Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00477

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PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 34th Issue, Thursday, August 22, 2013 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 11A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 13A Weekly Roundup ...........................................................Page 14A First Day of School Photos ............................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B Comics .............................................................................Page 9B Travel .............................................................................Page 10B INDEX OBITUARIES Montine Durrance Dorothy L. Pettis Carrie L. Yates See Page 10B See Page 11A newsThe WakullaTourism Board closer to a new directorTourist Development Council has 14 applications for the postPHOTO BY AMANDA MAYOR Commissioner Kessler wanted lower threshold for putting citizen initiatives on ballot … current requirement is 30 percent of register ed voters, a requirement he helped draftBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Monday nights county commission meeting began with citizens whose input was a prelude to what the bulk of the next two and a half hours would hold: attempts to lower the county charters threshold for citizen ballot referendum petition initiatives and the announcement of the Wetlands Alliances petition drive. Bob Danzey was first to speak and encouraged the board not to support the lowering of the threshold for citizen ballot referendum petitions from 30 percent to 10. Danzey pegged the issue as local maneuveringŽ and said that this is probably not how our system is supposed to work.Ž County Commissioner Howard Kessler made the proposal at a time when the threshold will have to be met if the petition by the countys newly formed Wetlands Alliance wants to get a referendum item put on the ballot to allow citizens to vote on whether or not to keep the countys wetlands ordinance. As for that petition, Eugene Watkins of Crawfordville got up to announce the launching of the initiative in the coming week. I want the citizens of the county to know that they will be receiving a knock at the door and a volunteer will be explaining to them why their property rights, property values and the quality of their water will be impacted by four members of this board of county commissioners,Ž he said. We also want to explain why state regulations are not redundant as weve been told by the county commission.Ž When presenting the item later in the meeting, Kessler made it clear that his proposal would not affect the current wetlands issue. This is for the future,Ž he said. Thirty percent puts a large burden on the citizens. They have the right under a charter government to make petitions and this just sets the bar too high.Ž Chairman Randy Merritt brought up the fact that, if the threshold were set at 10 percent, Wakulla would need 1,800 signatures to get a referendum. In Alachua County it would take 11,000, in Brevard it would take 18,000, in Charlotte 11,000 … so I dont think its a real apples to apples comparison,Ž he said. Merritt also brought up recent literature that was added to the state constitution about the illegality of con“ ning pregnant pigs in a space that doesnt allow them to turn around … a new law that he clearly didnt agree with. This is why the bar is set so high,Ž he said. Commissioner Richard Harden said that Kessler was on the board back when the charter was established. Turn to Page 2A By BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentWakulla High Schools Senior Class of 2013 outscored their counterparts in Florida on the American College Test (ACT) in all areas tested: English, mathematics, reading, science, and the composite score. This is one of the common tests used for college entrance quali“ cations, including meeting requirements to take dual enrollment college courses while still in high school. On the ACT, WHS students averaged 19.0 in English (state 18.7). In mathematics, WHS was at 19.9 (state 19.7). WHS reading scores averaged 20.9 (state 20.4). WHS science scores came in at 19.8 (state 19.1). The overall composite score for WHS graduates was 20.0 (state 19.6). The number of WHS seniors taking the ACT has increased over the past three years from 129 students in 2010 to 148 seniors in 2013. More participation is partly due to WHS offering the ACT on the WHS campus twice a year instead of students having to drive to Tallahassee. Students are encouraged to take the ACT and/or the SAT (Scholastic Assessment Test) in order to broaden their options for after high school. We are striving to meet the needs of our students and make sure they are prepared for many different career pathways after high school. It is validating to see our students consistently exceed the state averages on national tests such as the ACT,Ž stated Superintendent Bobby Pearce.Turn to Page 15AWakulla High grads exceed state in ACT scores By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net In the next couple of weeks, the Tourist Development Council will be looking to make a decision as to who they would like their director to be. At the TDCs Aug. 15 meeting, each member was given a packet of the 14 resumes that were submitted … the intention being that they look them over and reconvene on Aug 20 to decide on up to five to pursue further. With the pot narrowed down, the council plans to hold and be done with interviews by Aug. 29 and to make a selection on the morning of Sept. 3. The TDC hopes to have a recommendation in place in time for the Sept. 9 commission meeting where they will have to present their preference to county commissioners to be approved before of“ cial hiring may take place. If all goes according to plan, the TDC will then end its three-month stint of functioning without a director and not all too soon as the council was visited by Wakulla Springs Park Specialist Jeff Hugo asking for their help. Hugo, who is the chairperson and secretary of the committee that puts together Wild About Wakulla Week, said that he doesnt know if the event will happen this year as an empty spot in leadership has presented itself. Turn to Page 3A B a c k t o s c h o o l Back to school Classes resumed at Wakullas Public Schools on Thursday, Aug. 15. These Riversink Elementary students were leaving school on the “ rst day. Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce reported that there were no major problems beyond the typical transportation problems. He called it a pleasant startŽ to the year. Pearce did note that the district is still experiencing a decline in enrollment, but that the numbers are above what his of“ ce had anticipated. Hopefully, this is the year we begin to turn the other directionŽ with enrollment numbers, Pearce said. More photos of the “ rst day of school on Page 15A.… William Snowden Board rejects lower threshold Logo of the Wakulla Tourist Development Council. EXPLORING BRUGES, BELGIUM MANATEES COME FULL CIRCLE

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Members of the sheriffs department gathered on Friday, Aug. 16, to take part in a barbecue cookoff, the entries of which were judged by County Commissioner Ralph Thomas, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah and Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond. The maintenance area of the sheriffs grounds played host to six teams, each a different department of the of“ ce. Teams manned a hot smoking grill, cooking their rendition of a gourmet burger while co-workers and some members of the community gathered under the nearby pavilion. Monday through Thursday, employees have the option of grabbing lunch from the cafeteria, but on Fridays only breakfast is available. With that in mind, the of“ ce will hold occasional Friday afternoon lunch gatherings … usually a “ sh fry … every now and then, explained Sheriff Charlie Creel. Its just something to bring everyone together for fellowship and its my way of saying thanks for all of their hard work,Ž said Creel. These guys are all co-workers, yet because of different shifts, sometimes they dont get to interact or see each other.Ž Its a good morale booster, he said, and one that doesnt use any of the taxpayers money. Each team supplied their own materials and the production fed everyone who attended … with plenty leftover. Teams submitted burgers and sides, if they chose, and were judged in categories of overall best, presentation, taste and side. The overall winner was the corrections department team led by Major Jared Miller. Second place went to Sgt. Dale Evans training team and third went to the administration department team led by Undersheriff Trey Morrison. The winner of both the presentation and taste categories was Evans team and the winner of best side dish was Deputy Lisa Hummel of the corrections team for her macaroni and cheese. The overall winner, the corrections team, received a trophy and bragging rights. From Page 1AI wanted to learn how the 30 percent got in there,Ž he said. So I pulled the minutes from the meeting from Monday, July 21 of 2008.Ž Harden read the minutes aloud that stated that then commissioner Maxie Lawhon made the motion to raise the percentage from 15 to 30. The motion was seconded by Kessler and carried unanimously with a 5-0 vote. Commissioner Kessler was the only commissioner on this board that was there at the time, so effectively, this is his rule.Ž Harden said that he made it clear as to where he was on the wetlands issue when he ran for his seat as commissioner and that the people, by a good margin, allowed me to be where I am today.Ž So, in several ways said Harden, the citizens have voted on the subject and made it clear where their vote would be. Commissioner Ralph Thomas contended that Wakullas percentage is at the level it is because of its size and that the citizens were the ones that approved it in 2008 when the charter was formed. Out of the 20 counties that have a charter in the state, ours is the smallest … the next largest is twice our size,Ž he said. We have different things to think about than the large metropolitan areas. The citizens voted for this as it stands. We havent seen a problem or a failure or a need for this.Ž Thomas then offered his version of a compromise by noting that, in the charter, there is a provision stating that a committee of 15 citizens must review the charter before 2015. Thomas proposed that Kesslers motion be amended to include the formation of the committee rather than taking the steps then and there to lower the threshold. When asked by Merritt whether he wanted to take up the offer, Kessler replied that hed rather his motion stand as presented. Thomas then retracted his second and the item died for lack of a second. Thomas went on to propose the moving forward with forming a charter review committee, a motion that was seconded by Commissioner Jerry Moore. However, after hearing concern from Merritt as well as citizens to be heard, Thomas repealed his motion, saying that he would bring it back as an of“ cial agenda item. As the meeting was coming to a close, as is custom, commissioners gave closing remarks, during which Merritt threw in one more wetlands curveball. He asked the board to seriously consider going back to his original proposal … referring to the item that had passed 4-1 at their June 17 meeting that allowed variance inside the countys buffer zone. Merritt said that he thought the Wetlands Alliance efforts had enough juice to get this thing on the referendum and if it passes its going to be just like this pig law,Ž he said. There wont be anything we can do about it, well be stuck with it from here until the end of time.Ž Merritt said he was trying to compromise as we all have something to lose on this issue.Ž He explained that if it were between having the current ordinance and having nothing, then he would choose nothing because of property rights issues, but that there are serious repercussions to think about if the ordinance repeal were to go through, then after a lapse of time, it was reinstated. Its just something to think about,Ž he said. However, board members did not seem willing to change their stance and the lack of interest led Merritt to say hed drop the issue and things would continue. As it is, the countys wetlands ordinance is still at risk of being deleted unless the Wetlands Alliance petition efforts are successful.Board rejects lower thresholdPHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYORSheriff Charlie Creel shakes the hand of Deputy Lisa Hummel who won the award for best side dish. The corrections team won the overall cookoff.Sheriff’s of ce cookoffJudges for the cookoff were Clerk of Courts Brent Thurmond, Tax Collector Cheryll Olah, and County Commissioner Ralph Thomas. County commissioners at a recent meeting.FILE PHOTO LeeAnn Mathers LeeAnn is a Native of Wakulla County and a New Mom, Being a native of Wakulla County makes her familiar with the area and local market. Her family is from Wakulla County and now she has started her own family here. “I love the small town life, let me help you start yours today! “ Please give her a call for any of your real estate needs. She is a full time sales associate with lots of time to dedicate to your needs. 850-459-2202 Sales Associate CRS, SFR 850-926-1010 Mary Applegate Sales Associate Buyer Specialist 239-464-1732 Broker / Owner CRS, SFR, REO Specialist 850-591-6161 734 Shadeville Rd. Crawfordville FL 32327 — O ce: (850)926-1011 -Fax: (850)926-1611 WELCOMESJason Rudd Jason is a newly licensed Real Estate agent working full time and is originally from Leon County. Has two children and married for 16 great years. Recently employed in the insurance business and is looking forward to serving the community with the best Real Estate services he can provide. Please give him a call! 850-241-6198 New Home & Residential Sales, Commercial, Land Acquisitions & Property Management ONE HAPPY FAMILY AT A TIME! Thank you Wakulla and Leon counties WELCOMES THIRD YEAR ANNIVERSA R Y

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. From Page 1A Theres just not enough hours in the day,Ž said Hugo of the time he has available between his own job and other obligations to put forth what needs to be done for Wild About Wakulla. Hugo emphasized that the annual event is about showcasing the county. It just seems to meld with what the function of the TDC is,Ž said Hugo. So Im asking for your help.Ž He suggested that perhaps the council task the new director with becoming the spearhead of the project and that they might be the person to coordinate and lead the efforts. Hugo explained that if he couldnt “ nd new leadership by the committees next meeting, efforts for a Wild About Wakulla for the year 2014 would die then and there. In response, the council said they could not necessarily speak for the new, unknown director and expressed concerns that the part time position may not allow them suf“ cient time to take on such a task. However a few members offered to attend the upcoming meeting to offer any assistance that they could. Other happenings at the meeting included Commissioner Ralph Thomas update that the YMCA has pulled out of Wakullas community center efforts. Thomas reiterated that he was never exactly for the YMCA establishing itself in the county in the “ rst place and that he was optimistic for what the center could still become. We need to take the resources we have in the county and bring them under one roof,Ž he said. The council also discussed grant monies and expenditures. Some of which was spent recently on a two-page spread in the 2014 Travel Guide to Florida magazine, which showcases Wakullas attractions. In addition, three bidders have answered the TDCs destination marketing system RFP with large differences in bid amounts. But questions were raised as to eligibility of submissions as only one of the three contained everything the council asked for. TDC Chairman David Moody expressed the need to move the project forward as efforts for obtaining a new system have been going on for over a year.Tourism Board moves closer to hiring a new director NOTICE OF BUDGET HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on September 3, 2013 at 6:01 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider Adopting the FY2013/2014 Tentative Budget & Tentative Millage Rate. This is the rst of two required public hearings.If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Office at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla. com.AUGUST 22, 2013 AUGUST 22, 2013 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) PROGRAM HOUSING REHABILITATION PROJECT NUMBER: ITB# 2013-28 WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Any persons with a quali“ed disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of“ce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). General Fund8.5000 General Fund Special Revenue Funds Capital Project FundsEnterprise FundsTotal All Funds Taxes:Millage Per $1,000 95% Ad Valorem Taxes8.50001,077,772 7,236,199 8,313,971 Sales, Use, U lity & Fuel Taxes1,867,338 1,140,118 1,814,542 4,821,998 Licenses and Special Assessments41,000 1,112,724 1,153,724 Intergovernmental Revenues4,780,791 2,853,830 2,390,975 90,909 10,116,505 Charges for Services1,566,289 3,019,870 3,815,969 8,402,128 Fines and Forfeitures30,563 40,079 70,642 Miscellaneous Revenues57,990 25,628 1,005,500 1,089,118 Total Revenues Sources9,421,743 15,428,448 4,205,517 4,912,378 33,968,086 Transfers In98,392 184,271 297,500 632,564 1,212,727 Fund Balances Carried Forward587,825 859,795 1,544,808 420,454 3,412,882 Total Revenues, Transfers & Fund Balances 10,107,960 16,472,513 6,047,825 5,965,396 38,593,694 General Governement3,253,753 27,400 75,000 3,356,153 Public Safety2,255,561 11,392,508 567,509 14,215,577 Physical Environment178,920 20,000 105,262 4,759,480 5,063,662 Transporta on5,950 1,868,339 3,241,952 5,116,241 Economic Environment42,999 1,490,584 1,533,583 Human Services607,390 47,956 655,346 Culture and Recrea on851,914 514,839 365,559 1,732,312 Court Services55,000 200,819 255,819 Debt Service 251,969 725,285 613,386 1,590,640 Total Expenditures Uses7,251,486 15,814,413 5,080,567 5,372,866 33,519,332 Transfers Out2,671,069 169,766 650,900 579,530 4,071,264 Fund Balances Reserves185,405 488,335 316,358 13,000 1,003,098 Total Expenditures, Transfers & Fund Balances10,107,960 16,472,513 6,047,825 5,965,396 38,593,694 Es mated Expenditures: Proposed Millage Levy Es mated Revenues: Wakulla County, Florida • Fiscal Year 2013/2014 Tenta ve Budget Summary NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CONCERNING CONDITIONAL USE Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons with a disability needing a special accommodation should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Of“ce at least two (2) days prior to the meeting at (850) 926-0919; Hearing & Voice Impaired at 1-800-955-8771; or email at ADARequest@mywakulla.comAUGUST 22, 2013 000FPBG BOARD OF TRUSTEES NOTICE OF THE INTERNAL IMPROVEMENT TRUST FUNDSection 253.69, Florida Statutes – Rule 18-21.021, F.A.C.Revised August 1, 2013NOTICE OF AQUACULTURE LEASE APPLICATION NOTICE is hereby given pursuant to Section 253.70, Florida Statutes, that the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund has received an application (no. 65-AQ-1167), from Clay M. Lovel, Benjamin B. Lovel, and Leo V. Lovel, respectively, of 33 Ben Willis Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, for the following activities: The performance of commercial clam and oyster cultivation activities. The applicants are requesting approval of a sovereignty submerged land aquaculture lease preempting 5.0 acres, more or less, of sovereignty submerged lands offshore of Section 114, of the Hartsfield Survey, in Oyster Bay, near the town of Spring Creek, in Wakulla County, Florida. The applicants are requesting a water column lease to install floating cages for the cultivation of shellfish. The parcel is not located in an aquatic preserve. A map and diagram identifying the location and limits of the proposed activities company this notice. Anyone having any questions or comments regarding the proposed project should file them in writing with the Division of Aquaculture, Magnolia Center, Suite 501, 1203 Governor’s Square Boulevard, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, on or before 5:00 p.m. on the 7th day of September, 2013.

