld (24:45), Nick Emerson (25:40), Logan Cook (25:51), Tyler Westcott (26:01), Alex Smythe (29:09) and William Thomas (35:50). In the “ nal results, the local boys team “ nished well, nailing down fourth place of nine teams, “ nishing behind teams from Leon, Maclay and North Florida Christian. There were 107 “ nishers in the boys race. The cross country teams will travel to Jacksonville next Saturday, Sept. 7, to compete in the ultra-competitive Katie Caples Invitational held at Bishop Kenny High School. To date, 53 teams have entered the meet. The “ rst race will start at 5:45 p.m. CROSS COUNTRY FOOTBALLWakulla runners compete at Cougar Challenge WILLIAM SNOWDENWar Eagle running back Antonio Morris runs over a would-be Florida High tackler.War Eagles winWakulla opens the season with a 37-14 victory over Florida High HOME OPENER: The War Eagles host Navarre High at J.D. Jones Stadium on Friday, Sept. 6, at 7:30 p.m. Turn to Page 2B DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Offer Expires Spept. 30, 2013850926-3212*10%OFFANY PURCHASEMAKING ROOM FOR CHRISTMAS STOCK*Must present original coupon from printed newspaper only. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 SCALLOP SEASON IS SCALLOPSEASON IS As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning, Probate • Real Estate Transactions and Title Insurance • Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. • Business Planning & IncorporationsCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 Rhonda A. 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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy JOE JACOBSRMS CoachFor the “ rst time since 2008, the Riversprings Bears football team fell to the Wildcats of Wakulla Middle School. In a game that featured 6th graders in the 1st quarter, back-ups in the 2nd quarter, and starters in the 3rd and 4th quarters, the Wildcats were able to pound out a 50-8 victory. The loss begins RMS 2013 campaign 0-1. Riversprings graduated a lot of 8th graders last season, and only returned 1 starter on offense and 2 on defense. We knew we were in a huge rebuilding year coming in to this season,Ž said RMS Coach Joey Jacobs. We are raw.Ž The game served as a learning tool for both teams, and it gives the coaches a chance to see their squads in competition. According to Jacobs,Ž The good news is, we can improve a whole lot. We had a ton of issues, but they can be and will be “ xed.Ž Although the Bears lost the game, there were some bright spots. The Riversprings 6th grade unit only gave up 6 points in their quarter. The play of Paxton Tomani, Ian Walker, Jordan Hoover, Alvin White, and Dejuan Hughes was noted. We are young, but we are going to keep putting one foot in front of the other until we get where we are supposed to be,Ž Jacobs said. The Bears schedule doesnt get any easier, with a trip to Tolar in Bristol coming up on Tuesday, September 3rd. That is followed up by trips to Perry (September 12th), Franklin County (September 19th), and Marianna (October 10th), before returning home to face Port St. Joe on October 15. The Bears will end their season on October 22nd, when they face WMS for the County Championship in the annual Sand-gnat Slobber-knocker. Riversprings falls to Wakulla MiddleWar Eagles win over Florida HighBy AMY LEESpecial to The NewsWakulla Highs Lady Golf Team kicked off their season this past week. The team consists of four players: juniors Kenzie Lee and Micahlyn Jeziorski, freshman Alyssa Stokley, and senior Rachel Woosler. Last Thursday the “ rst tournament of the year was held at Capital City Country Club and Golf Course and Wakulla competed against Florida High and Leon. Wakulla played very well scoring the overall lowest score of 234, Leon scored 247 and Florida High scored 261 which gave the tournament win to Wakulla. Overall lowest score by an individual was made by Kenzie Lee with a 47, followed by Micahlyn Jeziorski with a 49. Alyssa Stokley shot a 68 and Rachel Woosler a 70. The Lady War Eagles will play this Thursday at Hilaman Golf Course against Lincoln and Florida High. The team will play in 10 more tournaments before participating in the City Championships on Oct. 7 at Southwood Golf Course. By SALLY WHEELERAssistant CoachThe Wakulla High School Volleyball team participated in Leons PreSeason tournament on Friday, Aug. 23 and Saturday, Aug. 24 with losses to Maclay as well as Panama Citys Mosley. The team struggled to get their momentum going against either team losing 3 straight sets in each match. After their rocky debut the Lady War Eagles came back with two intense games against Lincoln and Florida High, last Tuesday and Thursday. The WHS team played 5 sets with the Trojans losing the “ rst two 23-25, 17-25, then came back to win the second two sets 25-21 and 25-18. Their “ nal game slipped away when Lincoln gained a 6-point lead followed by the 6-15 loss for the War Eagles. Game leaders were Shannan Wood with 10 kills and four blocks. Caylee Cox contributed to the “ ght with 23 assists and six aces while Haley Brown had “ ve kills. Albrey Sorrell had six digs and Marina Petrandis had five. Petrandis also had two serving aces and four kills. The game was a much better display of the talent Wakulla High has to showcase this year. After the tough loss on Tuesday night the War Eagles jumped out quick against the Florida High Seminoles winning the “ rst set 27-25. The Seminoles did not back down easily winning the second set 22-25 but couldnt keep their momentum going against the Red, White, and Blue losing the next two 25-19 and 25-15. Wakulla defense was lead by Albrey Sorrell with 13 digs and three aces. Defensive specialist Brittany Hope and Kathryn Eck also contributed to the tight defensive play combining for 19 digs, while Tamia Potter had “ ve blocks. Haley Brown led the offensive play with “ ve aces and 8 kill while also digging 10 balls. Taylor Lawhon followed Brown with 7 kills. Wood and Petrandis each had five kills. Wakulla combined for 14 aces during the match. New Varsity Head Coach Elizabeth Potts said that she is looking forward to a great season and excited about the intensity of her teams play. The War Eagles (1-1) will be back in action at home on Tuesday, Sept. 3 at 5:30 and 7:30 against Chiles High School followed by a district game at home on Thursday, Sept. 5 during those same times. JUNIOR VARSITY The Junior Varsity team had similar results as the varsity losing against the tough Lincoln Trojans 18-25, 22-25 then dominating the Seminoles 25-10 and 25-16. Wakulla fell behind losing two straight on Tuesday, but turned around their game and won two straight versus FL High. The stat leaders for the JV Lady War Eagles were Taylor Clark with 12 assists, June Marino contributing 7 kills while Dori Stringer had 4 kills and Kayla Rudd contributed 3 kills. Khadizjah Stokley had 6 digs and Perri Thompson had 7 digs. The team totaled 16 aces between both games.sports news and team views SportsVOLLEYBALL GOLF MIDDLE SCHOOL FOOTBALLLady War Eagles split exciting games after rocky pre-season tournamentGirls team wins rst tournamentFrom Page 1Ban encroachment … and got to the Wakulla 14, but Florida High fumbled in the end zone and Wakulla recovered for a touchback. From its 20, Wakulla mounted a drive down the “ eld that included a nice pass from quarterback Feleipe Franks to his older