Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00470

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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 27th Issue Thursday, July 4, 2013 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailyReaders Choice ballot .....................................................Page 2A Public Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 11A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Weekly Roundup ...........................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Taking Care of Business ...................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside the Book.................................................Page 4B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 5B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 5B Comics .............................................................................Page 9B Travel ............................................................................Page 10A INDEX OBITUARIES Elizabeth Boykin Martha Mae Davis David ‘Buddy’ Hiers Herschel ‘Rodney’ Robinson Turn to Page 3ACommunity members come together to save landBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Christine Beatty “ rst got involved with animal rehabilitation 26 years ago. While living in Fort Lauderdale, she took in a kitten that had been chained to a tree and was dying of pneumonia. While trying to nurse it back to health, Beatty noticed the cat was developing some odd behavior, so she took it to the vet who said they thought it was a type of wildcat. Beatty took the little feline to the nearby wildlife center where she came to learn that she had been in possession of a baby bobcat. The south Florida center was one that took in about 10,000 animals a year … it fascinated Beatty … and from then on she was hooked. She began as a volunteer, but it wasnt long before Beatty decided she had found her calling. She left her well-paying job as a food and beverage manager for hospitals and never looked back. Beattys days went from handling the logistics of setting up hospital kitchens and hiring staff to work them … essentially an industry associated with those helping sick and injured people … to a nonpro“ t association working to help sick and injured animals. Ive always loved animals,Ž says Beatty about her involvement. After moving to Wakulla with her husband Mike and daughter Jessica in the 90s, Beatty soon realized the county and surrounding areas lack of an animal rehabilitation center. After watching two animals that had been hit by cars get shot, she decided, no, we cant have this.Ž So the Beattys opened Florida Wild Mammal Association on the property of their home. We thought that when we reached 500 animals, surely somebody would donate some property.Ž But that notion never came to fruition, and now the only thing left belonging to the family on their piece of property is their house. The rest of it is for the wildlife center. Its been different,Ž Beatty says. I do it because I love it,Ž she says, adding that she wouldnt be able to do it without the support of her very understanding husband of 25 years and family. When Beatty began FWMA, the intention was to take in sick or injured mammals, rehabilitate and release them back into the wild. Beatty succeeded in doing just that, throwing in all manner of birds … and even the occasional reptile as well. None of it though, she says, would be possible without the help of volunteers and the three employees that work for FWMA. This isnt based on me,Ž she says of the efforts put forth at the refuge. Beatty explains that the three staff members FWMA has have been there for years and are very committed. They obviously love what they do,Ž she says, because they dont get bene“ ts, they dont get days off, theres no Christmas, no birthdays, no nothing.Ž FWMA animals come from many rural and coastal communities, says Beatty, including Wakulla, Jefferson, Taylor and Franklin counties. Calls are received from animal control, FWC, veterinarians, the sheriffs of“ ce and citizens. Most people will call and say something along the lines of My cat caught a baby bird … what do I do?Ž she says. Turn to Page 3A By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Members of the community came together on Saturday, June 22 in an effort to help a Sopchoppy man keep his property. Extensive code enforcement liens landed about 10 properties on a list to potentially be foreclosed upon. Earlier in the month, county commissioners voted to approve the list and gave the code enforcement of“ ce permission to pursue necessary foreclosure proceedings. As an owner of a property effected by that vote, one Sopchoppy man … who is identi“ ed as Mr. BŽ for this story … stands to lose everything. For about “ ve years, Mr. Bs property has accumulated roughly $25,000 in penalties. That amount of “ nes is roughly equal to the value of the property itself, said the Rev. Kevin Hall. Hall, who is the pastor at Sopchoppy and Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist churches, heard about the mans situation and quickly stepped in to help. Hall wrote a letter, which he read at the county commission meeting on June 3 before the vote to pursue foreclosure on the properties. Hall asked the board to not move forward with foreclosure on behalf of all that would be effected, but especially Mr. B. Hall explained that he and Mr. B had established a friendship and, through counseling and many visits to the property, Hall had learned of Mr. Bs situation. According to Halls letter, Mr. Bs mother had passed away some “ ve years ago, leaving to him property that was bought and paid for by the blood and sweat of his parents.Ž Hall says that the trailer that Mr. B lives in, and the “ ve acres it sits on, are all he has. Mr. B has a physical handicap, lives on a meager Social Security income and his only source of transportation is a refurbished bicycle donated to him by others, Hall said. Because of a personal dispute with a neighbor,Ž Hall wrote, Mr. B was reported for code enforcement violation.Ž Hall describes Mr. B as a man of great prideŽ who doesnt wish to impose his burdens on anyone else and that on many occasions, when he went to visit him at the property, he would be attempting to rake up debris. When you take their land, their largest asset,Ž read Hall aloud, you in essence take their lives.Ž Despite Halls attempt, the board voted 4-1 to move forward with the foreclosures. The lone vote against came from Commissioner Richard Harden, who said he could not vote to support the foreclosure because of his personal knowledge of the speci“ c property and its owner. Turn to Page 3A By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Last week Gov. Rick Scott, along with the Florida Cabinet, voted to approve innovative techniques to support the oyster “ sheries in Franklin County … a vote that directly effects the Lovel familys oyster endeavor. Last year, the Lovels, owners of Spring Creek restaurant, began growing oysters out of Alligator Harbor, but current legislation dictated that the oyster cages be anchored within six inches of the seabed. This requirement not only makes it hard for SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCounty commissioners Richard Harden and Ralph Thomas helping to clean up the property of a Sopchoppy man facing $25,000 in code violations.Approval of oyster technique helps Lovel familyNew rules OKd by Cabinet last week directly e ect Spring Creek Oyster Co. AMANDA MAYOR/FILE PHOTOFather Leo with sons Ben and Clay Lovel. Florida Wild Mammal Association AMANDA MAYORFlorida Wild Mammal Association employee Tina Watkins with a whitetail deer. The group cares for injured or orphaned wildlife that come from all over the region. L i f e w i t h t h e a n i m a l s Life with the animals newsThe Wakulla T a k i n g C a r e o f Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s Business News f r o m from See Page 1B

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com is asking youƒ our readers to participate in identifying Wakulla Countys MOST POPULAR local businesses for 2013! Tell us your favorites by “lling out the of“cial ENTRY BALLOT below. Your name will then be registered in a random drawing for $100 in Cash.*Animal Care: Pet Care/Sitting ________________ Pet Grooming _________________ Pet Supplies __________________ Vetenarian ____________________ Automotive: Auto Engine Repair _____________ Auto Body Shops _______________ Used Car Dealer _______________ Financial Services: Bank ________________________ Credit Union ___________________ Mortgage Company _____________ Food and Beverage Liquor Store ___________________ Grocery ______________________ Ice Cream/Snacks ______________ Bakery _______________________ Health and Fitness Gym _________________________ Massage Therapist _____________ Chiropractor ___________________ Fitness Instructor/Trainer _________ Homes and Land Builder _______________________ Real Estate Company ___________ Title Company _________________ Surveyor _____________________ Lawn Care/Landscaping _________ Nursery/Garden Center __________ Flooring ______________________ Plumbing _____________________ Electrician ____________________ A/C-Heating ___________________ Painter _______________________ Tree Service __________________ Pool Care _____________________ Home Cleaning Service __________ Miscellaneous: Childcare _____________________ Clothing and Gifts ______________ Storage Centers _______________ Dance Studio __________________ Photographer __________________ Hotel ________________________ Hardware _____________________ Local News Source _____________ Personal Services: Barber Shop __________________ Hair Salon ____________________ Nail Care _____________________ Professional Services: Accountant ____________________ Attorney ______________________ Doctor _______________________ Dentist _______________________ Insurance Provider _____________ Recreation: Marina _______________________ Fishing Charter ________________ Bait & Tackle __________________ Boat & Motor Repair __________________ Canoe/Kayak Rental ____________ Scuba _______________________ Restaurant: Atmosphere ___________________ Breakfast _____________________ Lunch ________________________ Dinner _______________________ Service _______________________ Entertainment _________________Readers Choice Categories: Name______________________ Address_____________________________ City_____________________________ State_________ Zip______________ Phone____________________ Email________________________ Age____ Are you a current subscriber to ? _____Yes ______No Of“cial Rules*Entries must be handwritten on of“cial entry ballot from Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies, illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted. *At least 15 of the choices must be “lled out. *Only one entry per person. *Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided and will not be eligible for the $100 prize.*All ballots must be received by by 4:00 p.m. on July 12, 2013. Send entire ballot to Readers Choice ContestŽ, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 or bring it to our of“ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.) *Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of *All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional compensation. Announcement of the winner will appear in the Readers ChoiceŽ special section to be published in the August 1, 2013 edition of *Employees of and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for residents of states where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. *All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT & ENTRY FORM. Please complete and return to by 4:00 p.m. July 12, 2013. Use the area beside each category to list your favorite business. Please complete 15 or more choices, write clearly and legibly, to make your nominations count. Mail your of“cial entry form and completed ballot to: WIN $100 WIN $100 ENTRY FORM: Register Today for your chance toƒ Register Today for your chance toƒ c/o Readers Choice Contest P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326OR drop it off at of“ce: 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. the Readers Choice Contest is underway!Tell us Your Choice! Submit your completed entry form and be entered in the drawing to win $100 in Cash*

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From Page 1AWe try to get people to bring the animals here,Ž explains Beatty. We have three staff members and six and a half acres of craziness … we just dont have enough of us to go out and pick them up.Ž She adds that all animals are welcome at no charge to their deliverers and that FWMA provides care for the animals free of charge. But the venture gets very expensive. Help with funding is needed yearround as FWMA relies solely on donations, mailings, their annual gold tournament, Golf Gone Wild, and grants. Beatty recalls how the association was recently $15,000 in debt. Fortunately, a timely grant allowed them to pay that amount off in full, but the threat of debt will always loom, especially during baby season,Ž which takes place from April through September. During this time, says Beatty, feed bills come to roughly $1,000 per week. Its kind of scary sometimes when that happens,Ž she says of the money struggle. A thousand dollars a week can snowball very quickly.Ž However, just like with human babies, money isnt the only critical element demanded by baby season. Help and time are also very valuable. We cant do without staffing, we just cant.Ž says Beatty. She explains that baby birds have to be fed every 15 minutes from sun up to sundown. We have animals inside and outside, plus all the baby birds that are coming in, plus criticals, plus rescues plus paying bills and paper work and everything else that goes on behind the scenes.Ž As far as challenges, Beatty says that perhaps the biggest one is that the refuge houses all different kinds of animals, all of which have very speci“ c diets. You cant just buy 500 pounds of dog food and be okay,Ž she laughs. We have to buy bait “ sh and mealworms and bird-of-prey food and all kinds of formulas. They all eat something different and require different habitats.Ž A walk around the Beattys six and a half acre property reveals all different types of cages and fenced-in segments … each a simulation of a speci“ c animals wild domain. Some even hold pools. It makes it a little complicated,Ž she says. Beatty expresses her gratitude not only for her staff, but also for those who stop and pick up an animal, all the people who donate, all the people who stop here and get themselves “ lthy dirty trying to take care of animals … all of that is what keeps us open. Its not me, its them.Ž Anyone wishing to donate time, supplies or funding to the Florida Wild Mammal Association, may do so by visiting their website at www. wakullawildlife.org or by going by the refuge located at 198 Edgar Poole Road in Crawfordville. FWMA is available to receive animals 24 hours a day. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net In a conference call last week aimed at addressing mostly North Florida of“ cials, Congressman Steve Southerland gave updates on some legislation that affects District 2 and its rural counties … mainly current issues related to the Farm Bill. Southerland held a conference call with interested parties, including the media, on Friday, June 28. On Thursday, June 20, 62 Republicans and 172 Democrats voted against the Houses proposed version of a new Farm Bill. The proposed “ ve year, $500 billion bill was set to cut the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, also known as food stamps) and other such programs by $20.5 billion. A total of 218 votes were needed in order to pass the version, but only 195 were obtained. Time is running out, however, as the 2008 Farm Bill, slated to be in effect through the 2013 fiscal year, expires on Sept. 30. Essentially, one of three things can happen in terms of the fate of the legislation currently in limbo. One, as the Senate had passed its own version of a Farm Bill which is projected to reduce the food stamp program by some $400 million each year and establish roughly $2.4 billion a year in overall spending cuts … the House could choose to adopt their proposal; two, the House can continue its attempt to pass its own version; or three, Congress could choose to extend the current law for another year. The Farm Bill covers everything from crop subsidies and food aid to trade and conservation, but the biggest component is food stamps, which make up about 80 percent of spending in the law. Southerland, and the GOP in general, seem to be mostly in favor of cutting back on food stamp spending, indicating a belief that the program and its sister programs are widely abused. During an event in May of this year in which he was giving an update to Jackson County citizens, Southerland was quoted as saying, If you are of working age and you are physically, mentally and psychologically able to work, it is a sin for us to pay you not to work.Ž While 80 percent of funds are designated towards food stamps and the SNAP program, the other 20 percent is focused on actual farm policy. There is discussion to separate the two in order to give them each the certainty they deserve,Ž said Southerland, who seemed to be mostly focused on the farm issues during the call. That 20 percent of farm policy is what is going to directly bene“ t you all and your counties,Ž he said, addressing the rural community of“ cials listening on the other end. TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute Executive Director Bob Ballard was on the conference call with Southerland and asked the representative if “ nancial assistance would be offered in the farm bill for the areas oyster program. We are working very hard to include aquaculture assistance in this bill,Ž said Southerland. Even if it doesnt end up in this particular bill, we will push for it elsewhere. We want to make sure those who make their living off the water have the assistance necessary to get through hard times.Ž Southerland touched on the RESTORE Act monies and the potential for those funds to help the aquaculture industry. There is money there to fund projects that will help create a buffer,Ž he said in reference to possible industry collapses like that which has happened in the past after unforeseen detriments such as the BP oil spill. Southerland also said he spends most of his time working on Farm Bill policy as well as issues relating to the RESTORE Act. Rural communities are very important to me,Ž said Southerland, a Bay County native. The Building Rural Communities Act, Southerland explained, aims to provide the availability of loans and grants speci“ c to the building and improvement of important community infrastructure, public safety and other essential community facility needs. This includes things such as “ rehouses, police stations and sewer systems. That was passed by in the Agriculture Committee,Ž said Southerland, adding that it will be included as part of the Farm Bill. Gadsden County Commissioner Doug Croley raised a question about crop insurance and whether or not the bill that Southerland and his colleagues were proposing would affect it. Southerland assured him that Were absolutely not going to lose crop insurance,Ž and that issue was even covered separately from the farm bill. Also touched on brie” y during the call was the timber industry. Southerland said that in the version that they plan to bring back, he wants to include wood products language so that those constituents could participate and benefit from what the bill has to offer. I know we have a lot of timber stakeholders who are eager for inclusion,Ž he said, and added that he was working to provide that. Southerland wanted to assure his rural counties that he is doing what he can to bring them bene“ ts through the farm bill. I want to make sure you all know that I know this is very important,Ž he said in closing. We are working hard to get this done.Ž From Page 1A Hall then came back to the next county commission meeting on June 17 to announce to commissioners and the community that a cleanup effort would be taking place at Mr. Bs property in Sopchoppy on the upcoming Saturday and that all were invited to help. By that time many pieces had already come together towards the goal to help Mr. B. Commissioners Harden and Ralph Thomas had already become involved in the project and it was announced that Waste Pro had donated a large dumpster that would be set up on the property for the cleanup. According to Hall and Thomas, by the end of the day on Saturday, June 22, the dumpster had been “ lled, taken away, and then returned for another load. Also, a large amount of salvageable scrap metal found on the property was to be taken in by the owner and sold, with the earnings to be applied towards his “ nes. The group plans to go back to continue its efforts on Saturday, July 13 at 8 a.m. and invited anyone in the community to help in the cause. If anyone could come spend even just an hour of their Saturday to help it would make a difference,Ž said Hall. Its just a great way to give back and be a part of the community.Ž Hall said he wanted to express his gratitude to commissioners Harden and Thomas, as well as Sheriff Charlie Creel and Major Jared F. Miller of the Sheriffs department for their help with the project.Community comes together to save landFrom Page 1Aharvesters to bring up the heavy, oyster-“ lled cages, but it also makes the oysters highly susceptible to hindrances such as predators and contamination. Together, with the help of TCC, the Lovels have embarked on this oyster venture with success, but they had been anxiously awaiting word on a proposed change to allow them to use the full water column for oyster harvesting. This is important because the top 24 inches of the water column is where most of the oyster food is,Ž explained Clay Lovel. Last Tuesday, June 25, the Governor and Cabinet approved allowing the Lovels two existing 1.5 acre aquaculture leases in Franklin County to be modi“ ed to use the full water column for oysters. The Spring Creek Oyster Co. plans to attach ” otation devices to their oyster cages. This will allow the oysters to receive a fresher flow of water circulation, a safer distance from predators on the ground, as well as make it easier to “ sh the oysters out … which not only serves convenience, but ef“ ciency as well. It will make it easier for us to de-foul our oyster cages and oysters by having them out of the water for short periods of timeŽ said Lovel. Foul includes things such as grasses and barnacles that hinder the oysters growth and cleanliness. We also believe that, if this sets a precedent of being able to use the water column, other people will be able to more ef“ ciently grow oysters as well,Ž he said.Oyster technique helps Lovel familyFWMA: Life with the animals Rep. Southerland explains his position on Farm Bill FILE PHOTOU.S. Rep. Steve Southerland at a town hall meeting in St. Marks in 2011. SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Beverly CouncilJune 2013 WinnerHer name was drawn fromƒI thought I had won the Lottery !!! I encourage more people to participate. OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! C C Coastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken n t Eat DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC City of Sopchoppy JULY 4, 2013NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGThe City of Sopchoppy will be holding a regular meeting, Monday, July 8, at 6:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy.Purpose of the Meeting: To Conduct General Business of the City of Sopchoppy.Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the City of Sopchoppy Clerks Of“ce at (850)962-4611. FAIR HOUSING / EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY JULY 4, 2013