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Is a diagnosis of ADHD a blessing or a curse? Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $19/6 mo. Out of County $44/yr. $27/6 mo. Out of State $47/yr. $28.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Lane closures on 319 set for Wednesday, Aug. 21 • FDIC sues Wakulla Bank officers • Natural Wakulla: We have three types of hummingbirds in Wakulla • Man drowns at Mashes Sands on Sunday • Community center moving forward, youth coalition told • Flash flood warning for this weekend • Board rejects call for wetlands referendumthewakullanews.com Follow us on ank you, Sopchoppy water crew e other side of wetlands research Story of animal cruelty was disturbing Shopping locally was good experienceREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: The family of Ernest ErnieŽ Cox wishes to express our sincere thanks to all for the many prayers, calls of encouragement, cards, food, ” owers, donations, and giving of your time to come and be a part of his Celebration of Life. Thanks to the City of Tallahassee Fire Department for the honor guard! Ernie and his ever-present smile will be greatly missed by all who knew him. He was good, kind and loving husband, stepfather, granddaddy, great-granddad, brother and friend to everyone. We are blessed to have so many caring friends, family and neighbors. Gloria Cox and family Cox family expresses appreciationEditor, The News: I wish to commend commissioner Ralph Thomas for emphasizing the importance of research in informing his position on repealing the Wakulla County Wetlands Ordinance. (Vote came after researchŽ by Ralph Thomas, Opinion Page, July 31.) I was impressed by the seemingly persuasive arguments he marshaled based on his research. It made me wonder … perhaps there really is no need for a local ordinance if we are truly duplicating what is already adequately addressed by state and federal governments.Ž I was inspired to engage in my own research. Now, as Paul Harvey used to say on his radio show, for the rest of story. Thomas makes reference to the recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in the Koontz vs. St. Johns River Water Management District case, implying that it had relevance for those of us who live in Wakulla County. I took the time to read the entire Supreme Court ruling which, trust me, was not exciting reading. The first thing that struck me was the obvious: this was not a case of a local ordinance, but one involving the St. Johns Water Management District. Secondly, Koontz was denied a permit, not because of the actual impacts of his proposed development but because he and the Water Management District could not agree on appropriate mitigation. Thirdly, this case originated way back in 1994. Since then Florida has instituted a Uniform Mitigation Assessment Method which applies to all counties and water management districts and leaves mitigation decisions, when allowed by counties, up to the state agencies. Thus, if Wakulla County had an ordinance which permitted mitigation (which it does not have to do), any mitigation would not be up to the county. Lastly, in the body of the decision, the Supreme Court reaf“ rmed the right of local governing entities to determine the nature of appropriate development and that the greater public good is not trumped by individual property rights. Pursuing this further, I read a 2010 article in the Florida Bar Journal entitled Planning and Permitting to Protect Wetlands: The Different Roles and Powers of State and Local Government.Ž This article emphasized that Permitting is not planning,Ž and that (state) permitting programsƒdo not plan for future land developmental and do not use and identify and implement longrange goals, objectives and policies based on a comprehensive assessment of natural resources in a particular area in light of future growth projections and community needs and desires.Ž In other words, local control, oversight and vision is essential. They conclude that local government prohibitions on wetland development through sound planning play a critical role in ensuring that some of the most important wetland systems remain protected.Ž In light of Thomas view that state and federal laws will protect the Wakulla County environment and citizenry, the most stunning and important information I discovered came from a recent (June 14, 2013) article in the Tampa Bay Times which reported on the “ ring of four DEP lawyers. These lawyers had all received stellar job reviews in recent years.Ž One had won a major environmental victory in the Supreme Court in 2009 and another (Charles Byrd) was “ red “ ve months after successfully prosecuting a Marion County couple who had illegally filled in wetlands by an aquatic preserve along the Rainbow River. While the DEP denied that the “ rings were related to successful prosecutions or disagreements the lawyers had with the current DEP administrators, those fired had a different view. Byrd stated that DEP Deputy Secretary, Jeff Littlejohn doesnt like enforcement.Ž In fact, the DEPs own statistics show that DEP attorneys handled 2,289 enforcement cases in 2010, a number which dropped to 799 in 2012 and, as of the end of May, 2013, only 145 new cases were “ led this year. That last number projects to a total of 348 for this year. This means that the DEP is prosecuting 15 percent of the number of cases it was doing just three years ago. Byrd attributed the precipitous decline to a corresponding decline in inspectors looking for violations and administrative resistance to prosecute. The article quotes Byrd as saying, Before, when people failed to get permits for “ lling in wetlands or other activities, the agency went after themƒ Now the approach is to grant them an after-thefact permit and let it slide.Ž Hardly reassuring for the future of Florida. Thanks to Thomas example I have, through my own research, become a better informed citizen. However, my conclusions differ. I found that the recent Supreme Court case to not be relevant to a local Wakulla County ordinance because the county cannot control mitigation, that the principle of local oversight and control of environmental issues to be a cornerstone of responsible comprehensive planning, and that it is well established in law and precedence that individual property rights do not trump the greater good of the community and vulnerable environments. It also became abundantly clear to me that there is a huge gap in this state between laws, rules and enforcement. If we think that the DEP or the NWF Water Management District will protect our vital, unique environment I fear that we are kidding ourselves and effectively abandoning our responsibilities to our community, neighbors and children. I am sure that Thomas and the other commissioners have faith in the wisdom of our citizens, and I urge them to support a county referendum to determine the will of the people on this important issue. James Hennessey Crawfordville Editor, The News:The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce works hard to convince our countys citizens to shop locally and not always go up the roadŽ to Tallahassee. My recent experience of shopping locally was a positive reinforcer of that philosophy. Upon deciding that I needed a new lawn tractor, I stopped by Three Y Outdoor Equipment to investigate the options. Skip Young greeted me with a smile, taking the time to listen to my concerns and ask questions about how I planned on using the equipment. Then he showed me the options he thought would best suit my needs and budget. Together we arrived at a great choice. Im very pleased with the equipment I purchased, and especially the knowledgeable service. What turned out to be the one of the best things about the transaction was that when I later compared prices of comparable products at the big box stores in Tallahassee, 3Ys prices were very competitive. Ill continue to shop locally for great products and services while saving the time and money it takes to travel to Tallahassee. Mike Eakin Purple Frog LLCEditor, The News: Re: the Sheriffs Report of Aug. 8 edition. I was shocked and saddened to read of the poor dog who was left chained by humans with no food or water and left to die a slow death. How incredibly sadistic and careless is that? If it were legally possible, it would be justice well served to do the same to the perpetrators! Just stake them out in the hot sun and rain and give them a feel of what that dog went through! The cruelty and careless nature of human beings never ceases to amaze me! My wife and I have adopted six dogs from shelters. Wed rescue more if we could afford it. Potential dog owners, please understand that the cute little pup that you buy or adopt will one day become an old, slow, and medically expensive dog. Your responsibility does not end when the cuteŽ wears off. Think wisely before owning a dog or any pet. I sincerely hope that our new sheriff, his staff and our local court system will follow up fully on this incident. Thank you! We enjoy your paper immensely! Bill Catalina & Family Crawfordville, Editor, The News: On the 20th of July a storm rolled thru Medart. A bolt of lightning struck the waterline on Casora Drive. Our water was completely gone. The water crew from Sopchoppy jumped to “ x the line even before the rain stopped. They worked until 3:30 a.m. and then returned Sunday and worked until 7 p.m. It took them hours just to “ nd were the lightning struck. Once found they repaired it and our water was restored. The residents of Casora Drive greatly appreciated the hard work and dedication of; Leonard Tartt, Mike Porter, Dale Rushton and Derrick Allen. Thanks again, The Richardson Family CrawfordvilleBy RITA HANEY ADHD is having a Ferrari brain with bicycle brakes,Ž says Dr. Edward Holloway speaking at the Cape Cod Institute located on the Cape Cod National Seashore. Speaking before a room full of educators, psychologists and counselors about his unique strength based approach to ADHD. The of“ cial de“ nition of Attention-Deficit/ Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a neurobehavioral disorder which typically begins in childhood and may last into adulthood, and is characterized by developmentally inappropriate levels of inattention and hyperactivity resulting in functional impairment in academic, family and social settings. A different view of ADHD proposed by Dr. Holloway is ADHD is a collection of traits. The difference, according to Dr. Holloway, is Its very debasing to be told you have a disorder, Medical school is all about pathology and we (doctors) are trained to look for defects and the emphasis is always on whats missing. Its all about misery and mental disease.Ž Changing the way the ADHD traits are explained to patients is the beginning in new view of the ADHD diagnoses, a diagnosis which is often treated with powerful medications. Instead Dr. Holloway says to his patients, Congratulations! You have a Ferrari brain … with bicycle brakes.Ž This positive approach at the beginning changes the way patients and families begin to process the diagnosesŽ to a position of strength. Dr. Holloway urges professionals in the health care “ eld to embrace a model that celebrates the strengths. Who wants a de“ cit disorder when they can have hope, optimism and cheerfulnessŽ? BLESSING OR CURSE? Distractibility: One of the traits of ADHD often interfering with what a person is supposed to be doing at an assigned time and in a manner consistent with the program. Curiosity: Often interferes with the assigned program. Yet curiosity is what drives most artists, scientist and inventors, not to mention entrepreneurs. These folks often do not follow the program. Impulsivity: Another trait of ADHD is upside down creativity or, in Dr. Hallowells words, creativity is impulsivity gone good.Ž Impulsive behavior can also interfere in a set agenda. With good brakes on the Ferrari brain … quick thinking and quick acting can be a bene“ t to any project. Energy: Another ADHD trait. Energy is definitely not a bad thing. In fact almost everyone I know would like just a bit more. The brain in ADHD diagnoses then is top of the line. Its the brakes that need work. And kids will need to learn how to work the breaks. Raising a highly energetic and curious child is a challenge. Once your child masters the brake … then according to Dr. Holloway, the sky is the limit.Ž TIPS FOR PARENTS Exercise: Team sports and sports that require attention to body movement such as gymnastics and skateboarding; track … or just plan running. Nature: The outdoors is a positive experience for any body and is good for healthy minds and spirits as well. Combine nature with exercise such as kayaking, hiking, swimming. Boredom: I love to read … give me an insurance policy and my eyes glaze over. Help your child discover what he is interested in. If possible, sign your son or daughter up for a class such as art, taking great photographs, even one of the martial arts. the possibilities are endless. Boredom can be present in school. If your son or daughter is hyperactive when his/her work is done with the work and distracts others from doing the work … this is not bad behavior … it may be an inappropriate way to work the brakes. If grades are the problem take the time to learn and help your child discover ways to cope with things he is not interested in. This takes time. A tutor or mentor maybe a positive experience with the emphases on expanding the learning experience. Remember: Being a parent is a challenging experience. Work the brakes!Rita Haney, MSW, LCSW is a counselor in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 9262039.

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By RICHARD BICKFORDSpecial to The NewsGreg Bickford and his father Richard are back home after a 4,250-mile journey competing in Rally New England, a fundraising event for Camp Sunshine, a camp on Sebago Lake in Maine devoted to children with life-threatening medical conditions. The journey took them from Crawfordville to St. John, New Brunswick, Canada. Every team paid all their own expenses which included gas, food, lodging, tolls, etc. Each day of the rally the 78 teams from all over the U.S. and Canada lined up at the starting line according to the amount of money they raised for Camp Sunshine. Team Tallahassee was proud to line up in the 5th position each day of the rally. Pre-rally activities included laps on New Yorks Watkins Glen International Raceway during which each of the 78 drivers and co-drivers completed two white-knuckle laps on the track and a charity auction later that evening which raised an additional $2,000 for Camp Sunshine, the rally of“ cially kicked off the next morning. Day one of Rally New England had the teams lining up in downtown Ithaca, N.Y. and as each departed they were handed a clue as to where their next checkpoint. The teams then had to determine the fastest way to locate and drive to the checkpoint where they received clues for additional checkpoints that had them winding through the mountains to the day one final destination at Rutland, Vt. The checkpoints were tough to locate and many required both driver and navigator to run over a half-mile up and down hills through the woods to get a picture. It was quite exhausting! Along the way they stopped at more scenic locations including picturesque waterfalls, covered bridges (one haunted, one not!), an old fashioned country store and Ben & Jerrys Ice Cream Graveyard in Vermont. The best part of day two for all the teams was easily the visit to Camp Sunshine, the roads leading into the camp had signs made for each of the teams and as soon as we pulled in we were greeted with cheers from the volunteers and families at the camp. It was very emotional to see one little 6-year-old girl come running across the grass to leap into the arms of a participant who met the family a few months ago and by luck they were both destined to be at Camp Sunshine the same day. Team Tallahassee was disappointed to have missed receiving a third place trophy on day two, only losing by 60 seconds. Our spirits were quickly lifted though when we learned we placed third on day three of the rally, proudly accepting the trophy. Rally New England participants were extremely proud to have raised over $86,000 for Camp Sunshine. The children at the camp all have life-threatening illnesses and come to bond with other families as well as meet with doctors who specialize in each of the various rare diseases. Camp Sunshine is open to families from all over the world and has the distinction of being the only camp in the world where the entire family is invited to attend a week long session completely free of charge. Children get to meet other children with the same illness and they get to relax at a wonderful place where they hopefully can forget about their illness for a brief period. The week of the rally 40 children with DiamondBlackfan Anemia (DBA) were in attendance at Camp Sunshine. DBA is a very rare blood disorder, affecting “ ve to seven children per million, in which the bone marrow fails to make red blood cells. With only about 1,000 cases known worldwide the 40 families at the camp receive a tremendous amount of education, support and encouragement from the staff, volunteers, doctors and other families at the camp. Team Tallahassee would like to thank all of our friends, family and particularly the following local businesses: Ace Hardware in Crawfordville, Front Porch Florist, Gulf Coast Landscape & Sod, Gulf Coast Lumber & Supply, Luxury Cruise & Travel, and the White Elephant who all donated to Camp Sunshine on behalf of Team Tallahassee. We also want to thank our out of town sponsors, Autogeek.com, VandalEyes. net and especially The Real Deal Brazil which not only made a generous “ nancial donation but also provided several of their unique Real Deal Brazil hats for the charity auction, which were a big hit once again. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question: Where's your favorite swimming hole?SCOTT NELSON Emergency ManagementThats a tough one! I dont get out to swim much anymore, I stay so focused on work. I need to GO SWIMMING! SHAWN BEATY City of TallahasseeThe Ochlockonee River. Its where I grew up. Our whole family would go there.Ž CHRISTINA TALLEYStay-at-home mom I really like the City Park in Sopchoppy, I take my kids there and they love it! They ask me every day, even when its raining, Can we go to the park? Ž TIMOTHY THOMPSON Master MarinerMy favorite swimming hole is Bream Fountain which is no longer available to the public.Ž RUBY CLARY Analyst with DEOThe one off John Knox Road, Trousdell Aquatic Center. They have a big swimming pool and a little one for the kids. It is nice there and safe.Ž … Compiled by Lynda KinseyLocal team completes Rally New England SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Team Tallahassee Mustang in Maine. 000FQJ9 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the Phone: 926-4282HAIR SALON HAIR SERVICES FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY Originally from Tallahasse, she Specializes in Color, Lowlights, Highlights, Color Correction, Specialty Colors, Styles and Up-Dos. She also does Head and Neck Massages, Waxings & Mens Clipper Cuts. She would like to share her 7 Years of Professional Service with you!We cater to Family Hair Care Men, Women, and Children~ Licensed Cosmetologist and Barbers ~ G isela v on T rapp Barber Shoppe926-4282 & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & & Welcomes

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy ETHEL SKIPPERI remember as a child I was always glad when the “ rst day of school began. I have memories of walking three miles to school. There were no school buses or family car. Many mornings we had to pump for my mother to do the weekly laundry. Some days it was rainy, cold or hot. Today things are so different. Students can choose how they want to go to school, and do nothing if they desire. One thing we did have a lot of and that was love … and we were taught to respect everyone. Life itself taught us a lot of things. We are in a new day but things have not changed that much. Everyone is in a hurry. Slow down. Take time to have that prayer with your child. Tell them you love them. Most of all, show it. Love is kind, and does not act up. It respects others. Today let us examine the call to be mature in our relationship with others. The Church of Christ Written in Heaven Tallahassee Diocese Sunday School Convention 2013 will convene at Tabernacle Church in Gretna, 1242 Blue Star Highway, through Sunday, Aug. 25. Weeknights and Saturday beginning at 8 p.m., and on Sunday with Sunday School at 10:30 a.m. and noon worship service. Host pastor Diocese Mother Maylis Harrison. Bishop Walter Williams presider. Let us remember all the sick and shut-ins in our daily prayer, those in hospitals, nursing homes, prison, the homeless, all in need of our prayer everywhere. Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville • 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 – 11:30 and 3:00 – 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102  Panacea Congregational Holiness to hold revivalPanacea Congregational Holiness church will holding revival Monday, Aug. 26 through Friday, Aug 30. Services will begin at 7:30 p.m. nightly with special speaker Rev. Nathan Johnson. For more information please call (850) 508-1895. Revival set at Panacea Full Gospel AssemblyPanacea Full Gospel Assembly will host a revival Monday, Aug. 26, through Friday, Aug. 30 at 7 p.m. nightly at the church. There will be special singing each night! Brother T.R. Williams will be the Pastor. On Saturday, August 31, The Sky’s will join us for a Gospel Sing. Everyone is welcome! Grace Baptist Church will have free clothing giveawayA FREE Clothing Giveaway, sponsored by Grace Baptist Church, will be held Saturday, Aug. 24, beginning at 8 a.m. through noon. Clothes will be available for baby, toddler, children, teens, and adult. Both boys and girls. The event is at Grace Baptist Church, 803 Crawfordville Highway, just north of 267 on the right. For more information, call (850) 926-3217 and leave a voice message, and your call will be returned. Free dinner, clothes will be offered at St. Nora P.B.St. Nora Primitive Baptist Church will be hosting a free dinner and clothes for the less fortunate on Saturday, Aug. 24, from noon to 2 p.m. St. Nora is located at 1994 Sopchoppy Hwy in Sopchoppy.Financial tip: Pay attention OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDEREnjoying a casual evening at home, I reclined in my favorite easy chair reading, while the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage was chatting on the telephone. I rarely pay attention to telephone conversations. After all, I only get one side of the conversation, which may be misleading at the very best. Ive been caught in that trap before with some pretty dire consequences. Im not going to get caught again. Then an odd phrase caught my attention: plastic surgery.Ž My ears perked up and I heard my wife say, I certainly agree with that article and Im going to do some plastic surgery myself.Ž Well, you can imagine what thoughts were racing through my head. When she hung up the telephone, I queried her about it. In my book, plastic surgery is a big step. You do support me in this plastic surgery plan, dont you?Ž There are times to disagree with your spouse, but as a husband for over 40 years, I have never discovered that time. Forcing a smile, I nodded in the affirmative and told her she had my full support in whatever she decided. I had to admit that the timeŽ had “ nally come to our humble abode. Who am I to “ ght it? I go by this motto, He who smiles and agrees with his spouse lives to smile another day.Ž I plan to smile until the day I die. I never really thought about plastic surgery, but perhaps my wife was right. Perhaps she could use a little face-lift. For me to get a facelift, the surgeons would need a huge construction crane. Then comes the awkward part, what do they do with my face after it was lifted? Women, more than men, are a little sensitive about their appearance. For a man, appearanceŽ means he showed up. A woman has an altogether different approach to the term appearance.Ž Some women look in the mirror and see where some improvements could be made. For example, they see bags under their eyes that could not get through the airport carry-on luggage size requirement. Then there is the problem with their nose, which could stand a little tweaking. For all practical purposes, one of those double chins has to go. Moreover, what woman couldnt use a tummy tuck and other snippings of the ” esh? Believe me, I never would have brought it up, but if that makes my wife happy, then whatever it costs, we can put it on a credit card. The only problem with putting something like this on a credit card is that by the time you pay it off you need another procedure. She is worth it in my checkbook. Each day I checked the appointment calendar hanging on our refrigerator to “ nd out when she would be going in for the surgery. Daily I looked, but could never “ nd any appointment. I supposed she was sensitive about the whole thing and did not want it staring at her day after day on the appointment calendar. Whatever the reason, she had my silent support, for all that was worth. I am sure she would do the same for me. That is what marriage is all about. I decided to tuck this little bit in the back of my mind and, however it developed would be all right with me. One day this week, I went to the Slurp N Burp Caf for a quiet lunch. The issue was far from my mind as I enjoyed a delicious repast. As I “ nished my last cup of coffee, the waitress brought my bill and I pulled my wallet out to pay for it. In searching my wallet for a credit card I discovered, much to my double chagrin, that there were no credit cards to be found. Somehow, Id lost my credit cards. Perhaps, in the morning when I was getting dressed, they dropped out of my wallet as I was placing it in my trousers. Fortunately, I had my cell phone and called my wife. Honey, Ive lost all my credit cards. Im here at the restaurant and I cant “ nd any credit cards in my wallet. Do you have any idea what I did with my credit cards?Ž I cut them all up.Ž You did what?Ž You said you supported my plastic surgery plan, didnt you?Ž But, I thought...Ž You, thought what?Ž Oh boy. Dear reader: please disregard the “ rst part of this column. If you happen to read my obituary in next weeks newspaper, you will know that my lovely, vivacious, eternally youthful wife did not disregard the “ rst part and Im currently Resting In Pieces. I must confess that my hearing is good; it is my understanding that falls so far short. The only exercise I am really good at is jumping-to-conclusions.Ž This is common among many people who call themselves Christians. Their hearing is good but their doing,Ž is not up to par. The apostle James understood this truth quite well. He writes, But be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deceiving your own selvesŽ James 1:22 (KJV). It is not so much what you hear that pays dividends in life, but what you do. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Church BriefsRemember going back to school BUCKHORN NEWS

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By BYRON PRICESpecial to The NewsThe inter denominational Seafarers Chapel at Shell Point meets every Sunday at 9:30 a.m. at the Apalachee Bay Marine Safety Support Group building, previously known as Flotilla 13 of the Coast Guard Auxillary. For much of its existence, the Chapel has been under the spiritual tutelage of retired Air Force Chaplain Frank Metcalf, and his wife, Carolyn Metcalf. Serving for almost 40 years as a source of spiritual strength, and community cohesiveness, for residents of Shell Point, and surrounding areas, the Seafarers Chapel has always been staffedŽ by volunteers, including the speakers Jimmie Doyle, dutifully, schedules for each Sunday. The very casual services only last about 30 minutes, but everyone leaves with their spirits and friendships renewed, a small miracle each Sunday. The relaxed casual atmosphere of the chapel had even more humble beginnings. At a recent Memories Sunday,Ž local artist Ginger Tillman presented to the Seafarers Chapel a painting of the original Chapel building. Tillman had been commissioned some 30 years ago by Maggie Lloyd, now deceased, to do the painting, little realizing their efforts would culminate in the capturing and recording of a highly valued Shell Point memory. At the formal presentation of the painting, the unof“ cial matriarch of Shell Point, Sherrie Alverson, received the treasure on behalf of the Chapel. Actually, the Chapel has never owned its own building. The building depicted in the donated painting is the original building housing Flotilla 13 of the Shell Point Coast Guard Auxillary. Sherrie Alversons husband, Chuck Alverson, and Ken Lloyd, Maggies husband, were very instrumental in orchestrating the rehab of the original Shell Point restau rant, located approximately where the large pavillion is now located at Shell Point Beach, to serve as the “ rst location of Flotilla 13. In 1974, the building was made available, rent free, by the George Taff family, dba A.B. Taff and Sons. Early on, a handful of local residents began having Chapel services at the then-new Coast Guard Auxillary Building. In 1991, the rent-free building changed hands, and the members of Flotilla 13 began to bring their dream of the Flotilla owning its own building to fruition. The county commission agreed to a 50-year lease of the property, on which the current building is located. The general contractor for the Coast Guard building, Galveston Alexander, donated several thousand dollars in labor and material; and Shell Point locals, John Edrington, Enzil Trefzger, and Chuck Alverson worked fulltime until the project was completed. Gary Bliss put in the countertops, and James Taylor donated and installed the kitchen equipment. The ladies fed the always-hungry crew, and helped with sanding and painting. The Chapel currently rents space for the Sunday service from the Apalachee Bay Marine Safety Group. Although the Seafarers Chapel doesnt own its own space, it does ownŽ the miracles worked in the lives of many individuals and families in the area, and the invaluable memories which have helped to transform an areaŽ into a community of charitable thought and deed. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 7ACarrie L. Yates, 91, died Aug. 7, 2013 in Tallahassee. She was born in Fries, Va. She was a member of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Services were held on Aug. 12, 2013, at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Interment was held at New Harmony Church in Live Oak. In lieu of ” owers, the family has requested donations to be made to American Macular Degeneration Foundation, P.O. Box 515, Northampton MA 01061. Survivors include a daughter, Patricia Yates of Tallahassee; daughter-in-law, Theresa Yates; brother, Dewey Luper; sisters, Ruth Durham Pack and Evelyn Spitzer of Virginia; and four grandchildren and “ ve great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her beloved husband, Robert Yates; a son, William Yates; her parents, William and Rosa Luper; sisters, Ada, Faye, Lillian, Pauline and Mozelle; and brothers Clarence, Paul, James and Ralph.Obituaries Montine Durrance Dorothy L. Pettis Carrie L. YatesDorothy L. Pettis, 79, Tallahassee, passed away peacefully at home surrounded by her family, Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013. She was born in Oneonta, Ala. She settled in Florida after marrying William Pettis. She enjoyed gardening and NASCAR racing. She worked her entire life in the jewelry business and retired from Waste Management. Visitation was held Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services will be Thursday, Aug. 22, 2013 at 10 a.m. at Woodville Cemetery in Woodville. Survivors include her daughters, Kathy Cool (Terry) of Ocala, and Brenda Pettis of Green Cove Springs; a son, Jeff Pettis of Woodville; “ ve grandchildren; 10 greatgrandchildren and two great-great grandchildren; her mother, Corine Waid of Village Springs, Ala.; brothers, Bobby Waid (Gwen) of Sumiton, Ala., and Artis Waid of Village Springs, Ala. She was predeceased by her husband, William Pettis; and two infant children. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, FL is assisting the family with arrangements (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com). Montine Durrance, 88, of DeQuincy, La., passed away at 7:45 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 11, 2013 in DeQuincy, La. Mrs. Durrance was born Nov. 21, 1924 in Arran and was a graduate of Crawfordville High School. She lived in Florida all her life until moving to DeQuincy seven years ago. She worked as a beautician and was a member of Friendship Primitive Baptist Church in Medart, and attended First Baptist Church of DeQuincy, La. She enjoyed “ shing, crabbing, and collected stuffed animals. She also loved reading and playing games with her grandchildren. Family received friends Friday, Aug. 16, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Funeral services were held Saturday, Aug. 17, 2013 at 11 a.m. at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church with burial at Friendship Cemetery. Survivors include her daughter, Rita Kuyper and husband Kent of DeQuincy, La.; grandchildren, Caitlin Creel and husband Colten of Pineville, La., and Jared Kuyper of DeQuincy, La.; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband, Willard K. Durrance; her parents, C.O. and Sallie Harvey; and one brother and three sisters.Dorothy L. Pettis Montine Durrance Carrie L. Yates Memories and miracles at Seafarers Chapel in Shell Point PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMembers of the Seafarers Chapel with a painting of the original building done by Ginger Tillman. John Rosier, Jr.8/20/1932 11/4/1987You have been gone twenty six years. Your memory is still with us as we observe your Birthday on August 20, 2013. Remembering You…Ethel Skipper, Alberta Hines, Callie Gavin, Joseph Rosier, Merddie Rosier and Ruth Easter LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Special singing each night!Brother T.R. Williams will be the Pastor. On Saturday, August 31, The Skys will join us for a Gospel Sing. Monday, August 26 thru Friday, August 30 at 7 pmPANACEA FULL GOSPEL ASSEMBLY12 Taylor Street, Panacea Park Panacea Full Gospel Assembly