brother, receiver Jordan Franks, caught in double-coverage on the sideline. The War Eagles drive culminated in a 4-yard sweep to the corner by Malik Thomas for a score. The point after by Feleipe Franks was good and Wakulla was up 7-0. Florida High responded with its own long drive to tie the game at 7 each. On its next possession, there was another Franksto-Franks pass along the sideline, a quick, slashing run by Markel Rawls to the 15, then Bryan Nichols carried it to the 5, and Malik Thomas outran everybody to the corner on another sweep play to score. The point after was good and Wakulla was up, 14-7. Florida High was trying to mount an answering drive, but a pass over the middle was intercepted by defensive back Kieryn Parsons. The War Eagle offense scored on a quick pass to Thomas, who made a scorching run down the “ eld for a touchdown. The extra point made it 21-7 War Eagles. In the second half, the War Eagles mounted a drive that ended with Antonio Morris showing his speed on a 30 yard scoring run. The extra point put Wakulla up 28-7. The next Florida High series ended with Vonte Ervin intercepting a pass and returning it to the Seminole 10. But the War Eagles were unable to move the ball, and Feleipe Franks kicked a 27-yard “ eld goal to make it 31-7. The Seminoles came back, completing a 60-yard pass play down to the Wakulla 12, and then took it in a couple of plays later to cut the War Eagle lead to 31-14. Wakulla took the ball and drove to midfield where, facing a 4th down and 9, there was Franksto-Franks pass play down to the 18. At the start of the fourth quarter, the drive ended with a 25-yard Franks-toFranks touchdown pass. The extra point was blocked, making the score 37-14. Florida drove down the “ eld, but War Eagle defensive back Pat Harvey put an end to the threat with an interception in the end zone. THIS WEEK: NAVARRE Wakullas home opener is against Navarre. Prior to their opening loss against Pensacola Catholic last week, Navarre had been ranked 6th in Class 6A. Well have to play very, very well,Ž Klees said. Theres nothing they dont do … theyre good at everything.Ž Catch the Coachs Show, Thursday at 5 p.m. on WAVE 94.1. The Wakulla JV football team has tied the school record for most consecutive wins at 22 with their 26-7 win last week over Madison County. The JV squad hosts Taylor County at home this week for the chance to break the record, which was set several years ago by the JV volleyball ball team. The varsity win record is 21 in a row, set by the 1979-80 baseball team, which was coached by David Miller, who later became Wakulla superintendent of schools. The last time the JV team lost was three years ago, the first game of the season – which happened to be against the Taylor County Bulldogs. The game is Thursday night at 7 p.m. at J.D. Jones Stadium.… William SnowdenJV ties win record Players of the WeekJORDAN FRANKS Receiver 7 catches, 150 yards, TD FELEIPE FRANKS Kicker27-yard FG, 2 punts, 4 PATsJAMES DOUIN Linebacker 12 tackles, graded 82% ANTONIO MORRIS Running back 8 carries, 104 yards, TDO ense Defense Co-o ense Special Teams WILLIAM SNOWDENMalik Thomas crosses the goal line to score his second touchdown on a sweep play.Sponsored by 850926-1011Y our H ome T own R ealtor ”” Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the

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By MARTY COHENThere has been nary a dissenting syllable offered about the Florida offense this preseason … from the coaches to the players, its all been positive on that side of the ball. Heck, head coach Will Muschamp even offered praise early in camp when asked about Max Staver, the freshman quarterback who is fourth-strong at best, and battling to be the scout team QB this fall. Yet reality awaits. We will “ nd out quickly whether all the good vibes were just hot air designed to foster optimism, or if truly signi“ cant strides have been made by an offense that looked pedestrian for large stretches of last years breakthrough season. From the head coach down to the assistant ball boy, we all know it has to be better if Florida is going to achieve its primary goal of heading to Atlanta as SEC East champ. There are certainly tangible reasons to believe, but its no longer behind closed doors. The 2013 Florida offense takes ” ight on Saturday, with serious expectations … and accompanying pressure … of watching last seasons struggles disappear in the rear view mirror. Theres no question, when you have your quarterback back, the guy that won 10 ballgames for you a year ago, youre further along,Ž head coach Will Muschamp said. And I feel good about the talent level around him up front, at the receiver position, the running back position, I think the tight end position has improved itself though camp, so I think were better in spots than we were a year ago. And certainly the comfort level with what were going to be offensively is there.Ž For the first time since that Tebow guy left, there is a semblance of continuity on offense. The revolving door at offensive coordinator has halted as Brent Pease enters his second year with a “ rmer grasp on his personnel as the players feel more at ease in the system. Dont discount this factor … just look at the performance of the Gator in the second year of the Muschamp/Dan Quinn system last season, the “ rst in which a similar carousel of defensive coordinators ended. Yet much of it lands on junior quarterback Jeff Driskels shoulders, now firmly entrenched as the starter after entering opening day still battling with since-departed Jacoby Brissett a year ago. Not many rookie quarterbacks deliver the fanfare of a Johnny Manziel, and Driskel succeeded as more of a caretaker than a playmaker last fall. Well the training wheels are off and Muschamp has admitted as much, on a number of occasions declaring that the Gators are Jeffs team.Ž Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 3B F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators By TIM LINAFELTFrom his spot against the wall in Heinz Fields filledto-capacity media room, the senior wore an ear-to-ear grin as he watched the freshman “ eld questions from a group of reporters that hung on his every word. Turns out that Lamarcus Joyner was as wowed by Jameis Winston as the rest of us. Joyner, of course, had duties that prevented him from seeing every last detail, but he certainly got the highlights. And in the 10 days between now and Florida States homeopener against Nevada, Joyner, along with the rest of the college football world, will have plenty of time to fully digest the “ ner points of what can only be described as a transcendent debut for Jameis Winston. I just call it a prophecy being ful“ lled,Ž Joyner said. I knew since this guys freshman year, (when Winston was) out there on scout team making plays a “ fth-year senior, EJ Manuel was making, throws like that. And I just said to myself This guy is going to be special. As you saw tonight, he did pretty great for it being a “ rst game. Twenty-seven passes thrown. Twenty-“ ve completions. Some basic algebra reveals that thats an astounding 92.5 completion percentage … the best of any quarterback in Florida State history with at least 15 attempts. No one here needs reminding that this is a football program that has produced two Heisman Trophy winners at the position. Is it unfair to compare Winston to Charlie Ward and Chris Weinke? Sure. But its a lot less so than it was just a few hours ago. Consider: He completed his “ rst 11 passes. It wouldve been 12 had an of“ cial ruled that Kenny Shaw had been inbounds while making a catch on the sideline. By the time Winston “ nished, only one of his passing attempts had even hit the ground. He “ nished with 356 passing yards, annihilating the record for most yards in a freshmans FSU debut. He added another 25 yards on the ground and slipped through the teeth of Pitts short-yardage defense to score. All of it in front of a national, Labor Day audience and a sold-out Heinz Field eager to see a once-proud program make its ACC debut. I was so anxious. Everyone was excited,Ž Winston said. Its Monday Night Football. Were in college, playing on Monday NightFootball in a pro stadium? I was so pumped for that.