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ...........advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• A child’s question of ‘Are we there yet?’ follows us through life • June 17, 2013 designated by county as Larry Tucker Day •Logo for Wakulla seafood • Booth named employee of the month • Decision on wetlands ordinance will destroy food chain • Sopchoppy election generates controversy • WHS graduate receives Tinker AFB scholarship • Turtle returned to the seathewakullanews.com Follow us on Ive been thinking about... Misplaced tantrums arent the solution ank you for support of family in lossOpposed to weakening wetlands ordinance Commissioners as freedom ghters?Nurse Judy loves the Fourth of July reworksREADERS WRITE: Editor, The News: The family of Beatrice Revell Carter wishes to thank the community for the prayers, calls, cards, visits, food, ” owers and donations during the loss of our beloved mother. Yout kind expressions of love and support at this dif“ cult time has helped to make our loss easier and is very much appreciated. The family of Beatrice Carter Revell By MARJ LAWA couple days ago, while picking up messages on my computer, one came in suggesting I might want to converse with Anne Rudloe again. Pure happiness! My heart bounces. Yes. We can sit down at the Coastal and have a good chat. Anne always has something on her mind. What a great conversationalist. It has been too longƒ And then it hits me. Anne is gone. That brief moment of happiness falls with a thud. Every time I receive a message like this, gladness and sorrow hit one after the other, leaving a residue of sorrow. I know some people celebrate life,Ž but to me, suggesting that loss should be experienced as joy instead of sadness strikes me as a lot of claptrap. Maybe it works that way for some people, but not for me. So, each time one of these linking programs asks me if Id like to connect with a friend who has passed on, that hard jolt hits again and again. For one brief shining moment, our old friends are still waiting to hear from us. I fall for it every time. And yes, our friends are with us forever in our hearts, but in that lightning second before memory kicks in, it feels like they are ready to pick up that phone and give us a call. Since names are culled very, very slowly from contact lists, our friends live on somewhere in that empty internet void. So Anne, call me.Marj Law is retired as the director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, and writes occasionally for The Wakulla News.When the holiday “ reworks go off, Nurse Judy, that excitable alter ego of mine, is in her glory. Bee Bee, my cat, on the other hand, hides under the bed. With each beautiful celestial extravaganza, Nurse Judy jumps up and down and screams louder, which only frightens the poor cat more. In an effort to make the holiday more enjoyable for all of us, I determine that I will discuss the more serious side of this important date in our history. Do you even understand why we are having these “ reworks?Ž I ask her Of course,Ž she answers serenely. Its to have fun and celebrate the beginning of summer.Ž No,Ž I say. Do you understand what important event we are celebrating?Ž She thinks a moment and then answers. Of course, its to celebrate the inception of the Big Bang Theory.Ž Even though shes wrong, Im amazed and rather proud that shes even heard of this scienti“ c theory. Thats not right,Ž I say, but I can see where you might have connected the two-big bang and “ reworks. I am wondering where you were informed of this theory.Ž She looks at me in disbelief. Everyone knows about that,Ž she says. Its on TV every week.Ž Its my turn to have a disbelieving look. Youre comparing our national holiday to a comedy show? Do you even know what the Big Bang scienti“ c theory is about?Ž She gives me a winning smile. Of course,Ž she says, Žits about a bunch of very smart nerds who work in science and have a hard time “ tting into the real world.Ž I guess I should have been a little proud that she understood the premise of this show, but I felt compelled to press on. The Big Bang Theory is one of the major theories of how our universe was formed, I tell her. She just looks at me blankly, and I realize how far a“ eld this conversation has gone. Never mind.Ž I say, Lets get back to the Fourth of July. We are celebrating our independence, our chance to be our own country, and to be free of tyranny and taxes placed on us by others. We are celebrating our freedom.Ž The “ reworks are over. Bee Bee creeps out from under the bed. There is total silence as Nurse Judy digests this new information. I wait, hoping she has learned a good history lesson. Does that mean youre free?Ž she asks. Yes,Ž I say proudly. Does this mean Bee Bee is free?Ž she asks. Yes,Ž I say as Bee Bee stretches and yawns. Does this mean Im free?Ž she asks. Of course,Ž I say, realizing that I have made a breakthrough in her thinking. Okay,Ž she says, then Bee Bee and I are going to turn on the TV, watch The Big Bang Theory, and thank Sheldon for creating the universe and making us all free..Ž Somewhere my lesson went awry. Dont forget to celebrate the Fourth this weekend in Sopchoppy.Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Her website is www.nursejudyinfo.com.Editor, The News: An open letter to commissioners Richard Harden, Howard Kessler, Randy Merritt, Jerry Moore, and Ralph Thomas: I would like to share that I am strongly opposed to weakening our wetland ordinance. I believe in its importance to keep the environment I know and love viable. I also believe that it would be very shortsighted to risk damage to it, which will not be able to be undone.Ž Destroying our wetlands could lead to diminished “ shing and shell“ sh resources, drinking water, ecotourism opportunities, and protection from hurricane surges! And for what? More development, for which I, as a citizen, have to foot the billŽ? And then have to pay up to try to restore our environment, which can probably not be restored once lost, or to try to “ x the damages that occurred because of the harm to the environment? No thanks! Bad idea! I will hold it against those commissioners who continue to support this idea, in the voting booth! Thank you very much for allowing me the opportunity to share how I feel. MaryPat King Shell Point Editor, The News: Imagine our surprise when my wife and I returned a week ago from a few weeks of vacation and read proclamations in The News from some of our commissioners about how they had fought a recent battle for freedom.Ž We wondered if, in our absence, Wakulla County had been invaded by a foreign power and our sterling commissioners had swiftly liberated us? The truth was more mundane and depressing. Four of our commissioners had voted to gut the county Wetlands Ordinance that an appointed committee of industrious and civic-minded citizens had created a few years ago and which the majority of Wakulla residents supported. The freedomŽ about which these commissioners were crowing was liberation from regulations aimed at preserving the rich and unique environment that is Wakulla County. Somehow, the purity of our water, the productivity of our “ sheries, the protection of our coast from erosion and the appeal of our county to both wildlife and tourists meant less to them than the opportunity to pander to a select few. After all, the ordinary citizen or property owner does not bene“ t from the demise of the Wetlands Ordinance. Just the reverse, as we will watch our environment deteriorate and property values decline further. But land speculators and unscrupulous developers who bought vulnerable property in the hopes that their hand-picked commissioners would one day give them free reign to build, regardless of the impact on others, are rejoicing. The pro“ ts are theirs, the losses are ours and our childrens. I wish I could take comfort in the belief that these hypocritical freedom “ ghtersŽ will eventually be voted out of of“ ce, but I suspect that they and their backers dont much care. The damage will have been done and the effects will be long-lasting. In the words of an old Janis Joplin song, Me and Bobby McGee,Ž Freedom is just another word for nothin left to lose.Ž James Hennessey CrawfordvilleLiving forever on the internetEditor, The News: The recent wetlands ordinance passed by the BOCC has produced much venom on the part of those who did not agree with the decision. For the past two weeks I have read several Letters to the Editor in The Wakulla News. Most of them have been written by people whose names I recognize and have always respected … until now. As with many families in the county, ours has followed the debate more closely than perhaps some of the other issues brought before the commission. Every responsible resident, regardless of which side of the argument they fall on, understands that protection of our natural resources is an important issue that needs to be addressed. Intuitively, we recognize that there is a “ ne line between the rights of the property owner and the environment. This issue could not be an all or nothingŽ issue on either side. However, from the above-mentioned letters it appears that there are some forces in the community who are willing to sacri“ ce their reputations as community leaders, religious leaders and respected defenders of the environment in return for a few lines of threatening anger, hostility and name calling. Ultimately, the community, the people, and, most importantly, the answer to real wetlands protection are too important and too big for this type of behavior. Misplaced tantrums are not the solution and never will be. It was especially appalling that accusations were hurdled at our county commissioners without offering any proof, i.e. claims of commissioners lining their own pockets,Ž commissioners allowing developer buddies to freely “ ll isolated wetlands (where exactly is that development anyway), and one letter writer who claimed concern about level of discourseŽ and then proceeding to denigrate anyone who did not hold the same views as she. I believe that the majority of our commissioners are neither ideologues nor self-promoting legislators. They are genuinely concerned about the future of Wakulla County. They want to make it a place where citizens can enjoy our wonderful resources while respecting the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. Perhaps the ordinance is an imperfect compromise in acknowledging the needs of all and will not be the “ nal resolution to a dif“ cult problem. Rather than harping at the legislative process, we as citizens could be seeking alternative responsible solutions that would reduce environmental fears while protecting the rights of the citizen who pays property taxes. For instance, one suggestion might be to establish a private/public fund that would be used to purchase property as it becomes available for a wetlands buffer zone. Note: This weeks Supreme Court decision, Koontz vs St. Johns River Water Management District, although not a duplicate of Wakullas challenge, might be of interest to those who do not recognize that most often there are two legitimate sides to every issue. Cynthia Webster CrawfordvilleMore on the wetlands ordinance Judy Conlin Nurse Judy’s Nook

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question: Where is your favorite place to head to on the weekend?CHESTIN DogA human said for Chestin that his favorite place is St. George Island. DUSTIN GRUBBS Banker Centennial BankAnywhere … with my family.Ž KAREN McCANN Event specialistIts not work … its THE BEACH!Ž TANNER JONES Athletic director in PerryWe like to head to Wakulla … Lake Ellen.Ž TERRIE HINCHEE HousewifeAlligator Point.Ž … Compiled by Lynda KinseyBy JO ANN PALMER KWCB Director What do you do with 65 “ fth graders two days before school ends for the year? You take them out to pick up litter. As part of the Adopt-ARoad program with Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, the Otters of Riversink have been adopting a twomile stretch of Lonnie Raker Road in front of Riversink Elementary for several years. On May 29, Nick Weaver, Stan Ward, Vicki Anderson and Laura Hume handed out trash bags and safety vests to the students and explained the task at hand. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office was on hand to monitor traffic and escort the students safely down the road on their mission. The students were instructed by Sgt. Billy Jones on how to safely walk along the roadside, what to look for, how to appropriately pick up the litter and to not try to bag any snakes or road kill. Of course, within the “ rst 20 feet, what do they spot … a black snake. After much excitement, the snake slithered away, glad to have gotten out of the way of all those feet. At the end of the mission, the students had gathered approximately 200 pounds of litter, the majority being beer bottles, beer cans, and cigarette butts. This total represents a drop in the bucket of all the litter that could be picked up in this county any day of the week. The beer bottles, beer cans and plastic bags endanger wildlife, and our environment. A lesson the students recognize without exception. Thank you to the teachers and staff at Riversink for your commitment to help Keep Wakulla County Beautiful. Keep up the great work. Remember, reduce your personal waste, reuse, and recycle. For more information, check out our website at kwcb.org or contact us at helpkwcb@gmail.com. Special to The News The Stephen C. Smith Memorial Regatta Foundation held a thank you and awards event at the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club at Shell Point on June 14. This year marked the 40th anniversary of this sailing and windsur“ ng and charity auction event, held at Shell Point each April to raise money for the American Cancer Society. A check for $16,000 was presented to the ACS from the Foundation, which hosts the event along with the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club and the Shell Point Sailboard Club. The Regatta was established in honor of Stephen C. Smith, an avid sailor who died of leukemia, and has contributed over $375,000 to the ACS over recent years. PHOTOS BY JO ANN PALMER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRiversink Elementary students after picking up trash on Lonnie Raker Road in front of the school.In May, Riversink students helped KWCB pick up 200 pounds of litterRegatta honors local sponsors Centennial Bank Assistant Branch Manager Shirley Howard accepts a sponsorship award from Wright Finney, Foundation Chair, and Lee Chapin, Regatta chair. Jonathon Waters accepts the Stephen C. Smith Award for his decades of support of Regatta. Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches THG-13902 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 9:30am Worship Service850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Of course it’s raining, I just washed my car OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDERNobody can say I did not warn the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage, for all the good my warning did. I am not one to say, I told you so,Ž but I told you so.Ž I swear, at times I think my wife thinks I do not want to do something simply because I am too lazy. Nine times out of 10 it may be true, but what about that tenth time? What women need to understand is when their husband does not do something, there may be a good, logical reason behind it. The problem men have is articulating their perfectly good and logical reason to their better half. Trust me on this one, ladies. There are excellent reasons your husband does not always do what you request of him. I wish someone would explain this to my wife. It is just hard for us to explain it in terms women can understand. Last week, for example, my wife made a request of me. She said, Honey ...Ž Whenever my wife begins a sentence with Honey,Ž I know I am in for a sticky situation. Honey comes from bees and whenever she so addresses me, I know I be in trouble, and you can be sure there is a stinger in it for me … somewhere. My wife was looking out the window with her arms folded, which means she is thinking about some job around the house for Yours Truly. Then she said, Honey, dont you think you should wash the car?Ž If I live to be 100 that thought never crossed my mind. Do you know how much trouble it is to wash my car? Then, it never fails to rain right after I wash the car and have to wash it all over again. That was on Tuesday and I said to my wife, You know, dear,Ž whenever a husband so addresses his wife, it always means he is trying to “ nd some way out of doing her request, while making it sound like he wants to do it. I said, You know, dear, its a wonderful idea but it looks like it might rain.Ž The key to this point is to put on a grimace and look up in the sky, in a thoughtful frame of mind. Yes, I think I saw a raindrop. It wont be long now.Ž Right here is where most men fail. Simply because the “ rst round is over does not mean, by any stretch of the imagination, the issue is put to rest. I can sum up the next move in one word … vamoose. In other words, disappear. Remember the old saying, Out of sight, out of choresŽ? Find something to get you out of the line of “ re. There is always a chance … slim though it is … the missus will get busy with something else and forget. By Thursday, I forgot the car washing idea and was standing around our living room looking out the window. It seemed harmless enough. Have you heard the old saying, An idle husband is a wifes workhorse?Ž I heard those familiar words beginning with Honey ...Ž And a streak of panic ” owed through my body, freezing up every muscle I still had. Honey, our car really needs a good washing.Ž Now, that was bad enough and I think I could have worked out something else except … before I could clear my throat, she added a phrase no husband wants to hear. Dont you agree?Ž If I say, No,Ž I am in trouble. If I say, Yes,Ž I am in trouble. I am duped if I do not and doped if I do. With a feigned meekness that would make St. Francis of Assisi envious, I said what all good husbands say under similar conditions, Yes, dear.Ž The next three hours found me outside, vigorously washing Old Nelly. As I washed her, I could feel someone (I am not mentioning any names) watching from our living room window. Just as I was putting the “ nishing touches on the wax job, I felt something cold on the back of my neck. At first, being engrossed in my chore, I did not pay any attention to it. Then another … and another … and another. Then came the rain. I glanced at my freshly waxed car and saw drops of water cheerfully dancing on my mirrored hood. The thunder sounded like a heavenly giggle and before I could make it to the door, I was completely drenched. Ducking inside out of the rain, I was greeted by my wife who calmly asked, Oh, my. Is it raining?Ž Of course its raining,Ž I shivered, Ive just washed my car.Ž As I was drying off, I chuckled to myself as a favorite Bible verse came to mind. And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are the called according to his purpose.Ž (Romans 8:28 KJV.) Two things in life are for certain. One: things will always fall apart. Two: God can always take those things that fall apart and pull them together for His honor and glory … come rain or shine.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. BUCKHORN NEWS By ETHEL SKIPPER Today there are more choices available to us than ever before. We can select from 31 ” avors of ice cream. We can select from many ways to have our chicken cooked. We all love that. We can order various blends of coffee with cream or skim milk and extra ” avorings. We can buy our razors with one, two, three, four, or even five blades. We have hundreds of cable and satellite TV channels to choose from, or we can watch shows online. We have reached the point where life offers so many choices, we cannot possibly weigh each one adequately. But some choices matter more than others. In the Book of Luke there was a certain man who was clothed in purple and “ ne linen, he was rich and fared sumptuously every day. Remember there was a certain beggar named Lazarus, full of sores, the beggar died, the rich man also died and was buried. The rich man had all the comforts money could buy. Lazarus had no comfort at all except the dogs that licked his sores. Death is not the end of the story. Until death, the rich man had everything his way. Lazarus may have been equally surprised at his happy fate … he had no strength, no position, and no funds to earn his way into Heaven, yet there he was because of grace. VBS AT SKIPPER TEMPLE Skipper Temple Church will hold its 2013 Vacation Bible School this weekend. The theme is Jesus Family Reunion RemixŽ … and this is a celebration of being part of Gods family, and enjoying the fun of family reunion. But this family reunion celebrates being in the family of God with Bible truths, food, and fun. The VBS will be held at the church, located at 165 Surf Road in Sopchoppy, on Friday, July 5, beginning at 5:30 p.m., Saturday, July 6, from 9 a.m. to noon, and Sunday, July 7, beginning at 9 a.m. Wear your favorite family reunion T-shirt.Some choices matter more than others Brother Rick Creech of the New Testament Bible Church announced that the church has started a building program. Please pray for our needs or donate land for us. We would like one to “ ve acres on Crawfordville Highway. There is a lot of secular teaching going on in the government schools, as well as the teaching that takes place in the Hollywood entertainment industry. Every movie and television program is teaching something. The schools forbid teaching our children anything from the Bible such as Moses and the Red Sea, Joshua and the walls of Jericho, David and Goliath, and Jonah and the whale: and the spiritual and moral lessons behind these historical events. We need more teaching of the Bible in our society. Please help. Jesus said, Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every Word of God.Ž We stand for the teaching of Gods Word. Please stand with us. See our website at www. biblegems.com. God bless.New Testament Bible Church starts a building program Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce and Florida Department of Financial Services have joined forces to host Operation SAFE on Thursday, July 11 from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. Operation SAFE (Stop Adult Financial Exploitation) was launched as part of CFO Jeff Atwaters On Guard For Seniors initiative. Be Scam SmartŽ workshops are open to seniors, their family and caregivers to help inform, empower and protect Floridas seniors from “ nancial scams and fraud. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. at the senior center. For more information, visit www.MyFloridaCFO. com/SAFE or call 1-877MY-FL-CFO (693-5236). Program set to stop senior scams