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBill and Faye Harrod were married on August 2, 1963 in Bainbridge, Ga. By Judge Deese. The couple has two children: William Harrod III (Becky) and Penny Kaurase (David). They have seven grandchildren: Roxanne, Rachel, Curtis, Christine, Will, George and Courtney. The Harrods also have three great-grandchildren: Justin, Colby and Hunter. They will be celebrating their 50th anniversary with a trip to Maine. The annual Noma Community Reunion will be held in the Noma Town Hall building on Saturday, Sept. 7. The town hall will open at 10 a.m. and lunch will be served at noon CST. All past and present residents and their friends are cordially invited to attend. People planning to attend are asked to bring a well-“ lled basket of their favorite dishes. Also, please bring tea, if that is the beverage that you prefer. Soft drinks, ice, cups, plates and eating utensils will be provided. This gathering strengthens the bonds of friendship and lets us relive memories of the past, renew our ties with the land that once nourished us and walk among the graves of our dear departed kinsmen. Anyone desiring additional information is urged to contact Ludine Riddle at 850-974-8438. Loretta Guess is pleased to announce the engagement and upcoming marriage of her daughter, Connie Rochelle Guess, to Edward Clayton Brogdon. Brogdon is the son of Sue Vickers Stephens and Freddie Stephens of Cairo, Ga. Connie is also the daughter of the late Troy Guess, Jr. Guess and Brogdon will be married Sept. 21 at Myron B. Hodge City Park in Sopchoppy. Happy 60th Anniversary to Richard David and Lou Harnage, who will celebrate their Aug. 29 anniversary with a party on Aug. 31. Celebrations will take place at their home at 11 a.m. All are invited to stop in and say hello. Wishing you many more anniversaries to come. Love, the Gang.Special to The NewsConference organizers announced last week that the 2013 Democratic Womens Club of Florida state convention will feature former South Carolina congressional candidate Elizabeth Colbert-Busch. DWCF Communications Chair Rachel Pienta said, Our 2013 conference committee is pleased to announce an exciting line up of program sessions and featured speakers, including Elizabeth ColbertBusch, for our 57th annual state convention.Ž The convention will be held Sept. 26 through the 29th at the Edgewater Beach Resort in Panama City Beach. Elizabeth Colbert-Busch will be the featured keynote speaker on Saturday, Sept. 28. Limited dinner tickets are available. For more information and to purchase tickets, please visit DWCFs website at http:// democratic-women.org/. Elizabeth Colbert Busch: Colbert Busch has lived in the Charleston area since 1969, when she returned there after the tragic death of her father and two brothers in a plane crash. After a marriage that ended in divorce, and with three children, she returned to college and graduated from the College of Charleston with a concentration in Supply chair and Logistics. Following a working stint in D.C. she again returned to Charleston and became Director of Sales and Marketing for a nationally known ocean carrier, Orient Oversea Container Line, Inc. As a successful negotiator, she was liaison between the company, the federal government and several states and was named Chair for the Maritime Association of South Carolina and the S.C. International Trade Conference. Currently, she is a member of the Brookings Institutes Advisory Council on Exports and the World Trade Center Charleston at the Metro Chamber of Commerce. She has been named Woman of the Year by the Charleston Women in International Trade and one of the Journal of Commerces Top 20 Women in Transportation. Currently, she is the Director of business Development at Clemson Univ.s Restoration Institute at the former Naval Shipyard in North Charleston, S.C.Democratic Women’s Club Fla. Convention to Feature Elizabeth Colbert Busch Guess, Clayton wedding announced Harnages celebrate 60th anniversary Left: The Harnages on their wedding day. Above: The couple last year on their 59th anniversary.Noma reunion set for Sept. 7Harrods celebrate 50th anniversaryLeft: The couple in 1963. Above: The Harrods now. Michael and Dorothy Hall will celebrate their 50th anniversary on Aug. 24. They were married at the Otter Creek Community Church in 1963. Michael was employed with the Jitney Jungle Food stores in Tallahassee and pastored the Otter Creek Church. They honeymooned at Wilson Beach Cottages in Saint Theresa. Dorothy was a student at Sopchoppy High School. The couple has three sons: Jeffery, Shane (Maria), and Christopher (Ersa). They have seven grandchildren: Shanna Heron (Kenny), CydneyAnne, Joshuah, Preston, Jonah and Mason as well as two great-grandchildren expected in November and February. Michael now pastors the Friendship Church in Medart, while Dorothy is retired from The Department of Highway Safety. They are celebrating their 50th with a two-week road trip up north, east, west and south, then back home. Halls celebrate 50th anniversary Above: The couple in 1963. Below: The Halls recently. WHS Class of 73 reunion is slated for OctoberThe WHS class of 1973 will hold its 40th reunion celebration at the Shriners Club located at 4141 Crawfordville Hwy. Friday Oct. 11 The theme is western style and the event will be held from 7 p.m. until 11 p.m. Come dressed in your western wear: jeans, boots, etc. Class of 1973's Got Talent will be held during the evening with surprise performances by classmates. There will also be a 70s fashion show, refreshments and door prizes. Saturday Oct. 12 The theme is An Affair to Remember and the event will be held from 6 p.m. until midnight. Come dressed in your dance clothes, casual or dressy. The night will include a memorial tribute to classmates, meal, dancing and door prizes. Cost is $40 per person. Contact Wakullahigh40thReunion@gmail.com or call 509-1952 for more information. Sign up and pay your fees by Aug. 23! Palaver Tree Theater Co., will hold its audition party on Saturday, Sept. 7 from 1 p.m. until 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. A monologue (or two) is requested but not required. There will be pieces available for you to read, and snacks to munch as, well, its a party right? 20132014 production schedule: A Mania for Speculation is scheduled for November. A Matter of Seconds is scheduled for February. Wild” owers in the Median is scheduled for March. WakullaStory: Old Joe is scheduled for April. SCENE in Wakulla 2014 is scheduled for June. Young Adult production date is TBA.Actors needed for Palaver Tree eaters 2013-14 production season

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Special to The NewsThe Wakulla High School dress code policy has undergone some changes for the upcoming 2013-2014 school year. The changes are largely in response to students input voiced to administrators through representatives of the Student Government. As fashion changes, WHS tries to update our policies to stay in tune with these changes and with our students needs. Below is a brief summary of some of the changes in our school dress code, but please read the dress code policy in its entirety in the 2013-2014 Student Handbook because it is the responsibility of both students and their parents to read, understand and adhere to the school dress code. Shirts, tops, blouses, and jackets must cover all aspects of the bosom, chest, back and sides with straps at least three inches wide on each shoulder. Cleavage should not be visible. Tank tops, tube tops, halters, or spaghetti straps are not permitted as a primary top. Skirts, dresses and shorts must be approximately knee length when in a standing position. All dresses must have straps at least three inches wide. No revealing shortshorts and mini-skirts. Undergarments should not be visible at any time. Tights, leotard and leggings must be covered by clothing that is approximately knee length when in a standing position. Pants should fit appropriately, without sagging, and hide all undergarments (ballers, underwear, boxers, shorts, etc.). Floridas Sagging Pants Law requires school boards to adopt dress codes barring clothes that expose underwear or body parts in an indecent or vulgar manner.Ž Holes in pants above the knee must be covered. Attire and jewelry must not be sexually suggestive or feature crude or vulgar commercial lettering, printing or drawings which would be offensive or insensitive to those on the Wakulla High School campus. They may not depict drugs, tobacco, weapons, alcohol, or be indicative of gang membership. We hope these changes will have a positive impact on both the students and the school environment. It is important to make sure students are dressed appropriately when leaving for school every day. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsProfessional trainers from Cambridge Education provided summer training for all school based administrators for the purpose of enhancing educator effectiveness. Emphasis was placed on inter-rater reliability, accurate evaluation calibration and constructive feedback. Our teacher evaluation has experienced a complete overhaul. Training before school, together, was important,Ž notes Karen Wells, Chief Human Capital Of“ cer. The ultimate goal is improved consistency and uniformity throughout the district regarding teacher evaluations,Ž states Wells. Because Florida Statute currently mandates teachers and administrators receive pay based on performance, con“ dence and integrity in the evaluation ratings is imperative.Ž Consistency throughout the district will insure that all students at all schools have the same advantage of effective teaching and all teachers throughout the district have the same opportunity for accurate observations, honest feedback, and professional development in areas of need. The Cambridge Ed trainers, Terri Singleton and Christie McGinnis, previous Okaloosa County administrator, will return this September and again in November and guide school administrators in real-time classroom observations and during pre and post observation conferences in Wakulla classrooms. Principal Mike Barwick shared, The training was very informative. It was great to hear from administrators in other districts.Ž Principal Kim Dutton said, The emphasis on effective feedback based on evidence collected during observations was a key component in the training. Next year will be a time of learning for us all.Ž Cambridge Education provides training for administratorsSpecial to The NewsAll 28 colleges support principles to improve access, affordability and success for veterans and their families ~ Last week the 28 colleges in the Florida College System (FCS) signed on to a national initiative to promote veteran-friendly policies at colleges and universities. The eight strategies in Keys to Facilitating Veterans Success on CampusŽ encourages colleges to implement policies that help veterans, activeduty service members and their families achieve educational and training goals. "Our system is proud to provide education, jobtraining and re-training to veterans, active-duty service members and their families,Ž said FCS Chancellor Randy Hanna. I commend all 28 colleges for supporting the keys to success, and look forward to strengthening our efforts to create veteranfriendly environments.Ž The 28 FCS institutions joined more than 250 colleges and universities from across the nation to support eight keys to success endorsed by the U.S. Departments of Education, Veterans Affairs and Defense: € Create a culture of trust and connectedness across the campus community to promote well-being and success for veterans. € Ensure consistent and sustained support from campus leadership. € Implement an earlyalert system to ensure all veterans receive academic, career and “ nancial advice before challenges become overwhelming. € Coordinate and centralize campus efforts for all veterans, together with the creation of a designated space (even if limited in size). € Collaborate with local communities and organizations, including government agencies, to align and coordinate various services for veterans. € Utilize a uniform set of data tools to collect and track information on veterans, including demographics, retention and degree completion. € Provide comprehensive professional development for faculty and staff on issues and challenges unique to veterans. € Develop systems that ensure sustainability of effective practices for veterans. As of April 2012, the Florida College System enrolled 20,745 veterans, up from 14,171 in fall 2009. The U.S. Department of Education anticipates that number will continue to grow over the next several years. Our colleges have a strong history of responding to the needs of the state and local communities,Ž said Chancellor Hanna. We are proud to support the eight principles for creating veteran-friendly campuses that promote student success.ŽFlorida college system commits to support veteransSpecial to The NewsWhile the beginning of the school year is an exciting and wonderful time for students, parents and school staff, it is also the time for the in” uenza and other viruses to return with a vengeance. With so many people together in smaller areas, transmitting a virus is as easy as a handshake, a hug, or a sneeze. In an effort to be proactive regarding flu immunization, the Wakulla County Health Department (WCHD) is bringing letters to each school site that went home August 15th, letting parents know that they will be offering the ” u shots in the school clinics and asking parents to return the forms if they are interested in participating. Returning the forms in a timely manner will allow the health department to determine how much of the vaccine to purchase for each school site. Students and parents will be noti“ ed when a date has been chosen … it should begin in late September or early October. If students or staff have insurance, the WCHD will bill the insurance company for the immunization. If there is no insurance, the school board will pay for the immunization. This is the same process as last year. Parents please “ ll out all forms given out by the schools and return them in a timely manner. WHS looks forward to a great new school year and working with the community to ensure that our students and staff are happy, safe, and healthy. Special to The NewsTallahassee Community College is preparing more educational opportunities for Wakulla than ever this fall semester. With TCCs Wakulla Center beginning its second year in the Centennial Bank building in Crawfordville, TCC is expanding its offerings to include more for-credit and workforce training courses. Beginning August 26, Wakulla County residents can take prerequisite liberal arts classes at TCCs Wakulla Center: ENC 1101, College Composition Tuesday & Thursday 5:30 p.m. … 6:45 p.m. HUM 2210, Humanities I Monday 7 p.m. … 9:45 p.m. MAC 1105, College Algebra Monday & Wednesday 4 p.m. … 5:15 p.m. In addition to TCCs associate of arts program that prepares students for transfer to a university, TCC also offers degrees and certi“ cations that prepare students to move directly into the workforce. TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute offers an A.S. in Environmental Science Technology and a water quality technician certificate. Furthermore, beginning Sept. 3, TCCs Wakulla Center is also offering the Green Guide Certi“ cation, a 90 hour program of classroom and “ eld-based training designed to give students the knowledge and skills needed to work in nature-focused businesses. Registration for the fall semester is still open, with classes for the Fall Main and August Express sessions beginning Monday, Aug. 26, the September Express Session starting Sept. 9 and the October Expression Session starting Oct. 16. For more information visit www.tcc.” .edu/wakulla.TCC prepares a semester of opportunitiesA reminder of WHS dress code policy changesWHS u shots reminder The Wakulla Springs Christian School, Inc. admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs, and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the school. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national and ethnic origin in administration or its educational policies, admissions, scholarship and loan programs, and athletic and other school-administered programs.AUGUST 22, 2013NOTICE OF NONDISCRIMINATORY POLICY AS TO STUDENTS BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841 www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW! Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to AMERICASTROPHYPROPERTYAUCTIONEERS THE NATIONAL AUCTION GROUP INC.P.O. Box 149 € Gadsden, AL 35902 www.NationalAuctionGroup.com F REE B ROCHURE : 1-800-649-8720 or (256) 547-3434Thomas J. 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By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net This year, Head Coach Scott Klees said the number one goal of his Wakulla War Eagle football teams is to make it to the state championship game … and win … something that last years team came out shy of during their playoff run with a loss to Godby in the second round. But theres a lot of work to be done before that can happen. Klees says the War Eagles plan to take the season one game at a time. Were not going to look too far ahead,Ž he says. Our focus right now is Marianna and getting our guys ready for that.Ž The team will boast many new young faces as it lost a total of 26 seniors to graduation … 19 of whom were starters. Expectations, however, are the same as always, says Klees. He cites experience as the biggest difference in this years team from last years. Nevertheless, he says, the talent is every bit as much there. Were a young team and were going to have to mature a lot quicker than normal,Ž he says. but a state championship is de“ nitely a reachable goal.Ž Klees says hell be looking to develop the young players mentally as a lot will be asked of them in taking on a high caliber of physicality and speed. With a roster that is only about 40 deep compared to last years 56, Klees says the teams biggest challenge will be depth. The main focus in the off-season, he says, has been getting in shape and doing things right. We had a great conditioning program over the summer and we went to FCA camp, which is a full contact camp,Ž during which, Klees says, the team developed character. According to the head coach, the team focused this summer on being what God wants us to be. We want to have God “ rst, family second, school third and football fourth.Ž Basically, says Klees, they spent the off-season getting their priorities in order. As far as any individual expectations go, Klees says theyre the same for anyone. When its your time to make a play, we will expect you to make a play,Ž he says. The pressure is on every one of the players equally.Ž In terms of offense, the coach says this years team will look a little bit different. Known for running the ball, Klees says they expect there will be more passing than usual. Last year we probably ran the ball 65 percent of the time, this year itll probably be more like 50-50 passing and running.Ž The War Eagles defense, says Klees, will have to be aggressive. Were going to be very physical.Ž As far as team leadership goes, he hopes that the few seniors that they do have will step up and “ ll that role. Theyve been there done that,Ž he says. Theyre 24-4 in the last two years, so theyve got the experience.Ž Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy ALAN ROSSPlaying an alt-fuel strategy, 55-year-old Mark Martin came within three and a half laps of winning Sundays Pure Michigan 400 at the two-mile Michigan International Speedway tri-oval. Serendipitously, it was the kid he once championed, who in turn had once idolized Martin while growing up, who took the checkered ” ag. Joey Logano burst upon the NASCAR scene as an 18-year-old teen who won his “ rst Nationwide Series race in only his third start. Martin had been his hero as well as a fan. When Logano was just 14, Martin spotted him and commented that the young racing phenom was destined to be one of the greats. Many purveyors of racing have been waiting to see that greatness, and while its true that Loganos Cup success has not matched his Nationwide achievements, the 23-year-old has settled down to become a steady, contending challenger for new boss Roger Penske. That Logano got to hand his employer a hallowed victory at the track Penske once owned, you “ gure, had to go down exceedingly well with The Captain. Three cautions marred the races early stages, including Clint Bowyers spinout on the opening lap. But it was Cup standings leader Jimmie Johnsons unscheduled departure that provided the shocker of the day. After wrecking his primary car in Saturdays practice, Johnson started near the rear of the “ eld in a backup car, inheriting the lead on Lap 43 of the 200lap race during green” ag pit stops, in what looked to be a Top-10 day at worst. But 37 laps later, the “ ve-time Cup champion slowed, exiting the race with an engine failure. His Chase slot is already assured. With 27 laps to go, the races ninth caution came out, when Kyle Busch spun into the in“ eld. This is when Martin, who stayed out, took over the top spot. He pulled away on the restart, with Logano and Kurt Busch “ ghting hard behind him for second. Most likely the winner of that duel would take the eventual lead, since Martins fuel woes were known to all on pit road. Logano finally put Busch behind him and set sail for his onetime idol, who needed a fuel-stretching caution for any remote chance at victory. But with no yellows, the inevitable finally hit Martin with just under four laps to go. The 55 slowed in Turn 3 as Logano roared by, with Kevin Harvick a half second behind. It was Loganos third career Cup triumph and “ rst with Penske Racing. Johnson, with his 40th-place finish at Michigan, nonetheless maintains a 41-point lead over Clint Bowyer as the series heads to Bristol Saturday night. ROADSIDE RAVES: Austin Dillon, Tony Stewarts hand-picked successor to hop in the seat of the injured three-time Cup champions No. 14 Chevy, rallied from a lap down to “ nish 14th after an early Turn 4 spin. The 14 is battling the No. 56 of Michael Waltrip Racing for a spot in the owners Chaseƒ Loganos 203.695 mph lap on Friday that won pole set a track record at MIS, surpassing last years 203.241 by Marcos Ambrose. Ambroses mark had been the fastest lap recorded in NASCAR Cup qualifying in 26 years. Alan Ross has authored 29 books on sports history. You can e-mail him at: alanross_ sports@yahoo.com Sportland 2013THE COOL DOWN LAP Logano wins Pure Michigan 400 as Martin falters on fuelFOOTBALLWar Eagles set their sights on championship INSIDE War Eagle Football War Eagle Football War Eagle Football Special Section produced byPHOTO BY KEN FIELDS Head Coach Scott Klees FILE PHOTOThe home crowd was on its feet for last years November playoff game against Godby. After beating Godby and going undefeated in the regular season, the War Eagles fell to Godby, 14-7. Godby went on to win the state championship. Look for the guide to Wakulla football in next weeks Wakulla News.PRE-SEASON GAME: Wakulla War Eagles host the Marianna at Reynolds Field on Friday, Aug. 23, at 6:30 p.m. REGULAR SEASON opens against Florida High in Tallahassee on Friday, Aug. 30, at 7 p.m. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Chanida CarltonHer name was drawn fromƒI bought a paper while we eating at the Coastal Restaurant and saw the form an “lled it out for fun! I dont ever win anything, not even scratch off tickets. Thank you! OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Congratulations ank You So Much! Con Co C o C n Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Coastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken n n t t Eat DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILLJuly 2013 Winner Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the T H ES H O PGREATBICYCL E 3624 Woodville Hwy., 1/2 mile south of the Fairgrounds SALES SERVICE PARTS RENTALS ADULT TRIKES850-402-0545