Ž Pumped, sure. Nervous? Apparently not. Heck, even one of his few miscues, a fumble at the end of a scramble, bounced harmlessly out of bounds. Better to be lucky [i]and[/i] good. And as he stood at the podium, with his senior teammate smiling on, Winston insisted that he can only get better. There were, after all, the two incompletions. And two sacks. I dont like getting sacked,Ž Winston said with a smile. I can get better every single day,Ž he said. Theres so many things thats under the table that people dont see. As an athlete, youve got to get better every single day.Ž Jimbo Fisher has quite a task on his hands now. Winston is a national sports story now and any college football fans who dont already know his name will be learning it soon. Somehow, the hype will only continue to grow. It was one ball game, guys. Thats it,Ž Fisher said. He did a great job. As long as he keeps the process in mind and working with great habits, he will be “ ne.Ž F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A FLORIDA g a t o r s gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102Tennessee State at Florida A&MSaturday, Sept. 7 at 2 p.m.The game can be heard on WHBX 96.1-FM. #3 Florida at MiamiSaturday, Sept. 7 at NOONThe game can be seen on ESPN. #10 Florida StateBYE WEEK TI M E T O WI T N E S S TIME TO WITNESS A ‘ NE W’ OF F E N S E A ‘NEW’ OFFENSEJameis Winston had an amazing debut as FSU quarterback against Pitt. Running back Mack Brown with the ball.Pumped, sureƒ Nervous? Apparently not.PHOTO BY TRAVIS REGISTER GATOR BAIT / STEVE JOHNSON

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Call 877-282-4409 5855-0905 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING : EVENT:Regular School Board Meeting, Final Public Hearing on 2013-14 Budget DATE: Monday,September 9, 2013 TIME: Reguler Meeting -5:45 p.m., Final Public Hearing -6:00 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting, Final Public Hearing on Budget For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 September 5, 2013 5854-0905 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: JEDIDIAH S. RICKEY Last known address of: 232 Otter Lake Rd, Panacea, FL32346 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 September 5, 2013 5859-0912 TWN vs. Carson Development Corp. Case No. 13-18-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 13-18-CA CRE VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, Plaintiff, vs. CARSON DEVELOPMENT CORP., a Florida corporation, and WAKULLA BUSINESS CENTER PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure rendered on June 20, 2013, in that certain cause pending in the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CARSON DEVELOPMENT CORP., a Florida corporation, and WAKULLA BUSINESS CENTER PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., a Florida non-profit corporation, are the Defendants, in Civil Action Case No.: 2013-18-CA, I, Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the aforesaid Court, will at 11:00 a.m., on Thursday, September 26, 2013, offer for sale and sell to the highest bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property, situate and being in Wakulla County, Florida to-wit: 5860-0912 TWN Vs. Rivers, Jon Case #2012-CA-000380 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000380 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Jon T. Rivers and Christina Lin Rivers a/k/a Christina L. Rivers, Husband and Wife; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated August 1, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000380 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Jon T. Rivers and Christina Lin Rivers a/k/a Christina L. Rivers, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 26, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: FROM THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, RUN EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) 709.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH PARALLELTO THE WEST BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) 417.42 FEET, THEN TURN 8956LEFT AND RUN EAST 208.71 FEET, THEN TURN 9004LEFT AND RUN NORTH 417.42 FEET TO THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP, 4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, THEN RUN WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY208.71 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING BEING IN THE NORTHEAST QUARTER (NE 1/4) OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP4 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH AROADWAYEASEMENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF INGRESS, EGRESS AND REGRESS AS GRANTED BYBEATRICE CARTER, AWIDOW, IN ROADWAYEASEMENT RECORDED JULY2, 1987, IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 132, PAGE 348, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 September 5 & 12, 2013 5861-0912 TWN Vs. Paugh, Matthew Case #2012-CA-000479 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000479 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Matthew G. Paugh a/k/a Matthew Paugh; Unknown Spouse of Matthew G. Paugh a/k/a Matthew Paugh; Unknown Parties in Possession #1, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants; Unknown Parties in Possession #2, If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated August 1, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000479 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Matthew G. Paugh a/k/a Matthew Paugh are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 26, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 72 AND 73, BLOCK 17, WAKULLAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 September 5 & 12, 2013 3 BR 2BA SWMH $550 mo. Wakulla Realty850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker“One Stop Real Estate Of ce”2655 B Crawfordville Hwy Downtown CrawfordvilleRENTAL PROPERTY AVAILABLESTORAGE RENTALSAVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.ŽGIVE US A CALL, DROP IN OR VISIT US AT WAKULLAREALTY.COMNOTICE OF SALE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that ABC Storage, LLC will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, September 14, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of MiniWarehouses containing the personal property of: Jerry Lamar Hiers Elwanda Rodgers Darrell Hodge. Before the sale date of Saturday, September 14, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3743 Crawfordville Hwy. before 12:00 noon.8/29/13-9/5/13 8AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDS!BIGSEPT. 