Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00475

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Peppers P e p p e r s Peppers I n t h e g a r d e n n o w : In the garden now: By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe FDIC “ led a lawsuit in federal court in Tallahassee last week seeking more than $14 million in damages from “ ve former of“ cers of Wakulla Bank. The FDICs lawsuit was “ led against former Wakulla Bank President Walter Dodson, former executive Vice President Scott Gaby, former bank employee William Versiga, and two members of the banks Board of Directors, Gerald Bryant and Walter Roberts. Wakulla Bank closed on Oct. 1, 2010 and was taken into receivership by the FDIC. Centennial Bank later bought Wakulla Bank. According to the federal lawsuit, “ led Wednesday, July 31, the FDIC is not seeking to collect on outstanding loans made by Wakulla Bank, but seeks to collect damages that it claims were suffered as a result of defendants negligence, gross negligence, and breeches of their fiduciary duty.Ž The lawsuit paints a picture of bank management that was increasingly turning to higherrisk commercial real estate loans, but claims that bank of“ cers did not properly vet those seeking loans, or keep close tabs on development projects. Beginning in 2002, according to the lawsuit, Wakulla Bank pursued an aggressive growth strategy focused on high-risk (commercial real estate) loans.Ž The FDIC claims that the banks loan portfolio had become over-concentrated in commercial real estate. Defendants had a duty to engage in safe-and-sound lending practices,Ž the complaint states. Rather than act prudently, defendants took unreasonable “ nancial risks, violated internal policies and procedures when approving loan transactions, knowingly permitted poor underwriting in contradiction of internal policies and reasonable industry standards, and ignored repeated warnings about the risks associated with a high concentration in commercial real estate loans...Ž As a result of the commercial loans, adversely classi“ ed assets increased sharply from $1.6 million in 2006 to Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 32nd Issue Thursday, August 8, 2013 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 11A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 13A Weekly Roundup ...........................................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 2B EarthTalk ..........................................................................Page 3B Health & Fitness ...............................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B Comics .............................................................................Page 9B Travel .............................................................................Page 10B INDEX OBITUARIES DeLynn ‘Mrs. D’ Marie Bastian Thomas O. Carlton Ernest Wayne Cox Glenn Garfield Pope Jr. Leonard J. ‘Lenny’ Widmann See Shelley Swenson, Page 1B newsThe WakullaFDIC sues Wakulla Bank officersBoard rejects call for wetlands referendum Lawsuit seeks damages of $14 million for alleged negligence by ve o cers for pursuing high-risk loans PHOTO BY AMANDA MAYOR By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Wakulla County citizens crammed like sardines into the commission chambers before the Monday, Aug. 5 board meeting … most of them hoping that the board would vote to place a referendum on the 2014 ballot to incorporate the current wetlands ordinance into the county charter. The topic of wetlands has been a major point of contention throughout the county for quite some time now, dividing Wakulla citizens and sparking a heated debate. On one hand, some residents see the ordinance as a redundant set of rules that infringes on a property owners rights … while, on the other side, many feel that the county had set a high environmental bar with its adoption of wetlands regulations that extend past the protection of state regulations enforced by the Department of Environmental Protection.Turn to Page 2ACitizens group indicates they will pursue petition to put issue on ballot for 2014 election B y A M A N D A M A Y O R By AMANDA MAYOR a a m a y o r @ t h e w a k u l l a n e w s n e t mayor@thewakullanews.net W W h e n y o u l i s t e n t o hen you listen to J o d i P e r e z  s s t o r y Jodi Perezs story o f h o w s h e c a m e of how she came t o b e t h e n e w to be the new c h e f a t t h e W a k u l l a S p r i n g s chef at the Wakulla Springs l o d g e i t  s a l m o s t l i k e y o u c a n lodge, its almost like you can s e e a p u z z l e p u t t i n g i t s e l f t o see a puzzle putting itself tog e t h e r i n h e r l i f e gether in her life. M a n y p e o p l e h a v e f o n d Many people have fond m e m o r i e s o f E d w a r d B a l l S t a t e memories of Edward Ball State P a r k … s w i m m i n g i n i t s s p r i n g s Park … swimming in its springs, e a t i n g a t i t s r e s t a u r a n t a n d s t a y eating at its restaurant and stayi n g i n i t s l o d g e … a n d P e r e z i s ing in its lodge … and Perez is n o e x c e p t i o n no exception. S h e w a s b o r n i n A t l a n t a b u t She was born in Atlanta but e n d e d u p m o v i n g t o W a k u l l a ended up moving to Wakulla w i t h h e r f a m i l y w h e r e t h e y with her family where they l i v e d u n t i l s h e w a s a b o u t 1 4 lived until she was about 14 y e a r s o l d  T h i s p l a c e i s a h u g e years-old. This place is a huge p a r t o f m y f a m i l y  s h i s t o r y Ž s h e part of my familys history,Ž she s a y s e x p l a i n i n g t h a t f o n d m e m says, explaining that fond memo r i e s a b o u n d o f b i r t h d a y p a r ories abound of birthday part i e s a n n i v e r s a r i e s a n d r e u n i o n s ties, anniversaries and reunions w i t h h e r g r a n d p a r e n t s t h a t w e r e with her grandparents that were o f t e n h e l d a t t h e l o d g e  I l o v e often held at the lodge. I love i t h e r e s o m u c h Ž it here so much.Ž P e r e z c r e d i t s h e r l e a r n i n g a n d Perez credits her learning and d e v e l o p i n g a l o v e f o r c o o k i n g developing a love for cooking t o b o t h o f h e r g r a n d m o t h e r s to both of her grandmothers w h o s h e s a y s w e r e e x c e l l e n t who, she says, were excellent c o o k s  M y m o m n o t s o m u c h Ž cooks. My mom, not so much,Ž s h e l a u g h s  b u t s h e w a s g o o d she laughs, but she was good a t m a k i n g r e s e r v a t i o n s a n d at making reservations and t h r o u g h t h a t I g o t t o e x p e r i e n c e through that I got to experience a l o t o f f a b u l o u s r e s t a u r a n t s s o a lot of fabulous restaurants, so s h e i n ” u e n c e d m e t h a t w a y Ž she in” uenced me that way.Ž A s a c h i l d s h e s a y s s h e As a child, she says, she w o u l d s p e n d h e r S a t u r d a y would spend her Saturday m o r n i n g s c o o k i n g b r e a k f a s t f o r mornings cooking breakfast for h e r f a m i l y b e c a u s e  t h a t w a s her family because that was f u n f o r m e Ž fun for me.Ž A l i t t l e l a t e r i n l i f e w h i l e a t A little later in life, while att e n d i n g M e r c e r U n i v e r s i t y a n d tending Mercer University and p u r s u i n g a d e g r e e i n p o l i t i c a l pursuing a degree in political s c i e n c e ( s i g h t s s e t o n a t t e n d science (sights set on attendi n g l a w s c h o o l ) P e r e z s a y s s h e ing law school), Perez says she l a n d e d a  ” u k e o f a j o b Ž o n e landed a ” uke of a jobŽ one s u m m e r a t a c o u n t r y c l u b i n summer at a country club in A t l a n t a Atlanta. Turn to Page 5AMeet Chef Jodi Perez Commissioner Howard Kessler sought a referendum on the wetlands ordinance. COUNTY COMMISSION FILE PHOTOThe notice on the door when FDIC closed Wakulla Bank on Oct. 1, 2010. Turn to Page 3ANew chef at Wakulla Springs G a t o r C o u n t r y Gator Country G a t o r C o u n t r y Gator Country Reader Val LaHart of Ochlockonee Bay sent us this photo of a gator with a note that said: Ya think weve had enough rain? This 8-foot alligator hung out in Ochlockonee Bay for a day. Our bay is normally way too salty for these guys. In 20-plus years on the bay, we have never seen one of this size.ŽThe rumor is CORRECT! The Green Living Expo will be held again.

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Page 1AThose supporting the continuation of the wetlands ordinance say wetlands are the countys golden goose,Ž referring to the vital role they play in keeping a thriving ecotourism scene, good water quality and healthy “ sheries. The group sees the vote made by the board last month to begin the process of repealing the wetlands ordinance, which contains a key 75 foot notouch buffer zone, as a detrimental move for the countys survival. While all of the commissioners have publicly acknowledged the importance of the wetlands, four of the “ ve have previously voted twice in a row to diminish and deplete the ordinance in the name of freedom, citing property rights as the reason. Commissioner Howard Kessler, though, has clearly sided with those concerned about the environment and the inability of the states regulations to adequately protect the countys wetlands. Kessler, who cast the two previous lone votes against altering the wetlands ordinance … first when it was brought up by Chairman Randy Merritt, who wanted to establish a variance procedure to allow property owners inside the buffer zone, and then most recently by Commissioner Richard Harden who moved to completely do away with the ordinance last month. Kessler said that, as a “ nal attempt before citizens would have to take matters into their own hands to go out and collect signatures for a petition to put the matter before voters in 2014, he asked the board to support a referendum. Let the citizens vote, I trust their wisdom,Ž he said. I hope you will too.Ž Kesslers item called for a referendum for voters to choose whether to put the wetlands ordinance in the countys charter. Commissioners voted down the referendum idea by a 4-1 vote, with only Kessler voting for it. To pursue the citizen initiative to put the wetlands ordinance before voters, supporters must get signatures from 30 percent of registered voters … including 30 percent in each of the five commission districts. After the presentation of the item, Commissioner Ralph Thomas was the “ rst to speak, saying that he was against placing the ordinance in the charter. Our charter is a document that outlines the structure of the government,Ž he said. I realize there is not a restriction for doing this, but I think it convolutes our charter and its very much like making revisions to our constitution … state or federal. This is just not the appropriate place for it.Ž With that, the 23 citizens who had turned in speaker cards were given the chance to speak. Of those 23, about five or six were against Kesslers item … a fact that prompted David Damon to get up and say, Nine-tenths of the people are for making the referendum, but youre not listening. I dont understand that.Ž James Hennessey also seemed confused as to why the board was opposed to the thought of a referendum. I dont know why you wouldnt want to know what the citizens truly feel about this issue,Ž he said. He also shared research hed done, which showed the con” icts that DEP attorneys had with the agency administrators who did not seem to want to enforce wetlands ordinances around the state. Hennessey said there had been a 15 percent drop in enforcement in the past three years and the “ ring of one attorney who pointed out the lack thereof. Thats hardly reassuring,Ž he said of the idea of the state being in the position to regulate wetlands in Wakulla. Leon County Soil and Conservation Supervisor and Deputy Vice President of the Association of Florida Conservation Districts Martha Lang spoke for the countys wetland conservation. Im here to urge you to keep your wetlands buffer in place,Ž she said. It sends a fantastic message that the wetlands are a priority and you must allow the citizens to vote on this issue for the sake of democracy.Ž Of the small handful who were present to speak of their stance against putting the ordinance on the 2014 ballot, Tim Jordan maintained the idea that the state is more prepared to defendŽ any potential lawsuit challenging the wetlands regulations, while Bob Danzey insisted that there was a misconception among the citizens about what doing away with the ordinance would mean. The biggest misconception is that were going to do anything with the wetlands,Ž said Danzey. Were talking about a buffer. Nobodys digging into the wetlands. This is about the 75 feet of good dirt around the wetlands and someone being able to use their property.Ž Joining in the opposition was Susan Jones who said that she felt that state and federal regulations do enough already. Commissioner Thomas made it clear that he did not support the idea that the state government would not do an adequate job of protecting the environment. He also expressed frustration at the fact that some seemed to imply that he and other commissioners do not care about the countys wetlands. Id be willing to bet theres not a single person up here who wants to harm the wetlands,Ž Thomas said. Commissioner Jerry Moore seemed to support doing away with the ordinance in order to protect the county from future lawsuits. He explained that the county had just lost $600,000 in settlement fees because of wetlands lawsuits. Anyone who wants to build on their land will sue us and they will win every time,Ž he said. Im not going to subject the citizen taxpayers to the lawsuits that they are absolutely going to lose.Ž Commissioner Richard Harden reiterated what he had said at the boards meeting last month. This is a land use issue for me,Ž he said. What is endangered here is property rights.Ž This is not about duplication of efforts because the state doesnt have the 75 foot buffer,Ž Kessler said. So thats like comparing apples to oranges. If this board moves ahead with this, we are exposing our county to harm.ŽBoard rejects call for wetlands referendum David Damon speaks in support of a referendum. John Trice: the state cant handle enforcement. Ron Piasecki asked for local control of wetlands. TIm Jordan was for repeal of the ordinance. Sandy Tedder was opposed to ordinance repeal.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENCommissioner Ralph Thomas explains his reasoning for repeal of the wetlands ordinance. Commissioner Jerry Moore was against a referendum. HAPPY, HAPPY BIRTHDAY to the Best husband, dad, father in law and Pa EVER!Your FamilyTROY COLLINS, Aug. 8th 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning, Probate • Real Estate Transactions and Title Insurance • Francis Casey Lowe, P.A. • Business Planning & IncorporationsCrawfordville3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Ste. 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850-926-8245

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nearly $12 million in 2007 and more than $75 million by the end of 2009, according to the lawsuit. Regulators reportedly warned Wakulla Banks officers about imprudent lending practices,Ž the lawsuit claims. In July 2005, for example, officers were advised that analyses of borrowers “ nancial condition and payment history was lacking. Three years later, in March 2008, defendants still had not corrected the deficiencies.Ž In 2005 and again in 2009, regulators also criticized the quality of appraisal reviews, including the failure to review existing appraisals prior to loan reviews.NINE CASES OF NEGLIGENT LOANS The lawsuit cites nine cases in which loans were negligently issued or negligently administered by the banks of“ cers. The cases include the well-publicized fiasco of the Wildwood Golf Course, in which Wakulla Bank had loaned some $6 million that was secured by the golf course, restaurant and hotel. The purchase of the golf course in 2003 was by a high-pro“ le group that included businessman Joe Barry and thenSheriff David Harvey. The lawsuit does not name borrowers, but refers to their initials, and notes JBŽ as one of the principal partners in the golf course deal. A Wakulla Bank employee analyzed the initial $1.6 million loan in 2003 to buy Wildwood and called it a weak loanŽ for the bank, citing unfavorable trends in sales and pro“ ts, inadequate cash ” ow and unrealistic company projections. The bank went ahead with loan. In 2004, the bank added another $3.2 million and $473,000 in loans; and in 2005, another $800,00 and $259,000 in loans were added; and then the notes consolidated into one loan in 2006. The Wildwood partners defaulted in 2008. The FDIC is seeking $2.39 million in damages on that transaction. Other transactions included One New Orleans Place LLC, a 2005 loan of $4.23 million for of“ ce and condominums that was charged an interestonly loan. It defeated in August 2008. There were problems as early as March 2006, the lawsuit claims, with construction delays due to structural engineering and architectural issues. In 2007, the borrower sold commercial floor units for $90,000 less than originally anticipated, and by April 2008, none of the condo units had sold. Yet the bank of“ cers released two of the four loan guarantors in 2007, the lawsuit claims, and in September 2009, the remaining guarantors told Dodson, Gaby and Versiga that they were over-leveraged and couldnt pay. FDIC is seeking damages of $1.9 million in that case. FDIC is asking for $2.36 million in damages for a transaction to Booth Higgins Booth Trust LLC from 2005 for a commercial real estate loan. The lawsuit claims that by the time the bank did a proper appraisal of the property that secured the loan in 2007, the value of the property had decreased to $720,000. The borrowers defaulted in 2008. The lawsuit was “ led by attorney Kenneth Hart of the Tallahassee law “ rm of Ausley McMullen. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. From Page 1AFDIC sues Wakulla Bank o cers NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONTINUE IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS IN THE BROOK FOREST SUBDIVISION MUNICIPAL SERVICES BENEFIT UNIT AUGUST 8, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONTINUE IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS IN THE NORTHWOOD SUBDIVISION MUNICIPAL SERVICES BENEFIT UNIT AUGUST 8, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO CONTINUE IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS IN THE TUPELO RIDGE SUBDIVISION MUNICIPAL SERVICES BENEFIT UNIT AUGUST 8, 2013 Sealed bids for RFP 2013-23 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL DESTINATION MANAGEMENT SYSTEM will be received until 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August 14, 2013. AUGUST 1, 8, 2013

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $19/6 mo. Out of County $44/yr. $27/6 mo. Out of State $47/yr. $28.50/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Don’t build a new trap, build a better mouse • Update: Missing teen is found • Rick Ott and Nelle Mccall: They do it all From the Heart • The future of St. Marks • Respite care offers a break to Alzheimer’s caregivers • District grade falls to B for local schools • Task force moves housing project forward • Crawfordville man busted in meth labthewakullanews.com Follow us on Some more views on the wetlands ordinance:Portrayal of wetlands committee unfairCommon sense needed in wetlands debate Roberts column brought back memories Repeal will forever change Wakulla e play Nuevo Mundo was wonderful School names were confused in article€ A headline on the Heavens to Betsy column by Betsy Goehrig last week gave the wrong name for Dr. Melanie Barton, an author who held a booksigning in Crawfordville. The name was correct in the story and photo caption. € Because of a typographical error, Sally Gandy was misidenti“ ed in one of the photos of the senior centers Christmas in July celebration. We regret the errors.CorrectionsEditor, The News: In response to County Commissioner Richard Hardens explanation of his support for repeal of the wetlands ordinance (Harden explains reasoning for vote,Ž July 18 issue): Commissioner Harden has belied the members of Wakulla Countys former Citizen Wetlands Advisory Committee established by the Wakulla County Commission. He states that the Wetlands Ordinance was not written according to environmental science and best management practicesƒŽ and was originated by a very small group of citizens within a local environmental activist organization and written according to the personal preference of the same very small group of citizens.Ž Harden is, as is any citizen, de“ nitely entitled to his personal opinions about the desirability and accuracy of the science behind the wetlands ordinance. However, to make accusations about the quali“ cations and intent of the Committee members is beyond the pale. He implies that the committee was made up of a small cohesive, nontechnical, clique of citizens who forced their will on an inept Wakulla Commission. Nothing could be further from the truth. Each member of the former Wetlands Committee was appointed by a sitting Wakulla County Commissioner. I was appointed Chair of the Committee by Commissioner Howard Kessler. Instead of enumerating in detail my employment history; it should suf“ ce to note that I have extensive wetlands technical experience at both university, state, and federal level, including serving as Chief of Water and Land Quality at U.S. Environmental Protection Agencys National Environmental Research Laboratory in Las Vegas and senior positions at EPAs headquarters. I have also been recognized and testified as a wetlands technical expert in both federal and Florida state court proceedings. Katherine Gilbert was appointed by Commissioner Lynn Artz and was a senior biologist with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection and is one of the coauthor of DEPs well-known Florida Wetlands Plants: An Identi“ cation Manual.Ž Terry Kramer was appointed by Commissioner Alan Brock and is a lawyer with considerable environmental experience. Leslie Hope was appointed by Commissioner Mike Stewart and is an engineer with experience in environmental matters and has done contract work for the County. Hugh Taylor was appointed by Commissioner George Green and is an informed citizen with an intense love for Wakulla Countys history and environment. All members of the committee but one had technical or professional backgrounds in wetlands science and the members came from diverse ideological backgrounds. We were de“ nitely not a monolithic group. The former Wakulla Citizen Wetlands Advisory Committee was established in 2009 by county resolution and had its “ rst meeting Aug. 5, 2009 and went out of existence when the Wakulla Commission adopted the present Wetlands Ordinance on Aug. 16, 2010 by a 5-0 vote. During the time that it met, as required, as least twice a month and all meetings were well attended by Wakulla citizens and public comments were encouraged and considered. None of the committee members were reimbursed in any way for the considerable personal time and expenses they gave up for what they thought were the public good. Up to this time I have heard no complaints about the conduct and openness of the committee proceedings from both those that agreed or disagreed with the committees recommendations. Commissioner Harden owes the former Committee members an apology. Victor W. Lambou Crawfordville Editor, The News: I havent had a strong position on the wetlands ordinance until now but I have always wondered why so many county decisions are made without applying common sense. The people I speak with in the county seem to desire a common sense approach but small groups of people with personal wants get all the attention and the results … i.e., the community center, airport. I made my decision by applying common sense to the opinions expressed by Jack Rudloe and commissioner Ralph Thomas in The Wakulla News. I agree with Mr. Rudloe about the causes of sealife destruction, Ive seen it in South Florida. What I dont agree with is duplicate laws concerning the protection of our wetlands. We all want to preserve our area but if push comes to shove and we end up in a spitting contest with the state or feds, well lose. On a side note, I found it amusing that Mr. Rudloe wants to preserve its seafood industryŽ in column 1 but in column 3 states Wakulla seafood is a joke.Ž Commissioner Thomas has obviously approached the subject with common sense for the good of us, the TAXPAYERS! He concluded that our current ordinance is a duplication of state and federal laws, it has no exclusive purpose. The most important point Mr. Thomas makes applies directly to us, the TAXPAYERS! If there is challenge or lawsuit against our ordinance WE could be stuck with paying out hundreds of thousands of dollars again. Didnt we just go through this not long ago because of screw-ups in the way county rules were mishandled by those in charge? If the U.S. Supreme Court has already ruled against one Florida Water Management District do we really want to expose us, the TAXPAYERS of Wakulla County, to the cost of “ ghting a losing battle and then being liable for a huge penalty? Common Sense simply says we dont need the liability of another law that covers what the state and feds have already covered. Thank you, Mr. Thomas, for doing the research and pointing out that our wetlands are already protected and more importantly for trying to protect our counties “ nancial resources. I hope that you and the other commissioners will consider common sense in all your future decisions. F.J. Young Crawfordville Editor, The News: I read your story in the Aug. 1 edition of The Wakulla News entitled, District grade falls to B for local schools.Ž I thought the article was well-written; however, there was an error contained in the third to the last paragraph of the article. The article states that Riversink moved from a B to an A, joining the middle schools. This is incorrect. Riversink is the name of the elementary school; that school was an A last year as well as this year. RiverSPRINGS is the name of the middle school that was a B last year and moved to an A school this year, and was also THE ONLY school in Wakulla County (pending the high schools outcome) to increase the school grade point total; every other schools grade point total dropped, even those that maintained their A grade. As a member of the Riversprings faculty, I am very much aware of the vast amount of hard work and dedication that the entire faculty, staff, and student population at RMS put in last year to get that grade back up to an A. I am immensely proud of the efforts of my colleagues and students. Our pride was hurt last year when were were the only school in the district to make a B (by two points). We are overjoyed this year that our labors paid off. However, because of the error in your article, we are robbed of some of our public recognition. I am sure that many of our parents read The Wakulla News; I know our students look for news about RMS every week in the paper. It would be nice if they were able to see in print that their hard work was so successful. Thank you for your time. Sincerely, Jennifer Thaxton NBCT Alumna / Librarian Riversprings Middle SchoolEditors Note: My apologies to Jennifer Thaxton and Riversprings Middle School on the confusion. Its right there in my notes: Riversprings came up from B to A,Ž and yet, in the fog of deadline, I wrote Riversink. Congratulations to Riversprings!Editor, The News: Herb Donaldson has done it again! He provided an opportunity for community to enjoy some “ ne performance art and a unique view into our history by coordinating with the Theater With A Mission in a presentation of Nuevo Mundo (New World).Ž The play that took place at the Old Courthouse was wonderful. I wasnt sure what the evening would hold when I sat down but was soon pulled right into the era of Christopher Columbus with music, emotion and interaction. Im so glad I made the decision to attend. I encourage everyone to watch for these events and take advantage of the great work Herb and the Palaver Tree Theater do! Lynette Coleman Crawfordville Editor, The News: I “ nd it so disturbing that a group of four short sighted commissioners can forever change the landscape of Wakulla County. Those four votes will impact 30,000-plus residents, and destroy so many pretty waterways. Their vote will create more ” ooding and lower property values. They will harm recreational sports, including hunting, scalloping and “ shing. The already struggling commercial fishermen will also be impacted. Over the years, Shell Point Beach has been regularly closed due to septic tanks contaminating the water because of the short sited way Shell Point was developed. Havent they learned by now from the building mistakes that were made in the past? The boards decision to reduce our wetland protection will also further compromise the quality of our drinking water. Over the years, there have been enough parcels of land grandfathered in under old ordinances that can build close to the water. Moving forward we need to be smarter about our wetlands, their filling, and our impact upon them. No one is suggesting that we should undue what has been done, but it is time to recognize their importance and protect them and make wiser decisions going forward. Why not be smarter going forward? By rolling back wetland protections, it is simply a developer give away at the expense to the rest of the tax payers. Watch our commissioners. See what they are doing to your property values and how they could be impacting your quality of life. Sue Damon Shell Point Editor, The News: While visiting friends in Crawfordville last week, I read John Roberts article (Record-setting catch in St. Marks in 1954,Ž July 18 edition.) This brought back a rush of childhood memories for me. You see, my daddy, local tugboat captain Ira Cowart, took me down to the docks to see the big “ sh that day or maybe the next. I was 6 years old and I remember him telling me it was a Jew “ sh,Ž a species I had never heard of before, and that they had to shoot it to land it. Daddy has been gone now almost 25 years, but he is so often in my thoughts. Thanks for the memories! Janet S. Howard Jacksonville