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By PATTY WILBURIn late July 2007, a couple of park visitors hiked up to the Sally Ward Spring to have a look at the water. Instead of the usual “ sh and turtles in the spring that day was a mother manatee with a very small calf! The visitors reported it to Park Rangers, who were thrilled to see the manatees exit the Sally Ward Spring run during a tour the next day. At this point, the calf was the charcoal gray color of a newborn. This dark color fades to light gray within a month after birth. And since manatee mothers are known to seek out quiet waterways to give birth, theres a very good chance that the calf was born in the Sally Ward Spring. The mom, called CR505, was known from the Crystal River area based on her scar patterns. The little calf turned out to be a female, and was later named Gail. Gail and her mom continued to be seen fairly often throughout the fall of 2007, so much so that the park began to keep more detailed records of when manatees were spotted. This was fortuitous, because we were paying good attention when manatees decided to overwinter in the park for the “ rst time in the winter of 2007-08. Gail and her mom were two of the 12 pioneering manatees at Wakulla Springs that “ rst cold season. In late winter, after an absence of a couple weeks, the pair was back in the park. But Gail returned with a fresh prop wound above the base of her tail. Thankfully it healed well over time. The one upside of this unfortunate accident was that it made Gail recognizable after CR505 weaned her later that summer. Gail traveled down to Crystal River with CR505, once before leaving her moms side, but she has spent every winter at Wakulla Springs. We have seen her grow up in the park. She has been joined by a lot more manatees here in the last few years, but we have always had a soft spot in our hearts for that “ rst little calf that started the ball rolling. This summer, we were overjoyed to see things come full circle. On July 29, Gail was seen during tours with a teeny calf at her side! She seems to know exactly what to do; both mom and baby look great. By coincidence, CR505 was in the park that day too. At one point mother and baby were feeding right alongside grandma behind the boat dock. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe rain has made the shing not-so-good From Florida Forest Service Two dozen members of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services Florida Forest Service will deploy to battle blazes in Oregon this week. Two additional firefighters will aid firefighting in California. The Florida Forest Service has some of the best and most skilled “ re“ ghters in the country,Ž said Florida Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam. Thanks to Floridas persistent rainfall and current low wild“ re danger, we are able to offer our talented personnel to support the protection of people, structures and natural resources in other states,Ž Putnam added. An Initial Attack Hand Crew of 20 Florida Forest Service firefighters deployed to Oregon for two weeks alongside four additional crews from Florida, Georgia and Alabama. These “ re“ ghters will assist with front-line “ refighting operations by using shovels, axes and rakes to manually create a “ re break or “ re line around the wild“ re. Hand crews are critical to wild“ re suppression in the western United States. Four additional Florida Forest Service “ re personnel will assist in a variety of other wild“ re-related positions throughout Oregon. To date, the Florida Forest Service has also provided wild“ re assistance to Colorado, Arizona, Alaska and Nevada. Two Florida Forest Service employees are also serving as support staff for the Salmon River Complex of wild“ res on Californias Klamath National Forest. The Florida Forest Service manages 1 million acres of public forest land while protecting more than 26 million acres of homes, forestland, and natural resources from the devastating effects of wild“ re. For statewide wild“ re updates and additional wild“ re information, visit www.” oridaforestservice. com. For more information about the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, visit www.FreshFromFlorida.com.Florida Forest Service re ghters assist Oregon with wild resAdditional re ghters to help e orts in CaliforniaWell, things have gone from pretty good to pretty crappy. We continue to get rain that keeps dumping freshwater into our bays. The water is like threeday-old coffee and more fresh than salt. I dont believe the fresh water has that much effect on reds but the speckled trout sure dont like it. Jimmy at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks says they have started getting some live shrimp but the problem is there are no “ shermen to buy them and not many “ sh to eat them. The folks who bring them shrimp run five boats out of the Keaton Beach area and he said he is down to running just one boat due to poor “ shing where they deliver to. Jimmy said he went offshore a couple of weeks ago and caught some nice grouper but due to bad weather and fact that he had some young kids on board they came in earlier than he wanted. Bucky, who works at Shell Island, went last week down towards the Aucilla and caught some nice reds. Jimmy said folks are still catching reds but no trout and those that are able to get out grouper “ shing are doing good. We were talking about all the freshwater and he said someone he was talking to who keeps pin“ sh traps where Angelo keeps his boat, checked them the other day and had no pin“ sh but did have bream and freshwater cat“ sh in them. Capt. Randy Peart said he is still “ shing over at St. George and “ shing is hit and miss. He was able to get down to the East End of St. George for a couple of days and did good on reds on topwater and also caught some nice speckled trout to 5 pounds. The cut has been good for reds and big mangrove snapper but when the tide starts falling the grass gets so bad you cant “ sh. His best trips have been out a short ways from the beach and he has been “ shing the tide line with shrimp or gulp on the bottom and catching some really big white trout and whiting. Randys son went into the U.S. Army in January and has completed basic, Airborne and Ranger school. He will now be stationed at Ft. Benning and expects to be deployed to Afghanistan in about three or four months. Capt. David Fife had some fireman buddies down from the Atlanta area last week and he limited out on reds each day. He said they threw back quite a few legal “ sh and some small ones. They “ shed live minnows on the bottom. He said almost every bar they went to had fish and if there were plenty of mullet on the bar there were plenty of reds. Of course they didnt “ sh a whole long time due to the bad weather. One of my neighbors said he went out and dove in about 30 feet of water. He said there were grouper every where and they came in with their limit of gags and also had 15 hog snapper. Another neighbor went out last week and he said they had a good catch of grouper. They were out by one of the towers and using some extremely heavy tackle dropped some big baits down for Goliath grouper just to see if they could get one up and get a picture. The “ rst one they hooked straightened out the hook so they went to a bigger hook. He said they got one to the top that they estimated weighing 300 pounds. They took pictures and let it go. Alan Lamarche of Shell Point and owner of Plantation Security is “ nally home after his surgery. Alan has had a hard time recovering but hopefully now is on the down hill side. Alan takes lots of kids “ shing and donates quite a few trips to organizations. Glad youre home, Alan, and look forward to seeing you back on the water, as I know you are champing at the bit. The middle of October, Warriors and Quiet Waters will be bring six more soldiers from Ft. Benning to Wakulla for a week of fishing and relaxing. Capt. David Fife and I are again “ shing with three of them and look forward to them being here. Remember to know your limits and watch out for those thunderstorms out there. They can pop up rather quickly. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Manatees come full circle at Wakulla Springs PHOTO BY PATTY WILBURGail with her calf at Wakulla Springs.Born at Wakulla Springs in 2007, the manatee Gail is back with her own calf P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 SEASON SEASON SEASON CLOSEOUT PRICES ON SELECT MERCHANDISE: SNORKELING GEAR, SPEARGUNS AND ACCESSORIES, BCS, REGULATORS, WETSUITS, AND UNDERWATER CAMERAS.2784 COASTAL HWY., CRAWFORDVILLE 850745-8208Labor Day Weekend7am to 7pm Saturday, Aug. 31 WAKULLADIVING.com MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC.THG-12902 G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Serving Crawfordville and Tallahassee for over 8 years 850-926-2700 Located Just North of the Courthouse