6 & 7AUTUMNYARD SALE A MarkNet Alliance Member AU 479, AB 296 10% Buyer’s PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Details Visit RowellAuctions.com 270 Pruett Road, Eastpoint, FloridaSelling by Order of the U.S. Bankruptcy CourtOffered Online at RowellAuctions.comBidding Ends, Tuesday, Sept. 24th @ 2 p.m. RowellAuctions.comBeautiful Apalachicola Bay View Lot Beautiful Apalachicola Bay View Lot~ Subject to Auto Extend Bidding Feature ~-Fantastic 2.65 Acres Fisherman’s Paradise -Located near the foot of the St. George Island Bridge -Outstanding Views Overlooking Apalachicola Bay -Property Features Majestic Oak Trees & Great PondIn Co-Op with: Helen Spohrer, CCIM | (850) 899-1262 Prudential Shimmering Sands Realty Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403A-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN S ERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• S tump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED PAINTING AND LAWN SERVICE850-570-1687 • 850-296-5854 R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 5B Lot 2 of Wakulla Business Center, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded Plat Book 4, Page 17 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with all rights, easements, appurtenances, royalties, mineral rights, oil and gas rights, crops, timber, all diversion payments or third party payments made to crop producers, and all existing and future improvements, structures, fixtures, and replacements that may now, or at any time in the future, be part of the real estate described above (all referred to as PropertyŽ). The term Property also includes, but is not limited to, any and all water wells, water, ditches, reservoirs, reservoir sites and dams located on the real estate and all riparian and water rights associated with the Property, however established. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: June 21, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk September 5 & 12, 2013 5824-0912 TWN Vs. Nelson, Terry Case No.13-109-CANotice of Action I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 13-109-CA GIBBS REALTY CORPORATION, a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, 5825-0905 TWN vs. Diaz, Sarah Case No. 652012CA000233CAXXXX Notice Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION, CASE NO.: 652012CA000233CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/ASARAH SIMONDS PATTON, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated June 06, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652012CA000233CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACOUNTY, Florida, wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION, is Plaintiff, and SARAH S. DIAZ A/K/ASARAH SIMONDS PATTON, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 12 day of September, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Commence at an old concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 7, Township 3 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 00 degrees 01 minutes 27 seconds East along the West boundary of said Section 7, a distance of 674.17 feet to an old concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 50 minutes 33 seconds East 156.70 feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary of Whiddon Lake Road, thence run North 15 degrees 30 minutes 51 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 210.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 122.61 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said Point OF Beginning, continue North 14 degrees 52 minutes 25 seconds East along said Easterly maintained right-of-way boundary 149.00 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 89 degrees 41 minutes 03 seconds East 331.49 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 00 degrees 09 minutes 27 seconds East 224.25 feet, thence run North 78 degrees 02 minutes 43 seconds West 378.56 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 1.50 acres, more or less. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: August 9, 2013 Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL33309 Tel: 954-462-7000 Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Heather J. Koch Phelan Hallinan, PLC Heather J. Koch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89107 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No.0668273 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION c/o Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL33309 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 29 and September 5, 2013 5826-0905 TWN vs. Advanced Builders Docket No. 12-133CANotice of Foreclosure Sale NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on October 3, 2013, at 11:00 a.m Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: SEE EXHIBIT B ATTACHED HERETO. pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure Upon Count IV in a case pending in said Court the style of which is CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, v. ADVANCED BUILDERS & REMODELERS, INC., JIMMYBENNETT a/k/a JIM BENNETT, ROBERT C. CAMP, PREMIER BANK, THE GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE I PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., CAPITALCITYBANK and THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., BRYAN W. STRICKLAND and CHELSEAR. STRICKLAND, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 12-133CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days af ter the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esq., Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591, Tel: (850) 434-9200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations are available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 12 day of August, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA [SEALOF THE COURT] By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT BŽ LOTS 2 AND 3, BLOCK AOF GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE 1, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE(S) 77 AND 78, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. AND LOT 13-2 COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 1, BLOCK DŽ OF WILDWOOD ACRES, UNIT NO. 1, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 13 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF COUNTRYCLUB DRIVE 227.31 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED # 2919) MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 17 OF WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 35 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 234.90 FEET TO A RE-ROD (MARKED # 6475) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 17, OF WILDWOOD COUNTRYCLUB, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 56 MINUTES 11 SECONDS EAST 81.95 FEET TO AN IRON ROD (MARKED # 6475), THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 51 SECONDS 153.75 FEET TO AN IRON ROD MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 09 SECONDS EAST 150 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 51 SECONDS EAST 30 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 09 SECONDS WEST 150 FEET TO AN IRON ROD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 30 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. August 29, 2013 and September 5, 2013 5829-0905 TWN Vs. Sanders, Jarred Case # 2009CA000323 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2009CA000323 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANY, AS TRUSTEE, ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDERS OF THE J.P. MORGAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST2007-CH5 ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2007-CH5, PLAINTIFF, VS. JARRED SANDERS, ETAL. DEFENDANT(S). 