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 7AObituaries Elizabeth Boykin Martha Mae Davis David ‘Buddy’ Hiers Herschel ‘Rodney’ RobinsonMartha Mae Davis, 94, passed away June 29, 2013 in Crawfordville. She was born June 22, 1919 in Kokomo, Ind. She was a resident of Crawfordville for 51 years. She volunteered at the Wakulla County Health Department for a number of years and was a member of the Crawfordville Womans Club and Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Survivors include a daughter, Judie Davis; sons, Jeffrey Davis (Sandra), Dennis Davis and Rodney Davis (Donna); 13 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren and great-great grandchildren; and one sister, Mary Ann Allbaugh; and several nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her husband of 53 years, Charlie Davis; a daughter, Beth Shelley; and two sons, Curt Davis and Gene Davis. A celebration of her life will take place on Saturday, July 13, 2013, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements.Elizabeth L. Boykin, of Tallahassee, born Nov. 20, 1928, passed to her heavenly reward on June 30, 2013, in her home, surrounded by family and friends. Her love for her family and dedication to serve the Lord was most important in her life. She served as a Sunday School teacher for more than 35 years at the Branch Street Church of God. She was a longtime resident of Tallahassee who provided childcare to many local children in her home for over 25 years. She worked at Eleanor Shops in downtown Tallahassee for many years but later retired at Wal-Mart with 15 years service. Survivors include four children: Earline Whitley (and husband Gary) of Tallahassee, the Rev. Charles E. Boykin (and wife Kathy) of Tallahassee, Bobby Boykin (and wife DJ) of Mahomet, Ill., and the Rev. Dwayne Boykin (and wife Sharilyn) of Lakeland; 13 grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren; a brother, William Stokes (and wife Annalee) of Tallahassee, and Mary Ouzts (and husband JT) of Fort Braden, FL. She was the daughter of the late Maggie Stokes. Reception and visitation was held on Tuesday, July 2, 2013, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Bevis Funeral Home located in Tallahassee on North Monroe Street. Services will be held on Wednesday, July 3, 2013, at 1 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Chapel. Interment will be at the Roselawn Cemetery, Piedmont Drive, in Tallahassee. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (850-3852193 or www.bevisfh. com) is assisting the Boykin family with their arrangements. Herschel RodneyŽ Robinson, 70, of Crawfordville, passed away Wednesday, June 26, 2013. Born Sept.22, 1942 in Crawfordville, he was a lifelong resident of Leon and Wakulla counties. He was a proud veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps and enjoyed a long career as a master carpenter and building contractor. In his spare time, he enjoyed many outdoor activities such as “ shing, biking, golfing, gardening, and tending to his animals. Survivors include his daughters, Ginger (Robert) Gould and Wendy (Howell) Batts; a granddaughter, Helena Batts, all of Tallahassee; and a brother, Clyde Robinson of Port Charlotte. He was predeceased by his parents, Herschel L. and Clara L. Robinson; a sister, Doris Revell; and brother, Roger Robinson. A celebration of his life will be held on Saturday, July 13, 2013 from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the home of Wendy Batts, 3341 Lucky Debonair Trail, Tallahassee FL 32309. Memorial donations are welcome and should be mailed to Covenant Hospice, 5041 N. 12th Ave., Pensacola FL 32504. Arrangements are under the care and direction of FORBES FUNERAL HOME 850-559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at http:// www.forbesfuneralhome.net. David A. BuddyŽ Hiers Sr., 68, passed away on Sunday, June 23, 2013. He was born Feb. 26, 1945, in Colquitt County, Ga., to Joseph A. and Edna Inez Hiers. David lived his life in Brooks County, Ga., and the North Florida area lastly as a resident of Sopchoppy. The family received friends on Wednesday, June 26, 2013 from 1:30 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel. Burial followed at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Jean Audrey; his son, David Hiers Jr. (wife Nancy) of Boston, Ga.; daughter, Audrey Gregory (husband Chris) of Glen Burnie, Md.; two brothers, Gerald of Valdosta, Ga., and Lamar of Tallahassee; and a sister, Joann Merritt of Thomasville, Ga.; and three granddaughters, Savannah, Allison, and Logan; two grandsons, Andrew and Jacob; and one great-grandson, Charley. He was predeceased by his brother, Donald; and a son, Joe. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850926-3333 or bevisfh.com).Martha Mae Davis David A. ‘Buddy’ Hiers Elizabeth L. Boykin Herschel ‘Rodney’ Robinson Special to The NewsCommunity leaders, elected officials and medical professionals gathered recently at Big Bend Hospice for an announcement, dedication ceremony and the groundbreaking for the new Jean McCully Family House, designed to expand the organizations ability to serve those in the community with lifelimiting illnesses. The construction of the Jean McCully Family House will provide much-needed space for families and friends of patients in a familycentered environment. Additionally, Big Bend Hospice will add bedside oxygen and suction in all patient bedrooms in the Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice House enabling Big Bend Hospice to provide around-the-clock service to patients who otherwise would have to spend their “ nal days in an ICU or hospital setting. Were excited to share this occasion with the community … the driving force behind Big Bend Hospices ability to serve for the past 30 years,Ž said Cathy Adkison, Chief Executive Officer and President of Big Bend Hospice. The invaluable support has made it possible for Big Bend Hospice to grow and continue to meet the needs of patients and their loved ones … our number one priority.Ž Celebrating its 30th anniversary this year, Big Bend Hospice serves eight counties in the North Florida area with compassionate endof-life care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla counties. For additional information about services or how to contribute to Our House: The Campaign for Big Bend Hospice, please call (850) 878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org.Those breaking ground included Big Bend Hospice Foundation Director Nigel Allen, Big Bend Hospice Chairman Steve Mindlind, Sen. Bill Montford, Leon County Commissioner Kristen Dozier, Jean McCully, Big Bend Hospice Campaign Chair Marjorie Turnbull, Tallahassee Mayor John Marks, Big Bend Hospice Foundation Chairman Ron Tate and Big Bend Hospice Chief Executive Of“ cer and President Cathy Adkison. Special to The NewsOn June 20, Covenant Hospice hosted the Annual Remembrance Celebration at Maclay Gardens. The event was held in the the Gardeners Cottage with more than 40 attendees and featured the musical talents of the Indian Head Wood Quintet, as well as songs sung by Debi Brigman and Covenant Hospice Chaplains, Rick Stewart and Tony Leager. Guest speaker Justin Reigsecker shared his journey of grief and how he has found inspiration in his loss. The evening came to a close with attendees coming together and singing Ill Fly AwayŽ as the song “ lled the Gardens Cottage. Each year Covenant Hospice hosts the Annual Remembrance Celebration and invites Covenant Hospice Bereaved as well as community members to join in this special Ceremony honoring loved ones lost. For questions regarding services provided contact Bobbie Massey, LCSW, Senior Bereavement Specialist at (850) 575-4998 or bobbie.massey@covenanthospice.org.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBig Bend Hospice breaks ground on McCully Family House SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCovenant Hospice hosts Remembrance Celebration Harvest Fellowship Church850-926-4798 july july 7 th 7th 2013 2013 Jeremy Vanderloop Get Your Praise OnŽ Worship and Word 10:30 a.m. Youth Minister Christopher Whitehead 7 p.m. LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsThe installation of new of“ cers for the Wakulla County Memorial VFW Post 4538 was conducted in June. The following of“ cers will take their post at our next meeting on July 8th; Commander Bob Fetter, Senior Vice David Clark, Junior Vice Norm Peak, Quartermaster Ernest Chichester, Chaplain/Veteran Service Of“ cer J.D. Johnson, Judge Advocate Steve Barnes, Trustee #1 Ken Gooding, Trustee #2 Dallas Miller, Trustee #3 Darrien Humphries, Surgeon Steve Ellis and Adjutant David Clark. New officers in the Ladies Auxiliary are President Katherine Lyda, Senior Vice-President Pat Black, Junior VicePresident Laura Barnes, Treasurer Diane Curlee, Chaplin and Conductress Mable Johnson, Guard Sheryl Clark and Secretary Kay Cheatham. Exciting upcoming events are in the works for the community from VFW Post 4538 located at 475 Arran Road. Bingo will be returning on Tuesday, July 9, with Early Birds starting at 6 p.m. So get your dobbers ready for bingo every Tuesday night! Another yard sale is being planned along with the ever favorite Chinese Auction. Support your VFW by joining us.Local VFW post installs new officersAlberta and Isiah Hines, Sr. of Sopchoppy celebrated their 59th wedding anniversary on June 18. The Hines were married June 18, 1954 in Thomasville, Ga. They have “ ve children: Isiah Hines, Jr., retired Master Sgt. Derrick Hines, Jaqueline Grimmett, Kevin Hines and Felis White; 12 grandchildren and 17 greatgrandchildren. Hines celebrate 59 years of marriage Saundra Kelley, author of Danger in Blackwater SwampŽ recently held two book signings, one held at Myra Jeans and the other at the Riverside Caf. According to Terri Gerrell with Southern Yellow Pine Publishing, both book signings were successful events.Ž Both local restaurants are mentioned in the book by Kelley. At Myra Jeans Kelley did a short reading from the text that was very well received and at Riverside she received a ” ower from an attendee. The employees at both restaurants were extremely helpful and we appreciate all they did to help make the events successful.‘Danger in Blackwater Swamp’ book signings were a success Special to The NewsArmy Pvt. Eric R. Fox has graduated from basic combat training at Fort Jackson in Columbia, South Carolina. During the nine weeks of training, the soldier studied the Army mission, history, tradition and core values, physical fitness, and received instruction and practice in basic combat skills, military weapons, chemical warfare and bayonet training, drill and ceremony, marching, ri” e marksmanship, armed and unarmed combat, map reading, “ eld tactics, military courtesy, military justice system, basic “ rst aid, foot marches, and field training exercises. Fox is the son of Sharon Fox of Old Courthouse Way, Crawfordvile. He is a 2010 graduate of Wakulla High School.Special to The NewsAuthor Saundra Kelley poses with her book at a book signing held at Myra Jeans restaurant. Special to The NewsThe Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society is inviting local residents and area visitors to view a photo display of native wild” owers at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea. Native wildflowers bloom in every month of the year in Wakulla County. They are eye-catching in spring, fall, and steamy summer, but even in the dead of winter, an herb called wiregrass gentian opens large and lovely white flowers down among wiregrass tufts in the pine ” atwoods. Hundreds of species of wild” owers are indigenous to the County, and some are known only in Wakulla or Franklin County. Appreciation of this world of exquisite form and color is increasing. Enhancing this appreciation is a goal of our local Sarracenia Chapter. The chapter, serving Wakulla and Franklin Counties, is in the “ eld frequently in Wakulla and we are fortunate to have some skilled amateur photographers in the group. Over several years of “ eld trips in all seasons, we have compiled a signi“ cant collection of quality photos. Now, in concert with Viva Florida 500 and the Wakulla County Tourist Development Council, the Sarracenia Chapter will stage the six-week photographic exhibit Wild” owers of Wakulla CountyŽ in the Wakulla Welcome Center, 1493 Coastal Highway, Panacea. The exhibit, showcasing a wide diversity of wild” ower species in glorious color, will open on Tuesday, July 9, at 6 p.m. The opening will feature a reception for the public from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The hours afterward are Monday through Saturday 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and Sunday 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. The purpose of the Florida Native Plant Society is to preserve, conserve, and restore the native plants and native plant communities of Florida. The Sarracenia Chapter, one of 39, was formed in 2006. Its name honors the pitcherplants, several species of which are indigenous to Wakulla and Franklin Counties (some of them subjects of images in the exhibit). The Chapters monthly meetings, September through May, are held at Wakulla Public Library and are open to the public. Membership in the Chapter and FNPS can be made online at fnps.org. Viva Florida 500 is a statewide initiative led by the Florida Department of State to highlight the 500 years of historic people, places and events in Florida since the arrival of Juan Ponce de Leon to the land he named La Florida in 1513. The commemoration includes hundreds of events statewide during 2013.Wakulla wild ower photos will be showcased at the Welcome Center WHS alum graduates basic training The Wakulla County High School class of 1993 is holding their 20 year reunion on July 20. There will be a family fun day from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Wakulla Springs. Lunch and games for the kids will be provided. Dinner and socializing will take place that evening at Wildwood Resort, 3896 Coastal Hwy. Cost is $45 per person for the evening. For additional information please visit The Wakulla High School class of 1993 Facebook page, email langstonjen@gmail. com, or call (850) 5088623.WHS class of ‘93 reunion is slated 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Tuesdays at 6 475 Arran RoadNo one under 18 admitted. VFW Bingo is BACK VFW Bingo is BACK Yard Sale / Bake Sale!Fund RaiserApalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Dept.1557 Shell Point Rd. July 27th, 8am-2pm lots of goodies & items to sellIf you have items you would like to donate, please contact Marion 322-2652 for pick up. S A L E

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolFlorida college system leads national rankingsSpecial to The NewsFor the eleventh year in a row, the Florida College System (FCS) ranks among the top associate degree producers in the nation according to Community College Week. Florida, which ranks fourth in population, awarded more associate degrees and one-year certi“ cates than the larger states of Texas and New York. The Florida College System is proud to serve as the primary access point to higher education for nearly a million Floridians,Ž said FCS Chancellor Randy Hanna. These “ ndings build upon our access mission by highlighting the success of our students. I commend all colleges on this accomplishment.Ž Community College Weeks Top 100 Associate Degree Producers report identi“ es Florida as a leader in a range of categories using data from the National Center for Education Statistics. Highlights of the 2013 report include: Seventeen Florida colleges are among the top 100 producers of associate degrees. Broward College, Florida State College at Jacksonville, Miami Dade College and Valencia College are in the top 10; Fifteen Florida colleges are ranked in the number of associate degrees awarded to African American students. Broward College, Florida State College at Jacksonville, Miami Dade College and Valencia College are in the top 10; Ten Florida colleges are ranked in the number of associate degrees awarded to Hispanic students. Broward College, Miami Dade College and Valencia College are in the top 10; Eight Florida colleges are ranked for associate degrees awarded in the area of nursing. Broward College, Florida State College at Jacksonville and Miami Dade College are in the top 10; Six Florida colleges are ranked for associate degrees awarded in the area of health professions and related clinical sciences; and Nine Florida colleges are ranked for one-year certi“ cate production in all disciplines. With an array of programs and services, the Florida College Systems 28 institutions serve individuals, communities and the state with low-cost, high-quality education and job training,Ž said Chancellor Hanna. I am extremely proud of all colleges for their commitment to providing meaningful credentials for our students that help them get jobs.Ž For more information and to view the rankings, visit Community College Weeks Top Associate Degree Producers Report, 2013.Special to The NewsCommon Core State Standards (CCSS) are taking center stage this summer as teachers head into the classroom to learn how to better enhance learning opportunities to support student success. Seven, two-day institutes are being held at high schools across the state to train lead teachers and administrators, who will then share the information with the rest of their districts. The Common Core State Standards will help ensure Floridas students are well prepared to compete for jobs and college admissions in todays global marketplace,Ž said Commissioner of Education Dr. Tony Bennett. Through the Common Core Summer Institutes, Floridas teachers are engaging in meaningful professional development over the summer in order to successfully implement a more rigorous set of academic standards. I cant thank them enough for their dedication and hard work on behalf of their students.Ž Educators will have the chance to participate in many hands-on learning opportunities to better understand the more rigorous standards demanded by Common Core. Teachers will be asked to create and modify lessons speci“ c to their content area and aligned to the CCSS. Participants will also be asked to identify proven strategies to help all students achieve success, including those with disabilities, English-language learners and those identi“ ed as gifted. The Common Core State Standards put a focus on using innovative technology in the classroom. During the CCSS Summer Institute, teachers will be asked to demonstrate how they can incorporate opportunities for students to utilize technology as a tool for learning. Participants will also be given the opportunity to share their ideas so they can learn from one another how to best serve students throughout this transition.Teachers use summer break to hone common core skillsFloridas first lady encourages summer literacy adventuresSpecial to The NewsSurrounded by hundreds of elementary and middle school students, yesterday Florida First Lady Ann Scott kicked off an exciting program combining outdoor activity and literacy. The 2013 Summer Literacy Adventure Program, a partnership with the Florida Department of Education and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, encourages children to stay active and motivated about reading during this years summer break. Mrs. Scott was on hand at Roland Park K-8 Magnet School in Tampa to challenge students to read as many books as possible throughout the summer. Reading has always been an important part of my life,Ž said Mrs. Scott. I want to challenge all of Floridas students to join me in taking the Summer Literacy Adventure Pledge and read as many books as possible, while enjoying our states beautiful parks.Ž Studies have shown students who read throughout the year are better able to retain their knowledge and continue learning. During summer vacation, it is especially important for students to spend time reading and writing on a regular basis, whether the student is a beginning or pro“ cient reader. Strong reading skills are the foundation needed to learn every other subject,Ž said Commissioner of Education Dr. Tony Bennett. When students read regularly they gain confidence and ultimately do better in school and in life.Ž Each student can “ ll out his or her reading pledge on the Summer Literacy Adventure website. At the end of the summer, program representatives will announce which school has pledged to read the most books, and the winning school will receive a special visit from Mrs. Scott. To learn more about the program, watch First Lady Ann Scotts 2013 Summer Literacy Adventure video. For more valuable resources for students and parents, visit the Just Read, Florida! Of“ ce website. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF LORIDAA Leon County circuit judge sided with the state in a constitutional challenge to a 2011 law that links teacher pay and evaluations to student performance. A group of teachers, backed by the Florida Education Association, contended in the challenge that the law violated constitutionally guaranteed collectivebargaining rights and that lawmakers had given too much decision-making authority to the state Board of Education. But Circuit Judge John Cooper rejected the arguments in seven-page order, “ nding that the law does not "explicitly bar collective bargaining." "While the court “ nds it undisputed that the challenged provisions implicate mandatory subjects of bargaining, the court “ nds it equally undisputed that the act does not explicitly prohibit collective bargaining over any of the subjects embraced in its provisions,'' Cooper wrote. Andy Ford, president of the Florida Education Association, issued a statement expressing disappointment, but he left open the possibility that the union could appeal the ruling or undertake additional legal challenges. Were discouraged that the court ruled against FEA members,Ž Ford said. But theres nothing in the ruling that prevents us from going to court in the future when speci“ c aspects of SB 736 (the 2011 bill number) impairs our members‘ collective bargaining rights. We believe that this has occurred already and will continue to occur throughout the state as this ” awed law is implemented.‹ The law, known as the "Student Success Act," has been a highly controversial issue in the state's education system, with supporters touting it as a way to spur improved schools and critics saying it would not be fair to teachers. The teachers and FEA “ led the lawsuit in 2011 and, in a later court document, said the law dictates numerous issues that ordinarily would be subject to collective bargaining. "Senate Bill 736 prohibits an employer and an employee organization from agreeing to (or continuing to agree to) certain wages, hours and terms and conditions of employment that are customary in labor relations generally and public educational relationships in particular,'' the November 2012 document said. But attorneys for the state Board of Education and the state Department of Education responded in a document that the law is "facially neutral" about collective bargaining. "The plaintiffs claim that any change to the educational system must be bargained,'' the state's attorneys wrote. "This would achieve unintended and unworkable results and is not what the law requires or mandates." Along with ruling against the teachers and union on the collectivebargaining issue, Cooper also rejected arguments that the law is unconstitutional because it delegates too much authority to the Board of Education to develop critical standards to measure learning growth. Broadly, the issue is about the separation of powers between the Legislature and the executive branch. While the FEA lost in the circuit court, it also recently “ led a federal challenge that alleges the law violates rights of teachers who are evaluated on test scores of students or subjects they don't teach.Judge rejects performance pay challenge by teachers LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841 www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW!