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com As the saying goes, the best laid plansƒ This past weekend was heavy on rain, which leads us to remain on dry (or as dry as possible) land. The patrol that was scheduled for St. George Island had to be canceled de to inclement weather and ” ood warnings in the area. The crew of David Rabon, Duane Treadon and Fran Keating along with Coxswain Tim Ashley erred on the side of caution. We never want to create an unnecessary dangerous situation. Hopefully they will have the opportunity to reschedule this coming weekend! While waiting for the rain to pass, like many of you it was most of the weekend, time was spent reading an interesting article on the Coast Guard from the American Spirit magazine that was passed down from a friend. It seemed “ tting. The history of the Coast Guard was discussed in depth. Of particular interest was a review on the development of a Federal agency for aiding navigation the year before the establishment of the Revenue Cutter Service. The U.S. Lighthouse Service, operating under the Treasury Department, took over maintenance of lighthouses along with other aides to navigation on Aug. 7, 1789. As the Coast Guard we know today evolved, the Lighthouse Service moved under their umbrella. The “ rst lighthouse in the United States was built in 1716 on Little Brewster Island guiding ships into Boson Harbor. To add a little perspective, the lighthouse in St Marks was built in 1830, the “ rst lighthouse on St. George in 1833 and in Carrabelle in 1835. A little trivia, the oldest standing original light tower in the United States still in operation is the Sandy Hook Lighthouse in New Jersey. It was built in 1764. Why this all seemed to “ t, the rain we have had can make it hard for boaters to navigate even in familiar waters. The aids to navigation serve as resources to mariners to assist them in making it safely in to harbor. It is a good idea to practice navigating by using these rather than a GPS or other navigational aid in the event you need to rely on them. You dont want the first time you need them to be an emergency. If you are in the St. George Island area this weekend, we hope you will stop and say hello if you see us! If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. The lighthouse sends a beacon of light to guide sailors home, be sure you know how to follow the light.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies The nature of our underwater summer Travis and I just recovered our third 160-liter liquid oxygen Dewar ” ask this summer. A Dewar ” ask is like a special very insulated icebox that has coils wrapped around the outside to slowly turn the very cold liquid oxygen into a gaseous oxygen. We own the ” ask and have a Tallahassee supplier “ ll it in Georgia. We make Nitrox by taking this gasi“ ed liquid, blending it through our compressors, and store it in those huge white cylinders you see outside. We have approximately 80,000-cubic feet of stored gasses at our facility. Each Dewar ” ask we “ ll in Georgia will make over 40,000 cubic feet of 32 percent Nitrox! This turns out to be double the volume of oxygen that we used last summer. And all agree that this summer, has been wetter than most in the past (except for TS Debbie of last June). Something has changed! Our summer season is de“ ned by the arrival of the open water divers, recently awakened by the warmer weather and the promise of a bountiful ocean harvest. Over the past two years this began as early as March. The “ rst wave included those repairing or upgrading their life support technology (regulator service, cylinder inspection and BC repair). With the opening of popular “ shing seasons in April, servicing and accessorizing spear guns adds to the workload. By May, the ocean is much warmer bringing out the more timid divers in search of masks, “ ns and snorkels. With the close of local schools, June and July are so busy at our facility, hire extra help and we give up working special projects to focus just on customer support. A shift from spear “ shing to more scalloping depends upon the years predicted harvest and rainfall. This year has seen so much rain people are “ nding it dif“ cult to see the scallop shells in the grass beds. But there is still time! Scalloping season now extends through much of September. Only with the return to classes in August does the traf“ c slow down. Labor Day marks the technical end of our summer season which this year falls on the last days of August. Our underwater summer is currently six months long. What differed from last summer was the abundance of training requested throughout this summer over the last. Folks want to learn to dive, to use Nitrox, to dive caverns and caves, to learn side mount and rebreathers and dive deep breathing Trimix (a helium, nitrogen and oxygen blend we also mix at our facility). Perhaps this is a re” ection on an improving economy, availability of more free time, or better prices and interest in the sport now that diving support is readily available. I always expected folks to seek dive training in the cooler more comfortable winter when water clarity was better. But this summer has not seen the temperature soar into the 100s as it has in the past. Many of our training sites however, have been flooded much of the summer, yet the demand continued. The consequence is I now seek another diving instructor before next summer to be better prepared! All of this additional diving resulted in the consumption of an increase amount of the gasses that we blend using liquid oxygen. I took a chance when I invested in the Dewar ” ask two years ago. It set us back $1,000 (used), but reduced the cost of the commodity so much, we will recover the investment by years end. This fall we get back to projects (new Hydro station, expanded oxygen “ ll station, new repair facility, new web site) and dream of new directions (TCC courses in Diving at the Environmental Institute). See you next summer!Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Special to The NewsThe Franklin County Courthouse was a buzz on Tuesday, Aug. 13, with federal and state legislative leaders, organizations and individuals in Apalachicola for a press conference and the U.S. Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation “ eld hearing on the on Apalachicola Bay. The purpose of the hearing was to examine the impacts of decreased water ” ows on the Apalachicola Bay and area industries. It also addressed the effects that chronic drought and upstream water withdrawals have had on the Apalachicola Bay, the Gulf, local communities and the oyster industry, which has typically represented about 10 percent of the Nations supply and 90 percent of Floridas supply. At the press conference State Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, and Rep. Halsey Beashers, R-Monticello, were joined by Rep. Aaron Bean from Jacksonville to speak on the importance of the Apalachicola Bay, its uniqueness and the fact that it serves as a nursery to the many and varied “ sh species, oysters, shrimp, scallops, and other marine and plant life vital to the health of the Gulf of Mexico and the local economy. U.S. Senators Bill Nelson and Marco Rubio conducted the hearing, chaired by Sen. Nelson. A panel of distinguished individuals included Congressman Steve Southerland; Jon Steverson, Northwest Florida Water Management District; Dan Tonsmeire, Apalachicola RiverKeeper; Shannon Hartsfield, Franklin County Seafood Workers Association; and, Dr. Karl Havens, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences provided testimony on the importance of the Apalachicola Bay and the devastating impact of the ever increasing reduction of water ” ows for the Apalachicola River over the last two decades. The U.S. Army Corps was represented by Col. Jon Chytka, who spoke to the Corps efforts and challenges to update the system-wide Master Water Control Manual developed in 1958, for the ACF (Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Rivers) Water system. According to Colonel Chytakas testimony, the ACF draft Manual update now in progress will not be ready for release until two years from now. Gov. Rick Scott toured Apalachicola and in response to the need for action now, announced his intent to “ le suit against Georgia to stop their unchecked and growing consumption of water. Because Georgia has not negotiated in good faith to fairly share the waters that ” ow between our states that Florida will bring suit in the U.S. Supreme Court next month to stop Georgias unchecked consumption of water that threatens the existence of Apalachicola “ sheries and the future economic development of the region. The economic future of Apalachicola Bay and Northwest Florida is at stake,Ž Scott said. On Monday, Aug.12, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced that the condition in the Apalachicola Bay had resulted in a “ shery disaster for Floridas oystermen, allowing them to obtain relief funds. Emily Menashes, National Marine Fisheries Service testified at the hearing as well and explained the extensive process that is used to determine such a disaster. However, it will take Congress to approve funding for relief and it is not certain when or how much would be provided. Leaders meet to discuss Apalachicola Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Aug 22, 13 Fri Aug 23, 13 Sat Aug 24, 13 Sun Aug 25, 13 Mon Aug 26, 13 Tue Aug 27, 13 Wed Au g 28, 13 Date 3.8 ft. 3:41 AM 3.8 ft. 4:11 AM 3.8 ft. 4:38 AM 3.8 ft. 5:05 AM 3.7 ft. 5:31 AM High 0.6 ft. 9:37 AM 0.5 ft. 10:20 AM 0.5 ft. 11:02 AM 0.6 ft. 11:45 AM 0.8 ft. 12:33 PM 1.6 ft. 12:04 AM 1.9 ft. 12:40 AM Low 4.2 ft. 3:51 PM 4.0 ft. 4:33 PM 3.7 ft. 5:15 PM 3.3 ft. 5:59 PM 3.0 ft. 6:48 PM 3.5 ft. 6:01 AM 3.3 ft. 6:39 AM High 0.4 ft. 10:10 PM 0.7 ft. 10:40 PM 1.0 ft. 11:07 PM 1.3 ft. 11:34 PM 1.0 ft. 1:33 PM 1.2 ft. 2:57 PM Low 2.7 ft. 7:53 PM 2.5 ft. 9:28 PM High Thu Aug 22, 13 Fri Aug 23, 13 Sat Aug 24, 13 Sun Aug 25, 13 Mon Aug 26, 13 Tue Aug 27, 13 Wed Au g 28, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 3:33 AM 2.9 ft. 4:03 AM 2.9 ft. 4:30 AM 2.8 ft. 4:57 AM 2.7 ft. 5:23 AM High 0.5 ft. 9:48 AM 0.4 ft. 10:31 AM 0.4 ft. 11:13 AM 0.4 ft. 11:56 AM 0.6 ft. 12:44 PM 1.2 ft. 12:15 AM 1.4 ft. 12:51 AM Low 3.2 ft. 3:43 PM 3.0 ft. 4:25 PM 2.8 ft. 5:07 PM 2.5 ft. 5:51 PM 2.2 ft. 6:40 PM 2.6 ft. 5:53 AM 2.5 ft. 6:31 AM High 0.3 ft. 10:21 PM 0.5 ft. 10:51 PM 0.8 ft. 11:18 PM 1.0 ft. 11:45 PM 0.7 ft. 1:44 PM 0.9 ft. 3:08 PM Low 2.0 ft. 7:45 PM 1.9 ft. 9:20 PM High Thu Aug 22, 13 Fri Aug 23, 13 Sat Aug 24, 13 Sun Aug 25, 13 Mon Aug 26, 13 Tue Aug 27, 13 Wed Au g 28, 13 Date 3.5 ft. 4:17 AM 3.6 ft. 4:47 AM 3.5 ft. 5:14 AM High 0.6 ft. 10:41 AM 0.5 ft. 11:24 AM 0.5 ft. 12:06 PM 1.0 ft. 12:11 AM 1.2 ft. 12:38 AM 1.5 ft. 1:08 AM 1.7 ft. 1:44 AM Low 3.9 ft. 4:27 PM 3.7 ft. 5:09 PM 3.4 ft. 5:51 PM 3.5 ft. 5:41 AM 3.4 ft. 6:07 AM 3.3 ft. 6:37 AM 3.1 ft. 7:15 AM High 0.4 ft. 11:14 PM 0.7 ft. 11:44 PM 0.6 ft. 12:49 PM 0.7 ft. 1:37 PM 0.9 ft. 2:37 PM 1.1 ft. 4:01 PM Low 3.1 ft. 6:35 PM 2.8 ft. 7:24 PM 2.5 ft. 8:29 PM 2.3 ft. 10:04 PM High Thu Aug 22, 13 Fri Aug 23, 13 Sat Aug 24, 13 Sun Aug 25, 13 Mon Aug 26, 13 Tue Aug 27, 13 Wed Au g 28, 13 Date 3.0 ft. 3:25 AM 3.0 ft. 3:55 AM 3.0 ft. 4:22 AM 2.9 ft. 4:49 AM 2.8 ft. 5:15 AM 2.7 ft. 5:45 AM High 0.6 ft. 9:16 AM 0.5 ft. 9:59 AM 0.5 ft. 10:41 AM 0.6 ft. 11:24 AM 0.8 ft. 12:12 PM 1.0 ft. 1:12 PM 1.8 ft. 12:19 AM Low 3.3 ft. 3:35 PM 3.1 ft. 4:17 PM 2.9 ft. 4:59 PM 2.6 ft. 5:43 PM 2.3 ft. 6:32 PM 2.1 ft. 7:37 PM 2.6 ft. 6:23 AM High 0.4 ft. 9:49 PM 0.7 ft. 10:19 PM 1.0 ft. 10:46 PM 1.3 ft. 11:13 PM 1.6 ft. 11:43 PM 1.2 ft. 2:36 PM Low 1.9 ft. 9:12 PM High Thu Aug 22, 13 Fri Aug 23, 13 Sat Aug 24, 13 Sun Aug 25, 13 Mon Aug 26, 13 Tue Aug 27, 13 Wed Au g 28, 13 Date 3.9 ft. 3:38 AM 3.9 ft. 4:08 AM 3.9 ft. 4:35 AM 3.8 ft. 5:02 AM 3.7 ft. 5:28 AM High 0.7 ft. 9:34 AM 0.5 ft. 10:17 AM 0.5 ft. 10:59 AM 0.7 ft. 11:42 AM 0.9 ft. 12:30 PM 1.8 ft. 12:01 AM 2.0 ft. 12:37 AM Low 4.3 ft. 3:48 PM 4.1 ft. 4:30 PM 3.7 ft. 5:12 PM 3.4 ft. 5:56 PM 3.0 ft. 6:45 PM 3.6 ft. 5:58 AM 3.4 ft. 6:36 AM High 0.4 ft. 10:07 PM 0.8 ft. 10:37 PM 1.1 ft. 11:04 PM 1.5 ft. 11:31 PM 1.1 ft. 1:30 PM 1.3 ft. 2:54 PM Low 2.7 ft. 7:50 PM 2.5 ft. 9:25 PM High Thu Aug 22, 13 Fri Aug 23, 13 Sat Aug 24, 13 Sun Aug 25, 13 Mon Aug 26, 13 Tue Aug 27, 13 Wed Au g 28, 13 Date 2.8 ft. 3:55 AM 2.8 ft. 4:12 AM 3.0 ft. 4:31 AM 3.1 ft. 4:53 AM 3.1 ft. 5:20 AM 3.2 ft. 5:53 AM 3.1 ft. 6:35 AM High 1.1 ft. 8:54 AM 1.0 ft. 9:41 AM 0.8 ft. 10:28 AM 0.7 ft. 11:20 AM 0.7 ft. 12:19 PM 0.7 ft. 1:30 PM 0.7 ft. 2:48 PM Low 3.2 ft. 3:30 PM 3.0 ft. 4:25 PM 2.8 ft. 5:21 PM 2.6 ft. 6:23 PM 2.4 ft. 7:35 PM 2.4 ft. 9:05 PM 2.4 ft. 10:55 PM High 0.7 ft. 9:35 PM 1.0 ft. 10:00 PM 1.2 ft. 10:23 PM 1.5 ft. 10:46 PM 1.6 ft. 11:13 PM 1.8 ft. 11:48 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 22 Aug. 28First Sept. 12 Full Sept. 19 Last Aug. 27 New Sept. 52:35 AM-4:35 AM 3:00 PM-5:00 PM 8:44 AM-9:44 AM 9:08 PM-10:08 PM 3:25 AM-5:25 AM 3:50 PM-5:50 PM 9:47 AM-10:47 AM 9:47 PM-10:47 PM 4:15 AM-6:15 AM 4:39 PM-6:39 PM 10:47 AM-11:47 AM 10:25 PM-11:25 PM 5:04 AM-7:04 AM 5:28 PM-7:28 PM 11:45 AM-12:45 PM 11:05 PM-12:05 AM 5:52 AM-7:52 AM 6:16 PM-8:16 PM 12:41 PM-1:41 PM 11:46 PM-12:46 AM 6:40 AM-8:40 AM 7:04 PM-9:04 PM --:-----:-1:36 PM-2:36 PM 7:29 AM-9:29 AM 7:53 PM-9:53 PM 12:29 AM-1:29 AM 2:28 PM-3:28 PM BETTER GOOD AVERAGE AVERAGE AVERAGE AVERAGE AVERAGE7:08 am 8:10 pm 9:09 pm 8:45 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:09 am 8:09 pm 9:48 pm 9:48 am 7:09 am 8:08 pm 10:26 pm 10:48 am 7:10 am 8:07 pm 11:06 pm 11:46 am 7:10 am 8:06 pm 11:47 pm 12:43 pm 7:11 am 8:05 pm --:-1:37 pm 7:12 am 8:04 pm 12:30 am 2:29 pm91% 84% 77% 70% 63% 57% 51%Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes Major Times MinorTimes City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 13A On Monday, Aug. 12, Thomas James Allen, 30, of Crawfordville was arrested for aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill and resisting a law enforcement of“ cer with violence. Deputies were called to a complaint by a 53-year-old Crawfordville man that Allen was threatening him with bodily harm. The victim stated that Allen reached down to the roadway and picked up what he thought was a rock. Witnesses corroborated the victims story. During the arrest process, Allen refused to follow commands to put his hands behind his back. Deputies were forced to take Allen to the ground to comply with the handcuff orders. The suspect also refused to get out of the patrol vehicle at the Wakulla County Jail and jail staff was forced to remove him. Nobody was injured. Deputy Ian Dohme, Deputy Anthony Paul, Sgt. Ryan Muse and Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office this week:THURSDAY, AUGUST 8€ Jackie Mounts of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A yard angel statue was damaged when a suspect threw it to the ground. Lawn furniture was thrown into a garden and a trash receptacle was damaged. Damage is estimated at $50 and suspects have been identi“ ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € John Gerhardt of the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department reported a residential burglary at the Panacea Womans Club pavilion. While WCSO Of“ cer Roy Crum and his work crew were cutting the grass in Panacea, Officer Crum observed a window that was tampered with. A “ re extinguisher was discharged on some chairs in the kitchen. Damage to the facility is estimated at $500. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Brenda Bush of Crawfordville reported a recreational vehicle “ re. The vehicle was being used as a home for the victim and was a total loss in the blaze. The older RV was valued at $3,500, but there were no injuries. Due to evidence collected at the scene the “ re was ruled suspicious and a person of interest has been identi“ ed. The state Fire Marshal was called to the scene to investigate. The Red Cross was called to the scene to assist the victim. Sgt. Lorne Whaley, Detective Randy Phillips and Detective Matt Helms investigated. Wakulla EMS and Wakulla Fire“ ghters also responded to the blaze. € Travis Everett Randerson, 21, of Panacea was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked with knowledge for failure to pay traf“ c “ nes. Deputy Mike Zimba observed a vehicle in Panacea that did not have a rear bumper or vehicle tag and conducted a traf“ c stop. € Mike Strickland of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported an unauthorized charge on his bank card at a retail store in California. The charge was valued at $332. Deputy Richard Moon investigated.FRIDAY, AUGUST 9€ Sonya Renee Miller of Crawfordville reported the loss of her sons cell phone at Sopchoppy City Park. The victim received a call from a Sopchoppy man who recovered the phone and wanted to return it to her. In the time the phone was in the possession of the Sopchoppy man, a $350 data usage fee was accrued. The Sopchoppy man refused to pay the usage fee. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Amanda Weeks of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed an unauthorized withdrawal from her bank account. The $227 withdrawal was used to pay utilities in Tallahassee. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Siefe Awad of Panacea was arrested for driving a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked. Deputy Vicki Mitchell observed Awad driving at a slow rate of speed on U.S. Highway 98 and he was unable to keep the vehicle in a single lane. A traf“ c stop was conducted by the deputy. Deputy Mitchell discovered that Awad was arrested and convicted for DWLSR in 2004 and twice more in 2013. € Terrence Everett Seyboth of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for attached tag not assigned. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks was checking to determine if the tag was expired and discovered that it belonged to another vehicle. The tag was seized by the deputy. € Katrice Austreng of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A Chevrolet truck grill emblem/logo was removed from the victims truck. The victim is attempting to establish a possible location for the theft. Deputy Anthony Paul investigated.SATURDAY, AUGUST 10€ A 17-year-old Crawfordville juvenile was given a civil citation for being in possession of two marijuana pipes during a traffic stop. The male driver was unable to maintain a single lane and the traf“ c stop was conducted. The juvenile was returned to his home at the request of his father. Deputies Richard Moon and Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Deputy Anthony Paul, Sgt. Ryan Muse and Deputy Alan Middlebrooks observed several subjects drinking alcohol at an open house party in Crawfordville. Deputies investigated and discovered that the underage drinkers were age 14, 19, 19, 18, 16, 20, 17, 18, 19, 19, 18, 17 and 18. Deborah A. Collins, 47, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for allowing underage possession of alcohol at an open house party. € David Fletcher of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $2,912 worth of property was stolen from the home. Damage to the home was estimated at $310. During the investigation a shed was determined to have been entered as well following another forced entry. The suspect or suspects defecated in the shed and DNA evidence was collected. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. € Priscilla Roberts of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Clothing and a television, valued at $350, were reported missing from the home. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy David Pienta investigated.SUNDAY, AUGUST 11€ Jack Aaron of Panacea reported “ nding a bicycle on a vacant lot near his home. The WCSO did not have any reports of a stolen bicycle in the area and the bike was turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy David Pienta investigated. € Jack Aaron of Panacea reported a freshly planted marijuana plant while deputies were investigating the recovery of a bicycle. The plant was seized for destruction. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy David Pienta investigated. € Dana Clevenger of Crawfordville reported recovering personal property in a plastic bag on the side of Shadeville Highway. Attempts to contact the property owner, Fredrick E. Strain, were unsuccessful and the contents were turned into the Property and Evidence Division. The items included bank cards, identi“ cation cards and business cards. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Greg Seidel of the Wildwood Country Club reported the grand theft of a range picker. The range picker is used to collect golf balls from the driving range and contains a cage and ” atbed. The picker was discovered missing after lunch. Evidence was collected at the scene. The cart is valued at $5,000. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy David Pienta investigated. € James Harvey of the Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone used a vehicle to create donutsŽ in the church parking area. Damage was estimated at $300 and a similar incident was reported in July. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Jason Creech of Crawfordville reported the theft of a car battery. The battery is valued at $120 and was removed from the victims vehicle on his property. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Jimmy Roger Rosier, 34, of Crawfordville was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge following a traf“ c stop. Deputy Ian Dohme observed a vehicle without a tag and conducted the traf“ c stop. Rosier was issued a notice to appear in court.MONDAY, AUGUST 12€ Robert Cochran of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. An all terrain vehicle was stolen from the victims home. During the course of attempting to “ nd the ATV, the victim located a bicycle that did not belong to his family. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Sgt. Danny Harrell followed evidence tracks for several miles in the severe August heat before “ nally losing them in the Apalachicola National Forest. They followed the tracks through Wakulla County and into Leon County before heading back into Wakulla County. The ATV is valued at $6,000. The bike was turned in to the Property and Evidence Division. € Kathryn Roberts of Crawfordville reported the theft of a firearm from her vehicle. The firearm was removed from an unlocked vehicle and is valued at $320. The “ rearm will be entered in the NCIC/FCIC data base once a serial number is obtained. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Deputies Alan Middlebrooks and Richard Moon investigated a ” eeing and eluding incident from Aug. 9 involving a 20-year-old Sopchoppy man that occurred in Crawfordville. The motorist took the two deputies on a late night chase through Crawfordville as deputies attempted to investigate the aggressive driver on Wakulla Arran Road. The chase continued through Crawfordville until the deputies were called off on Arran Road for safety reasons. Deputies Moon and Middlebrooks were assisted by Deputy Anthony Paul and Sgt. Ryan Muse in locating the suspect through witnesses in Crawfordville. A warrant has been requested for the motorist for high speed ” eeing and eluding a law enforcement of“ cer with lights and siren activated.TUESDAY, AUGUST 13€ Wanda Murray of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victims bank card was used to make a $20 purchase in California. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Edward Jones of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Two firearms were reported missing from the victims home. They are valued at $700. Deputy Billy Metcalf and Detective Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Bradley Newkirk of Dollar General in Crawfordville and Panacea reported frauds. Someone was attempting to pass counterfeit $50 bills. Subjects entered the stores and purchased some merchandise using the bogus bills and received change. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated.WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14€ Sgt. Lorne Whaley was on patrol on U.S. Highway 319 after dark when he spotted a pedestrian in the roadway. Sgt. Whaley stopped his vehicle to check on the subject for safety reasons. The pedestrian allegedly refused to comply with the commands of the sergeant to stop and the subject put his hand in his pocket. Sgt. Whaley observed what appeared to be a knife and deployed force to gain compliance. A knife was reportedly recovered on Aldon Robert Milhon, 32, of Crawfordville. Milhon was charged with resisting arrest without violence. Lt. Brent Sanders also investigated. € Deputy Mike Zimba was assisting the Florida Highway Patrol with a hit-and-run investigation from Aug. 8 when contact was made with Patrick Lynn Steele, 47, of Woodville Highway. FHP Trooper Danny Quiles received information about the suspect vehicle and it was determined that Steele had an active warrant out of Leon County for driving while license suspended or revoked. Steele was taken into custody without incident. Approximately $50 worth of damage was created to a house door during the arrest process. Lt. Brent Sanders also investigated. € Marie Gilbert of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. The victim observed a fraudulent charge on her bank card for $97. The charge was created through an online transaction. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Maria Hinkle of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Johnny M. Slocum, 41, no known address, kicked a hole in the victims aquarium. Damage was estimated at $300. A trespass warning was also issued for Slocum. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Amanda Allen of Crawfordville reported the theft of personal items, electronics and miscellaneous food and clothing items from her home. The items are valued at approximately $650 and individuals of interest have been identi“ ed. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated.THURSDAY, AUGUST 15€ Deputy Alan Middlebrooks conducted a traffic stop as a result of an improper taillight on Highway 267. Deputy Middlebrooks discovered that Eva Audrey Colona, 19, of Crawfordville did not have a valid driver license. Reserve Deputy Matthew Hedges allegedly observed marijuana in the ash tray. The marijuana was collected and weighed 1.8 grams. Colona was issued a notice to appear in court for driving with a suspended license, and a notice for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Joshua David Stone, 23, of Crawfordville was allegedly in possession of a smoking pipe. He was issued a notice to appear for possession of drug paraphernalia. € James Jones of Crawfordville reported the theft of a cell phone. The victim placed his phone down at the register at Wal-Mart while paying for merchandise and left it there. The phone was traced to Tallahassee and is valued at $300. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 1,064 calls for service during the past week including 19 business and residential alarms; 13 disturbances; 21 E-911 calls; 75 investigations; 55 medical emergencies; 33 subpoena services; 16 suspicious people; 17 suspicious vehicles; 40 traf“ c enforcements; 97 traf“ c stops; 11 trespassing complaints; and 19 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 16 … As summer began to wind down in Tallahassee, at least one of the sources of inspiration or annoyance for the capitals denizens wound down as well. The Dream Defenders, who held the longest-lasting protests in recent memory at the state Capitol, announced they would move on. None of their goals had truly been accomplished, but the protesters argued that they would push forward with enough votes to oust Gov. Rick Scott in 2014, if it came to that. More action, though, was already in the of“ ng in Tallahassee. Scott announced a lawsuit against the states neighbor to the north, the latest skirmish in a three-way water war,Ž and Democrats began plotting for campaigns that will provide fodder for more than a year. DREAMING OF AN END What happens to a dream deferred?Ž Langston Hughes wrote in the poem Harlem.Ž Does it dry up / like a raisin in the sun? / Or fester like a sore„ / And then run?Ž After a month-long occupation of the hallway outside Scotts of“ ce, the Dream Defenders group decided that they had festered enough -and, if not quite run, were at least ready to leave. The last celebrity to visit them, civil-rights icon Julian Bond, applauded the group at its goingaway press conference. Its “ tting that the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington is coming up in a few days,Ž he said. That movement made this movement possible, and that movement -your movement -gave our movement its legacy.Ž The sit-in protest began July 16, following the acquittal of Georgia Zimmerman in the shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. The protesters asked for the state to repeal its controversial stand your groundŽ self-defense law, which grants immunity to people who use deadly force if they have reason to believe their lives are in danger. Also they called for taking steps to end racial pro“ ling and to get rid of zero-tolerance school discipline policies that the protesters said hurt childrens ability to get an education, often for trivial offenses. While Zimmerman never used the stand your groundŽ law in his defense, instead relying on a more traditional self-defense claim, the discussion of the law often dominated the early debate over the case. And it often overshadowed the other changes the Dream Defenders said they were looking for. Ending their protest after 31 days, the demonstrators pointed to a list of what they called accomplishments, even as critics could point out that they didnt have much to show in terms of results. The group forced a poll of lawmakers that could have resulted in a special session to deal with stand your ground.Ž But it will end up well short of the 96 lawmakers needed to support a special session; by the end of the week the idea was losing by a 96-45 margin. The protests prompted House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, to announce a hearing on stand your ground,Ž but the chairman of the subcommittee that will hold the hearing has said hes not inclined to change one damn commaŽ of the law. One thing protesters seemed to do successfully was to discourage Scott from showing up at the Capitol. The governor rarely appeared at his of“ ce during the protests. He also seemed content to allow the protests to run out of steam on their own, even as legislative leaders ran out of patience and called for the demonstrators to leave. After the state had spent more than $400,000 on security for the protests -some of it in the form of overtime for Capitol police -Scott thanked the Florida Department of Law Enforcement for providing a safe environment for people to exercise their First Amendment rights. We live in a great state, in a great nation, where everyone is free to express their views.Ž But the Dream Defenders also vowed to be back Sept. 23, the “ rst committee week leading up to the 2014 regular session. So had the sit-in ended, or had it merely been deferred? DREAMS OF MY WATER While the protests raged on at his Tallahassee of“ ce, Scott made his way to the Panhandle on Tuesday, where he announced the latest escalation in a decadeslong battle between Florida, Alabama and Georgia: a lawsuit at the U.S. Supreme Court aimed at getting more water released downstream from a lake that is used to slake the thirst of the Atlanta metropolitan complex. For 23 years, the three states have bickered over how to divvy up the water in the ApalachicolaChattahoochee-Flint River basin. Florida has argued that water use at the top of the system has reduced the downstream ” ow of freshwater to the Apalachicola Bay region, damaging that areas oyster industry. Florida and Alabama say too much water is being siphoned off for Atlantas drinking water. Last year, the Apalachicola Bay collapsed. The lack of freshwater combined with a historic drought to produce the lowest ” ows in 89 years --since they have been recorded. That followed a series of court rulings that sent the responsibility for regulating the ” ows back to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Its having a dramatic impact, and its because Georgia has taken our water,Ž Scott said. The Corps of Engineers is not worried about us. Thats why Floridas going to “ le suit against Georgia. Take this all this way to the Supreme Court.Ž Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal slammed Scotts move in a statement. Gov. Scotts threat to sue my state in the U.S. Supreme Court greatly disappoints me after I negotiated in good faith for two years,Ž Deal said in a prepared statement. More than a year ago, I offered a framework for a comprehensive agreement. Florida never responded. Its absurd to waste taxpayers money and prolong this process with a court battle when Ive proposed a workable solution.Ž The Atlanta area uses 360 million gallons of water per day, according to Scotts of“ ce, and Georgias consumption is expected to nearly double to 705 million gallons per day by 2035 -about the entire amount of water in the Apalachicola Bay. Scott was able to announce less antagonistic news Friday, saying the states unemployment rate had held steady at 7.1 percent. In a video message, Scott chose to focus on the number of jobs created in July. In the month of July the private sector in Florida generated over 34,000 jobs,Ž Scott said. Thats right, over 34,000 private sector jobs. Thats the biggest growth in private sector jobs in any month in the last two and half years.Ž Scott also said the total number of new jobs during his time in of“ ce -369,100 -was half of his claim that he would add 700,000 jobs to the states workforce in seven years. Democrats were quick to remind voters that Scott suggested at one debate that the 700,000 would be in addition to normal economic growth, which would push the number he needs to hit much higher. They also gave credit to President Barack Obama for the job growth. Before Rick Scott took of“ ce, he promised Floridians 1,700,000 new jobs … hes barely 20 percent of the way there,Ž Florida Democratic Party Chairwoman Allison Tant said in a written statement. He has fallen so far short of his promises, his only choice is to take credit for jobs he didnt create. The truth is that hes been holding Florida back, with big tax giveaways for special interests.Ž DREAMS OF THE DEMOCRATS Meanwhile, the state party with the fewest legislative seats and just one statewide elected of“ ceholder began dreaming up ways to overcome both problems … though at least one of those efforts seemed to end up with an early wake-up call regarding just how dif“ cult it would be. On Thursday, Democrats announced they had their first candidate for a Cabinet post, or at least the “ rst candidate that the party was willing to put any weight behind. Allie Braswell, the 51-year-old head of the Central Florida Urban League, announced he would challenge Chief Financial Of“ cer Jeff Atwater in 2014. Unseating any of the three Republicans who currently hold the states Cabinet posts looks like a tall order; each of them won by at least 13 percentage points in 2010, and all could bene“ t if Obamas sagging approval ratings and the normal six-year itch for incumbent presidents generate another GOP wave approaching the one in 2010. But Braswell was undaunted, touting his ability to slash a $14 million budget he oversaw as a technology executive at Disney to $11 million without cutting jobs. We can tighten the belt, and we can also help Floridians,Ž Braswell said. The next day, though, reports suggested that the new candidate had not been quite as successful with his personal “ nances. The Florida Times-Union reported Friday afternoon that Braswell has “ led for bankruptcy three times, most recently in 2008 in Orlando. Braswell said he used bankruptcy as way to responsibly pay my debtŽ and that his “ nancial problems would allow him to empathize with voters. The only other Democrat currently on the statewide ballot is Thaddeus ThadŽ Hamilton, who is taking another shot at the agriculture commissioner post after getting 2 percent of the vote as a non-partisan candidate four years ago STORY OF THE WEEK: The Dream Defenders decide to bring an end to a month-long sit-in protest over the states self-defense laws, school discipline policies and the issue of racial pro“ ling. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Our work and our power have grown too big for these walls.Ž … Phillip Agnew, the Dream Defenders leader, on the decision to leave.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Hey now, hey now, don’t dream it’s overBy DAVID WHITE Intimidated by wine? Youre not alone. Consider the prototypical wine connoisseur … swirling his glass, sniffing his wine, and blabbering on about some French chateau. Hes insufferable. Or consider a representative tasting note. Wine Spectator recently praised a wine for offering notes of creamy boysenberry, plum skin and cassis . [along with] hints of mesquite and grilled herbs.Ž Theyre bewildering. Add to that the number of wine regions, grape varieties, and production methods that oenophiles can easily rattle off, and its no wonder why so many people “ nd wine so daunting. Keep your chin up. Wine might be complex, but at the end of the day, its just fermented grape juice. And the best way to learn about wine is to drink it. For budding wine enthusiasts, the importance of tasting is impossible to overstate. Even simple questions, like your goto varietal on a normal weeknight, are impossible to answer until youve tasted hundreds of different wines. If you prefer white wine, do you seek ones that are crisp and light, like Sauvignon Blanc from Sancerre? Or do you prefer whites that are buttery and ripe, like California Chardonnay? If you prefer red, do you seek out big, muscular wines, like Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon? Or the more restrained pro“ le of Pinot Noir from Burgundy? Tasting can be as simple as visiting the local wine shop or attending a food and wine festival. Getting together with friends and asking each person to bring something different is another way to taste several wines at once. One of my favorite tastings is a bit more formal. I select four varietals … generally Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, and Syrah … and open two bottles of each, one from California and one from France. The stereotype tells us that American wines are fruitier than their French counterparts. While one can “ nd wines that debunk this stereotype, its based in truth. So I purposefully seek out wines that fit the stereotype. And I serve everything blind, pouring the wines from paper bags to mask where theyre from. Recognizing the differences should be obvious, even to novices. The aromatics of California Sauvignon Blanc are intense, typically reminiscent of fresh-cut grass and grapefruit. French Sauvignon Blanc, especially from Sancerre and Pouilly Fum, presents more subtle aromatics, like chalk and white ” owers. Chardonnay provides a similar contrast. While California Chardonnays are characterized by tropical fruits and butter, French Chardonnays are marked by tart fruits, like green apples and lime. When Pinot Noir comes from warmer regions of California, like Napa Valley and Carneros, it presents aromatics of sweet fruits, like black cherries. In the French region of Burgundy, Pinot Noir generally offers aromas of tart cherries and earth. Syrah can offer a stunning contrast. Many California winemakers utilize the grape to produce fruit bombs … think gobs of ripe blackberries and licorice. French Syrah is typically more restrained, marked by blueberries, meat, and pepper. Looking for differences between similar wines is extremely educational. And when the paper bag comes off each bottle, its exciting to see whether or not you correctly deduced the origin of each. This is just one model for a tasting, of course. One can just as easily host a wine on a budgetŽ party, selecting several bottles under $10. Its also fun to explore one grape, in depth. Pinot Noir, for example, is particularly expressive -so its fun to explore the differences between classic bottlings from Napa, Sonoma, Oregon, and Burgundy. Once wine becomes a passion, those baf” ing tasting notes make sense. Hard-to-pronounce regions across Europe become easier to remember. Those ” aws that sommeliers can spot become obvious. But only if youve tasted enough wine. So start drinking.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. WHITE’S WINESIntimidated by wine? Just start drinking -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 15A First Day of School From Page 1AStudents can prepare for doing well on the ACT and on other college entrance exams by taking advantage of the rigorous curricula offered at Wakulla High School such as Tallahassee Community College dual enrollment courses and Advanced Placement courses. TCC dual enrollment opportunities have increased this year for WHS students due to courses now offered at the Crawfordville TCC Center and more TCC courses offered on the WHS campus. Currently at WHS, students can take dual enrollment English and social studies classes without ever leaving the high school. In addition, distance learning equipment was purchased from the Gifted and Talented STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Scholars grant through the Panhandle Education Consortium. Wakulla High is using this equipment to offer dual enrollment STEM courses that do not have enough WHS students to offer a class there, but through distance learning, the WHS students can virtuallyŽ become part of the actual TCC class in Tallahassee while remaining on the WHS campus. Furthermore, Advanced Placement courses are high school classes taught at a challenging college level with an internationally recognized standardized test at the end of the course. Students earn high school credits and can also earn college credits through the AP program. Students will be better prepared to score higher on the ACT and on the SAT if they have chosen a challenging course of studies. Wakulla High School has increased information and awareness efforts, including Parent Nights several times a year. For more information on taking the ACT or the SAT, contact the Wakulla High School Guidance Department at 926-2221 or WHS Assistant Principal of Curriculum Sunny Chancy at 926-7125 (sunny.chancy@wcsb.us).Wakulla High grads exceed state in ACT scores PHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYOR

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comA close working relationship is a great experience. It encourages and allows for the accomplishment of deeds beyond the abilities of a single individual. Whether called teamwork, unit integrity or a symbiotic relationship, the accomplishments are compounded many times over when two or more are working together with a single purpose. Antiquity and current events are replete with examples of the teamwork which accomplished feats with long lasting effects. Who would have known of Roebuck without Sears, or Smith without Wesson, or even Adam without Eve? This concept carries far beyond the human involvement of recent recorded history. A good example of this model in Wakulla County is lichens. Lichens are composed of algae and fungi living together in a symbiotic fashion which is beneficial to both organisms. They are found in a wide variety of locations around the planet, including some exceptionally harsh environments. The fungi play an important role in the nutrient cycling and organic residue decomposition. They are responsible for the breakdown of dead organic materials so it may be converted into a useable form for utilization by another organism. The algae processes atmospheric carbon dioxide into organic carbon sugars to supply nutrients both organisms. By working together, albeit unconsciously, both are able to prosper in environments where they would individually fail. Lichens can be found in a variety of locations in Wakulla County. One of the most obvious, at least to homeowners and gardeners, is on shrubs and trees. In many cases the lichens are blamed for the decline of the plant or tree. The reality is the lichens are opportunistic and are completing the natural cycle. If the lichens were not on the job of consuming dead organic matter, something else would be aiding the decay of the material. Another common Wakulla County lichen is deer moss. The greygreen clusters have a cloud-like appearance and a resemblance to Spanish moss, but are located exclusively on the forest ” oor. Deer moss is very slow growing with large mats taking many years, even multiple decades, to develop. Floridas natural “ re cycle will kill this lichen. When large mats are encountered in the woods, it is an indication the area has not burned recently. Deer moss has a miniscule root structure and gets its moisture from the air, like all lichens. During periods of drought it will be crunchy and delicately fragile. The recent rains have delivered ample moisture and insured the clumps are soft and pliable. This rehydration process will take a short period and is common to all lichens. Even before recorded history, lichens have had multiple uses, depending on the culture and time period. Some populations in northern Eurasia and North America have utilized lichens as food, on a regular basis or as a means of survival during famine. Some of these same peoples have utilized lichens as a basis for textile dyes. In recent years synthetic dyes have replace most of these natural dyes. One of the most common contemporary uses for deer moss is as miniature trees and shrubs for model railroaders and architects. Contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce at 850-9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.ufl.edu/ to learn more about lichens in Wakulla County. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Lichens are algae and fungi working together Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLichens are composed of algae and fungi living together in a symbiotic fashion: The fungi breaks down dead organic materials while the algae converts atmospheric carbon dioxide into carbon sugars to feed both organisms. Tree lichen, above, and deer moss lichen, below left. Submit your Special Event and we will include it in The Wakulla news Week n WakullaContact: amayor@thewakullanews.net(850) 926-7102fax (850) 926-3815 Name __________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone ____________________ Email __________________________ Payment Enclosed Bill MeSign up online Promo Code: SCHOOL Clip, complete and mail to:Expires 8/31/13. In-County OnlyP.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Call 1-877-401-6408 or fax: 850-926-3815www.TheWakullaNews.netGet ready for the next school year with the BEST of local news, sports, events, coupons and more! For 10 Months$2013 *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and re“nances. Re“nances and used car purchases 2 006 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA.

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life Programs to help seniors with health care costs Savvy Senior, Page 4B WEEK IN WAKULLA Page 2B Explore charming Bruges, BelgiumTravel by Linda Carter, Page 10B By MICHELLE HUNTEROf the Senior CenterThe month of July brought a fun celebration for the Fourth of July and a winter celebration with Christmas in July. Christmas in July is our biggest fundraiser of the year, which supports the Meals on Wheels program and our congregate meals program which are served daily in the centers dining room. The Meals on Wheels program provides 800 meals per week for the homebound seniors of Wakulla County, and we serve approximately 400 to 450 congregate meals a week to those who visit here at the center. We would like to thank all of our sponsors who graciously gave to this event to make it a success; Air-Con of Wakulla, Bevis Funeral Home/Harvey-Young Chapel, Centennial Bank, Creative Bus Sales, ESG Wakulla, James Moore & Company, Jared Miller/Trinity Food Service, R.H. and Beverly Carter, Sheriff Charlie Creel, The Wakulla News, WCTV Channel 6, Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee, Wakulla Insurance Agency, and Wal-Mart. We would also like to thank the many volunteers who put in the long hours it takes to make this such a popular event for the community, and all the members of the community that come out and gave their support to this event. Diane Vauss played Christmas music on the piano while guests had the chance to visit with Santa and have their pictures taken with him by Jo Ann Palmer. The silent auction is the big hit of this event with 88 auction items to bid on, many went home happy with a great gift. One exception may be all those that bid on the autographed football signed by Nigel Bradham of the Buffalo Bills; formerly a player for Wakulla High and FSU; but only one person went home with it. All of the silent auction items are donated by many in the community, and the staff from the center. The dining room looked just like Christmas with a large Christmas tree as a back drop for Santa, beautifully decorated wreathes all around the room, the tables dressed in red and white linens with a very large mirror in the center, decorated with winter scenes of train sets, winter villages with snow, and toy soldiers. During lunch Virginia Moore and Becky Black from the fundraising committee raf” ed off prizes that were donated by many of our local businesses. Lunch was served by our Angels, the staff and many volunteers from the Sheriffs Department. Again, thank you everyone for your help and support that made this years Christmas in July a huge success. Happy Birthday USA brought out the stars and stripes with glitter, a few crowns with stars, and red and blue cupcakes. The band played a good selection of patriotic songs and the seniors joined in to sing and dance. We played a game of 50 state Bingo in which we called the states of the birthplace of many of the seniors … amazing how many states other than Florida were called. Turn to on Page 3B A few favorite sayings of mine: A child will get just as much fun from playing with an inch worm as he does a new red bicycle.Ž Time sometimes ” ies like a bird or crawls like a worm. Humans are most happy when they dont notice how father time passes at all.Ž The early bird catches the worm and the early worm always gets caught. Sometimes its good to sleep late!Ž Be nice to worms, value their life, dont trod over them, help them along their path if you can, because after all is said and done; they will pay us back one day. Worms: They were my “ rst pet until I went to school and had to take the little glass bottle home, give a stool specimen, “ ll out the paper and wrap the little rubber band around the paper af“ xing it to the jar and then turn it in to my teacher. This test had been the standard for many years to ward off intestinal protozoa. The protozoa was examined and when detected the mircoscopist could then determine parasite stages in the specimen or duodenal ” uids and treatment could be administered effectively. One of my uncles, when he was a boy in school, decided that he would get his sample for testing from the hog pen (piney woods rooters) behind the house. You can only imagine what the microscopist found during that examination. My uncle was caught and given strict warning to never do that again. Everyone has a fascination with these little creatures. As a child we use to sing about eating worms;Nobody likes me, everybody hates me, I think Ill go eat worms! Big fat juicy ones, Eensie weensy squeesy ones, See how they wiggle and squirm.ŽMany of us remember that little song about worms and I hope I caused you to sing the tune. While working in my backyard this week, I noticed an inch worm humping its back, jousting its body forward and dragging its hind-end forward to catch up (maybe the action occurs in reverse, its how you look at the inch worm) only to repeat the cycle once again. The inch worm is the larvae of a moth (I didnt know this little tidbit of information). I wrote the quote above regarding an inch worm amusing a child only to discover that a 60-year-old man has the same fascination with the inch worm as a 6-year-old child. I spotted him crawling on a plant I had picked up while seated atop of my John Deere tractor. I stopped the tractor, got off and let the inch worm travel up my hand, wrist and arm before letting his last arch take him to a live branch on a plant. Turn to Page 4BLets talk about worms! THE MAGIC OF AGINGBy T.W. MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center Director e secret to extending life may be found in a simple worm PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSeniors celebrate Happy Birthday USA on the Fourth of July.Seniors celebrated the Fourth of July, Christmas in JulySanta with Shelly Homan and Maurice Langston of the Senior Center at Christmas in July. DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Offer Expires Aug. 31, 2013850926-3212*10%OFFANY PURCHASEMAKING ROOM FOR CHRISTMAS STOCK*Must present original coupon from printed newspaper only. As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning, Probate • Real Estate Transactions and Title Insurance • Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. • Business Planning & IncorporationsCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245 IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! 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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Aug. 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Aug. 23 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Saturday, Aug. 24 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Aug. 25 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Aug. 26 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Aug. 27 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will hold its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.Wednesday, Aug. 28 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 4911684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsTuesday, Sept. 3  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, Sept. 9  PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, Sept. 11  CODE ENFORCEMENT meeting will be held in the commission chambers at 5:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. M onday, Oct. 7  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, Oct. 14  PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers.Weekly meetings Special EventsThursday, Aug. 22  SUSTAINABLE BIG BEND INC will be holding a planning meeting at the IFAS Extension Of ce at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be in preparation for a Green Living Expo to celebrate Earth Day on April 26 of next year. Contact Shelley Swenson (sswenson@u .edu) if you have questions.  ADULT LITERACY TUTOR TRAINING will begin its rst session at 6 p.m. at the Woodville Branch Library. The second session will be Aug. 24 from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. and the third session will be on Aug. 29 from 6 a.m. until 8 p.m. To register please call 850-606-2644 or email literacy@leoncounty .gov. Saturday, Aug 24  KRIS ANNE HALL, radio talk show host and Attorney, is scheduled to present a seminar on the U.S. Constitution and the Founding Fathers from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. Lunch will be provided. This is a free seminar for those who want to be better informed about the history of our Constitution and its authors. Ms. Hall is not only a constitutional attorney but she is also a disabled veteran, a radio talk show host, and a Pastor’s wife. She is magnetic, fun and knowledgeable and this event will be bene cial to anyone who is seeking to know more about the roots of American Liberty.  FREE CLOTHING GIVEAWAY will be sponsored by Grace Baptist Church. The event will take place from 8 a.m. until noon. Baby, toddler, children, teens, and adult clothes will be available. The event is at Grace Baptist Church located at 803 Crawfordville Highway, just north of 267 on the right. For more information call 926-3217, please leave a voice message and your call will be returned.Upcoming EventsSaturday, Aug. 31  ARBOR DAY FOUNDATION will give away 10 free white owering Dogwood trees if you become a member by Aug 31. New members of the Arbor Day Foundation also receive The Tree Book, which includes information about tree planting and care, and a subscription to Arbor Day, the Foundation’s bimonthly publication. To receive the free white owering dogwood trees, send a $10 membership contribution to Ten Free Dogwoods, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410 or join online at arborday.org/august.  CAUZICAN ANIMAL RESCUE will be holding an animal bene t called Woofstock: Peace, Love and Puppies. There will be live music, vendors, food, a raf e, an agility course and many adoptable animals looking for their forever families. The event will take place from 2 p.m. until 7 p.m. at Shiloh Farm located at 1500 Benjamin Chaires Road in Tallahassee.  CPR/AED course will be offered by Joey Tillman on Saturday at the TCC Wakulla Center from 8 a.m. until 10 a.m. Course is $20. Call Joey Tillman at 566-2634 with any questions. Sunday, Sept. 1  WILDERNESS FIRST AID Course will be offered by Joey Tillman on Sunday at Myron B. Hodge Park in Sopchoppy from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. Course is $125 which includes book, medical kit, and certi cation card. You must attend this course and the Saturday, Aug. 31 CPR/AED course in order to receive certi cation through the American Safety and Health Institute. Call Joey Tillman at 566-2634 with any questions. Saturday, Sept. 14  FLORIDA PUBLIC ARCHAEOLOGY NETWORK together with the University of West Florida, the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement and the Panhandle Archaeological Society at Tallahassee will host a Public Archaeology Day at the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement from noon until p.m. The Panhandle Pioneer Settlement is located in Sam Atkins Park in Blountstown, Fla. Have your personal artifact collections identi ed by archaeologist! This event is free and open to the public! For more information, contact Barbara Hines at bhines@uwf.edu or the Panhandle Pioneer Settlement at info@panhandlepioneer. org. Saturday, Sept. 21  2013 COASTAL CLEANUP will be hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at 9 a.m. The ve major sites will be St. Marks Refuge, Shell Point, Mashes Sands, St. Marks River Park and Bottoms Road in Panacea. Find out more information and sign up early by emailing tohelpkwcb@gmail.com.  WAKULLA HISTORICAL SOCIETY plans to hold its annual fundraiser yard sale and we are in need of articles to sell. We need housewares, decorating items, tools, yard items, books, videos, almost anything you have to donate. Please make sure the items are undamaged, clean, and complete. We are not going to sell clothing or shoes this year. If you have items, please contact either Helen at 933-6888 or Tanya at 5080881 and they will arrange to meet you at the old Crawfordville School lunchroom to accept the donations. Aug 22 –Aug 29 Now thats schools back in its time to tell you about some great things coming to WCPL in the coming weeks. First, Wilderness Coast Public Libraries, the library co-operative were a part of along with Franklin & Jefferson Counties, has purchased a Document Station for us which will be installed by midSeptember. This piece of equipment, which comes at no cost to our budget, will allow users, via a user friendly touch screen system, to scan directly to our public computers, make copies, change PDF documents into Word, as well as allowing us to provide a faxing service, along with other options. You will also be able to pay directly at the station. After of course an initial period of growing pains associated with any new piece of equipment, we think this will allow our patrons an easier time with managing their documents here. We thank Wilderness Coast for helping us provide new services to our patrons! Secondly, beginning in October, we are going to begin to phase in audio books into our Overdrive e-book library. You will be able to easily download audio books, to your computer, phone, or other compatible listening device. Youll be able to check out these audio books the same way as you to our e-books, via our website. Were excited to offer this new service and believe that it will become as popular as our e-book service has! Wed also like to remind everyone that the many great community organizations, which use the library during the fall through spring months, are ramping back up in September. We encourage everyone to come by and meet with great groups such as; the Wakulla County Historical Society, the Iris Garden Club, Native Plant Society, CCOW, Wakulla County Christian Coalition, and many more! These groups offer all a way to get involved in our great community as well as learning new things about Wakullas history, environment, and community issues. All meetings are free and open to the public and you can get meeting times by going to our website www.wakullalibrary. org and clicking on the events link, our Facebook page, or coming by or calling us at 926-7415 to be added to our weekly email newsletter. Friday Night Movie Our Friday Night Movie this week is a sci-fi blockbuster that came out earlier this year starring Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman. This thought provoking PG-13 “ lm (which our Public Showing License forbids me to name here) tells of how one of the few remaining drone repairmen assigned to Earth, its surface devastated after decades of war with the alien Scavs, discovers a crashed spacecraft with contents that bring into question everything he believed about the war, and may even put the fate of mankind in his hands. What it the truth and is the repairman actually who he thinks he is? Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for this 7 p.m. showing.By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News... GREEN LIVING EXPO MEETING Extension Of ce 6:30 p.m. WHS vs. MARIANNA War Eagle Stadium 6:30 p.m. FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE Wakulla Library 7 p.m. KRIS ANNE HALL SEMINAR Wakulla Library 9 a.m. 3 p.m.ThursdayFridayFridaySaturday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 3B Last month, seniors celebrated Fourth of July, Christmas in JulyFrom Page 1BLt. Bruce Ashley assisted in bringing the group Operation S.A.F.E. to the center to educate seniors about the many scams that target them. They covered such things as a reverse mortgage, “ nancial assistance with funeral expenses, telephone scams, and so much more. This is an ongoing issue that we try to keep up with to protect our seniors from becoming a victim. This was a very informative presentation and everyone took home a folder with items they can keep for future reference. Sara Thomas, the Gopher Tortoise Conservation Intern from Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, and two other interns, Kaylee Larkin and Sarah Power, presented a very educational program on the gopher tortoise that lives in our area. They described the look and shape of the hole that is the entrance to their home, how and why they are a protected species, and discussed all the different critters that inhabit and share the space with the tortoise; it is a very symbiotic relationship. Many of the seniors grew up with these in the area, and some still have them on or near their property. The seniors enjoyed seeing and touching all the artifacts, and the live gopher tortoise they brought along to observe and talk about. We have a drumming circle coming up on Thursday, Aug. 22, at 10:30 a.m. if anyone would like to join in. There will be drums provided or you can bring your own. It is a free program so come join in the fun. We will be starting a Walk With Ease program in September. It is a six week program, one hour per day, three days a week, to promote physical activity such a gentle exercise, warming up, walking and a cool down. If you are interested please call 9267145 ext. 223 and speak to Angel for details. The program is free to those over 60. Or you can stop by the center if you have any questions about this activity or any others on our calendar of events. You can also follow us on Facebook to see what is going on at the center … https://www. facebook.com/WakullaSeniorCenter. Alice Veasman visits with Santa at Christmas in July. Interns with the FWCs Gopher Tortoise Program presented information to seniors about the endangered species.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLt. Bruce Ashley, left, takes a moment away from serving Christmas in July dinner to pose with Santa. Above, Lt. Ashley talks to seniors as part of Operation S.A.F.E. to educate seniors about the many “ nancial scams that target them. A thank you to sponsors of Christmas in July posted at the entrance to the event, right. The Wakulla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com From Page 1B Observation: We really should spend more time with inch worms as I think it extends life as it reduces stress and is a very amusing sight. I liken it to staring at a camp“ re … its mesmerizing. For several years now we have celebrated in Sopchoppy the Worm Gruntin Festival. Sopchoppy is renowned for its title as the worm gruntin capital of the world. Having had the pleasure of being Master of Ceremonies at this past years event, I have thoroughly researched the earthworm, which is the common name for the largest members of the Oligochaeta in the phylum Annelida family. They are one of natures top soil scientist and a gardeners friend. There is a lot of scientific data regarding the earthworm and their positive effects on our environment but if you bring it all down to where we live in Wakulla County, they are a great “ sh bait too! So lets talk about worms (not intestinal worms, not inch worms and not earthworms) being the key to extending human life and how our environment affects our life span. If environment is important to extending our life span, and it is, then what changes in our environment can we make to lengthen life? In crawls the worm, the superman of aging and research that has been conducted in a small worm that researchers call Caenorhabditis elgans. The worm is no longer than a sesame seed, it is tubular, and is also called a roundworm. C. elegans are transparent, unsegmented, vermiform (wormshaped), and bilaterally symmetrical (mirror image halves) and basically does three things in its short lifespan of two weeks: it squirms, eats bacteria, and eliminates waste taken into its little worm body. Just because it is little doesnt mean it isnt one tough little elegan. Some of its kind survived the concussion of the in-air explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. Therefore, it survived the “ reball in the sky but at the same time it can also survive a deep freeze in a sort of hibernation, then thaw time. So while the C. elegan can survive a great deal of heat and deep freeze temperatures, what it cannot survive is time. As stated, its life span is a mere two weeks and our little worm dies. But dont sell C. elegan short, it has been a great collaborator with researches and has been the factor of three Nobel prizes being awarded to researchers who work with them. For those researchers who regard aging as a disease, the C. elegans makes a good case. If the little worms are made to live in a petri dish and are given enough food to live on, and subjected to no outside stress in the form of disease or trauma, C. elegans still live only two weeks and then die. That means that something internal to their makeup is killing them. Yet because the organism is pretty easy to work with, and because its genome (the genetic material of an organism) has been as thoroughly sequenced as possible, researchers have used C. elegans to see how to play around with genes in ways that extend its life. More interesting, the tiny worms genetic makeup is close enough to that of more complex organism, like humans, to shed light on aging in general. In the lab, mutations of the worm can be created by engineering bacteria to carry genetic materials that, once the bacteria are eaten, start changing the behavior of select genes in the worm. As with human, C. elegans have genes that control growth and aging by regulating hormones that influence growth and aging. When those genes are altered, the way organisms grow and age also changes. In a series of experiments led by Cynthia Kenyon at the University of California San Francisco, the teams turned off the expression of a gene in C. elegans known as daf-2. The gene encodes a hormone receptor that rests on the membrane of the worms cells. Normally the gene enables a hormone that speeds aging in older worms. Humans have the hormones insulin and insulin growth factor (IGF 2) to perform a similar job. When the gene was turned off in the worms, they lived twice as long. Lets not call that miraculous, which in a way it is, the state of the longer-living worms in their new old age was equally as impressive. When normal C. elegans worms reach the last day of their two weeks among us, they still eat but can no longer squirm. However, the changed worms were squirming all over the place in their third week and also seem able to resist disease, toxins, and stress (such as cold and heat) far better than normal worms. Did these scientist and researcher extend the life span by 50 percent? Yes. They developed kind of a super-C. elegans-wormŽ that lives much longer and has a vivacious quality of life. By the way, similar gene mutations in yeast, fruit ” ies, and mice that attempt to regulate the hormones that influence growth and aging have also extended the life and vigor of those creatures. Therefore the big question is will it work on humans? Well, Im glad you asked; its still being researched. There is unpublished research out there in California but its still in the research stage. In the meantime, Dr. Kenyon offers a prelude in the studies of human centenarians, who she notes also often have modified genetic pathways that distinguish how they regulate hormones, and who tend to be particularly good at warding off disease and dealing with environment stress. While we wait on the experiments to reveal whether we can reengineer the life span, the worms remain a particularly good way to reveal date on the fundaments of how we age. According to Dr. Kenyon, it is all about how well we deal with the insults that environments throw at us and how our bodies turn on themselves as we grow older. Our genes turn on and off the mechanism that age us, and between us there are enormous variations in how our genes are expressed. Moreover, the lack of one central process governing aging may mean that each organ system, perhaps each cell establishes its own local aging identity and that many of them in” uence longevity. After studying and researching for 25 years, scientists tell us that the superstar of solving the rapid aging process is found in C. elgans, the premier organism in which to do aging research. Who would have thunk it? Wouldnt it be hilarious if the magic of aging for human beings was found in the anatomy, the gene pool of a microscopic worm? T.W. Maurice Langston is executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center.Lets talk about worms: e secret to extending life may be in a simple wormBy RON POLLACKFamilies USA At the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiumsŽ? A: When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene“ ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security benefit each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi“ cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also reflect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same high-income bene“ ciaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can “ nd out if you qualify and apply online at www.socialsecurity. gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800-MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800-MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www.familiesusa.org/resources/ program-locator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, speci“ cally Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a “ xed income…and thats most people…this is encouraging news.Ron Pollack is executive director of Families USA.Understanding Medicare premiums Dear Savvy Senior, Are there any programs that you know of that help seniors with their Medicare expenses? Im 67 and live primarily on my Social Security, and am having a hard time paying my Medicare premiums, deductibles, copays and prescription drug costs. … Need Some Help Dear Need, There are several “ nancial assistance programs that can help Medicare bene“ ciaries who are having a tough time paying their out-of-pocket health care costs. Heres whats offered, along with the eligibility requirements and how to apply. MEDICARE SAVINGS Lets start with a program that helps lower-income Medicare bene“ ciaries pay premiums and out-of-pocket costs for Medicare Parts A and B. Its called the Medicare Savings Program (MSP), and it has several different bene“ t levels for people with different “ nancial resources. At its most generous the program will pay your Part B premium and pretty much all your Medicare deductibles and coinsurance. At its least generous the program will pay just your Part B premium. To qualify for a MSP, the minimum standard set by Medicare, is an income under 135 percent of the federal poverty level, which at the moment works out to around $1,313 a month for individuals. Everything counts towards income, including payouts from 401(k) plans, pensions, Social Security, and help from family members. Medicare also allows states to impose an asset test, which can be as little as $7,080 per individual, not counting your house or car but counting retirement savings and bank accounts. But some states have made their MSP programs a lot more generous, with much higher income limits and in some cases no asset tests at all. And the program may be called something else in your state. To “ nd out if you qualify or to apply, contact your local Medicaid of“ ce … call 800633-4227 for contact information. MEDICATION ASSISTANCE For help with your Medicare prescription drug plan costs, there is another completely separate program called Extra Help. To get it, youll need to apply through your local Social Security of“ ce. Depending on exactly how low your income is, the program will pay all or part of your Part D prescription drug plan premium and deductible, a hefty chunk of your copay, and totally eliminate the doughnut hole coverage gap. In 2013, individuals with an income below $1,436 a month, and assets under $13,300 can qualify for Extra Help. If youre eligible to be in a Medicare Savings Program, you will automatically qualify for Extra Help. But because the requirements are slightly different, even if you dont qualify for a Medicare Savings Program for Part B you might be able to get Extra Help for Part D. For more information or to apply, call Social Security at 800-772-1213 or visit socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp. GET HELP To help you “ nd out if youre eligible for these programs, use the National Council on Aging web-based tool at bene“ tscheckup.org. Youll need to fill out an online questionnaire that asks things like your date of birth, zip code, expenses, income, assets and a few other things. Once completed youll get a report detailing which programs you may qualify for, along with downloadable application forms and, in the case of Extra Help, allow you to complete your entire application online. The program even knows the specific MSP eligibility rules in your state. Or, if you dont have Internet access, contact your State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), who provides free one-on-one Medicare counseling in person or over the phone. To locate your local SHIP, call the eldercare locator at 800-677-1116. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy SeniorŽ book.Assistance programs that help seniors with health care costs THE SAVVY SENIOR By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 5B The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Abroad Acrobats Ahead Ancient Anyone Arent Burnt Canyon Chief Coldest Color CommaContributionDense Division Early Failed Foggy Gives Homes Hopes Human Hungry Joins Lined Manufacturing Missed Nicest Noisy Notes Obeyed Opposed Pearl Plans Posts Pound Reign Reported Shift YOUR AD HERE Slice Speed Split Spoon Stern Tapped Tomatoes Treat Trend Vetoed Wants The Wakulla News