5830-0905 TWN vs. Ceruti, Donald Case No. 65-2012-CA-000448 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000448 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. DONALD L. CERUTI; CHRISTINE M. CERUTI; BRACKENCHASE BUILDERS INC.; OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated August 1, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000448, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and DONALD L. CERUTI; CHRISTINE M. CERUTI; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; BRACKENCHASE BUILDERS INC.; OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION INC.; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 19th day of September, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 33, OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE REPLAT, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 102, IN THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 1st day of August, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Submitted by: Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com August 29 and September 5, 2013 5831-0905 TWN Vs. Tucker, Leah 65-2010-CA-00000066CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000066CA DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUSTCOMPANYAS TRUSTEE FOR MSAC 2007-SEA1, Plaintiff, vs. LEAH TUCKER AND DANIELTUCKER A/K/ADANIELOWEN TUCKER, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, and entered in 65-2010-CA-000066CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONALTRUST COMPANYAS TRUSTEE FOR MSAC 2007-SEA1, is the Plaintiff and LEAH TUCKER; DANIELTUCKER A/K/ADANIELOWEN TUCKER are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on September 19, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 41 OF EASTGATE SUBDIVISION (UNRECORDED) AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NE CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 3030Ž WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 59 ADISTANCE OF 2365.0 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 5245Ž EAST 1050.52 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NE CORNER OF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 4045Ž WEST 1000.0 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF ACOUNTYROAD (GRIFFIN ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYSOUTH 17 DEGREES 5145Ž EAST 466.75 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A50.0 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT (MIDWAYCOURT); THENCE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE NORTH 72 DEGREES 4045Ž EAST 500.0 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 4045Ž EAST 100.0 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 5145Ž WEST 155.59 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 4045Ž WEST 100.0 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 5145Ž EAST 155.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.36 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. SUBJECT TO A25 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE SOUTHERN PORTION OF SAID PROPERTY. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 2 day of August, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 August 29 and September 5, 2013 5832-0905 TWN Vs. Sanders, Thomas Case #13-97-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-97-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, 5853-0905 TWN vs. Celebrate Coastal Development, Case No. 12-352-CANOS Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 12-352-CA CADC/RADCVENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company Plaintiff, v. CELEBRATE COASTALDEVELOPMENT, LLC, et. al., Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to Order on Plaintiff, CADC/RADC Venture 2011-1, LLCs Motion to Cancel and Reset Foreclosure Sale dated the 1st day of August 2013 and entered in Case No. 12-352-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CADC/RADC Venture 2011-1, LLC is Plaintiff, and Celebrate Coastal Developments, LLC and Lakes at Shell Point HomeownersAssociation, Inc. are Defendants, the Clerk of Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the courthouse located at Room 136 of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 am on the 12th day of September, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOTS 24 AND 25 OF THE LAKES AT SHELLPOINT, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 8, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. APERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN SIXTY(60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE BECKER & POLIAKOFF, P.A., Attorneys for Plaintiff Alhambra Towers, 121 Alhambra Plaza, 10th Floor Coral Gables, Florida 33134 Phone: (305) 262-4433 Fax: (305) 442-2232 By:/s/Adam Cervera, Esq., Florida Bar #81679 Primary: acervera@becker-poliakoff.com Secondary: cpons@becker-poliakoff.com Secondary: cgarcia@becker-poliakoff.com August 29 and September 5, 2013 5856-0912 TWN Vs.Weems, Richard Case No. 65-2010-CA000205 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000205 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. RICHARD STEPHEN WEEMS; LONALISAWEEMS; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on June 20, 2012, and the Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale entered on July 24, 2013, in this cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, the clerk shall sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: LOT 11, OF DOE FOREST, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1994 DOUBLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ATTACHED THERETO HAVING VIN #47620322GA, TITLE #66714392 AND VIN #47620322GB, TITLE #66714391. WHICH IS NOW RETIRED. a/k/a 9 WHITE TAILDR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-1644 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, on September 26, 2013 at 11:00 AM. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at St. Petersburg, Florida, this 25 day of July, 2013 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL33716 727-536-4911 phone / FAX 727-539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHAWELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALLTDD 1-800-955-8771. September 5 & 12, 2013 5857-0912 TWN Vs. Green, Kenneth 2012-CA-000439 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-CA-000439 522012CA000439XXCICI GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, A FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH O. GREEN; WANDA F. GROOVER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH O. GREEN; JOHN DOE; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT, PURSUANT TO THE JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE ENTERED IN THE ABOVE CAUSE, I WILL SELL THE PROPERTY SITUATED IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, DESCRIBED AS: << SEE ATTACHED LEGAL DESCRIPTION ON EXHIBIT X > AT PUBLIC SALE, TO THE HIGHEST AND BEST BIDDER, FOR CASH, ON SEPTEMBER 26, 2013 AT 11:00 AM AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. IF YOU ARE A PERSON WITH A DISABILITY WHO NEEDS ANY ACCOMMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE. PLEASE CONTACT Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, Fl 32303, 850.577.4401 AT LEAST SEVEN (7) DAYS BEFORE YOUR SCHEDULED COURT APPEARANCE, OR IMMEDIATELY UPON RECEIVING THIS NOTIFICATION IF THE TIME BEFORE THE SCHEDULED APPEARANCE IS LESS THAN SEVEN (7) DAYS; IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALL 711. DATED: JUNE 19, 2013 BRENT X. THURMOND,CLERK OF THE COURT (SEAL) By:/S/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk VESCHIO LAW GROUP, LLC, 2001 W. KENNEDY BLVD., TAMPA, FL 33606 (813)254-6666 LEGAL DESCRIPTION EXHIBIT X. Commence at the Southeast Corner of Section 35, Township 2 South, Range 1 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence run South 89 degrees 35 minutes 21 seconds West 1563.54 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 00 degrees 22 minutes 55 seconds East 1465.07 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 89 degrees 35 minutes 31 seconds West 1072.46 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 00 degrees 42 minutes 30 seconds West 351.82 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 89 degrees 43 minutes 38 seconds East 1079.12 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 22 minutes 55 seconds West 349.30 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 8.66 acres more or less. Subject to a 15 foot wide ingress/egress and utility easement lying over and across the Westerly 15 feet described thereof. September 5 & 12, 2013 Plaintiff, v. THOMAS L. SANDERS and LORINDA C. SANDERS, husband and wife; et al .; NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 16, 2013, entered in Case No. 13-97-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and THOMAS L. SANDERS and LORINDA C. SANDERS, husband and wife, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordsville Highway, Crawfordsville, Florida 32327, at 11 oclock a.m. on September 19, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 16th day of July, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) EXHIBIT AŽ Commence at a U.S. Government concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of Section 24, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, said point lying on the West boundary of Lot 75 of Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North 01 degrees 22 minutes West along said West boundary of Lot 75 a distance of 101.76 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINIT OF BEGINNING continue North 01 degrees 22 minutes West along said West boundary 510.28 feet, thence leaving said West boundary of Lot 75, run North 72 degrees 34 minutes 42 seconds East 392.56 feet to the Westerly boundary of a 50.00 foot county roadway, thence run along said Westerly roadway boundary as follows: South 03 degrees 04 minutes 59 seconds East 423.30 feet, thence South 02 degrees 08 minutes 56 seconds West 200.51 feet, thence leaving said Westerly roadway boundary run South 89 degrees 18 minutes 03 seconds 377.66 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 5.00 acres, more or less. TOGETHER WITH5 1984 RIVI SW MH ID #TW1ALBS107460 TITLE #41855624 August 29 and September 5, 2013 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013, in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on September 19, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 for the following described property: LOT 106, TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY, FLORIDAWESTSIDE AS SHOW IN PLAT BOOK NO. 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF MAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: AUGUST2, 2013. By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk of the Court (SEAL) Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A. 1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 29 and September 5, 2013 13-002928-FIH 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS• 3143 Shadeville Hwy, near Wakulla Station – 3BD/2BA house, no smoking, no pets, $900 per month with $900 security deposit Available Sept 1st. • 14 Cutchins Court – 3BD/2BA Doublewide, no smoking, no pets, $700 per month with $700 Deposit, Available Sept. 15th. • 52 Deer Run – 1BD/1BA, cottage on Sopchoppy River, no pets, no smoking, $700 per month with $700 deposit. Available Sept 1st. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!7 Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA CHA, Carport, 1 Car Garage. $630 mo. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550 mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $1,050 mo.

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 5814-0905 TWN To: Brandon Bennett, Case No. 13-66-50, NOA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTYCOURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-66-50 IN RE: 1979 MUSTANG, VIN# 9FO4Y113722 NOTICE OF ACTION YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for establishment of ownership of personal property described as : 1979 Must ang V in # 9F04Y1 13722 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses if any, to it on Plaintiff, Donald Sexton, whose address is: 2771 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville, FL32327, or or before September 6, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on August 9, 2013. (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk August 15, 22, 29, & September 5, 2013 vs. TERRY C. NELSON, CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, CLAYTON C. OAKS, SR., CHARLES W. MATHENY, III, as successor trustee under the Charles W. Matheny, Jr. Trust Agreement, OAKS PROPERTIES, INC., a Florida dissolved corporation, THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF EVALINDA LOBDILL, JESSICA STAR DUNCAN, ALLANA MOON DUNCAN LUQUETTE, SAVANNAH SKY SHEALY n/k/a SAVANNAH SKY GARNER, and BENJAMIN EAGLE DUNCAN, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF EVALINDA LOBDILL YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following real property in Wakulla County, Florida: Commence at the Northeast corner of Section 12, Township 6 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 11 minutes 10 seconds West 978.40 feet; thence South 17 degrees 57 minutes 40 seconds West 394.90 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly right of U.S. Highway 98 said point also lying on a curve to the right with a radius of 3337.79 feet, said point also lying on the Northerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 527, Page 370 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida said point being the POINT OF BEGININNG; thence leaving said Northerly Boundary line and said POINT OF BEGININNG run along said Westerly right of way line and said curve Southeasterly along the arc, thru a central angle 04 degrees 58 minutes 56 seconds, for a distance of 290.24 feet, chord of said arc being South 07 degrees 02 minutes 22 seconds East 290.15 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way boundary line run South 79 degrees 35 minutes 39 seconds West 318.88 feet; thence South 03 degrees 59 minutes 17 seconds East 76.02 feet to an iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of property described in Official Record Book 572, Page 375 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northwest corner run South 03 degrees 59 minutes 17 seconds East 100.04 feet to an iron pipe marking the Southwest corner of said property as described in Official Record Book 572, Page 375; thence leaving said Southwest corner run South 05 degrees 17 minutes 58 seconds East along the Westerly right of way of a 10 wide easement as described in Official Record Book 208, Page 424, in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida for a distance of 62.29 feet to an iron pipe marking the intersection of said Westerly edge of easement with the Northerly right of way of Surf Road also known as County Road #372 said point lying on a curve to the right, said curve having a radius of 1106.28 feet; thence leaving said Westerly edge of easement run along said curve and said Northerly right of way thru a central angle of 02 degrees 39 minutes 26 seconds, for an arc distance of 51.30 feet, chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 32 minutes 41 seconds West 51.30 feet to a 4x4 concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 183, Page 646, in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northerly right of way boundary line run along the Westerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record book 183, Page 646, North 05 degrees 57 minutes 37 seconds West 298.31 feet to an old axle marking the Northeast corner of said property described in Book 183, Page 646; thence leaving said Northeast corner run North 02 degrees 55 minutes 40 seconds West 258.66 feet to a 4x4 concrete monument lying on the North Boundary line of property described in official Record Book 527, Page 370 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence run along said Northerly boundary line North 85 degrees 48 minutes 59 seconds East 356.47 feet to the POINT OF BEGININNG, containing 2.92 acres more or less. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jack E. Kiker, III, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 4128, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-4128, on or before September 20, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. Dated this 8 day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk August 22 & 29 and September 5 & 12, 2013 4774-0905 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 09/14 sale PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, September14, 2013, at 10:00 a.m at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: JASON SILVER ROBERT LOOMIS RICHARD MAN CLIFTON K. MARLOW Before the sale date of Saturday, September 14, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. August 29 and September 5, 2013 5843-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 053 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2245Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10478-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 7 LOT 16 OR 1 P 157 & OR 50 P 278 Name in which assessed JOE VINCENT WOOD said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5844-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 055 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 5845-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 054 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2444Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-086-188-11586-06CWILDWOOD ACRES PHASE II BLOCK C LOT 6 OR 134 P 706; OR 134 P 861; OR 176 P 223 OR 179 P 753; OR 480 P 615 Name in which assessed DANA LYNN HANSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5846-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 056 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #675 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:01-6S-02W-147-03576-C04TARPINE BLK C LOT 4 OR 59 P 50; OR 67 P 480-492 OR 523 P 202 Name in which assessed PANACEA COASTAL PROP INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this16day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5847-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 057 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1502Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-035-008-06918-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1 BLOCK 7 LOT 56 OR 2 P 192; OR 121 P 984; OR 228 P 366 OR 495 P 364; OR 517 P 728; OR 574 P 454 Name in which assessed SCOTT E & KATE STRATTON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5848-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 058 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1052Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:17-3S-01W-318-04457-D23LINZY MILL S/D LOT 23 BLK D OR 744 P 87 Name in which assessed THE PINNACLE GROUP OF THE PANHANDLE LLC & CONLIN JOHN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5849-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 059 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2258Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10508-000GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 17 LOTS 2,3,4,5,6,7,13,14 & 15 AND A PORTION OF LOTS 1, 8 THRU 12 DB 58 P 510; OR 121 P 202 Name in which assessed R.E.M. DEVELOPERS, LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5850-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 060 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2259Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10508-002GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 17 A PORTION OF LOTS 1,8,9,10,11 & 12 OR 521 P 861; OR 548 P 165; OR 205 P 184; OR 337 P 643 Name in which assessed R.E.M. DEVELOPERS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5851-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 061 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2251Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10505-025GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 13 LOT 1 & E 1/2 OF 2 DB 31 P 405; OR 50 P 277; OR 104 P 337; OR 179 P 190 OR 190 P 150; OR 523 P 866 Name in which assessed TARPON IV LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 5852-0919 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 062 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatUS BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2253Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10506-021GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 13 LOT 21 & E 1/2 OF 20 DB 31 P 405; OR 50 P 277; OR 104 P 337; OR 179 P 187 OR 196 P 153; OR 519 P 327 Name in which assessed TARPON IV LLC Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 2548Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-121-122-11977-089PARADISE VILLAGE SHELL POINT UNIT 1 LOT 89 OR 52 P 96 & OR 99 P 522 Name in which assessed BETTY J BRAUN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 9 day ofOctober, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 29 and September 5, 12 & 19, 2013 Brain Teaser 1234 5678910 111213 14 15 16 1718 19 20 2122 232425 26 27 282930 31 32 333435 36 373839 40 4142 43 4445 4647 48 4950 51 5253 54 55 5657585960 61 62 63 64 65 66 A cross 1 They're often covered w ith baby food 5 "The Human C omedy" author 1 1. Sporty British car, f or short 1 4. Lazing about 1 5. "My Favorite Year" s tar Peter 1 6. Cousin of org, com, a nd net 1 7. "Rebel Without a C ause" actress 1 9. Fish eggs 2 0. Eliot's "___ Marner" 2 1. Detroit baseball team 2 3. Magazine founder G loria 2 6. John, Jane, etc. 2 7. Route to the roof 2 8. In need of calories 3 1. Sigourney Weaver f lick 3 2. Not too shabby 3 3. Latvia's capital 3 6. Get benched 3 7. Tulsa residents, e.g. 4 0. Sought office 4 1. Sarcastic laugh 4 3. Mr. Flintstone 4 4. Rainbow or lake, e.g. 4 6. Made shine 4 8. Medal metal 4 9. Underworld figure 5 1. Doesn't just brush 5 2. What some graduate w ith 5 4. Bias 5 5. Billy Joel's "Don't __ Me Why" 5 6. "Clue" suspect 6 1. Forego folding 6 2. Relaxed, on base 63. Goad 64. Blow it 65. Decades, to centuries 66. Kitty comment Down 1. Recycling container 2. Ore. neighbor 3. Diner order 4. Coast 5. Big water heater 6. 2010 action movie, with "The" 7. Meteorologist's predictions 8. Lion's home, maybe 9. Bunches 10. Giving up 11. Best Actor of 1990 12. Love to pieces 13. Shot in the dark 18. Content of some closets 22. Teri of "Young Frankenstein" 23. Cut drastically, as prices 24. Shire of "The Godfather" movies 25. Archie's mate 28. Gave an edge to 29. "Previously owned," in ad-speak 30. Neither here ___ there 32. Achy 34. Bandage material 35. Primes the pot 38. Not working 39. Pungent 42. Wheels 45. Speaker's platform 47. Prepare a disk for data 48. Turns the music way up 49. Step 50. Unfortunate fellow 51. ___ and blood (kin) 53. Spot 54. "ER" command 57. D.C. figure 58. Before 59. This may be inflated 60. Improved partner Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 2413 35647 1 42 78 935 15 479 7624 813 517 2438 9 6 624798153 893156427 351 984672 472615389 968327514 135 472968 786539241 249861735 BIBS BALZAC JAG IDLE OTOOLE EDU NATALIEWOOD ROE SILAS TIGERS STEINEM NAMES LADDER HUNGRY ALIEN SOSO RIGA SIT SOONERS RAN HAHA FRED TROUT BUFFED BRONZE PLUTO FLOSSES HONORS SLANT ASK MISTERGREEN SEE ATEASE URGE ERR TENTHS MEOW

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 – Page 7B 1. MYTHOLOGY: A satyr is a mythical creature that is half man and half what? 2. MILITARY: What is a dreadnought? 3. FAMOUS QUOTATIONS: What famous actor once said, “Comedy is simply a funny way of being serious”? 4. PSYCHOLOGY: What fear is represented by the condition called gamophobia? 5. LANGUAGE: What does the Latin prefix “ambi” mean? 6. GEOGRAPHY: Where is Denali National Park? 7. TELEVISION: Who was the first female guest host of “Saturday Night Live”? 8. ENTERTAINERS: What was the name of ventriloquist Edgar Bergen’s most famous puppet? 9. HISTORY: What land did Alexander the Great rule as king? 10. MUSIC: Which rock group recorded the hit “Walk This Way”? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Goat or horse 2. A heavily armored battleship 3. Peter Ustinov 4. Fear of marriage 5. Both 6. Alaska 7. Candace Bergen 8. Charlie McCarthy 9. Macedonia 10. Aerosmith Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, September 5, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comCherbourg, France – gateway to NormandyBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsDiscover Cherbourg, France, the perfect home base to explore Normandy. Twelve-foot wide multi-story buildings, with roofs perched precariously atop, line up like soldiers in a row. Wander through the markets winding streets. Full of stereotypical French shops, boucherie, butcher shop, pastisserie, bakery, fromagerie, cheese shop, poissonnerie, fish shop … foreign names, and exotic foods. Ogle at the windows stuffed with morsels almost too beautiful to eat. Stop and sample the mouthwatering delicacies. American takeout pales in comparison to beautiful take-away dinners, that taste and look as if they belong in a “ ve star restaurant. The French love affair with food is evident here. Wander further down the ancient streets and experience the dichotomy. Meat spins on roasters, and men lean out windows hawking food to the passerby. Centuries old picture-perfect French buildings with signs reading le Chinese food, le Thailandese, le Balinese, and kebab advertise dinner choices. Even in France, variety abounds. Visit St. Johns Cathedral, for a few minutes of contemplation. Nearby, hidden within the maze of city streets is a green oasis. Gardens overflow with rhododendron, primrose, old garden roses, azaleas, iris and fountains tinkle in the background. The natural history museums artifacts from around the world, and a large collection of vertebrates and invertebrates invite a visit. Cherbourg was the “ rst stop on the Titanics fatal voyage, so visit The Museum of the Sea. Experience what it was like for emigrants leaving for America, and see how the Titanic was constructed in the Titanic, Return to Cherbourg.Ž exhibit. Explore a nuclear submarine, or marvel at marine life in giant aquariums. There is something for the whole family at this museum. Explore the beaches of Normandy made famous during World War II. The monument at Pointe du Hoc honors the Rangers who scaled the cliff and captured the German command bunker. A visit to Utah, Omaha, Gold, Juno and Sword Beaches followed by the U.S.A. Cemetery provides a moving reminder of our countrymens great sacri“ ce. No one can fail to be moved by the sacri“ ces of these young men. See Mont Saint Michel, as described in the New York Times in August 1944, seems to ” oat on the sea as gracefully as a ship under full sail, catching all the changing colors of the clouds.Ž Stunning at sunrise and sunset, floodlit at night, explore this small tidal island. Completely surrounded by a bay, stay long enough and witness the tidal ” ow, rising 20 inches and traveling a distance of 15 miles at the speed of a galloping horse. Once only accessible at low tide, today a highway connects the island to the mainland, but plans underway to install a bridge will return the Mont to its island past. Inhabited for centuries, as a church, a prison, and most recently an Abbey, there is much to discover. The famous Bayeux Tapestries depicts the 1066 Norman conquest of England. An embroidered linen measuring 230 feet long, the tapestry is housed in the old Bayeux Seminary. The 13th century Cathedral of Notre Dame in Bayeux, resembles its namesake in Paris, its 11th century Gothic crypts the only remnants of a medieval priory once located here. Ideal as a base for Normandy, take the time to explore charming Cherbourg, France.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www. luxury-cruising.com. PHOTOS BY LUXURY CRUISE & TRAVEL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Cherbourg Market, above, and the Cherbourg Public Gardens, below left. Treat your pooch to a day at the Spa! SATURDAY,SEPT. 14th10:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. Hudson Park Crawfordville Spa amenities include: All Natural Ingredients Aromatherapy Bubble Bath (lavender, vanilla, mint and more) Le Flea & Tick Spray Towel Drying PAWdecure Donations: $12 All amenities (flea dip included) $7 Regular bath only $5 Pet Photos (fall decorations & various costumes) $7 Anal Gland Extraction $25 Micro-chipping (includes registration of micro-chip) $15 Plush Pet Pillows CHAT of Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326 www.chatofwakulla.org A copy of the official registration CH-13163 and financial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endorsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. LUNCH PARTNER… R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . n t