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From Page 1A O r i g i n a l l y h e r g i g i n Originally, her gig inv o l v e d w o r k i n g w i t h t h e volved working with the m e m b e r s h i p o f f i c e b u t membership office, but a f t e r t h e f o o d a n d b e v e r after the food and bevera g e d i r e c t o r a t t h e c l u b age director at the club s u d d e n l y q u i t s h e q u i c k l y suddenly quit she quickly f o u n d h e r s e l f h e l p i n g found herself helping w i t h t h a t a s p e c t o f i t  I with that aspect of it. I j u s t l o v e d i t Ž s h e s a i d  I just loved it,Ž she said. I d e c i d e d t h e n t h a t I w a n t decided then that I wante d t o p u r s u e a c u l i n a r y ed to pursue a culinary e d u c a t i o n a n d f r o m t h e r e education and from there i t j u s t s o r t o f t o o k o f f Ž it just sort of took off,Ž s h e s a y s  I  v e b e e n i n t h e she says. Ive been in the i n d u s t r y e v e r s i n c e Ž industry ever since.Ž T h a t w a s a b o u t t w e n t y That was about twenty y e a r s a g o years ago. A b o u t t e n y e a r s l a t e r About ten years later, w i t h p l e n t y o f e x p e r i e n c e with plenty of experience g a t h e r e d u n d e r h e r b e l t gathered under her belt, P e r e z a n d h e r h u s b a n d Perez and her husband o p e n e d a r e s t a u r a n t i n opened a restaurant in P o r t S t J o e c a l l e d P r o v i Port St. Joe called Provis i o n s t h a t s h e s a y s i s s t i l l sions that she says is still  g o i n g s t r o n g Ž going strong.Ž E v e n t u a l l y t h o u g h s h e Eventually though, she d e c i d e d t h a t s h e w a n t e d decided that she wanted t o “ n d s o m e t h i n g t o d o to “ nd something to do m o r e o n h e r o w n a n d i t more on her own and it w a s n  t l o n g a f t e r t h a t r e wasnt long after that rea l i z a t i o n t h a t s h e l e a r n e d alization that she learned o f t h e o p e n i n g a t t h e of the opening at the l o d g e  I t w a s j u s t k i n d lodge. It was just kind o f f a t e Ž s h e s a y s  I h a d of fate,Ž she says. I had t w o o r t h r e e i n t e r v i e w s two or three interviews, t h e y w e n t r e a l l y w e l l a n d they went really well and I s t a r t e d i n M a r c h Ž I started in March.Ž W h i l e s t i l l a p a r t o w n While still a part owne r o f P r o v i s i o n s P e r e z er of Provisions, Perez n o w l i v e s i n T a l l a h a s s e e now lives in Tallahassee a n d w o r k s a t t h e l o d g e and works at the lodge f u l l t i m e H e r e x p e r i e n c e full-time. Her experience i n c l u d e s h a v i n g w o r k e d includes having worked f o r s m a l l r e s t a u r a n t s a n d for small restaurants and l a r g e c o r p o r a t e c h a i n s a s large corporate chains, as w e l l a s o w n i n g a r e s t a u well as owning a restaur a n t … a n a r s e n a l w h i c h rant … an arsenal, which s h e s a y s h a s c r e a t e d she says, has created h e r e x p a n s i v e w e a l t h o f her expansive wealth of k n o w l e d g e knowledge. Whats Perezs favorite part about being a chef at Wakulla Springs? The creativity,Ž she says, adding how much she enjoys setting up and planning for special events such as weddings. Perez took time to boast of the restaurants new menu, which is selling well, she says. Not only are there new food items, but a new wine list as well. We still have some of the traditional dishes,Ž she says. We kept the ones we know are important to people.Ž However, the restaurant is making new strides in trying to incorporate as many local ingredients as possible. The change in the wine list, Perez explains, is geared more towards the local seafood and designed to compliment the traditional dishes as well. We sought out unique, quality wines, not widely available in this area, and we also looked for varietals from vineyards with names that re” ected our surroundings,Ž she says. For example, on the menu youll “ nd a Volunteer Cabernet Sauvignon, which Perez says, gives a nod to the wonderful volunteers that help take care of Wakulla Springs.Ž Also included are wines named: Wines by Joe, Tangly Oakes, Toad Hollow and Landmark, among others. All were selected, she says, for their quality and how their names related to our location. Perez also expresses gratitude for the staff and the hard work and dedication that goes into looking after the historical park, lodge and restaurant. Being here has really just felt like coming home,Ž she says of her new job. Theres no drudgery here. I love coming to work every day.Ž www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question: Paper or plastic?DEBORAH HUMPHRIES ClerkPLASTIC! It is recyclable and easier. I have some reusable bags, but remembering to bring them... FREDA ROBINSON RetiredPLASTIC! It is recyclable and I can re-use them. I use my reusable bags for many different items!Ž STEVE HARTPipe “ tter/welderPAPER! I use paper for anything. It keeps people in work, and it is hard to wrap books or presents in plastic.Ž TRACY JEFFERSON Teacher, Havana MiddlePAPER! Because it is biodegradable. I wish more stores would offer it!Ž TRAVIS RILES MaintenancePLASTIC! Paper gets wet, plastic has the handles for gripping.Ž … Compiled by Lynda KinseyNew chef at Wakulla Springs … meet Jodi Perez AMANDA MAYOR

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner St. Elizabeth Ann SetonCatholic Church Fr. Edward T. Jones, Pastor3609 Coastal Hwy. Crawfordville • 850 926-1797Sunday Mass 10:00 am Wednesday & Thursday Mass 7:00 pm Monday Mass 3:30 pm Eden Springs 1st Saturday of every month: Confessions 10:30 – 11:30 and 3:00 – 4:00 Adoration Mass 10:00 am St 360 360 Cemetery lots and Cremain spaces available.850509-7630 Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102  Thessalonia sets back to school giveaway Aug. 10Thessalonia Missionary Baptist Church Rev. Frederick Bell, pastor, will be having a FREE back to school giveaway on Aug. 10 at Hudson Park from 8 a.m. to noon. Everyone welcome! For more information please contact Deacon Preston Triplett at (850) 925-6041. Breakthrough Revival setA Breakthrough Revival featuring Apostle G.E. Washington of Albuquerque, will be held at 213 Oak Crest Blvd. in Tallahassee on Aug. 7-10 beginning at 7 p.m. nightly. The revival is hosted by Emmanuel Full Gospel Ministries. For prayer or directions, call (505) 203-9301.Rumors of being stranded in the Phillippines are exaggerated OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDERIt was my birthday and I decided to celebrate it as low-key as possible. I am at that stage in life where I really do not need presents from anybody reminding me of how old I really am. I know every present represents an obligatory return on the gesture and at my age, I do not have the energy to return anything. All I really need is just a friendly Happy Birthday.Ž I have developed a special rule along that line. For every Happy BirthdayŽ I receive, I am allowed one slice of birthday cake. So far I am on my 19th birthday cake and anticipating more. The rule about saying Happy BirthdayŽ is that as long as there is a six-month period either way, it is still in play. I am looking forward to a lot more Happy BirthdayŽ greetings. After all, what do you get a person who has had as many birthdays as I have had that would be original and surprising? Believe me, I have enough ties. Of course, cash is always in good taste. Throughout the years I have been known to pull a few surprises on the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonages birthday but nobody has been able to reciprocate. That is, until recently. It was the day of my birthday when suddenly I began receiving emails and phone calls and they all had one theme. Not one of them was wishing me happy birthday but all were concerned about an email they allegedly received from me. According to this email, I was in Manila, Philippines on some mission trip. Actually that was not quite unusual because several years ago I did go on such a trip and most of my friends knew it. Now, according to this friendly email being sent to my friends, I was back in the Philippines on another mission trip. According to this anonymous friend, I was stranded in the Philippines. I had been robbed, my passport had been con“ scated, and I needed money to get out of the Philippines. My email account had been hacked and all of my email contacts were sent what seemed to be an emergency email. Most of my friends were relieved to “ nd out that I was not stranded in the Philippines. My Korean publisher actually was willing to put up money to rescue me from my situation. Two other people were trying to “ nd out how to get money to bail me out. The thing that worries me along this line is of all of my friends only three were willing to bail me out “ nancially. I must make a mental note of this and never get stranded in the Philippines. My birthday hacking became a little more than I at “ rst thought. At first it was a little joke, ha ha ha, I am really not in the Philippines. A joke can only go so far. I thought it was the end of the joke, but boy, was I in for a wonderful birthday surprise. My entire email account had been compromised and a new email address was inserted so all of the response would go to another person. I “ nally found out how he changed my account, changed it back and changed my password. All of my emails for the past month, including important ones from my publisher and agent, were lost in the mysterious world of the Internet. Somewhere in that mystifying world, my emails are ” oating around not knowing whither to cometh or goeth. Delving deeper into my birthday hacking present I discovered that although my email contacts were missing, where I once had over 600 email contacts, I now had exactly none. How do you deal with noneŽ? I now do not know who my friends really are. Their addresses are gone. How do I contact them? I am beginning to think this birthday hacking present is not all it is hacked up to be. Now, my post birthday activity will be salvaging all of those email contacts. I suppose it is good every once in a while to start over again. I guess there is something good about getting a fresh start in life. I would like to know who my birthday benefactor really is. I would like the opportunity to properly and fully acknowledge and express to this person my true feelings about him face-toface, and not on Facebook. After all, thank youŽ does not always say it. I think I now appreciate Josephs feelings towards his brothers who caused him so much trouble. But as for you, ye thought evil against me; but God meant it unto good, to bring to pass, as it is this day, to save much people aliveŽ (Genesis 50:20 KJV). I am still looking for the good in this situation. For one, I am not stranded in the Philippines without any money. I am at home without money, but that is a different story. Although he hacked my email account, he did not touch my soul. A rumor can never hurt you if you really know the truth.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Church BriefsBy ETHEL SKIPPER Good teachers use a variety of methods to get their message across. It is fine to tell students what you want them to know, but it is better to show them as well. They are more likely to grasp and retain the knowledge you impart. In our churches, we need good teachers as well as good preachers. Some people still dont get the message. It came to pass, that as he was praying in a certain place, when he ceased, one of his disciples said unto him, Lord, teach us to pray, as John also taught his disciples.Ž (Luke 11:1:4). There are time we need to ask to be taught something. As people of God, we need to spend much time in the home, the church and everywhere, teaching more. We should not leave it up to the government and schools. Macedonia Church of Christ will host the Wakulla County Usher Union on Sunday, Aug. 10, at 2:30 p.m. Speaker is Pastor E.M. Skipper. Everyone is welcome to attend. Host pastor is Elder Alfred Nelson. Skipper Temple Church Choir will have their choir anniversary on Aug. 17. All choirs and singing groups are invited to be on the program. The community on Surf Road in Sopchoppy had a wonderful fellowship service last Saturday with Bishop Joseph Rosier and his family from Greenville, S.C. Thanks to everyone. The church will have free school supplies to giveaway on Tuesday, Aug. 12, at 6 p.m. Fire From Heaven Annointed Ministries welcomes you to service on Sunday, Aug. 11, at 3 p.m. in the Crossway Plaza, 4727 Crawfordville Hwy. in Tallahassee, unit 10, with pastor Prophet Randy Moore and co-pastor Michelle Moore. An open invitation is extended to everyone. Contact them at (850) 745-6490 or 895-6844.We need good teachers in churches BUCKHORN NEWS Healing of the Whole Man Conference, Mind, Body & Soul, hosted by Pamela Donaldson Cotton, Founder of H.E.L.P. (Healing Emotions, Empowering Lives, Loving People) Ministries. The Conference will be held at, Wakulla Springs Baptist Church 1391 Crawfordville Highway in Crawfordville on Aug. 9-11 … Friday at 7 p.m., Saturday Morning at 9 a.m., Saturday night 7 p.m. and climax Sunday evening at 3 p.m. We have some powerful speakers lined up: Powerhouse Pastor Sabrina Smith, Tampa; Pastor Erica Cotton-Proctor, Jacksonville, N.C.; Deaconess Joy Donaldson Stephens, Minister Tanya Price, Prophetess Angel Harper, and Shawanna Adams RN. H.E.L.P. Ministries was founded in December 2011 by Pamela Donaldson Cotton, a native of Wakulla County. Any donations please email pamelatcotton@ yahoo.com or (850) 4593336.Healing conference to be held

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Glenn Gar“ eld Pope Jr., 54, of St. Marks, died on Aug. 4, 2013, at his home. Survivors include his wife of 25 years, Janice Pope; daughters, Missy Harris (Scoby), Crystal Lee (David Hogan), and April Vaillancourt (John), all of Crawfordville; a son, Michael Pope of Crawfordville; brother, Pasco Pope of Crawfordville; 10 grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. A memorial service will be held at a later date. He was predeceased by his mother, Mary Genevieve Pope; his father, Glenn Gar“ eld Pope Sr.; and a sister, Rhonda Gail Holder. ICS Crematory and Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements (www.icsfuneralservices.com). Thomas O. Carlton, 88, of Crawfordville, died on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, in Tallahassee. Son of the late Sidney N. and Nora L. Dupree Carlton, he was born Nov. 26, 1924, in Thomasville, Ga. He served in the U.S Army during World War II. Survivors include his wife of 67 years, Marjorie Loose Carlton; sons, Thomas M. Carlton (Chanida) and J. Wendell Carlton (Cathy); a daughter, Doris Ann Shelton (Bobby); brother, Delma O. Carlton (Wynelle); four grandchildren; eight great-grandchildren; seven nieces and nephews; and a daughterin-law, Diann. He was predeceased by a son, Wayne H. Carlton; and two sisters, Betty L. Nelms (Gene) and Sara L. Ward (Luther). Visitation was held on Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013 at 10 a.m. with the funeral service following at 11 a.m. at Abbey Funeral Home. Interment will follow at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. In lieu of ” owers, the family requests donations be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd. in Tallahassee. The online guestbook may be signed at www. abbeyfh.com. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 7ALeonard J. LennyŽ Widmann, 96, formerly of Wakulla County, passed away Sunday, Aug. 4, 2013 in Houston. He was born in Queens, N.Y., and had lived in Medart since 1976 coming from Long Island, N.Y. He was a senior communications specialist and retired from Western Union. Lenny was a founding member and usher at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church. He was an amateur radio operator and a musician. He was a great husband, father, grandfather and friend to all who knew him. Lenny and his sense of humor will be greatly missed. Visitation will be Wednesday, Aug. 7, and Thursday, Aug. 8, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral Services will be Friday, Aug.9, 2013 at 10 a.m. at St. Elizabeth Catholic Church, Coastal Highway in Crawfordville. Burial will follow at St. Elizabeth Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, the family requests that donations be sent to St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, 3609 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327 or St. Dominic Village in Houston. Survivors include two sons, John Widmann of Long Island, N.Y., and Buddy Widmann (Nancy) of Houston; and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife of 55 years, Elizabeth Widmann; and four sons, Lenny, Bill, Walter and Ray Widmann. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements.Obituaries DeLynn ‘Mrs. D’ Marie Bastian Thomas O. Carlton Ernest Wayne Cox Glenn Garfield Pope Jr. Leonard J. ‘Lenny’ WidmannDeLynn Mrs. DeeŽ Marie Bastian, 65, passed away July 24, 2013, from complications of cancer. She was born and raised in St. Louis, Mich., but had resided in Crawfordville for the past 29 years. She worked at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens of“ ce in Crawfordville for 23 of those years. She loved working with the seniors in the community and also wrote the Senior Gazette column in The Wakulla News for many years. Some of DeLynns favorite hobbies included working in the yard and planting flowers, playing golf, scrapbooking, baking, and doing crafts. She was funny and caring and will be greatly missed. Survivors include her three children, Daniel and Robert Napieralski, and Katherine Bastian of Crawfordville; her “ ve grandchildren, Ciara, Ilyana, and Karis Napieralski, Courtney Napieralski, and Lillian Bastian. Memorial services will be held in Michigan at a later date. In lieu of ” owers, the family requests that donations be sent to DeLynns favorite charity, St. Judes Childrens Research Hospital. Her daughter Katherine would like to give a special thanks to the TMH Cancer Center, Irene Dickey, a wonderful friend, Mike Sasser and family, and Holly Barton and family for their great care over the past few years and during this very dif“ cult time, Thank You. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com). Ernest Wayne Cox, 67, passed away Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013 in Sopchoppy. He is survived by his wife of 32 years, Gloria Cox. He was born Feb. 20, 1946, to Leroy and Agnes Cox in Tallahassee. He married Gloria Jean Holley on Sept. 25, 1981. He was a lifelong resident of this area and a member of Mt. Elon Baptist Church. He retired after 25 years with the Tallahassee Fire Department on North Adams Street; 20 years with FSU and two years with the Leon County School System. He was an avid outdoorsman, loved “ shing and duck hunting. He was kind, caring, always smiling and always left you encouraged. Visitation was held Wednesday, August 7, 2013 at Mt. Elon Baptist Church in Sopchoppy from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Funeral services were held Wednesday, Aug. 7, 2013 at Mt. Elon Baptist Church in Sopchoppy at 11 a.m. Burial followed at Smith Creek Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308 or Mt. Elon Baptist Church, 2433 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy FL 32358. In addition to his wife, he is also survived by son and daughter, Wayne Cotner (Laura Cotner) and Gina Ragans (Kenny Ragans); grandchildren, Lee Kuperberg (Jill), Amanda Holley (Brandon), Wayne A. Cotner, Tyler Ragans, and Courtney Gwaltney; great-grandchildren, Madison Kuperberg, Coleman Bell, Autumn Gay, and Tucker Gwaltney; brother, Clayton Cox (Joann); and sister, Wanda Schwartz (Bill). He was predeceased by brother, Carey Cox; and sisters, Christine Mercer and Lorraine Baxley. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, FL is assisting the family with arrangements (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com).Thomas O. Carlton DeLynn ‘Mrs. D’ Marie Bastian Glenn Gar eld Pope jr. Ernest Wayne Cox Leonard J. ‘Lenny’ Widmann By DR. BETSY GOEHRIGDavid Fell has been the Pastor of First Baptist Church since November 2007. The church is located near the Courthouse, at 3086 Crawfordville Hwy., Their Sunday services include: 8:30 a.m. contemporary service, 9:45 a.m. Sunday School, 11 a.m. traditional service, and a 6 p.m. evening service. They also meet on Wednesdays at 6 p.m. for evening fellowship and 7 p.m. for evening service. First Baptist Church was “ rst organized April 4, 1904. For more information, call (850) 926-7896, visit the website at www.crawfordvillefbc.com, or email dave@crawfordvillefbc. com. Prior to serving at First Baptist, David was the Discipleship/Teaching Pastor for over 10 years at Celebration Baptist in Tallahassee. His education includes a degree in Biology from FSU. Davids calling into ministry occurred on June 3, 1997. When asked, Who or what has been an inspiration or has in” uenced your life and ministry?Ž David responded with two key persons: the pastor at Celebration Baptist Church and his father, Buck Fell. His father, now deceased, was a Baptist pastor. His childhood memories of him were of seeing him studying the Word or praying at night. A challenging time in which his faith made a difference was when he and his wife Debbie lost their second son, Aaron Michael, when he was two days old, in January 1992. He had suffered a massive heart attack. David had also lost his mother the year before. David quoted Charles Spurgeon: The sovereignty of God is the rock that crushes the heathen, but its the pillow believers sleep on at night.Ž He knew God was watching out for them. For three months his wife cried upon waking. Many people came out who had lost children to support and comfort them. His dad said, It will get better with timeŽ … his father knew, because he also had a child who had died. David and his wife Debbie have been married 28 years. They have three sons, Austin, 23, Caleb, 17, and Jonathan, 16. A brief scripture that has been especially meaningful for him is from Isaiah 55:11, So shall my word be that goes out from my mouth; it shall not return to me empty, but it shall accomplish that which I purpose, and succeed in the thing for which I sent it.Ž David was part of a mission trip this summer to West Africa. After ” ying to Togo, the group took a 12-13 hour bus ride north to the village where they served. David went last year with Louis Pollard of Wakulla Springs Baptist Church to mentor 25-26 pastors. This year the 8-day Pastors Conference had 28 pastors and was part of a longer three week mission. In addition, a school was being built … only one story of the two stories was complete at that time. A little boy named Will Smith had died. His parents started a foundation and paid to “ nish the school, which started last October and had their “ rst class graduate four weeks ago. The school is the only building of its kind within 100 miles, with surrounding homes being made of adobe and thatched roofs. David remarked that these children were the most disciplined bunch of children at The Hope Center, whether standing patiently in line to begin the days schooling or sitting still. The students are all tribal kids, many of whom are attending school for the “ rst time. The school currently has grades 1-5, with plans to build a secondary school for grades 6-12. They do all of their cooking outdoors on coals and feed the children twice a day, for breakfast and lunch. They eat outside in the morning when its cool at 95 degrees, and inside for lunch when it is at 100+ degrees. When David preached, he was translated into Moba and then retranslated into French. When he preached an ordination service for Pastor William, the service lasted 2.5 hours! Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church. HEAVENS TO BETSYPreacher Feature: Pastor David FellPastor David Fells favorite memory of this years mission trip: At the end of a Sunday morning service, this young lady walked up to Pastor William with a baby in her arms. She asked Pastor William if David would dedicate her newborn baby. Pastor William translated to David, She wants you to name the baby!Ž Surprised, David searched for and chose a name from the New Testament, Stephen, the “ rst Christian martyr. Stephen is Etienne in French.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO

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The Board of County Commissioners is proud to announce the release of their new and improved website redesign at http:// mywakulla.com. The redesign is part of the Countys continued effort to meet the needs of the public. The improved website provides a fresh new look, easy navigation, and improved content organization. A few of the new and improved features include, form builder, events calendar, emergency alert noti“ cation, screen size compatibility, site search, GIS integration, web statistics, and secure connection. In addition, staff can now easily and quickly add and change the websites content through the new Content Management Software (CMS). Therefore, updates and changes will now only take minutes compared to the old website which could take up to 24hours. Overall, the CMS will provide 24/7 communications and a huge cost savings to the County. Your feedback is valuable; if you have an opportunity please visit our site and let us know what you think by using the Feedback Form located on the Communications & Public Services page, so we can continue to make improvements. For questions, contact Jessica Welch at 926-0919 ext. 706 or jwelch@mywakulla.com Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityBy Michelle McMillan Kirby Special to The NewsThe ladies of R Don McLeod Chapter 2469, United Daughters of the Confederacy, began another great year with their July chapter meeting. Benevolent Chair Evelyn Stills led the group with collection of household items for the Veterans Village in Tallahassee. Members have been asked to prepare thank you cards before the next meeting for the residents of the Veterans Village. The chapter voted to award two Martha McLeod scholarships to Katie Register and Sloan Barwick. The namesake of the scholarship, Martha McLeod, was the daughter of former Wakula County Judge R. Don McLeod. His daughter Martha McLeod was a very active citizen, author and leader in her own right. Martha provided the $1000 seed money to being the chapter's scholarship fund and attended to the needs of many. Chapter Historian Carolyn Harvey was recognized with a supplemental certi“ cate for her great grandfather Wyatt N. Garner. Mrs. Harvey shared an emotional story of how the record of her ancestor was nearly discarded by the government but was thankfully found on a personal visit to a library in North Carolina. She reminded the group how records of the War Between the States are fragmented and that one should search local records when other sources are not fruitful. Mrs. Harvey is also Chair of the Genealogy Group sponsored by the Wakulla County Historical Society. Understanding the importance of preserving local history, many of the R. Don McLeod chapter members, serve as volunteers and curators for the Wakulla County Historical Society. The Society leases the old Wakulla County Jail for their genealogical research center, archives, and county history museum. R. Don McLeod Chapter member Cathy Frank is President of the Society and presides over the project. The Museum includes a special room dedicated to Judge R. Don McLeod and also includes personal belongings of Martha McLeod. As the year continues, the ladies of R. Don McLeod 2469 continue to support the community through various initiatives for our veterans and local interests. Coming up in August will be a historical presentation on women in the South during the Reconstruction era featuring two women of Leon County. The chapter has an ongoing project to identify Confederate soldiers either buried in Wakulla County or serving from Wakulla County. This includes virtual cemeteries using Find a Grave which can be found on their website at http://www. rdonmcleod.org. Considering the “ ve objectives of the United Daughters of the Confederacy are memorial, historical, benevolent, educational and patriotic, the ladies of R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 are off to a great start this year. Ladies age 16 and up with a Confederate ancestor who honorably served or gave material aid to the Confederacy are invited to inquire. Continue to expect great things from the ladies of R. Don McLeod 2469. You may contact the Chapter via their website or email: rdonmcleodudc@gmail. com. Cooper Allen Barrett celebrated his “ rst birthday on July 16. He is the son of Casey and Renee Barrett of Crawfordville. Coopers maternal grandparents are Paul and Donna Pigott of Tallahassee and his paternal grandmother is Monica Barrett also of Tallahassee. Paul and Dolores Pigott of Crawfordville and Elizabeth Prevatt of Crestview are Conners greatgrandparents. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Medical Center located at 1328 Coastal Hwy in Panacea will hold a health fair on Aug. 9 from 2 p.m. until 4 p.m. Come receive free health screenings and education. In addition, free school supplies to the first 150 school-age children. For more information call 984.4735United Daughters of Confederacy begins yearHistorian Carolyn Harvey, left, receives her supplemental certi“ cate upon the military record of her great grandfather Wyatt N. Garner from President Louise ThomasSpecial to The News Cooper Barrett turns 1 Wakulla Medical Center health fair is slatedSpecial to The NewsFor its next production, the Palaver Tree Theater Company is looking for actors who can commit time between now and November. The original play, written by historian Madeleine Carr and Palaver Tree Theater Director Herb Donaldson, is called A Mania for Speculation. The three-act play depicts what happened to Indian lands after the Spanish departed the state. Carr explained that even though Florida has commemorations all year long about the discovery of Florida in 1513, very little is actually known about the end of Spanish colonialism. A Mania for Speculation is set in modern-day St. Marks. The large cast consists of modern-day people looking into their history in this area. As they progress in their search, historic treaty scenes, and landswapping discussions are held in Fla., todays Ala., Washington D.C., and Cuba. Based on the historic Forbes Purchase and Harts“ eld Survey, actors will portray an Indian Chief, John Forbes, Spanish Governor Folch and Surveyor Asa Hartfield. During the territorial Florida period, Andrew Jackson and lawyers Daniel Webster, Joseph White and two law clerks appear. Five relatively small male roles are to be “ lled, with the larger scenes providing a more challenging opportunity for local actors. Contact palavertreetheater@gmail.com for rehearsal dates to see how your schedule permits you to ful“ ll your acting dreams.Palaver Tree looking for actors for next play County announces new website design 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to 000FMQY

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Special to The NewsSummer is almost over and school is about to begin. On Aug. 15, the “ rst day of school, students will be dismissed at noon. At 7:33 a.m., students will report to their homeroom where they will receive a copy of their class schedule. The students will spend the rest of the day locating and attending their seven classes and eating lunch. Aug. 16 will be a full school day. Students are expected to attend all seven classes and be prepared in each class. WHS offers a wide variety of classes and courses of study, so there is no way to list all the supplies a high school student may need. However, we were able to compile a basic supply list: ALL WHS students will need a 3 inch Dringed binder, seven dividers for the binder, pencils, blue or black pens, a highlighter, and three-hole notebook paper. Every student will be receiving a free planner. Remember, Open House is on Aug. 12 from 5:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. Open House provides a good opportunity for students and their parents to meet the teachers and to get additional supply lists before school starts. Along with their schedules and supply lists, all students will receive important packets that parents and students need to read, “ ll out, sign and return to the high school. Students and parents are also expected to read and understand the Student Handbook and the Student Code of Conduct, available on the school website at whs. wcsb.us. If you do not have computer access to these documents, please contact Student Services at 850-926-7125 and a hard copy will be provided for you. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsThe Jake Pigott Memorial American Legion Post and Auxiliary 114 sent students to the annual Boys and Girls State session to represent Wakulla County in Tallahassee in July. The Wakulla High School rising seniors took part in a mock legislative session similar to the session held by the Florida Legislature. Participants elect members to serve as governor and other state, county and city positions. They propose bills and pass legilislation. Tiana Haskett attended the Girls State while Landon Glover and David Damon III attended the Boys State program. Haskett is the daughter of Jimena Haskett of Sopchoppy. Glover is the son of Kenny and Amy Glover of Crawfordville and Damon is the son of David and Sue Damon of Crawfordville. Barrie Glover of the American Legion Post 144 has served as councelor at Boys State for the past 33 years. Special to The NewsThrough the FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Projects University of Florida Immersion into STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) Experience, talented and gifted high school juniors and seniors from small and rural districts across Florida spent “ ve full days immersed in STEM learning on the universitys campus. From the Panhandle Area Educational Consortium (PAEC) area, twenty-nine STEM Scholars and seven teachers took advantage of this unique opportunity. This customized experience, tailored to the unique needs of these students, was made possible through a partnership with the University of Floridas Center for Precollegiate Education and Training (CPET). STEM Scholars representing Wakulla County were Wakulla High School seniors Minh Hoang, Doran McFalls, Aaron Smith, and Chione Young Throughout the week students interacted with university faculty and graduate students as opportunities were provided to learn about a variety of STEM career options and the post-secondary preparation required. They also gained familiarity with techniques and procedures used in scientific research by conducting experiments involving crystallization, DNA extraction, PCR, gel electrophoresis, and construction of morphological and molecular phylogenies of a group of plants. These experiments took place in the Health Science Center and were led by UF College of Medicine students and university faculty members. Students also took advantage of some of the outside classrooms on campus as they learned about soils, explored a Florida wetland ecosystem where they waded through wetlands to collect various types of data, spelunked in a dry cave associated with the Floridan Aquifer, and visited Blue Springs, where water from the Floridan Aquifer emerges. Throughout the week students used universityprovided iPads to document their experiences daily on Edmodo and Blogger. The iPads were also used to create a photographic journal and develop final presentations covering a range of STEM careers. The week was packed full of fun learning and students went home with many new friends and an expanded outlook on STEM career options. The FloridaLearns STEM Scholars Project is funded through the Florida Department of Educations Race to the Top award and involves a partnership among Floridas three educational consortia, which provide critical educational support services to Floridas small and rural school districts. The consortia are Panhandle Area Educational Consortium in northwest Florida, Heartland Educational Consortium in south central Florida, and North East Florida Educational Consortium in the northeast part of the state. The project is focused on serving gifted and talented students in grades 9 … 12 who reside in the small and rural school districts served by PAEC, HEC, and NEFEC. The Project affords increased access to rigorous STEM courses, provides collaborative problemsolving experiences, and ensures that students are well informed about STEM career options. Rising seniors compete at Boys, Girls StateLandon Glover David DamonTiana Haskett WHS back to school information is availableSTEM scholars explore STEM careers through UF Students go back to school on Aug. 15Special to The NewsIt is that time of year again when students start to think about their new classes for the fall, the old friends they will see, new ones they will make, and the possibilities that await in the 2013-14 school year. Wakulla County public school Open Houses for the new school year are: MONDAY, AUG. 12 € Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School from 4:30 to 7 p.m. € Wakulla High School from 5:30 to 8 p.m. TUESDAY, AUG. 13 € Wakulla Pre-Kindergarten from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. € Crawfordville Elementary, Medart Elementary, Riversink Elementary, and Shadeville Elementary from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m. If parents or guardians are registering a student in the Wakulla County School System for the “ rst time, they can check online under the Wakulla County School District website for the Registration Packet and other essential information needed to register students, such as proof of residency. It is important to register students as soon as possible before school starts. All parents and guardians are encouraged to look on school websites or contact schools if they are unsure of what is needed to start school, including proof of immunizations.Open houses are set for Aug 12, 13 BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841 www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW! GARAGE SALE & SWAP MEETSaturday, Aug. 10th 8am-2pm at the vacant lot next to Lindy’s Chicken Restaurant on Hwy. 319, north of CrawfordvilleGarage sale and swap meet start at 8 am. Fish Fry starts at 11am. $5 per platecat “sh “ngers, baked beans, cole slawIf you are interested in setting up a booth call our of ce at 926-1033 for booth applications, booth space is $15 for a 12’X12’ space. 2013-2014 WHS Yearbook Y earbooks and add-ons can be purchased online with a credit card at www.yearbookordercenter.com Job#: 0636 or you call: 866-287-3096 Questions? Email: jillian.solburg@wcsb.us or hunter.tucker@wcsb.us Valid only at Open House on August 12, 2013 No Coupon = No Discount Applies to WHS yearbook sales only! This coupon cannot be applied to senior page ads. On August 12, 2013 at Open House, you will have the opportunity to pay $65 for your yearbook, this is $10 discount on the Yearbook price. You must bring this coupon to receive the discount. No Coupon = No Discount and the book costs $75. On Thursday, October 31, 2013 the price will go up to $85. **Additional items (ordering ends in February for these items): *Plastic Cover: $2.00 *Name Plate: $10.00 *Name Plate with Design: $13.00 $10.00 savings

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy ALAN ROSS Kasey Kahne won a two-lap shootout with teammate Jeff Gordon to take the Pocono 400 Sunday, Kahnes second win of 2013 and 16th of his career. The Washingtonian, whose No. 5 Chevrolet was the dominant car of the races second half, was the recipient of a timely reprieve. Only seven laps from the end, Kahne surrendered the lead to Gordon on a crucial restart after the two had raced neck and neck for nearly an entire lap around the 2.5-mile Pocono Raceway tri-oval. But Gordons time at the top was short-lived. A “ nal caution and restart with two laps left gave Kahne another shot. This time he bested Gordon, taking the lead in Turn 2 and driving away from there for the victory. Pole-sitter Jimmie Johnson dominated the “ rst 100 miles of the race, but after a green-” ag pitstop, wound up back in 14th, quickly “ nding that moving through traffic did not equal the ease of leading the “ rst 58 laps at the challenging Long Pond, Pa. track. It seemed every car began enacting its own pit strategy after the “ rst caution fell before the race had made it through the “ rst turn of the “ rst lap. By the time Johnson cycled back into the lead on Lap 73 of 160, nearly half the “ eld was running alternate strategies. But three laps later, just before the halfway point, Johnsons right front tire went down and the No. 48 Chevy smashed the outside wall hard exiting Turn 2. The accident dropped the season points leader to the 28th spot, his race seemingly over. He had led 43 of 76 laps. Kasey Kahne moved up, taking the lead from Brad Keselowski before the “ fth caution with just over 60 laps to go. Shortly after, the sixth caution fell. Of the six yellows by Lap 101, four had been caused by blown tires. But there was still a round of pitstops to go. Only a week before, at Indianapolis, the complexion of the race changed during the “ nal pit stops, with Ryan Newman cycling out ahead of racelong leader Jimmie Johnson. For his last stop, Kahne took four tires and had no delays. The only issue was if he would cycle through with the lead intact. He did, with 23 to go. Sailing along smoothly with a 7.5-second lead, an untimely caution … for Kahne … came out for debris with 11 laps left. Now, three Hendrick Motorsports cars lined up at the head of the pack: Kahne, Gordon, and Dale Earnhardt Jr., 1-2-3. The restart was one of the best of the season, Kahne and Gordon racing flat even for a full lap around the lengthy circuit before Gordon, surprisingly, took the lead with seven to go … surprising in that Kahnes car all afternoon was the class of the track after Johnsons exit. But all of Gordons hard work was vaporized by Matt Kenseths wreck with “ ve laps to go. It would come down to a two-lap dash to the checkered flag. Gordon got away best but Kahne caught him on the exit of Turn 1 then pulled ahead for good in Turn 2 and never looked back. Johnson, who “ nished a remarkable 13th after his disastrous shunt with the wall halfway through the race, takes a 77-point lead in the standings over Clint Bowyer heading to Watkins Glen. INDYCAR 200 AT MIDOHIO: IndyCars inspirational diabetes poster boy, Charlie Kimball, won his “ rst-ever IndyCar victory in 45 career starts. The third-year California driver, previously best known, though ignominiously, as the Indianapolis 500 backmarker that caused JR Hildebrands lamentable last-corner crash in the 2011 classic, showed early that he was fast, quickly moving through traffic on the opening laps along the twisting Lexington, Ohio, road course circuit. The big moment came when, with 18 laps to go, Simon Pagenaud cycled out ahead of Kimball after their “ nal pit stops. Kimball retaliated by driving boldly inside Pagenaud at the end of the long back straight to take a lead he would not relinquish. Alan Ross has written 29 books on sports history. You can e-mail him at: alanross_sports@ yahoo.com. Sportland 2013THE COOL DOWN LAP VOLLEYBALL BASEBALL Kahne edges Gordon at Pocono; IndyCar Mid-Ohio win is Kimballs rst RMS try-outs setWakulla makes it to regional FOOTBALL Gridiron Club will be at open house Riversprings Middle School volleyball will host an open gym for interested girls starting Monday, Aug. 12. The following schedule will be for open gym: Monday from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m Thursday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and Friday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tryouts will be Monday, Aug. 19, and Tuesday, Aug. 20.Special to The NewsIt is almost time for War Eagles Football! We are expecting a big crowd this year so hurry up and purchase your Gridiron seats as we only have 100 seats left for this season. All seats that have not been paid for have been opened for purchase. If you have not already paid for your seat renewal, please contact Kathi Douin, President at (850) 5196531 as soon as possible. Sponsorship opportunities are still available if you would like to help support the War Eagles. Remember the only way to purchase a sponsorship is through the Wakulla Gridiron Club. We would like to encourage anyone who wishes to sponsor War Eagle Football to please contact Kathi Douin at (850) 519-6531, Ginger Franks at (850) 980-4202 or Carolyn Hurst at (850) 566-1523. The Wakulla Gridiron Club will also have a booth set up at the Wakulla High Open House on Aug. 12. Anyone who has already purchased a Gridiron seat or who wishes to purchase a Gridiron seat can stop by and pick up their tickets and parking passes. Also, we will be selling T-shirts, pre-paid custom T-shirts and hoodies, hats and our new camo hats. Prices are listed on our website at http://www.wakullagridironclub. com/ for your convenience. We hope to see everyone at the preseason game on Friday, Aug. 23. After a 2-1 bottom of the 10th inning loss to San Jose in the championship game of the state tournament, Wakulla got a invite to the Southeast Regional Tournament in Ocala. Wakulla “ nished the tournament with a record of 3-2. It was a special tournament for the team as it got revenge on the lose at state to San Jose in dramatic fashion. Down 4-3 in the bottom of the 8th with 2 outs, it looked like San Jose had Wakulla again. Back-to-back singles by Jake McCarl and Zach Norman kept Wakulla alive. After battling to a full count, Chase Forester hit a walk-off single to left “ eld scoring both McCarl and Norman. It was a summer to remember. The team would like to thank the parents and sponsors (Wakulla Babe Ruth, Wakulla Cal Ripken, Wakulla Rec. Board, Gulf Coast Lumber, Ace Hardware) for giving them this great opportunity. Top … Coach Stalvey, Payton Bennett, Jordan Vaughan, Aaron Ginn, Jake McCarl, Jackson Montgomery, Coach Montague, Coach Norman. Bottom … Morgan Stalvey, Dylan Atkins, Adrian Morris, RJ Kinard, Zach Norman, Austin Hogan, Chase Forester. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the REGISTRATION DATES: REGISTRATION TIMES: OR DURING OFFICE HOURS: REGISTRATION DEADLINE: REGISTRATION PLACE: AGE DETERMINING DATE:1. FLAG FOOTBALL: AGES … 5 … 7 DIVISION AND 8 … 10 DIVISION COST IS $40.00 PER CHILD. Player must be 5 prior to 9/1/13 to be eligible.2. TACKLE FOOTBALL BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 6 … 8. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 90 LBS. PEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9 … 11. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 126 LBS. LINEMEN MAY WAY UP TO 155 LBS. JUNIOR DIVISION … AGES 12 … 14. WEIGHT LIMIT IS 170 LBS. LINEMEN MAY WAY UP TO 175 LBS. COST FOR TACKLE FOOTBALL IS $85.00 PER CHILDA COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.3. TACKLE CHEERLEADING BANTAM DIVISION … AGES 5 … 8 PEE WEE DIVISION … AGES 9-11 COST FOR TACKLE CHEERLEADING IS $45.00 PER CHILD (Includes shirt and pom poms)A COPY OF A BIRTH CERTIFICATE IS REQUIRED.Anyone interested in coaching any of the youth sports are encouraged to contact WPRD at 926-7227. All volunteer coaches are required and subjected to a Florida Department of Law Enforcement Criminal history background check to ensure the safety of our youth participants.SATURDAY 8/10/13 and SATURDAY 8/17/13 8:00 am TO 12:00 NOON MONDAY 7/29/13 TO FRIDAY 8/16/13, 8AM 5PMSATURDAY 8/17/13, 12:00 PM MEDART RECREATION PARK OFF US 98 SEPTEMBER 1, 2013WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION DEPARTMENT2013 FALL SPORTS REGISTRATION For more information contact WCPRD at 926-7227 or our web page at www.WCPRD.com or visit our facebook page. T H ES H O PGREATBICYCL E 3624 Woodville Hwy., 1/2 mile south of the Fairgrounds SALES SERVICE PARTS RENTALS ADULT TRIKES850-402-0545

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIt seems like we go from one extreme to the other when it comes to the weather. Its not raining as much as it was but, man, did it get hot all of a sudden. With the humidity around 100 percent and temperatures in the 90s, you better take plenty of water with you when you head out for a day on the water. I can just walk outside and start sweating. The water clarity is still like day old coffee inshore and I talked to someone that dove last weekend and he said they were in 60 feet of water and it was dirty near the top but they had 20-foot visibility on the bottom. Well, the 10th annual King“ sh Shootout is history. For the most part the weather was pretty for the 50 boats that competed for the largest king. Fishermen came from as far away as Valdosta and Peachtree City in Georgia, Key West, and Chicago. Many of the folks who fished this year were returning “ shermen from last year. First place and a check for $5,000 went to Tommy Merrell from Carrabelle and Chester Coward from Archer. Their team name was Knot Ready but they were ready Saturday. He said there was a good bite Saturday but better on Sunday although most fish on Sunday were in the 20-pound range. They caught the winning king, 47 pounds, in 107 feet of water trolling. Last week he pre-“ shed the tournament and caught one that weighed 50 pounds. Second place went to Loose Connections from Lenox, Ga., with a 45.3-pound king. Panhandle Outdoors came in with a 42.1 pound king to take third and Reel Smokers from Panacea placed fourth with a 41.3 pound king. Team Genesis from Tallahassee “ nished out the top “ ve places with a king weighing 41.2 pounds. All of the “ sh in the next “ ve spots were over 30 pounds. Jimmy Crowder started this tournament 10 years ago in memory of his daughter, Lisa Crowder Jackson, who died from leukemia. All proceeds after prizes go to the Leukemia Research Foundation and this year Mr. Crowder presented them with a check for $36,500. That brings the 10year total raised by this tournament to $703,000. A big thanks to all the sponsors and all the anglers who fished and made this another successful tournament and all the folks at C-Quarters who worked to put this on and make it a big success. Dont know what to say about scallops. They are still getting some at Lanark but the grass is so thick they can be hard to “ nd. St. Joe Bay and Steinhatchee are the places to go if you want to get your limit quick. Capt. David Fife continues to catch reds around the Spring Creek, Oyster Bay area using mud minnows. The reds right now are bronze colored due to the watercolor. Morris Brown of Crawfordville said he took a friend out last week and it was just one of those days that everything fell into place. The “ rst place they went to was covered up with big reds and they caught and released about nine of them. The next place they went to they caught some nice grouper and a couple of cobia. Fishing around the towers they caught a big barracuda and his buddy caught two big nurse sharks which he had never caught before. They ended up the day catching and releasing a pile of Spanish. Mike Falk Jr. fished with his son Carson. He said they were trying for flounder but couldnt get them to bite. He said they caught a 25 and 28inch cobia, which they released and had three take rock bass away from them, as they were reeling them to the boat. Spanish were everywhere and they caught and released a bunch of them “ shing a chartreuse grub under a popping cork. On Wednesday of last week I “ shed with Tommy Tyrone from Douglasville, Ga., and his wife. We had three trout, two reds and six flounder. One of the trout his wife caught weighed about 5 pounds. It and the two reds were caught on mud minnows and everything else on white Gulp. Thursday I “ shed with Steve Lewis and his son Austin. The morning started slow as I went to about six places that I just knew were holding reds. They were covered with bait. Problem was they werent feeding, at least on what we were offering them. I went to my favorite bar, which had not been producing for me, and fortunately those fish were biting. We limited out on reds and Austin said that was the best day red “ shing he had ever had. Thats what I like to hear. We then went out and caught seven nice ” ounder using a white Gulp. Alan Lamarche of Shell Point and one heck of a “ sherman needs our prayers. Alan had heart surgery about 10 days ago and is recovering but its taking longer than they had expected. Alan takes a lot of kids “ shing and donates quite a few offshore trips to different charities and organizations. I know he is chomping at the bit to get home and back on the water. We wish you a speedier recovery. Remember to know your limits and make sure you take plenty of water out there with you. When that wind stops its gonna get awfully hot. Good luck and good “ shing! From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Results of the 10th annual King sh Shootout PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTommy Merrell and Chester Coward with “ rst place king, a 47-pounder. Jimmy Crowder presents check to Leukemia Research Foundation. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Her name was drawn from OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken n t Ea t Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor Chanida CarltonJuly 2013 Winnerank You So Much! DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE Do you have the right insurance coverage?CENTRAL RIDGE INSURERS, LLC2535 N. Reston Terr., Hernando, FL(Next to Village Services on 486)Call Your Local Team Of Experts For A Free Analysis And Estim ate!352-527-0110n Home n Auto n Business n Financial Services000FOEV www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches THG-12902 “Re-Store”Shadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat.  9 a.m. 5 p.m.

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com This past week, the Coast Guard turned 223! What an amazing feat for a service that has undergone so many traditions and is still going strong. Past columns have recounted for you the evolution of this branch of service, so I will spare you all from the repeat. However, if you are interested in learning more about why men and women choose to join this branch of service as well as those who are going above and beyond in serving our country, take a few minutes to peruse the Coast Guard Compass at http://coastguard. dodlive.mil. Here you will “ nd the shipmate of the week as well as the Why I ServeŽ segments. Our own Sherrie Alverson has been featured on the blog before! As mentioned last week, Flotilla 12 held their monthly meeting. Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon sent in the following report. As with many things, we continue to get better with age and find new ways to do things! This past week our Flotilla held its monthly meeting in Crawfordville. Members took time to talk about how to improve various program areas including Public Education. Traditionally we hold safe boating courses just before the boating season starts and after during the winter months. While this has worked as a good model in the past and the Flotilla plans to continue offering courses during these times it was recognized that offering coursed during the boating season can also bene“ cial to the boating public. Members often get inquiries during the boating season on when the next class will be offered. Recognizing that a lot of people do not want to wait, sometimes several months, until the next class we are looking at ways to offer the courses on a more frequent or customizable schedule. Several options being considered include having a set day a month to offer a class, another to have smaller class size and work with the people who request the class to “ nd a time that best meets their schedule and instructors availability. By altering the way we offer our safe boating class we can better serve the boating public. If you are interested in finding out more about our course offerings please contact our Public Education officer Alex Gulde at FSO-PE@uscgaux.net or Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at duanet@uscgaux.net. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www. uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Now you can have access to a safe boating class that works with your schedule!a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary Apalachee Bay (Flotilla 12) .................................. (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Diving Panama City We get many requests for places to dive. Since Wakulla has decided to prevent folks from diving the most famous cavern and basin in the state, and the coastal margin is seldom accessible without a boat, we must send divers east or west. The most popular dive destination to our west is Panama City. This city 100 miles away, boasts of numerous dive stores that host boats to take you out to a variety of offshore arti“ cial reefs. Advanced reservations will assure you get to go to your desired dive destination if the weather permits. A less expensive but equally interesting dive site is the jetty dive at St. Andrew State Park. No reservation is required, and the weather is less limiting but be sure to watch the tides. Water passing through the inlet draining St. Andrew Bay can run very swiftly during a spring tide. The ideal dive at the jetties is near the high tide, when clean water, which has been “ lling the bay, slows to a stall before draining begins. You have a window of around an hour or more for a splendid dive. Be sure to take a ” oating dive ” ag! Rig up behind the dunes next to the parking lot under the pavilions. Then walk over the dune stairs and over the beach. Begin your dive in the kiddy pool behind the jetties. There you can adjust your rig and look at the “ sh that have jumped the jetties during the incoming tide. Follow them over the opening into the inlet and down the inner rocky jetty slope down to a depth of about 40-50 feet. You can swim parallel to this rocky slope at any depth toward the ocean or the bay. I like to head out to sea against the current since I can expect the tide to change and alert me to the tidal peak. When I feel the water pushing outward, I turn and swim back again, against the current. When I get back near the opening in the jetty into the kiddy pool, I turn and go up. In this way I avoid most of the “ shing lines and surface surge. Be sure to carry a knife in case you get tangled in “ shing line. You will see every form of creature transiting the inlet during these dives. And dont forget to look closely at the small creatures living on and between the rocks. This is a state park so dont disturb these residents. A second and very different dive can be made in the same area on the other side of the beach, the ocean-facing beach. Once through the surf, swim out a bit on the sandy bottom and turn eastward towards the jetty. Once at the jetty turn seaward and begin what I call the treasure dive. Folks loose masks, “ shing rods, anchors and all sorts of stuff that end up in this corner of the park. At the tip of the jetty, the current can pick up and pull you around, so stay close to the bottom and be prepared to reverse course and return to the beach with your booty. These are simple and fun dives, often used by instructors as check-out dives. The cost to get in is by the vehicle and very reasonable. Enjoy the sun, the surf and the dives in beautiful Panama City Beach.Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Aug 8, 13 Fri Aug 9, 13 Sat Aug 10, 13 Sun Aug 11, 13 Mon Aug 12, 13 Tue Aug 13, 13 Wed Au g 14, 13 Date 3.7 ft. 4:00 AM 3.8 ft. 4:25 AM 3.8 ft. 4:50 AM 3.8 ft. 5:16 AM 3.8 ft. 5:46 AM High 1.0 ft. 9:42 AM 0.8 ft. 10:18 AM 0.7 ft. 10:55 AM 0.6 ft. 11:37 AM 0.6 ft. 12:26 PM 1.1 ft. 12:14 AM 1.5 ft. 1:01 AM Low 4.0 ft. 3:39 PM 4.0 ft. 4:15 PM 3.9 ft. 4:55 PM 3.7 ft. 5:40 PM 3.4 ft. 6:33 PM 3.8 ft. 6:22 AM 3.7 ft. 7:08 AM High 0.2 ft. 10:08 PM 0.3 ft. 10:34 PM 0.5 ft. 11:03 PM 0.8 ft. 11:36 PM 0.6 ft. 1:27 PM 0.6 ft. 2:44 PM Low 3.1 ft. 7:41 PM 2.9 ft. 9:10 PM High Thu Aug 8, 13 Fri Aug 9, 13 Sat Aug 10, 13 Sun Aug 11, 13 Mon Aug 12, 13 Tue Aug 13, 13 Wed Au g 14, 13 Date 2.8 ft. 3:52 AM 2.8 ft. 4:17 AM 2.9 ft. 4:42 AM 2.9 ft. 5:08 AM 2.9 ft. 5:38 AM High 0.7 ft. 9:53 AM 0.6 ft. 10:29 AM 0.5 ft. 11:06 AM 0.5 ft. 11:48 AM 0.4 ft. 12:37 PM 0.8 ft. 12:25 AM 1.1 ft. 1:12 AM Low 3.0 ft. 3:31 PM 3.0 ft. 4:07 PM 2.9 ft. 4:47 PM 2.8 ft. 5:32 PM 2.5 ft. 6:25 PM 2.9 ft. 6:14 AM 2.8 ft. 7:00 AM High 0.2 ft. 10:19 PM 0.2 ft. 10:45 PM 0.4 ft. 11:14 PM 0.6 ft. 11:47 PM 0.4 ft. 1:38 PM 0.4 ft. 2:55 PM Low 2.3 ft. 7:33 PM 2.1 ft. 9:02 PM High Thu Aug 8, 13 Fri Aug 9, 13 Sat Aug 10, 13 Sun Aug 11, 13 Mon Aug 12, 13 Tue Aug 13, 13 Wed Au g 14, 13 Date 3.4 ft. 4:36 AM 3.5 ft. 5:01 AM 3.5 ft. 5:26 AM High 0.9 ft. 10:46 AM 0.7 ft. 11:22 AM 0.6 ft. 11:59 AM 0.5 ft. 12:07 AM 0.7 ft. 12:40 AM 1.0 ft. 1:18 AM 1.3 ft. 2:05 AM Low 3.7 ft. 4:15 PM 3.7 ft. 4:51 PM 3.6 ft. 5:31 PM 3.6 ft. 5:52 AM 3.6 ft. 6:22 AM 3.5 ft. 6:58 AM 3.5 ft. 7:44 AM High 0.2 ft. 11:12 PM 0.3 ft. 11:38 PM 0.6 ft. 12:41 PM 0.5 ft. 1:30 PM 0.6 ft. 2:31 PM 0.5 ft. 3:48 PM Low 3.4 ft. 6:16 PM 3.2 ft. 7:09 PM 2.9 ft. 8:17 PM 2.7 ft. 9:46 PM High Thu Aug 8, 13 Fri Aug 9, 13 Sat Aug 10, 13 Sun Aug 11, 13 Mon Aug 12, 13 Tue Aug 13, 13 Wed Au g 14, 13 Date 2.9 ft. 3:44 AM 2.9 ft. 4:09 AM 3.0 ft. 4:34 AM 3.0 ft. 5:00 AM 3.0 ft. 5:30 AM 3.0 ft. 6:06 AM High 0.9 ft. 9:21 AM 0.8 ft. 9:57 AM 0.7 ft. 10:34 AM 0.6 ft. 11:16 AM 0.6 ft. 12:05 PM 0.6 ft. 1:06 PM 1.4 ft. 12:40 AM Low 3.1 ft. 3:23 PM 3.1 ft. 3:59 PM 3.0 ft. 4:39 PM 2.9 ft. 5:24 PM 2.6 ft. 6:17 PM 2.4 ft. 7:25 PM 2.9 ft. 6:52 AM High 0.2 ft. 9:47 PM 0.3 ft. 10:13 PM 0.5 ft. 10:42 PM 0.8 ft. 11:15 PM 1.1 ft. 11:53 PM 0.6 ft. 2:23 PM Low 2.2 ft. 8:54 PM High Thu Aug 8, 13 Fri Aug 9, 13 Sat Aug 10, 13 Sun Aug 11, 13 Mon Aug 12, 13 Tue Aug 13, 13 Wed Au g 14, 13 Date 3.7 ft. 3:57 AM 3.8 ft. 4:22 AM 3.9 ft. 4:47 AM 3.9 ft. 5:13 AM 3.9 ft. 5:43 AM High 1.0 ft. 9:39 AM 0.9 ft. 10:15 AM 0.8 ft. 10:52 AM 0.7 ft. 11:34 AM 0.6 ft. 12:23 PM 1.2 ft. 12:11 AM 1.6 ft. 12:58 AM Low 4.1 ft. 3:36 PM 4.1 ft. 4:12 PM 3.9 ft. 4:52 PM 3.7 ft. 5:37 PM 3.5 ft. 6:30 PM 3.9 ft. 6:19 AM 3.8 ft. 7:05 AM High 0.2 ft. 10:05 PM 0.4 ft. 10:31 PM 0.6 ft. 11:00 PM 0.8 ft. 11:33 PM 0.7 ft. 1:24 PM 0.6 ft. 2:41 PM Low 3.1 ft. 7:38 PM 2.9 ft. 9:07 PM High Thu Aug 8, 13 Fri Aug 9, 13 Sat Aug 10, 13 Sun Aug 11, 13 Mon Aug 12, 13 Tue Aug 13, 13 Wed Au g 14, 13 Date 2.8 ft. 4:19 AM 2.8 ft. 4:34 AM 2.9 ft. 4:53 AM 3.0 ft. 5:15 AM 3.1 ft. 5:42 AM 3.2 ft. 6:14 AM 3.3 ft. 6:54 AM High 1.3 ft. 9:03 AM 1.2 ft. 9:38 AM 1.1 ft. 10:18 AM 0.9 ft. 11:03 AM 0.8 ft. 12:00 PM 0.7 ft. 1:16 PM 0.5 ft. 2:49 PM Low 2.9 ft. 3:14 PM 2.8 ft. 4:01 PM 2.7 ft. 4:53 PM 2.5 ft. 5:54 PM 2.3 ft. 7:09 PM 2.2 ft. 8:49 PM 2.2 ft. 11:13 PM High 0.5 ft. 9:26 PM 0.7 ft. 9:46 PM 0.9 ft. 10:10 PM 1.1 ft. 10:37 PM 1.3 ft. 11:06 PM 1.6 ft. 11:36 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacAug. 8 Aug. 14First Aug. 14 Full Aug. 20 Last Aug. 27 New Sept. 5Major Times 2:36 AM 4:36 AM 2:59 PM 4:59 PM Minor Times 8:34 AM 9:34 AM 9:16 PM 10:16 PM Major Times 3:21 AM 5:21 AM 3:43 PM 5:43 PM Minor Times 9:29 AM 10:29 AM 9:51 PM 10:51 PM Major Times 4:06 AM 6:06 AM 4:29 PM 6:29 PM Minor Times 10:25 AM 11:25 AM 10:26 PM 11:26 PM Major Times 4:52 AM 6:52 AM 5:16 PM 7:16 PM Minor Times 11:23 AM 12:23 PM 11:03 PM 12:03 AM Major Times 5:40 AM 7:40 AM 6:05 PM 8:05 PM Minor Times 12:21 PM 1:21 PM 11:44 PM 12:44 AM Major Times 6:31 AM 8:31 AM 6:58 PM 8:58 PM Minor Times --:---:-1:22 PM 2:22 PM Major Times 7:25 AM 9:25 AM 7:53 PM 9:53 PM Minor Times 12:28 AM 1:28 AM 2:24 PM 3:24 PM Better++ Good Average Average Average Average Average7:00 am 8:24 pm 8:35 am 9:17 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:01 am 8:23 pm 9:30 am 9:52 pm 7:01 am 8:22 pm 10:26 am 10:27 pm 7:02 am 8:21 pm 11:23 am 11:04 pm 7:02 am 8:21 pm 12:22 pm 11:44 pm 7:03 am 8:20 pm 1:23 pm --:-7:04 am 8:19 pm 2:25 pm 12:29 am9% 15% 22% 28% 35% 42% 49% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 13A On July 26, Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated an animal complaint from Wakulla County Animal Control. A complaint was received about a dead animal smell and vultures on a nearby fence on Drew Lane in Crawfordville. The skeletal remains of a dog were discovered. There was nothing left of the animal except bones and a collar attached to a stationary object in a dog pen. No food or water was discovered on the scene. A live dog was found under a porch at the residence that was undernourished with no food or water. Animal Control Of“ cer Bonnie Brinson took the dog back to the animal shelter for care. The next day Sgt. Muse spoke to the property owner and turned the case over to Deputy Alan Middlebrooks who interviewed the dog owner. Stephanie Louise Vautier, 20, of Crawfordville was charged with animal cruelty and issued a notice to appear in court. The family told Deputy Middlebrooks that they did not want the surviving dog back if there is a fee to recover it. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week:FRIDAY, JULY 26€ Pollie Lawhon of Sopchoppy reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were reported on the victims bank account. The charges were created at a Wal-Mart in Avon, Ind., and were valued at $1,000. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € James Harvey of Pilgrim Rest Primitive Baptist Church in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone used a motor vehicle to create donutsŽ on the church grass and parking lot. Damage to the church property is estimated at $500. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Benjamin Curtis Olive of Tallahassee backed a Culligan water truck into a vehicle owned by Deanna Murphy of Alligator Point at 2887 Crawfordville Highway. There were no injuries and minor damage was estimated at $500. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € A 17-year-old Crawfordville juvenile backed a Chevrolet Tahoe into a Chevrolet Trailblazer owned by Elaine Gary of Crawfordville at Beef O Bradys in Crawfordville. There were no injuries and damage to each vehicle was estimated at $1,800. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Lt. Bruce Ashley investigated a criminal mischief at the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce of“ ce in Crawfordville. Someone broke a window with a small projectile. Damage is estimated at $200. € Brenda Aaron of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief at the Panacea Lighthouse Motel. One of the motel rooms was trashed and vandalized by a previous renter. Damage was observed to the couch, wall, ceiling, bed and other items. Additional damage was observed by Deputy Elisee Colin including vandalism and profanity on the wall and mirror. Damage was estimated at $1,000 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. € Patrick Harvey of Crawfordville reported the theft of property from his boat. Someone cut the gas line on his boat motor and stole the gasoline and the gas tanks. The total value of the stolen and damaged property is $100. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € Jeorg Weinheimer of Germany was involved in a traf“ c crash on Spring Creek Highway and U.S. Highway 98 with a rental vehicle. The victim ordered a new rental vehicle the next day and was adjusting the seat when he discovered a loaded .357 revolver valued at $600 under the seat. He turned the weapon, ammunition and holster over to the WCSO. The weapon was not reported stolen and was turned over to the Evidence and Property Division. Deputy David Pienta investigated.SATURDAY, JULY 27€ Jason Creech of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Audio equipment was stolen from the vehicle. The stolen property is valued at $1,220 and the vehicle was left unsecured. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Kelli Moody of Crawfordville reported that someone hacked into her computer which changed her computer settings and damaged her equipment. Deputy Ian Dohme and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. € James Doyle of Family Dollar in Crawfordville reported recovering narcotics inside the store. Two marijuana cigarettes were discovered in a shopping cart. The marijuana weighed one gram and was turned over to the Evidence and Property Division. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Sandra Cook of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and a game camera, knife and computer photographic equipment, valued at $500, was stolen. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated.SUNDAY, JULY 28€ Raquell Revells of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A relative of the complainant left her wallet inside her vehicle for a short time and returned to “ nd it stolen. The wallet and contents are valued at $100. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston investigated. € Garland Landers Jr. of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A lawnmower, valued at $150, was stolen from the property. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Della Hattery of Crawfordville reported the theft of money. The victim was at Winn-Dixie when she requested cash from the self checkout machine. She dispensed $25 from the machine but failed to take the money before leaving the store. Suspect evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Gary Simmons Jr. of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone keyedŽ the victims vehicle. Damage was estimated at $50. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated.MONDAY, JULY 29€ Jonathan Youngblood of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone smashed the victims passenger window of the truck. Damage was estimated at $250. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Maxine Glenn of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A forced entry was observed at the home. Damage to the door was estimated at $300. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Thomas Porter Jr. of Sopchoppy reported the theft of currency, a ” ashlight and cell phone, valued at $135. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Ashley Gordon of Crawfordville reporting discovering an illegal narcotic growing on the side of Navajo Trail in Crawfordville. A single marijuana plant was extracted from the side of the road and placed into the Evidence and Property Division for destruction. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Charles Dennison of Tallahassee reported the theft of a car battery and tools, valued at $130. The tools were taken to a friend in Panacea who refuses to return them. Detective Cole Wells talked to the complainant and the friend and the friend turned the property over to Detective Wells who turned the property into the Property and Evidence Division until Dennison picks them up.TUESDAY, JULY 30€ A 17-year-old Tallahassee juvenile reported missing in Tallahassee was found in Wakulla County. The runaway male teenager was found and a guardian was contacted in Tallahassee. The guardian refused to pick up the teenager in the Ace High Stables Road area and Deputy Vicki Mitchell made arrangements with the Tallahassee Police Department to turn the child over to a TPD Of“ cer. € Lorna Conner of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her vehicle. The vehicle was left unsecured at the time of the theft. The medications are valued at $78. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Beverly Blocker of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag. The tag is valued at $80. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € James Herring of Sopchoppy reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed. Firearms and ammunition were stolen and approximately $100 worth of damage was done to the home. The missing property is valued at $6,300. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Stephen Simmons and Detective Cole Wells investigated. € Jill Sasser of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim reported the theft of a purse from her unsecured vehicle. The purse and contents are valued at $104. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Tyler Whyard of Tallahassee reported a vehicle burglary. The victim parked his vehicle near a sinkhole off U.S. Highway 319 and C.J. Spears Road and returned to “ nd the vehicle window broken and a purse stolen from inside. The purse and contents are valued at $151. Suspects have been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Ruby Barnes of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victims son had his bicycle stolen out of her garage. The bike is valued at $100. Deputy Richard Moon investigated.WEDNESDAY, JULY 31€ Justin Millians of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A “ rearm was stolen from the victims unlocked vehicle. The theft is believed to have occurred in Sopchoppy. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Randal Roe reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and items within the home were disturbed. Damage to the door was estimated at $100. An electronic game system, valued at $150, was reported missing. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Deputies Ian Dohme and Alan Middlebrooks responded to the Spring Creek Highway Stop and Save store. Both deputies were preparing to deliver a child for a pregnant woman. Wakulla EMS arrived in scene and transported the female to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital before the baby arrived in the world at the store. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 978 calls for service during the past week including 10 residential and business alarms; 78 citizen contacts; 13 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 3 regular E-911 abandoned calls; 28 regular E-911 calls; 51 investigations; 41 medical emergencies; 338 business and residential security checks; 16 special details; 32 subpoena services; 14 suspicious people; 11 thefts; 26 traf“ c enforcements; 105 traf“ c stops; 10 disabled vehicles; and 14 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportStaff ReportThe Florida Supreme Court permanently disbarred Crawfordville attorney Richard Reno in June. According to The Florida Bar, Richard William Reno, P.O. Box 368, Crawfordville, was permanently disbarred, effective immediately, following a June 12 court order. He was admitted to practice: 1998. Reno was found in contempt for non-compliance with the terms of an April 16 disbarment order. He was ordered to notify all his clients, opposing counsel and tribunals of his disbarment, and provide The Florida Bar within 30 days of the disbarment, a sworn af“ davit listing the names and addresses of all persons and entities that were furnished a copy of his disbarment order. (Case No. SC13-20) The Florida Bar, the states guardian for the integrity of the legal profession, announced that the Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders disciplined 25 attorneys, disbarring eight, suspending 15 and publicly reprimanding two. As an official arm of the Florida Supreme Court, The Florida Bar and its Department of Lawyer Regulation are charged with administering a statewide disciplinary system to enforce Supreme Court rules of professional conduct for the 96,000-plus lawyers admitted to practice law in Florida. Case “ les are posted to attorneys individual Florida Bar pro“ les and may be reviewed at and/or downloaded from The Florida Bars website, www.” oridabar.org. Court orders are not “ nal until time expires to “ le a rehearing motion and, if “ led, determined. The “ ling of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline. Disbarred lawyers may not re-apply for admission for five years. They are required to go through an extensive process that rejects many who apply. It includes a rigorous background check and retaking the bar exam. Historically, less than “ ve percent of disbarred lawyers seek readmission.Supreme Court disbars Crawfordville attorney 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & ModelsOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Celebrating 8 Years … in Wakulla … 850-926-2700

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Aug. 2 … Outrage has become the latest trend during the long, hot summer days in Tallahassee. Democrats found themselves outraged over the past actions of now-former Education Commissioner Tony Bennett, who was himself outraged at politically motivatedŽ reports about grading policies in Indiana. The Rev. Jesse Jackson stopped by to express his outrage during protests aimed at overhauling the states self-defense laws and other policies. And Jacksons comments -where he seemed to compare Florida to Selma and South Africa, and Gov. Rick Scott to George Wallace … drew well over a dozen statements of outrage from Republicans. By the end of the week, it seemed that many people in the Capitol could use something to help them calm down. And John Morgan was more than happy to help. UNTIL YESTERDAY In less than eight months on the job, Bennett had already shown a ” air for the ambitious. He continued work to put the national common coreŽ education standards in place. He began work on a reorganization of the Department of Education. And instead of waiting for poor school grades to be unveiled … a mistake that tripped up his predecessor, Gerard Robinson … Bennett acted to curb the damage when superintendents “ rst raised warnings of a possible public-relations disaster. But it was something from Bennetts past that took less than a week to end his time as the top education of“ cial in Florida. On Monday, an Associated Press report out of Indiana said that Bennett, while the elected superintendent of public instruction in that state, and his employees frantically overhauledŽ the Hoosier States school-grading system in 2012 in a way that bene“ ted one of Bennetts political contributors. The changes came after state officials realized that Christel House, a school founded by Christel DeHaan, might get a grade as low as a CŽ in the “ rst edition of state report cards to use the letter-grade system. As a superintendent fighting for strong accountability measures, Bennett had touted Christel Houses success. They need to understand that anything less than an A for Christel House compromises all of our accountability work,Ž Bennett wrote in one email obtained by the AP. Bennett defended himself Tuesday, saying Christel Houses grade raised legitimate concerns about the grading system in Indiana. While the AP reported that the emails it obtained pointed to algebra results as part of the problem, Bennett said education of“ cials “ gured out it was largely because Christel Houses high school and 12 others hadnt yet added an 11th or 12th grade. The rule governing grades in Indiana, though, required graduation rates to be included in high school grades. That calculation unfairly penalized those 13 schools,Ž Bennett said during the 40-minute conference call. We found that and we “ xed that in order to give a true, transparent grading model for Indiana schools.Ž By that point, some Democrats already sensed blood in the water. A trio of lawmakers called Wednesday for Bennett to resign, including a pair of House members who held a conference call to pressure the commissioner. I think we deserve to know if hes brought his pay-to-play tactics to Florida also,Ž said Rep. Janet Cruz, D-Tampa, even as she conceded that there was no evidence that he had. The next day, Bennetts detractors got their wish. Saying he didnt want to be a distraction, Bennett resigned Thursday even as he continued to defend his actions. He stepped aside despite reported pressure from Scott and State Board of Education Chairman Gary Chartrand to stay. The decision to resign is mine and mine only because I believe that when this discussion turns to an adult we lose the discussion about making life better for children,Ž Bennett said. Bennett became at least the 11th department head hired during Scotts term to have resigned; the governor is also on his third chief of staff and is still looking for a replacement for Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll. The next education commissioner, who will technically be selected by the State Board of Education, will be the fourth permanent head of the agency to serve under Scott. The turmoil has fueled calls for the state to go back to electing its schools chief. On Friday, the board tapped Pam Stewart to serve as interim education commissioner, a job she held before Bennett was hired in December. STILL STANDING THEIR GROUND Meanwhile, a sit-in at Scotts of“ ce aimed at sparking a special session to review the states self-defense laws neared the three-week mark with no signs of dissipating. Scott returned to the Capitol on Monday, but largely maintained a busy travel schedule that has kept him out of the of“ ce for most of the sit-in. The governor did not meet with the protesters, but they did get a couple of visitors. One was unlikely; Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, stopped by despite disagreeing with the protesters on whether the state should call a special session to review the controversial stand your groundŽ law. Beshears said that any review could wait until the Legislature comes back for its regularly scheduled session in 2014. I agree with stand your ground, its a good law,Ž Beshears said. I think it has great intention. I disagree with the application in some cases. But like any good law, there is always some bad applications, but theyre very minor.Ž Scott has said repeatedly that he will not call a special session to appease the protesters, who also want the state to end zerotolerance discipline policies in schools and approve initiatives to combat racial pro“ ling. The protesters began the part-vigil, part-siege protest after George Zimmerman was acquitted of second degree murder in the 2012 shooting death of 17year-old Trayvon Martin. The law was not used as part of Zimmermans defense, but has become associated with the incident. On Tuesday, the Dream Defenders, a group leading the protest, got a visit from a higherpro“ le “ gure and a veteran of the civil-rights movement … the Rev. Jesse Jackson. Jackson invoked Selma in remarks to reporters, telling them that massive non-violent resistanceŽ was justi“ ed until Florida changed its behavior. And he seemed undaunted by Scotts repeated insistence that the governor has no intention of calling the special session. We hope that the moral appeal and the urgency of the matter will change his mind,Ž Jackson said. Weve seen Southern governors before have to change their minds.Ž Jackson listed infamous segregationist George Wallace, a former governor of Alabama, as one of those of“ cials who had to change his mind. Combined with the Selma remark and an earlier reported comment calling Florida an apartheid state,Ž Jackson set off a “ restorm. Scott didnt address the Wallace slam, but demanded Jackson apologize for the Selma and South Africa comparisons. Jackson refused, drawing another statement from Scott. Its disappointing that Jesse Jackson refused to apologize yesterday for his insulting and in” ammatory comments about Floridians. Instead, he doubled down on his divisive and reckless remarks,Ž Scott said. Other members of the GOP also kept up the pressure, with the Republican Party of Florida sending out daily emails with new lists of lawmakers making sure that the press was aware of their outrage. One of the “ rst to speak out, though, was Pensacola Rep. Mike Hill, the only black Republican in the Legislature. When Jackson uses language that describes us as an apartheid state and compares our governor to one of historys most notorious bigots, he is either hopelessly out of touch or purposefully dishonest,Ž Hill said. HEMP VOTES The week was not all about anger. Orlando attorney John Morgan … whose personal-injury “ rm employs former Gov. Charlie Crist … traveled to Tallahassee on Thursday to pitch his plan to legalize medical marijuana. He told the Capital Tiger Bay Club that he learned about the magic weeds therapeutic power when his father was dying of esophageal cancer 20 years ago. I know it works because I have seen it,Ž Morgan said. Are we going to do whats right, or are we going to get hung up on the word drug? The attorney denied his efforts had anything to do with the possible political future of Crist, a Republican-turned-independentturned-Democrat who could be on the ballot in 2014, when Morgan hopes voters will decide the future of cannabis. Others werent so sure. Susan MacManus, a political science professor at the University of South Florida, said putting hotbutton issues on the ballot as constitutional amendments can mobilize potential supporters. And thats why, historically in Florida, both parties have often turned to some of these kinds of issues to get non-traditional voters … and were spelling out here, young voters … to the polls,Ž she said. STORY OF THE WEEK: Education Commissioner Tony Bennett resigns after reports that he altered the school grading formula in Indiana in a way that bene“ ted a school founded by a political contributor. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: I dont intend to move one damn comma on the stand your ground law.Ž … Rep. Matt Gaetz, R-Fort Walton Beach, chairman of the House Criminal Justice Subcommittee, which will review the law.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)An outrageous summer in TallahasseeBy DAVIDWHITEWine one is a white wine. Its clear, star-bright, and theres no evidence of gas or ” occulation.Ž Some movies rely on grand battles and epic “ ght scenes to keep audiences on the edge of their seats. Somm,Ž a new documentary from Jason Wise about three students aiming to join the Court of Master Sommeliers, attempts to captivate viewers with wine evaluation. And it succeeds. When Ian Cauble, a master sommelier candidate, assesses an Australian Riesling early on in Somm,Ž its impossible to look away. Before even tasting whats in his glass, Cauble detects notes of lime candy, lime zest, crushed apples, under-ripe mangos, under-ripe melon, and melon skin.Ž As he describes the wine, Cauble speaks with the conviction of a preacher and as quickly as an auctioneer. The ” orid jargon comes out at a mile a minute … and its riveting. During the courts “ nal exam … a two-day test divided into three sections … each sommelier is expected to identify six unlabeled glasses of wine by variety, country, district and appellation of origin, and vintage, all within 25 minutes. Candidates must also pass a verbal theory examination that tests their knowledge of virtually everything in the world of wine, from the regions and villages where grapes are grown to the reasons why some vintages are better than others. Finally, candidates must impress existing master sommeliers with their service skills. Theyre judged on their ability to open and decant wine, speak eloquently about cigars, spirits, and wineand-food pairing, and even resolve con” icts with unruly guests. Virtually everyone fails. Fewer than 10 percent of master sommelier candidates pass the “ nal exam. Since its inception in 1977, just 202 professionals worldwide have earned the title of master sommelier. Many exceptionally talented sommeliers never pass. At the most recent seating … held in Dallas in July … just one of 70 candidates succeeded. Its no wonder the exam is often described as the hardest test youve never heard of.Ž The three men at the center of SommŽ are tremendously likeable. Unlike the snooty wine stewards of yesteryear, Ian Cauble, Brian McClintic, and Dustin Wilson are young, funny, and approachable. If anything, theyre too bro-ish … the friends seem to split their time between studying for the exam and trash talking each other. But its refreshing to see sommeliers who would be just as comfortable shotgunning beers in a frat house as evaluating highend Bordeaux at a French chateau. Its no wonder why Brians wife, Kristin, describes the three men as guys in a locker room, with wine bottles.Ž The supporting characters are just as endearing. DLynn Proctor, another exam candidate, isnt just the best-dressed man in the “ lm … hes also the most con“ dent. But that con“ dence evaporates on exam day when he leaves the hotel to “ nd a doctor who will prescribe a steroid to clear his nasal passages. Fred Dame, Americas first master sommelier, seems cantankerous at first. But it quickly becomes obvious that hes rooting for every candidate to pass. Reggie Narito, another master sommelier, is cool and calm as he mentors the students … even when it seems as if Ian Cauble is on the edge of a nervous breakdown. The documentary isnt without ” aws. But this is Jason Wises “ rst feature “ lm, so some shortcomings can be forgiven. Early in Somm,Ž Reggie Narito confesses that hes only cried on a handful of occasions: when his parents died; when his children were born; and when he passed the master sommelier exam. At “ rst, the admission seems ludicrous. But by the end of Somm,Ž even viewers will cry when test results are announced. SommŽ is still playing in a handful of theaters, but its easiest found through iTunes, Amazon Instant Video, and Comcast On Demand. Itll be available on DVD on Sept. 3.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com, which was named Best Overall Wine BlogŽ at the 2013 Wine Blog Awards. WHITE’S WINES‘Somm’ captivates viewers with wine evaluation -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 15A OUR FAMILY WELCOMES YOU! OUR FAMILY WELCOMES YOU! Event Located at BACK TO SCHOOL HEALTH FAIR FRIDAY August 9th, 2013 2:00-4:00 p.m. FREE SCREENINGS FREE SCHOOL SUPPLIES TO THE FIRST 150 SCHOOL AGE CHILDREN In Celebra on of Na onal Health Center Week Eve n t Loc a ted a at 1328 Coastal Hwy, Panacea (850) 984-4735 We Welcome Dr. Lysmar “Carrion” Dinguis We Listen. We Care. Call us at We Listen. We Care. Call us at (850) 984-4735 PRIMARY CARE New Patients Welcome ~ Same Day Appointments Family Medicine ~ Well Care ~S chool Physicals ~ Sports Physicals Immunizations / Vaccines ~ Well Woman Exams Medicare Physicals, Self Pay, Medicare, Medicaid CHP, BCBS Most Other Insurance Accepted Discount Slide Fee Program & Discount Prescription Program www.NFMC.org

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comThe dog days of August have settled over Wakulla County. This period is typi“ ed by the hot, humid days and nights which induces languid behavior in most of the residents, human or not. Dog days began during the ancient Roman Empire when Sirius, identi“ ed as the Dog Star, was present in the skies. If Sirius was angry the weather heated up more. Even today there is a muted tone to the days as the temperature heads up. Only the buzz of the occasional insect can be heard during the warmer parts of the day. Nights are different when Sirius soars above. There is a manic, raucous quality under the diamond sparkling star light as temperatures retreat to the manageable level while humidity surges to the saturation point. Barred owls call out boisterously through the shadowy haze as familiar forms convert to strange shapes. Creatures great and small will probe in the dark and gloom for meals, mates and territory to claim. The greatest clamor comes from the ponds and swamps with blend of frog species populating the waters and shore. The rolling chorus surges and retreats as round after round pluses through the night. The bullfrogs bassbaritone voices penetrate the night air with a steady cello like chord. The largest native frog in North America, it reaches a maximum body length of eight inches. The bullfrogs diet consists of just about any animal it can fit in its mouth and swallow. This includes, but is not limited to insects, snakes, small turtles, tadpoles, rodents, cray“ sh, and other frogs. It will, given the opportunity, cannibalize its own kind by eating other bullfrogs. Bullfrogs demonstrate various forms of aggression to establish social and mating dominance. Its stance is a key factor in establishing social position and intimidating challengers, bellowing through the night. The Southern Leopard Frog adds to the nocturnal pandemonium with its grunting and chirping voice. It is generally green or brown in color, with a distinct light spot occurring in the center of its eardrum. It has a long and distinctly pointed head, and a light line extends along its upper jaw. The dark spots on the upper surface of its body are highly variable in occurrence, and often elongated. Like the bullfrog, the southern leopard frog is indiscriminately carnivorous. Insects, worms, spiders, and any other animal it can stuff in its three and a half inch body are on the menu. Native tree frogs are well adapted to life in forested environment in and around swamps. Their toes have adhesive disks that allow them to climb easily on bark or twigs. Their high-pitched staccato chirping contributes to the orchestral quality of the nightly amphibian concert. Because they often appear or are heard during rain storms, folklore and legends regard these frogs to be weather prophets.Ž They too are indiscriminately carnivorous. Little fish or tadpoles, mosquitos and any other tiny animal it can catch in its inch long body are used to energize the little frogs with the big voices. To learn more about frogs in Wakulla County contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u” .edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.During Dog Days, the frogs are loud at night Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe southern leopard frog, above, adds to the nocturnal pandemonium during the Dog Days of summer with its grunting and chirping voice. WAKULLA SENIOR CITIZENS CENTER THANKS YOU FOR SPONSORING CHRISTMAS IN JULY CHRISTMAS IN JULY2013 List of SponsorsAir-Con of Wakulla Bevis Funeral Home / Harvey-Young Chapel Centennial Bank Creative Bus Sale ESG Wakulla James Moore & Company Jared Miller / Trinity Food Service R.H. & Beverly Carter Sheriff Charlie Creel The Wakulla News Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee Wakulla Insurance Agency Wal-Mart WCTV / Channel 6

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 Winter in Paris – a great time to see the city of light Travel, Page 10B The Eight Limbs, Yoga for LifeTry exercising outdoors, Get Fit Health & Fitness, Page 4B What are ‘ghost factories’?EarthTalk, Page 3B Yes, the rumor that is circulating in the county is correct. The Green Living Expo will be held again. After a few years of not holding the event, a committee is forming to re-launch it in celebration of Earth Day. It will be held on Saturday, April 26. Our last Expo realized 700 attendees and many expressed interest in its continuance. Its time has come again and we would like you to consider being a part of the planning as well as attending. The persons who gathered to discuss its continuance have identi“ ed, but are not limited to, issues that are often requested by Wakulla County residents for further education and discussion. The topics seem to “ t into three categories which include Coastal Sustainability, Food Security and Nutrition, and Water Conservation. Through additional planning, these categories may be changed, enhanced, re-thought and/ or expanded to enable us to have the educational experiences as worthwhile as possible. We will be locating innovative and knowledgeable practitioners and educators to assist with the presentations and vendors to represent their product line. Everyone knows that it takes a great deal of work to realize the completion of an event like this. Would you consider being a part of the planning team? Because there are so many aspects of the planning, volunteers can determine how much they want to invest. Would you consider serving on the overall planning committee, work with logistics, plan the program, market, or recruit and coordinate the educational workshops and vendors? You can be as involved as you chose to be. Many of the things could be completed without ever having to attend a meeting! Please consider this opportunity. The Green Living Expo speaks to the very nature of the county we live in … sustainable living practices that will allow the beautiful Wakulla County environment to remain for generations to come. We are having a planning meeting on Thursday, Aug. 22, at our of“ ce, UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension, 84 Cedar Avenue, Crawfordville at 6:30 p.m. Want to learn more before this meeting? Call me at 926-3931 to discuss any ideas and suggestions you have. SEWING SKILL UPDATE Come join a group of people who have varying degrees of expertise who are wanting to learn/refresh their sewing skills. We are meeting on Monday, Aug. 12, at the Extension Of“ ce at 6:30 p.m. and plan to re-purpose shirts into aprons. Many sewing skills can be learned and reviewed as you make a creative, re-purposed item. Men and women of all ages attended our last workshop and many agreed that they wanted to learn more. Class size is limited so call 926-3931 today to get all the details and/or to enroll. NO TIME TO COOK! WORKSHOP Eating healthy meals doesnt mean you need to spend hours in the kitchen. A little planning, a well-stocked kitchen and quick-“ x tricks will help get healthy meals on your table with minimal effort. Join the cooking school participants to try quick-“ x tricks and taste test recipes in this handson workshop. It will be held on Tuesday, Aug. 20 from 6 to 8 p.m at the Extension Of“ ce. To cover the materials, including food, a $15 payment is requested while no one will be turned away if unable to “ nancially assist. Pre-registration is necessary. Call 926-3931 to enroll. Shelley Swenson is Wakulla County UF/IFAS FCS Agent III. She can be reached at 926-3931.By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Green Living Expo is revisitedBy LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSON of the Extension Of“ ceWakulla Countys gardens are still producing in August. Granted, the choice of crops is limited to a few stalwarts able to handle the 90 degree temperatures, high humidity and the chronic rains, some of which have been brutal in their hammering abuse of vegetable plants. While many plants planted in the spring have reached the end of their seasonal run, peppers at the UF/IFAS Wakulla County demonstration garden are still delivering their tasty, and in some cases “ ery, delicacy. This popular vegetable grows well in Wakulla County and is a popular addition to fresh salads, the basis for many secret hot sauces, and a staple for stir fry and other ethnic dishes. Peppers, both sweet and hot, common to Wakulla County are part of the Solanaceae plant family which includes tomatoes, potatoes and eggplant. This family also includes nightshade which is toxic. Historically, peppers have been part of the human diet in the Americas for almost 10,000 years. Archaeologists who specialize in botany think the chili pepper was domesticated and deliberately cultivated over 6,000 years ago in South America. Bell peppers are thought to be native to Mexico, Central America and northern South America. They proved so popular with the early explores that the seed were carried back to Spain along with all the gold, silver and new world emeralds. Cayenne peppers, native to the northeast coast of South America, were processed differently with they fell into the hands of French colonists. It was commonly ground into a “ ne powder and used as a seasoning agent. The name Cayenne comes from a town name in French Guiana of the same name were these hot specialties were once commonly grown. Over the years, pepper cultivars have made their way around the globe and into numerous local specialties and nationally known cuisines. Each move resulted in local plant breeders “ ne tuningŽ the plants to “ t local taste. Todays gardener has an excellent selection of pepper cultivars from which to choose. They can be cultivated using either seed or transplants. Pepper plants are a relative hardy garden vegetable with the potential to last, and produce peppers, for several years. Cold and frost will kill them. Transplants will take 70 to 90 days to produce peppers. Seed will take a week or two longer. The plants require about an inch and a half of rain per week during their growing season, and pollinators are very important to insuring the plants successfully set. Stinkbugs and leaf-footed bugs can damage the plants, but are more likely to injure the vegetable itself. Disease pressure in Wakulla County is not a common problem. Peppers are rich in vitamin C, a nutrient which is needed daily by the human body. Additionally, they are an excellent source of antioxidants, especially Lycopene. The UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension currently had Cayenne, Bell and Sweet Wax Peppers producing. Anyone interested is encouraged to visit during normal business hours. To learn more about growing and using cantaloupes in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Director and Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent. Peppers P e p p e r s Peppers I n t h e g a r d e n n o w : In the garden now: PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCayenne, Bell and Sweet Wax peppers are still producingFiery read Cayenne peppers at the Extension garden. Below, Bell peppers. Bottom, sweet peppers. DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Offer Expires Aug. 31, 2013850926-3212*10%OFFANY PURCHASEMAKING ROOM FOR CHRISTMAS STOCK*Must present original coupon from printed newspaper only. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 SCALLOP SEASON IS SCALLOPSEASON IS NOW OPEN10AM 7PM • Mon-Fri9AM 4PM • Sat 2591 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL Badcock.com 850926…2281 Please report orphaned or injured wildlife 363-2351

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, Aug 8 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Friday, Aug 9 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832.Saturday, Aug 10 LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.Sunday, Aug 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.Monday, Aug 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.Tuesday, Aug 13 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO is starting up its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library.Wednesday, Aug 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 4911684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsThursday, Aug. 8  BUDGET DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP for scal year 2013-2014 will take place in the commission chambers at 5 p.m.  CITY OF ST. MARKS will hold a public hearing on a request for variance beginning at 6:45 p.m. at City Hall. Monday, Aug. 12  PLANNING COMMISSION meeting will take place in the commission chambers at 7 p.m.  CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will hold its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. in the City Hall Commission Chambers. Thursday, Aug. 15  TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will meet at the welcome center in Panacea at 8:30 a.m. Monday, Aug. 19  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 6 p.m. in the commission chambers.  WAKULLA SCHOOL BOARD will hold its regular meeting at 5:45 p.m. in the School Board room, 69 Arran Road. Weekly meetings Special EventsFriday, Aug. 9  WHS CLASSES OF ‘76-’80 will be holding their collective reunion on Friday and Saturday evenings at 7 p.m. at the Shriner’s Club in Medart. Friday night’s theme is Urban Cowboy and Saturday night’s theme is Saturday Night Fever. $35 per person for all events. Please contact Brent Thurmond at forgump60@gmail.com or Pollie Lawhon at pollielawhon@hotmail.com or 591-2358. Saturday, Aug. 10  BIG HEARTED ANGELS will sponsor its 7th annual back to school shopping event for disadvantaged children. The goal of BHA is to take 150 children on our annual Back to School shopping spree, whose families are in need of assistance. Sponsorship for one child is $50. Donations of any amount will be greatly appreciated and are tax deductible. Sponsorships or donations may be made at AMERIS Bank. Please make checks payable to “Big Hearted Angels Inc.” Visit www.bigheartedangels.org for more information. The shopping spree will take place at Crawfordville Elementary from 8:30 a.m. until 9 a.m.  NAMI WAKULLA will host a sh fry and garage sale swap meet from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. at the vacant lot next to Lindy’s Chicken Restaurant on Hwy 319. The Garage sale and swap meet will start at 8 a.m. while the sh fry will begin at 11 a.m. Fish fry plates will cost $5 per plate and will have cat sh ngers, baked beans and coleslaw. If you are interested in setting up a booth call 926-1033 for booth applications. The cost is $15 for a 12x12 foot booth space. If you have garage sale items you wish to donate to NAMI Wakulla call our ofce for pickup and/or delivery.Monday, Aug. 12  OPEN HOUSES will take place at Riversprings Middle School and Wakulla Middle School from 4:30 to 7 p.m. Wakulla High School will also hold its Open House on Monday from 5:30 p.m. until 8 p.m. WILDERNESS COAST PUBLIC LIBRARIES’ (WILD) Governing Board will meet at 1:30 p.m. at the library. The meeting is open to the public. For more information, please call 997-7400. Tuesday, Aug. 13  OPEN HOUSES will be held at Wakulla PreKindergarten from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. Also, Crawfordville Elementary, Medart Elementary, Shadeville Elementary and Riversink Elementary will hold their Open Houses from 4:30 p.m. until 7 p.m.  THE SEED WORKSHOP will take place at Crescent Moon Organic Farm in Sopchoppy from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m. The workshop will demonstrate seed saving techniques for organic food grown in the southeast region including greens, lettuce, eggplant, peppers, okra, peas, corn, cucumbers, melons, squash, herbs, beets, carrots, onions, parsnips, cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, etc. Registration is $25 per person. For information about this and other sustainable development efforts, please contact Dr. Jennifer Taylor, Coordinator Small Farm Programs, FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs at famu.register@ gmail.com. Thursday, Aug. 15  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.Upcoming EventsFriday, Aug. 16  FAIRCLOTH AUTO & AC SPECIALIST has moved to 2235 Crawfordville Hwy and will be holding a ribbon cutting ceremony scheduled to begin at 11:45 a.m. with a grand opening celebration to begin at noon. Saturday, Aug. 17  CATHERINE CAMERON BOOK LAUNCH will be held at the Crawfordville Woman’s Club from 2 p.m. until 4 p.m. to celebrate the release of her book “Are You Looking for an Administrative Job?” Refreshments, books for sale and, of course, great fellowship will be offered. RSVP to bluewater5@ centurylink.net by August 10. Book is also available on www.amazon.com and www.bn.com. Thursday, Aug. 22  SUSTAINABLE BIG BEND INC will be holding a planning meeting at the IFAS Extension Of ce at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be in preparation for a Green Living Expo to celebrate Earth Day on April 26 of next year. Contact Shelley Swenson (sswenson@u .edu) if you have questions. Saturday, Aug 31  ARBOR DAY FOUNDATION will give away 10 free white owering Dogwood trees if you become a member by Aug 31. New members of the Arbor Day Foundation also receive The Tree Book, which includes information about tree planting and care, and a subscription to Arbor Day, the Foundation’s bimonthly publication. To receive the free white owering dogwood trees, send a $10 membership contribution to Ten Free Dogwoods, Arbor Day Foundation, 100 Arbor Ave., Nebraska City, NE 68410 or join online at arborday.org/august. Aug 8 –Aug 15 RED CARPET PREMIERE AT WCPL!! This Friday, Aug. 9 at 7 p.m. we are happy to announce that we will be hosting a red carpet premiere of the short “ lm that our Cinemaniacs Young Adult group has been working on all summer. In A Night on the Nautilus, a young boy falls asleep at the library and wakes to an adventure inspired by many of the books on the shelves, 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea in particular. This highly improvisational film is the product of hard work by children with ages ranging from 12-14 years old and, outside of some help editing, the work is 100% their own. Please come out for a 30 minute “ lm by some very talented kids and stay after to speak to our local Spielbergs, and for refreshments. SUMMER PROGRAM WRAP-UP After the event mentioned above, the 2013 Summer Program at WCPL will come to an end. We had nearly 200 children sign up and attend some portion of our program this summer. We had presenters from the Tallahassee Museum of Natural History and archeologists from the State come down and hold fun but informative programs for the kids. ESG, the Countys Public Works Department, came down on two days with diggers, and other big machines for the children to see and learn about. We had 8 fantastic performers from around the State of Florida as well as into Georgia come and entertain the families of Wakulla County with shows ranging from Sherlock Holmes, to magic, to songs and stories, along with much more. In our enrichment programs children ranging from infants to teens heard great stories, made some awesome crafts, worked on their own film, and maybe (shockingly!) learned a thing or two this summer while having all this fun. As always, our entire Summer Program is free to all thanks to the support of the Friends of the Library. Planning for our Summer Program actually begins in January and all of this would not be possible without the hard work of two very special people, Leilania Nichols and Molly Clore, WCPLs 2 Childrens Coordinators. Both of these ladies come up with great ideas for and work very hard for, the children who come into the library. They both think out of the boxŽ which you can see in the innovative programs they come up with and the fun they have running our Summer Program. If youve been lucky enough to attend even part of all the fun this summer, please take some time and thank Leilania & Molly for all of their hard work. Theyre already thinking about new ideas for next summer as well as some events during the fall and winter so keep an eye on us!By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News... NAMI WAKULLA FISH FRY & SWAP MEET next to Lindy’s 8 a.m. 2 p.m. OPEN HOUSE at RMS and WMS 4:30 7 p.m. WHS 5:30 p.m. 8 p.m. OPEN HOUSE at WAKULLA PRE-K 3 p.m. 5 p.m. ALL ELEMENTARY 4:30 p.m. 7 p.m. THE SEED WKSHP at Crescent Moon Organic Farm $25 11 a.m. 5 p.m.SaturdayMondayTuesdayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 3BDear EarthTalk: What are ghost factories?Ž Philip Walker Hartford, Conn. In April 2012, USA TODAY published a series entitled Ghost Factories,Ž a report on an investigation into lead contaminated soil in hundreds of neighborhoods around the U.S. where lead factories once operated. The investigation addressed the lack of action taken by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to test and clean up these sites despite having been warned in 2001 about the dangerous levels of lead contamination around the areas of these old facilities. The factories, which used a process called smelting to melt down lead, were in operation from the 1930s until the 1960s when they began to shut down. While the factories themselves may now be gone, their toxic legacy remains, as they have left behind significant amounts of poisonous lead particles in surrounding soils. The lead particles are particularly dangerous for children who live and play in these areas. Lead poisoning occurs when lead builds up in the body, often over a period of months or years,Ž reports the Mayo Clinic, adding that even small amounts of lead can cause serious health problems. Children under the age of 6 are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can severely affect mental and physical development [and] at very high levels...can be fatal.Ž Environmental scientist William Eckel warned government officials of the dangers of old lead factories in his research article Discovering Unrecognized Lead-Smelting Sites by Historical Methods,Ž which was published in the American Journal of Public Health in April of 2001. Eckel used EPA databases along with lead industry directories to compile a list of more than 400 possible factory sites around the country that may have been unknown or forgotten over time. In an effort to create some urgency for federal regulators, he paid to have the soil around eight of the sites tested and all but one exceeded the EPAs hazard level for residential areas. More recent soil tests done by USA TODAY revealed that all 21 areas that were examined in 13 states had potentially dangerous enough lead levels that children should not be playing in that dirt. This meant, of course, that cleanups of these sites had not been done. In response to Eckels “ ndings and the USA TODAY series, EPA has initiated work with states to survey the majority of the sites on the 2001 list, although records for many of the affected areas are incomplete. I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,Ž reports Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPAs Superfund program. She says her agency is open to reassessing sites that may need another look thanks to more recent information uncovered by USA TODAY. Unfortunately, ongoing federal budget woes mean that resources are severely limited. In fact, the EPA lacks funds to complete even previously scheduled Superfund remediation projects. In the meantime, individual homeowners can determine whether or not they live near a former lead smelter and can apply pressure to local authorities accordingly. USA TODAY has posted a free online map to help people “ gure out exactly where the danger zones might be. CONTACTS: USA TODAY Ghost Factories,Ž http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/news/nation/ lead-poisoning; Discovering Unrecognized LeadSmelting Sites by Historical Methods,Žwww. ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles/PMC1446633/ pdf/11291377.pdf. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine. com). Subscribe: www. emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www. emagazine.com/trial.What are ghost factories? Unsafe levels of lead contaminate soil in hundreds of neighborhoods around the U.S. where lead smelting facilities operated between the 1930s and 1960s. Children under the age of six are especially vulnerable to lead poisoning, which can severely affect mental and physical development. Pictured: Rusty remains at an old lead smelting mill.PHOTO BY SIMON BOWEN By JENNIFER TAYLORFAMU Small Farm ProgramWe are thrilled to be bringing the internationally known U.S. seed saving pioneer Ira Wallace of Southern Exposure Seed Exchange to the Tallahassee area. Southern Exposure Seed Exchange offers over 700 varieties of openpollinated heirloom and organic seeds selected for ” avor and regional adaptability. Wallace is a worker/ owner of the cooperatively managed Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. She is a member of Acorn Community which farms over 60 acres of certi“ ed organic land in Central Virginia, growing seeds, alliums, hay, and conducting variety trials for Southern Exposure. She serves on the boards of Organic Seed Alliance, Virginia Association for Biological Farming, and the Organic Seed Growers and Trade Association (OSGATA) … the lead plaintiffs in OSGATA et al v Monsanto. The Seed Workshop is important for all serious growers interested in saving their own seed, preserving local seed biodiversity and preserving small farm sustainability. During this hands-on capacity building workshop participants will learn: € Why Seed Saving Matters, € GMO Agriculture Issues and Your Farm or Garden, € Fundamentals of Good Seed Saving (crossers and selfers, how to promote good seed set, how to maintain your crops genetics, isolation, population size, roguing, etc.), € Dry and Wet Fermentation Seed Processing, € Simple Seed Cleaning and Storage Techniques, € How to plan seed saving for your Farm, and € The Business of Growing Seed for Farm and Sale, etc. The workshop will demonstrate seed saving techniques for organic food grown in the southeast region including greens, lettuce, eggplant, peppers, okra, peas, corn, cucumbers, melons, squash, herbs, beets, carrots, onions, parsnips, cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kohlrabi, etc. The 2013 Seed Workshop will be provided on Aug. 11, 12, and 13 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at three locations: € Aug. 11 at the FAMU Center for Viticulture and Small Fruit Research, 6505 Mahan Drive in Tallahassee. € On-farm learning will take place on Aug. 12 at Artzi Garden, 114 Artzi Drive in Thomasville, Ga., and € August 13, at Crescent Moon Organic Farm, 145 Crescent Moon Trail in Sopchoppy. The Seed Workshop is provided in collaboration with FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, Southern Exposure Seed Exchange, Ekanlaunee Seed Exchange, Leon County Extension, and local small farmers. Registration is $25 per person. FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs is an active participatory capacity building program designed to assist and equip underserved farming populations and their families toward a thriving sustainable development. For information about this and other sustainable development efforts, please contact Dr. Jennifer Taylor, Coordinator Small Farm Programs, FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs at famu.register@ gmail.com. Seed workshop includes Sopchoppy’s Crescent Moon FarmDEP NewsNew 2012 recycling data released by the Florida Department of Environmental Protection shows Floridas of“ cial recycling is 48 percent, up from 30 percent in 2011. This year marks the first time solid waste converted to fuel was counted toward the statewide recycling rate. Renewable energy credits are calculated based on the amount of electricity produced using waste as a fuel. Per Florida Statutes, each megawatt-hour of electricity produced by waste equals one ton of recycling. For 2012, there were 3.7 million megawatthours of electricity produced from both wasteto-energy facilities and the use of land“ ll gas. The statute was amended by the Florida Legislature in 2012 to promote the production of renewable energy from solid waste. Since this is the “ rst year the Department is using the renewable energy data to determine the total recycling rate, it is also important to recognize gains in the traditional recycling rate without the new renewable energy credits. The traditional recycling rate also increased in 2012, increasing by “ ve percent from 30 percent to 35 percent. As we get closer to the 2020 deadline for the 75 percent recycling goal, we need all Floridians to step up recycling efforts,Ž said Division of Waste Management Director Jorge Caspary. While we have made modest improvements, in order to reach this goal, the commercial sector must amplify its recycling efforts.Ž In 2008, the Florida Legislature first established a new statewide recycling goal of 75 percent to be achieved by 2020. In order for Florida to reach its 75 percent goal, DEP is urging all sectors, especially the commercial sector, to actively increase its recycling efforts. Commercial municipal solid waste accounts for approximately 55 percent of the total municipal solid waste stream in Florida. However, less than half of the commercial solid waste in Florida is being recycled according to the 2012 annual report. Increasing commercial recycling would have a substantial positive effect on the recycling numbers as a whole. DEP is again promoting its Recycling Recognition Program and attempting to bring more awareness, particularly to commercial recycling efforts throughout Florida. It is crucial that businesses, schools and other commercial recyclers increase their recycling efforts. DEP has an easy tool for companies to input data, track and compare their recycling efforts to that of other businesses … the Florida DEP Business Recycling Tracking Tool. According to the updated report, and looking at the traditional recycling rates, Alachua County remains atop the list of counties in the state for the third consecutive year. Hillsborough County made a signi“ cant improvement, increasing its traditional recycling rate from 28 percent in 2011 to 40 percent in 2012. Also making notable improvements is Broward County, jumping from 26 percent in 2011 to 37 percent in 2012. For total recycling rates including renewable energy credits, Lee and Martin Counties have the top two total recycling rates at 75 and 74 percent, respectively.Report shows need for increased commercial recyclingState recycling rate takes modest steps toward the 75 percent goal aimed at by 2020TOP 10 TRADITIONAL RECYCLING RATES, BY COUNTY: 1. Alachua, 54 percent 2. Martin, 49 percent 3. Sarasota, Brevard, 47 percent 4. Lee, St. Lucie, 44 percent 5. Leon, 43 percent 6. Duval, 42 percent 7. Orange, 41 percent 8. Hillsborough, Collier, 40 percent 9. Putnam, Escambia, 39 percent 10. Broward, 37 percent TOP 10 TOTAL RECYCLING RATES, BY COUNTY: 1. Martin, 75 percent 2. Lee, 74 percent 3. Hillsborough, 69 percent 4. Hendry, 67 percent 5. Pinellas, 63 percent 6. Pasco, 62 percent 7. Monroe, Broward, 59 percent 8. Alachua, 55 percent 9. Palm Beach, 54 percent 10. Collier, 51 percent… from DEP

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESS The question blossomed one afternoon during a teacher-training workshop: How might my work life have looked if I had lived yogas guiding principles when I began an asana practice in the early 1990s.Ž If I had learned about the Eight Limbs, outlined thousands of years ago by the Indian sage Patanjali, I am certain it would have helped me better navigate a challenging career. The qualities that serve me on the mat … strength, stability, flexibility and perseverance to name a few „ are equally valuable at work. Practicing other precepts off the mat makes me a better worker, a more skillful manager, and a more effective leader. Practicing yoga off the mat and on the job gives us benefits no one can take away. Here are a few suggestions based on the First Limb, known as Universal Morality. It is comprised of five precepts, called the yamas, that outline an ethical framework for the modern work environment. 1. Non-Violence (Ahimsa) You dont physically assault or verbally abuse people, so youre nonviolent, right? But ahimsa also asks us to do no harm. Subtle forms of violence are common in the workplace/home „ so accepted it becomes invisible. Do you cut others down to make yourself look better? Savage anothers ideas or reputation in meetings? Treat those who are different with contempt? How often do you make decisions affecting the lives of others without including them in the conversation? All of these have the potential to harm another. Practice Suggestion: Make a list of what you have to lose and what you have to gain by practicing ahimsa. What do you notice? What would you have to give up to gain the bene“ ts? 2. Non-lying (Satya) Truth has three facets. Telling the truth as you know it, being open to anothers truth, and recognizing that many things can be true at the same time. Satya at work/home also means taking responsibility for speaking up about dif“ cult issues with good will, and honoring others who do the same by developing the skill of intense, open listening and understanding. Practice Suggestion: List some of the ways you honor satya, and ways you could be violating it. What are the triggers in those situations? What are you trying to avoid, or gain? 3. Non-stealing (Asteya) Stealing money or stuffŽ is an obvious violation, but what about theft of time, ideas, credit, or … peoples reputation or dignity? Showing up on time to meetings, being mindful about who you copy on emails, and working ef“ ciently honors asteya. Also be aware of how you take credit for an idea or project. Practice Suggestion: Keep a time log for a week, jotting down each time youre late, or procrastinate or indulge in gossip. How much time was stolenŽ? What else was stolen? 4. Non-squandering of vital energies (Brahmacharya) Often interpreted as the celibacy clause,Ž the heart of this yama is really about respect for yourself and others „ including seeing people as people, not sex objects. Practicing this precept helps harness energy and time in ways that best serve the enterprise, instead of wasting them on unnecessary distractions. Indulging your cravings, especially when they lead to bad habits, could be another violation of brahmacharya. Practice Suggestion: Make a list of some of your cravings at work. What are the consequences of satisfying your cravings at work/home? Looking over the long term, what benefits have you derived? What consequences were you unhappy about? 5. Non-hoarding (Aparigraha) Greed is the provenance of much of the worlds suffering, and this precept asks that you take or use only what you truly need. When you “ nd yourself getting attached to things that dont truly belong to you (my office, my status, my parking spot, my people) youre in danger of violating aparigraha. Gratitude is a beautiful antidote to greed. Practice Suggestion: Make list of the reasons you work. Put them in order of importance to you. What do you notice? Sure, I wish I had known more about these yoga principles years ago. But the good news is „ its never too late to start!Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher at Studio 88 Dance Productions. She can be reached at (228) 380-0140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Going out on the Eight LimbsNow that the weather is warm, a lot of people are opting to exercise outdoors. This is always a great way to change your routine, learn a new sport or just get some fresh air. There are so many options for exercising outdoors. You can run, walk, swim, kayak or canoe alone or with friends. A walk or run on the beach is a great way to burn some calories and soak up some sun. You can play team sports and get your socialization and exercise at the same time! Cross “ t is always more interesting outdoors too! While exercising outdoors is fun and usually safe, you need to be careful to stay hydrated while you are out. Water or sports drinks are a great way to keep yourself going while you are having fun. Signs of dehydration include but are not limited to excessive thirst, headache, dizziness and dry mouth. Be sure to drink water or sports drinks on a regular basis the whole time you are outside. Sometimes we get to having such a good time, we forget to hydrate until dehydration has already occurred. Always err on the side of safety … if you or anyone you are with experience these or other symptoms, go indoors and get cool and hydrated immediately. So, get outside and enjoy the sun and fresh air. Try a new sport or activity. You might just “ nd your new passion. At the least, you will get moving and burn some calories and have fun!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. GET FITBy GENADAVIS For a change, try exercising outdoors Special to The NewsSkin cancer can affect anyone, and overexposure to the sun, a key risk factor for skin cancer, can occur at any time of year. Whether it is a hot, sultry day spent by the pool or a chilly day skiing the slopes, any exposure to the sun can result in skin damage that can increase a persons risk for skin cancer. Plus, certain areas of the body are more susceptible than others. HOW DOES SKIN CANCER FORM? When DNA, the material that encodes genetic information in all cells of the body, is damaged and the body cannot repair that damage, a persons risk for cancer increases. Damaged cells begin to grow and divide uncontrollably. Damaged skin cells that divide and spread can cause skin cancer. Because skin cancer tumors generally form in the outer-most layer of the skin known as the epidermis, skin cancer may be more readily apparent and detectable than many other cancers in the early stages. The American Academy of Dermatology says that 1 in 5 Americans will develop some form of skin cancer in their lifetime, while the Canadian Skin Cancer Foundation says that basal cell carcinoma, the most common form of skin cancer, affects 50,000 to 60,000 Canadians each year. WHERE IS SKIN CANCER MOST LIKELY TO APPEAR? Skin cancer is most likely to appear on the areas of the body most exposed to the sun. These include the head, face, neck, arms, and legs. Those who are bald or balding can also have skin cancer appear on their scalp. But skin cancer can develop anywhere on the body where there is skin, which makes it important to routinely check all areas of the body for indicators of the disease. A recent study by The Mayo Clinic found that, while skin cancer can affect anyone, young women are more likely to receive a diagnosis. The study indicated that melanoma, the most serious type of skin cancer, has increased by eight times for women under the age of 40 since 1970. Even children can get skin cancer. A study in the journal Pediatrics found that the number of cases of skin cancer among children and adolescents has been increasing each year by about 2 percent. TYPES OF SKIN CANCER There are three main types of skin cancer. They include basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and melanoma. € Basal cell carcinoma occurs in the basal cells, which are the lowest level of the epidermis. It can appear as a shiny translucent or pearly nodule, a sore that continuously heals and then reopens, a pink slightly elevated growth, reddish irritated patches of skin, or a waxy scar. € Squamous cell carcinoma occurs in the upper layer of the epidermis. It often looks like a crusty, red patch of skin. € Melanoma begins in the melanocytes, the cells in the epidermis that give the skin its color. Melanoma is the most deadly form of skin cancer because it can quickly spread into the lymph system of the body and organs. Melanoma can form in a preexisting mole or form a new mole. CAUSES OF SKIN CANCER Exposure to sunlight is the leading cause of skin cancer, according to the American Cancer Society. While the rays of the sun may be more intense during the summertime, any exposure to the sun can lead to skin cancer. The sun can re” ect off of snow and become concentrated. No matter how many layers a person wears during cooler weather, the head and neck area tends to remain exposed to the suns damaging UV radiation year-round. Skin cancer is most likely to occur in people with pale skin who have a tendency to burn or freckle when exposed to the sun. But everyone should be diligent and cover up when spending time outdoors. No one is immune to skin cancer, and the change of seasons does not lower a persons risk of getting the disease. Anytime a person is in the sun he or she runs the risk of UV exposure that can lead to skin cancer, which highlights the importance of taking preventive measures to safeguard yourself from skin cancer. Skin cancer is a concern, no matter what the season Adults and even children are susceptible to skin cancer when spending time outdoors.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 5B The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Acted Admit Apple Assist Avoid Blush Brief Crisper Dairy Diary Direct Dishes Draws Evenly Field Gates Greys Ground Heads Herself Hired Islands Ledge Lined Louder Lowlands Movie Narrow Noisy Opera Orbits Pencils Pleases Pools Posts Power Recipes Rooms Shrill Sings YOUR AD HERE Snows Solid Sweden Tempo Tense Third Touch Vision Waited Wizard Wounds The Wakulla News

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Raker FarmsVegetables are Here! U Pick -We Pick peas, squash & cucumbers 850-926-7561 or 850 -274 -8033 Advertise in newspapers across Florida One phone call puts your ad in 117 newspapers. Reach millions of Floridians for one low cost by calling 866.742.1373 or visit www .AdNetworks Florida.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Metal Roof InstallersNeeded immediately Tallahassee & surrounding areas, paid health insurance and weekly pay, paid vacation, must have valid Fl drivers license, will consider non experienced, and will train call 850-575-1168 Busy Automotive Shop needs:Shop helper, Tires, light mechanical experience helpful but not required. must have dependable transportation, good attitude and a willingness to work and learn. Apply in person at 2170 Crawfordville Hwy.Crawfordville Auto & Tire MAINTENANCE POSITIONPart time Experience a plus.Call (850) 984-4811 10:00 to 2:30Mon. through Fri. ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT TRAINEES NEEDED! Become a Certified Microsoft Professional! NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! SC Train can get you job ready ASAP! HS Diploma/GED PC/Internet needed! (888)212-5888 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Can You Dig It? Heavy Equipment Operator Training! 3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators.Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. National Certifications. VABenefits Eligible. 1-866-362-6497 TURN KEY SPECIALTY Sandwich Shop fo r Sale owner retiring, well est. clientele, just walk in and take over! email: gfurdock@gmail.com CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $450. 1st $450. Last NO PET References required (904) 548-8342 CRAWFORDVILLELake Ellen Drive 3/2 Doublewide, cold cental a/c, fenced yard, dishwasher, new carpet, recent paint. $715 + deposit, app and references, available now. 850-524-4090. MEDART3BR/1BAon acreage. CHA. Very clean and private. No Smoking. References required. $600mo., $400/Security (352) 493-2232 WOODVILLEAvailable 8/1, 5 mi south of Woodville, 2/2 w/office on 5 acres. $675 includes garbage pick up (850) 574-4354 SHELLPOINTAmazing views from 3rd story deck. Studio apartment with full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Fully furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6-month lease minimum. Linda 850-591-3306 CRAWFORDVILLEEfficiency apt for rent utilities included $550 pr mnth. refs reqd. Call 850-926-5575 or 850-459-7162 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualify.Call (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. Crawfordville2/1 with fireplace, deck, gas stove, AC/Heat $750 1st & last $60 monthly for water, Mysterious Waters (850) 926-7538 CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Duplex all appliance, ceiling fans, washer/dryer, newly renovated, carpets, $875 monthly $850 deposit, small pet ok (850) 694-6184 CRAWFORDVILLEWell maintained 3br/ 2 ba in Crawfordville. Convenient to excellent schools and the Gulf. Big shady yard with lots of room to park your boat. $950/ mo. First, last and deposit. Security check. 850-926-7865 Ochlockonee Baytwo homes available 3BR/3BAhome on canal, screened porch, garage/workshop, boatlift -$1075/month or 2BR/2BAhome on Bay, carport and storage shed $1000/month. First/Last/Deposit. References required. Call Carol Odell, Century 21 Silver Coast Realty, 850-984-5007 FOR SALE:2 Bdrm. 1 Bath House On 2 Acres 2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing Available with Easy Terms. WAC Call 855-847-6807. Absolute AuctionAndalusia, Alabama, Covington County, 188+/-acres offered in 5-8 acre parcels, combos/entirety, 3 houses, metal building, August 20,1:00pm. Gt auctions.com, 205.326.0833, Granger, Thagard & Associates, Jack F Granger, #873 117 S Lunar Terrace Inverness 2 bedroom. 2 bath. CB home, big yard, Move in ready. Clean as a whistle. Big Garage, plus Carport. GREAT BUY! $79,500. Owner 352-344-9290 OWNER MUST SELL! Beautifully wooded homesite located next to crystal clear mountain lake, WISPSki area and brand new golf Course-only $79,900. Adjoining lot sold for $249,900. Bank will finance. Call 301-387-8100, x 91 FORECLOSURE LAND LIQUIDATION! Own your own mountain retreat with National Forest access in the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains. 1+ acre mountain view homesite in gated mountain community, bargain priced at only $14,900 -way below cost! Paved road, municipal water, underground power. Financing. Call now 1-866-952-5303, x 32 Seth Scotts Heat & Air State Lic.Contractor #CAC1817434 Honest & Dependable Service, Installation, Repair & Maintenance: Residential & Commercial 12yrs Exp. 850-509-2405 5799-0808 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Invitation to Bid Inmate Commissary Wakulla County Sheriffs Office (WCSO) is withdrawing the request for proposal # 2013-001 for Inmate Commissary and Trust Fund Accounting Services. Wakulla County Sheriffs Office (WCSO) is accepting written proposals under RFP # 2013-002 from all qualified and interested parties for Inmate Commissary and Trust Fund Accounting Services. Parties interested in preparing a response to this RFP need to go to www.wcso.org and complete the requirements set forth in the attached documents. Under the proposal process of WCSO, the conditions as set forth herein are binding to the proposer to the extent you confirm acceptance by your binding signature, by an officer, on the cover letter. WCSO welcomes your response. WCSO reserves the right to reject any proposal found to be non-responsive, vague or non-conforming. WCSO also reserves the right at any time to withdraw all or part of this proposal request in order to protect its best interest. WCSO is not liable for any costs incurred by the party in preparing its response, nor is a response an offer to contract with your firm. Pursuant to Chapter 119, Florida Statutes, all proposal responses are subject to open records laws. August 8, 2013 5784-0815 TWN vs. Crosby, Michael Case No. 2003 DV 093 Summons PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2003 DV 093 TINA MARIE HAMMEL Petitioner vs. MICHAEL CROSBY Respondent SUMMONS: PERSONAL SERVICE ON AN INDIVIDUAL TO: TINA MARIE HAMMEL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL IMPORTANT A lawsuit has been filed against you. You have 20 calendar days after this summons is served on you to file a written response to the attached complaint/petition with the clerk of this circuit court, located at: ___________________ A phone call will not protect you. Your written response, including the case number given above and the names of the parties, must be filed if you want the Court to hear your side of the case. If you do not file your written response on time, you may lose the case, and your wages, money, and property may be taken thereafter without further warning from the Court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service or a legal aid office (listed in the phone book). If you choose to file a written response yourself, at the same time you file your written response to the Court, you must also serve a copy of your written reaponse on the party serving this summons at: Steven P. Glazer, 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327. 850-926-1234. If the party serving summons has designated e-mail address(es) for service or is represented by an attorney, you may designate e-mail address(es) for service by or on you. Service must be in accordance with Florida Rule of Judicial Administration 2.516. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents, upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. (You may file Designation of Current Mailing and E-mail Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be served at the address on record at the clerks office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings.ly Law Rules of Procedurejail Address. July 25 and August 1, 8 & 15, 2013 5798-0808 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that the Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a Financial Committee Meeting to approve invoices on August 15, 2013. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. CST at the law offices of Harrison, Sale, McCloy, 495 Grand Boulevard, Suite 206, Miramar Beach, FL. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or alicia.stephen@hdrinc.com. August 8, 2013 Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403 www.coastalgems.comPO Box 1268, Crawfordville, FL 32326850566-9293 Est. 2000 BUY NOW FOR BEST DEALS! Need more listings ƒ almost sold out!Carol Ann Williams, Licenced Real Estate Broker/ OwnerOPEN BAY, WALK TO THE BEACH Canal Front, Deep Water, Home Owners Swimming Pool, Tennis Court, Security Gate, Parking area for boat trailers. And A wonderful home in a bird sanctuary. AS-IS! MAKE OFFER! Lush green acreage, overlooking “eld. 5 acres being broken out of a larger piece. Mostly high land on a paved road. $29,000. OCHLOCKONEE RIVER FRONT Beautiful home high above the river, with wetlands below you to catch the water. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, Warm woods throughout. Short Sale. $159,000, make offer. 3Br 2Ba House $850 mo RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSTORAGE RENTALS AVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž “Specializing in new home construction”Congratulations JANE ROBINSONTOPPRODUCER JULY2013 WWW.REALESTATEWAKULLA.COMCoastwise Realty,Inc. 3295 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 850 524 8881jrobinsoncoastwise@embarqmail.com Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net A-1PRESSURE CLEANING 850-926-3399 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK C & P T OWING AND RECOVERY 2 2 C C C & & P P O W O W W O W HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC 850290-4058 # T156394LUXURY CRUISE & TRAVEL, INC.Linda Carterwww.Luxury-Cruising.comfor ALL Your Travel NeedsTrust your Vacation to your Local Agent! Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTSPROFESSIONAL, DEPENDABLE SPECIALIZING IN COASTAL PROPERTIESLICENSED& INSURED TERRY NELSON, JR. 850 933-0057 TERRY NELSON, JR. 850-933-0057 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN S ERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• S tump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSUREDSelling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 7B 5764-0815 TWN vs. Crosby, Michael Case No. 2003 DV 093 Motion to Dissolve Injunction PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 2003 DV 093 TINA MARIE HAMEL Petitioner vs. MICHAEL CROSBY Respondent MOTION TO DISSOLVE INJUNCTION COMES NOW, the respondent, MICHAEL CROSBY, by and through undersigned counsel to petition this honorable Court pursuant to F.S. 784.046 to dissolve the injunction in this cause and as grounds states: 1. On July 31, 2000, this honorable Court granted Ms. Cliftons petition for injunctive relief. 2. Since that time there has been a circumstantial change in circumstances in that Ms. Clifton no longer lives in the State, in fact, it has been discovered through local investigations, so far that she is currently on the run from the law. 3. There has never been any violation in the 13 years this injunction has been in place. There is obviously no danger to her. The scenario underlying the injunction no longer exists so that continuation of the injunction would serve no valid purpose. 4. Mr. Crosby request this relief because of the stigma attached to his record. He is greatly harmed by the stigma of having a DVI on his record. Whenever he applies for work the injunction serves as highly prejudicial in his pursuit of a job. WHEREFORE, Mr. Crosby seeks relief consistent with this Motion. Respectfully submitted, /s/STEVEN P. GLAZER 3 High Drive, Crawfordville, FL 32327 850-926-1234, Florida Bar No. 0789798 July 25 and August 1, 8 & 15, 2013 5788-0808 TWN Vs. Maxey, Wendy L. Case No: 2012-CA000245 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012 CA000245 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. WENDYL. MAXEYA/K/AWENDYL. MILLER;UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF WENDYL. MAXEY A/K/AWENDYL. MILLER; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; MALLARD POND HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 22nd day of August 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 52, MALLARD POND, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 56-57 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 15th day of July, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954)-779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Katrina D. Lacy Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E., Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 August 1 & 8, 2013B&H #292974 5789-0808 TWN Vs. Gill, William Case No: 652012CA000372 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000372 J JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff vs. WILLIAM GILL, et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: WILLIAM GILL, 1782 WOODVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32311 WILLIAM GILL, 2308 SPRING CREEK HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, 32327 WILLIAM GILL, 9013 SILVER OAK LN, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32311 TINA GILL, 1782 WOODVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32311 TINA GILL, 525 MASHES SANDS RD, PANACEA, FL 32346 TINA GILL, 1438 N MERIDIAN RD #1N, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 AND TO:All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the afore said Defendants. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Wakulla County, Florida: BEGIN AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION TWENTY SEVEN, TOWNSHIP THREE SOUTH, RANGE ONE EAST, (S.W. COR. OF E. 1/2 OF N.E. 1/4 OF N.W. 1/4 OF SEC. 27, T 3 S, R 1 E); THENCE RUN NORTH 510 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING; FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN EAST 1026.58 FEET TO THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF STATE ROAD NO. 363; THENCE RUN NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE WEST RIGHT OF WAY LINE OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 363 FOR 219.17 FEET; THENCE RUN WEST 963.82 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 210 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action, on Greenspoon Marder, P.A., Default Department, Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose address is Trade Centre South, Suite 700, 100 West Cypress Creek Road, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309, and the file original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice in THE WAKULLA NEWS on or before August 31, 2013; otherwise a default and a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Copy furnished to: A copy of this Notice of Action, Complaint and Lis Pendens were sent to the above-named Defendants at the last known address. IMPORTANT In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a reasonable accommodation to participate in this proceeding should, no later than seven (7) days prior, contact the Clerk of the Courts disability coordinator at 850-577-4401. If hearing or voice impaired, contact (TDD) (800)955-8771 via Florida Relay System. August 1 & 8, 2013 (23472.3834/AG) 5790-0808 TWN Vs. Linton, Gary Case #13-88-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 13-88-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. GARY F. LINTON et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated July 16, 2013, entered in Case No. 13-88-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and GARY F. LINTON a/k/a GARY FRANKLIN LINTON, a single man; PAUL DONALDSON a/k/a PAUL D. DONALDSON a/k/a PAUL DOUGLAS DONALDSON, a married man; LINTON & DONALDSON, PARTNERSHIP; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordsville Highway, Crawfordsville, Florida 32327, at 11 oclock a.m. on August 22, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, to-wit: Lots 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 and 38 in Block 50 of WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT FIVE, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, page 56 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH A 1973 FUTU DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME I.D. #G4806A TITLE #11009241 AND I.D. #G4806B TITLE #11009242. 5791-0808 TWN vs. Cook, Teressa Case No. 65-2010-CA-000101 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2010-CA-000101 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. : TERESSACOOK et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated June 20, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000101 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NAis the Plaintiff and TERESSACOOK; DANIELL. GUILDAY; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the22nd day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT AST. JOE PAPER COMPANYMONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 60 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 60 ADISTANCE OF 1135.23 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLYBOUNDARY19.93 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 46 SECONDS EAST 197.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 37 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 44 SECONDS EAST 12.72 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 39 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 233.77 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 43 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 39 SECONDS WEST 160.65 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 37 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 404.80 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 40 DEGREES 14 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 229.09 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A359 ALEXANDER ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on June 20, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10007362 WELLSLPS-CONV-R-csarwark-Team 1 -F10007362 Copies Furnish to: eservice@wolfelawfl.com **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. August 1 & 8, 2013 F10007362 5792-0808 TWN Sumner, Alpha L. 12-283-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY CASE NO.: 12-283-CA HANCOCK BANK, a Mississippi banking corporation, as assignee of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, as Receiver for Peoples First Community Bank, a Florida banking Corporation, Plaintiff, v. ALPHAL. SUMNER Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, pursuant to the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure, entered in this cause, will sell the property at public sale to the highest bidder for cash, except as set forth hereinafter, on August 22, 2013, 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, the following described real property lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, to-wit: Lots 3 of CEDAR CREEK ESTATES, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 2, Page(s) 33, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. This Notice dated this 20th day of June, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk, of Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk August 1 & 8, 2013 5800-0815 TWN Vs. Anderson, Janith 12-CA-000318 Re-Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.: 12-CA-000318 RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS, INC. Plaintiff, vs. JANITH ANDERSON, UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF JANITH ANDERSON UNKNOWN TENANT(S) IN POSSESSION #1 AND #2, AND ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES, et al. Defendant(s). RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated June 20, 2013 and an Order Rescheduling the Foreclosure Sale dated July 18, 2013, entered in Civil Case No.: 12-CA-000318 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein RESIDENTIAL CREDIT SOLUTIONS, INC, Plaintiff, and JANITH ANDERSON is Defendant. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash in the Front Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32326 at 11:00 AM, on the 29th day of August, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOT 28, BLOCK 26, GREINERS ADDITION TO THE TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on July 18, 2013 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Attorney for the Plaintiff: Brian L. Rosaler, Esquire, Popkin & Rosaler, P.A. 1701 West Hillsboro Boulevard, Suite 400, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442. Telephone: (954) 360-9030 Facsimile: (954) 420-5187. August 8 & 15, 2013 11-31464 5802-0815 TWN Vs. Porter, Sue Lynn Case No: 2012-CA-000476 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-CA-000476 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, SUE LYNN PORTER; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUE LYNN PORTER; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; BENEFICIALFLORIDA, INC., and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 29th day of August 2013, at 11am at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Aportion of Lots 3 and 4, block 4Ž of GRIENERS ADDITION TO THE CITYOF CRAWFORDVILLE, being more particularly described as follows: commence at a concrete monument marking the Northeast corner of Lot 1, Block 4Ž of GRIENERS ADDITION TO THE CITYOF CRAWFORDVILLE, a subdivision as per map or Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, of the Official Records of Wakulla County, Florida, said point also lying on the Southerly right of way of Nelson Road; thence run along said right of way South 72 degrees 15 minutes 41 seconds West 109.97 feet to a rod and cap for the point of beginning; thence from said point of beginning continue along said right of way South 72 degrees 11 minutes 30 seconds West 59.99 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 17 degrees 43 minutes 52 seconds East 100.03 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 72 degrees 13 minutes 05 seconds East 59.95 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 17 degrees 42 minutes 19 seconds West 100.05 feet to the point of beginning. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 17th day ofJuly,2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk 5803-0829 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 13-SC-63 IN RE: LIBERATOR (BOAT) GRACE ELIZABETH DELONG 150 TRIPLETT ROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Plaintiff. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for establishment of ownership of personal property described as: 1 9 FOOT LIBERA TOR TUNNEL BOA T has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff, GRACE DELONG whose address is 150 TRIPLETT ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA, on or before August 30, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on July 30, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/Becca Daugherty, Deputy Clerk August 8, 15, 22 & 29, 2013 5804-0815 TWN vs. Stewart, Anthony 2007-40-FC Notice of Resched. Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2007-40-FC HSBC BANK USA, N.A., Plaintiff, ANTHONYSTEWART, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated July 22, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 2007-40-FC of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein HSBC BANK USA, N.A., is the Plaintiff and ANTHONYSTEWART; JEANNIE STEWART; ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC. SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO AAMEES FUNDING CORPORATION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 22nd day of August, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT30 OF EASTGATE SUBDIVISION (UNRECORDED) AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 59 ADISTANCE OF 2365.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 1000.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYOF ACOUNTYROAD (GRIFFIN ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYSOUTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 466.75 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE A50 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT (MIDWAYCOURT); THENCE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 155.59 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 155.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A5 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERN PORTION OF SAID PROPERTY. A/K/A24 MIDWAYCOURT, CRAWFORDVIL, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on July 22, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk. Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018kk F07006995 CHASESBPRDIR-CONV-B-mlee-Team 3 -F07006995 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. August 8 & 15, 2013 (COURTSEAL) DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954)-779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Katrina D. Lacy Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 August 8 & 15, 2013 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 16th day of July, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) August 8 & 15, 2013 5801-0815 TWN Estate of: Williams, Francis File No. 13-71-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 13-71-CP IN RE: ESTATE OFFRANCIS E. WILLIAMS, III, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of FRANCIS E. WILLIAMS, III, deceased, whose date of death was February 21, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, File Number 13-71-CP, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representatives and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be serve must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTY (30) DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons who have claims or demands against the decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN THREE (3) MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. THE DATE OF FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE IS: August 8, 2013. Personal Representative: Roland Williams 30 Houston Street, Savannah, GA 31401 Attorney for Personal Representative: AARON R. HOLLOWAY, Florida Bar #0096426 Ausley & McMullenPost Office Box 391 Tallahassee, Florida 32302(850) 224-9115 aholloway@ausley.com spelham@ausley.comAugust 8 & 15, 2013 5795-0808 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 8/17/13 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, August 17, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Timothy White Elizabeth Joyner Shane Maynor Denver Cyr Laura Moneyham William Keith Stalvey Before the sale date of Saturday, August 17, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. August 1 & 8, 2013 656-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 051 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2278Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10525-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 29 LOT 11 OR 50 P 277 OR 66 P 853 Name in which assessed OPAL J GUESS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 657-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 052 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2279Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10526-000GRIENERS ADDITION BLOCK 29 LOT 12 OR 50 P 277 OR 66 P 852 Name in which assessed M H GUESS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!141 Shar-Mel-Re 3BR/2BA, 1 car garage, 1,121 sq. ft., Screened-in Back Porch, $850 mo. 6 River Cove $550 mo., 2 BR/1BA, BAY VIEW. Near Community Boat Ramp. Pets Considered. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550. mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $1,050 mo. 3049 Crawfordville Hwy. Commercial building in downtown Crawfordville. Across from the courthouse, perfect building for professional of ce.Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 30 36 39 45 49 54 58 61 2 27 46 3 28 47 4 24 42 5 21 43 18 37 40 55 59 62 6 15 31 56 7 29 50 8 25 48 9 22 44 23 41 60 63 10 16 19 32 38 57 11 33 51 12 34 52 13 35 53 ACROSS 1. Almost out of 6. Attire for Dracula 10. Brother of Little Joe on '60s TV 14. Spanish tourist center 15. Soon, in verse 16. "Ulysses," for one 17. U.S. money market 19. Anniversary, e.g. 20. Tough to trick 21. Stick of gum, informally 22. Sweater type 24. Heroic deed 25. Holm of "Still Breathing" 26. Preacher's admonition 29. Strongly opposed 30. Publicist's assignment 31. "Warmer" or "colder" 32. "You gotta be kidding!" 36. 45 or 78 37. Cagney's TV partner 38. Hatchery so und 39. __-eyed 40. Discordant deity 41. Converted split, e.g. 42. "Ivanhoe" author 44. Trample underfoot 45. Branch out 48. Ill-mannered sort 49. "Can't resist!" 50. Lover's __ 51. __ up (make sense) 54. Hu and pu 55. Engineer or conductor 58. __ Reader (eclectic magazine) 59. Like dishwater 60. Oddball 61. Compote fruit 62. Nordic runners 63. Well-knownDOWN1. Things on books 2. Place to do laps 3. See 20-Across 4. Feeling rotten 5. Just emerging 6. Shift-6 7. One more time 8. "The Gold-Bug" writer 9. P lea 10. Crop-dusting plane 11. Iridescent gems 12. Occupy, as a table 13. Noisy public ght 18. "Take __!" 23. Supermodel Carol 24. Indecisive sort 25. Road construction markers 26. Pete Rose's longtime team 27. Devil's doings 28. Cuban currency 29. OK to do 31. Literary Bret 33. Disorderly stack 34. Pianist Peter 35. All-comers tournament 37. Aerobics attire 41. Brief visit along the way 43. Stimpy or Sylvester 44. Take to the sky 45. Make confetti of 46. Quartz variety 47. Karan of fashion 48. Partners of whistles 50. Stripper St. C yr 51. Comic Sandler 52. Fake out at the rink 53. Scott in a noted court case 56. Cousin of a pun 57. In the style of American Prole Hometown Content 8/4/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 2 3 4152 3678 13 87 59 8726 95 64 7821 253 200 9 HometownContent 198 5274 3 6 674381952 352694718 213 968547 567412389 849735261 935 176824 786243195 421859673 L A W S R E D S R I P U O V A L E V I L A G A T W I L Y P E S O D O N N I L L F E N C E S I T T E N A S C E N T C A T T H A T L E O T A R D C A R E T H A R T E A U A N E W L I C I T L I L P O E C O N E S B E L L E N T R E A T Y S O A R A L T S T O P O F H E D G E H O P P E R A L O P A L S H E A P A D A S I T A T N E R O D E K S C E N E O P E N D R E 647-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 040 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #804 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-2S-01W-000-03979-00024-2S-1W P-13-M-65 1/2 ACRE IN NE 1/4 of SEC 24 DB 56 P 537 Name in which assessed SAMP GAVIN SR 648-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 041 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #812 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-2S-01W-000-04008-00024-2S-1W P-41-M-65 S 1/2 of SE 1/4 OR 106 P 142,143 OR 141 P. 337 Name in which assessed WILLIE T JENKINS II AS PER REP OF WILLIE T JENKINS & ELOISE JENKINS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 649-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 042 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1204Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:33-2S-01E-189-04995-D07SPRINGWOOD SUBD. PHASE 1 LOT 7 BLOCK D OR 121 P 140 Name in which assessed JOE HILL GREGORY III & SUSAN RENEE PATTERSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 650-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 44 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #272 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:26-4S-02W-108-02183-142LAKE ELLEN PROPER BLOCK H LOTS 1 2 3 & 4 OR 57 P 793 Name in which assessed J C & FRANCES LONG said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this18day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 651-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 045 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 652-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 046 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #986 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:05-3S-01W-131-04291-022BOYNTON ESTATES EAST 1/2 LOT 14 LOTS 15 & 16 OR 538 P 708 OR 546 P 691 Name in which assessed AMANDA ALLEN GLOVER & LAURA ALLEN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 653-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 048 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1784Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-09373-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 40 LOTS 6 & 7 OR 9 P 521 Name in which assessed WINDER VI LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 654-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 049 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #263 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:26-4S-02W-108-02183-019LAKE ELLEN PROPER BLOCK B LOTS 11, 12, 13, & 14 OR 254 P 151 OR 263 P 119 Name in which assessed HEIDI J PARMARTER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 655-0822 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 050 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that US BANK AS C/F the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property,and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #629 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:25-5S-02W-046-03480-000AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK N LOT 27 DB 56 P 335 Name in which assessed THAXTON C YANCY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this19day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1,8, 15 & 22, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 000FPBG BOARDOFTRUSTEESNOTICEOFTHEINTERNAL IMPROVEMENTTRUSTFUNDSection 253.69, Florida Statutes … Rule 18-21.021, F.A.C.RevisedAugust1,2013NOTICE OF AQUACULTURE LEASE APPLICATION NOTICEisherebygivenpursuanttoSection253.70,FloridaStatutes,that theBoardofTrusteesoftheInternalImprovementTrustFundhasreceived anapplication(no.65-AQ-1167),fromClayM.Lovel,BenjaminB.Lovel, andLeoV.Lovel,respectively,of33BenWillisRoad,Crawfordville,FL 32327,forthefollowingactivities:Theperformanceofcommercialclam andoystercultivationactivities.Theapplicantsarerequestingapprovalof asovereigntysubmergedlandaquacultureleasepreempting5.0acres, moreorless,ofsovereigntysubmergedlandsoffshoreofSection114,of theHartsfieldSurvey,inOysterBay,nearthetownofSpringCreek,in WakullaCounty,Florida.Theapplicantsarerequestingawatercolumn leasetoinstallfloatingcagesforthecultivationofshellfish.Theparcelis notlocatedinanaquaticpreserve.Amapanddiagramidentifyingthe locationandlimitsoftheproposedactivitiescompanythisnotice. Anyonehavinganyquestionsorcommentsregardingtheproposedproject shouldfiletheminwritingwiththeDivisionofAquaculture,Magnolia Center,Suite501,1203GovernorsSquareBoulevard,Tallahassee, Florida32301,onorbefore5:00p.m.onthe7thdayofSeptember,2013. Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day of September,2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this7day of May2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 1724Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-08811-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 19 LOTS 34 & 35 OR 23 P 699 Name in which assessed MRS. MARLENE P CHEWNING said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 11 day ofSeptember, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this18day of June2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaAugust 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2013 Like us on newsThe Wakulla

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 – Page 9B 1. GEOGRAPHY: Where are the Orkney Islands? 2. MUSIC: To which rock group did singer Freddie Mercury belong? 3. TELEVISION: Which popular 1990s sitcom featured a character named Chandler? 4. CARTOONS: Which animated superhero’s theme song contains the lyrics, “Speed of lightning, roar of thunder,/ Fighting all who rob or plunder”? 5. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is the currency of Brazil? 6. ENTERTAINERS: Which actor/ director was born Melvin Kaminsky? 7. MOVIES: Where was Alfred Hitchcock’s movie “The Birds” set? 8. U.S. STATES: What is the only U.S. state named after a president? 9. LITERATURE: Who wrote the book of poems called “Sonnets from the Portuguese”? 10. FOOD & DRINK: In South Asian cuisine, what is ghee? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. North of Scotland 2. Queen 3. “Friends” 4. Underdog 5. The real 6. Mel Brooks 7. Bodega Bay, Calif. 8. Washington 9. Elizabeth Barrett Browning 10. Clarified butter Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, August 8, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comWinter in Paris – a great time to see the city of lightBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsYes, it is cold but not unbearably so. Crowds have all gone home and the lights twinkle even more brightly. Your reward, the ability to see more. Instead of hours long lines, wait only minutes to explore the magic of Paris. A visit here requires substantial planning. The sheer size is overwhelming, but you can hop on a tourist bus for a great overview. Unlike many European counterparts, Paris biggest sites are not within easy walking distance. Sit back on the bus and let the famous sites roll by … the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame Cathedral, the Louvre and Sacre Coeur Cathedral. Now with your favorite choices in mind, it is easier to budget your time. Consider purchasing the Paris Museum pass. www. en.parismuseumpass.com. Valid at over 60 museums, you can sample the museums, then return to those you enjoy. A simple calculation will determine if the price of the pass is worth it for you. Extremely convenient in winter, during peak season this is a huge time saver. Climb the tower at Notre Dame Cathedral. The winding staircase seems to spiral up forever. Reward yourself with a close up view of the gargoyles, and a panoramic view of the city. The Sacre Coeur is perched on a hill in the distance is an awesome sight. Discover the riot of colored glass in the Sainte Chappelle. Multi colored glass casts a warm glow all around. Bible stories told in the colorful images stretch to the ceiling. Transport yourself to Monets home in Giverney when you step in to LOrangerie Museum. Marvel at the room-size paintings wrapped around the walls. Sit quietly and contemplate, with the smaller crowds you dont have to hurry. Prepare to be overwhelmed at the Louvre, the largest museum in the world with over six miles of galleries. There is no way to see the whole museum in a day. Using the museum pass, make several short visits, and focus on your mustsee items. Stroll through the Latin Quarter, birthplace of Paris, and home of university students for centuries. Find a caf, sit back and take in the atmosphere. What visit to Paris would be complete without a trip to the Eiffel Tower. Originally reviled by the Parisians, the tower has become synonymous with the city of light. Indulge in a meal, or simply take the elevator to the top. Sample the food; Nutella crepes from street side vendors, mouthwatering croissants, completely unlike their U.S. counterparts, and chocolate perfection. No wonder Paris is synonymous with food. Arrive mid-November through early January for the famous Christmas market. Stroll past the 150 authentic chalets along the Champs Elysses. Sample delectable desserts and myriad cheeses and wines. Browse among the teeming stalls. With the several hundred dollars you save traveling off-season, you can splurge. The holiday lights add to Paris enchanting nightscape. Take a tour and soak up the ambiance. Climb the Arc de Triumph at night for a birds eye view of the sparkling lights changing color, and the hourly twinkling lights on the Eiffel Tower.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www.luxurycruising.com. PHOTOS BY LUXURY CRUISE & TRAVEL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBrightly lit spheres illuminate Paris over the winter holidays. Below chocolates in Paris. The Eiffel Tower at night. Name __________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone ____________________ Email __________________________ Payment Enclosed Bill MeSign up online Promo Code: SCHOOL Clip, complete and mail to:Expires 8/31/13. In-County OnlyP.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Call 1-877-401-6408 or fax: 850-926-3815www.TheWakullaNews.netGet ready for the next school year with the BEST of local news, sports, events, coupons and more! For 10 Months$2013 Boat and RV rates as low as 2.99% APR for up to 72 months. Motorcycle and ATV rates as low as 2.99% APR for up to 60 months. Rates and terms are subject to change and are based on credit score. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NC UA. Boat & RV Loans 72 Months Motorcycle & ATV Loans 60 Months Bt&RVL