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Todays New Ads Crawfordville2/1 with fireplace, deck, gas stove, AC/Heat $850 1st & last $60 monthly for water, Mysterious Waters (850) 926-7538 CRAWFORDVILLE 2BR/2BASWMH on acreage w/front porch CHA. $625/mo, $500/deposit. 3BR/2BADWMH on large fenced lot. $875/mo., $700/deposit. 850-926-2955 CrawfordvilleMOVING SALE Saturday Only 8am-? Chipper/shredder, sm trailer, chain link dog run, Gas Cultivator, lawn mower, edger, chain saw, tools, kitchen items,beds, tables, much more 6 Nine Gables Lane (off Wakulla-Arran) EQUIPMENT OPERATORWith light and or heavy equipment experience, CDLLic. perfered Apply in Person ESG Operations, Inc. 340 Trice Lane, Crawfordville, Fl PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $475/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SopchoppySerene Retreat on Sopchoppy River excellent condition 1 or 2 bedroom great room with cathedral ceiling screen porch $79k (850) 524-1026 for info. or appt. Lost Round Silver Pendant fingerprint on one side, engraved on back In memory pendant Ace High Stable Rd. End of July SMALL REWARD Very Very sentimental (850) 942-2020 Lost Female Boarder Collie Mix. Brown/white. Old dear friend has lymphoma. Lost behind Summer Wind, Wakulla State Forrest. $500 REWARD (850) 574-4354 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 EQUIPMENT OPERATORWith light and or heavy equipment experience, CDLLic. perfered Apply in Person ESG Operations, Inc. 340 Trice Lane, Crawfordville, Fl Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Metal Roof InstallersNeeded immediately Tallahassee & surrounding areas, paid health insurance and weekly pay, paid vacation, must have valid Fl drivers license, will consider non experienced, and will train call 850-575-1168 DRIVERS:Guaranteed Home EVERY Weekend! Company: All Miles PAID (Loaded or Empty)! Lease: To Own NO Money Down, NO Credit Check!. CALL: 888-880-5911 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 MEDICAL OFFICE TRAINEES NEEDED!Become a Medical Office Assistant! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training at SC gets you job ready! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! 1-888-374-7294 Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators.Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. VA Benefits Eligible. 1-866-362-6497 TURN KEY SPECIALTY Sandwich Shop fo r Sale owner retiring, well est. clientele, just walk in and take over! email: gfurdock@gmail.com Public Auction Online & Onsite September 17 @ 10am Preview: 09/16 10-4pm 7575 NW 70 Street, Miami, Fl 33166 Cigarette & Tobacco Manufacturing / Packaging Equipment, Forklifts, Unprinted Paper & Foil, Tools, Racking, Servers, Electronics & Accessories. 15% -18%BP Bankruptcy Vehicles: 2007 Nissan Altima 2.5 S & 2005 Dodge Grand Caravan SE 10% -13% BP(Case #13-12543 / Case #13-18780) Visit www.moecker auctions.com for Details, Photos and Catalog Moecker Auctions (800) 840-BIDS $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin CrawfordvilleMOVING SALE Saturday Only 8am-? Chipper/shredder, sm trailer, chain link dog run, Gas Cultivator, lawn mower, edger, chain saw, tools, kitchen items,beds, tables, much more 6 Nine Gables Lane (off Wakulla-Arran) OCHLOCKONEE BAY2231 Surf Road, Moving, Rain or Shine, Saturday 24th 8a-3p lots of stuff, bikes furniture, big screen TV DVDs Easier access off Shoreline Drive CRAWFORDVILLE 2BR/2BASWMH on acreage w/front porch CHA. $625/mo, $500/deposit. 3BR/2BADWMH on large fenced lot. $875/mo., $700/deposit. 850-926-2955 CRAWFORDVILLE Lake Ellen Drive3/2 Doublewide, cold cental a/c, fenced yard, dishwasher, new carpet, recent paint. $715 + deposit, app and references, available nowWakulla Gardens2/2 SWMH $575/mo + deposit.850-524-4090. PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $475/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner Financing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473 LandHomes Express.com PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualify.Call (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. Efficiency Apartment Utilities Included, furnished, $500 mthly + Sec. 850-926-9540 Crawfordville2/1 with fireplace, deck, gas stove, AC/Heat $850 1st & last $60 monthly for water, Mysterious Waters (850) 926-7538 CRAWFORDVILLE3BR/2BA, Access to Wakulla River. Large Lot $850. mo + water bill (850) 251-1937 MEDART2BR, 2BA, Very Nice, Fenced yard, Security Gate, central Heat/Air, ceiling fans, No pets or Non smoking firm $600/month + deposit. 850-545-0126 Ochlockonee Baytwo homes available 3BR/3BAhome on canal, screened porch, garage/workshop, boatlift -$1075/month or 2BR/2BAhome on Bay, carport and storage shed $1000/month. First/Last/Deposit. References required. Call Carol Odell, Century 21 Silver Coast Realty, 850-984-5007 FOR SALE:2 Bdrm. 1 Bath House On 2 Acres 2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing Available with Easy Terms. WAC Call 855-847-6807. SopchoppySerene Retreat on Sopchoppy River excellent condition 1 or 2 bedroom great room with cathedral ceiling screen porch $79k (850) 524-1026 for info. or appt. 5803-0829 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 13-SC-63 IN RE: LIBERATOR (BOAT) GRACE ELIZABETH DELONG 150 TRIPLETT ROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Plaintiff. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for establishment of ownership of personal property described as: 1 9 FOOT LIBERA TOR TUNNEL BOA T has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff, GRACE DELONG whose address is 150 TRIPLETT ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, on or before August 30, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on July 30, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/Becca Daugherty, Deputy Clerk August 8, 15, 22 & 29, 2013 5818-0829 TWN Vs. Hagan, Howard 12000482CAAXMX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 12000482CAAXMX OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC Plaintiff, vs. HOWARD HAGAN JR AND KIM HAGAN, et. al. Defendant(s), NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013, and entered in 12000482CAAXMX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC, is the Plaintiff and HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/AHOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/AHOWARD C. HAGAN, JR.; KIM HAGAN A/K/AKIM COX A/K/AKIM WYNETTE COX; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HOWARD HAGAN JR. A/K/AHOWARD C. HAGAN A/K/AHOWARD C. HAGAN, JR.; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KIM HAGAN A/K/AKIM COX A/K/AKIM WYNETTE COX; UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; UNKNOWN TENANT(S) are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on September 12, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: 5819-0829 TWN Vs. Thomas, Jennifer 13-5CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 13-5-CA RESI WHOLE LOAN VI LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JENNIFER THOMAS AND FRANKLIN D. THOMAS A/K/AFRANKLIN THOMAS, et.al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 10, 2013 and entered in 13-5-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein RESI WHOLE LOAN VI LLC, is the Plaintiff and JENNIFER THOMAS; FRANKLIN D. THOMAS A/K/AFRANKLIN THOMAS; THE GROVE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION OF WAKULLA, INC.; BAYVIEW LOAN SERVICING, LLC; UNKNOWN TENANT#1 N/K/ASHAWNIQUE THOMAS; UNKNOWN TENANT#2 N/K/A FRANKLIN R. THOMAS are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Lobby, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on September 12, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 51, THE GROVE PHASE II, ASUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 14, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10 day of June, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 August 22 & 29, 2013 12-08542 5824-0912 TWN Vs. Nelson, Terry Case No.13-109-CANotice of Action I N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 13-109-CA GIBBS REALTY CORPORATION, a Florida corporation, Plaintiff, vs. TERRY C. NELSON, CADC/RADC VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, CLAYTON C. OAKS, SR., CHARLES W. MATHENY, III, as successor trustee under the Charles W. Matheny, Jr. Trust Agreement, OAKS PROPERTIES, INC., a Florida dissolved corporation, THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF EVALINDA LOBDILL, JESSICA STAR DUNCAN, ALLANA MOON DUNCAN LUQUETTE, SAVANNAH SKY SHEALY n/k/a SAVANNAH SKY GARNER, and BENJAMIN EAGLE DUNCAN, Defendants. AMENDED NOTICE OF ACTION TO:THE KNOWN AND UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF EVALINDA LOBDILL YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to quiet title to the following real property in Wakulla County, Florida: Commence at the Northeast corner of Section 12, Township 6 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence South 89 degrees 11 minutes 10 seconds West 978.40 feet; thence South 17 degrees 57 minutes 40 seconds West 394.90 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Westerly right of U.S. Highway 98 said point also lying on a curve to the right with a radius of 3337.79 feet, said point also lying on the Northerly boundary line of property described in Official Record Book 527, Page 370 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida said point being the POINT OF BEGININNG; thence leaving said Northerly Boundary line and said POINT OF BEGININNG run along said Westerly right of way line and said curve Southeasterly along the arc, thru a central angle 04 degrees 58 minutes 56 seconds, for a distance of 290.24 feet, chord of said arc being South 07 degrees 02 minutes 22 seconds East 290.15 feet; thence leaving said Westerly right of way boundary line run South 79 degrees 35 minutes 39 seconds West 318.88 feet; thence South 03 degrees 59 minutes 17 seconds East 76.02 feet to an iron pipe marking the Northwest corner of property described in Official Record Book 572, Page 375 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northwest corner run South 03 degrees 59 minutes 17 seconds East 100.04 feet to an iron pipe marking the Southwest corner of said property as described in Official Record Book 572, Page 375; thence leaving said Southwest corner run South 05 degrees 17 minutes 58 seconds East along the Westerly right of way of a 10 wide easement as described in Official Record Book 208, Page 424, in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida for a distance of 62.29 feet to an iron pipe marking the intersection of said Westerly edge of easement with the Northerly right of way of Surf Road also known as County Road #372 said point lying on a curve to the right, said curve having a radius of 1106.28 feet; thence leaving said Westerly edge of easement run along said curve and said Northerly right of way thru a central angle of 02 degrees 39 minutes 26 seconds, for an arc distance of 51.30 feet, chord of said arc being North 87 degrees 32 minutes 41 seconds West 51.30 feet to a 4x4 concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of property described in Official Record Book 183, Page 646, in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence leaving said Northerly right of way boundary line run along the Westerly boundary line of said property described in Official Record book 183, Page 646, North 05 degrees 57 minutes 37 seconds West 298.31 feet to an old axle marking the Northeast corner of said property described in Book 183, Page 646; thence leaving said Northeast corner run North 02 degrees 55 minutes 40 seconds West 258.66 feet to a 4x4 concrete monument lying on the North Boundary line of property described in of ficial Record Book 527, Page 370 in the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; thence run along said Northerly boundary line North 85 degrees 48 minutes 59 seconds East 356.47 feet to the POINT OF BEGININNG, containing 2.92 acres more or less. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Jack E. Kiker, III, the Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 4128, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-4128, on or before September 20, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on the Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or Petition. Dated this 8 day of August, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk August 22 & 29 and September 5 & 12, 2013 3Br 2Ba House $850 mo.5Br 2Ba TWMH $950 mo. + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $925 mo. + Sec. Dep. RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSTORAGE RENTALSAVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net A-1PRESSURE CLEANING 850-926-3399 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK C & P T OWING AND RECOVERY 2 2 C C C & & P P OW OW W O W HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN S ERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• S tump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED PAINTING AND LAWN SERVICE850-570-1687 • 850-296-5854 R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. R OBERT E. G REEN L.L.C. 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED 22 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE ~ LICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 7B COMMENCE AT A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 43, THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 790.93 FEET TO A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF STATE ROAD NO. S-368, THENCE RUN NORTH 53 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY463.32 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE RIGHT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLYALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYAND SAID CURVE TO THE RIGHT WITH ARADIUS OF 1860.07 FEET, THROUGH ACENTRALANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 57 MINUTES 25 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 355.71 FEET, CORD OF SAID ARC BEING 58 DEGREES 43 MINUTES 02 SECONDS EAST 355.17 FEET TO A4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #2919) THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 265.90 FEET TO A5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 282.15 FEET TO A5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYING ON THE NORTHERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY OF APPALOOSAROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY329.38 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLYALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYAND ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH ARADIUS OF 50.22 FEET THRU ACENTRALANGLE OF 89 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 38 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 78.63 FEET, CORD OF SAID ARC BEING NORTH 27 DEGREES 44 MINUTES 37 SECONDS EAST 70.84 FEET TO A5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261) LYINGON THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF PALOMINO ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY232.19 FEET TO A 5/8 INCH RE-ROD (MARKED #4261), THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 35 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 379.35 FEET TO POINT OF BEGINNING. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10 day of June, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Submitted by: Robertson, Anschutz & Schneid, P.L. Attorneys for Plaintiff 6409 Congress Avenue, Suite 100, Boca Raton, FL33487 Telephone: 561-241-6901 Fax: 561-241-9181 AUGUST22 & 29, 2013 13-10770 5805-0822 TWN vs. Advanced Builders Case No. Dkt No. 12-133CANotice of Foreclosure Sale NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BY CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on August 29, 2013, at 11:00 a.m Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville, Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following Described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: SEE EXHIBIT AATTACHED HERETO. pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure Upon Count I in a case pending in said Court the style of which is CENTENNIALBANK, Plaintiff, v. ADVANCED BUILDERS & REMODELERS, INC., JIMMYBENNETT a/k/a JIM BENNETT, ROBERT C. CAMP, PREMIER BANK, THE GARDENS OF SARALAN PHASE I PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., CAPITALCITYBANK and THE FAIRWAYS AT WILDWOOD HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., BRYAN W. STRICKLAND and CHELSEAR. STRICKLAND, Defendants. and the docket number of which is 12-133CA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale. if any other than the property owner as of the date of the l is pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days af ter the sale. In accordance with the AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Stephen A. Pitre, Esq., Clark Partington Hart Larry Bond & Stackhouse, P.O. Box 13010, Pensacola, Florida 32591, Tel: (850) 434-9200, not later than seven days prior to the proceeding to ensure that reasonable accommodations ae available. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 29TH day of July, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND CLERK OF THE COURT WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA [SEALOF THE COURT] By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A LOTS 17 THRU 28 AND 61 THRU 72, BLOCK DŽ; LOTS 1 THRU 15 AND LOTS 39 THRU 52, BLOCK EŽ AND LOTS 1 THRU 15, BLOCK JŽ OF MAGNOLIAGARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. LESS AND EXCEPT THE FOLLOWING 2 PARCELS: APORTION OF LOT 14, BLOCK JŽ AND APORTION OF LOT 15, BLOCK JŽ, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN IRONPIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 16, BLOCK JŽ, OF MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF A50.00 FOOT RIGHT -OF-WAY, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160) MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID WESTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 100.01 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160),THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST 99.90 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND APORTION OF LOT 15, BLOCK JŽ, MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN IRON PIPE MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 16, BLOCK JŽ, OF MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT ALSO LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF A50.00 FOOT RIGHT -OF-WAY, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 35 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARY60.00 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160), THENCE LEAVING SAID SOUTHWESTERLYRIGHTOF-WAYBOUNDARYRUN SOUTH 73 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 99.88 FEET TO AN IRON ROD AND CAP(MARKED #7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 38 SECONDS EAST 60.00 FEET TO AN RON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 73 DEGREES 09 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST 99.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Published four (4) times in The Wakulla News August 15, 22,29 and September 5 2013 5807-0822 TWN V. Dario, Lorenzo Case No. 2011-CA-000160 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO.-2011-CA-00160 OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, LLC., Plaintiff, vs. DARIO A. LORENZO A/K/A DARIO LORENZO; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DARIO A. LORENZO A/K/A DARIO LORENZO; FRANCISCA R. LORENZO A/K/A FRANCISCA R. LORENZO A/K/A UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF FRANCISCA LORENZO A/K/A FRANCISCA LOREZO; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANY UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT (S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALL OTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Lot 13, Block 17, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 111, A SUBDIVISION, according to the plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. A/K/A 56 Winnegago St., Crawfordville, FL 32327 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, South front door, Gadsden County Courthouse, 10 EastJefferson Street, Quincy, Florida 32351 at 11:00 AM, on September 5th, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 1st day of August, 2013. 5808-0822 TWN vs. Jones, Marcia Case No. #65-2012-CA-000031 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000031 Division SUNTRUST MORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, vs. MARCIA D. JONES A/K/A MARCIA DENISE MITCHELL, JOHN D. JONES AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on July 18, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 20, BLOCK 3, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT TWO, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 78 SPOKAN TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse on September 5, 2013 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 1st day of August, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, B. X. Thurmond (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Edward B. Pritchard (813) 229-0900 x1346 Kass Shuler, P.A.P.O. Box 800,Tampa, FL 33601-0800 August 15 & 22, 2013 5809-0822 TWN vs. Gormley, Richard Case No. #65-2011-CA-000277 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2011-CA-000277 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. RICHARD GORMLEY, CHRISTINA GORMLEY, STANLEY ROBERTS, CASSANDRA ROBERTS, AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on July 18, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 2, BLOCK 42, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 5, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. and commonly known as: 1658 DR MARTIN LUTHER KING PKW Y CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse on September 5, 2013 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 1st day of August, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, B. X. Thurmond (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Alexander J. Marqua (813) 229-0900 x1346 Kass Shuler, P.A.P.O. Box 800,Tampa, FL 33601-0800 August 15 & 22, 2013 5812-0822 TWN Vs. Tromly, Laurence Case #2011-CA-000378 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000378 Federal National Mortgage Association (Fannie MaeŽ) Plaintiff, -vs.Laurence Albert Tromly, III a/k/a Laurence Tromly, III a/k/a Laurence Tromly and Mary Elizabeth Thomas a/k/a Mary elizabeth Tromly a/k/a Mary Thomas; Farmers & Merchants Bank; Bunting Neighborhood Property OwnersAssociation, Inc., d/b/a Bunting Neighborhood Homeowners Association, Inc. Songbird Subdivision Property Owners Association, Inc. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated July 18, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000378 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Federal National Mortgage Association, Plaintiff and Laurence Albert Tromly, III a/k/a Laurence Tromly III a/k/a Laurence Tromly and Mary Elizabeth Thomas a/k/a Mary Elizabeth Tromly a/k/a Mary Thomas are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED ATCHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on September 5, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 4, BLOCK B, SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 88-92 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 August 15 & 22, 2013 5813-0822 TWN vs. Jinks, Louis, Case No. 652010CA000290CAXXXX Re-Notice Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION, CASE NO.: 652010CA000290CAXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P. Plaintiff, LOUIS L. JINKS A/K/ALOUIS LESLEYJINKS, et al Defendants. RE NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE RE-NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale filed July 30, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652010CA000290CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACOUNTY, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P., is Plaintiff, and LOUIS L. JINKS A/K/ALOUIS LESLEYJINKS, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 05 day of September, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: TRACT 19, CRESTWOOD, ALSO KNOWN AS CRESTWOOD FIRST ADDITION, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 7, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Together with A1995 Grant 5815-0829 TWN vs. Bruno, Alicia Case No:65-2011-CA-000296 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 65-2011-CA-000296 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, ALICIABRUNO, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 18th day of July, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000296, of the Circuit Court of the 2ND Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is the Plaintiff and ALICIABRUNO and UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECTPROPERTYare defendants. The Clerk of this Court shall sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the FRONTDOOR of WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE, 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32326, 11:00 AM on the 12th day of SEPTEMBER, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 11, BLOCK 41, OF PANACEAMINERALSPRINGS, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 5 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Dated this 2nd day of August, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (COURTSEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Choice Legal Group, P.A., 1800 NW 49th Street, Suite 120 Fort Lauderdale, Florida, 33309 Telephone: (954) 453-0365 Facsimile: (954) 771-6052 Toll Free: 1-800-441-2438 DESIGNATED PRIMARYE-MAILFOR SERVICE PURSUANTTO FLA.R.JUD. ADMIN 2.516 eservice@clegalgroup.com August 22 & 29, 2013 5816-0829 TWN vs. Bradley, Joseph Case No. 65-2010-CA-000383 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000383 BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. : JOSEPH B. BRADLEY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated July 18, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000383 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPis the Plaintiff and JOSEPH B. BRADLEY; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JOSEPH B. BRADLEYN/K/AJESSICA BRATCHER; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the12 day of September, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOTS 44 & 45, BLOCK N OF MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 37 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A117 TED LOTT LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on August 2, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10108419 COUNTRY-FHA-R-sfilkins-Team 2-F10108419 eservice@wolfelawfl.com **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. August 22 & 29, 2013 F10108419 Double-Wide Mobile Home, VIN# GAGMTD0689Aand VIN# GAGMTD0689B. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: August 9, 2013 Phelan Hallinan, PLC,Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL33309 Tel: 954-462-7000, Fax: 954-462-7001 Service by email: FL.Service@PhelanHallinan.com By: /s/ Heather J. Koch Phelan Hallinan, PLC Heather J. Koch, Esq., Florida Bar No. 89107 Emilio R. Lenzi, Esq., Florida Bar No. 0668273 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration,301 S Monroe St, Rm 225,Tallahassee, FL32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August 15 & 22, 2013 5814-0905 TWN To: Brandon Bennett, Case No. 13-66-50, NOA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTYCOURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-66-50 IN RE: 1979 MUSTANG, VIN# 9FO4Y113722 NOTICE OF ACTION YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for establishment of ownership of personal property described as : 1979 Must ang V in # 9F04Y1 13722 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses if any, to it on Plaintiff, Donald Sexton, whose address is: 2771 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville, FL32327, or or before September 6, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on August 9, 2013. (COURTSEAL) BRENTX. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk August 15, 22, 29, & September 5, 2013 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk THIS INSTRUMENT PREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL 33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. August15 & 22, 2013 5806-0822 TWN vs. Nelda Chochette IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE No., 13-69-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF NELDAEVERSON CHOQUETTE a/k/a NELDAE. CHOQUETTE Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Nelda Everson Choquette, deceased, File 13-69 CP is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is August 15, 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS• 3143 Shadeville Hwy, near Wakulla Station – 3BD/2BA house, no smoking, no pets, $900 per month with $900 security deposit Available Sept 1st. • 14 Cutchins Court – 3BD/2BA Doublewide, no smoking, no pets, $700 per month with $700 Deposit, Available Sept. 15th. • 52 Deer Run – 1BD/1BA, cottage on Sopchoppy River, no pets, no smoking, $700 per month with $700 deposit. Available Sept 1st. • 27 Amy Lane – 3BD/2BA no smoking no pets. $1,000 per month with $1,000 deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!141 Shar-Mel-Re 3BR/2BA, 1 car garage, 1,121 sq. ft., Screenedin Back Porch, $850 mo. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550. mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $1,050 mo.