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach With storms looming and lightning threatening, the fate of the first annual Wakulla Cross Country Boosters Freedom Run 5K/1 Mile Runs was, in some peoples minds, in question. But Race Director Dr. Michael Atkinson knew that, short of an impending hurricane, the race must go on, and it did. Approximately 120 runners were undaunted by the rough weather and showed up ready to challenge the wet and muddy course that went from Wakulla Springs to Cherokee Sink and back. The first runner to splash his way back to the “ nish line was former WHS runner and an assistant coach last year at Florida High School, Stanley Linton, who covered the 3.1 mile course in 17:32. This was Lintons 15th overall win in road races this year. Current WHS track star, Madison Harris, running in her “ rst serious 5K, was the overall female winner in the time of 21:12. Other current and former cross country coaches also made their presence felt. Florida High Coach Brian Grif“ th “ nished a strong second to Linton in the excellent time of 18:18 and Maclay Coach Gary Droze was third overall and “ rst Masters (40 years old and up) runner in 18:32. Former Wakulla High School Cross Country Coach and 50 state marathoner Ron Christen was the Great Grand Master (60 years and up) Champion, “ nishing in 24:15. Tallahassees Jacque Myers was the “ rst female Masters runner (26:43), David Anderson captured the Male Grand Masters title (23:40) and Crawfordville resident, Aidy Casto won the female Grand Masters title (32:44). While the current WHS cross country runners worked the race, former runners made their presence felt in the 5K race. Zach Broadway was second in the 15-19 male category, with Cora Atkinson, Raychel Gray and Savanna Harris taking the “ rst three places in the same age group for females. Joshua Dismuke and Shawn Morris took first and second places respectively in the 20-24 male category. Other Wakulla County residents winning or placing in their respective age groups included Joe Wiedeman (1st, male 9 & under), Mason Jarmon (2nd, male 9 & under), Samantha Piotrowsk, daughter of race director Beth Piotrowski, (1st, female 9 & under), Jacob Dismuke (1st male 10-14), Amanda Baker (1st female 10-14), Eric Swanson (2nd, male 35-39), Lewis Pollard (3rd, male 35-39), Tiphani Salas (1st female, 35-39), Kristen Brazier (3rd, female 35-39), Nikki Breeden (1st, female 4044), Sandi DeRoss (2nd, female 40-44), prolific road racer and top masters runner Duane Evans (1st, male 40-44), Kelley El-Urfali (1st female 4549), Christa Dismuke, mother of Joshua and Jacob, (2nd, female 4549), Michael Cipriano (1st, male 55-59) and Carolyn Yarbrough (1st, female 55-59). In the 1 mile fun run, the overall winners were: Steve Burch (male, 8:45) and Haley Caperton (female, 7:46). Haley is from Tennessee and a cousin of WHS runners Cora and Mitchell Atkinson and niece of Race Director Michael Atkinson. Other Wakulla County residents placing in the event included: Mason Tillman, 4 years old, (1st, male 8 & under and 2nd male overall), Abigain Avera (2nd, female overall), Jordyn Tillman (3rd, overall female), Jesse Shaw (1st, female 8 & under) and Madison Martin (2nd, female 9-12). Complete results can be found by visiting the Gulf Winds Track Clubs website, www. gulfwinds.org. There was also a special category for competitors running in minimalist shoes with awards, a free pair of shoes, provided by Vibram, the makers of the Vibrum FiveFingers and other minimalist shoes. The winners were Coach Brian Grif“ th and Jacque Myers. The race was the “ rst of what the Cross Country Boosters plan on being an annual event to help provide “ nancial support for the WHS cross country teams. The weather de“ nitely affected the number of participants as approximately 30 pre-registered runners failed to show up, but the event was still very successful thanks in major part to the many sponsors, both local and from the Tallahassee area, who stepped up to support the Boosters efforts. Forty-two sponsors contributed and the Boosters Club and WHS runners expressed their appreciation for the wonderful support. Co-race directors Dr. Michael Atkinson and Beth Piotrowski did an outstanding job and expressed their gratitude to the many cross country parents and current runners who stepped up and assisted with the myriad activities that needed to be done to ensure a successful event. Plans are already underway for next years event and the directors are looking at ways to improve the event and boost participation. RUNNING BODYBUILDINGWHS runners, area coaches dominate Freedom RunBy PAM CHICHESTERSpecial to The NewsWakulla County loves sports, but there is one sport we have that does not get a lot of publicity, which is Natural Bodybuilding. In the past few months, we have had several local competitors receive titles and wins; € Jason Lowe has competed in OCB Beach Body Jacksonville and OCB Southeast State in Altamonte Springs, Jason received “ rst place win in his “ rst open show and went on to compete and was in the top “ ve. € Ezekiel Davis, professional bodybuilder continues to compete and maintains his professional status in the IFPA Pro Galaxy Elite. While Zeke was preparing for his show, he was training other bodybuilders in preparing for their shows. € Tylher Tillman competed in the Emerald Coast Classic and received a second place trophy in the Open Bikini Division. Tylher had never competed in a Fitness Competition before receiving this second place win. € Pamela Chichester, also competed in the Emerald Coast Classic and received a “ rst place win in Open Physique Competition. Pam, who is 54, continues to compete against girls twice her age and still believes that age is just a number and hard work will pay off. Wakulla shows o its muscleAbove, Pamela Chichester and Tylher Tillman. Below, Jason Lowe. WINNERS: Back row: David Anderson (Male Grandmaster), Gary Droze (Male Master), Jacque Myers (Female Master), Ron Christen (Male Great Grandmaster), Aidy Casto (Female Grandmaster); Front row: Stanley Linton (Overall Male) and Madison Harris (Overall Female). PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS By ALAN ROSS Playing a strategy that called for no fresh tires but with a premium placed on track position, Matt Kenseth leapt ahead of race-long leader Jimmie Johnson in the pits with 22 laps to go then held on to take the checkered flag of the Kentucky 400 at Sparta Sunday in a race postponed Saturday night due to rain. Johnson breezed through the the bulk of the race uncontested, until Brian Vickers hit the wall with 26 laps to go, bringing out the ninth caution. Coming off pit road, Kenseth nipped Johnson for “ rst by electing to forego new tires. The gamble paid off, putting the No. 20 at the head of the pack for the crucial restart. Johnson, with the heartache of Dover apparently still in his mind on restarts, got away horribly when the green ” ag fell with 17 laps remaining, spinning sideways coming off Turn 2 as Kenseth grabbed the lead. Johnson, the unquestioned top-performing car of the day, restarted 25th after the caution he caused. To Johnsons competitive credit, he tore through the field over the final nine laps to capture ninth place. For Kenseth, it was his fourth Cup win of 2013. Kurt Busch took the prize for best job bringing out the red ” ag. On Lap 48, looking to make a gain, Busch bonzaied into Brad Keselowski. Busch had peeled down onto the apron in an attempt to springboard past the defending Cup champion as both headed around Turn 4. But the aggressive, borderline-reckless older brother of Kyle bit off way more than he could chew. Rejoining the track off the apron, Busch catapulted into the man he was trying to pass. The ride wasnt over for Keselowski. Following the punt by Busch, the No. 2 Penske Ford was suddenly at the mercy of a cadre of speeding cars bearing down on him. Thats when Greg Bif” e pulverized Keselowski, sending both into the outside wall and producing the red ” ag. ROADSIDE RAVE: Labonte milestone: With Bobby Labontes failure to start at Kentucky (A.J. Allmendinger took his seat in the No. 47 car), his consecutive Cup appearance streak came to a halt at 704 races. In fact, it was the “ rst time a Labonte (dont forget two-time Winston Cup champion Terry) had not started a Cup race since 1978. Johnson, despite the closing disappointment at Kentucky, holds on to his championship points lead by 28 over Carl Edwards. Kenseth lies fifth in the standings. The series goes under the lights at Daytona Saturday night. BRITISH GRAND PRIX: Nico Rosberg won his second grand prix of the season at the venerable Silverstone Circuit in England, but it was the failure and dangerously threatening instability of the Formula One series Pirelli tires that made headlines Sunday at the British Grand Prix. The race was marred with four separate leftrear tire failures in the “ rst 15 laps that affected four different teams, including race leader Lewis Hamilton of Mercedes, who lost his two-second lead on Lap 9 when his left-rear intermediate Pirelli exploded into strips. Pirelli has come under steep criticism all season for the under-performance of its tires. The race went on, and Vettel typically dominated after expertly picking off second place on the race start before passing for the lead not long after. But with 10 laps of the 52-lap race left, Vettel slowed with a gearbox issue. The races “ fth leftrear tire explosion … Sergio Perezs McLaren late in the race … brought out the safety car, setting up the best racing of the season for the “ nal seven laps. Almost everyone took fresh tires and the mad dash was on, won by Rosberg over Mark Webber, with Fernando Alonso third. Read Alan Ross article on the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2013 in Lindys Sports 2013 Pro Football Preview at newsstands everywhere. E-mail: alanross_sports@ yahoo.com. Sportland 2013THE COOL DOWN LAP Kenseth strategy pays o at Kentucky; tire ap mars Silverstone GP Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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From FWC NewsThis report represents some events the FWC handled in the Northwest Region over the week of June 21-27, but it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. LEON COUNTY: Of“ cer Greg Louque observed a truck parked in the Lake Jackson Mounds State Park. When he attempted to make contact with the driver of the vehicle to con“ rm payment of state park fees, the driver of the vehicle left the area in a hurry. Louque stopped the vehicle to do an inspection and smelled cannabis emanating from inside the vehicle. Consent was given to search the vehicle. The subject was found in possession of less than 20 grams of cannabis and drug paraphernalia. The subject was cited for not paying state park fees, and misdemenaor drug possession and drug paraphernalia. WASHINGTON COUNTY: Investigator James Armstrong responded to a vessel accident on the Choctawhatchee River that occurred when a large sturgeon jumped out of the water and struck three of the “ ve family members onboard. The family was trying to escape a rainstorm when the sturgeon leapt from the water, ejecting three of the occupants, and severely injuring a child. The child was airlifted to Sacred Heart Hospital where he remains in intensive care. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Officer Ben Pineda was working at a local boat ramp when he observed a man operating a vessel without lights as he returned to the ramp. As Pineda continued to watch, the man almost hit the dock and was laughing about almost throwing a passenger out of the boat. Pineda approached the man and detected indicators of impairment. The man performed poorly on field sobriety tasks and was arrested for BUI. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsCan you believe it is the Fourth of July already? Where does time go. This weekend, starting on Thursday, the waters are gonna be extremely crowded and this is a time to be extremely careful. Scallop season opened on Sunday and you know what that means. There will be hundreds of boats around St. Marks. I talked to the folks at Jerrys Bait and Tackle and Shell Island and they said folks were finding scallops. The report put out by the FWC does not show our area as having many but who knows … and you wont know unless you go. Every year we have relatives down for the Fourth to go scalloping. We will be going tomorrow and hopefully they will be there. Dont forget your diver down ” ag and watch out for people in the water. I talked with Capt. Randy Peart today and he is guiding over at St. George Island and said “ shing is pretty tough. He said he is catching a lot of silver trout. He said he “ shed last week at the Aucilla and Econ“ na and “ shing down there continues to be good for both big trout and reds. Look for reds around the creek mouths and shoreline and trout around rock grass and in about six to seven feet of water. Capt. David Fife has been catching lots of reds in the Spring Creek and Oyster Bay area using mud minnows. He has also been catching quite a few nice ” ounder and trout up to 5 pounds. The Ochlockonee Shoals is holding plenty of trout in 12 to 18 feet of water. Fish a Gulp on the bottom very slow over the grass. Expect to loose some jigs because there are plenty of small sharks, Spanish and blues out there as well. Jeff May from Carrolton, Ga., came down today and they went offshore. They came in with two grouper and a nice cobia. They were fishing live pin“ sh. We just got back from 10 days in the Grand Tetons and Yellowstone and if you have never been you need to put that on your bucket list. The scenery was breathtaking. Anywhere you looked it was beautiful. Wildlife was everywhere and in one meadow we probably saw 1000 bison. I always thought they were buffaloes, but found out they were actually bison. We saw elk, mule deer, moose, black bears, mountain goats and antelope. The people were extremely friendly and there wasnt any trash anywhere. I wouldnt want to live out there, but would go back again. The temperatures ranged from 32 to 78 and there was no humidity in the air. People talk about going out of the country to see the sights but we have the best sights right here in the good old USA. We went out this afternoon for about two hours and caught 24 nice white trout and one ” ounder using the Pearl White Gulp on the bottom. Tomorrow we will try scalloping, depending on the weather. Remember on July 20, C-Quarters in Carrabelle is putting on their ninth annual Youth Fishing Tournament and on Aug. 3 and 4 they will hold the 10th annual King“ sh Shootout. All proceeds go to the Leukemia Research Foundation. You need to read the limits on scallops and make sure you have that dive ” ag or you will get a ticket. If you are out of your boat and standing in ankle deep water you have to have a diver down ” ag. Watch out for the thunderstorms because this time of year they can be pretty bad. Watch out for other boaters because I can tell you right now there will plenty out there this weekend that shouldnt be driving a boat. Good luck and good fishing and I hope you have a safe and happy Fourth of July. From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Lots of boats on the water, be careful out thereFrom the Forest ServiceThe Apalachicola Public Shooting Range has reopened to the public. Fire ghters from the Apalachicola National Forest worked on rehabilitating the area around the range, which was burned during the Gun Range Fire last February. Wildland re rehabilitation is a response effort to improve forest health after wild res; restoring the condition of the area so habitat can continue to ourish in a post- re environment. The Forest Service is responsible for managing post- re work on federal lands, which involves emergency stabilization, rehabilitation and restoration activities. For additional information on the Apalachicola Public Shooting Range and other recreation sites, please call the Wakulla Ranger District of ce at (850) 926-1904.FWC Law Enforcement operations Forest shooting range re-opens to public www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Wakulla County Fourth Annual Ronald Reagan Wakulla County Fourth Annual Ronald Reagan & July 8, 2013 Wakulla Springs Lodge July 8, 2013 Wakulla Springs LodgeVIP Reception with Governor Scott6:45 7:30 PMIncludes Appetizers & Cash BarBarbecue Dinner at 7:30 pm Table Sponsorships Available for $1,200 ~ Seat 8 Table Sponsorships Available for $1,200 ~ Seat 8 Dinner ~ $50pp VIP Reception ~ $25pp Dinner & Reception for Couples ~ $125 Dinner ~ $50pp VIP Reception ~ $25pp Dinner & Reception for Couples ~ $125 Visit: www.wakullagop.com to purchase your tickets online or call 850.926.4402 for more information.This ad paid for by The Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee not in support of any candidate. Keynote SpeakerGovernor Rick Scott

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This week brings two important events. The first is our Nations birthday … July 4th is a time for all of us to remember and celebrate our nations history and her future. While it was not a federal holiday until 1941, the signing of the Declaration of Independence declaring our independence from Brittan in 1776 was the beginning of our future. Celebrations date back to the American Revolution. No matter how you celebrate, please remember to be safe and responsible. The second important event this week is the opening of scallop season. This year the season runs from June 29 through Sept. 24. Anyone wanting to scallop in the area needs to know and follow the rules and regulations as well as follow safety precautions. The scallop harvest zone runs from the PascoHernando County line through the west bank of the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County. All scallops must be caught and processed within these boundaries. It is also illegal to land scallops outside the designated harvest area. All scallopers must also have a Florida saltwater fishing license, even if you are scalloping from shore. There are also catch limits per person as well as per boat. For more detailed information, visit http:// myfwc.com/“ shing/saltwater/recreational/bayscallops. In addition to knowing the rules and regulations for scalloping, there are also other important safety measures that should be taken. All divers must have a diver down ” ag displayed at the highest point available. Boaters should make every reasonable effort to stay at least 300 feet from a diver down flag, but everyone should slow down and use caution knowing that there are going to be many divers in our area. If the flag is flown from the boat, it must be at least 20 x 24 inches. If it is tethered to the diver, it must be at least 12 x 12 inches. In years past, divers have been lost due to current and not being able to swim. While no one can deny the great taste of a fresh scallop, know your limits and be mindful of fatigue, weather conditions and what is going on around you. A day of scalloping can be great, but the aftermath of a severe sunburn, heat exhaustion or a scalloper who does not make it home can ruin the day. Have fun, but remember to be safe while out on the water. If you would like to learn other safe boating tips, please get in contact with our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for public education to “ nd out about our next class. You can reach Alexander Gulde at fso-pe@ uscgaux.net. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Be safe and remember to watch for diver down ” ags! Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Marine Resolve Every year our facility attracts young graduate students with grand ambitions. They come in search of a rewarding future based upon a noble past. But our governments support of underwater research has waned recently, defunding the Aquarius Habitat (an underwater research lab in the Florida Keys) and all of the National Underwater Research Programs. What does our future in the sea look like? Our current generation of space age life support technology we call rebreathers, is the result of a NASA study in the late 1960s where engineers and aquatic graduate students lived in an underwater habitat called Tektite. NASA wanted to study how people would live in the cramped quarters of a space lab soon to be called Sky Lab. These early aquatic scientists spent long hours outside the station on an early version of the space suit built by General Electric. Space suits are rebreathers, based upon a two-century old technology … a recirculating breathing machine that takes your exhaled gas, cleans out the carbon dioxide, adds oxygen, heats up the mix and adds moisture. There are few bubbles! My mentor, Dr. William Herrnking, was one of these graduate students back then, and is one of the many reasons I now live in Wakulla County. Soon afterwards, Fred Parker and other engineers on the Tektite project opened a new company called Bio Marine, making smaller versions of the GE rebreather dedicated to military applications. Through government surplus of these units years later, a cottage industry grew up in the 1990s resulting in the civilian production of thousands of affordable rigs, some that permit the diving enthusiast up to a comfortable eight hour dive. With the current breed of rebreathers, caves have become smaller, wrecks more accessible, deep reef research more common, and recreational diving more pleasant. It is said that if Cousteau had not had an unfortunate experience on an early rebreather in the late 1940s, we would all be diving them today in lieu of the loud open circuit scuba. This brings me back to the future. Last month I was privileged to provide education and training to several graduate students from many countries, including our own. The “ rst is an aerospace engineer from Taiwan who stated up front that she will become an astronaut expecting to dive the subterranean caves of Mars. They are expected to be similar to our North Florida caves. She will return at Christmas to complete her rebreather training while attending Stanford in California. The next is a neurobiologist seeking skills to better understand those who take these extremeŽ challenges willingly. This week I continue working with a marine biologist headed to Hawaii to study the deep reefs down to 500 feet. He is joined by another marine biologist studying microbiology in Florida caves. All speak of their continued interest in developing future university dive training programs to perpetuate their underwater vision. All of these very bright folks are in their early twenties, and full of the bright prospects of an underwater career. And here I was worried that with the recent downsizing of the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administrations support of underwater science and technology, we might lose our commitment to our vast underwater environment. Not so, say my students. Just you wait and see! Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton From DEP NewsThe Florida Department of Environmental Protections Florida State Parks and Office of Greenways and Trails invites visitors and residents to visit a state park and trail for outdoor recreation, events and family fun all throughout July. Gov. Rick Scott proclaimed July as Recreation and Parks month, observing that parks and recreation programs build family unity, strengthen neighborhood involvement and promote cultural diversity. July is the perfect time for residents and visitors to take the time to enjoy the many activities available at one of our award-winning state parks and trails,Ž said Florida Park Service Director Donald Forgione. Floridas state parks are a great place for families and friends to experience the outdoors and build a healthy lifestyle together.Ž Recreation and Parks Month recognizes the importance of recreational and educational opportunities available at parks and trails, including boosting economies, attracting new business and increasing tourism. During the 2011-2012 fiscal year, nearly 25 million people visited Floridas 171 state parks and state trails. This July, the Department encourages residents and visitors to visit a state park in their district for exciting events and activities. An easy way to plan a fun trip to a park this July is to download the Florida state parks mobile app, available for free download for smartphone users. This interactive guide gives users access to all state parks and trails with information on park amenities, facility maps and a real-time calendar of events. Kick off Recreation and Parks Month by attending an event being hosted this week at a state park or trail.July is recreation and parks monthGrab family and friends and head to a state park this month for some outdoor fun Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jul 4, 13 Fri Jul 5, 13 Sat Jul 6, 13 Sun Jul 7, 13 Mon Jul 8, 13 Tue Jul 9, 13 Wed Jul 10, 13 Date 2.7 ft. 1:13 AM 2.9 ft. 1:55 AM 3.0 ft. 2:30 AM 3.2 ft. 3:03 AM 3.3 ft. 3:35 AM 3.4 ft. 4:05 AM 3.5 ft. 4:34 AM High 2.0 ft. 5:41 AM 1.9 ft. 6:37 AM 1.7 ft. 7:24 AM 1.6 ft. 8:06 AM 1.5 ft. 8:45 AM 1.3 ft. 9:23 AM 1.2 ft. 10:00 AM Low 3.5 ft. 12:08 PM 3.6 ft. 12:54 PM 3.7 ft. 1:34 PM 3.8 ft. 2:10 PM 3.9 ft. 2:43 PM 3.9 ft. 3:15 PM 3.9 ft. 3:49 PM High 0.3 ft. 7:34 PM 0.1 ft. 8:13 PM 0.0 ft. 8:48 PM -0.0 ft. 9:19 PM -0.1 ft. 9:47 PM -0.1 ft. 10:12 PM -0.0 ft. 10:38 PM Low Thu Jul 4, 13 Fri Jul 5, 13 Sat Jul 6, 13 Sun Jul 7, 13 Mon Jul 8, 13 Tue Jul 9, 13 Wed Jul 10, 13 Date 2.0 ft. 1:05 AM 2.2 ft. 1:47 AM 2.3 ft. 2:22 AM 2.4 ft. 2:55 AM 2.5 ft. 3:27 AM 2.6 ft. 3:57 AM 2.6 ft. 4:26 AM High 1.4 ft. 5:52 AM 1.4 ft. 6:48 AM 1.3 ft. 7:35 AM 1.2 ft. 8:17 AM 1.1 ft. 8:56 AM 1.0 ft. 9:34 AM 0.9 ft. 10:11 AM Low 2.6 ft. 12:00 PM 2.7 ft. 12:46 PM 2.8 ft. 1:26 PM 2.9 ft. 2:02 PM 2.9 ft. 2:35 PM 2.9 ft. 3:07 PM 2.9 ft. 3:41 PM High 0.2 ft. 7:45 PM 0.1 ft. 8:24 PM 0.0 ft. 8:59 PM -0.0 ft. 9:30 PM -0.0 ft. 9:58 PM -0.0 ft. 10:23 PM -0.0 ft. 10:49 PM Low Thu Jul 4, 13 Fri Jul 5, 13 Sat Jul 6, 13 Sun Jul 7, 13 Mon Jul 8, 13 Tue Jul 9, 13 Wed Jul 10, 13 Date 2.5 ft. 1:49 AM 2.7 ft. 2:31 AM 2.8 ft. 3:06 AM 3.0 ft. 3:39 AM 3.1 ft. 4:11 AM 3.2 ft. 4:41 AM 3.3 ft. 5:10 AM High 1.8 ft. 6:45 AM 1.7 ft. 7:41 AM 1.6 ft. 8:28 AM 1.4 ft. 9:10 AM 1.3 ft. 9:49 AM 1.2 ft. 10:27 AM 1.1 ft. 11:04 AM Low 3.2 ft. 12:44 PM 3.4 ft. 1:30 PM 3.5 ft. 2:10 PM 3.6 ft. 2:46 PM 3.6 ft. 3:19 PM 3.6 ft. 3:51 PM 3.6 ft. 4:25 PM High 0.2 ft. 8:38 PM 0.1 ft. 9:17 PM 0.0 ft. 9:52 PM -0.0 ft. 10:23 PM -0.1 ft. 10:51 PM -0.1 ft. 11:16 PM -0.0 ft. 11:42 PM Low Thu Jul 4, 13 Fri Jul 5, 13 Sat Jul 6, 13 Sun Jul 7, 13 Mon Jul 8, 13 Tue Jul 9, 13 Wed Jul 10, 13 Date 2.1 ft. 12:57 AM 2.2 ft. 1:39 AM 2.4 ft. 2:14 AM 2.5 ft. 2:47 AM 2.6 ft. 3:19 AM 2.7 ft. 3:49 AM 2.7 ft. 4:18 AM High 1.9 ft. 5:20 AM 1.8 ft. 6:16 AM 1.7 ft. 7:03 AM 1.6 ft. 7:45 AM 1.4 ft. 8:24 AM 1.3 ft. 9:02 AM 1.2 ft. 9:39 AM Low 2.7 ft. 11:52 AM 2.8 ft. 12:38 PM 2.9 ft. 1:18 PM 3.0 ft. 1:54 PM 3.0 ft. 2:27 PM 3.1 ft. 2:59 PM 3.1 ft. 3:33 PM High 0.3 ft. 7:13 PM 0.1 ft. 7:52 PM 0.0 ft. 8:27 PM -0.0 ft. 8:58 PM -0.1 ft. 9:26 PM -0.1 ft. 9:51 PM -0.0 ft. 10:17 PM Low Thu Jul 4, 13 Fri Jul 5, 13 Sat Jul 6, 13 Sun Jul 7, 13 Mon Jul 8, 13 Tue Jul 9, 13 Wed Jul 10, 13 Date 2.8 ft. 1:10 AM 2.9 ft. 1:52 AM 3.1 ft. 2:27 AM 3.2 ft. 3:00 AM 3.4 ft. 3:32 AM 3.5 ft. 4:02 AM 3.6 ft. 4:31 AM High 2.1 ft. 5:38 AM 2.0 ft. 6:34 AM 1.9 ft. 7:21 AM 1.7 ft. 8:03 AM 1.6 ft. 8:42 AM 1.4 ft. 9:20 AM 1.3 ft. 9:57 AM Low 3.5 ft. 12:05 PM 3.7 ft. 12:51 PM 3.8 ft. 1:31 PM 3.9 ft. 2:07 PM 4.0 ft. 2:40 PM 4.0 ft. 3:12 PM 4.0 ft. 3:46 PM High 0.3 ft. 7:31 PM 0.1 ft. 8:10 PM 0.0 ft. 8:45 PM -0.0 ft. 9:16 PM -0.1 ft. 9:44 PM -0.1 ft. 10:09 PM -0.0 ft. 10:35 PM Low Thu Jul 4, 13 Fri Jul 5, 13 Sat Jul 6, 13 Sun Jul 7, 13 Mon Jul 8, 13 Tue Jul 9, 13 Wed Jul 10, 13 Date 2.3 ft. 2:50 AM 2.4 ft. 3:25 AM 2.5 ft. 3:53 AM 2.5 ft. 4:18 AM 2.5 ft. 4:40 AM 2.6 ft. 5:00 AM 2.6 ft. 5:18 AM High 1.8 ft. 4:37 AM 1.8 ft. 5:44 AM 1.8 ft. 6:39 AM 1.8 ft. 7:25 AM 1.7 ft. 8:06 AM 1.6 ft. 8:45 AM 1.5 ft. 9:24 AM Low 2.9 ft. 10:38 AM 2.9 ft. 11:25 AM 2.9 ft. 12:11 PM 2.9 ft. 12:57 PM 2.9 ft. 1:41 PM 2.9 ft. 2:24 PM 2.8 ft. 3:08 PM High -0.1 ft. 6:54 PM -0.2 ft. 7:36 PM -0.2 ft. 8:13 PM -0.2 ft. 8:45 PM -0.1 ft. 9:12 PM -0.0 ft. 9:35 PM 0.1 ft. 9:56 PM Low Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJuly 4 July 10First July 15 Full July 22 Last July 29 New July 7Major Times 10:50 AM 12:50 PM 11:14 PM 1:14 AM Minor Times 3:51 AM 4:51 AM 5:50 PM 6:50 PM Major Times --:---:-11:38 AM 1:38 PM Minor Times 4:35 AM 5:35 AM 6:39 PM 7:39 PM Major Times 12:02 AM 2:02 AM 12:26 PM 2:26 PM Minor Times 5:23 AM 6:23 AM 7:26 PM 8:26 PM Major Times 12:50 AM 2:50 AM 1:13 PM 3:13 PM Minor Times 6:12 AM 7:12 AM 8:10 PM 9:10 PM Major Times 1:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:00 PM 4:00 PM Minor Times 7:04 AM 8:04 AM 8:51 PM 9:51 PM Major Times 2:23 AM 4:23 AM 2:46 PM 4:46 PM Minor Times 7:57 AM 8:57 AM 9:29 PM 10:29 PM Major Times 3:09 AM 5:09 AM 3:31 PM 5:31 PM Minor Times 8:50 AM 9:50 AM 10:05 PM 11:05 PM Average Good Better Best Best Better++ Better6:40 am 8:42 pm 3:52 am 5:51 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:41 am 8:42 pm 4:36 am 6:40 pm 6:41 am 8:42 pm 5:24 am 7:27 pm 6:42 am 8:41 pm 6:14 am 8:11 pm 6:42 am 8:41 pm 7:05 am 8:52 pm 6:43 am 8:41 pm 7:58 am 9:30 pm 6:43 am 8:41 pm 8:51 am 10:06 pm24% 18% 12% 6% 0% 6% 12% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 13ABy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 28 … Like most Americans, Floridians kept a watchful eye on the U.S. Supreme Court over the last week, as the justices issued closely-divided and contentious decisions on the Voting Rights Act and gay marriage. But the impacts in Florida varied widely from those in other parts of the country. Florida doesnt allow any kind of gay marriage or domestic partnerships, meaning that only a ruling far wider than anyone expected from the Supreme Court would make a difference in the Sunshine State. And the state is, unlike many others, at least partially covered by the Voting Rights Act, meaning any decision on that federal law was actually more signi“ cant in Florida than elsewhere in the country. The difference in the impact of the rulings were clearly illustrated in the comments from the opponents of the courts conclusions. House Judiciary Chairman Dennis Baxley, ROcala, a strong supporter of the states ban on gay marriage: In Florida, I think theres been a very clear statement with the marriage amendment, where we stand.Ž Deirdre Macnab, president of the League of Women Voters of Florida, which supports the VRA: Todays decision undermines 40 years of fundamental protections against discriminatory voting laws and the League urges Congress to act quickly to restore the Voting Rights Act.Ž OUR COUNTRY HAS CHANGED For supporters of the ruling in the Voting Rights Act case … which struck down the formula used to “ gure out which state and local governments qualify for extra federal oversight of their voting laws … the issue was relatively simple. No longer is the South the land of segregated water fountains and literacy tests, and a formula that was established back when those dark days were a fresh memory is no longer relevant. Our country has changed, and while any racial discrimination in voting is too much, Congress must ensure that the legislation it passes to remedy that problem speaks to current conditions,Ž Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the 5-4 majority. Those who opposed the decision, though, saw the act as part of the reason that there were no longer literacy tests, poll taxes or several other devices that states came up with to try to keep black voters from casting ballots before the Civil Rights Movement. The sad irony of todays decision lies in its utter failure to grasp why the VRA has proven effective,Ž Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg wrote in a dissent. For Florida, the implications were relatively clear. Unless and until Congress comes up with a new formula for which states qualify for preclearance,Ž and unless the state or one of its counties falls under that formula, state lawmakers are free to pass pretty much any change in voting laws they like. Any challenge would have to come after the fact, in a lawsuit. Any time we have the opportunity to make our own decisions, I think thats great for our state,Ž Gov. Rick Scott told reporters Tuesday following the state Cabinet meeting. As the week ended, there were not yet any indications about whether the state might try to push through any changes that would previously have been tripped up by preclearance. But that is clearly what opponents feared. It should be disturbing to every Florida voter that the Supreme Court seems not to have noticed what happened in Florida over the last two years, where we have battled the Legislatures partisan manipulation of our voting rights,Ž Macnab said. WERE GOING TO BE A TRADITIONAL MARRIAGE STATE The decision on samesex marriage was more of a mixed bag for those who support allowing gays and lesbians to tie the knot. The court threw out part of a federal law, called the Defense of Marriage Act, that denied federal bene“ ts to same-sex couples who are legally married in states that approve their unions. But Florida doesnt allow same-sex marriage. And the courts ruling on a California ban on gay marriage essentially invalidated that law, but was decided on procedural grounds and didnt “ nd a constitutional right requiring states to give gays and lesbians access to marriage. The rulings out of the Supreme Court mean so much for so many people, but so much less for the people in Florida,Ž said Rep. Joe Saunders, an Orlando Democrat and one of the “ rst two openly gay lawmakers in the state. That didnt seem likely to change any time soon. The voters in 2008 decided that were going to be a traditional marriage state,Ž said Gov. Rick Scott, noting that hes been married since he was 19. Thats what the voters decided, and its my job as governor to uphold the law of the land.Ž The only path that looked like a possible route to same-sex marriage in Florida was Equality Floridas ballot initiative, Get Engaged,Ž which is trying to get a measure before voters in 2014. But University of South Florida political science professor Susan MacManus said the measure might do better in 2016, a presidential year when the electorate is likely to be younger and more supportive. But its still a divided state on the issue,Ž she said, and if it were put on the ballot, much would depend on the turnout … the demographic make-up of the voters who actually turn out to vote.Ž CLOSER TO HOME Not everything important happened in Washington, D.C. In fact, for the 1.26 million customers of Citizens Property Insurance Corp., the state-backed insurer, their wallets will likely feel more of a pinch from a Wednesday decision by that board than anything the Supreme Court did. The Citizens board approved an average 7 percent increase in premiums, with the hike hitting 7.5 percent for those with sinkhole coverage. The increase is expected to generate another $178 million next year, but actuarial estimates say $505 million is needed in additional premium charges. For single-family coverage, the average nonsinkhole rate will stand at $2,112 next year, up from $1,981 in the current year. We cant ignore the political consequences of what we do, but such interest must always yield to sound business judgment, “ duciary duty and the requirements of law,Ž Chairman Carlos Lacasa said. The rate proposal must still be approved by the Florida Of“ ce of Insurance Regulation. Sean Shaw, a former state insurance consumer advocate and founder of Policyholders of Florida, criticized the increases. We only hear two things from Citizens Property Insurance … either lack of self-control or rate hikes, Shaw said in a prepared statement. Today its rate hikes, and once again Tampa Bay is taking most of the punishment.Ž Meanwhile, Florida A&M University took another step in its attempt to recover from the 2011 death of drum major Robert Champion following a hazing ritual, as Interim President Larry Robinson announced the return of the schools iconic March 100 band. Robinson highlighted the changes that have happened at FAMU since Champions death, including a comprehensive anti-hazing plan, a revised student conducted code and the creation of two new positions aimed at preventing hazing. Part of changing behavior is ensuring that people understand … those who might not quite get it … that were very serious about it,Ž Robinson said. When and if it rears its head, we will take the appropriate action.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: Floridas elections laws are now easier to overhaul after a decision by the U.S. Supreme Court decision striking down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This governor and this Legislature have been walking advertisements for why federal oversight is needed.Ž … Howard Simon, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Florida, on the decision striking down a portion of the Voting Rights Act that subjected Florida laws affecting “ ve counties to federal scrutiny.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Court decisions have varied impact in FloridaBy DAVID WHITEToday, more than 12,000 U.S. wine shops have a presence on the web. But just 14 states allow consumers to order wine from out-ofstate retailers. Eleven states prohibit residents from ordering wine from outof-state wineries. Four states ban the sale of wine on Sundays. The overwhelming majority of Americans support supermarket wine sales, but 15 states force consumers to purchase their wine in a dedicated liquor store. In another 15 states, its illegal to bring your own bottle of wine into a restaurant … even if the restaurant owner is okay with it. Like virtually all Americas liquor laws, these restrictions trace their origins to Prohibition. Today, these laws simply harm consumers. Fortunately, theres a new organization thats fighting these anticonsumer wine laws. Called the American Wine Consumer Coalition (www.WineConsumers.org), the group deserves every wine lovers support. When Prohibition was repealed 80 years ago, states were given the authority to regulate the transportation or importationŽ of liquor within their borders. At the insistence of a motley crew of interest groups, states imposed an assortment of rules. A top priority was weakening producers, because before prohibition, teetotalers and law enforcement alike believed they wielded too much power. Temperance advocates blamed producers for the ills of drunkenness; police of“ cers associated producers with organized crime. Lawmakers answered this call in one of two ways. They either took control of the sale and/or distribution of alcohol or created a wholesaler tierŽ to sit between producers and retailers. Today, just Pennsylvania and Utah maintain total control on alcohol sales. In those two states, government of“ cials decide which liquor brands are sold, how much is charged, and where those products can be purchased. Virtually every other state depends on a wholesale tier through which most alcohol must pass. This is essentially a state-mandated middleman. As one might guess, wholesaling is big business. Together, the nations two largest wholesalers had revenues of more than $14 billion last year. So its no surprise that the wholesaling industry “ ghts hard against efforts to undermine its presence. Consider direct-toconsumer wine sales. About 20 years ago, Americans started developing a taste for high-end wines, typically from California. Many consumers started ordering directly from producers. Such transactions cut out wholesalers, so they spearheaded a campaign to prohibit winery-to-consumer shipping. Consumers responded with lawsuits, and in 2005, the Supreme Court ruled that state lawmakers could only prohibit direct shipping from outof-state wineries if they blocked wineries in their states from shipping out of state. The 11 states that still prohibit direct-to-consumer wine sales hardly produce any wine of their own. The wholesaling industry has also fought to block online retailerto-consumer wine sales … and remains successful in 36 states. So if you live in Pennsylvania and desperately want a bottle of wine that can only be found at a store in Washington, D.C., youre out of luck. Wine retailers obstruct supermarket wine sales. After all, if consumers could pick up a bottle of Merlot while shopping for dinner, they might skip the trip to the liquor store. And while bans on Sunday sales were originally promoted to keep the Sabbath holy, theyre now pushed by retailers who hate the thought of increased competition. Laws against bringing your own bottle of wine into a restaurant are pushed by the restaurant lobby. The reason? Restaurants pro“ t handsomely from wine sales, typically tripling the retail price. Plus, its easy to imagine an upstart restaurant gaining traction by encouraging patrons to bring in their own booze … and established restaurants dont enjoy competition. Americas liquor laws are designed to protect and serve special interests … not consumers. Thats why the time has come for the American Wine Consumer Coalition.David White is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com, and president of the American Wine Consumer Coalition. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine (PalatePress.com). WHITE’S WINESFinally a voice for wine consumers -Janet

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com On June 20, Marianne Frost Forester, 51, of Crawfordville was charged with DUI, driving while license is suspended or revoked as a habitual offender and hit-andrun of an unattended vehicle without leaving identi“ cation. The WCSO received information that a motorist had struck a dumpster at a convenience store at Highway 267 and U.S. Highway 319. The suspect vehicle was observed near Arran Road and U.S. Highway 319. While investigating the DUI, additional information was obtained about the suspect striking a vehicle at a Crawfordville convenience store as the tag and vehicle description matched in both incidents. Prior to the vehicle stopping in Crawfordville, Deputy Ward Kromer observed the suspect vehicle leave the road three times over a two mile span. Forester refused to provide a breath sample and was taken to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Deputy Kromer and Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week:JUNE 20€ Steven Baird of Verizon Wireless in Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Two suspects, who have been identified, entered the business and stole a cellular telephone. The phone is valued at $650. The suspect information was forwarded to other area law enforcement. Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € Deputies Ward Kromer and Ian Dohme responded to a disturbance complaint at Hickory Park in Crawfordville. Robbin Woodard Kilpatrick, 41, of Crawfordville was arrested for aggravated battery of a pregnant woman after striking an 18-year-old Crawfordville victim. During the altercation the suspect became aware that the victim was pregnant. The unborn child was not injured in the altercation and Kilpatrick was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. € Roger Nathaniel Rosier, 37, of Sopchoppy was observed in a driveway on the Sopchoppy Highway. The suspect has an outstanding warrant from the WCSO. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks stopped to pick up Rosier, who then reportedly ran away from the deputy into the woods. A warrant will be issued for resisting arrest without violence. € Siefe Joseph Awad, 63, of Panacea was observed by Deputies Ian Dohme and Alan Middlebrooks knowingly driving a vehicle with a suspended license. A traf“ c stop was conducted in Medart. The suspect was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. He was charged with driving while license is suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction.JUNE 21€ Siefe Awad of Panacea reported a residential burglary. Items were taken from the victims home and his shed. Some of the stolen items included a television, jewelry, cash, knives, furniture, compressors, chain saw and lawn mower. Suspects have been identi“ ed and the value of the stolen property is estimated at $3,650. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Olivia Garcia of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. Someone used the victims bank card to purchase items at two convenience stores. The fraud was valued at $40.33. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Marie Garner of Crawfordville reported finding property near the Triangle Petro store. Some jewelry was turned in by the reporting person that had been found on the side of the road. The jewelry was valued at $20. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Joshua Blankenship of Crawfordville reported the theft of a boat trailer tag. The tag was entered in the NCIC/FCIC data base. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Stephen Crabtree of St. Marks reported the theft of lawn maintenance equipment that was valued at $120. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Michael Avant of Monticello reported a residential burglary in Crawfordville. The victim is attempting to sell a home that was broken into. Beer bottles were smashed inside the home, siding was damaged and windows were broken. Damage was estimated at $500. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € William Mullinax of Crawfordville reported the theft of three dirt bikes from his property. The bikes are valued at $6,500. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Barbie Leeann Henderson of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Sgt. Lorne Whaley was patrolling the Mashes Sands Boat Ramp when he observed a suspicious vehicle. The two subjects in the vehicle were in possession of open containers. Henderson told Sgt. Whaley she was in possession of marijuana which was discovered in the vehicle. The marijuana weighed “ ve grams. The second subject was not charged. Deputy Stephen Simmons also investigated.JUNE 22€ Jeffery Brown of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The reporting person was watching a home at Union Street and Old Fort Road in St. Marks for an out of state homeowner. He reported graf“ ti spray painted on the side of the residence and on some trees. Damage was estimated at $250. Sgt. Danny Harrell and Detective Cole Wells investigated. € Detention Deputy John David Metcalf reported recovering narcotics as part of a road cleaning project with inmate trustees on Highway 267. Drug paraphernalia and what appeared to be crack cocaine residue and crack rocks were recovered. The drugs were seized for destruction. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Raquel Tully of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left her purse in her vehicle and left the vehicle unlocked. Sgt. Lorne Whaley investigated.JUNE 23€ Randall Nichols of Kingsland, Ga. reported the theft of bicycles in Crawfordville. The bicycles are valued at $298 and were taken from the back of the victims truck. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € Genja Cornwell of Crawfordville reported the theft of three folding tables from an open lot next to Rose Alley in Crawfordville. The tables were set up to sell “ reworks. The tables are valued at $120. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € Noel Hurst of Tallahassee reported discovering a marijuana plant on his undeveloped property. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Wanda Mahaffey of Panacea reported recovering property at Otter Lake Park. A backpack containing camera equipment was recovered. The camera and related equipment was inventoried by Deputy Sean Wheeler. € Andrea Mathis of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim went to Lost Creek Bridge to swim and discovered a vehicle window broken as she returned to it. A purse was stolen from inside the secured vehicle. The purse and contents are valued at $582 and damage to the vehicle is estimated at $200. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Justin Hammond of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A window at the home was broken and “ rearms and jewelry were missing. The estimated value of the stolen property is $6,000 and the damage to the home was estimated at $200. Deputy Richard Moon and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. € Donna Bruce and Lisa Christal, both of Crawfordville, reported a criminal mischief. A speeding motorist kicked dirt and rocks onto the victims parked vehicles creating damage. Damage to the vehicles is estimated at $2,500 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Richard Moon and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated.JUNE 24€ Scott Ferrell of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim lost jewelry from his vehicle. The jewelry is valued at $1,072. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Heather Lane of Crawfordville reported the theft of two bicycles from her property. The bikes are valued at $200. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € Tammy Godwin of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. An unauthorized charge was observed on the victims bank account for $124. The charge was created at a gas station in Lakeland. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Mary B. Mims of Crawfordville reported the theft of mail. The phone was purchased in Crystal River but never delivered to the victims Crawfordville postal box. The Postal Inspector conducted an investigation. After the investigation the package was located in another postal customers mailbox who returned it. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € Craig Kittendorf of Woodville reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were observed on the victims bank account. The fraud was committed at two gas stations in Lakeland. The value of the fraud was $448. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Catherine Slicker of Sopchoppy reported a residential burglary. A rug, valued at $400, was taken. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Joicelyn Powers of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief as someone placed an unknown substance inside her mailbox. Two other mailboxes in the area had similar substances in them. The substance is believed to be from a “ re extinguisher. Detective Rob Giddens investigated. € Walter Connors of Panacea reported the theft of a boat motor. The boat was left on U.S. Highway 98 and Surf Road for sale. The 9.9 four stroke was valued at $1,500. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Ronald Murray of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim was involved in a vehicle crash and was transported to the hospital. His vehicle contained approximately $1,000 worth of “ shing equipment inside. The vehicle crash included a roll-over and some of the property may have been ejected in the crash. Deputy Mike Crum investigated.JUNE 25€ A 16-year-old from Tallahassee was issued a notice to appear in court after Deputy Alan Middlebrooks observed him riding a bicycle at 3:16 a.m. without lights on Jasper Thomas Road. The juvenile handed over a backpack that allegedly contained drug paraphernalia. The juvenile was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia and turned over to a parent. € Deputies Evelyn Brown and Marshall Taylor recovered a bicycle at Commodore Place and Taff Drive and a second bicycle was found at Trice Lane and Shadeville Highway. The bikes were involved in a previous complaint. Deputies are still attempting to contact the owner. € Timothy Spivey of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victims bank card was used nine times in three different states, Virginia, Maryland and North Carolina. The transactions totaled $10, $187 and $177. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Ronald Hall of Crawfordville reported the theft of a cell phone at Wal-Mart. The victim placed the $600 phone down in the restroom and left without it. When he returned later, it was missing. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € Jessica Pagel of Crawfordville reported the theft of her wallet from Wal-Mart. Store staff was able to “ nd her wallet, but $80 was missing from it. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated.JUNE 26€ Christina Hanna of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim failed to lock her vehicle overnight and $200 worth of property was stolen from her purse. Deputy Nick Boutwell investigated. € Jean-Pierre Roberts of Crawfordville reported recovering a Florida vehicle tag. The tag was recovered near the county sewage treatment plant on Lawhon Mill Road. The owner is C & G Automotive in Tallahassee. It was listed stolen by the Tallahassee Police Department in May. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Donna Savary of Crawfordville reported the theft of small sign boards from four locations in Crawfordville. The boards advertised a summer program and are valued at $88. Sgt. Mike Helms investigated. € Dawn Burgess of Harvest Fellowship Church reported a criminal mischief in Crawfordville. An air conditioning unit was moved and wires were tampered with. Lt. Bruce Ashley investigated. € Linda Herbst of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A vehicle window was broken and a purse was taken at Lost Creek. The value of the stolen items was $500. Sgt. Billy Jones and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. € Detective Derek Lawhon was on patrol at Lost Creek Bridge when he observed a suspicious motorcycle. The motorcycle had an expired tag. After a traf“ c stop, Lawhon discovered that Matthew Daniel Pryor, 22, of Crawfordville was allegedly in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. The marijuana weighed four grams. He was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. € Jennifer Hicks of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. The victim left her vehicle unlocked overnight. The victim reported $50 worth of property being stolen. Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € Doris Chason of Sopchoppy reported a fraud. The victims bank account had been accessed 20 times for a loss of $3,400. The unauthorized charges included food establishments, clothing and transportation. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € Alyssa Taylor of Crawfordville reported the theft of her wallet. The wallet and contents are valued at $107. Deputy Evelyn brown investigated. € Cynthia Dotson of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash involving her mailbox. The East Ivan Road mailbox was observed by Deputy Mike Zimba in pieces on the victims lawn. The box is valued at $100. Suspect information was obtained. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated.JUNE 27€ Detectives Cole Wells, Derek Lawhon, Josh Langston and Matt Helms were attempting to locate stolen dirt bikes when they discovered “ ve marijuana plants at a remote Crawfordville location. The plants were seized for destruction. € Christine Jenkins of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Electronics valued at $1,915 were stolen. A forced entry was observed at the home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson, Sgt. Danny Harrell and Detective Clint Beam investigated. € Jeanetta Nichols of Panacea reported a fraud. The victims bank card was used to purchase $39 worth of merchandise at a big box store. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Kasey Merkison of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Musical equipment and a radio, valued at $820, were reported missing from the home. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Frank M. Lawhon of the City of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief. Youths created hand prints on the park pavilion and restrooms. Damage was estimated at $30. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 1,278 calls for service during the past week including 15 business alarms; 13 residential alarms; 122 citizen contacts; 15 disturbances; 39 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 12 E-911 abandoned calls; 19 regular E-911 calls; 10 frauds; 85 investigations; 11 loud music/noise complaints; 54 medical emergencies; 11 property recoveries; 379 business and residential security checks; 27 special details; 39 subpoena services; 13 suspicious people; 10 suspicious vehicles; 17 thefts; 34 traf“ c enforcements; 113 traf“ c stops; 14 reckless vehicles; and 14 wanted people.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 15ASpecial to The NewsA 27-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested Friday, June 28, in connection with a felony drug charge after a K-9 narcotics dog alerted Wakulla County Sheriffs Office investigators to a suspicious package in Panacea, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. During the undercover investigation deputies reportedly observed James Joshua Williams collect the package. He was arrested at 10 a.m. and charged with possession of more than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment. The package was opened by law enforcement who observed two sealed plastic bags that contained 272.5 grams or roughly one-half pound of high grade marijuana. The suspects vehicle was also seized and taken to the WCSO Impound yard. During the inventory of the vehicle, investigators allegedly located a marijuana smoking pipe and $340 in U.S. currency in various denominations. WCSO investigators estimated the street value of the seized marijuana at approximately $7,000. Williams is being held on a $3,000 bond.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Office selected three Employees of the Quarter for April to June 2013. The employees who are selected are nominated by members of the agency and considered for selection by an Employee of the Quarter committee. The recipients included: Sgt. Danny Harrell for Law Enforcement; Sgt. Steve Smith of Corrections and Lorinda Sanders for Civilian employees. Sgt. Harrell is a road patrol sergeant while Sgt. Smith is the lead bailiff and Lorinda Sanders is the evidence and property custodian. Congratulations to these deserving members of the agency,Ž said Sheriff Charlie Creel. PHOTOS BY WCSO/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSUndersheriff Trey Morrision, Lorinda Sanders of evidence and property, and Sheriff Charlie Creel.WCSO names Employees of the QuarterAbove, Sgt. Danny Harrell for law enforcement; at left, Sgt. Steve Smith, lead bailiff, with Sheriff Creel.Drug dog’s alert leads to felony charges James Joshua Williams Would like to wish Everyone A Safe and Happy 4th of July! 1st in ServiceŽConcrete 1st in ServiceŽConcrete L.B. BROOKS1532 Coastal Highway, Panacea, Florida 32346 Check out our Face book page Brooks ConcreteŽ www.brooksconcrete.com 850-984-5279Serving ALL of your Concrete Needs! Painted Picinic Tables Ping Pong Tables Planters Stained Slab Tables Picnic Tables Fish Cleaning Tables Stepping StonesVariety In Stock! Serving Wakulla & Franklin Counties For 40 Years *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and re“nances. Re“nances and used car purchases 2 006 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA.

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comIn fairy tales, cartoons and modern literature, the rabbit is portrayed as a harmless, innocent spirit with only the best of intentions. Even Bugs Bunny with his wisecracking Brooklyn/Bronx accent was the model of restrained sarcastic humor intending to poke fun at the obvious absurdities of contemporary life and procure the necessary and ever-present carrot. After all, a small furry creature with big blinking eyes and cute buckteeth is an immediate candidate for a hug. There could be no better creature to bring colorful eggs to children awaiting the Easter Bunny. Wakulla Countys rabbit population certainly quali“ es for all of the above with the appropriate amount of cuteness, but popular myths and reality diverge at this point. The local rabbits are cottontails of the genus Sylvilagus. They are related to hares and pikas, a mouse-like mammal which lives in northern ranges of Europe, Asia and North America. While similar in appearance, hares and rabbits have several importance differences. The most obvious is the young at birth. Rabbits give birth to blind, hairless young. Hares give birth to fur covered young with welldeveloped eyesight. Unlike the remainder of the worlds rabbit population, cottontails utilize nests in thick, well-disguised sites to raise their young, and to gather when not foraging. Other rabbits in Europe, East Asia, and North America live in underground warrens. Subterranean warrens would prove to be a problem from several perspectives for Wakullas cottontails. The “ rst is the potential for ” ooding during sudden summer showers. The helpless young would quickly drown. The second, and most likely the greatest problem from the rabbits perspective, is snakes. The legless reptiles are a major population control factor to the highly proli“ c rabbits. A warren would prove to be a compartmentalized smorgasbord for any large snake that happened by the entrance. Rabbits are herbivores which eat a variety of tender foliage plants. Many vegetable gardens and highly manicured landscapes have been reduced to little more than decimated wastelands by troupes of ravenous cottontails. The local rabbits are most active at dawn and dusk using the low light and long shadows as camou” age. In addition to snakes, rabbits have to be concerned about their high standing on the menu of coyotes, birds of prey, and the occasional fox. Wakulla rabbits are not completely helpless. First and foremost among their defensive tools are their ears. The oversized auditory utensils are a “ rst-alert system for impending danger. The second defense is the rabbits speed and agility. The zigzag escape run makes it difficult for even the most nimble predators to keep up. Rabbits quickly retreat to heavy brush, commonly interwoven with briars and brambles. Once ensconced in the safety of their prickly fortification, they silently wait for the predator to lose interest and seek nourishment elsewhere. The rabbits third level of defense is luck. What could be luckier than having four rabbits feet for good fortune. The origin of the custom has been lost in the mist of time, but is believed by some social anthropologist to have begun over 2,600 years ago. To learn more about rabbits in Wakulla County contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce at 850-9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u” .edu/. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.On the trail of Wakulla’s cottontail rabbits Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA cottontail on alert in some brush. In addition to snakes, they are on the menu for coyotes, birds of prey, and the occasional fox. Have an “Old Fashioned” 4TH OF JULY Have an “Old Fashioned” 4TH OF JULY

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 T a k i n g C a r e o f B u s i n e s s Taking Care of Business B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from Ameri rst Home Mortgage Spotlight on Business, Page 3B WEEK IN WAKULLA Page 2B Visit to London By Linda CarterTravel, Page 10B By PETRA SHUFFOf the ChamberI always enjoy conversing with people inquiring about our local businesses and I have the most fun when I receive calls for the little restaurant on Crawfordville Highway. What is the name of that little restaurant on the highway?Ž You mean That Place on 319?Ž Yes, that one … whats the name of it?Ž You get the idea. And That Place is where some networking was going on Wednesday, June 26, at our monthly networking luncheon. Mike Keller offered a choice of fried shrimp and pork chop combo with mashed potatoes and green beans, or a luncheon salad with grilled shrimp. Mary announced our new member for June, The Cave Connection, specializing in cave diving training, guide services, sales and rentals. Next was our spotlight member, Kim Campbell with Graphic Visions, who promised that she dishes up a whole lotta creativity without the expensive check.Ž Kim has 25 years of graphic design experience, founded her company in 1993, and has worked on an array of projects from menus, billboards, logos, convention materials, directories, brochures etc. She showed a billboard of some of her local projects like the TDC tearoff map with local places to visit, and the brochure for Warriors for Quiet Waters, and the new Shepard Accounting logo as examples. Kim is also a print broker, which means she will shop for the best prices on your printed materials for you. Kim also works closely with our member Chuck Daugherty of TCB Marketing who received a liveŽ testimonial about being the best mailing agent around from attending member Harry Bozeman, owner of the UPS Store #6044 on Capital Circle SW. Kim is also a glass artist and a member of the Florida Goldsmith Society. She currently teaches glass art and would like to be able to offer classes in Wakulla in the near future. As customary Kim drew our next spotlight member … which will be the City of St. Marks. Jo Ann Palmer announced the Chambers upcoming Business Excellence Awards, sponsored by CenturyLink and Waste Pro. The awards categories are start-up business, business of the year, non-pro“ t organization of the year, environmental stewardship, Wakulla area business of the year (this business does not have to be a Chamber member), Chamber member of the year, and new this year … director of the year. Sample packets were handed out, and will also be emailed to all of our members shortly, so be on the lookout and send in your nominations; you could be a winner! Jo Ann recently obtained a cigarette litter prevention grant for Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and handed out car and pocketbook ashtrays for those interested. Jocelyn Hayes, Girl Scout Council of the Panhandle Area informed us about Girls Unity Day, Friday, July 19, from 6 to 8 p.m. at TCC Wakulla Center, a free event for girls of all ages. Secondly, the third Annual Back to School Outreach Event which will be held on Saturday, Aug. 3, at Hudson Park in Crawfordville from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. The theme for this years event is F.R.E.S.H. (Fully Refreshing and Empowering Students Holistically: mind, body and soul). Sponsors are sought for this event. Email Jocelyn at jocelynlhayes@gmail.com for more information. Registration forms are also available on the Chamber website. Towards the end of the program, Mary thanked Mike and his attentive staff for hosting our luncheon, and Mike drew the cash prize winner of $45, which went to Kim Campbell. We always appreciate items for our raffle and thank the following for their contribution: June Vause, Petra Shuff, Cook Insurance, Graphic Vision, Susan Schatzman, Capital City Bank, WorkforcePlus, Critter Control, Marianne and Lionel Dazevedo, and The Wakulla News. We will not hold a networking luncheon in July due to Wakulla Senior Center Christmas in July event Wednesday, July 24. By TAMMIE BARFIELDChamber PresidentThe Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce is dedicated to assisting and serving Wakullas business community. The Chamber provides a forum for relationship building among Wakullas business owners and provides a public voice to advocate sound public policies that will improve and enhance opportunities to do business in Wakulla County. One of the objectives of the Chamber is to discover and correct factors that prevent the promotion of business and community growth. Occasionally a situation arises when it is prudent for the Chamber to participate in developing or improving policies that impact area businesses. When the Chamber takes a position in support of or in opposition to public policy, that position is nonpartisan and non-sectarian, as stated in the bylaws, and it is with a consensus of the board of directors. Recently the Chamber board unanimously voted to take a position opposing the revised sign ordinance as it was presented and approved. The Chamber board supports a sign ordinance for Wakulla County and would welcome the opportunity to participate in the development of an ordinance that would encourage the effective use of signs as a means of communication and enhance the countys appearance, while also remaining business-friendly with fair and reasonable provisions. BUSINESS EXCELLENCE AWARDS Every year the chamber provides an opportunity for its members and the public to recognize outstanding businesses in our area through the Business Excellence Awards and Environmental Stewardship Awards. These awards were established nine years ago to honor chamber businesses exemplifying excellence in their contributions to the community. Our title sponsors for the awards this year are CenturyLink, a leading provider of Internet, TV and voice services, and Waste Pro, a Florida based solid waste, recycling, processing and disposal company. We are very proud to be partnering with these two premier sponsors to bring these prestigious awards to our businesses. Nominations are being sought now to determine who will be the winners of the awards this year. There is a list of qualifying businesses on the chambers website as well as the nomination forms. Go to www.wakullacountychamber.com, print the form and complete it, then fax, email or mail it to the chamber of“ ce at 850-926-2050 (fax), info@ wakullacountychamber. com, or Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce, 23 High Drive, Crawfordville FL 32327-2032. This years event will be held Sept. 19 at the Wakulla County Senior Center.Tammie Barfield is president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce.Chamber opposes revision to sign ordinance PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENAbove, Mary Wallace looks at winning cards drawn during the luncheon. Below, Chamber members network at That Place on 319 restaurant.That Place on 319 hosts Chamber luncheonNew members: € Cave Connections … specializing in cave diving instruction, guide service, sales and rentals. € Luxury Cruises & Travel specializing in luxury cruises, river cruises, tours, travel arrangements. PRESIDENTS MESSAGEChamber Chatter IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 SCALLOP SEASON IS SCALLOPSEASON IS 750MLCROWNROYAL $ 19 99Prices Good Through July850926-3212375MLWOLFSHMIDTVODKA $ 3 99 1.75LSVEDKAVODKA $ 19 99 $ $ 1.75LLORD CALVERT $ 16 99 $ $ 1.75LSEGRAMS GINN $ 16 99 S BUDLIGHT $ 14 99 18PK Rhonda A. Carroll, MAI State Certi ed General Real Estate Appraiser #RZ459 575-1999 • 926-6111 • Fax 575-1911 Competitive Rates • County Resident • Specializing in Commercial & Residential Appraisals (Including Mobile Homes) • Leon/Wakulla Native • 26 Years Experience Appraising Real Estate •Visit Our Website at: www.carrollappraisal.com r r sTM Appraisals in Leon, Wakulla, Gadsden, Jefferson & Franklin Counties

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, July 4  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, July 5  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, July 6  LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, July 7  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, July 8  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, July 9  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. Wednesday, July 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsMonday, July 8  PLANNING COMMISSION meeting will take place in the commission chambers at 7 p.m.  CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will be holding its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. Wednesday, July 10  CODE ENFORCEMENT meeting will take place in the commission chambers at 5:30 p.m. COMMUNITY CENTER ADVISORY COUNCIL is holding a public meeting in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administration Conference Room at 3 p.m. RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE is holding a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center, located at the north entrance of Centennial Bank. Thursday, July 11  CITY OF ST. MARKS will hold a budget workshop at 6:30 p.m. and a public hearing at 6:45 p.m. at 788 Port Leon Dr. Monday, July 15  COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.Monday, July 22  COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD meeting will be held at 5:45 p.m. in the school board room. For information call 9260065. SOPCHOPPY FOURTH of JULY celebration going on through Saturday SIT-IN MOVIE FEST showing ‘Citizen Kane’ and ‘Dark Knight Rises’ 5:30 p.m. ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB open house and kayak demoKayak demo 10 a.m. Open house 2 p.m. BLUE JEANS & BLACK TIE AFFAIR Wakulla Springs Lodge 7 p.m.ThursdaySaturdaySundayMonday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net Weekly meetings Special EventsThursday, July 4  SOPCHOPPY CELEBRATION, Come celebrate the Fourth of July in Sopchoppy! Festivities for the day begin with a parade downtown Sopchoppy from 10-11 a.m. Byron B. Hodges Park opens to the public at 11 a.m. for the opening ceremony at noon Donation of $3 for park entry. Browse vendor booths and enjoy live entertainment before getting settled in for the reworks at 9 p.m. For a schedule of events, parade, or vendor registration visit sopchoppy orida.com/2013july4thcelebration.html  OAKS BAR N GRILLE CELEBRATION, Come celebrate the Fourth of July with us at The Oaks Bar N Grille, formerly Wildwood. It is a great way to spend your day with family and friends. We will have live broadcasted music, delicious BBQ grilling, fun kid friendly activities or just relaxing in our bar, restaurant or hotel. Great rates will be offered all day on our full bar and food. We will have raf e tickets with prizes to give away too. We look forward to seeing you! Friday, July 5  SOPCHOPPY CELEBRATION continues with a string pull at Myron B. Hodge City Park from 10 a.m. until noon. From 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. there will be a free concert at City Park. Then, from 7 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. Writers in the Round at From the Heart Studio Lon & Liz Williamson, Frank Lindamood and Rick Ott. $10 admission. Contact Rick Ott at 962-5282 or email fromtheheartrecordingstudio@gmail.com Saturday, July 6  SOPCHOPPY CELEBRATION continues beginning at 10 a.m. with a free concert at the downtown stage until noon. Following will be a songwriter’s workshop at From the Heart Studio hosted by Chuck Cannon and Lari White 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. $50 admission, contact Rick Ott at 9625282 or fromtheheartrecordingstudio@gmail.com to participate. Then, from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sopchoppy supper at depot downtown with $5 hamburger and hot dog plates, hosted by Spirit Life Church Youth Ministry. Finally, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. enjoy a free concert downtown with Coon Bottom Creek, Ralph Pelletier and Lindsay Evans with other artists TBA.  SIT-IN MOVIE FEST will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. All shows start at 5:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. Bring lawn chairs, beach chairs and blankets to sit on main arena oor or bleachers. Folding chairs will also be provided. Popcorn and snacks are available but drinks are limited, so bring your own. This Saturday’s features are “Citizen Kane” and “The Dark Knight Rises.” Sunday, July 7  ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB is holding an open house and kayak demo. We will be showing off our beautiful facility from 2 p.m. until 6 p.m. Please come learn about our new memberships and rental options. If any questions call Charlene at 933-1718. In addition St. Marks Out tters will have a kayak demo from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with lunch and a raf e. If you have any kayak questions call Capt. Mike at 510-7919. The Yacht Club is located on the Wakulla River 36 Yacht Lane, St. Marks, FL. Open to the pubic.Monday, July 8  WAKULLA COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY will host Florida Governor Rick Scott from 7 p.m until 8:30 p.m. at the Fourth Annual Ronald Reagan Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. The Governor will be available for photos with attendees of the VIP Reception at 7 p.m. Tickets include a BBQ dinner, cash bar, and live entertainment. $50 per person for dinner, $25 per person for VIP Reception, or $125 per couple for dinner and VIP reception. Table Sponsorships are $1200 for 8 seats including dinner and VIP Reception for each. Table sponsors will be recognized in the program. Advance ticket purchase may be obtained at www.wakullaGOP.com or by calling 926-4402. Tuesday, July 9 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO is starting up its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. 18 years and up only please. Thursday, July 11  AIRPORT MASTER PLAN MEETING will be held at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea from 6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the citizens of Wakulla County and other interested parties an opportunity to provide input on the development of the Wakulla Airport Master Plan. Upcoming EventsFriday, July 12  THE FLOW MOBILE (Florida Licensing On Wheels) will be at the Wakulla Senior Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. FLOW Mobile provides a convenient method to renew a driver license, obtain a replacement, change a name or address on a license, get an identi cation card, renew a vehicle registration and purchase a specialty license plate. They also offer the department’s critical safety services such as emergency contact information registration and safety campaigns. No written or driving tests are given from mobile units, all normal fees apply. For more information about the FLOW Mobile you can go to: http://www. hsmv.gov/ofces/FLOW.htm, or call 926-7145. July 4 –July 11 TOMMY JOHNS BRINGS HIS MAGIC BACK TO WCPL Magician Tommy Johns brings his show back to WCPL on Thursday, July 11 as part of our Summer Program of Events! In addition to his Dig a Little DeeperŽ show for the entire family at 7 p.m., Tommy is also holding an Underground MagicŽ workshop at 5 p.m. for the teens of Wakulla County. This ALL NEW 60 minute young adult street magic workshop will provide YA readers the supplies and instructions to perform a half dozen magic tricks and will expose them to a number of resources in the library to enable them to learn more about this ancient art. Participants will see a brief magic show, learn how to perform simple and amazing magic tricks, with cards and coins (including MIND READING!), be introduced to some of the history and major “ gures of magic, and be shown ways that the library can help them “ nd out more about this fun and rewarding hobby. After the workshop, Tommys Dig a Little DeeperŽ program will entertain the whole family with magic, puppets, and comedy while showing how important reading and the library are to the community. Again, the Underground Magic workshop is intended for Young Adults and takes place at 5:00 p.m. The family performance will take place at 7 p.m. Please come out and join us for all the fun. As always all Summer Program events are free to the public thanks to the Friends of the Wakulla County Library. COMPUTER ASSISTANCE THIS SUMMER While we will have no scheduled computer classes for the rest of the summer (they will begin again in the fall), Carly Peary, who works for Wilderness Coast Public Libraries (the library co-op we are a part of) will be on hand from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. on July 9 & July 23 as well as August 8 & August 22 to answer any questions or to help you with any computer issues you may have. This wont be in a classroom setting but rather a Computer Dr.Ž one-on-one setting to help you through any issues you may have. We encourage anyone who has any questions regarding computer programs, the Internet, getting started, etc to come by and take advantage of Carlys expertise. That way, when our instructor Deanna returns in the fall youll be that much farther ahead in your skill set! E-BOOKS UPDATE As we hit the halfway point of the summer, we at WCPL would like to remind everyone that we have hundreds of e-books available for checkout through our website. These materials can be read on your Kindle, iPad, Nook, PC, or many other devices and are 100 percent free with your WCPL membership. We have e-books in many genres and for all age levels (as well as some of the Summer Reading Books). Our e-book collection is available anywhere you have internet access so you can download them. We even had a patron on a European vacation take advantage of it. Please take advantage of this great service and dont hesitate to ask us any questions. Keep an eye out in the fall as we phase in audio books to our e-book service!By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 3B S p o t l i g h t o n B u s i n e s s Spotlight onBusiness B u s i n e s s N e w s f r o m Business News from In an effort to keep our members informed on the RESTORE Act and how it will affect business in Wakulla County, we will be providing monthly updates from the countys RESTORE Act committee. The Chambers RESTORE Act Committee is chaired by Chuck Robinson, the county committees designated member is John Shuff with Rachel Pienta as alternate. We are not sure how large the settlement will be or of the timing of distributions, but it will be large and will have a huge impact on our county. There are provisions in the Act for environmental restoration, economic, workforce, and tourism development, and infrastructure improvements. There is also an emphasis being placed on our seafood industry with consideration being given to aquaculture to relieve the blight we have suffered from the last few years. We encourage local businesses and organizations to get involved. If you have questions or ideas please feel free to contact John Shuff at 567-3989.Special to The NewsThe City of St Marks held its CDBG Streetscape ribbon cutting on Tuesday, June 25. Fred Fox Enterprises Inc. assisted the city in acquiring the $600,000 commercial revitalization grant for our downtown area through the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity, with Hydra Engineering overseeing the project. The grant allowed the city to extend the sidewalk from city hall connecting with Tallahassee-St. Marks Bike Trail on Riverside Drive. The grant also allowed the city to install underground utilities with period lighting, landscaping, park benches, and pedestrian crosswalks. City Manager Zoe A Mans“ eld presented Mayor Charles Shields who introduced those attending from state of“ ces, Wakulla County, City of Tallahassee, and City of Sopchoppy. State Sen. Bill Montford and Wakulla County Administrator David Edwards gave a brief talk on the visioning of the City of St. Marks.Special to The News The Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce is proud to once again announce our partnership with CenturyLink, a leading provider of internet, TV and voice services, and WastePro, the Floridabased company which is one of this countrys fastest growing solid waste collection, recycling, processing and disposal companies in the country. These two companies are being recognized as the title sponsors of the 2013 Wakulla County Chamber Business Excellence Awards. The Wakulla County Chamber Business Excellence Awards and Environmental Stewardship Awards were established nine years ago to recognize a Wakulla County Chamber business that exempli“ es outstanding achievement and contributions to the community. The Environmental Stewardship Award is given to the Chamber member that owns and-or operates a business, organization, or a residential development that promotes responsible environmental preservation. With the addition last year of the Chamber Member of the Year Award, we will recognize an owner or an employee of a member business whose service and dedication have made a signi“ cant contribution to the Chamber and the community. Solicitations begin soon with the awards banquet set for Sept. 19. It is important that as a chamber we strive to develop and sustain viable businesses that serve the citizens of Wakulla County well,Ž said Chamber President Tammie Bar“ eld. As a small business owner, I have begun to keenly recognize the importance of a strong Chamber and our chamber has at hand the best interest of all businesses in Wakulla. The Business Excellence Awards shine a spotlight on those businesses that have been selected by their peers as providers of outstanding service to Wakulla area residents,Ž Bar“ eld said. We appreciate the support that CenturyLink and WastePro provide in order to make it possible to recognize these important efforts,Ž said Bar“ eld. For more information on the awards, contact the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce at wakullacochamber@embarqmail.com or visit the website at wakullacountychamber.com. Name of owner: AmeriFirst Crawfordville is a branch of“ ce of AmeriFirst Financial Corp. in Portage, Mich. Ralph and Cynthia Thomas are the local managers. Tell us about your business : AmeriFirst has been in business for 30 years. The Crawfordville of“ ce was the “ rst AmeriFirst branch to open in the state of Florida, opening in August 2001. What services, products do you offer? We provide a full range of residential mortgages including conventional, FHA, VA, USDA. We specialize in construction loans and renovation loans including Fannie Mae Homepath and FHA 203(k). What sets your business apart from the competition? We are a Mortgage Lender. We originate and underwrite our loans in-house. We maintain the servicing of our loans after they close, which means that our loans stay with us without being transferred to another lender. Ameri“ rst currently services more than $1 billion in residential mortgages. We focus our attention on building relationships and service to our clients. By focusing on people instead of pro“ t, we have weathered the dif“ cult “ nancial storms and continue to be in a position to help the citizens of Wakulla County own their own homes. What should the community/customer expect when they visit your business? We love our clients. We arent interested in transactions. We love building lasting relationships and hope to be your Mortgage Lender for life. We are there for our clients, before, during, and after the closing. How long have you been a Chamber member? Since 2001. Why did you join the Chamber? The Chamber of Commerce is vital to our success as well as the overall health of the Wakulla County business community. As new businesses open, our citizens bene“ t from the jobs they create, the taxes they pay, and the conveniences they offer. The Chamber of Commerce is the glueŽ that holds all of this together. Through their efforts, business owners are able to network with other business owners and receive the bene“ t of decades of knowledge and experience. There is strength in numbers. When businesses work together, we all bene“ t! What Chamber services have you taken advantage of and/or will take advantage of in the near future? Through the years, we have participated in almost everything the Chamber has to offer, including educational opportunities, networking events, charitable fund raising, and involvement in local government. Whats your reason Wakulla residents should Shop Local? When you shop local, you are making a decision to re-invest your money into your own community. It may seem convenient to buy gas, food, and other goods in other counties, but when you do so, you are leaving your tax dollars there also. Would you rather have your hard earned money buy “ re trucks and build libraries in our county or in neighboring counties? If anyone is interested in your products/services, how do they contact you? Stop by and see us in the North Pointe Shopping Center, 1596 Crawfordville Hwy. Suite D or give us a call at 926-4044. Additional comments: We are blessed to live and work in Wakulla County. If we can ever be of service, just let us know.Business: AmeriFirst Home Mortgage SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe ribbon-cutting for the City of St. Marks new streetscape.New city streetscape unveiled Update on RESTORE Act Chamber partners with CenturyLink, Waste Pro to honor business excellence The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews. com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s www.TheWakullaNews. c o m com Providers from the TMH Family Medicine Residency program see patients in your health department on a regular basis. Our experienced physicians and nurse-midwives provide personalized healthcare to women before, during and after pregnancy. We proudly deliver babies at the TMH Womens Pavilion, the only hospital in the region with a Newborn ICU. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment, call us at (850) 926-0400. COMPLETEPrenatal Care IN WAKULLA C OUNTY Having a bay? Want pregnancy care close to home? Florida Department of Health Wakulla County 48 Oak Street Crawfordville, FL 32327

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Accuse Admired Animals Ashes Blood Carry Clubs Costs Cycle Direct Engine Enter Geese Gravel Hibernate Hoped Hostage Lifted Lofty Moves Omitted Opinion Ought Outdoor Point Prayer Purpose Rattle Recipe Recite Revolt Rhythm Rocked Sealed Separates Share YOUR AD HERE Smiled Spices Sword Twigs Twist Until Wheelbarrows Yield The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 5B Todays New Ads Bob and Marge Yard Sale, Everything MUST GO!!!!!!! Fri-Sat July 5th-6th Make any reasonable offers and take it home Located at ABC Storage CRAWFORDVILLEWell maintained 3br/ 2 ba in Crawfordville. Convenient to excellent schools and the Gulf. Big shady yard with lots of room to park your boat. $950/ mo. First, last and deposit. Security check. 850-926-7865 Florida Certified Teacher(Crawfordville) Substitute Florida Certified Teachers wanted for innovative summer program. Experience in Project Based Learning a plus. Salary starts at $20/hr. Email resume: charrlottecobb2011@ gmail.com or call (850) 745-4680 PanacaFishermans Retreat Lovely small cottage on the canal Mashes Sands Rd $500/mo. Pets Welcome call Lisa (850) 510-1118 Paraprofessional (Crawfordville)Paraprofessionals wanted for summer program. Salary starts at $8/hr. Flexible schedules available for qualified applicants. Email resume: charrlottecobb2011 @gmail.com or call (850) 745-4680 Raker FarmsVegetables are Here! U Pick -We Pick peas, squash & cucumbers 850-926-7561 or 850 -274 -8033 AIRLINE CAREERSbegin here -Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-314-3769 Florida Certified Teacher(Crawfordville) Substitute Florida Certified Teachers wanted for innovative summer program. Experience in Project Based Learning a plus. Salary starts at $20/hr. Email resume: charrlottecobb2011@ gmail.com or call (850) 745-4680 Paraprofessional (Crawfordville)Paraprofessionals wanted for summer program. Salary starts at $8/hr. Flexible schedules available for qualified applicants. Email resume: charrlottecobb2011 @gmail.com or call (850) 745-4680 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Drivers -HIRING EXPERIENCED /INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS Earn up to $.51 per mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req. Tanker Training Available. Call Today! (877)882-6537 www .OakleyT ran sport.com EARNING BETTER PAYIS ONE STEP AWAY! Averitt offers Experienced CDL -ADrivers Excellent Benefits and Weekly Hometime. 888-362-8608, Recent Grads w/a CDL-A1-5/wks Paid Training. Apply online at AverittCareers Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE TIDY NOOK NEEDS handyman / landscaper / cleaner to service properties in area.Travel required. Will train. Must have access to internet and own tools. 888-389-823 7 YARD MAN/ HANDY MANOn an as needed basis. Odd jobs, painting, palm tree maintenance, yard work. Must have transportation and references. 850-567-3732 PART TIME HANDY MAN WANTEDHistoric Wakulla Springs Lodge is looking for a jack of all trades to assist with facility and grounds upkeep. Job includes: responding to trouble calls preventative maintenance tasks, and janitorial duties. Experience in carpentry, painting, plumbing, and electrical required. HVAC experience preferred. Qualified applicants may pick up an application at the Lodge front desk, located inside Wakulla Springs State Park, 550 Wakulla Park Drive. Wakulla Springs, FL 32327. Wakulla Springs is an EEO/Drug Free Workplace. MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 MOECKER AUCTIONS Public Auction Display & Cabinet Manufacturing Co. LIVE & ONLINE Tuesday, July 9 at 10am 16290 NW 13th Ave, Miami, Fl 33169 Wood & Plastic Fabricating/ Rotating & Cutting Equip.: CNC Routers, Fork lift, Furniture, Fixtures & Equipment. Details at www.moecker auctions.com (800) 840-BIDS 15%-18%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Premium Metal Roofing, Manufacturer Direct! 8 Metal Roof profiles in 40+ colors Superior customer service, same day pick-up, fast delivery! 1-888-779-4270 or visit www.gulfcoast supply.com Bob and Marge Yard Sale, Everything MUST GO!!!!!!! Fri-Sat July 5th-6th Make any reasonable offers and take it home Located at ABC Storage Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. ACE HARDWARE (850) 926-3141 www .happy jackinc.com SHELLPOINTAmazing views from 3rd story deck. Studio apartment with full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Fully furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6-month lease minimum. Linda 850-591-3306 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. WAKULLALive in a beautiful Wakulla River neighborhood w/access to the community docks, boat ramp & park. Upscale 2 br 1 1/2 ba home situated on a secluded wooded lot. The house includes a 2 car carport, wraparound porch, hardwood floors, 6 burner Jenn-Aire stove, fireplace, skylights, ceiling fans thru-out w/d hook-up in a huge storage area. $950. mnth + $900.dep sml pets considered 850-926-4217 CRAWFORDVILLENewly Remodeled 3BR/2BA; W/D hook-up, $850 month plus Dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLEWell maintained 3br/ 2 ba in Crawfordville. Convenient to excellent schools and the Gulf. Big shady yard with lots of room to park your boat. $950/ mo. First, last and deposit. Security check. 850-926-7865 CRAWFORDVILLE,3 Bed/2 Bath -1,297 sq ft Single Family Home with A/C in good neighborhood. washer/dryer. close to all AŽ schools. Great find!! $1000 Security / $1075 Monthly 850-524-2276 PanacaFishermans Retreat Lovely small cottage on the canal Mashes Sands Rd $500/mo. Pets Welcome call Lisa (850) 510-1118 FOR SALE:2 Bdrm. 1 Bath House on 2 acres2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing available with easy terms. Call 855-847-6807. Brand New Luxury Lakefront Condos in Florida. New construction. Was $349,900, NOW $199,900. -2 & 3 BR residences, luxury interiors, resort-style amenities. Below builder cost! Call now 877-333-0272, x 55 Owner Must Sell! Nicely wooded lot in prime recreational area. Crystal clear mountain lake, ski area & brand new golf course. All within 1 mile of property. Only $79,900. Adjacent lot sold for $249,900. Bank will finance. Call 1-877-888-7581, x38. CHRYSLER2012 Town & Country Wheelchair van with 10 lowered floor, ramp and tie downs call Tom for more info 352-325-1306 Seth Scotts Heat & Air State Lic.Contractor #CAC1817434 Honest & Dependable Service, Installation, Repair & Maintenance: Residential & Commercial 12yrs Exp. 850-509-2405 5749-0704 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865.09, Florida Statutes. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Doing business as: Down Town Automotive at 764 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, Wakulla County with a mailing address of 764 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville, Florida desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 26th day of June, 2013. /s/ Lee Highsmith July 4, 2013 5733-0711 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS SPRING CREEK HIGHWAY WIDENING & RESURFACING Request for Proposal No. ITB 2013-25 Advertisement Begin Date/Time: June 28, 2013 at 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed responses for Spring Creek Highway Widening and Resurfacing addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Director, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 will be received until August 2, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. at which time all proposals will be publicly opened. Any responses received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Proposer. Please direct all questions to: Deborah DuBose Phone: 850.926.9500 Ext 707, FAX: 850.926.0940 e-mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com Copies of the Invitation to Bid and the Plans and Specifications Packages may be obtained at the Wakulla County Purchasing Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 for a non-refundable deposit of $100.00 beginning June 28, 2013, 8:00 a.m. Checks or money orders only please -made payable to: Preble-Rish, Inc. No pre-bid meeting will be held for this project. All Bidders are encouraged to visit the site to become familiar with the project area. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Randy Merritt, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Director, Employee Support Services July 4 & 11, 2013 5750-0711 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR PRE-QUALIFICATION TO BID CONSTRUCTION WAKULLASCHOOLDISTRICT PUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENTREQUESTING PRE-QUALIFICATIONS FROM QUALIFIED GENERALCONTRACTORS PRE-QUALIFICATION PROPOSALS ARE REQUESTED FROM QUALIFIED GENERAL CONTRACTORS BYTHE WAKULLACOUNTYSCHOOLDISTRICT. PROJECT:Guidance Office Renovations at Wakulla High School 3237 Coastal Highway Crawfordville, Florida 32327 SCOPE TO INCLUDE: The project consist of selective demolition, construction of new walls and partitions, installation of new doors, frames and door hardware, installation of finishes including floor coverings, base, ceilings, drywall, painting and installation of new casework. Mechanical work includes the replacement of one HVAC unit and the installation and redistribution of HVAC duct. Electrical work includes new light fixtures, duplex outlets and telecom outlets, and the relocation of existing light fixtures. GENERALINFORMATION: Provide four (4) copies of the Pre-Qualifications Package to the Wakulla County School Board Office, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Submittals must be received at the office of the Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools by 2:00 p.m. local time on Wednesday, July 17, 2013. Facsimile (FAX) and submittals received after 2:00 p.m. will not be considered. Apre-submittal meeting will be held to review the pre-qualification procedures and requirement and the scope of the project on July 15, 2013 @ 2:00 p.m. at the site, Wakulla High School, 3237 Coastal Highway, Medart, Florida. Completed packets and a Public Entity Crimes Statement must be returned to the office of Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, ATTENTION: William R. Bristol no later than July 17, 2013 @ 10:00 a.m. The School Board of Wakulla County Florida reserves the right to waive or reject any informality in the selection process and to reject any or all pre-qualification packets when such a waiver or rejection is in the best interest of the Wakulla County School Board. Pre-Qualification Packets may be obtained free of charge upon request to William R. Bristol, Executive Director of Facilities, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, telephone (850) 926-0065. Wakulla County School Board is an equal opportunity agency. Robert Pearce, Superintendent July 4 & 11, 2013 5748-0725 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SUSPENSION Case No: 201301598 TO: Michael K. Smith, ANotice of Suspension to suspend your license and eligibility for licensure has been filed against you. You have the right to request a hearing pursuant to Sections 120.569 and 120.57, Florida Statutes, by mailing a request for same to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, Division of Licensing, Post Office Box 3168, Tallahassee, Florida 32315-3168. If a request for hearing is not received by 21 days from the date of the last publication, the right to hearing in this matter will be waived and the Department will dispose of this cause in accordance with law. July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Award WinningSEWING & ALTERATIONSGowns, Weddings, Prom Casual Wear274-3653 LAWN CARE Husband & Wife Team Call Dave 850-443-9427Since 1995 Lic & InsAffordable HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTSPROFESSIONAL, DEPENDABLE SPECIALIZING IN COASTAL PROPERTIESLICENSED& INSURED TERRY NELSON, JR. 850 933-0057 TERRY NELSON, JR. 850-933-0057 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f f A A A ll ll ll ll f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L C C C C C N N N d d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• Stump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED 850-926-3399 24 HOURS 7 DAYS A WEEK C & P T OWING AND RECOVERY 2 2 C C C & & P P OW OW W O W 8AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDS!BIGJULY 5 & 6RED HOT!YARD SALE 3Br 2 Ba Twnhs $875 mo. 3Br 2Ba Twnhs $900 mo. 2Br 2Ba Hs. $775 mo. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $900 mo. 3Br 2Ba Hs. $825 mo. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875 mo. RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSTORAGE RENTALS AVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 5730-0704 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: James W. Petros Last known address of: 11 Helena St., Crawfordville, FL32327 Cassius T. Martin Last known address of : 31 Magpie Trail, Crawfordville, FL32327 Benjamin D. Millership Last known address of: 9 Catherine St., Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 July 4, 2013 5712-0704 TWN vs. Screws, Robert Case No. 652012CA000337CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 652012CA000337CAXXXX Bank of America, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. Robert Screws; Joni Bradwell; Capital City Bank; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2,Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated May 14, 2013 entered in Case No. 652012CA000337CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Robert Screws; Joni Bradwell; Capital City Bank; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on July 11, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, CYPRESS COVE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 73, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1997 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME; VIN NUMBERS: FLFLV70A25150SK21 AND FLFLV70B25150SK21 Dated this 10th day of June, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jessica L. Fagen, Esquire, Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St., Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL33309 FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.com June 27 and July 4, 2013 5713-0704 TWN Vs. Merkison, Jimmy Case No. 65-2011-CA-000331 Notice of ReSched Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE No: 65-2011-CA-000331 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY MERKISON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 22, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000331 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, is the Plaintiff and Jimmy R. Merkison, Kasey Merkison, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 18th day of July 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 308.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 311 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 E-service: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. June 27 and July 4, 2013 11-84561 5714-0704 TWN vs. Taylor, Craig Case No. 12000003CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO.12000003CA CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Craig A. Taylor; Unknown Spouse of Craig A. Taylor; Escambia County Housing Finance Authority; The Hammocks Subdivision Property Owners Association, Inc.; Unknown Tenant #1 and Unknown Tenant #2 Defendants. 5716-0704 TWN v. Ogden, Jennifer Case No.: 2013-75-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2013-75-CA SCORE FEDERALCREDITUNION, Plaintiff, v. JENNIFER OGDEN, et al Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Jennifer Ogden 53 Scott Drive Havana, Florida 32333 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gadsden and Wakulla County, Florida: Parcel I: All that certain property situated in the County of GADSDEN, and State of FLORIDA, being described as follows: Commence at an iron pipe bearing north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 80.3 ft from the northwest corner of Section 15, Township 2 north, Range 2 west, Gadsden County, Florida, thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east along the northerly boundary of said Section 15, 888.10 ft to a concrete monument; thence south 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds east; 1496.60 ft to a concrete monument on the northerly right of way boundary of State Road 270 (70.00 foot right of way), said point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly; thence along said northerly right of way boundary and along said curve through a central angle of 10 degrees 00 minutes 59 seconds with a radius of 1726.94 ft for an arc distance of 301.90 ft (the chord of said curve being south 70 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds east: 301.52 ft) to a point on the intersection of the said northerly right of way boundary of State Road 270 and the centerline of Long Leaf Drive; thence north 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds west along the said centerline of Long Leaf Drive 461.27 ft to a point on the centerline intersection of Long Leaf Drive und Lob Lolly County; said point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly; thence along the said centerline of Lob Lolly Court and along said curve through a central angle of 13 degrees 26 minutes 22 seconds with a radius of 411.54 ft for an arc distance of 96.53 ft (the chord of said curve being south 83 degrees 44 minutes 27 seconds east 96.31 ft); thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east along said centerline 824.60 ft to a point of curve to the left; thence along said centerline and along said curve through a central angle of 27 degrees 06 minutes 29 seconds with a radius of 150.00 ft for an arc distance of 70.97 ft (the chord of said curve being north 75 degrees 59 minutes 08 seconds east 70.31 ft) to the point of beginning. From said point of beginning thence continue along said centerline and along said curve through a central angle of 38 degrees 11 minutes 52 seconds with a radius of 150.00 ft for an arc distance of 100 ft (the chord of said curve being north 43 degrees 20 minutes 00 seconds east 98.16 ft); thence south 35 degrees 06 minutes 10 seconds east 33.91 ft to a concrete monument; thence continue south 35 degrees 06 minutes 10 seconds east 445.63 ft to a concrete monument; thence south 01 degrees 36 minutes 54 seconds west 75.84 ft to an iron pin; thence south 89 degrees 45 minutes 55 seconds west 257.49 ft to a concrete monument; thence north 11 degrees 51 minutes 14 seconds west 375.48 ft to a concrete monument; thence continue north 11 degrees 51 minutes 14 seconds west 30.97 ft to the point of beginning. Subject to the following ingress and utility easement; a 60 foot ingress, egress and utility easement lying 30 ft either side of the following described centerline; Commence at an iron pipe bearing north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 80.3 ft from the northwest corner of Section 15, Township 2 north, Range 2 west, Gadsden County, Florida, thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east along the northerly boundary of said Section 15; 888.10 ft to a concrete monument; thence south 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds east 331.00 ft to a concrete monument. Thence continue south 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds east 1496.60 ft to a concrete monument on the northerly right of way boundary of State Road 270 (70 foot right of way), said point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly; thence along said northerly right of way boundary and along said curve through a central angle of 10 degrees 00 minutes 59 seconds with a radius of 1726.94 ft for an arc distance of 301.90 ft (the chordof said curve being south 78 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds east 301.52 ft); thence north 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds west 461.27 ft to a point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly, said point being the point of beginning. From said point of beginning, thence along said curve through a central angle of 13 degrees 26 minutes 22 seconds with a radius of 411.54 ft for an arc distance of 96.53 ft (the chord of said curve being south 83 degrees 44 minutes 27 seconds east 96.31 ft); thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 824.60 ft to a point of curve to the left, thence along said curve through a central angle of 90 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds with a radius of 150.00 ft for an arc distance of 235.62 ft (the chord of said curves being north 44 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 212.13 ft); thence north 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds west 150.00 ft to the terminal point of said centerline, said terminal point being the radius point of a 50 foot radius cul-de-sac. Parcel II: All that certain property situated in the County of WAKULLA, and State of FLORIDA, being described as follows: Lot 54, Block 19,Ž Wakulla Gardens Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel III: All that certain property situated in the County of WAKULLA, and State of FLORIDA, being described as follows: Lot 55, of Block 19, Wakulla Gardens, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Henry L. Miller, Jr., Esq., whose address is 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32303, on or before thirty days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated: May 9, 2013 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk June 27 and July 4, 2013 5726-0711 TWN vs. Jessup, Ashlee Case No. 11-367-CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO.11-367-CA CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff, vs. Ashlee M. Jessup f/k/a Ashlee M. Shealy; John B. Jessup; Crawfordville Homeowners Association, Inc. a/k/a East Gate of Crawfordville Homeowners Association, Inc.; Penny McKinney; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to AN Order dated May 22, 2013, entered in Case No. 11-367-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Ashlee M. Jessup f/k/a Ashlee M. Shealy; John B. Jessup; Crawfordville Homeowners Association, Inc. a/k/a East Gate of Crawfordville Homeowners Association, Inc.; Penny McKinney; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 18th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23 OF EASTGATE SUBDIVISION (UNRECORDED) AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS; COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 59 ADISTANCE OF 2365.0 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 1000.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLYRIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYOF ACOUNTYROAD (GRIFFIN ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYSOUTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 933.50 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAYRUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION 150.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 75.00 FEET; THENCE NORTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 130.58 FEET TO THE SOUTHERN BOUNDARYOF A 50 FOOT RIGHT OF WAY(EASTGATE WAY); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY SOUTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 75.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 0.22 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. Dated this 18thday of June, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jessica L. Fagen, Esquire, Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St, Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL33309 FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.com July 4 & 11, 2013 5727-0711 TWN Vs. Forde, Erin Case No: 2012 CA000204 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012 CA000204 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. ERIN FORDE A/K/AERIN M. FORDE A/K/AERIN MOLLIE FORDE; BAKARI SAMPSON A/K/ABAKARI BERNARD SAMPSON; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ERIN FORDE A/K/AERIN M. FORDE A/K/AERIN MOLLIE FORDE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BAKARI SAMPSON A/K/ABAKARI BERNARD SAMPSON; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 25th day of July 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 42, BLOCK Q, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE(S) 37, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 11th day of June, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954)-779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Latasha Moore-Robinson, Butler & Hosch, P.A. 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E., Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 July 4 & 11, 2013B&H #294208 5728-0711 TWN Vs. Flynn, Ruth Case #: 2011-CA-000332 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2011-CA-000332 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Ruth Flynn Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated June 11, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000332 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Ruth Flynn are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY., CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on July 25, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 8, BLOCK 4Ž, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT TWO, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Brent X. Thurmond, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT Submitted By: ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 July 4 & 11, 2013 5729-0711 TWN Vs. Mitchell, Amanda Case No: 2012-CA-000304 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 2012-CA-000304 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. AMANDAN. MITCHELLA/K/AAMANDAMITCHELL; TIMOTHYW. MITCHELLA/K/ATIMOTHYMITCHELL; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 25th day of July 2013, at 11 A.M. at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: THE SOUTH HALF OF LOT 35 AND ALLOF LOT 34, BLOCK 54Ž, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT 5, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 11th day of June, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needsany accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954)-779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Latasha Moore-Robinson Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E., Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 July 4 & 11, 2013 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated May 14, 2013 entered in Case No. 120000003CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc.is the Plaintiff and Craig A. Taylor; Unknown Spouse of Craig A. Taylor; Escambia County Housing Finance Authority; The Hammocks Subdivision Property Owners Association, Inc; Unknown Tenant #1 and Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on July 18, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 74, THE HAMMOCKS PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 34 PAGES 44-45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Dated this 10th day of June, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jessica L. Fagen, Esquire, Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St., Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL33309 FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.com June 27 and July 4, 2013 5731-0711 TWN In Re : Estate of Jones, Myles Case No: 13-48-CPNotice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO: 13-48-CP IN RE : ESTATE OF MYLES WESLEYJONES a/k/a MYLES W. JONES 5732-0711 TWN The Estate of Susan Roberts Case No. 13-58-CP Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 13-58-CP In Re: The Estate of:Susan Walker Roberts Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Susan Walker Roberts, deceased, whose date of death was December 30, 2012 File Number 13-58-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is July 4, 2013. Personal Representative: Lee Walker 1815 Hernando Dr., Tallahassee, Florida 32303 Attorney for Personal Representative: T. WHITNEY STRICKLAND, JR., 3360 Capital Circle NE Suite B, Tallahassee, Florida 32303, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 (850) 222-2888 Florida Bar No. 0287350 July 4 & 11, 2013 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!6 River Cove $550 mo., 2 BR/1BA, BAY VIEW. Near Community Boat Ramp. Pets Considered. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550. mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 2797 Surf Rd. 2BR/1A Block, Bay front home. 1,140 Sq. ft. heated area Newly remodeled, No pets, No smoking, $1,050 mo. 3049 Crawfordville Hwy. Commercial building in downtown Crawfordville. Across from the courthouse, perfect building for professional of ce. 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS• Tallahassee 1309 Larette 2BR/2.5BA $725 Mo., $725. Dep. • 45A & 47B Dispennette – 3BR/2BA, $750 Mo., $750 Dep. No smoking, only outdoor pets with approval and $250 pet fee. • 1519 Jacks Drive – 2 BR/2.5BA. $850. Mo., $850 Dep. Available Aug. 1. Pets okay with approval and $250 pet fee. • 94 Chickat Trail – 3BR/2BA $750 Mo., $750 Dep. No Pets, No Smoking Available July 1 • 52 Deer Run – 1BR/1BA $700 Mo., $700 Dep., located on Sopchoppy River. Available Aug. 1st

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 7B 5715-0704 TWN Estate of Smith, Betty Ann File No: 13000047CPAXMX Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 13000047CPAXMX IN RE: ESTATE OF BETTY ANN SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BETTY ANN SMITH, deceased, whose date of death was January 12, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 27, 2013. Personal Representative: Lisa Hoyt 4533 SW 37th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312 Stuart E. Bloch, Esq.Florida Bar No.: 886459STUART E. BLOCH, ESQ. 980 N. Federal Highway, Suite 302, Boca Raton, FL 33432Telephone: (561) 338-7299 Email: stuart@seblochlaw.comJune 27 and July 4, 2013 Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Myles Wesley Jones, deceased, File 13-48 CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney is set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims, on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against decedents estate, including unmatured, contingent or unliquidated claims must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS NOTSO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. This date of the first publication of this notice is July 4, 2013. Personal Representative: Opal E. Howell 4214 Erie Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32305 Attorney for Personal Representative: Frances Casey Lowe, Esq., Florida Bar No. 521450 Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 (850) 926-8245 July 4 & 1, 2013 5734-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 026 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10 L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1278Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:17-3S-01E-096-05369-000TOWN OF WANETA SQUARE 57 LOTS 4, 5 & 6 OR 408 P 3 OR 444 P 380 Name in which assessed PATTIE E SMITH said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this 3 day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5735-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 027 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #795 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:22-2S-01W-000-03942-014P-1-14-M-61 A 2 AC TRACT LOCATED IN THE NE CORNER OF THE NW 1/4 OF SECTION 22 OR 224 P 821OR 754 P 396 Name in which assessed DENZEL OR RUTH DOCKERY TRUST said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 3day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5736-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 028 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #177 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:13-4S-02W-000-01935-00113-4S-2W P-14-1-M-50A 1.25 AC KNOWN AS TRACT 2 OR 89 P 682 OR 329 P 199 Name in which assessed RONA LAVON HAWKINS SR said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 3day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5737-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 029 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1014Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:09-3S-01W-000-04349-0009 3S 1W P-9-M63 SW 1/4 OF NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4 OR 527 P 129 OR 555 P 894 Name in which assessed L B INVESTMENTS LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 3day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5738-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 030 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #543 Year of Issuance Description of Property: Parcel #:24-5S-02W-057-03224-000 PANANCEA MINERAL SPRINGS UNIT 1 BLOCK 37 LOTS 1 & 2 OR 169 P 709 OR 557 P 127 5739-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 031 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1323Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:02-4S-01E-000-05547-0002-4S-1E P-1-M-83B 2 ACRES IN SW COR OF N 1/2 OR 151 P 771OR 312 P 294 Name in which assessed JOHN T & JENNIFER A MOCK said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5740-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 032 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2264Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10519-006GREINERS ADDITION SUB. BLOCK 24 LOTS 1 OR 289 P 262 OR 342 P 832 Name in which assessed SECRETARY OF HOUSING & URBAN DEVELOPMENT said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5741-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 033 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1509Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-035-008-06981-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 1 BLK 9 LOTS 13 & 14 OR 2 P 943 Name in which assessed WILLIAM T BECK III & REBECCA B STANLEY, TRUDY B THURMOND & MARY B PARKER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5742-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 034 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #75 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:35-5S-03W-000-01293-00035-5S-3W P-19-M-28 RAILROAD R-W LESS COUNTY ROAD OR 25 P 109 OR 488 P 696 Name in which assessed HOBERT S MCCLANAHAN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5743-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 035 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #400 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:07-5S-02W-000-02675-0007-5S-2W P-42-M-32B E 1/2 OF SW 1/4 OR 175 P 939 OR 211 P 288 Name in which assessed MICHAEL PORTER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5744-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 036 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #390 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: 5745-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 037 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #624 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:25-5S-02W-046-03462-001AQUA DE VIDA S/D LOT 33 BLK M PB 1 PG 12 OR 775 P 371 Name in which assessed BOBBY R & PATTIE F SMITH said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5746-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 038 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued, thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #246 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-4S-02W-192-02077-16ALAKE ELLEN PARK SUBD. LOT 16 UNRECORDED OR 187 P 60 OR 525 P 858 Name in which assessed GERALD HANDLEY & DOROTHY M MILEY-HANDLEY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013 ,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5747-0725 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 039 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #254 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:25-4S-02W-000-02083-00025-4S-2W P-3-3-M51 A PARCEL OF LAND 207 X 415 FT OR 260 P 593 OR 339 P 465 & 467 Name in which assessed DANIEL & JANET DAILEY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5710-0718 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 13-DR-273 NOTICE OF ACTION Wendy Walker Gregory, Petitioner Jose Miguel Gregory, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE (NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT) TO: Jose Miguel Gregory, Last Known Address: 529 Cooperwood Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Wendy Walker Gregory, the petitioner, whose address is 531 E. Miracle Strip Parkway, #8, Mary Esther, Florida 32569 on or before July 25, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville, Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 before service on the Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property should be divided: NONE Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915. Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the Clerks office. Dated: June 17, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk June 20, 27 and July 4 & 11, 2013 Parcel #:05-5S-02W-000-02612-000 5-5S-2W P-8-M-32 A PARCEL OF LAND IN SEC 5 OR 45 P 600 Name in which assessed WALTER DICKSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013, at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaJuly 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 Name in which assessed JER BE LOU DEV CORP said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 14 day of August, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this 3day of May, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida July 4, 11, 18 & 25, 2013 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. 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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 1 14 17 20 27 31 36 40 46 50 56 60 63 2 28 47 3 29 48 4 23 43 24 41 5 15 18 21 37 57 61 64 6 38 58 7 30 32 51 8 25 44 49 9 26 45 19 22 42 10 16 39 52 59 62 65 11 33 53 12 34 54 13 35 55 ACROSS 1. Have braking problems 5. Plant firmly 10. Nightclub of song 14. Taylor of "Six Feet Under" 15. Rita Hayworth title role 16. A Baldwin 17. Cobblers' tools 18. Offerer of insincere greetings 20. Catchall abbreviation 21. Catch in the act 22. "Mule Train" singer Frankie 23. Waffle maker 25. Paris Hilton, for one 27. Without a care 31. Bonaparte's punishment 32. Court star Arthur 33. Fruit center 36. "Or __!" 37. Simply smashing 39. Show anger 40. "Black-eyed" veggie 41. Philander ing sort 42. Visit unexpectedly 43. Carnival ride with organ music 46. Submits an amended return 49. Safire piece, once 50. Speedy train 51. "Hail!" 52. It's clenched 56. Flag for Captain Kidd 59. Mental invention 60. Skin care substance 61. Fictional Scarlett 62. High-five sound 63. Subtle flavor 64. Woes for toes 65. Call to FidoDOWN1. __-dunk 2. New Zealand bird 3. Causes of misery 4. Faithful follower 5. Seasonal quaff 6. Alyssa of "Who's the Boss?" 7. Talk too much 8. Former Leno announcer H all 9. Morse T 10. One who sings to the cops 11. Nostalgic number 12. Hammer parts 13. The 40 of "the back 40" 19. Much the same 24. Ham holder 25. Corn coverin g 26. Tunnel effect 27. Dickens's hateful clerk 28. Trucker's toll unit 29. Galileo's home 30. Cagney's TV partner 33. __ platter (Chinese menu choice) 34. Remark while anteing 35. Take care of 37. Like poor losers 38. Yours and mine 39. Salmon and trout, for two 41. Pass-the-baton race 42. Lead-in for law or med 43. Forage grass 44. Wield authority 45. "Manon" and "Carmen" 46. Big Indian 47. Gastroenteritis cause, maybe 48. One facing life, maybe 51. Gelling substance 53. Not in use 54. Mark with a branding iron 55. Piece of Watergate evidence 57. Bird in "Arabian Nights" 58. Exclamation of discovery American Prole Hometown Content 6/30/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 3456 471 54 138 29 16752 9 47 7583 162 200 9 HometownContent 671 2539 8 4 329841756 485769321 594 627138 238415679 167398542 912 534867 756982413 843176295 S L A M H E E P R A J A H K I W I A X L E E C O L I I L L S P I S A F E L O N D I S C I P L E M I L L E T R Y E R E L A Y E G G N O G S O R E R O C M I L A N O O U R S O H O B L A B L A C E Y A G A R E D D H U S K G O V E R N D A H E C H O O P E R A S A L I K E P R E C A N A R Y F O O D F I S H O L D I E P U P U I D L E P E E N S I M I N S E A R A C R E S T E N D T A P E JULY 4, 2013MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON JUNE 17, 2013

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 – Page 9B 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What was the name of the priest who founded Boys Town? 2. ANATOMY: What is the common name for horripilation? 3. LAW: What amendment to the U.S. Constitution gave women the right to vote? 4. MOVIES: In the movie “Speed,” what was the lowest speed that the bus could travel without blowing up? 5. LITERATURE: Who wrote the memoir “Life on the Mississippi”? 6. GEOGRAPHY: The Douro River flows through which two countries? 7. TELEVISION: What is the theme song for the reality TV show “Cops”? 8. MUSIC: How many copies does an album have to sell for it to go platinum? 9. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What kind of animal is a gerenuk? 10. MYTHOLOGY: How is the Roman god Janus often depicted? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Father Edward Flanagan 2. Goose bumps or goose flesh 3. 19th 4. 50 mph 5. Mark Twain 6. Spain and Portugal 7. “Bad Boys” 8. 1 million 9. Gazelle 10. Janus, the god of endings and beginnings, has two faces, each looking the opposite way. Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, July 4, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy LINDA CARTERSpecial to The NewsSeeing the sites outside of London can be a challenge for Americans. Unused to driving from the right side of the car, or the left side of the road, driving here is less than relaxing. Instead tour the countryside with a group whose size best “ ts your needs. Our tour with Evan Evans, for $125 each, delivered lots of sights, but was not necessarily for everyone. Be prepared for a very full day, the typical bus tour begins at 7:30 a.m., and continues into the early evening. The biggest struggle is choosing the best tour … every decision eliminates another mustsee option. Warrick Castle, typecast straight out of a King Arthur novel, is a twohour drive from London. Completely furnished with period-dressed actors, animatronic waxworks “ gures, smells and sound effects, you will feel as if you have stepped back in time. Horses hooves pound as the jousting begins, falconry is explained as birds of prey soar overhead, and soldiers boast of battle. Upstairs in the grand chambers, the castles last residents gossip about their life, and party guest, Winston Churchill questions if you have met. Centuries of castle life spread out before you, except you only have an hour and a half to experience it all. At Shakespeares birthplace in Stratford-on-Avon, half-timbered houses, known as waddle and daub, look today as they did in the 1500s. Knowledgeable, period-dressed guides share detailed accounts of the cottages history. Graf“ ti etched into the windowpanes speaks of tourists visits since the 18th century. My kingdom for a horse,Ž we would have given our kingdom for a few more minutes to sightsee. Charming countryside dotted with centuries-old limestone structures pass by the windows. Once only the realm of sheep, vast fields are now adorned with yellow ” owers, destined to become canola oil, barley and wheat as well. Homes, unchanged for generations, feature pictureperfect thatched roofs, and riotous ” owers bloom on every windowsill. Sadly with such a tight schedule, there is only time for a brief photo stop from the bus. In Oxford, expect to see Harry, Ron and Hermione around every corner. The basis for several scenes in the famous Harry Potter series, colleges cover much of Oxford. Inside the dining hall, feel as if you are on the set, missing only the bewitched ceiling. Wonder if the stonemasons stamp was the inspiration for Harrys scar. Wander through the individual colleges, as university students have for generations. Visit the pub where famous authors got their inspiration. But time marches on, so back to the bus. Finally, “ nish your tour at the tube station, and navigate back to your hotel, tired but satis“ ed. While delivering multiple sites, and the best prices, a big bus tour can feel rushed. On a mini bus tour can you actually visit local towns in the Cotswolds, traveling on scenic back roads, but these tours operate less frequently, include fewer sights, and cost about $25 more each. On a private tour choose exactly what you see, and how long you remain. Groups of four pay $250 each. Save time by using an experienced travel agent, to help you determine the perfect tour for you. Regardless of which type of tour you choose, make the choice to get out of London and discover more of what the United Kingdom has to offer.Linda Carter is the owner of Luxury Cruise & Travel Inc. in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 290-4058 or www.luxurycruising.com. Seeing the sights of London can be a challenge PHOTOS BY LUXURY CRUISE & TRAVEL/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSKensington Gardens, above. Oxford, below right. Warrick Castle, below left. Choose Capital Health Plan, your health care partner. Attend a seminar to learn about Capital Health Plan Advantage Plus (HMO) & Capital Health Plan Preferred Advantage (HMO). Capital Health Plan is among the highest-rated health plans in the nation, and is the top-ranked plan in Florida according to the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) in NCQAs Medicare Health Insurance Plan Rankings, 2012…2013.Ž Capital Health Plan is a health plan with a Medicare contract. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings, call one of the numbers above. A sales person will be present with information and applications. Call Capital Health Plan today to RSVP 850-523-7441 or 1-877-247-6512 (TTY: 850-383-3534 or 1-877-870-8943) 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., seven days a week, October 1 February 14 8:00 a.m. 8:00 p.m., Monday Friday, February 15 September 30 www.capitalhealth.com/medicare H5938_ DP 432 CMS Accepted 12112012 SMAn Independent Licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association Seminars are held at 10:00 a.m. at the Capital Health Plan Health Center at 1491 Governors Square Blvd Capital Health Plan Medicare Advantage (HMO)your local plan ranked highest in Florida by NCQA July 12 July 26 August 9 August 23 September 13 September 27 October 11 October 25 November 8 Name __________________________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________________ City _______________________________________________ State _______________ Zip __________ Phone ____________________ Email __________________________ Payment Enclosed Bill MeSign up online Promo Code: BLAST Clip, complete and mail to:P.O. 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