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 2013. Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq.,Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, (850) 926-8245 Personal Representative: Misty C. Brown 24 Aaron Strickland, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 August 15 & 22, 2013 5823-0829 RIV PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE -09/07/13 SALE DATE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statutes, Chapter 83, Part IV that Wakulla Realty will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, September 7, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. at 59 Shadeville Rd. of the contents of Mini-warehouse containing personal property of: Tamara Schiedon Henderson Newton Debbie Spivey Nick Harrison Jean Graham Tim McNicholas Charles Burgess Lisa Herron Before the sale date of September 7, 2013, the owner may redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and cost by mailing it to Post Office Box 464, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 or by paying in person at 2655 U.S. Highway 319, Crawfordville, Florida. August 22 & 29, 2013 5811-0822 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Seminole Self Storage LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDASTATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON AUGUST 30 2013 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINIWAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONALPROPERTYOF: CHRIS BELLE NANCYBEAM Before the sale date of AUGUST 30th, 2013 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. August 15 & 22, 2013 647-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 040 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #804 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-2S-01W-000-03979-00024-2S-1W P-13-M-65 1/2 ACRE IN NE 1/4 of SEC 24 DB 56 P 537 Name in which assessed SAMP GAVIN SR said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day of September,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida August 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 648-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 041 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #812 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-2S-01W-000-04008-00024-2S-1W P-41-M-65 S 1/2 of SE 1/4 OR 106 P 142,143 OR 141 P. 337 Name in which assessed WILLIE T JENKINS II AS PER REP OF WILLIE T JENKINS & ELOISE JENKINS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 649-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 042 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1204Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:33-2S-01E-189-04995-D07SPRINGWOOD SUBD. PHASE 1 LOT 7 BLOCK D OR 121 P 140 Name in which assessed JOE HILL GREGORY III & SUSAN RENEE PATTERSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 650-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 44 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #272 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:26-4S-02W-108-02183-142LAKE ELLEN PROPER BLOCK H LOTS 1 2 3 & 4 OR 57 P 793 Name in which assessed J C & FRANCES LONG said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this18day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 651-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 045 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1724Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-08811-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 19 LOTS 34 & 35 OR 23 P 699 652-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 046 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #986 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:05-3S-01W-131-04291-022BOYNTON ESTATES EAST 1/2 LOT 14 LOTS 15 & 16 OR 538 P 708 OR 546 P 691 Name in which assessed AMANDA ALLEN GLOVER & LAURA ALLEN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 653-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 048 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1784Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-09373-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 40 LOTS 6 & 7 OR 9 P 521 Name in which assessed WINDER VI LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 654-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 049 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #263 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:26-4S-02W-108-02183-019LAKE ELLEN PROPER BLOCK B LOTS 11, 12, 13, & 14 OR 254 P 151 OR 263 P 119 Name in which assessed HEIDI J PARMARTER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 655-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 050 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F 656-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 051 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2278Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10525-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 29 LOT 11 OR 50 P 277 OR 66 P 853 Name in which assessed OPAL J GUESS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 657-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 052 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2279Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10526-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 29 LOT 12 OR 50 P 277 OR 66 P 852 Name in which assessed M H GUESS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Name in which assessed MRS. MARLENE P CHEWNING said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this18day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkCler k of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property,and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #629 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:25-5S-02W-046-03480-000AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK N LOT 27 DB 56 P 335 Name in which assessed THAXTON C YANCY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1,8, 15 & 22, 2013 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 32 36 39 42 48 56 60 63 2 33 49 3 26 46 4 24 43 5 21 44 57 61 64 18 37 40 58 6 15 27 34 50 7 28 51 8 29 52 9 25 45 47 10 22 41 62 65 23 38 59 11 16 19 35 53 12 30 54 13 31 55 ACROSS 1. Doves' homes 6. Jellied dish 11. Dance like Hines 14. St. Theresa's town 15. Hard-to-nd character in a book 16. Ex of Frank and Artie 17. Ice cream avor 19. Hobbyist's purchase 20. Like some glances 21. Tried 22. Crayola color renamed Peach 24. Evil computer in "2001" 25. Ball game delayer 26. Part of a toy construction set 32. Engraver Albrecht 34. Oodles 35. Place for a ring 36. Athenian H's 37. Does not mention 38. Slick, like a garage oor 39. Rode the bench 40. Seeks fa vor with 41. Atahualpa's people 42. Popular Campbell's variety 46. Castle material? 47. "Yoo-hoo!" 48. Nametag word 50. Relaxing gym amenity 53. Has permission 56. NASA spacewalk 57. Roof over Congress 60. Give the gas 61. Kevin of "Dave" 62. Italian ice avor 63. Neolithic __ 64. Splinter groups 65. Sentence unitsDOWN1. Cleveland cagers, briey 2. Horse course 3. Itsy-bitsy 4. Y sporter 5. Seaside aroma 6. On vacation 7. Kemo __ 8. Said "Not guilty!," e.g. 9. Mount in Crete 10. C asual talk 11. Observe intently 12. Rent-a-car giant 13. Maze solution 18. Lounge around 23. Mae West's Diamond __ 24. Emerald and ruby 25. Army units: Abbr. 26. Slovakia's capital 27. Runyon or Wayans 28. Troy, as it's also known 29. "Au contraire!" 30. Mixer for rum 31. Florida islets 32. Family tree listing: Abbr. 33. Bryce Canyon locale 37. Had liabilities 38. Nothing but 41. In a perfect world 43. Iron man Ripken, Jr. 44. Bad-mouths 45. "It can't be!" 48. "__ goes!" 49. Happily-after link 50. __ and Span (cleanser) 51. "__ No Suns hine" (1971 hit) 52. Sport __ (rugged vehicles) 53. N.Y.C. cultural institution 54. Love, personied 55. Cravings 58. Oktoberfest order 59. Not-so-hot grade American Prole Hometown Content 8/18/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 4356 782 2 45 164789 576 3 62 7914 925 200 9 HometownContent 918 2463 7 5 423751968 756938421 287 469513 164523789 395187246 531 674892 672895134 849312657 C A V S D E S C H E R O V A L U T A H E V E T I N Y B R A T I S L A V E L I H U E S C A L S A L T A I R K N O C K L O L L O W E D A L A W A Y D A M O N S P I S A B E I L I O N A I N P L E D N O T S O U T E I D A R G T S O H N O C O N F A B I D E A L L L I L O N L Y D E T A K E N O T I C E M O M A V I S C O L A A M O P A T H K E Y S Y E N The Wak ulla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 – Page 9B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where is Ascension Island located? 2. MOVIES: What film featured a character called The Dude? 3. ANATOMY: What divides the outer ear from the middle ear in humans? 4. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What does an arctophile collect? 5. TELEVISION: What were the boys’ names on “Home Improvement”? 6. ANIMAL KINGDOM: How many teeth does a dog have? 7. HISTORY: What English statesman wrote the 19th-century novel “Vivian Gray”? 8. GAMES: What is the board-game version of the outdoor game known as “Capture the Flag”? 9. SCIENCE: Where would you most likely find a Bunsen burner? 10. LANGUAGE: What does the word “hieroglyphic” mean in the original Greek? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. South Atlantic Ocean 2. “The Big Lebowski” 3. The eardrum 4. Teddy bears 5. Mark, Randy and Brad Taylor 6. 42 7. Benjamin Disraeli 8. Stratego 9. Laboratory 10. Sacred carving Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 22, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comExploring charming Bruges, BelgiumBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsWhat if you could go back in time? Well, you can by simply stepping through one of Bruges original city gates. A compact Gothic city beckons; full of cobblestone streets and winding canals, old-world charm is waiting around every corner. Chartered in 1128, the city dates back to the time of Julius Caesar. Strategically located at the intersection of the north-south trade routes, Bruges achieved prominence quickly, along with Antwerp and Flanders. Trade guilds ” ourished here, and the city prospered. Originally connected to the sea by the Zwin Canal, by the 1500s the channel began silting in. In spite of numerous attempts to reestablish connections with the sea, eventually the canal failed. A decline in a population from 200,000 to 50,000 by 1900 resulted in an untouched historic city center. If chocolate is the “ rst thing that comes to your mind when you think of Belgium, you are not alone. Stroll past dozens of chocolate shops, widows overflowing with black gold. Chocolate in every conceivable form … rows of ducks, plates of shells, perfectly round bon-bons encased in chocolate and smothered by assorted toppings; sample until you discover your favorite. Wander along the winding avenues and placid canals. Stop for a few minutes and relax at one of the many cafs. Savor steaming hot chocolate and crispy waffles smothered in clouds of whipped cream, a city specialty. Serving cocoa since the 17th century, the drink has been perfected here. Learn more about Belgian chocolates history at the Chocolate Museum. Nearby, housed in one of Bruges best preserved buildings is the Freitmuseum, which is dedicated to the story of the potato. After your tour sample delicious Belgian fries with an assortment of sauces. Shoppers enjoy browsing among the numerous gift shops. Famous for Belgian lace, most of what you see displayed is now machine made. But you can still see lace made the original way at the Lace Museum. It is hand-woven, just as it has been since the 17th century. For the same entry fee, explore the Jerusalem Church, next door. Modeled after the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem, the dark interior seems macabre by todays standards. Marvel at well-preserved gothic bell towers, including the second largest brick bell tower in Europe. One, a 13th century landmark, now houses a municipal carillon comprising 48 bells. Listen as the many bells mark the passing of time, or if you are fortunate, stay for a concert at St Saviors Cathedral. Market Square is A UNESCO world heritage site; much of the medieval architecture is still intact, including the Belfry of Bruges, and the “ sh market. More picture-perfect buildings including Stadhuis Town Hall, and the Basilica of the Holy Blood surround the burg. These charming squares are a perfect stopping point. Horse hooves echo on the streets, boat motors hum as they slip quietly past, swans glide serenely on, and crowds of tourists amble by following their guides. Whether on foot, by boat, in a carriage, or by mini-bus, take the time to discover the simple pleasures of Bruges.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www.luxurycruising.com. PHOTOS BY LUXURY CRUISE & TRAVEL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Gothic city of Bruges, Belgium is on an old canal that silted in and no longer connects to the sea. Are you currently pregnant or a new mom? If so, join Dr. Tanya Evers for free milk and cookies to learn more and ask questions about breastfeeding.Florida Department of Health Wakulla County 48 Oak Street Crawfordville, FL 32327 Thursday, August 22frm 10 am to 11 amat the Wakulla County Health Department TMH.org LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt