Wakulla news

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Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00469

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PAGE 1

By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net On Monday, June 17 the YMCA Capital Region President and CEO Ray Purvis “ nally got the goahead from the countys commissioners to begin the process of planting a YMCA in Wakulla … a motion that was barely passed with a 3-2 vote. Since June 2011, when the then-county commissioners approved the initial proposal with the YMCA, it has been an ongoing, back and forth discussion … discussion that will finally turn into action. At the board meeting on June 3, discussion had ceased temporarily as Commissioner Ralph Thomas had brought to the boards attention the possibilities of establishing programs such as the 21st Century Community Learning Center. Thomas suggestions put a delay on the boards vote until commissioners could further look into the possibility. On that matter, Purvis returned to Mondays meeting with an update as to the YMCAs progress in Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Servi Servi Our 118th Year, 26th Issue Thursday, June 27, 2013 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents kulla County For More T h h h an A Century kulla County For More T h an A Centur y P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Street Beat ......................................................................Page 5A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 11A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 13A Weekly Roundup ...........................................................Page 14A Readers Choice ballot ...................................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 2B Health & Fitness ...............................................................Page 6B Thinking Outside the Book.................................................Page 7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B INDEX OBITUARIES Mary B. Elcoate William R. Flury Dora Ellen Hanna Sadie Lynn Harvey Celia Ruth Vause Lippincott Jessie Clinton Nazworth Sr. • Master boatbuilder Larry Tucker is honored, Page 2A • Questions raised about sheriff’s budget, Page 3A More county news: S t o r y Story, P a g e 5 A Page 5A By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net On Saturday, June 22, hundreds of people showed up at Bald Point State Park to witness the release of a loggerhead sea turtle named Allie back into the wild. Allie had begun her stay in captivity about a year ago when, while on Alligator Harbor, “ shermen John Trumbull and Steven Long had happened upon a struggling sea turtle and had brought her to Jack Rudloe at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea. Trumbull recounted how they tried to tie what they at “ rst thought was a piece of wood to the boat thinking theyd move it so other boats wouldnt hit it. Thats when it started to move,Ž he said. But the turtle didnt get very far. You could tell something was wrong with her.Ž According to Michelle Gomez at Gulf Specimen. the turtle tried again and again to dive down below the waters surface, but to no avail. Whether she starved or suffocated,Ž said Gomez, she would have died without help.Ž The problem, they later found out, was that the turtle had a growing mass in her chest. A mass that kept her a” oat and which crowded her internal organs. Rudloe commented on the cooperation and help given by the “ shermen. Turn to Page 2ATurtle returned to the seaHundreds turn out on Saturday to see release of turtle rehabilitated by Gulf Specimen Marine LabOn-again, off-again YMCA-run center is back onBoard votes 3-2 to move ahead with community center AMANDA MAYOR GULF SPECIMEN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSGulf Specimen founder Jack Rudloe, in the powder blue suit, prepares to release a Kemps Ridley turtle before releasing the larger loggerhead. Dr. Norm Griggs and staff check on the loggerhead, named AllieŽ after its rescue. Logo for Wakulla seafood WILLIAM SNOWDENNEW LOGO UNVEILED: Fisherman Keith Ward of Lighthouse Seafood and Ike Thomas of My Way Seafood, holding a T-shirt, as the Fresh From Wakulla seafood logo is displayed last week.Fresh From Wakulla intended to promote countys seafoodBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThere was a good sized crowd at the unveiling of the new Fresh From WakullaŽ seafood logo last week. A late afternoon thundershower on Thursday, June 20, created a sweltering humidity at Panaceas Rock Landing Dock, but didnt dampen the enthusiasm generated by the logo … or attendees appetite for some local seafood. The logo was created with input from the Wakulla Tourist Development Council, and backed by the state, and unveiled at a ceremony hosted by the TDC and the Chamber of Commerce. County Commissioner Ralph Thomas said the logo is part of a campaign to promote Wakulla seafood … and includes catching “ sh, cleaning “ sh, and cooking “ sh.Ž Ike Thomas of My Way Seafood in Panacea said the logo is something that will represent Wakulla County around the state.Ž Sherri Posey Miller said she regretted TDC Chairman David Moody was unable to attend the ceremony because of a family illness, saying he had done a lot of the work in pushing for the logo. Were looking forward to promoting and getting people down to purchase local seafood,Ž Miller said. Notables in attendance included state Rep. Halsey Beshears, R-Monticello, whose district includes Wakulla, as well as an aide from the of“ ce of state Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee. Local playwright and artistic director of Palaver Tree Theater Herb Donaldson had originally scheduled a welcome party to kickoff the groups planned three-day Scene in Wakulla festival, but brought his guests to the event to enjoy the seafood. Turn to Page 3A Sgt. Billy Jones saves 4-year-old girl from choking

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From Page 1AThis represents a major triumph,Ž he said. It is a story of uncommon cooperation … commercial “ sherman working sideby-side with biologists. Our hard-won relationship opens lines of communication and saves sea turtles lives.Ž Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital owner Norm Griggs had provided veterinarian treatment during the turtles stay at GSML. According to Griggs, Allie had joined some number of other ” oatersŽ or turtles unable to dive down for food and without the ability to defend themselves. In many cases, said Griggs, the predicament comes from the turtle eating something that damages their intestines. Many turtles end up dying from this occurence and indeed Allie would have it hadnt been for her rescuers. She was in bad shape when she came in,Ž said Griggs, adding that she was severely malnourished and one of her back “ ns had been bitten off. Over the course of a year, Gulf Specimens reptilian resident recuperated amidst loyal visitors, gifts of blue crab from her fishermen friends and diligent care by Griggs as well as her caretaker, Keith Grumbly of Gulf Specimen … all of which led to her full comeback and the reaching of her goal weight of 230 pounds. All 230 pounds of loggerhead were carried from an ATV on the beach over to the shoreline as hundreds of onlookers crowded around, trying to catch a glimpse and say goodbye. Loggerheads are one of seven species of sea turtle, “ ve of which nest on Floridas shores. The loggerhead is found in the Atlantic, Paci“ c and Indian Ocean as well as the Mediterranean Sea … basically most places with warm waters. All sea turtles are protected by law. Attendees of Allies release party were surprised by the release of another sea turtle … a young Kemps Ridley sea turtle that was found caught in “ shing line and brought to Gulf Specimen for rehabilitation and monitoring. After a short stay, the small turtle … too young to determine its gender according to Rudloe … was brought out in a small bucket and set on the shore as the audience watched it kick up its ” ippers and disappear into the waves. According to Gomez, Allies release party is an effort to promote habitat conservation and increase awareness about turtles, adding that nesting season has begun. Alligator Point Sea Turtle Patroller Bill Wargo says that between Alligator Point and Bald Point, a record-breaking 47 nests were hosted during last years nesting season. Wargo urges those in the community to keep the beaches in their natural state as the best protection for the endangered turtles is to keep their breeding habitats minimally disturbed. Also, a reminder that during this nesting season, turn lights out after dark so as to avoid what is called disorientation. Instinctively, hatchlings head toward the brightest horizon, which because of the moon, is naturally the horizon over the water. Arti“ cial lighting can easily lead the babies away from where they should be going, wasting precious time and making them exponentially more vulnerable to predators. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comTurtle returned to the sea By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net Wakulla county commissioners voted unanimously to approve the designation of June 17, 2013 as Larry Tucker Day in honor of the countys master boatbuilder and longtime “ sherman. There to make a presentation honoring Tucker was Big Bend Maritime Center (BBMC) Executive Director Bill Lowrie together with Roger Pinholster and Commissioner Jerry Moore. Moore had brought the subject to the commissioners agenda. Wakulla has a rich history of “ shing and boat building and Tucker has played a major role in the success of the boat-building program at the maritime center. As Commissioner Moore wrote in his agenda proposal, There are generations of “ sherman and boatbuilders here, craftsmen who worked long and hard hours to plan and construct their craft. The BBMC in Panacea is dedicated to furthering the skills and traditions of that founding generation through its boat-building program and displays, thereby advancing a wider understanding and appreciation by citizens of today and tomorrow.Ž The BBMC will honor Tucker by naming its boatbuilding facility the Larry Tucker Watercraft Center. Lowrie revealed artwork done by Clay Lovel of Spring Creek, intended for display as the watercraft centers new sign. The artwork depicts a “ sherman, ” oating in a boat near the coast, retrieving a “ shing net. Lowrie said that if anyone would like to learn more about old-time Florida, particularly in the Panacea area, that they should visit the maritime center where a voice box features Tuckers account of local history, along with how he learned to build boats from his uncle many years ago. The sentiment was made of“ cial as Moore read the proclamation aloud to a packed room. Tucker received a standing ovation.June 17, 2013 designated by county as Larry Tucker Day e Panacea boatbuilder is honored for his workLarry Tucker, Commissioner Jerry Moore, and Bill Lowrie, director of the Big Bend Maritime Center, with a sign designed by Spring Creek artist Clay Lovel for the facility to be named the Larry Tucker Watercraft Center.PHOTO BY AMANDA MAYOR AMANDA MAYORJack Rudloe in the surf to release the loggerhead and Kemps Ridley turtles. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Questions raised about payments in sheriff’s budgetestablishing a 21st CCLC in conjunction with the Y as, at the June 3 meeting, he assured the YMCAs previous experience running 21st CCLC programs. During his update Purvis said, We are committed to bringing a 21st CCLC to the YMCA, but I cant say it will absolutely take place.Ž Purvis explained that there is a very real possibility to seek funding through grants with the help of TCC and that those conversations are already in progress. He said that his goal is to have the 21st CCLC kickoff in the summer of 2014 at the community center. I cant guarantee its success,Ž he said of the process, but it is underway.Ž The newly revised agreement with the YMCA states that the group will provide summer camps, a KidZone, after school programs, teen leadership development programs, a wellness center, group exercise programs, youth sports programs, adult education programs and more, as they are needed. Since the June 3 meeting, a few key changes have been made to the contract between the county and the Y. The section that stated that the $6,000 feasibility study cost should be borne equally between the two parties has been deleted. The amendment to one section states that the YMCA shall retain 25 percent of rental fees and the YMCA shall submit 75 percent of all third party rental fees to the county. In addition, the section that designated the development of a proposed independent advisory council that would make recommendations on fundraising and community activities has also been deleted. According to the contract, the YMCA will open when it reaches 350 memberships during an initial presale effort. The target kickoff date is April 1, 2014, however, there is the possibility of opening earlier if the membership goal is reached before then. With the approval of the contract terms, the next step for the YMCA is to conduct the feasibility study, which will ensure the logistical success of the YMCA in Wakulla. Such a study has been a topic of argument amongst some commissioners, although, as Purvis has explained, its only aim is to help ensure success. It aims to address such concerns as those brought up by Thomas, who feels as if our families have a set amount of discretionary income to spend.Ž Thomas has expressed his concern about the YMCA luring clientele away from the countys already established health clubs. However, Purvis has consistently maintained that YMCAs throughout the country have coexisted fairly and successfully with such businesses throughout the programs lifetime. Purvis pointed out that 30-35 percent of the Ys revenue goes toward scholarships for children and families that may have trouble paying membership and program fees. We do not turn anyone away because of their inability to pay,Ž Purvis iterated. To Thomas comments specifically, Purvis answered: There are limited resources in every county,Ž and that collaboration is key.Ž The study will aim to calculate the probability of success and will look at a slew of economical and demographically relevant factors. Then and only then, as stated in the contract, will the YMCA move further to establish a presence at the countys community center. If the results of the study prove unpromising, further progression to establish the Y in Wakulla will cease. In which case, says Commissioner Richard Harden, We have several good Plan B options to fall back on.Ž Commissioner Howard Kessler is also for the YMCA and sees good reason for a study of feasibility. If they fail, we fail,Ž he said about the Ys efforts. I just want to reiterate our support of the YMCA,Ž said Tim Devlin, who serves on the community center advisory council. He pointed out that there have been improvements in the contract and that the council is comfortable with moving forward. A vote followed shortly afterwards with Commission Chairman Randy Merritt and commissioners Harden and Howard Kessler voting to move forward with the YMCA project, and commissioners Jerry Moore and Thomas voting against.From Page 3AOn-again, o -again YMCA-run center is back onCOUNTY COMMISSIONBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net At the June 17 board of commissioners meeting, an item brought forward by Commissioner Dr. Howard Kessler was not well received. The item requested that the board formally request an opinion from counsel of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office explaining how or why the disbursement of funds of approximately $100,000 from money of the 20112012 fiscal year budget was in compliance with section 215.425 of state statutes. The reason for his request, says Kessler is that, we have a “ duciary responsibility to obtain an answer for, the protection of the taxpayers dollars.Ž Kessler explained that on October 31, 2012 the then-Sheriff Donnie Crum had written a letter to his employees announcing a one time cost of living adjustment.Ž According to Kesslers proposal, this expenditure was made unilaterally without consultation with the BOCC and in an environment of “ scal constraint (although improving). It was done when reserves in both the WCSO and the BOCC were and still are inadequate.Ž In a series of emails back and forth between county staff, County Attorney Heather Encinosa speci“ cally recommends that the WCSO provide the county with their analysis as to why the employee bonuses provided at the end of the last “ scal year do not violate section 215.425, Fla. Stat., which prohibits extra compensation being provided to public employees after services have been rendered or an employment contract made.Ž In her email, Encinosa later adds that the county may consider having the general fund made whole by recouping a like amount. If the motion had moved forward, and the “ ndings of the actions of the former sheriff were in fact illegal, then the county would stand to gain $100,000 … an amount that simply cant be ignored, says Kessler. The confusion lies in that the disbursement of funds came very near the time when the statute was put into place. Also, depending on what exactly the funds were delegated under could affect their legitimacy. According to Encinosa, her initial understanding was that the Sheriffs payout was not a cost of living increase, but just a one-time payment at the end of the year … which would not be allowed under the statute. However, says Encinosa, if it was a prospective cost of living salary adjustment then the statute would likely not apply. An email from WSCO Finance Director Mary Dean Barwick to a Tallahassee attorney seeking clari“ cation is unclear. The opening line of Barwicks email refers to the payout as a cost of living adjustment,Ž but in the very next sentence she writes, This would be a one-time adjustment paid to all employees of the WCSO as of Oct. 31, 2012.Ž The reply back to Barwick from the attorney said simply, Mary Dean this looks good.Ž Chairman Randy Merritt interceded, declaring that he wasnt willing to go on a witch hunt.Ž The other board members were also unwilling to pursue action, implying that Kessler might only be doing so to pursue personal agenda. The remaining board members wanted to iterate that the current staff at the WCSO is not under scrutiny. I would be against asking them for the $100,000 back,Ž said Commissioner Richard Harden, who stated that the county was in the process of paying back the WSCO for funds previously borrowed. Commissioner Jerry Moore added, I think this is coming from a grudge.Ž If something illegal was done, no matter what the intention,Ž maintained Kessler, that $100,000 should come back to the taxpayers.Ž Current Sheriff Charlie Creel said, I think its time to put this issue to rest. The only ones who are going to win in this are the attorneys. I dont want to waste my valuable time, commissioners time or the taxpayers dollars.Ž The board voted 4-1 to drop the item. All Wakulla County Board of County Commissioner Of“ces will be closed on Thursday, July 4th and Friday, July 5th, 2013. in Observance of Independence Day.JUNE 27, 2013 NOTICE OF WAKULLA COUNTY BOCC OFFICE CLOSURE NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on July 15, 2013 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.JUNE 27, 2013 City of Sopchoppy JUNE 27, 2013 A public hearing on the proposed Resolution will be held on Monday, July 8, 2013, at 6:30 p.m., or as soon as can be heard in the City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL. A copy of the Resolution may be obtained and persons wishing to comment may do so in person at the public hearing or by writing to the City of Sopchoppy, P.O. Box 1219, Sopchoppy, Florida 32358. If an individual decides to appeal any decision made by the commission with respect to this meeting, a verbatim transcript may be required. If so, the individual should make provision for a transcript to be made at the meeting, (RE: Florida Statute 286.0105). Pursuant to the provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act, any person requiring special accommodation to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the city at least 48 hours before the meeting by contacting Jackie Lawhon at the above address or by phone at 850-962-4611. The City Commission of the City of Sopchoppy gives notice of its intent to consider the adoption of the following Resolution: The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.JUNE 27, 2013City of St. Marks will hold a Budget Workshop for Fiscal Year 2013-2014Date: July 11, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. Location: 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, FL 32355 The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of“ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.JUNE 27, 2013The City of St. Marks will hold a Public Hearing Community Redevelopment Area BoardDate: July 11, 2013 at 6:45 p.m. Location: 788 Port Leon Drive St. Marks, FL 32355 JUNE 27, 2013U.S. EPA (EPAŽ) has selected the City of St. Marks (CityŽ) for a brown“elds cleanup grant. Hazardous substances grant funds will be used to clean up the former St. Marks Re“nery at 627 Port Leon Drive. Grant funds also will be used to analyze and approve the cleanup action plan and support community outreach activities. EPA programmatic support will be required by the selected Quali“ed Environmental Professional (QEPŽ) as that term is de“ned by EPA. The City is seeking a quali“ed Consultant that meets the requirements of this RFQ with demonstrated expertise in civil engineering, environmental assessment, remediation and engineering, and programmatic capabilities managing U.S. EPA Brown“elds Assessment and Cleanup grants and sub-grants under a Brown“elds Cleanup Revolving Loan Fund (BCRLFŽ). Respondents to this RFQ solicitation must be prepared and quali“ed to meet all state and federal requirements for work funded by U.S. EPA Brown“elds Assessment and Cleanup grants or BCRLF sub-grant including all conditions and terms (i.e., Small Business Liability Relief and Brown“elds Revitalization Act, CERCLA, OMB directives, Davis-Bacon and DavisBacon Related Acts and other federal laws, guidance and memorandums, as applicable) of EPAs cooperative agreement with the City. No minimum or maximum amount of work is guaranteed under any contracts resulting from this solicitation. The City reserves the right to decide which and the number of the selected “rms chosen to provide tasks under the continuing contract. To obtain a copy of the RFQ visit the Citys webpage at http://cityofstmarks.com/home.htm or email cityofst. marks@comcast.net with a request for a copy of the RFQ.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Sheriff’s Report for June 13, 2013 • Wakulla schools score superior in state, region •Wakulla TDC pushes ahead without a director • Gov. Scott to speak at Wakulla GOP fundraiser • Wakulla Democrats host gathering in Panacea • Sopchoppy election generates controversy • Board revises wetlands ordinance • Sopchoppy Fourth of Julythewakullanews.com Follow us on Disappointed in wetlands vote ank you, News, for youth insert Wetlands decision was short-sighted Wakulla is an overdeveloped suburbBy JACK RUDLOEOn Saturday, June 22, nearly 1,500 people turned out to witness Allie, our 230 pound loggerhead sea turtle return to the wild. Allie was brought to us by commercial “ shermen who went to a great deal of trouble and expense to bring her to the dock a year ago, when they found her ” oating and comatose off Alligator Point. Dr. Norman Griggs of the Shepard Springs Animal Hospital provided a years worth of veterinary care, medications and X-rays. Volunteers at our aquarium hand-fed her until she could catch live crabs. School children raised money to purchase crabs, which have become very costly because they are so scarce. When Allie was strong enough to be released, the state Fish and Wildlife Commission and Department of Environmental Protections state park provided logistics to move her from Gulf Specimen Marine Labs aquarium to the waters edge at Bald Point State Park. It was a joyous occasion, with the crowd cheering and taking photographs, as we hoisted the turtle that had been so sick, and so close to death a year ago out of the Parks ATV and turned her lose. No one expected so many people to show and express such enthusiasm. So take heed, Commissioner Randy Merritt and the three other commissioners who voted to trash Wakulla Countys wetlands ordinance last week over the objections of nature lovers like the people who turned out in mass to see Allie released. By allowing development of so called isolated wetlandsŽ and eliminating buffers, you are destroying the food chain, and totally out of step with the overwhelming majority of the public who want to see our waters, coastal forests and swamp and over” ow lands “ lled with wildlife, birds, “ sh and turtles. Your hypocritical speeches about private property make me sick. If you really believed in private property, youd get rid of most of your bloated Building and Planning and Zoning departments and your bloodsucking attorneys that drain our taxes and inflict neverending permits, fees and licenses and dictate trivia like how wide our steps must be and how many nails should be put in a board. Protect trees and vegetation that give us oxygen and “ lter the water we drink, swim and “ sh in. If you were really public servants, youd concern yourself on protecting property owners from the ” ooding when your developer buddies can freely “ ll isolated wetlands. The damage you just in” icted on the public will remain long after youre gone when bulldozers scatter wildlife and deplete the nutrients from the isolated wetlands that feed the blue crabs and horseshoe crabs that in turn feed Allie the loggerhead sea turtle along with the “ sh, shrimp and crabs that we love to eat. Remember what Shakespeare said, The evil that men do lives after them; the good is oft interred with the bones.Ž We will remember your evil come election time.Jack Rudloe is the founder of Gulf Specimen Marine Lab in Panacea and the author of numerous books.Editor, The News: Like many, Im disappointed in the board of county commissioners decision to weaken our wetland protections. But what worries me most is the level of discourse by our commissioners. Environmental protection depends on understanding scienti“ c principles and then using that information to form policy. This is difficult with sitting commissioners who think in terms of enoughŽ wetlands „ as in, the Apalachicola National Forest provides enoughŽ wetland protection, making additional protections obsolete. This represents a profound ignorance of the way water systems (and their contaminants) operate and is akin to saying sunscreen on half your body ensures that you wont get a sunburn on any of it. The same applies to the dismissive discussion of isolated wetlands which suggested that a mosquito bogŽ doesnt merit protection like a pristineŽ river, as if “ nding a natural feature pleasantŽ was the only measure of its usefulness. This kind of thinking explains the boards eagerness to shift local protection to the state level. Most troubling of all, though, is the way words like freedomŽ and rightsŽ get used as a cudgel to dilute discussion. Or to exempt whomever utters them from thinking things through. It should go without saying that were all in favor of freedom,Ž but its no longer suf“ cient. So politicians remind us that they like freedom. A lot. The problem with how we use this word is that its often too abstract to make good policy. Is a 35 foot wetland buffer a violation of freedom? How about any wetland buffer? How about preservation of the wetland itself? This sort of sliding scale is very worrisome when whats at issue isnt individual or private at all, but something that impacts EVERYONE: our water. Saying this is simply an issue of freedomŽ for property owners removes all context from what should be (and is) a complex and crucial subject. Its also a way, despite good intentions, to perpetuate willful ignorance and wishful thinking. An overlooked point made at the board meeting was this: We know more now. We better understand the sources of our ecological problems and how to remedy them. To act in direct violation of that knowledge in the name of principle doesnt make the outcome any less real. Of course, freedom and rights count … they just dont get to bully or distract or get the last word simply because.Ž Before I risk sounding alarmist, Ill grant that the approved changes arent sweeping. But the level of critical thinking demonstrated by our countys leadership doesnt bode well for future efforts. Degradation is patient and incremental, and … most importantly … it tends to be one-way. Given the current boards thinking (and past intent), too much seems possible. Emily Smith Sopchoppy Editor, The News: The county commissions short-sighted decision on June 17 could result in developers building in areas that current regulations do not allow. Commissioner Randy Merritts proposal to amend the comprehensive plan is a step toward weakening wetland protection in Wakulla County. A few years from now when developers want more land to build on you can be sure there will be more proposals to weaken wetlands protection. Do we really want Wakulla to look like South Florida? Pollution in Tampa Bay eliminated scallops from the bay area by the 1970s. I wonder how many times wetland protection laws were weakened before water quality in Tampa Bay deteriorated to the point scallops could not survive. A little here, a little there. . Many people say we have plenty of protected land in Wakulla County. Apparently we do not have enough since local beaches are often unsafe due to high bacteria counts. Development and agriculture are already adding too much runoff to the Gulf of Mexico. The coral reefs of the Florida Keys are dying. Do we as a society really think that property rightsŽ gives us the right to add even more pollution to the Gulf? How big will the dead zone in the Gulf have to get before we realize that this level of human impact is unsustainable? Interior and coastal wetlands “ lter out nitrogen and other man-made contaminants. As Jerry Moore points out, Leon County accounts for much of the nitrogen coming into Wakulla County. This actually makes preserving our wetlands even MORE critical for “ ltering these contaminants. The commissioner said this is about freedom. Remember that along with freedom comes the responsibility to do the right thing. We are not freeŽ to cause harm. If you agree that our wetlands are important to saving our coastal “ sheries and quality of life, please take action. Attend future meetings involving this proposal to weaken our wetlands ordinances and let your voice be heard. Eugene Watkins dwew35@embarqmail.com Editor, The News: As a longtime resident (we moved here in 1963), I have seen our tiny rural county grow from a sleepy country farming and “ shing community, complete with limestone dirt roads and neighbors who treated each other like family, to what it is today … an overdeveloped progressiveŽ suburb of Tallahassee, complete with stormwater runoff, wildlife habitat and ecosystems destruction, loud noisy sirens in the streets and highways, and much more. Forever gone is the beauty of what was once The Sportsmans Paradise.Ž All for the sake of real estate developers and agents raping the land to vomit up even more foreclosed and empty housing, for which they line the pockets of one or two commissioners and/or building officials to gain the votes to push throughŽ their projectsŽ regardless of the wishes or good of the people. Since I can remember, this county has NEVER had a board of county commissioners who have ever sat in agreement for the good or well-being of the people. There will always be at least two or three who vote their own agenda... you know...the one that was bought and paid for. Rev. R. Perry Sanders CrawfordvilleDecision on wetlands ordinance will destroy food chainREADERS WRITE:Editor, The News: Thank you, Wakulla News, for the great work pulling together the summer opportunities for youth insert. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to support all community news and endeavor providing prosocial opportunities for youth. Summer is a great time and so needed for our youth to replenish and grow. Wakulla is a great place to live, work and play... and as that insert reminds us....we have a growing list of opportunities for our youth to interact with peers and adults in meaningful, fun and rewarding enrichment programs. Thank you, Sherri Kraeft, for taking the lead to make it happen. It was rich and worthwhile. We live in an awesome place. Respectfully, Gail Campbell Coalition for Youth Matt Davies … Remapping Debate

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 5A < STREET BEAT > Random, man-on-the-street interviews with Wakulla Countians. This week's question: When you were little, what did you want to be when you grew up? HARRIET RICH RetiredA performer … I wanted to be on stage.Ž HALSEY BESHEARS State representativeI wanted to be a college football star and after that a dirt row farmer.Ž CATHY SCARBROUGH Mineral Springs SeafoodI wanted to become an archaeologist.Ž BEVERLY KEISTER CPA... I didnt want to work at all!Ž DEE SHRIVER Shell Point RealtyI wanted to be a doctor.Ž … Compiled by Lynda KinseySpecial to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Sgt. Billy Jones quick reaction saved the life of a 4-year-old preschool child who was choking on an undetermined foreign object Monday, June 17. The child was not breathing when the childs mother frantically gave the child to Sgt. Jones seeking assistance. Jones was able to grab Sapheriah McKinney from her mother, Yolanda Timmons, and dislodge the foreign object. The object cleared the childs throat and Wakulla EMS arrived on scene to transport the child to the hospital for observation. After doctors determined that the child was in no danger, she was released from the hospital. On Wednesday, June 19, Yolanda Timmons presented a Special Hero Award to Jones in Sheriff Charlie Creels of“ ce. Forty-eight hours after the incident took place it was still emotional for Timmons. They are still not sure what it was,Ž said Timmons as she wiped away her tears. I would like to give a special thanks to Sgt. Billy Jones for saving my daughters life. If it wasnt for you and God, my daughter wouldnt be here right now.Ž Sgt. Jones showed great care in assisting the child and mother in their time of distress and crisis, but he also took the time to go back to the Bright Beginnings Preschool to let them know that Sapheriah was going to be “ ne,Ž said Sheriff Creel. He is a “ ne example of some of the outstanding people we have working at the sheriffs of“ ce. This is what he was trained to do.Ž We just panicked and got in the car and “ gured wed meet him halfway,Ž said Timmons, a mother of three. You are my angels from above.Ž After dislodging the object, Jones carried the child into the ambulance and gave her a teddy bear. I told her this little teddy bear needed a mama,Ž said Jones, who has two children of his own. I get a little emotional too when I think about what could have happened.Ž When Jones shared the story with his own family after work earlier this week, his daughter asked him to give a Minnie Mouse doll to Sapheriah on her behalf. Jones presented the Minnie Mouse to Sapheriah Timmons while the girls mother presented Jones with a plaque. Jones also returned to the preschool to talk to the students about never putting foreign objects in your mouth on Tuesday. Theres nothing worse than thinking youre losing a child,Ž said Jones. I love working with the kids and it was awesome to get a hug.Ž Jones tends to shy away from publicity but as Timmons presented the plaque, he said, I will treasure this.Ž Jones is a former School Resource Of“ cer at Wakulla High School who is currently assigned to the Youth and Community Services Division. With in-service training underway at the sheriffs of“ ce, Jones was substituting on the Road Patrol while the regular road patrol crew was involved with training.Sgt. Billy Jones saves 4-year-old girl from choking Yolanda TImmons and her daughter Sapheriah McKinney present a plaque to Sgt. Billy Jones as Sheriff Charlie Creel looks on. SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Please Recycle 000EWP9 206 E. 6th Avenue Corner of Monroe St. & 6th Midtown Tallahassee, FL 32303 Mon-Sat 10-6 (850) 894-VERA thegreyfoxonline.com One-Stop Shopping Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET?

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 It was a Murphy’s Law week OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDERI am not what you would call a superstitious person. [Knock on wood.] I am a realist in a modi“ ed definition of that word and I usually take things as they come My past week, however, was an open commentary on Murphys Law.Ž Offhand I am not quite sure who come up with this concept, but they must have had a week somewhat like my week this past week. If I had it within me, I would establish Snyders LawŽ which simply stated means, what can go right will go right. Then all would be right with the world. Well, except for those who are left-handed. It all started Monday morning when I had an early morning meeting. I meant to set my alarm clock for 6 a.m. but for some reason I set it for 6 p.m. and overslept. Have you ever noticed when you are 15 minutes late in the morning the day ends up being 90 minutes late? Do not ask me how that happens. Ask Murphy. In the mail, I got a notice from the bank that I was overdrawn and they were charging me an insuf“ cient fund fee. Well, I was furious. After all, I know how to add and subtract and I know how to take care of my bank account. I was about ready to call them and give them a piece of my mind when I noticed … how it happened I will never know … I forgot to include two checks I had written last week. I hate when that happens. My whole checkbook is now screwed up. I think it might be easier for me just to close my account and start all over again. It was Tuesday but I had to go across town and endure all that traf“ c. It is not my favorite place to drive, I will tell you right now. Just as I turned onto a street, my engine sputtered a little bit. Then, much to my chagrin, the engine stopped completely. I hate when that happens. I turned the key several times and then, I do not know why I did it, but I glanced at the gas gauge and the arrow was pointing way beyond the E. My gas tank was about as empty as my bank account. It is bad to run out of gas, but the worst thing for me about running out of gas is calling the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and asking her for help. I would walk 100 miles not to tell her I am out of gas. She always comes and bails me out. However, for the next six months I am reminded and reminded and reminded to put gas in my tank. Thursday also had its issues. My wife wanted me to go to the store and pick up something and for some reason, I cannot remember now, I used her car. Maybe it was because I did not want to run out of gas! I got to the store, paid for my purchase, came out and tried “ nding my truck. I walked up and down and my truck was nowhere in sight. The only thing I could think of at the time was that somebody had stolen my truck. I thought about calling the police, and then I thought better and decided I would call my wife “ rst. You know what it is like when your wife hears something secondhand. And so I called her. I cant “ nd my truck,Ž I said trying to keep my voice as calm as possible not to get her upset, I think somebody stole it. Should I call the police?Ž Silence on the phone. Then I heard her say in a very calm voice, Whoever stole your truck parked it in our driveway.Ž I then remembered I was driving her car. I tried to chuckle within but I knew that this incident would hang in our house for months to come and I have Mr. Murphy to thank for that. It was such a horri“ c week and I was so deep in trouble with my Better Half, I decided to take her out Friday night for a nice meal on the town. I took her to her favorite restaurant and we ordered our supper, then set back and kind of sighed the week away. Maybe all that could go wrong has gone wrong and the week was about to turn around. We chatted. I tried to skew the conversation away from running out of gas and misplacing my truck. Then the waitress came with our meal. I was ready to settle down, enjoy a scrumptious meal and end the week on a happy note. The waitress set my wifes plate in front of her and she smiled. Then the waitress set my plate in front of me and I freaked out. For some reason the waitress got my order mixed up with somebody elses order and right in the middle of my plate was a pile of broccoli. The only hope I have is that it cannot get any worse than this. I think David, the psalmist, understood this when he wrote, ... weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morningŽ (Psalm 30:5 KJV). As bad as it gets, as a Christian I have some great things to look forward to in Jesus Christ.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. Special to The NewsA third fundraiser has been set for Lynnette Andersen, a member of First Baptist Church of Crawfordville, who will leave in August for a nine-month mission trip around the world. Lynnette has been accepted to participate in the Passport: Immersion program sponsored by Adventures in Missions. Participants are called to live out of a backpack and tent as they travel to Central America, Southeast Asia, and Africa. In addition to sharing and living out the gospel, contending for justice on behalf of orphans, the poor, and the traf“ cked mark the ministry experience of the Passport program. A parents night out event, where children 12 and under are cared for in the Christian Life Center at the church, is scheduled for Friday, June 28, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. This event is donation-based and open to the public. Our wish is parents will have an evening out with peace of mind that child(ren) are being cared for while missionary efforts are being supported. No reservation is necessary. Cheese pizza and snacks will be provided. If your child has an allergy or is a picky eater, please pack a bag. To those that have supported the prior fundraising events of garage sale and “ sh-fry, Lynnette is truly humbled and thankful.Parents night out fundraiser set at First Baptist St. Nora holds its second free dinner for less fortunateSpecial to The NewsOn Saturday, June 22, St. Nora Primitive Baptist Church held its second free dinner for the less fortunate. Sister Shirley Baucham and her church family reached out to the community serving smothered meatballs and gravy, yellow rice, green beans with potatoes, chicken and rice, rolls, red velvet cake, and tea. The church also gave away free clothing. We give God all the glory,Ž said Baucham, because, without, we could do nothing, and I pray that God will continue to be in our midst as we continue to reach out to the less fortunate.Ž St. Nora will continue to serve free dinners once a month with the dates and times to be announced. Special to The NewsThe teenage girls of Lighthouse Childrens Home in Tallahassee will be singing and giving testimony at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church, 165 Friendship Church Road in Medart, on Sunday, June 30, during the 11 a.m. worship service. Everyone is invited.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLighthouse Home girls will sing at Friendship P.B. Church

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 7AObituaries Mary B. Elocate William R. Flury Dora Ellen Hanna Sadie Lynn Harvey Celia Ruth Vause Lippincott Jessie Clinton Nazworth Sr.Mary B. Elcoate, 84, of Crawfordville, passed away June 11, 2013 in Crawfordville. Private services are planned. In lieu of ” owers, memorial contributions may be made to your favorite charity. A native of Mercid, Calif., she spent most of her working years in southern San Francisco and Fremont, Calif., until she moved to Florida to be with her family. Survivors include her daughter, Judy Parker; grandchildren, Faxon Kalama (Julia Crosby) and Jaelynn Kalama; greatgrandchildren, Mckenzie and Jemma; brother, Richard Coffman. She was predeceased by two children, Linda and Harold. Arrangements by Fairchild Funeral Home in TallahasseeCelia Ruth Lippincott passed from this life on Tuesday afternoon, June 11, 2013, at her home in Alvin. Born Sept. 21, 1931 in Crawfordville, she had been a resident of Alvin since 2006, previously of Houston. She had worked as a registered nurse at the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center for seven years, was a former member of the Fair Haven United Methodist Church in Houston, a member of the Power Squadron Club and the Sewing Guild. She was an avid sewer, enjoyed fishing, line dancing and always enjoyed trying new things. Survivors include her daughter, Lisa Lewis and husband, John of Friendswood; brothers, Henry Vause and wife Gay, D.R. Vause and wife DLinda; sisters, Faye Morgan, Raye Wright, Ethel Vause all of Crawfordville; grandchildren, Zachary Austin Lewis and Benjamin Miles Lewis both of Friendswood; numerous nieces, nephews and cousins. She was predeceased by her parents, Henry Clay and Ethel Corine (Andrews) Vause; husband, Marvin Miles Lippincott; brothers, J.C. Vause, Truman Vause, R.W. Vause; sisters, Winifred Cooper and Maye Roberts. Funeral services were held on Saturday, June 15, 2013, at the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church, 1207 West Winding Way Drive, Friendswood, Texas, with the Rev. Geoffrey Gwynne of“ ciating. Interment followed at Forest Park East Cemetery under the direction of Hayes Funeral Home. Pallbearers will be Benjamin Lewis, John Lewis, Zachary Lewis, Richard Morgan and Troy Sunkle. Visitation with the family was held on Friday, June 14, in the chapel of Hayes Funeral Home, 10412 Highway 6, (409) 925-3501. Memorial donations may be made to the University of Texas, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Post Of“ ce Box 4486, Houston TX 772104486 or the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, 5433 Westheimer, Suite 300, Houston TX 77056. Newborn Sadie Lynne Harvey of Crawfordville passed away Thursday, June 13, 2013. Survivors include her parents, Shawn and Melissa Harvey and her big brother, Wyatt Harvey of Crawfordville; maternal grandparents, Jerry Boler of Crawfordville and Deborah Orr of Freeport; great-grandmother, Margie Kemp of Clinton, Miss.; uncle and aunt Jeff and Shannon Thompson and cousin Taylor Thompson of Crawfordville; uncle and aunt Jeff and Elaine Cox of Union, S.C.; and uncle and aunt Jeremy and Adrienne Boler of Forrest City, N.C. She was predeceased by her paternal grandparents Ralph and Edna Moore. A graveside service was conducted on Tuesday, June 18, 2013 by family friend and Pastor Charles BBŽ Barwick at Hanna Town Cemetery, in Hanna Town, Ga. Funeral arrangements were handled by family friend Charles McClellan of Charles McClellan Funeral Home in Quincy. William R. Flury, 91, of Crawfordville, died on Wednesday, June 19, 2013. He was a retired minister. Survivors include his daughters, Jean (Lester) Whitfield of Crawfordville and Wanda (Allen) Bechtelheimer of Dade City; a brother, Carl (Mildred) Flury of Demorest, Ga.; three grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; numerous nieces and nephews; two step-grandchildren and four stepgreat-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Frances Flury; and his granddaughter, Jennifer Grantham. A graveside funeral service was held at 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 22, 2013 at Friendship Cemetery in Crawfordville with the Rev. Bill Payne officiating. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the cemetery. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home in Macclenny (850-559-3380). Sign the online guestbook at http://www.forbesfuneralhome.net. Jessie Clinton Nazworth Sr., 85, of Crawfordville, passed away Friday, June 21, 2013 in Tallahassee. He is survived by his wife of 66 years, Carolyn Shiver Nazworth. He was a lifelong resident of this area, was a Baptist and an avid hunter and “ sherman. He was a foreman in the Carpentry section at Florida State University where he worked for 33 years. He served in the U.S. Navy. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday, June 24, 2013 at Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Tuesday, June 25, 2013 at 10 a.m. at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. In addition to his wife, he is also survived by five children, Karen King (David), Clint Nazworth (Chris), Lorinda Sanders (Lonzo), Darlynn Ard (Dan), and Sheryl Kilgore; as well as 12 grandchildren, 18 great grandchildren and a host of nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents, George William and Ranna Harvey Nazworth; brother, Edsel Nazworth; sisters, Clifford Smith and Lillian Jackson; and grandchildren, Melanie and Kevin. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, FL is assisting the family with arrangements. (850926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Dora Ellen Hanna, 79, of Greensboro, died June 19, 2013 at her home. She was born on April 21, 1934 in Sopchoppy, and was a graduate of Sopchoppy High School. She is survived by two sons, Randy Hanna (Jerri) of Tallahassee and Sammy Hanna (Stacy) of Hosford; a daughter, Donna Rowan (Allen) of Birmingham, Ala.; seven grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Dora was predeceased by her husband, Wayne Hanna; her parents, Samuel and Lola Donella McKenzie; her sisters, Myrtice Strickland and Iris Bell; and her brothers, John McKenzie, Clinton McKenzie, Paul McKenzie, Sam McKenzie, David Earl McKenzie and Daniel McKenzie. The family received visitors in the Fellowship Hall of the First Baptist Church of Greensboro on Friday, June 21 from 6 until 8 p.m. Services will be held at the church at 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 22. Memorial contributions to the First Baptist Church of Greensboro, P.O. Box 100, Greensboro FL 32330, The Florida Baptist Childrens Home, 8415 Buck Lake Road, Tallahassee FL 32317 or The American Cancer Society Charles McClellan Funeral Home of Quincy is in charge of arrangements.Mary B. Elcoate Celia Ruth Vause Lippincott Sadie Lynne Harvey William R. Flury Jessie Clinton Nazworth Sr. Dora Ellen Hanna By DR. BETSY GOEHRIGOne of my daughters and I were talking about taking trips this week, as she was anticipating going to church camp and other adventures this summer. She reminisced about when she was a little girl, she would ask, Are we there yet?Ž repeatedly, in anticipation of arriving. She said she no longer asks that … at least, not out loud … but she still has it in her head, Are we there yet? Are we there yet?Ž I think we still do that as adults. We go through life asking, Are we there yet?Ž when the question that really lurks in our minds is, When are we ever going to get there?Ž And the thereŽ may seem ever elusive. What is the there?Ž When are we ever going to arrive at our lifes destination, the place where we are at home and comfortable with our lives, the place of our best and greatest potential. The thereŽ becomes something that keeps moving. We ask, Are we there yet?Ž when we strive toward becoming an adultŽ and free from the oppression of being a child in someone elses home. Is the thereŽ at 18? or 21? With boomerang kids moving back home after launching and “ nding that life and freedom are not that easy, they again wonder, Are we there yet?Ž which then stretches into midto late 20s. Are we there yet?Ž we ask, as we climb the corporate ladder and seek to grow in our careers to the highest level. And with todays job uncertainties, we can get knocked down that ladder and start the climb all over again. We thought we were almost thereŽ when the thereŽ moved on us. Are we there yet?Ž can be the question we ask in our relationships. We may go from one relationship to another, searching for a lifes mate, with the thereŽ being marriage. Then what happens when we get thereŽ „ the thereŽ becomes creating a family. A couple who are dating awhile are often prompted by their kin, So when are you getting married?Ž which then becomes So when are you going to start having babies?Ž Then we seek the next level of there.Ž Middle age? Retirement? Death and new life? The Are we there yet?Ž can be laced with to do lists. We get thereŽ when we daily, weekly, monthly, yearly knock out our to-do lists, only to be followed by one list after another. So where is thereŽ in the never ending line of to-do lists? I am guilty as charged. I get so caught up in my lists that sometimes I have to stop and just focus on the big picture. Where are my to-do lists taking me, in the big picture of things? Am I left feeling like I can never “ nish all of the lists and thus never get there?Ž Sure, it feels great to mark off everything on a days listƒI did it! I got everything done that I needed to accomplish today.Ž What a great feeling. THEN, tomorrow comes! All those things I accomplished yesterday are now forgotten. Thats old news. Today brings new goals, new challenges and I have to start all over again. The important question is, Is my to-do list just a barrage of shortterm tasks? Or does it have a larger there in mind?Ž I frequently pray for God to help me be the best I can be, knowing that I have yet to attain my full potential. I pray for God to help me be the best wife and mom I can be. And the best daughter and the best grandparent I can be. I pray that I can be the best minister I can be and to help others be the best persons they can be. And I ask, Am I there yet? Am I at my very best?Ž Not yet. I … and we … are still being challenged toward an even greater potential that God has in store for us. Its a lifelong journey. So as we continue on this journey of life, know God will be leading us toward ful“ lling Gods desires for our lives to become all weve been created to be. We can enjoy the thereŽ in each place along our journey. Yet keeping before us there is more. Are we there yet? Yes, each moment is a precious there.Ž And, No, because were still on the way! And were tough enough for the journey and whatever we may face, by the grace of God. Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church. HEAVENS TO BETSYA childs question of Are we there yet? follows us through life The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com featuring Antioch Holiness Revival Center Singers of Perry, Florida Saturday June 29, 7 p.m. Saturday June 29, 7 p.m. PANACEA FULL GOSPEL ASSEMBLY

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsThe staff of North Florida Child Development is excited to announce that they have been picked to participate in this years National Center on Health UCLA Healthcare Training Institute. With nine regional centers and serving over 360 area families, North Florida Child Development is one of only 50 Early Head Start and Head Start programs, nationwide, and the only one in Florida, selected to receive the training. The mission of UCLA Healthcare Training Institute is to educate parents in America to make better healthcare decisions for their children. North Florida Child Development applied for the training, which is 100% grant funded, and plans to conduct the parent training sessions in September of this year. Over 100 area families will participate in the initial two-day workshop receiving textbook and other valuable healthcare tools such as digital thermometers, free of charge. This training is designed to provide healthcare knowledge and enable parents to make better healthcare decisions for their children,Ž said Sharon Gaskin, Executive Director, North Florida Child Development. The program is based on the What to Do When Your Child Gets SickŽ guidebook assembled by the UCLA group. In addition to the easy-to-read book, training sessions for parents will also include hands-on education on how to correctly measure medication and the correct hand-washing technique, among other things. Flipping through the book, Gaskin said each chapter has the same four sections: What is it, what do I see, what can I do at home and when to call the doctor. Its natural for parents to be worried when their child gets sick but it (the book) really takes the panic out,Ž said Gaskin. A UCLA study showed that from 2002 to 2006 the program reduced participants' emergency room visits by 58%, doctor's visits by 42% and missed school days by 29%. During the last decade, UCLA health experts have helped Head Start coordinators train over 45,000 families in 39 states to use basic tools including reference books, digital thermometers and liquid medical dispensers to treat their children and avoid unnecessary visits to doctor's offices and emergency rooms. For more information contact Sebrina McGill, North Florida Child Development, at 850-639-5080.Special to The NewsJoe D. White Sr., retired manager of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge has done it again. Poised on the brink of his four score years he has just published his second book, The Blue Goose and Me„A National Wildlife Refuge Memoir.Ž Upon the completion of a thirty-“ ve year career with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service„National Wildlife Refuge System, Joe retired in 1996 and, with wife Anne, resides in their Brandt Hills neighborhood of Tallahassee. Born and raised in Winston County, Miss., his “ rst book, Sweet Times, Sweet Places,Ž which was well received, tells of growing up country in Winston County during The Great Depression and WWII years. The Blue Goose and MeŽ (the Blue Goose is the internationally recognized symbol of the National Wildlife Refuge System) takes a different tact, and in his conversational writing style Joe recalls some of his outdoor adventures as a young assistant manager on the “ rst four of the six southeastern national wildlife refuges on which he served. According to Joe, As a youngster growing up in rural Mississippi, I was vaguely aware of state and national parks and national forests, but I was totally ignorant about national wildlife refuges until I graduated from Southern Miss. and began my career as a wildlife/ wildlands manager on Chassahowitzka Refuge near Homosassa Springs. Today, I simply Google national wildlife refuge system and instantly have history and details at my finger tips, but back in mid-century, I had to learn the hard way„working on one, which on balance I didnt consider work at all. Shoot, I would have done it for free, but they kept forcing a salary on me, which was just as well since I had a family to support. For one who started out ignorant about the national wildlife refuge system, I found out in a hurry that it was arguably one of the premiere national conservation agencies. Some of my fantastic experiences on six southeastern refuges border on the surreal, producing the kind of outdoor experiences that the average citizen would “ nd dif“ cult to comprehend. But, they were indeed real, not something I experienced in a dream, and in time I felt compelled to share the best of these adventures with readers who enjoy and appreciate wildlife and wilderness habitat for the wild creatures with whom we share planet earth. Even in my retirement, I am still enamored with national wildlife refuges. Sandwiched in between writing, fishing, honeydos, and dealer-trade driving for the Proctor dealerships, I still “ nd time to occasionally volunteer on St. Marks Refuge, helping maintain the Florida National Scenic Trail, leading hikes, and working a couple of annual events.Ž The Blue Goose and MeŽ is now available in print form from www. amazon.com books, or the St. Marks Refuge book store, or call Joe at (850877-9544). The e-book version is available from www. amazon.com Kindle store. Search by title for each version.Former St. Marks refuge manager publishes second book Joe D. White, Sr. points to the internationally recognized symbol for the National Wildlife Refuge System.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS North Florida child development is picked for UCLA training Wakulla County news and announcements are now viewable on Comcast Channel 16. In addition to the regularly scheduled county commission meetings, citizens can now tune-in to Comcast Channel 16 to obtain a broad range of information, including county news, public service announcements, upcoming meeting notices, invitation to bid opportunities, and employment opportunities. Comcast has dedicated Channel 16 to Wakulla County 24/7. The information being provided will be updated on a weekly basis. “It’s important to keep our citizens informed of important information that might affect them. This is another tool we are happy to provide to keep our citizens informed,” said Jessica Welch, Communications & Public Services Director. If you have any questions, please contact the county Communications & Public Services of ce at (850) 926-0919.County news and announcements now available on Channel 16 A reunion will be held for the Daughtry Crum family on Saturday, June 29 in the Sopchoppy gymnasium. Bring your specialty covered dish. Lunch will be served at noon, but come early and plan to spend the afternoon visiting. Contact Amanda Daughtry for more information at 524-5373.Daughtry Crum reunion is slated Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. 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FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 239-464-1732 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsThe Coastal Optimist Club's annual school supply drive is in full swing. Donation boxes can be found in the following places: Centennial Bank, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, Posey's SteamRoom in Panacea, Winn Dixie, Ace Hardware, Gulf Coast Lumber, Crawfordville United Methodist Church and Ameris Bank. Boxes of supplies will be given to eight schools from elementary to high school to help needy students. Please help to make this drive successful by remembering to donate. Due to the economy many children need help to do well in school. Especially needed are items like loose leaf paper, pencils, pens, crayons, glue, and markers. Money donations can be mailed to June Vause at P.O. Box 610 Crawfordville FL 32326 or dropped off at Centennial Bank.Coastal Optimists is now accepting school supplies Special to The NewsJune Employee of the Month: Wakulla Middle Schools Wilton Booth Superintendent Bobby Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the dedication and the commitment Booth displays on behalf of the students, faculty and staff at Wakulla Middle School. He makes a positive difference! The Wakulla County School District has selected Wilton Booth as the June Employee of the Month. Booth has served as a custodian at WMS since 2007. When asked what is most enjoyable about his job, Booth replies, Seeing that the kids have a clean and safe environment to learn in. I also like smiling and communicating with others at work.Ž Booth is committed to the Wakulla County School System, as he attended Shadeville Elementary School, Sopchoppy Elementary School, and graduated from Wakulla High School. After graduation, Mr. Booth served our country for six years in the US Army from 1980-1986. Prior to working for the school district, Booth worked for the State DOT. He is also an usher for the River of Life Church and assists the community at American Legion Post 13. Operation Foreman Larry Shiver adds, Mr. Booth has been a dedicated employee of Wakulla Middle School for eight years. He is very pleasant and always has a smile on his face no matter what he is doing. Mr. Booth is a team player and is always willing to do what is asked of him. It is a pleasure to have Mr. Booth as a member of the Wildcat family.Ž Booth named employee of the monthEmployee of the Month Wilton Booth of Riversink ElementarySPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF LORIDALooking to avoid another botched rollout of school grades this year, the State Board of Education on Tuesday asked Education Commissioner Tony Bennett to appoint a task force to examine the test scores used to calculate the grades. The move comes just a few weeks before the grades are set to be released, and with superintendents warning that preliminary calculations already show a possible collapse in the grades for schools across the state. The resulting grades show nearly 10 times more F elementary schools in our district,Ž said Hillsborough County Superintendent MaryEllen Elia. Educators suspect the grades are being complicated, at least in part, by a slew of changes to the states testing regimen and standards. In addition to the increased standards, a provision put in place last year to keep school grades from dropping more than one letter is set to expire. In all, there are 13 changes being made to the scores this year after 19 were approved by the state board last year, said Miami-Dade County Superintendent Alberto Carvalho, who along with Elia spoke to the board at its Tuesday meeting to push for change. When you put all of that together, I dont think anybodys taken the time to examine the implications of the simultaneous coming together of all these variables,Ž Carvalho said. While it was mentioned only in passing at the meeting, last years mishandling of the release of state grades formed part of the backdrop for Tuesdays discussion. Bennetts predecessor, Gerard Robinson, resigned in 2012 after less than a year on the job after the public-relations pounding the department took when FCAT scores collapsed, followed a few months later by a school grades mix-up. The Florida Board of Education was forced to lower passing grades for the statewide writing tests last year after the passing rate plunged from 81 percent to 27 percent for fourth graders and showed similar drops in eighth and 10th grades. Then, in July, the department had to reissue grades for 213 elementary and middle schools and nine school districts as part of a continuous review process.Ž Within weeks, Robinson was gone, though he said the resignation was to allow him to spend more time with his family. But Carvalho said that at least one problem had been repeated, saying the state had not done enough to prepare parents for the possibility of a widespread drop in grades as standards increased, and clarifying that students might be learning more even as the grades fell. Now we are but a couple weeks away from the release of letter grades,Ž he said. Its too late.Ž Bennett and board members are hoping thats not the case. The task force will include superintendents from different regions of the state as well as state of“ cials who deal with the testing and accountability system. While no board meetings are scheduled before September, Chairman Gary Chartrand said one could be called if Bennetts group recommends changes. It may be late, but its not too late,Ž Chartrand said. The task force is expected to be put together by sometime next week. State Board of Education looks to avoid another school grades fiascoCoastal Optimist Club members with school supplies collected for needy students.WHS graduatereceives Tinker AFB scholarshipSpecial to The NewsThe annual Scholarships for Military Children Program winners have been announced and the Honor Roll is impressive. Approximatel 5,000 students applied for the scholarships tocommissary locations worldwide. Janay Webster of Crawfordville is a recipient of a $1,500 college scholarship awarded at Tinker AFB. Tinker AFP is one of over 250 commissaries operated worldwide by the Defense Comissary Agency (DeCA). Janay is the daughter of Anthony and LaSheryl Webster. She is enrolled, or plans to enroll at Florida State University and her school and community activities include basketball, track and field, National Honor Society, tutor and Soup Kitchen volunteer. Applicants for the 2013 program were required to maintain a 3.0 grade point average, participate in voluntary school and community activities, demonstrate leadership qualities and write an essay on discuss in detail how one of the First Ladies (since 1933) has made an impact on a social issue in the United States.Ž Manufacturers and organizations that do business with the commissary system funded the scholarships with money ordinarily used for various other contests and promotions. Janays scholarship at Tinker AFB was funded through the generosity of Reynolds Consumer products. The Fisher House Foundation administers the Scholarships for Military Children Program through Scholarship Managers, which is a professional scholarship management services organization. Fisher House is known for building military comfort homes near military medical facilities. As in prior years, the level of competition continues to be very keen. As in all prior years, the caliber of the applicants continues to be a step above those students who apply to the many other scholarship programs we administer,Ž says President of Scholarship Managers Bernard T. Cote. A healthier you is the “rst step to a healthy baby.To get tips for a healthy pregnancy, visit www.text4baby.org. Find parenting resources at www.ounce.org. Baby steps to better health can deliver big results. Before, during and even after pregnancy, take a multivitamin containing folic acid every day, get regular medical checkups and screenings, and maintain a healthy weight with daily physical activity and a balanced diet. Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsFrom FSU Sports InformationSummer league baseball is in full swing across the nation and several Seminoles have already seen action in their respective leagues. John Nogowski of Tallahassee, Fla.) is coming off a fantastic week in which he hit .448 (13-for-29) with seven runs, “ ve RBI, two doubles, one triple and one home run in leading the Amsterdam Mohawks of the Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League to a 5-2 mark. For his efforts, Nogowski was named PGCBL Player of the Week. In the Cape Cod League, Jose Brizuela of Weston and DJ Stewart of Yulee are off to a fast start at the plate as both Seminoles are hitting over .380 through “ ve games. Brizuela is batting .444 (8-for-18) with six runs, “ ve RBI, one double and two triples for the Brewster Whitecaps, while Stewart is pacing the Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox with a .381 average (8-for-21), with four runs, four RBI and four doubles. Freshman Kenny Burkhead has made three starts for the Sanford River Rats of the Florida Collegiate League and has posted a 2-1 record with a 2.50 ERA. Burkhead is coming off an 8.0-inning complete game on June 23 as he allowed two runs on six hits in a tough 2-0 loss to the DeLand Suns. The right hander from Deltona has worked 18.0 innings over his three starts allowing “ ve runs on 15 hits with two walks and six strikeouts. The USA Baseball Collegiate National Team opened its preseason tour of the Coastal Plain League with a 1-0 victory over Peninsula on Saturday, June 22. Luke Weaver got the start for Team USA and tossed 4.1 scoreless innings allowing just two in“ eld hits and no walks while striking out seven. Here is a look at how the Seminoles are performing this summer: Alaska Baseball League Billy Strode, Peninsula Oilers … No appearances Dylan Silva, Peninsula Oilers … No appearances (play begins 6/19/13) Cape Cod League Jose Brizuela, Brewster Whitecaps … 5G, .444 (8-18), 6 R, 5 RBI, 1 2B, 2 3B Brandon Leibrandt, Brewster Whitecaps … 1G, 0-0, 9.00 ERA, 1.0 IP, 3 H, 1 ER, 0 BB, 1 SO Bryant Holtmann, Hyannis Harbor Hawks … 1G, 0-0, 0.00 ERA, 1.0 IP, 2 H, 0 ER, 0 BB, 1 SO DJ Stewart, Yarmouth-Dennis Red Sox … 5G, .381 (8-21), 4 R, 4 RBI, 4 2B (play begins 6/12/13) Coastal Plain League Lee Howard, Columbia Blow“ sh … 2G, .250 (1-4) (play began 5/29/13) Florida Collegiate League Kenny Burkhead, Sanford River Rats … 3 GS, 2-1, 2.50 ERA, 18.0 IP, 15 H, 5 ER, 2 BB, 6 SO (play begins 6/12/13) Northwoods League Brandon Johnson, Alexandria Blue Anchors … 1G, 1-0, 0.00 ERA, 2.0 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 0 BB, 2 SO (play began 5/29/13) Perfect Game Collegiate Baseball League John Nogowski, Amsterdam Mohawks … 14G, .383 (18-47), 9 R, 5 RBI, 3 2B, 1 3B, 1 HR John Sansone, Amsterdam Mohawks … 7G, .250 (6-24), 1 R, 2 RBI, 1 2B (play began 6/5/13) Team USA Luke Weaver … 1 GS, 0-0, 0.00 ERA, 4.1 IP, 2 H, 0 ER, 0 BB, 7 SO (camp begins 6/21/13) Stay tuned to Seminoles. com throughout the summer for further updates on the Boys of Summer. As always, Seminole fans can follow the Noles on twitter @FSU_Baseball and remember to like the Seminoles on Facebook (www. facebook.com/FSUBaseball). THE COOL DOWN LAPSeminole baseball summer updateBy ALAN ROSSThe month of June should start with the letter WŽ for Martin Truex Jr. It was 218 races in coming, but the Michael Waltrip Racing driver “ nally notched his second career Cup victory Sunday, cycling into the winning pit-stop strategy early to win the Toyota Save Mart 350 at the twisting, elevationchanging road layout of Sonoma Raceway. His previous one and only win? A June ride across the “ nish line at Dover six years ago, back in 2007. It was our day,Ž said Truex Jr., the lap leader, with 51. Weve had a lot of days that were not our day.Ž Early on, it was all pole-sitter Marcos Ambrose. The Tasmanian driver with the road-racing pedigree stormed to the front and held onto the premier spot until passed by Kurt Busch on Lap 19 of the 110-lap tour of the northern California vineyard countryside. Jeff Gordon got burned when the races second caution flag came out on Lap 24, just a second before he crossed the commitment cone onto pit road. The 24 car had to restart 37th and its day appeared done. Busch, going for what appeared to be a two-stop strategy, held off pitting until Lap 36. He probably wished he hadnt. Busch got busted for speeding on pit lane (twice during the afternoon!) and just like that, his race too suddenly seemed over. With 30 to go, a caution created decisions up and down pit road. The top 15 cars, including leader Truex Jr., wound up staying out on track, gambling that theyd make it the rest of the way, and most importantly, not wanting to yield track position with the race in its latter stages. But a host of cars, headed by Gordon, pitted for fresh tires and fuel. With 25 to go, Truex Jr. took the restart. Gordon, meanwhile, clearly resurfaced, picking off spots right and left through the “ eld before roaring to a secondplace “ nish. Lo and behold Kurt Busch, long left for dead, crossed the line in fourth place, both cars producing the most remarkable comebacks of the afternoon. Jimmie Johnson, a ninth-place finisher at Sonoma, holds a 25-point lead over Carl Edwards in the points race, as the Cuppers descend on Sparta, Kentucky, this Saturday night. IOWA CORN INDY 250: Pole-sitter James Hinchcliffe won his third IndyCar race of 2013, completely dominating the Iowa Corn Indy 250 Sunday. Graham Rahal gave Hinchcliffe the only challenge at the .875-mile Iowa Speedway tri-oval. On the restart following the third caution with 90 laps to go in the 250-lap race, Rahal brie” y took the lead but ultimately failed to hold off the stronger car of Hinchcliffe. With 35 laps remaining, interim leader Ed Carpenter was delayed on pit road by a slow tire change and Hinchcliffe easily regained the lead in the cycling changeover. Defending series champion Ryan HunterReay then slipped into second place, and with 16 laps left, it was Andretti Autosport … the years unquestioned superior team in IndyCar … running 1 and 2. But Hunter-Reay got hung up in traf“ c with eight laps left, and Hinchcliffe breezed to victory, Andretti Autosports “ fth triumph in seven races this season. Helio Castroneves, an eighth-place “ nisher at Iowa, maintains a ninepoint series points lead over Hunter-Reay, as IndyCar picks up in Pocono a fortnight from now.Read Alan Ross article on the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2013 in Lindys Sports 2013 Pro Football Preview at newsstands everywhere. His email is alanross_ sports@yahoo.com.Truex Jr. ends second longest winless drought in NASCAR history; Hinchcliffe wins at Iowa SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Gloria GuindonMay 2013 WinnerHer name was drawn fromƒI was so surprised, I have been entering at all of the restaurants since this “rst started. We eat at these restaurants and enjoy them all!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! w C C Coastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken n t Eat DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. 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Carey & Jones • Genghis • Gulf Coast Lumber • Harbor Point Realty • Hicks Hea ng & Air • Pearl Izumi • Rogers-Gunter-Vaughn Insurance • Savannah’s Restaurant • Sun Tire • St. Marks Powder • Tallahassee Auto Museum • Tallahassee Orthopedic Clinic • TMH Diabetes Center • Dr. Quill Turk • Wakulla Medical CenterOn Race Day, Make Checks Payable to: Wakulla High School Cross CountryONLINE REGISTRATION:www.raceit.com/Register/?event=20879 or www.gulfwinds.org/Calendar/2013%20Calendar/Calendar%202013.asp Wakulla High School Cross Country Boosters Freedom 5K and 1 Mile Run/WalkWakulla Springs State Park Date: June 29, 2013 Time: 5K 8:00 a.m. 1 Mile 9:00 a.m. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsFrom DEP NewsGov. Rick Scott, along with the Florida Cabinet, approved innovative techniques to support the oyster fisheries in Franklin County. Im proud to support efforts that can help Franklin County,Ž Scott said. Our Florida Families First budget provides $4.7 million for water quality restoration projects in the Apalachicola Bay estuary and oyster shelling and research to help the industry recover. These new techniques will support the oyster “ sheries and help Florida families in Apalachicola.Ž For more than 20 years, the State of Florida has battled Georgia and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers over water that ” ows south from the Chattahoochee River into the Apalachicola River and Bay. Historically low water levels brought about by Georgias excessive consumption have caused oysters to die because of higher salinity in the Bay and increased disease and predator intrusion. Scott said, The Cabinets action today allows Spring Creek Oyster Co., operating within Alligator Harbor Aquatic Preserve in Franklin County, to modify two existing aquaculture leases in order to use the full water column for oyster harvesting. Currently, the company uses the submerged land bottom to conduct oyster cultivation by placing young oysters in cages at the bottom of the waterbody. Once the oysters mature, the cages are removed and oysters harvested. Allowing the company to use the full water column will allow the cages to be suspended above the bottom, providing the oysters some protection from predators and greater access to nutrients as they grow. The ” oating cages may be the initial step in a new aquaculture practice and may become a potential alternative economic stimulus for the eastern bounds of Apalachicola Bay, which historically has produced 90 percent of the oysters in Florida and 10 percent of the nations supply. Allowing use of the full water column is the only change to Spring Creek Oyster Co.s two aquaculture leases, which expire Jan. 29, 2022 and March 29, 2022. The company is a current submerged land leaseholder and is in compliance with the terms and conditions of two existing leases and the Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services aquaculture best management practices. Both the Department of Environmental Protection and Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services have reviewed the proposed modi“ cation to the existing leases and determined that the activities will not result in adverse impacts to seagrasses, existing shell“ sh beds, natural reefs or other sensitive habitats.ŽLease approved for innovative oystering techniqueInnovative oyster process could rejuvenate Apalachicola Bay industry KIDS FISHING EQUIPMENTThe big fishing tackle us adults use can be difficult for kids to use. Ultralight push button or spin casting are ideal and much more durable than those cute little cheap combos. These downsized rigs are easy for small kids to hold and are relatively tangle free. Best of all, they make even a small sunfish feel like a whopper. Starting a child right means using decent, functional tackle. Anything less performs poorly and invites discouragement. Find an ultralight combo with a soft tip which means easy casting and a reel that handles 4-pound test line well and has a smooth drag. The price is usually around $30 which isnt too bad either. Most important from the youngster's view is that it works, it fits, and its fun. Now go find a place where they can catch a mess of perch or bullhead catfish and youll have a kid hooked on fishing. Jimmy Houston is host of Jimmy Houston OutdoorsŽ For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on News & Tips From FWC NewsThis report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of June 14-20 in the Northwest Region, but it does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. LEON COUNTY: Investigator James Bryant was patrolling Luther Hall Landing Boat Ramp when he observed a pickup truck traveling northbound pulling a vessel trailer with an expired registration and no operating taillights. Bryant conducted a traf“ c stop. He made contact with the driver and after identifying the subject, Bryant learned that he had just been released from prison seven months earlier for felony battery and narcotics sales, and was currently on felony probation. A routine records check confirmed the subjects driver license was suspended, and he was classi“ ed as a habitual traffic offender. Bryant placed the subject under arrest for felony driving while license suspended and habitual traffic offender. The individual was transported to the Leon County Jail. BAY COUNTY: Officer Karl Hellett received a complaint of subjects consuming alcohol and shark “ shing from the St. Andrews State Park pier. Of“ cer Hellett arrived at the pier at midnight and found eight subjects shark “ shing. He observed four of the subjects consuming alcohol and inquired if they had permits to be in the park after hours. The subjects could not produce any permits. Once at the parking lot, he asked for identification from all eight subjects. One of the subjects, who Of“ cer Hellett knew from past experiences, stated he did not have any identification. This subject left the park before Of“ cer Hellett completed his inquiry. He issued citations to the four subjects he observed consuming alcohol and written warnings to all seven of the subjects for remaining in a closed state park without a permit. Of“ cer Hellett knew the name of the subject who left the park and where he worked. Two days later, Hellett assisted by officers Michael Goodwin and James Moore, went to the subjects place of employment. They waited for the subject to get off work and arrested him for resisting without violence. The subject was also cited for being in a closed state park without a permit. The man was transported to the Bay County Jail. € Lt. Leamon Keen, Of“ cers Jim Moore and Warren Walsingham responded to a complaint of a subject who jumped from the Hathaway Bridge. Of“ cer Walsingham launched his vessel at the Carl Grey Park Boat Ramp and transported a Bay County sheriffs of“ ce supervisor to the area under the bridge where the subject landed. Lt. Keen and Of“ cer Moore arrived by vessel to the scene and found the deputy standing near the deceased victim on a concrete platform under the center span of the bridge. Lieutenant Keen and Of“ cer Moore assisted the sheriffs of“ ce by obtaining contact information from witnesses in two vessels who were “ shing near the center span when the subject jumped. € Of“ cer Warren Walsingham observed a subject fishing from a kayak in the Burnt Mill Creek Boat Ramp area. When the subject approached the ramp, Of“ cer Walsingham engaged the subject in conversation and asked him if he had caught any “ sh. The subject stated he caught one redfish, and began loading his kayak into his truck. As he was storing his gear, Officer Walsingham saw him stow a “ llet knife and also noticed the subject appeared nervous and rushed. Of“ cer Walsingham identi“ ed himself as an FWC Of“ cer and checked the mans catch. The individual had a legal redfish and was asked if he had any more “ sh. The subject stated he did not. While checking the cooler bag that contained the legal red“ sh, Of“ cer Walsingham found two redfish fillets. The subject admitted he knew he couldnt have “ llets on the water and thats why he did not tell the truth. The subject was cited for failure to land red drum in whole condition. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Of“ cer Kenneth Manning received a call from Alabama Marine Resources requesting assistance with a net case. A net boat was observed fishing in the Gulf of Mexico just off the beach at the state line. Of“ cer Manning quickly responded to the area, began searching for the vessel and located the 28-foot homemade vessel moored at the Bayou Grande Marina on Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola. Of“ cer Manning alerted the Navy Security Forces and, within minutes, was noti“ ed three adult males on foot were apprehended. Lt. Dan Hahr, and of“ cers Faris Livesay and James Rockwell responded to the area to assist with the investigation. Lt. Hahr and Of“ cer Manning interviewed the subjects and were initially told they had been towed into the marina after having engine trouble. Of“ cers with Alabama Marine Resources located a piece of a mono“ lament gill net that was left behind by the net “ shermen. The vessel owner admitted that he had a net in his boat, but claimed that he was shark “ shing in federal waters as he was permitted to do. The of“ cers continued to interview the owner and obtained a confession that he had been “ shing in Alabama waters very near to the Florida line, but was spooked by witnesses, cut the net, and then ” ed to the Pensacola Pass. The subjects located a place to park their boat and got a ride. The of“ cers located two mono“ lament gill nets in the boat. One of the nets was wet and contained approximately 75 pounds of coastal “ sh including blue runner, Spanish mackerel, blue fish, and one blue crab. The larger net was estimated to be approximately 20,000 square feet. The vessel owner was arrested and charged with two felony counts of possession of a mono“ lament entangling net (flagrant violation), two counts of carriage of illegal nets across state waters, and two counts of possession of a net that was not marked as required. The man was booked at the Escambia County Sheriffs Of“ ce. He and the other two subjects onboard were issued notices to appear in front of a Federal Magistrate for unlawful entry onto a military base for unlawful purposes. Of“ cers with Alabama Marine Resources are conducting an investigation regarding net fishing without a license and additional charges are pending.FWC Law Enforcement operations Ill show you how a life insurance policy with living bene“ts can help your family with both long-term and short-term needs. We put the life back in life insurance.’ CALL ME TODAY. It can also provide for today. Insuring your life helps protect their future. State Farm Life Insurance Company (Not licensed in MA, NY or WI) State Farm Life and Accident Assurance Company (Licensed in NY and WI) Bloomington, IL1311023 Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla@gaylaparks.com www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health € Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04

PAGE 12

Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiences Dive equipment repair. One of the hot topics of debate is equipment servicing. Regulators for example, that device that delivers breathing gas to the diver at ambient pressure, is considered to be life support equipment. The buoyancy compensator has been lumped into the same category. These products have been sold under manufacturer guidelines to be serviced annually. Some manufacturers, like Atomic Aquatics, are backing their service intervals down to 200 dives or two years, whichever comes “ rst. But many assumptions exist. Numerous manufacturers are no longer in business. Dacor is a classic example of a company that closed its doors after ” ooding the market with very good regulators. Some of their replaceable components can now be sourced by third parties but many dive stores wont service due to liability concerns (no manufacturer to blame). Even the companies who specialize in just servicing regulators, usually for dive stores, wont touch these discontinued models. Many stores offer plans to restore these vintageŽ or discontinued regulators under the condition that they not be used for life support, that is to say … you put them on display only. What exactly is happening to your equipment when it is being servicedŽ? How much should it cost? Is the person servicing your equipment both quali“ ed and certi“ ed to do so? Is the store that is servicing it a dealer for it and able to get parts? Is servicing really necessary? These are ALL things you, the diver, should be asking when you bring a piece of equipment in for service or repair. When a regulator (or any dive equipment) is brought in for service it should “ rst be inspected for obvious signs of corrosion and/or damage. The hose protectors should be pulled back to inspect the hoses and then the regulator should be function tested. In many cases the regulator is probably functioning just “ ne. It may need a tuning, but chances are good that if you care for it then the machine is operational. If an unquali“ ed technician takes it apart there is a good chance they could damage it internally or that it will perform worse than when you dropped it off. Its imperative that you discuss your use of the equipment with the technician and make sure they are quali“ ed and in stock of most, if not all, service parts. The delay from having to order a part can be signi“ cant. The scuba world doesnt follow the trends set by automotive parts stores so there arent any warehouses a few cities away offering next day shipment of critical components. Inside your average scuba regulator is little more than an organized arrangement of O-rings and some seating surfaces. The seats consist of a soft, plastic like, sealing surfaces. Over time the soft seats can wear and this allows a leak past the ori“ ce. The O-rings can dry out and crack or diaphragms can be eaten by roaches. A standard service consists of disassembly, cleaning, replacing these rubber components with new ones, and adding a bit of lube to dynamic seals. Its extremely basic to work on, but knowing how to troubleshoot an issue and properly tune them for optimal breathing is critical. As a diver its ultimately your responsibility to make sure your equipment, including regulators, cylinders, valves, and buoyancy compensators are in good working condition. Its also your due diligence to be informed about the workings of your speci“ c equipment so that you can best make decisions about how, when, and where it is serviced. Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies On Saturday, Auxiliary members Duane and Carolyn Treadon and Tim Ashley drove over to the Naval Air Station in Pensacola for the Summer Division Meeting. Duane Treadon attended as Flotilla Commander for Flotilla 12, Carolyn Treadon is the Division secretary and Tim Ashley is the Division “ nance staff of“ cer. Flotillas on the western side of our area are much closer to military bases and have established a great working relationship with them. This allows us as an auxiliary to utilize meeting space and interact with the active duty. In addition to the Divisions leadership, Commander Gordon Schmidt and Vice Commander Eric DeVuyst, we were lucky to be joined by Commander Russell Hellstern from DIRAUX, 8CR Commodore Larry King and District Capt. East Mo Davis. Commander Hellstern shared with us the impact that budget cuts have had on the active duty as well as the auxiliary. He challenged us to do our best to maximize our assets and utilize our resources to the best of our ability. Commodore King addressed to everyone the importance of mentoring new members and maintaining communication to ensure that all members are able to get from the Auxiliary what they hoped for when joining. If we dont take time to talk to people, he said, we are not operating effectively and cannot complete our mission to the fullest of our ability. District Capt. East Mo Davis talked about hurricane season, ensuring that we are all prepared to respond if needed. As an Auxiliary, we are often “ rst responders when the active duty are responding to other emergencies. Especially in an area like ours where the station is so far away. Throughout the meeting, we were lucky to catch sight of various practice ” ights in different formations. For those of us who do not see it regularly, it was a real treat. In addition to the Division meeting this past weekend, the Auxiliary had another major event … we celebrated our 74th birthday on June 23, 2013! As we all left the Naval Air Station, there were community members, “ re trucks, police, sheriff, and other emergency personnel were lining the streets. We later found out that it was for Army Staff Sgt. Jesse Thomas, 31, who was killed June 10 while serving in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. It was a reminder of the many sacri“ ces that are made every day that allow us to have our freedom. We offer our sincerest condolences to the family and friends of Staff Sgt. Thomas. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Be a beacon for safe boating and be prepared!Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton PHOTOS BY CAROLYN TREADON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCommander Russell Hellstern and Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon. Jets ” y over the Pensacola Naval Air Station. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jun 27, 13 Fri Jun 28, 13 Sat Jun 29, 13 Sun Jun 30, 13 Mon Jul 1, 13 Tue Jul 2, 13 Wed Jul 3, 13 Date 3.4 ft. 6:00 AM 2.5 ft. 12:19 AM High 1.2 ft. 11:35 AM 0.3 ft. 12:20 AM 0.8 ft. 12:58 AM 1.2 ft. 1:37 AM 1.6 ft. 2:24 AM 1.9 ft. 3:23 AM 2.0 ft. 4:34 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:34 PM 3.3 ft. 6:37 AM 3.3 ft. 7:16 AM 3.2 ft. 8:01 AM 3.2 ft. 8:56 AM 3.3 ft. 10:03 AM 3.3 ft. 11:11 AM High 1.2 ft. 12:32 PM 1.2 ft. 1:39 PM 1.2 ft. 3:02 PM 1.0 ft. 4:32 PM 0.7 ft. 5:50 PM 0.5 ft. 6:48 PM Low 3.2 ft. 6:30 PM 2.8 ft. 7:39 PM 2.5 ft. 9:13 PM 2.4 ft. 10:59 PM High Thu Jun 27, 13 Fri Jun 28, 13 Sat Jun 29, 13 Sun Jun 30, 13 Mon Jul 1, 13 Tue Jul 2, 13 Wed Jul 3, 13 Date 2.6 ft. 5:52 AM 1.9 ft. 12:11 AM High 0.9 ft. 11:46 AM 0.2 ft. 12:31 AM 0.6 ft. 1:09 AM 0.9 ft. 1:48 AM 1.2 ft. 2:35 AM 1.4 ft. 3:34 AM 1.4 ft. 4:45 AM Low 2.8 ft. 5:26 PM 2.5 ft. 6:29 AM 2.5 ft. 7:08 AM 2.4 ft. 7:53 AM 2.4 ft. 8:48 AM 2.4 ft. 9:55 AM 2.5 ft. 11:03 AM High 0.9 ft. 12:43 PM 0.9 ft. 1:50 PM 0.8 ft. 3:13 PM 0.7 ft. 4:43 PM 0.5 ft. 6:01 PM 0.4 ft. 6:59 PM Low 2.4 ft. 6:22 PM 2.1 ft. 7:31 PM 1.9 ft. 9:05 PM 1.8 ft. 10:51 PM High Thu Jun 27, 13 Fri Jun 28, 13 Sat Jun 29, 13 Sun Jun 30, 13 Mon Jul 1, 13 Tue Jul 2, 13 Wed Jul 3, 13 Date 2.4 ft. 12:55 AM High -0.1 ft. 12:46 AM 0.3 ft. 1:24 AM 0.7 ft. 2:02 AM 1.1 ft. 2:41 AM 1.5 ft. 3:28 AM 1.7 ft. 4:27 AM 1.8 ft. 5:38 AM Low 3.2 ft. 6:36 AM 3.1 ft. 7:13 AM 3.1 ft. 7:52 AM 3.0 ft. 8:37 AM 3.0 ft. 9:32 AM 3.0 ft. 10:39 AM 3.1 ft. 11:47 AM High 1.1 ft. 12:39 PM 1.1 ft. 1:36 PM 1.1 ft. 2:43 PM 1.0 ft. 4:06 PM 0.9 ft. 5:36 PM 0.7 ft. 6:54 PM 0.4 ft. 7:52 PM Low 3.4 ft. 6:10 PM 3.0 ft. 7:06 PM 2.6 ft. 8:15 PM 2.3 ft. 9:49 PM 2.3 ft. 11:35 PM High Thu Jun 27, 13 Fri Jun 28, 13 Sat Jun 29, 13 Sun Jun 30, 13 Mon Jul 1, 13 Tue Jul 2, 13 Wed Jul 3, 13 Date 2.7 ft. 5:44 AM 2.6 ft. 6:21 AM 2.0 ft. 12:03 AM High 1.2 ft. 11:14 AM 1.2 ft. 12:11 PM 0.8 ft. 12:37 AM 1.2 ft. 1:16 AM 1.6 ft. 2:03 AM 1.8 ft. 3:02 AM 1.9 ft. 4:13 AM Low 2.9 ft. 5:18 PM 2.5 ft. 6:14 PM 2.6 ft. 7:00 AM 2.5 ft. 7:45 AM 2.5 ft. 8:40 AM 2.5 ft. 9:47 AM 2.6 ft. 10:55 AM High 0.3 ft. 11:59 PM 1.2 ft. 1:18 PM 1.1 ft. 2:41 PM 1.0 ft. 4:11 PM 0.7 ft. 5:29 PM 0.5 ft. 6:27 PM Low 2.2 ft. 7:23 PM 2.0 ft. 8:57 PM 1.9 ft. 10:43 PM High Thu Jun 27, 13 Fri Jun 28, 13 Sat Jun 29, 13 Sun Jun 30, 13 Mon Jul 1, 13 Tue Jul 2, 13 Wed Jul 3, 13 Date 3.5 ft. 5:57 AM 2.6 ft. 12:16 AM High 1.3 ft. 11:32 AM 0.4 ft. 12:17 AM 0.9 ft. 12:55 AM 1.3 ft. 1:34 AM 1.7 ft. 2:21 AM 2.0 ft. 3:20 AM 2.1 ft. 4:31 AM Low 3.7 ft. 5:31 PM 3.4 ft. 6:34 AM 3.4 ft. 7:13 AM 3.3 ft. 7:58 AM 3.3 ft. 8:53 AM 3.3 ft. 10:00 AM 3.4 ft. 11:08 AM High 1.3 ft. 12:29 PM 1.3 ft. 1:36 PM 1.2 ft. 2:59 PM 1.1 ft. 4:29 PM 0.8 ft. 5:47 PM 0.5 ft. 6:45 PM Low 3.3 ft. 6:27 PM 2.9 ft. 7:36 PM 2.5 ft. 9:10 PM 2.5 ft. 10:56 PM High Thu Jun 27, 13 Fri Jun 28, 13 Sat Jun 29, 13 Sun Jun 30, 13 Mon Jul 1, 13 Tue Jul 2, 13 Wed Jul 3, 13 Date 2.5 ft. 6:45 AM 2.6 ft. 7:11 AM 1.9 ft. 12:07 AM 2.1 ft. 1:57 AM High 1.3 ft. 11:18 AM 1.1 ft. 12:30 PM 0.6 ft. 12:24 AM 0.9 ft. 12:57 AM 1.2 ft. 1:32 AM 1.5 ft. 2:15 AM 1.7 ft. 3:20 AM Low 2.6 ft. 5:10 PM 2.3 ft. 6:22 PM 2.6 ft. 7:37 AM 2.7 ft. 8:06 AM 2.8 ft. 8:38 AM 2.9 ft. 9:13 AM 2.9 ft. 9:54 AM High 0.3 ft. 11:49 PM 0.9 ft. 1:48 PM 0.6 ft. 3:04 PM 0.4 ft. 4:14 PM 0.1 ft. 5:15 PM -0.0 ft. 6:08 PM Low 2.0 ft. 7:49 PM 1.8 ft. 9:42 PM High Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJune 27 July 3First July 15 Full July 22 Last June 29 New July 7Major Times 5:18 AM 7:18 AM 5:43 PM 7:43 PM Minor Times --:---:-11:16 AM 12:16 PM Major Times 6:08 AM 8:08 AM 6:32 PM 8:32 PM Minor Times 12:02 AM 1:02 AM 12:17 PM 1:17 PM Major Times 6:56 AM 8:56 AM 7:20 PM 9:20 PM Minor Times 12:39 AM 1:39 AM 1:16 PM 2:16 PM Major Times 7:43 AM 9:43 AM 8:06 PM 10:06 PM Minor Times 1:16 AM 2:16 AM 2:13 PM 3:13 PM Major Times 8:29 AM 10:29 AM 8:52 PM 10:52 PM Minor Times 1:52 AM 2:52 AM 3:10 PM 4:10 PM Major Times 9:16 AM 11:16 AM 9:39 PM 11:39 PM Minor Times 2:29 AM 3:29 AM 4:04 PM 5:04 PM Major Times 10:03 AM 12:03 PM 10:26 PM 12:26 AM Minor Times 3:09 AM 4:09 AM 4:58 PM 5:58 PM Average Average Average Average Average Average+ Average6:38 am 8:42 pm --:-11:17 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:38 am 8:42 pm 12:04 am 12:18 pm 6:38 am 8:42 pm 12:41 am 1:17 pm 6:39 am 8:42 pm 1:17 am 2:15 pm 6:39 am 8:42 pm 1:53 am 3:11 pm 6:40 am 8:42 pm 2:30 am 4:05 pm 6:40 am 8:42 pm 3:10 am 4:59 pm70% 63% 56% 49% 43% 37% 30% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

PAGE 13

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 13A On June 12, Deputy Clint Beam and Detective Derek Lawhon assisted the Tallahassee Police Department with an ongoing investigation that included a stop in Crawfordville. The Wakulla deputies detained two individuals who were wanted for questioning over the sale of items to pawn shops. Tallahassee Police entered into a mutual aid agreement and joined the investigation in Crawfordville. Investigators seized items from the suspect vehicle after being given consent to search by the owner. The suspects allegedly attempted to fraudulently sell property to the Crawfordville business owner at a higher value. Evidence was collected at the scene for a possible Wakulla case and Tallahassee Police took the suspects back to their of“ ce for questioning and additional investigation. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: JUNE 13 € Charlie W. Palmer of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Tools and equipment were stolen from the victims garage. The property is valued at $650. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € Scott Gaby of Crawfordville reported an animal incident. The victim observed his terrier shot on the side of the road. Gaby was able to take the animal for medical treatment and a .22 caliber round was removed from the dog. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Deputy Stephen Simmons responded to an impaired driver complaint on U.S. Highway 98 in Medart. Fred Warren Bradford Jr., 33, of Panacea was operating a moped scooter and had an active arrest warrant. Deputy Simmons approached Bradford at a convenience store and he allegedly refused to comply with commands upon his arrest. Deputy Simmons and Sgt. Lorne Whaley gained compliance from Bradford on the ground. During the search of the subject, 1.9 grams of marijuana and a bottle of alcohol were allegedly recovered from his person. Later, Bradford was reportedly unruly toward jail staff and had to be restrained. He was served with an arrest warrant for arson of an unoccupied dwelling and was also arrested for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana, driving while license is suspended or revoked third or subsequent time and resisting arrest without violence. € A Woodville man reported that a friend of his former wife in Crawfordville shared pornographic photographs and videos on an iPod with his 10-year-old daughter. The Department of Children and Families was notified. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Joey Wimberly of Crawfordville reported finding a bicycle on a wood line adjacent to Bridlewood apartments. The bike had not been reported missing and was transported to the WCSO Property Division for storage. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. JUNE 14 € A Sopchoppy motorist reported a four-wheeler in the ditch at 699 Sopchoppy Highway. Deputy Will Hudson determined that the machine had been tampered with. Lt. Jimmy Sessor loaded the vehicle into his patrol unit and transported it to the WCSO Impound Yard until an owner can be determined. € Melissa Dodson of Walgreens reported the theft of a prepaid cell phone from the store. The subject took the phone off the counter and left without paying for it. The phone is valued at $30. Deputies searched the area for the suspect vehicle and Detective Rick Buckley stopped the motorist a short time later. Henry Grady Robertson, 40, of Lanark Village was arrested for retail theft. The phone was recovered. A male subject in the vehicle was consuming an alcoholic beverage and was on probation with a no-alcohol condition in his probation. WCSO deputies contacted his probation of“ cer during the case follow-up. Lt. Jimmy Sessor also investigated. € Christy Chaires of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a go-cart from her property. The go-cart is valued at $350. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated and searched the area with negative results. € Jon Berryman of Tallahassee reported a vehicle burglary in Crawfordville. The victim was leading rescue training for college students at the Lost Creek Bridge when his vehicle was entered. A window was smashed and an iPad and a storage bag were stolen from the vehicle. The property is valued at $350 and the iPad was entered into the NCIC/ FCIC data base. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Henderson H. Herring of Crawfordville reported a burglary to his vehicle and home. The vehicle was not locked and golf clubs were stolen. A forced entry was observed at the home. Paperwork and coins were reported stolen. The value of the stolen property is $1,876. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy David Pienta investigated. € Michael D. Cherry of Tallahassee was injured in a “ ght at the County Line Bar. A witness reported that Cherry walked into the middle of a “ ght between two men in the parking lot and was knocked unconscious. The two fighting men left the scene before law enforcement arrived and Cherry was transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for treatment of his injuries. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. JUNE 15 € Brandon Eugene Harrell, 26, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for disorderly conduct following a “ ght at Captain Seaniles Bar. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks issued the notice to Harrell after locating him at Dux Lounge in Crawfordville. € Timmy Hills of USA Grocery in Crawfordville reported a retail theft. A suspect, who has been identified, came into the business and took a 12 pack of beer without paying for it. The beer is valued at $13. The suspect left the scene in a vehicle. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Ronnette Tye of Sopchoppy reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed. The victim observed the loss of medications, cash, a knife and a beverage, valued at $135. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. JUNE 16 € Elizabeth Noble of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A suspect, who has been identified, damaged the victims cell phone and vehicle dashboard. Damage to the vehicle is estimated at $800 and damage to the phone is estimated at $150. Efforts to locate the suspect in the area of the call were unsuccessful. The suspect has active warrants. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Annie Francis of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. During the early morning hours, the victim reported someone throwing a rock at her living room window. The window was observed damaged and a rock was located nearby. Damage was estimated at $300. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Kaylynn Crum of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. A suspect used the victims card without her authorization. The victim noted approximately $100 had been withdrawn from her card. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Deputy Ward Kromer responded to a disturbance at the Lake Ellen Boat Ramp. Deputy Kromer observed several individuals including an injured 24-year-old Crawfordville man. Due to con” icting statements and inconsistent accounts the primary aggressor could not be determined. EMS treated the injured male. The rest of the group involved in the con” ict were separated and told to leave the area. JUNE 17 € Detective Rob Giddens investigated a suspicious vehicle at Lost Creek Bridge. Due to the vehicle being partially on the roadway and obstructing traf“ c, the vehicle was towed. Efforts to contact the owner of the vehicle, Kenneth Wayne Davis of Crawfordville, were unsuccessful. € Patricia Antill of Tallahassee reported a theft at Lake Ellen Baptist Church Cemetery. Several ceramic pieces and a birdhouse were stolen from the victims parents gravesites. The property is valued at $100. Sgt. Billy Jones investigated. € Clara Bottorf of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. The medications are valued at $50 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € Catherine McCarthy of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and the home was ransacked. Jewelry and utensils were reported missing. The stolen property is valued at $308. Damage to the home was estimated at $200. Detective Rob Giddens investigated. € Terry Land of Crawfordville reported the theft of a four-wheeler, two gasoline cans and a helmet. The property was stolen from the victims pole barn. The fourwheeler, gas cans and the helmet are valued at $690. The four-wheeler was entered in the NCIC/ FCIC data base. Detective Nick Boutwell investigated. € Deputy Scott Rojas was contacted by management at the Landing Motel about recovering drug paraphernalia in a room. The paraphernalia was collected from the location and placed into the Evidence Division for destruction at a later date. € Glenda McCarthy of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims glass storm door was broken. Damage was estimated at $150. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Harold Holland of Winn-Dixie reported a retail theft. A 15-year-old female was observed allegedly attempting to walk out the door without paying for cough drops. The products were valued at $16. The female was issued a notice to appear in court and a trespass warning for Winn-Dixie. The teenager was turned over to her mother. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. JUNE 19 € James Osgood of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary at a home at which he is serving as caretaker. A forced entry was discovered at the home. The home was mostly empty due to the homeowner moving out of state. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € Caleb Wynn of Hibbett Sports in Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone scrawled markings on the store windows. Blackout “ lm was damaged by the markings. The estimated damage is between $500 and $800. Lt. Bruce Ashley investigated. JUNE 20 € Joshua Roddenberry of Crawfordville reported the loss of his wallet. The victim believes it was lost during his time carrying out his work duties at Wakulla Correctional Institution. The wallet and contents are valued at $50. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Khaytelyn Borden of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief in Crawfordville. A suspect put paint and spaghetti sauce on the victims belongings outside a home. A verbal altercation resulted in some of the paint and spaghetti sauce getting on the victims vehicle. The damage estimate for the victims property is $300. Michael Thomas Salter, 24, of Crawfordville was arrested for criminal mischief and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. € Wal-Mart employees reported a male with blood on his hands and a female with blood on her face in the parking lot. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Alan Middlebrooks spoke to the two individuals and determined that the injuries were a result of separate and unrelated incidents as a result of consuming alcohol. The two said they were not in a physical altercation with each other and the case was closed. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 988 calls for service during the past week including 12 business and residential alarms; 107 citizen contacts; 17 disturbances; 23 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 9 E-911 abandoned calls; 21 regular E-911 calls; 55 investigations; 12 juvenile citizen contacts; 55 medical emergencies; 295 business and residential security checks; 41 special details; 27 subpoena services; 11 suspicious vehicles; 10 thefts; 10 traf“ c enforcements; 82 traf“ c stops; 12 disabled vehicles; and 19 reckless vehicles.reports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 DO YOU KNOW Thomas Clark a/k/a PuddŽ or The Cabinet Shop? If you do, please call or email 850-510-6658 jcwst@comcast.net Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, June 21 … After a weekend where Democrats expressed confidence that they could beat Gov. Rick Scott in 2014, a pair of events this week sent them a stark reminder of a bromide that approaches clich: In politics, 17 months is a lifetime. On Tuesday, a public poll showed Scotts approval rating improving -not enough to give him a lead on some of his possible Democratic opponents, but enough to give him a chance to put his rumored $100 million re-election budget to good use. Now that doesnt mean that happy days are here again for the governor, but if he is going to make a comeback these are the kind of steps that would be required, said Peter Brown, assistant director of the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute, in a news release announcing the results. Whether it is the start of something larger, well see in the coming months.Ž And the governor got more encouraging news by the time he stepped off a plane Friday, returning home from a trip to Paris. The states unemployment rate fell to 7.1 percent in May, the lowest since September 2008. SCOTTS TRES BONNE WEEK The positive news for Scotts political fortunes could only be seen when considering where he was a few months ago. Florida voters were evenly divided on his job approval rating, with 43 percent approving and 44 percent disapproving. Thats an improvement for a governor who, in March, was staring at 36 percent approval and 49 percent disapproval. Scott also boosted his standing in a hypothetical race against former Gov. Charlie Crist, who spent the weekend showing off his newfound Florida Democratic Party membership at the Jefferson-Jackson soiree in Hollywood, Fla., but wouldnt directly answer questions about whether he would challenge Scott. If Crist does take that step, the poll showed the race moving from a drubbing for Scott to a sound defeat. Crist led the poll by 10 points, instead of 16 points just three months ago. U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson would also win by 10 points if he reverses his not-quite Shermanesque insistence that he wont run. Scott would beat former state Sen. Nan Rich, but that could have more to do with the fact that Rich remains unknown to 84 percent of Floridians despite Republican Party of Florida Chairman Lenny Currys efforts to bring attention to the only current or former elected of“ cial to announce her candidacy for the Democratic nomination. In perhaps the surest sign that the poll was good news for Scott, Democrats tried to downplay the numbers. Only in Rick Scotts world does going from an F to a Drepresent success,Ž state Democratic Party Chairwoman Allison Tant said in a statement. While polls will go up and down, whats certain is that Florida voters do not trust this governor to “ ght for them and their families, and we are con“ dent they will vote him out of of“ ce next yearŽ The governor was not in town to hear about the poll numbers -he had spent the week in Paris, attending an air show while leading a trade delegation. Nor was he there to hear Browns advice for how Scott could continue to turn things around. The governor needs to make voters believe he is responsible for a better economy. Thats the key to his electoral future, Brown said. He isnt going to get re-elected because he is Mr. Personality. He needs to essentially convince voters, You may not like me, but Im the guy who is making things better.  But as Scott returned to the country … voila! … the states unemployment rate continued its turnaround. It fell to 7.1 percent in May, the latest chance for Scott to use his campaign slogan: Its Working. Each month, we continue to distance ourselves from the national unemployment rate, and it is clear we are succeeding in growing opportunities for Florida families to pursue the American Dream,Ž Scott said in a release. Once again, Floridas unemployment rate is well below the national average.Ž The national mark stands at 7.6 percent. Economists said, however, that some of the drop is still due to people having dropped out of the work force, in addition to new jobs created in a clearly recovering economy. SUMMER SCHOOL Despite most of their students being out, the two boards that oversee the vast majority of education in Florida spent the week considering policies concerning public schools and universities. After hearing hours of presentations about the future plans of universities, the Florida Board of Governors shot down those schools proposals on student fees … even though the increases were favored by students. The most sweeping decision came on a proposal by eight universities to increase the capital improvement trust fundŽ fees, or CITF fees, which pay for construction projects approved by university panels that draw at least half their members from the student body. But the board also rejected new environmental fees at two Florida schools. Carlo Fassi, the student body president at the University of North Florida, said he and other colleagues strongly support the increase in the construction fee and the projects it could fund. I truly, and the student body presidents here truly do not believe that a vote against CITF is prostudent,Ž Fassi said. Not whatsoever.Ž But board members said they were growing exasperated with repeated requests to boost fees by what they were constantly assured was a small amount. And we amount it to, well, its only a cup of coffee,Ž board member Norm Tripp told students backing one of the fees. But what weve got now are gallons and gallons of coffee that youre paying for every credit hour.Ž Meanwhile, the State Board of Education was maneuvering to avoid another embarrassing rollout for school grades after last years release was botched. Superintendents from around the state are warning that a possible collapse could happen because of a slew of changes to testing standards. When you put all of that together, I dont think anybodys taken the time to examine the implications of the simultaneous coming together of all these variables,Ž MiamiDade Superintendent Alberto Carvalho said. The board asked Education Commissioner Tony Bennett to put together a task force to look into the issue. Bennetts predecessor, Gerard Robinson, resigned in 2012 after less than a year on the job after the public-relations pounding the department took when FCAT scores collapsed, followed a few months later by a school grades mix-up. SLOW-WALK THE LINES Looming almost as large as Scotts poll numbers in the 2014 electoral picture is whether the districts that lawmakers drew for congressional districts … and legislative districts for that matter … would stand. Leon Circuit Court Judge Terry Lewis decided Thursday to push back the trial on a case challenging the congressional maps, in part because Lewis is still working on which documents can be used during arguments over the lines. The trial was set to begin in August, but will now likely be pushed back to December or January, Lewis said. In that trial, a coalition of voting-rights groups will argue that the maps violated the states new, anti-gerrymandering Fair DistrictsŽ standards. Lewis decision became despite arguments from Ashley Davis, counsel for the Florida Department of State, that the delay could impact the 2014 election cycle, with candidates facing a March 31 deadline to collect signatures for qualifying petitions. Meanwhile, the two sides continued scuf” ing over whose maps were actually biased. George Meros, an attorney for the Florida House, said the coalitions maps would intentionally favor Democrats. A fundamental part of their complaint is that these are non-partisan entities that joined together that wanted to draw fair districts, when we know the evidence shows to the contrary,Ž Meros said. But the newest filing from the coalition also included portions of the May 16 deposition of Marc Reichelderfer, listed as a political operative,Ž which indicated that he received seven electronic drafts of congressional maps a couple of weeks before they were made public. The maps were given to Reichelderfer by an aide to then-House Speaker Dean Cannon. When asked during the deposition if he received the maps so he could analyze the political impact of the proposed lines, Reichelderfer responded, I could have done that, yes, sir.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: The Florida Board of Governors, under pressure from Gov. Rick Scott, shot down a series of fee increases requested by students. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: We always anticipate that when former Gov. Bush doesnt get his way, he just keeps coming back until he can try and get it.Ž … Florida Education Association President Andy Ford, on whether he anticipates the return of an education bill backed by former Gov. Jeb Bush.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Tres bien fait, Monsieur le GouverneurBy SLIM RANDLES In the realm of country cooking, the elite are those who can take a heavy cast-iron Dutch oven, scrape out some glowing coals from a cook “ re, and create masterpieces. And in this neck of the woods, the emperor of cast-iron splendor is Ed Parsons. Ed actually has a j.o.b. to pay the bills, you know, but his passion kicks in on the weekend with about 600 pounds of pots, a lot of “ re, an authentic cowboy chuck wagon and hungry folks who appreciate excellence. In fact, ol Ed has come real close to turning an art form into a science. He does this by shunning the use of coals from a “ re and relying instead on the practicality of charcoal briquets. Using charcoal, he knows to the minute when each dish is ready to eat, and he likes it that way. A few years ago, he ventured to another state to participate in a chuck wagon contest, complete with a cowboy Dutch oven cook-off, and as usual he represented those of us here at home admirably. But what was more important was how he managed to carve his name into something of a legend in this outof-state town. There were hundreds of chuck wagons and campfires out there,Ž Ed said. Seemed like miles of them. And this lady reporter from the local paper heard there was someone from out of state taking part, so she looked me up for an interview. I had just put some cobbler on in a 12-incher and had checked my watch, because with the briquets, I know it takes me exactly ... I mean exactly... 18 minutes until its ready. I suggested we go somewhere quiet for the interview, so we walked about a hundred yards away through dozens of chuck wagons and sat down for a visit.Ž Ed was his usual charming self through the interview, but kept an eye on the time, without seeming to. When 18 minutes had passed, he stuck his nose in the air and sniffed, then sniffed again. He said hed have to be excused, because he could smell his cobbler and it was done. You cant possibly smell your cobbler out of all the hundreds of yard out there,Ž the reporter said. Ed gave her a kind look as you would to a newcomer in any sport, then sniffed again. Yep,Ž he said, turning brown on top. In fact, by the time we get back, the brown will be clear across the top. A good cook always knows his own cobbler.Ž He then led the reporter back through the maze of cooks, popped the lid on the Dutch oven, and showed her the finished product. Nice and brown all the way across the top. Ed laughs at the memory. Eighteen minutes,Ž he says. Im telling you, eighteen minutes exactly.Ž Brought to you by Home Country (the book) winner of two regional awards. Order yours at www. slimrandles.com. HOME COUNTRYCast-iron splendor -Janet

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 15A is asking youƒ our readers to participate in identifying Wakulla Countys MOST POPULAR local businesses for 2013! Tell us your favorites by “lling out the of“cial ENTRY BALLOT below. Your name will then be registered in a random drawing for $100 in Cash.*Animal Care: Pet Care/Sitting ________________ Pet Grooming _________________ Pet Supplies __________________ Vetenarian ____________________ Automotive: Auto Engine Repair _____________ Auto Body Shops _______________ Used Car Dealer _______________ Financial Services: Bank ________________________ Credit Union ___________________ Mortgage Company _____________ Food and Beverage Liquor Store ___________________ Grocery ______________________ Ice Cream/Snacks ______________ Bakery _______________________ Health and Fitness Gym _________________________ Massage Therapist _____________ Chiropractor ___________________ Fitness Instructor/Trainer _________ Homes and Land Builder _______________________ Real Estate Company ___________ Title Company _________________ Surveyor _____________________ Lawn Care/Landscaping _________ Nursery/Garden Center __________ Flooring ______________________ Plumbing _____________________ Electrician ____________________ A/C-Heating ___________________ Painter _______________________ Tree Service __________________ Pool Care _____________________ Home Cleaning Service __________ Miscellaneous: Childcare _____________________ Clothing and Gifts ______________ Storage Centers _______________ Dance Studio __________________ Photographer __________________ Hotel ________________________ Hardware _____________________ Local News Source _____________ Personal Services: Barber Shop __________________ Hair Salon ____________________ Nail Care _____________________ Professional Services: Accountant ____________________ Attorney ______________________ Doctor _______________________ Dentist _______________________ Insurance Provider _____________ Recreation: Marina _______________________ Fishing Charter ________________ Bait & Tackle __________________ Boat & Motor Repair __________________ Canoe/Kayak Rental ____________ Scuba _______________________ Restaurant: Atmosphere ___________________ Breakfast _____________________ Lunch ________________________ Dinner _______________________ Service _______________________ Entertainment _________________Readers Choice Categories: Name______________________ Address_____________________________ City_____________________________ State_________ Zip______________ Phone____________________ Email________________________ Age____ Are you a current subscriber to ? _____Yes ______No Of“cial Rules*Entries must be handwritten on of“cial entry ballot from Sorry, no computer generated ballots, mechanical reproductions, photocopies, carbon copies, illegible entries or ballots with answers that are not true and/or relevant will be accepted. *At least 15 of the choices must be “lled out. *Only one entry per person. *Ballots not meeting these requirements will be voided and will not be eligible for the $100 prize.*All ballots must be received by by 4:00 p.m. on July 12, 2013. Send entire ballot to Readers Choice ContestŽ, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 or bring it to our of“ce at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. (No purchase required.) *Winning entry will be drawn by a representative of *All entrants agree to publication of their name, home town, and photograph without additional compensation. Announcement of the winner will appear in the Readers ChoiceŽ special section to be published in the August 1, 2013 edition of *Employees of and their families are not eligible to win. Not intended for residents of states where prohibited by law. Winner must be 18 years of age or older. *All ballots that do not meet this criteria will not be counted.THIS AD IS YOUR OFFICIAL BALLOT & ENTRY FORM. Please complete and return to by 4:00 p.m. July 12, 2013. Use the area beside each category to list your favorite business. Please complete 15 or more choices, write clearly and legibly, to make your nominations count. Mail your of“cial entry form and completed ballot to: WIN $100 WIN $100 ENTRY FORM: Register Today for your chance toƒ Register Today for your chance toƒ c/o Readers Choice Contest P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326OR drop it off at of“ce: 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville. the Readers Choice Contest is underway!Tell us Your Choice! Submit your completed entry form and be entered in the drawing to win $100 in Cash*

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comThere are a certain select few words in the English language which convey instantly the concept to be communicated. These terms are frequently puny, terse, and quite to the point. Stink is one of those expressions. Rare be the individual who does not understand when the term stink is applied to the abstract concept or a tangible object in a conversation. Whether it be a particular sports team, a political idea or a weekend spent at some ill-considered activity, if it stinks it is not good or worth repeating. The insect world has a member which has this appellation attached. Stinkbugs, which are members of the Pentatomidae family, have a welldeserved reputation for bad behavior and odor. Curiously, the scienti“ c name Pentatomidae means “ ve sections, referring to the body parts. Wakulla County is currently seeing an abundant quantity of all this familys malodorous members. Vegetable gardeners are particularly concerned as these insects damage the plants and the vegetable products produced. Two stinkbug types are exotic pests. The Southern green stink bug is believed to have originated in Ethiopia with its distribution now including the tropical and subtropical regions of Europe, Asia, Africa and the Americas. In North America, it is limited primarily to the southeastern United States, Ohio and Arkansas in the Midwest, and to Texas in the southwest. It is also established in Hawaii and California. The adult is easy to recognize with a shieldshaped body and an overall dull green color. The eyes are dark red or black. The average length for males and females is about half an inch. Females can lay eggs three to four weeks after becoming adults, laying as many as 260 eggs over her life span. The other exotic member is the Kudzu bug which was “ rst found in Wakulla County last month. Its length is less than one quarter inch and it originated in Japan. These exotic stinkbugs work like most of the stinkbugs worldwide, using their mouth parts to pierce tender plant tissues and suck juices out. This trait is not an issue until it interferes with suburban landscapes or commercial agriculture. Farmers and homeowners alike have spent countless sums fighting the hordes of stinkbugs dining on particular plants and foliage. Tender vegetation and inmature vegetables are particularly attractive to the stinkbugs. Only the stinkbugs reproductive rate and hardiness have assured its continuation. Behavior and popularity aside, the stinkbug does use an internal chemical weapons system to deliver a foul smelling substance for its personal safety and protection. This anti-predator adaption is located in the stinkbugs thorax pores and is hard to miss when it expends all of its reeking resources. Unfortunately for the stinkbug this does not always work. In some native Southeast Asian cultures, the stinkbugs odor is considered a culinary enhancer. The local stinkbugs are mixed with other local specialty items to produce a popular, strong smelling condiment. To learn more about exotic and native stinkbugs in Wakulla County contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.There are two types of stinkbugs in Wakulla Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Southern green stinkbug, above, has a shield-shaped body and overall dull green color. The other member of the species is the kudzu bug, below, “ rst found in Wakulla County last month. thJuly 4 Headliners La r i W h i t e C hu ck Ca nno n B i l ly De a n Lari WhiteA Weekend Jam-Packed Full of Excitement Thursday Independence Day Celebra on Parade Fes val Music Mr. Leggs Contest Arts-Cra s & Food Vendors Kid’s Ac vi es FireworksThursday night, Friday & SaturdayCamping String Pull Free Concerts Fundraiser Cookout Songwriters’ Workshop presented by Chuck Cannon & Lari White“Writers in the Round Concert” Liz & Lon Williamson, Frank Lindamood and Rick O Real Americana Parade Downtown July 4 @ 10amCome to Sopchoppy, Thursday, July 4th for our downtown parade at 10am followed by our Independence Day Celebra on at Myron B. Hodge City Park. All day entertainment begins at 11am with reworks at dark. Then plan to camp at the park on the bank of the river and enjoy the weekend lled with ac vi es.Ju l y 4 t h H e adli ner s Chuck CannonBilly Deanwww.sopchoppy.org Facebook: Sopchoppy 4th of July 850-962-4611 For the complete weekend schedule and camping information visit Park Gate $3.00 Opens 11 am Please no coolers or pets Boat ramp closed July 4 Sopchop p y 4th of July W ee k end Celeb r a on July 4 6 Sopchoppy 4th of JulyWeekend Celebra onJuly 4 6Dedicated to the memory of“M r Sopchop p y ” “Mr. Sopchoppy” Bill S t ephens Bill StephensCapital City Bank Duke Energy Best Western of Wakulla Family Coastal Restaurant Wakulla AdventuresG old Sponsors Gold SponsorsSil v er Sponsors Silver SponsorsC & L Construction, LLC Baskerville-Donovan, Inc. Spirit Life Church Sopchoppy Lions Club ESG Operations Wakulla News Gadsden County Times From the Heart of SopchoppyB r on z e Sponsors Bronze SponsorsThurmond Roddenberry and Associates, Inc. Air-Con Bad Bobs Bait & Tackle J & M Automotive Gene Lambert, Farm Bureau P a t r iot Sponsor Patriot Sponsor Ray and Linda BolesP l a tinum Sponsors Platinum Sponsors City of Sopchoppy Centennial Bank WTXL ABC 27 H ot T amale F r ank Lindam o o d T he C ur r y s Linds a y E v ans & R ick O tt B and Lis & L on W illiamson Hot Tamale Frank Lindamood The Currys Lindsay Evans & Rick Ott Band Lis & Lon Williamson Wakulla County Fourth Annual Ronald Reagan Wakulla County Fourth Annual Ronald Reagan & July 8, 2013 Wakulla Springs Lodge July 8, 2013 Wakulla Springs Lodge Keynote SpeakerGovernor Rick Scott VIP ReceptionwithGovernor Scott6:45 7:30 PMIncludes Appetizers & Cash BarBarbecue Dinner at 7:30 PM Table Sponsorships Available for $1,200 ~ Seat 8 Table Sponsorships Available for $1,200 ~ Seat 8 Dinner ~ $50pp VIP Reception ~ $25pp Dinner & Reception for Couples ~ $125 Dinner ~ $50pp VIP Reception ~ $25pp Dinner & Reception for Couples ~ $125 Limited Seating Available Limited Seating Available Visit: www.wakullagop.com to purchase your tickets online or call 850.926.4402 for more information.This ad paid for by The Wakulla County Republican Executive Committee not in support of any candidate. “Re-Store”Shadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat.  9 a.m. 5 p.m.

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life By MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center DirectorI was reading this week on MSN where Jiroemon Kimura died. He was the Guinness World Record holder for being the oldest person alive on Earth. Kimura was a 116 years old at the time of his death and was a former post of“ ce worker. MSN stated that he was the last known man to live across three centuries.Ž I thought to myself life is good!Ž He was obviously a man who knew how to turn stumbling blocks into stepping stones. I never met Mr. Kimura, but I cant help believe he was a positive thinker like Zig Zigler writes about. Most likely he got up every morning, gave himself an internal check-up from the neck up, and destroyed any negative or stinkin thinkinŽ that may have greeted him when his feet hit the ” oor. Im always looking for keys or clues to long life to employ at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. Mr. Kimura, though thousands of miles away gave me a few tips on quantity of life and quality of life. Kimuras Tips and Techniques to living the good life: No. 1 … Get out in the sunlight! On his 115th birthday, Mr. Kimura told reporters he attributed his longevity to getting out in the sunlight. Now weve all been warned about the sunlight and melanoma. I heed warnings like this and so to better prepare myself for the sunlight I spent $75 for appropriate headgear (Salt Life hat) and a facial wrap (Buff facewrap). I look like Freddy KrugerŽ on my boat now but everybody is wearing it for sun protection. I came across this article from the Huf“ ngton Post warning readers to avoid all sunlight all the time. Ive printed the article in part it for your edi“ cation and see if you pick up on anything strange; Avoid all sunlight all the time. The co-founder of the Melanoma Research Alliance and Broadway producer formed this alliance after her own experience with melanoma on the bottom of her foot.Ž Maybe she used to go into Central Park or onto the roof of her apartment building and do headstands for several hours daily, or she spent way too much time in tanning parlors. Theres no other way a Manhattanite would get melanoma on the bottom or her foot if sunlight is the sole culprit for skin cancers.Ž Sunlight is the creator of vitamin D3 creation in our bodies. Sunshines UVB rays interact with the cholesterol in our skin that ignites a process to create vitamin D from our kidneys and liver. I will wear my hat and face wrap but will enjoy the sun on my face and skin for 20 to 30 minutes at least four times a week. Im in luck too … Florida has plenty of sunshine. Thank you, Mr. Kimura, for shedding a little light on the issue of long life. No. 2 Try a little kindness. MSN went on to say; He lived at home under the care of his grandsons 60-year-old wife. Kimura would greet almost any visitor from abroad with the English phrase he learned: Thank you very much, you are very kind.Ž Kindness is a powerful tool, a boomerang, a weapon of wonderful that we should throw at folks every day. And like the boomerang kindness will always come back to you. Kindness is an in your face action and attitude. What I mean by that is people can see kindness expressed in your face, your eyes, in your smile and your expression; literally its an in your face response. George Washington Carver said; How far you go in life depends on your being tender with the young, compassionate with the aged, sympathetic with the striving, and tolerant of the weak and strong. Because someday in your life you will have been all of these.Ž Researcher tell us that there are good health benefits to being kind. Scientist tell us that being kind has numerous physical health bene“ ts as well has mental health bene“ ts. Kindness is the gift you get when you give kindness as a gift. Mr. Kimura was well aware of this and I believe it contributed to his long life. No. 3 … Look up to the sky. I am always looking up towards the sky. That is how I am,Ž Kimura said. Was Kimura a man who gave thanks and thought that all of his blessing came from above? Did he ever read Luke 9:16 which says in part, Looking up to heaven, He gave thanksƒŽ Turn to Page 4BOn the death of the world’s oldest man, Jiroemon Kimura By MICHELLE HUNTERof the Senior CenterMay was for all the mothers on their special day. We had a very special celebration to honor all the mothers who came to the center for some fun and pampering. The ladies started the day getting the fingernails polished by Courtney Parker and Angel Carter. They had every color polish you could imagine, and painted ” owers and fun designs. Then they dressed up in hats and feather boas to get their glamour photos taken. Our volunteer photographers, Joanne Strickland and Toni Courtier, took pictures of mothers, mothers with their daughters, grandmothers with their granddaughters, and even husbands with wives, and everyone received a framed photo. Thank you, Courtney, Angel, Toni, and Joanne for making it such a fun “ lled day. Senior Center Director Maurice Langston addressed the ladies with a heart “ lled story about a mothers love and the God given gift a mother brings to the world. Doug Apple, of WAVE 94FM, interviewed several of the ladies for a Mothers Day radio program which aired several times on that Sunday. Each of the participants received a recorded copy of the program on a CD. Some of the ladies spoke of how it brought them to tears when they listened to the program. Doug made the interview sound as if they were all sitting around talking to an old friend. They reminisced about memories of songs that reminded them of their mothers, and gave advice they thought new mothers today could use. Thank you, Doug Apple, for such a joyful gift. We celebrated a Pioneer Day with blacksmiths, soap makers, a camp“ re cake maker, and a good ol “ sh fry. Turn to Page 3BSeniors celebrated Mothers Day, Pioneer Day, had a sh fry, and welcomed medical students in May PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHush puppies being cooked up as part of a “ sh fry for seniors held in May. Former senior center director R.H. Carter at last years Christmas in July, set this year for July 24. How to spot, prevent senior nancial fraudThe Savvy Senior, Page 4B WEEK IN WAKULLA Page 2B Yoga for Life by Dolly MoodyGet Fit by Gena DavisHealth & Fitness, Page 6B *Rates as low as 1.49% APR for up to 60 months on new and used car purchases, and re“nances. Re“nances and used car purchases 2 006 model year and newer. Rates and terms are based on credit score and subject to change. Excludes current Gulf Winds loans. Federally insured by NCUA. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 Father’s Day Weekend • June 14th 16th GET ALL YOUR BAIT AND SUPPLIES HERE!!! DAD WANTS TO GO FISHING... GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE GAG GROUPER OPEN Prices Good Through June850926-32121.75LPOPOVVODKA $ 12 99 $ $ $ $ 1.75LCAPTAIN MORGANORIGINAL SPICE $ 22 99 O $ $ JAGERMEISTER750ML $ 19 99 $ $ 1.75LABSOLUTEVODKA $ 29 99 A $ $ 750MLSEGRAMS VODKA $ 9 991.75LSEGRAMS 7 $ 17 99 S

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, June 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, June 28  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, June 29  LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, June 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, July 1  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, July 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. Wednesday, July 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for tod-dlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsMonday, July 8  PLANNING COMMISSION meeting will take place in the commission chambers at 7 p.m. Wednesday, July 10  CODE ENFORCEMENT meeting will take place in the commission chambers at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, July 11  CITY OF ST. MARKS will hold a budget workshop at 6:30 p.m. and a public hearing at 6:45 p.m. at 788 Port Leon Dr. Monday, July 15  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Monday, August 5  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular board meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Thursday, August 8  BUDGET DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP for scal year 2013/2014 will take place in the commission chambers at 5 p.m. Monday, August 12  PLANNING COMMISSION meeting will take place in the commission chambers at 7 p.m. SOPCHOPPY OPRY SHS Auditorium $10 ALIVE ONSTAGE WORKSHOP Register online SOPCHOPPY JULY 4th CELEBRATION Begins at 10 a.m. OAKS BAR N GRILLE JULY 4th CELEBRATION All daySaturdaySaturdayThursdayThursday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net Weekly meetings Special EventsSaturday, June 29  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB will meet at 11 a.m. at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com.  SOPCHOPPY OPRY will be held at 7 p.m. Guitarist Eddie Gay will be among the featured performers as South Bound Band welcomes special guests, Big Bend Bluegrass to the historic stage of the Sopchoppy High School Auditorium. Tickets are $10 and may be reserved by calling 962-3711.  SCENE IN WAKULLA continues as the Canopy Roads Theatre Co. presents the ALIVE Onstage Workshop which will be led by Artistic Director of Canopy Roads Kevin Carr as well as actor Summer Hill Seven and cast members from the current “Raisin in the Sun” production. Register by visiting www. PalaverTreeTheater.org Thursday, July 4  SOPCHOPPY CELEBRATION, Come celebrate the Fourth of July in Sopchoppy! Festivities for the day begin with a parade downtown Sopchoppy from 10-11 a.m. Byron B. Hodges Park opens to the public at 11 a.m. for the opening ceremony at noon Donation of $3 for park entry. Browse vendor booths and enjoy live entertainment before getting settled in for the reworks at 9 p.m. For a schedule of events, parade, or vendor registration visit sopchoppy orida. com/2013july4thcelebration.html  OAKS BAR N GRILLE CELEBRATION, Come celebrate the Fourth of July with us at The Oaks Bar N Grille, formerly Wildwood. It is a great way to spend your day with family and friends. We will have live broadcasted music, delicious BBQ grilling, fun kid friendly activities or just relaxing in our bar, restaurant or hotel. Great rates will be offered all day on our full bar and food. We will have raf e tickets with prizes to give away too. We look forward to seeing you!Upcoming EventsSaturday, July 6  SIT IN MOVIE FEST will be held at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. All shows start at 5:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. Bring lawn chairs, beach chairs and blankets to sit on main arena oor or bleachers. Folding chairs will also be provided. Popcorn and snacks are available but drinks are limited, so bring your own. This Saturday’s features are Citizen Kane and The Dark Knight Rises Monday, July 8  WAKULLA COUNTY REPUBLICAN PARTY will host Florida Governor Rick Scott from 7 p.m until 8:30 p.m. at the Fourth Annual Ronald Reagan Blue Jeans and Black Tie Affair at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. The Governor will be available for photos with attendees of the VIP Reception at 7 p.m. Tickets include a BBQ dinner, cash bar, and live entertainment. $50 per person for dinner, $25 per person for VIP Reception, or $125 per couple for dinner and VIP reception. Table Sponsorships are $1200 for 8 seats including dinner and VIP Reception for each. Table sponsors will be recognized in the program. Advance ticket purchase may be obtained at www.wakullaGOP.com or by calling 926-4402. Tuesday, July 9 VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO is starting up its weekly occurrence. Bingo will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. Thursday, July 11  AIRPORT MASTER PLAN PUBLIC MEETING will be held at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea from 6 p.m. until 7:30 p.m. The purpose of the meeting is to provide the citizens of Wakulla County and other interested parties an opportunity to provide input on the development of the Wakulla Airport Master Plan. Monday, July 22  SCHOOL BOARD MEETING will be held at 5:45 p.m. in the school board room at 69 Arran Rd. For more information please call the Superintendent’s ofce at 926-0065. June 27 –July 4 FOURTH OF JULY WEEK HOURS & PROGRAM CHANGES Along with the other County of“ ces, the Library will be closed Thursday July 4, Friday July 5 and Saturday July 6 for the Fourth of July Holiday. There will also be no Summer Program events next week either. We will reopen on Tuesday July 9 and our Summer Program will resume that day as well. Library materials can be dropped off in our book drop on these days as it will be checked over the long weekend. My staff and I wish everyone a safe and happy holiday! BITS & PIECES PUPPETS RETURNS TO WCPL On Thursday June 27, the Bits & Pieces Puppet Theatre brings their tale of The Sel“ sh GiantŽ to the Library as part of our Summer Program. The Sel“ sh Giant builds a high wall to keep kids out of his garden. Soon after a great wind blows, the frost comes, and snow dances through the trees. Can the giant get past his sel“ shness so that spring can enter the garden again? This award winning puppet show also features a Make & Take Puppet Workshop afterwards. Please join us for all the fun at 7 p.m. on the 27th. FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE Our Friday Night Movie this week is the blockbuster prequel to the classic Wizard of Oz, which came out earlier this year. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, & Michelle Williams, among others, this PG rated “ lm from Disney, and directed by Sam Raimi (who directed the 1st 3 Spider Man movies) tells how the Great & Powerful wizard came to Oz and began the “ ght against the 2 wicked witches. Full of action, laughs, and nods to the classic “ lm and stories, this “ lm should be fun for the entire family! Doors open at 6:45 for the 7 p.m. show. We expect a big crowd so arrive early and grab a good seat! SUMMER READING BOOKS UPDATE As were about to head into July and the “ rst day of school being the 15th of August, we strongly recommend that if your child hasnt at least put themselves on the waiting list for their grades summer reading that they do so as soon as they can. While we have purchased multiple copies of each summer reading book, we are rapidly approaching a date where we cant guarantee that your child will be able to get the book before school begins. If you or your child has an account with us were more than happy to add you to any waiting list over the phone. We also have copies available of some of the books via e-book for those who have a reader. Please dont hesitate to contact us at 926-7415 if we can help you in any way.By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Library News...Guitarist Eddie Gay (left) will be among the featured performers at the Sopchoppy Opry on Saturday. Special to The News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 3B From Page 1B Danny Willis of the Florida Artist Blacksmith Association demonstrated his skills of blacksmithing the old fashioned way, and displayed the items he makes from forging the hot metal. Susan Willis demonstrated how to make soap from ingredients such as fat from her own pigs, lye, and other natural items. She heated the ingredients over a “ re, lique“ ed it and poured it into a mold, then shared it with the seniors. Many of them remembered doing this when they were younger. Steve Can“ eld made a camp“ re dump cake in a cast iron pot. He poured peaches in the bottom of the pot, covered that with a cake mix, covered it with foil and the lid, and placed hot coals on top and underneath, and baked for 40 minutes. Everyone agreed that it was delicious. The crowd inside enjoyed the music of the Pickin n Grinnin Band, and the day concluded with a Fish Fry lunch. Several gentlemen from the community volunteered their time to prepare the fish and hush puppies … a local favorite. We were honored to host a group of 40 young medical students from the FSU College of Medicine. They came to tour and observe rural Wakulla County as part of their studies, and to encourage them to become doctors that would want to bring their medical practice to such a county. They visited the Health Department, the senior center, and the Wakulla TMH Physicians of“ ce. At the center, Maurice Langston, executive director of the senior center, County Commissioner Jerry Moore, and Michelle Hunter spoke to the students on what it is that our seniors need and are looking for in a physician. They also spoke on the importance of the Senior Center as part of the social community needed for our senior population to remain active and healthy. The students were accompanied by Dr. John Fogarty, dean of FSU College of Medicine; Dr. Mel Harts“ eld, dean of Tallahassee Regional Campus of the College of Medicine; Dr. Alan Rowan of the College of Social Sciences and Public Policy; and Dr. Gail Bellamy, professor and director of the Florida Blue Center for Rural Health Research and Policy. It was a very informative day for the students, and the FSU staff enjoyed getting to know us and what we do here at the center for our senior population. They are planning to bring future students here as part of their curriculum. If you have any questions please call the center at 926-7145. Seniors celebrated Mothers Day, Pioneer Day, had a sh fry, and welcomed medical students in May A soapmaking demonstration with Susan Willis. Volunteers fry up “ sh for lunch for the senior citizens. Demonstration at Pioneer Day. County Commissioner Jerry Moore addresses the FSU medical students. FSU medical students visit the Wakulla Senior Center. The “ sh is served up as the volunteer cooks look on. Blacksmith Danny Willis prepares to give a demonstration of his art. The senior centers biggest fundraiser of the year is Christmas in July, featuring Christmas songs and trees and Christmas dinner … plus the silent auction. This years Christmas in July will be held on July 24 at the senior center. For tickets, contact the senior center at 926-7145.Christmas in July is July 24

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Page 1B Could Mr. Kimura be telling us that thanksgiving is not just a one day holiday, observed every year, but that every day is thanksgiving? Thankfulness is not to be a temporary state of mine, but a permanent state of the heart. Had Mr. Kimura turned thanksgiving into thanksliving? Perhaps this is why he lived to age 116? Maybe we should practice thanks-livingŽ every day and when we walk out of our homes, dont just look out, but look up! No. 4 … Eat often and eat right. According to local media, Kimura ate a threemeal-a-day diet of rice, pumpkins and sweet potatoes. Now Im not a vegetarian, but I am rethinking my eating habits. The sweet potato is packed with “ ber, protein, and complex carbohydrates. The vine is close kin to the morning glory and the sweet potato is close kin to the regular potato. Kimura liked starchesŽ and ate them three times a day. The sweet potato is very rich in beta carotene and is a rich source of ” avonoid and other antioxidants. Rice is the staple grain for more than half the worlds population, especially Asia. I cant help but wonder, did he dine on white rice or brown rice? Brown rice is a good source of vitamins such as Vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (ribo” avin) and vitamin B3 (niacin) as well as iron, magnesium and dietary “ ber. Rice is also a great source of complex carbohydrates which gives us much of the energy we need. Rice alone provides 20 percent of the worlds dietary energy supply. Rice contains all the amino acids essential for building and maintaining muscle tissue, and make up antibodies, enzymes, and hormones. These amino acids also help maintain healthy skin, hair, eyesight, and nourish the heart, lungs, tendons and ligaments, brain, nervous system and glands. No. 5 … Family. The MSN article went on to say; He leaves behind seven children, 14 grandchildren, 25 great-grandchildren and 14 great-great grandchildren.Ž Family may well be the most powerful force on Earth! It was instituted long before all other institutions; government, church, etc. We read of the “ rst family (not the President), Adam and Eve. The home is the “ rst and “ nest institution known to man. Kimura was living with his grandson and was being cared for by the grandsons 60-year-old wife. Kimura was aging at home with family. A mans home is not just his castle, its a cocoon! Home is the place where family wraps you tightly and its a place of warm, love, unity and comfort. The good home environment is the environment that everyone longs for. The home is the closest thing to heaven we can know on Earth. Its not just a haven, its a piece of heaven. Homes are made up of a man, a woman, a child or two or more, and lets not forget our four-legged friends and those with fur, feathers, skin or “ ns. Call this unit a unit, a clan, a brood, a tribe, a herd, a network or a family … they are priceless treasures that we can return home too and their differences make the difference in our lives. Someone said a family is like fudge, what makes it great is there are a few chocolate drops, a few fruits and some nuts! It sounds like a banana split to me with a cherry on top! Today at the Wakulla Senior Center I was met “ rst thing with a homeless senior citizen. He had family but no family he could return to … how sad. I will call it the “ rst bad day Ive had at the senior center. To see someone in their late 60s and knowing at the end of the day there is no place for him to go to lay his head or no one to lay his head upon brought on deep angst in my heart. Im working with the various charities to try to “ nd a roof for his head. I may be able to provide a house for him but the troubling part is, I cant provide a home. There is a difference between a house and a home. A house is made of wood, a home is made of warmth. A house is inanimate and home is animated. My feet this morning had to leave my house but my heart is still home, it never leaves home. My family is working miles apart this week: my son in Tallahassee, my daughterin-law a few miles away, my grandchildren are playing a few miles south of town, my wife is traveling this week with her job, my mother is at home in Smith Creek. However, they are all close. I cant touch them, but I feel them as strongly and as sure as they were embracing me now. Could it be then that family is not at a place, under a roof, but is in the head and the heart? This is my de“ nition of family, I call it the King Maurice Version. Someone has well said, Having a place to go is home, having someone to love is family, and having both of these under the same roof is a blessing beyond measure.Ž Ive watched children travel the world over trying to find themselves, their niche, their nook, cranny, alcove, their place of belonging, acceptance, and of course love. Most often they discover it when they come back to their town, their county, and of course their home. Its home where children really “ nd themselves. I can only imagine the kind of home Kimura had, but I have an idea that he was well respected, adored and held in highest esteem and deeply loved by his family and who knew him. I didnt know him and somehow I dont grieve for the family and friends that did know him, I grieve for those of us who didnt know him but had to hear of him and his story on the internet and wish that we could have known him. So as I close this article and my mind drifts from my desk to my cocoon on Rehwinkel Road. Im wondering, whats for dinner? I think Ill have some pumpkin, sweet potatoes and rice in honor of Kimura. In the words of Mr. Spock from the TV show Star Trek,Ž to all of the readers: Live long and prosper!ŽLangston: On the death of the worlds oldest man, Jiroemon KimuraDear Savvy Senior: Can you offer some tips on protecting seniors from “ nancial scams? My neighbors elderly mother was recently swindled out of $10,000 and I want to make sure my own mother is protected. … Troubled Daughter Dear Troubled, Financial scams that target the elderly continue to be a big problem in the U.S. In fact, its estimated that some 5 million Americans over age 60 are scammed out of roughly 3 billion every year. Here are some tips that can help you spot a scam, and what you can do to protect your mom. SCAM WATCHINGSpotting a scam or a con artist is not always easy to do They range from shady financial advisers to slick-talking telemarketers to professional caregivers and relatives who steal from the very people theyre supposed to be looking after. The most common scams targeting seniors today come in the form of freelunch seminars selling dubious “ nancial products, tricky/high-pressure telemarketing calls, and endless junk mail peddling free vacation packages, sweepstakes, phony charity fundraisers and more. And, of course, theres the ongoing problem of identity theft, Medicare fraud, door-todoor scams, credit card theft, and Internet and email scams. The best way to spot a scam is to help your mom manage her “ nances, or at least monitor her accounts. Reviewing her “ nancial statements each month can alert you to questionable checks, credit card charges or large withdrawals. If, however, she doesnt want you looking at her “ nancial records, there are other clues. For example: Is she getting a lot of junk mail for contests, free trips, and sweepstakes? Is she receiving calls from strangers offering awards or moneymaking deals? Also notice if her spending habits have changed, if she has complained about being short of money lately, or has suddenly become secretive or defensive about her “ nances. All these may be signs of trouble. PROTECT YOUR PARENT The most effective way to help protect your mom is to alert her to the different kind of scams out there. The easiest way to do this is by visiting the Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force website (stopfraud.gov … click on Protect YourselfŽ), where you can get a rundown on the different types of scams making the rounds these days. The Better Business Bureau Scam Stopper site at bbb.org/scam-stopper is another good resource. If your mom doesnt have access to a computer, print out the materials yourself and use them to start a conversation. Its also a good idea to keep close tabs on your moms social circle. Has she acquired any questionable new friends lately, or is she seeing anyone whos giving her advice, “ nancial or otherwise? Some other tips to protect her include reminding her to never give out her Social Security number or “ nancial information unless she initiated the contact and knows the institution. Also, see if your mom would be willing to let you sort her mail before she opens it so you can weed out the junk. To reduce the junk mail and/or email she gets, use the Direct Marketing Association consumer opt-out service at dmachoice.org. And to stop credit card and insurance offers, use the Consumer Credit Reporting Industry opt-out service at optoutprescreen.com or call 888-567-8688 … they will ask for your moms Social Security number and date of birth. Also, register your moms home and cell phone numbers on the National Do Not Call Registry ( donotcall.gov, 888-3821222) to reduce telemarketers. And help her get a free copy of her credit report at annualcreditreport.com to make sure she isnt a victim of identity theft. REPORT IT If you suspect your mom has gotten scammed report it to your state securities regulators of“ ce (see nasaa.org for contact information), or your states Adult Protective Services agency (call 800-6771116 for contact information) that investigates reports of elderly “ nancial abuse. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org. Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC Today show and author of The Savvy SeniorŽ book. By Jim MillerThe Savvy Senior How to spot and prevent senior nancial fraudBy RON POLLACKDirector, Families USAAt the end of May, the Medicare Trustees reported that Medicare costs are expected to grow more slowly than was previously expected. One of the positive effects of this trend is that Medicare premiums are also expected to increase more slowly. What does that mean for you and your family? Heres a look at the different types of Medicare premiums. Q: What do people mean by Medicare premiumsŽ? A: When people talk about Medicare premiums, theyre often thinking of the Part B premium (Part B primarily covers doctor visits and other outpatient services). For most bene“ ciaries, this premium is automatically deducted from their Social Security benefit each month. In 2013, most people with Medicare pay a Part B premium of $104.90 a month. Q: What other Medicare premiums exist besides Part B? A: Most people with Medicare do not pay a premium for Medicare Part A (which covers hospital and other inpatient care) because they or their spouse paid enough in Medicare taxes during their working years to qualify for premium-free Part A. If you have a Part D prescription drug plan, you do pay premiums. In 2013, the national average for a Part D monthly premium is $40.18, but Part D premiums vary widely from plan to plan and region to region. If you have a Medicare Advantage plan, your plan usually charges an additional premium. Finally, you may have a private Medicare supplemental policy, either from a former employer or private company. The premiums for these policies vary signi“ cantly. Q: How are Medicare premiums determined? A: By law, the Part B premium must cover 25 percent of Medicares Part B costs. When Medicare costs grow more slowly, so do premiums. Part D premiums are similarly tied to the costs of prescription drugs. Medicare Advantage premiums are determined by a more complicated process, but they also reflect trends in costs. Because Part D and Medicare Advantage plans are run by private companies, premiums can vary a lot. But even so, when health care costs rise more slowly, premiums usually do too. Q: Does everyone pay the same premium? A: If your income is more than $85,000 (for just you, or $170,000 for you and your spouse), you pay an additional Part B premium. How much more depends on your income: People with the highest incomes pay the most. Also, since 2011, the same high-income beneficiaries have paid higher Part D premiums. Part A premiums and Medicare Advantage premiums are not affected by these rules. Q: If I have a limited income, can I get help paying my premiums? A: For people with limited incomes and resources, the Part D Extra Help program covers all or most of their Part D premium, as well as other pharmacy costs. You can “ nd out if you qualify and apply online at www.socialsecurity.gov/prescriptionhelp or by calling 1-800-MEDICARE. Each state also has Medicare Savings Programs that cover Part B premiums for people with limited incomes. In some cases, these programs also cover other Medicare costs. To learn more, call 1-800-MEDICARE and ask for a referral to your local state health insurance assistance program (SHIP), or go to this website www.familiesusa.org/resources/ program-locator and click on your state. Q: What will happen to Medicare premiums in the future? A: Medicare premiums depend greatly on what happens to health care costs, speci“ cally Medicare costs, in the future. No one knows for sure if the recent slowdown in Medicare costs will continue. The early indications from the Medicare Trustees report are that the trend should continue for now, and that the 2014 Part B premium will be unchanged from 2013. For anyone with Medicare living on a fixed income … and thats most people … this is encouraging news.Families USA is the national organization for health care consumers. We have advocated for universal, affordable, quality health care since 1982. Ron Pollack is the Executive Director of Families USA.Understanding Medicare premiums HEALTH MATTERS 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Before, duringand after pregnancy take a multi-vitamin with folic acid every day, get regular medical checkups and screenings and maintain a healthy weight. Visit www.text4baby.org and www.ounce.org.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 5BBy MARK UNDERWOODHave you ever wondered where novelists, actors or writers “ nd inspiration for their work? Creativity is not a predetermined way of looking at the world„you can get inspired by almost anything, anywhere, anytime. All you have to do is be receptive to inspiration. Some people inherit a highly developed sense of creativity or come to it naturally because they were raised in a creative environment. But most of us need some form of inspiration if we want to look at the world with a different perspective. Whatever you call it… creativity, thinking outside the box or thinking sideways, creative thinking is all about looking at the world with a different twist, in a slightly different way than you usually do. The good news is that inspiration is all around us. NURTURING CREATIVITY Creativity can be used in many endeavors. In World War II it was used to save lives. J.P. Guilford, a psychologist and father of modern creativity, came up with a game plan to test the creative thinking of bomber pilots in the U.S. Air Force in World War II. He designed a personality test to select the most creative pilots who were most likely to survive being shot down by using their creativity. His question, What would you do with a brick?Ž helped weed out pilots who werent good at thinking sideways or differently in dire circumstances. Try it yourself. Can you come up with 50 uses for a brick in 15 minutes or less? Most of us fine-tune our creative side when we are exposed to new things around us. All of us are in” uenced by our experiences … whether they are theatrical productions, symphonies, “ lms, TV or travel. Look for something new to explore or learn. Then hold on to those experiences and use them to inspire you. How did you feel when you listened to a magni“ cent choir or attended a concert in a park on a summer evening? Unleash those feelings to inspire your creative juices. A MYSTERIOUS PROCESS Creativity is a complex neurological process. Its not as easy to quantify. Theres no such thing as a light bulb over your head announcing a good idea. But scientists have found that they can see ideasŽ with a brain scanner. A few seconds before a person gets an idea, the area of the brain called the superior anterior temporal lights up. No one path inspires creativity, but scientists have found that different parts of the creative process require different types of creative thinking. They have also learned that when we are resting, the superior anterior temporal (behind the ear) tries to send us messages of inspiration. Albert Einstein may have summed up long naps and walks on the beach best when he said, Creativity is the residue of wasted time.Ž TIPS FOR GETTING INSPIRED Most of us are creatures of habit, but you can ramp up your creativity if you try new things. Get in tune with these random in” uences: € Change your TV watching habits. Most of us enjoy watching the same TV shows, but if you changed things up you might get new ideas. Use your remote to randomly watch programs that arent on your favorites list. € Change your Internet activity. Adults spend an average of 29 hours, 15 minutes browsing the Internet each month. Are you using the same web browsers, going to the same shopping or news sites? Try new sites that arent typically on your radar. You may get new ideas that unlock your creativity. € Read differently. Push your comfort zone. If you read memoirs or biographies, try reading an historical novel, poetry, science and health or classic literature. Move around the house. Read in a different room or chair. € Take a nap. Inner thoughts can give you intriguing new ideas. € Get unstuck. Do something simple like taking a walk around the block at a different time of day. You may meet someone new or see nature differently when you change your routine. New things inspire new ideas. And thats an inspiration worth taking a walk for any day.Mark Underwood is a neuroscience researcher, president and co-founder of Quincy Bioscience in Madison, Wis. More articles and tips for healthy aging can be found at: www.TheGoodNewsAboutAging.com.Special to The NewsNearly one-third of adults living in Tallahassee, Wakulla, Quincy and Monticello are family caregivers who could be at risk for heart disease, diabetes, depression and various other physical and emotional maladies as a result of caregiver distress, a potentially dangerous condition brought on by the pressures of caring for a senior loved one. Studies increasingly point to caregiving as a leading stressor for families. In fact, one U.S. study revealed that more than half (52.8 percent) of those caring for individuals with diseases including cancer or Alzheimers had scores indicating depression. In response to this growing issue, the local Home Instead Senior Care of“ ce has launched a public awareness campaign … Family Caregiver Stress Relief at FamilyCaregiverStressRelief.com … to help family caregivers determine if they are at risk for distress and to minimize problems before they escalate. Included in the program are two new tools: The Are You a Caregiver Quiz, which is designed to help a family caregiver self-identify and recognize the role of a caregiver, and the Family Caregiver Distress Assessment, adapted for the Home Instead Senior Care network by Dr. Peter Vitaliano of the University of Washington. The assessment allows caregivers to determine their risk for distress and resulting emotional and physical issues, including depression, heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity. So many spouses and adult children are unaware of their potential risk of caregiver distress because they dont see themselves as caregivers,Ž said Scott Harrell, owner of the local Home Instead Senior Care of“ ce. These new resources enable them to understand their role, the stresses they may face as a caregiver, and how that stress might lead to more serious health effects.Ž A recent Home Instead Senior Care study discovered that caregivers are prone to hiding their emotions and, as a result, their health suffers. Approximately 74 percent of caregivers who hide their feelings report fatigue, 53 percent report dif“ culty sleeping, 37 percent report depression, and 30 percent weight gain or loss. Research shows that certain characteristics make family caregivers more vulnerable to caregiver distress, the top being: € Gender: Women report more psychological distress than men (however, male caregivers have more negative physiological responses to caregiving, including higher blood sugar and insulin levels, poorer cholesterol and immune function, and obesity). €Reluctance to ask for help: Caregivers who wont ask for help are setting themselves up for the kind of exhaustion that can lead to distress. € Chronic Illness: Caregivers who are already sick or have existing medical conditions, such as coronary disease, hypertension and cancer, are more vulnerable to additional negative health effects resulting from caregiver stress. Its important for caregivers to understand that stress can impact ones ability to care,Ž said Harrell. If they dont care for themselves, they may put their senior loved ones at risk. Whether its support groups, stress management techniques or respite help, caregivers need to realize the importance of managing their health, too,Ž he said. For more information about the services of the Home Instead Senior Care office serving Tallahassee, Wakulla, Quincy and Monticello call 850-297-1897 or visit www.homeinstead.com/233. Home Instead Senior Care was founded in 1994 in Omaha, Neb., by Lori and Paul Hogan, the Home Instead Senior Care network is the worlds largest provider of non-medical in-home care services for seniors, with nearly 1,000 independently owned and operated franchises providing in excess of 45 million hours of care throughout the U.S., Canada, Japan, Portugal, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, the United Kingdom, Taiwan, Switzerland, Germany, South Korea, Finland, Austria, Italy, Puerto Rico, the Netherlands and Mexico. Local Home Instead Senior Care of“ ces employ more than 65,000 caregivers worldwide who provide basic support services … assistance with activities of daily living (ADLs), personal care, medication reminders, meal preparation, light housekeeping, errands, incidental transportation and shopping … which enable seniors to live safely and comfortably in their own homes for as long as possible. In addition, caregivers are trained in the networks groundbreaking Alzheimers Disease or Other Dementias CARE: Changing Aging Through Research and Education Program to work with seniors who suffer from these conditions. This curriculum is also available free to family caregivers online or through local Home Instead Senior Care of“ ces. At Home Instead Senior Care network, its relationship before task, while continuing to provide superior quality service that enhances the lives of seniors everywhereSpecial to The NewsFor Americans 65 and older, falling down can be the worst thing to happen to them, according to statistics from the National Council on Aging: € One in three seniors experiences a signi“ cant fall each year € Every 18 seconds, a senior is admitted into an emergency room after losing balance and hitting the ground € Every 35 minutes, an elderly person dies from a fall -the leading cause of death for seniors The projected cost in health-care expenses for 2020 due to fall-related injuries in the United States is $55 billion,Ž says Karen Peterson, a therapist with multiple certifications, and author of Move With Balance: Healthy Aging Activities for Brain and BodyŽ (www.MoveWithBalance.org). Shes also the founder and director of Giving Back, a nonpro“ t organization that grows and spreads programs that support senior health. Its important for seniors to keep moving and learning, thats what helps improve balance and coordination, and even helps build new neural pathways,Ž says Peterson, who emphasizes the cognitive importance to her workout programs. But if youre rather frail, or just very fearful of falling, youre less likely to get up and move around.Ž These activities bene“ t all seniors, from 55 to 105. Peterson says a fun, social program of games and activities that include exercises speci“ cally designed for seniors helps them address multiple issues, including those that tend to keep seniors sedentary … which only lessens their strength and balance. Last year, her program was independently evaluated from Hawaiis Department of Heath, which found a statistically signi“ cant reduction in falls from seniors … 38 percent. It also won the MindAlert Award from the American Society on Aging. Seniors of all ages need to continually work on improving their balance, coordination, strength, vision and cognitive skills. When they do, theyre less likely to fall … and more able to enjoy life.Ž Peterson suggests these moves, which address many different areas of the body: € The cross-crawl: After various light warmups, begin with the basic cross-crawl, which focuses on the fundamentals of balance. March in place, lifting the knees high. At the same time, reach across and touch the lifted knee with the opposite hand or elbow; alternate and keep going. This can be done sitting, standing or lying down. Once any of these exercises are mastered, Peterson says, participants should continue to challenge themselves. For even greater balance work, and to exercise the vestibular system, close your eyes and count backwards from 100 by threes. Its not fun if youre not conquering a challenge,Ž she says. Her book includes several challenges for each exercise. € Forward toe-touch dancer: To improve motor skills, physical coordination and cognition, there are many dance exercises that are appropriate for seniors. If needed, use a chair for assistance. Place your feet shoulder-width apart. Now, simultaneously extend your left foot and your right arm forward. Keep your left toes pointed down, touching the ” oor; or for more dif“ culty, maintain the toes a few inches off the ” oor. Repeat this move with your left arm and right foot. Hold each pose for several seconds, and increase holding time. € Sensory integration … the arrow chart: Look at an arrow chart and call out the direction indicated by each individual symbol. Then, thrust your arms in that direction; in other words, say and do what the arrow indicates. For an additional challenge, do the opposite of what the arrow indicates. € Side-step walk: Walk sidestepping … bring your right foot across the left and step down three to “ ve inches away from the left foot, ankles crossed. The closer the feet, the harder it is to balance. Alternate crossing the foot in front and then behind the other foot as you move along; repeat several times, then do the same with opposite feet. As a bonus challenge, try a reading exercise from a vision card, designed for stimulating the brain/ visual system, while sidestepping. € The cat jump: This activity is practice in case of a fall; the muscle memory of the movement will be etched in your body. Bend your knees in a squat. Jump a little off the ground with both feet, and land softly, like a cat, without jarring your body. Repeat until you are con“ dent in your ability to prevent a spill. Research shows that most falls are preventable,Ž Peterson says. These and other exercises, performed regularly, are a great way to achieve safety and a revitalized lifestyle.ŽKaren Peterson is founder and director of Giving Back, a nonpro“ t organization dedicated to improving the lives of elders through intergenerational mentoring. She has multiple certi“ cations, including as a Brain Gym instructor, educational kinesiologist, natural vision improvement instructor, Touch for Health instructor and a massage therapist. For 25 years, Peterson has been teaching these modalities to children, businesspeople, athletes, classroom teachers and adults of all ages and occupations.Move it or lose it: 5 moves to put seniors back in the gameLocal caregivers need not suffer in silenceSelf-assessment tool helps Wakulla-area families avoid the dangers of caregiver distress GOOD NEWS ABOUT AGINGThink creatively, think sideways

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On the mat, Im getting stronger. There are postures I can do that I couldnt do before, like handstand, a crazy arm balance where you balance your body on both hands with your legs suspended up in the air. I love doing the arm balances because I believed that once I could do them, it would prove to everyone, to me, that I was a real yogi. The thing is, I can do a lot of the postures now, and no one has showed up at my front door with my of“ cial youre-a-realyogiŽ card to carry around in my wallet and ” ash at unsuspecting bystanders. I guess thats because it was never a title to be issued in the “ rst place. Come to think about it, yoga isnt about the acrobatics at all. Actually, I think its more to do with peeling onions. Yep, you read correctly. Yoga is all about onion peeling. If youve ever peeled an onion you know it has several layers to it, before you get to the good part worth eating. Well, we have layers, too. We cant see them, but years of struggling, of being dissatis“ ed with our lives for all the various reasons, has subconsciously caused us to put on protective layers, a sort of shield from the outside world. We overeat, we become emotionally detached, we stop taking risks, and spend much of our time, if not at work, sinking into the comfort of our couches, unchallenged and unful“ lled … drained. The layers were meant to protect us, but actually, theyve done more harm than good. They weigh us down, trap us. We get stuck, lost, and often times depressed. Our relationships fall apart, our lives exhaust us, and our health deteriorates. The onion needs peeling. Yoga does that for us. The more we go to the mat, the more we shed layers of ourselves, the excess that we dont need. It may be extra body weight, it may be emotional baggage, or if youre like me, both, but over time, with every drop of sweat, every burning muscle, every time we replace I cantŽ with I can,Ž rooting ourselves deeper into the posture and on the mat, we slowly peel away another layer of our onion, until, pretty soon, we get to the good part of who we are. That, my friends, is why we practice. Its the awakening, or at least, the start of one, the point where we shed our egos and our true practice begins. This is when we start truly living our lives. Its this presence, this sort of awakening, which led me to writing … combining my journey on the mat with what I love to do. Maybe your awakening wont lead you to writing, but I bet it leads you to something you love doing, something you were meant to be doing. Doesnt that make it worth squeezing into your yoga pants and holding that pose just a little longer than you thought you could? I totally think so. So, for this, I need no of“ cial card. I just need to say I willŽ a little more often than I want to, trying the stuff that challenges me, and keep coming to the mat.Dolly Moody is a proffessional Kripalu Yoga teacher at Studio 88 Dance in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESS Now that the weather is getting warmer, a lot of people are opting to exercise outdoors. This is always a great way to change your routine, learn a new sport or just get some fresh air. There are so many options for exercising outdoors. You can run, walk, swim, kayak or canoe alone or with friends. A walk or run on the beach is a great way to burn some calories and soak up some sun. You can play team sports and get your socialization and exercise at the same time! Cross “ t is always more interesting outdoors, too! While exercising outdoors is fun and usually safe, you need to be careful to stay hydrated while you are out. Water or sports drinks are a great way to keep yourself going while you are having fun. Signs of dehydration include but are not limited to excessive thirst, headache, dizziness and dry mouth. Be sure to drink water or sports drinks on a regular basis the whole time you are outside. Sometimes we get to having such a good time, we forget to hydrate until dehydration has already occurred. Always err on the side of safety … if you or anyone you are with experience these or other symptoms, go indoors and get cool and hydrated immediately. So, get outside and enjoy the sun and fresh air. Try a new sport or activity. You might just “ nd your new passion. At the least, you will get moving and burn some calories and have fun!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. GET FITBy GENA DAVIS YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY More time on the mat means more layers peeled awayGet outside and get some exerciseSpecial to The NewsEarly summer weather can provide the ultimate motivation to get outside and be active. The sun is shining, nature is in full blossom, and coats and earmuffs are no longer essential. Summer can give people a certain zest for “ tness, but sometimes temperatures can turn good intentions into a sweltering mess. Incorporating new habits and precautions into your warm weather workouts can keep you safe, motivated, and cool. TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) Club, the nonpro“ t weight-loss support organization, offers the following tips to make the most of your summer “ tness plans: 1. Fill up on fruit Water-heavy fruits … like watermelon, cantaloupe, honeydew, and grapes … are a great way to boost energy and replenish ” uids lost after a workout. Containing more than 80 percent water, these fruits are easily digestible in the summer heat and are a tasty way to keep hydrated and satis“ ed. Eating them frozen also makes a refreshing summer treat. 2. Reroute for optimal shade If your usual running, walking, or cycling route makes you an easy target for sun exposure, opt for a shadier course. Road Runners Club of America features running routes around the country on their website, www.rrca. org. Weather.com also offers local parks forecasts and a “ tness comfort index by the hour … ideal for determining the best time of day to exercise. 3. Incorporate the season into your routine Make summer chores part of your “ tness plan for time-saving and warm weather-friendly exercise. Washing the car, gardening, taking the dog for a walk, and mowing the lawn, are all activities on your to-do list that burn calories as a bonus. 4. Pay attention to your heart rate The hotter it is, the harder your body has to work so if you normally run at a 9-minute-mile pace, when the temperature hits 90 degrees, you may “ nd yourself having to slow down to a 10-minute-mile. Using a heart-rate monitor can help ensure that you arent pushing yourself too hard, which can lead to heat exhaustion and strokes. Deluxe heart monitors keep track of not only your heart, but also your speed, distance, pace, and calories burned. Models with fewer features can cost as little as $50. 5. Take the path less paved Walking, running, or cycling on dirt or gravel paths can keep the body signi“ cantly cooler than paved paths. Asphalt and concrete tend to radiate heat and re” ect the suns rays, making you feel hotter. Running near bodies of water also has a noticeable cooling effect. 6. Slow it down without sacri“ ce To keep safe without giving up calorie burn, perform your regular cardio routine at a slightly slower pace, and then add in 30-second speed bursts every three to “ ve minutes. Youll maintain the same bene“ ts and burn even more calories without exerting extreme effort the entire workout. TOPS Club is the original weight-loss support and wellness education organization. Founded more than 65 years ago, TOPS is the only nonpro“ t, noncommercial weight-loss organization of its kind. TOPS promotes successful weight management with a Real People. Real Weight Loss.Ž philosophy that combines support from others at weekly chapter meetings, healthy eating, regular exercise, and wellness information. TOPS has about 150,000 members … male and female, age seven and older … in nearly 9,000 chapters throughout the United States and Canada. Visitors are welcome to attend their “ rst TOPS meeting free of charge. Membership is affordable at just $28 per year in the U.S. and $32 per year in Canada, plus nominal chapter fees. To “ nd a local chapter, view www.tops.org or call (800) 932-8677.Special to The NewsBack pain is one of the most common health issues in the United States, with up to 80 percent of the population suffering the condition at some point in ones life. But this exceedingly high number is just the beginning of the problem, because multiple studies indicate that roughly 70 percent of back surgeries fail,Ž says Jesse Cannone, a back-pain expert and author of The 7-Day Back Pain CureŽ (www.losethebackpain.com). Its so common that theres a name for it … failed back surgery syndrome, or FBSS.Ž One recent study monitored 1,450 patients in the Ohio Bureau of Workers Compensation database; half of those on disability endured back surgery, half did not. After two years, only 26 percent of those who had surgery returned to work. Additionally, 41 percent of those who had surgery saw a drastic increase in painkiller use. The success rate for the most common treatments is pathetically low, so its no surprise people often struggle years or decades with back pain, with few ever “ nding lasting relief,Ž Cannone says. The majority of back surgeries are not only ineffective, but most could have been completely avoided.Ž He reviews seven common mistakes made by back-pain sufferers: € Continuing a treatment that doesnt work: One of Cannones clients experienced 70 treatments with a chiropractor, resulting in no relief. Heres a general rule to follow,Ž he says. If you see no improvement after going through a three-month period of treatment, consider making a change.Ž € Failing to solve the problem the “ rst time: Take pain seriously the “ rst time. Cannones own mother suffered a signi“ cant bout of back pain, which subsided after a few days. But two years later it came back, and the second time was so debilitating she couldnt work. If she had taken the “ rst bout more seriously, she probably would have prevented the second, more debilitating bout.Ž € Thinking youre too healthy or “ t to have back pain: Staying in shape is always a good idea, but it does not make you invulnerable. People who train their body can be more prone to back pain because they often push their bodys limits, says Cannone, who has been a personal “ tness trainer since 1998. € Treating only the symptoms: Cortisone shots, anti-in” ammatory drugs, ultrasound and electrical stimulation only address pain symptoms. You may get rid of the pain, but the problem causing the pain will persist if not addressed,Ž he says. If you want lasting relief, you must address the underlying causes, and its never just one.Ž € Not understanding that back pain is a process: In most cases, back pain, neck pain and sciatica take weeks, months or even years to develop; the problem may exist for quite a while before the sufferer notices it, except for rare one-time trauma incidents like automobile accidents. Most people sit for hours at a time, yet the body was developed for diverse movements throughout the day. Think of a car with steering out of alignment; eventually, tires will wear down unevenly and there will be a blow out,Ž Cannone says. The same is true with your body.Ž Just as the damage was a process, recovery is the same and can be timeintensive. € Believing there are no more options left : Not only does back pain hurt and prove physically debilitating; it also tries the morale and determination of the patient. A sufferer can run the gamut of treatments. But, often, it takes a cocktail of treatments that address all of the underlying causes. Remember, you cant really treat the root of pain until you know whats causing it,Ž Cannone says. In so many cases, this is precisely the problem.Ž € Failing to take control: Doctors and other specialists are ultimately limited to what they know and what theyre used to. If you have a debilitating back problem, it should be among your top priorities to learn all you can about it, and how to “ x it. Get a second, third and fourth opinion if treatment isnt working; try out alternative therapies, and consider a healthy mix of treatment. Most importantly, take control … its your back, your body and only you can heal it, with help from others. I may be critical of how most handle back pain, but thats because Ive proven to patients that there are ” aws in the traditional approaches as well as more effective alternatives,Ž Cannone says. I also feel that Im offering a hopeful message because of my high success rate in helping to cure the back pain from my clients.Ž Jesse Cannone is a personal trainer since 1998, specializing in finding root causes for chronic pain, and finding solutions with a multidiscipline approach. Cannone publishes the free email newsletter Less Pain, More Life,Ž read by more than 400,000 worldwide.7 mistakes back-pain su erers make Cool summer workout tips Special to The NewsSkin cancer is a lifestyle disease, affecting young women, older men and everyone in between. But there is good news: because skin cancer is chie” y lifestyle disease, it is also highly preventable. 1. Seek the shade especially between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m when the sun is strongest. An extra rule of thumb is the shadow rule.Ž If your shadow is shorter than you are, the suns harmful UV radiation is stronger; if your shadow is longer, UV radiation is less intense. 2. Do not burn. A persons risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had “ ve or more sunburns at any point in life. 3. Avoid tanning and UV tanning booths. UV radiation from tanning machines is known to cause cancer in humans, and the more time a person has spent tanning indoors, the higher the risk. Those who make just four visits to a tanning salon per year can increase their risk for melanoma by 11 percent, and their risk for the two most common forms of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, by 15 percent. 4. Cover up with clothing including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses. Clothing can be your most effective form of sun protection, so make the most of it with densely woven and bright-or dark-colored fabrics, which offer the best defense. 5. Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/ UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. 6. Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating. 7. Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens may be used on babies over the age of six months, but they should also be protected by shade and clothing. Children are very sensitive to ultraviolet radiation … just one severe sunburn in childhood doubles the chances of developing melanoma later in life. 8. Examine your skin head-to-toe every month. While self-exams shouldnt replace the important annual skin exam performed by a physician, they offer the best chance of detecting the early warning signs of skin cancer. If you notice any change in an existing mole or discover a new one that looks suspicious, see a physician immediately. 9. See your physician every year for a professional skin exam.Skin cancer is preventable, reduce your risk

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 7B The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Accepted Adults Again Agree Beast Bought Brain Cabbage Coals Communications Cubes Drain Dress Eager Enter Fleet Fought Hairs Hired Knits Knows Lines Liters Marry Mouths Nests Nylon Ointment Owner Reaches Realize Rooms Sewed Sharper Social Spent Struck Stung Surrounds YOUR AD HERE Sword Tackle Tended Though Topics Tossed Twice Upward Voted White Width The Wakulla News

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLE,3 Bed/2 Bath -1,297 sq ft Single Family Home with A/C in good neighborhood. washer/dryer. close to all AŽ schools. Great find!! $1000 Security / $1175 Monthly $50 Contact: Don Sweet 850-524-2276 AIRLINE CAREERSTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES AREHIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Youth & Family AdvocateSeveral available positions as full-time counselor in an innovative agency serving adolescents and their families in outlying counties (Taylor, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson & Madison). 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Receivership Case No.:6:13-cv-00657JA-KRS AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin CRAWFORDVILLESaturday 29th, 7am-2p Huge 2 Family Sale 159 Mulberry Circle HOusehold items, TV, power tools mens clothes, sz. 42, shirts 17-18 & coats womens clothes misses 14-18, womens extra large to size 16, & shoes, nurse uniforms, extra large -16 womens Baby clothes, infant to 2T, Kerousene heater, pool stairs, Many other items Everything Must Go! RAIN OR SHINE Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine. ACE HARDWARE (850) 926-3141 www .happy jackinc.com CRAWFORDVILLE2/1, Singlewide, clean, new deck, 53 Cayuse Row $450. Mo. $450. Sec. $450. Last References required (904) 548-8342 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. CRAWFORDVILLE3 bedroom. 2 bath. Well maintained classic home on 4 tree-shaded acres. Centrally located in walkable Azalea Park neighborhood. Hardwood floors, screened porch, workshop; recent dishwasher, refrigerator and custom cabinets. $950./mo. First, last and deposit. Security check. 926-7865. Leave message. CRAWFORDVILLENewly Remodeled 3BR/2BA; W/D hook-up, $850 month plus Dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLE,3 Bed/2 Bath -1,297 sq ft Single Family Home with A/C in good neighborhood. washer/dryer. close to all AŽ schools. Great find!! $1000 Security / $1075 Monthly Contact: Don Sweet 850-524-2276 FOR SALE:2 Bdrm. 1 Bath House on 2 acres2243 Curtis Mill Rd Sopchoppy FL. Financing available with easy terms. Call 855-847-6807. Brand New Luxury Lakefront Condos in Florida. New construction. Was $349,900, NOW $199,900. -2 & 3 BR residences, luxury interiors, resort-style amenities. Below builder cost! Call now 877-333-0272, x 55 GEORGIA MOUNTAIN BARGAIN! 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Contact Your Local Service Professional at 1-801-857-9349 Or www.supremesecurity.org For Your Home Security System Today! 5725-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Notice Under Fictitious Name Law, pursuant to Section 865-09, Florida Statutes NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Doing business as: Top Hat Limo & Sedan Services, Inc. at 76 Steve Chason Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, in the County of Wakulla with a mailing address of 76 Steve Chason Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 18th day of June, 2013 /s/Clark Lowell June 27, 2013 5719-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Policy 2.70 -Prohibiting Discrimination, Including Sexual and Other Forms of Harassment. PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 120.54, 1001.41, 1001.42, 1012.23 Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 112.51, 119.07, 760.01 et seq., 1000.05, 1000.21, 1001.43, 1012.22, F.S., 34CFR99, 34CFR100.0(d), 34CFR 106.9, 34CFR 108.9, 34CFR110.25, 34CFR200.43(c), P.L. 110.223 ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD 5720-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Policy 5.141* -Homeless Students PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, 1003.21 Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 382.002, 1002.21, 1001.43, 1003.01, 1003.21, 1003.22, FS McKinney-V ento Homeless Assistance Act, P.L. 100-77 No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, P.L. 107.110 ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices, Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: July 29, 2013 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 LEGALADVERTISEMENT June 27, 2013 5721-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Policy 6.36 -Complaints Against Employees and Other School Board Matters. PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 120.81(1)(a), 1001.32(2), 1001.41, 1001.42, 1001.43, 1012.23 Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 1012.27, 1012.31, 1012.796, FAC: 6B-1.006(5)(m) ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices, Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: July 29, 2013 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 LEGALADVERTISEMENT June 27, 2013 5722-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Policy 6.90 -Personnel Files PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1012.22, 1012.23, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 112.08(7), 441.85(10), 1001.43, 1012.31, FS ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices, Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: July 29, 2013 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 LEGALADVERTISEMENT June 27, 2013 5723-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Policy 7.70 -Purchasing and Bidding PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 337.11(5), 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 112.312, 120.57, 212.0821, 255.04, 1001.43, 1010.01, 1013.47 ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices, Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: July 29, 2013 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 LEGALADVERTISEMENT June 27, 2013 5724-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Policy 8.14* -Inspections. PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42 Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 404.056, 1001.43, 1013.12, 1013.42, FS ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices, Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: July 29, 2013 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 LEGALADVERTISEMENT June 27, 2013 5711-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Christian radio station WUJC will be holding a public meeting at St. Marks Volunteer Fire Dept., on Friday, July 5 at 12 noon. This is a general meeting that will address public issues, and any questions or concerns about CSN International The public is invited to attend. June 27, 2013 3Br 1Ba House $775mo + Sec Dep 3Br 2Ba DWMH $875mo + Sec Dep 3Br 2Ba House $1000mo + Sec Dep RENTALS: Wakulla Realty850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerSTORAGE RENTALS AVAILABLESpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Award WinningSEWING & ALTERATIONSGowns, Weddings, Prom Casual Wear274-3653 LAWN CARE Husband & Wife Team Call Dave 850-443-9427Since 1995 Lic & InsAffordable HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! O.C.D. ONE CALL. DONE! HOME REPAIRS & IMPROVEMENTSPROFESSIONAL, DEPENDABLE SPECIALIZING IN COASTAL PROPERTIESLICENSED& INSURED TERRY NELSON, JR. 850 933-0057 TERRY NELSON, JR. 850-933-0057 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f f A A A ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L C C C C N N N d d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• Stump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403

PAGE 25

www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 9B 5718-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF INTENT TO CHANGE RULE CHAPTER AND TITLE: School Board Policy 2.25 School Board Adopted Plans-Code of Student Conduct and Elementary, Middle and High School Attendance Policies to include the Corporal Punishment Policy. PURPOSE AND EFFECT: To reflect legislative requirements and district procedures. LEGALAUTHORITY: 1001.41, 1001.42, Florida Statutes LAWS IMPLEMENTED: 1001.41, 1001.43, Florida Statutes ECONOMIC IMPACT: None REVISION ORIGINATED BY: Beth ODonnell, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction REVISION APPROVED BY: Robert Pearce, Superintendent of Schools IF REQUESTED WITHIN TWENTY-ONE (21) DAYS OF THIS NOTICE, AHEARING WILL BE HELD TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices, Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: July 29, 2013 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 LEGALADVERTISEMENT June 27, 2013 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE: Administrative Offices, Wakulla County School Board 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DATE: July 29, 2013 ACOPYOF THE PROPOSED REVISION MAYBE OBTAINED AT COST FROM: Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32326-0100 LEGALADVERTISEMENT June 27, 2013 5717-0627 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: Darrell L. Yates, 96 Hidden Valley Lane, Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 June 27, 2013 5705-0627 TWN v. Tatum, Blane Case No. 12000209CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12000209CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, VS. BLANE C. TATUM, ET AL., Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated the 9th day of May, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12000209CA, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, at 11:00 A.M. on the 11th day of July, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, BLOCK AŽ, WILDWOOD ACRES, UNIT I, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED, IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 20 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 123 WILDWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of The Circuit Court Menina E. Cohen, Esq., Florida Bar#: 14236 Ablitt|Scofield, P.C., The Blackstone Building 100 South Dixie Highway, Suite 200, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Primary E-mail: pleadings@acdlaw.com Secondary E-mail: mcohen@acdlaw.com Toll Free: (561) 422-4668 Facsimile: (561) 249-0721 Counsel for Plaintiff June 20 & 27, 2013 C301.2023 5706-0627 TWN vs. Yates, Thomas Case No. #65-2012-CA-000252 Notice of Sale 5707-0627 TWN Vs. Foggy, Kimberly Case No.: 65-2012-CA-000235 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000235 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLYA. FOGGY, et al. Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure or Order dated June 6, 2013, entered in Civil Case Number 65-2012-CA-000235 in the Circuit Court for Wakulla, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. the Plaintiff, and KIMBERLYA. FOGGY, et al, are the Defendants, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla Florida, described as: LOT 7, BLOCK 4, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT TWO, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA at a public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 at 11:00 AM. on the 25th day of July 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons in need of a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding shall, within seven (7) days prior to any proceeding, contact the Administrative Office of the Court, Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, telephone (850) 926-0905, TDD 1 800 955 8771 or 1 800 955 8770 via Florida Relay ServiceŽ. Dated: June 6, 2013. WAKULLACOUNTYCLERK OF COURT (SEAL) CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner as Deputy Clerk FLORIDAFORECLOSURE ATTORNEYS, PLLC 4855 Technology Way, Suite 500 Boca Raton, FL33431 (727) 446-4826 June 20 & 27, 2013 5712-0704 TWN vs. Screws, Robert Case No. 652012CA000337CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 652012CA000337CAXXXX Bank of America, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. Robert Screws; Joni Bradwell; Capital City Bank; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2,Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated May 14, 2013 entered in Case No. 652012CA000337CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Bank of America, N.A. is the Plaintiff and Robert Screws; Joni Bradwell; Capital City Bank; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on July 11, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 7, CYPRESS COVE SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 73, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH 1997 DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME; VIN NUMBERS: FLFLV70A25150SK21 AND FLFLV70B25150SK21 Dated this 10th day of June, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jessica L. Fagen, Esquire, Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St., Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL33309 FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.com June 27 and July 4, 2013 5713-0704 TWN Vs. Merkison, Jimmy Case No. 65-2011-CA-000331 Notice of ReSched Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE No: 65-2011-CA-000331 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. JIMMY MERKISON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated May 22, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000331 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, is the Plaintiff and Jimmy R. Merkison, Kasey Merkison, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 18th day of July 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NO. 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARY OF SAID LOT 73 A DISTANCE OF 33.00 FEET TO THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 66 FOOT COUNTY ROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 308.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 100.00 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, RUN THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 311 TRICE LN, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 E-service: servealaw@albertellilaw.com In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. June 27 and July 4, 2013 11-84561 5714-0704 TWN vs. Taylor, Craig Case No. 12000003CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO.12000003CA CitiMortgage, Inc. Plaintiff, vs. Craig A. Taylor; Unknown Spouse of Craig A. Taylor; Escambia County Housing Finance Authority; The Hammocks Subdivision Property Owners Association, Inc.; Unknown Tenant 5716-0704 TWN v. Ogden, Jennifer Case No.: 2013-75-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION CASE NO: 2013-75-CA SCORE FEDERALCREDITUNION, Plaintiff, v. JENNIFER OGDEN, et al Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO:Jennifer Ogden 53 Scott Drive Havana, Florida 32333 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in Gadsden and Wakulla County, Florida: Parcel I: All that certain property situated in the County of GADSDEN, and State of FLORIDA, being described as follows: Commence at an iron pipe bearing north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 80.3 ft from the northwest corner of Section 15, Township 2 north, Range 2 west, Gadsden County, Florida, thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east along the northerly boundary of said Section 15, 888.10 ft to a concrete monument; thence south 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds east; 1496.60 ft to a concrete monument on the northerly right of way boundary of State Road 270 (70.00 foot right of way), said point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly; thence along said northerly right of way boundary and along said curve through a central angle of 10 degrees 00 minutes 59 seconds with a radius of 1726.94 ft for an arc distance of 301.90 ft (the chord of said curve being south 70 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds east: 301.52 ft) to a point on the intersection of the said northerly right of way boundary of State Road 270 and the centerline of Long Leaf Drive; thence north 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds west along the said centerline of Long Leaf Drive 461.27 ft to a point on the centerline intersection of Long Leaf Drive und Lob Lolly County; said point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly; thence along the said centerline of Lob Lolly Court and along said curve through a central angle of 13 degrees 26 minutes 22 seconds with a radius of 411.54 ft for an arc distance of 96.53 ft (the chord of said curve being south 83 degrees 44 minutes 27 seconds east 96.31 ft); thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east along said centerline 824.60 ft to a point of curve to the left; thence along said centerline and along said curve through a central angle of 27 degrees 06 minutes 29 seconds with a radius of 150.00 ft for an arc distance of 70.97 ft (the chord of said curve being north 75 degrees 59 minutes 08 seconds east 70.31 ft) to the point of beginning. From said point of beginning thence continue along said centerline and along said curve through a central angle of 38 degrees 11 minutes 52 seconds with a radius of 150.00 ft for an arc distance of 100 ft (the chord of said curve being north 43 degrees 20 minutes 00 seconds east 98.16 ft); thence south 35 degrees 06 minutes 10 seconds east 33.91 ft to a concrete monument; thence continue south 35 degrees 06 minutes 10 seconds east 445.63 ft to a concrete monument; thence south 01 degrees 36 minutes 54 seconds west 75.84 ft to an iron pin; thence south 89 degrees 45 minutes 55 seconds west 257.49 ft to a concrete monument; thence north 11 degrees 51 minutes 14 seconds west 375.48 ft to a concrete monument; thence continue north 11 degrees 51 minutes 14 seconds west 30.97 ft to the point of beginning. Subject to the following ingress and utility easement; a 60 foot ingress, egress and utility easement lying 30 ft either side of the following described centerline; Commence at an iron pipe bearing north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 80.3 ft from the northwest corner of Section 15, Township 2 north, Range 2 west, Gadsden County, Florida, thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east along the northerly boundary of said Section 15; 888.10 ft to a concrete monument; thence south 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds east 331.00 ft to a concrete monument. Thence continue south 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds east 1496.60 ft to a concrete monument on the northerly right of way boundary of State Road 270 (70 foot right of way), said point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly; thence along said northerly right of way boundary and along said curve through a central angle of 10 degrees 00 minutes 59 seconds with a radius of 1726.94 ft for an arc distance of 301.90 ft (the chordof said curve being south 78 degrees 31 minutes 37 seconds east 301.52 ft); thence north 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds west 461.27 ft to a point lying on a curve concave to the northeasterly, said point being the point of beginning. From said point of beginning, thence along said curve through a central angle of 13 degrees 26 minutes 22 seconds with a radius of 411.54 ft for an arc distance of 96.53 ft (the chord of said curve being south 83 degrees 44 minutes 27 seconds east 96.31 ft); thence north 89 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 824.60 ft to a point of curve to the left, thence along said curve through a central angle of 90 degrees 00 minutes 00 seconds with a radius of 150.00 ft for an arc distance of 235.62 ft (the chord of said curves being north 44 degrees 32 minutes 22 seconds east 212.13 ft); thence north 00 degrees 27 minutes 38 seconds west 150.00 ft to the terminal point of said centerline, said terminal point being the radius point of a 50 foot radius cul-de-sac. Parcel II: All that certain property situated in the County of WAKULLA, and State of FLORIDA, being described as follows: Lot 54, Block 19,Ž Wakulla Gardens Unit 1, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel III: All that certain property situated in the County of WAKULLA, and State of FLORIDA, being described as follows: Lot 55, of Block 19, Wakulla Gardens, as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Henry L. Miller, Jr., Esq., whose address is 277 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida, 32303, on or before thirty days from the date of the first publication of this notice, and file the original with the clerk of this court before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated: May 9, 2013 BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk June 27 and July 4, 2013 #1 and Unknown Tenant #2 Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated May 14, 2013 entered in Case No. 120000003CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc.is the Plaintiff and Craig A. Taylor; Unknown Spouse of Craig A. Taylor; Escambia County Housing Finance Authority; The Hammocks Subdivision Property Owners Association, Inc; Unknown Tenant #1 and Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on July 18, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 74, THE HAMMOCKS PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 34 PAGES 44-45, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA Dated this 10th day of June, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jessica L. Fagen, Esquire, Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St., Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL33309 FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.com June 27 and July 4, 2013 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2012-CA-000250 Division BRANCH BANKING AND TRUST COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS R. YATES, OLIVIA F. YATES, OYSTER BAY ESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on May 10, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: EAST PART OF LOT 11, BLOCK EŽ, OYSTER BAY ESTATES, UNIT NO 2 COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 11, BLOCK EŽ ,OYSTER BAY ESTATES, UNIT NO. 2, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 10 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY,FLORIDA SAID CORNER MARKED BY A CONCRETE MONUMENT AND BEING THE POINT OF BEGINNING FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF THE SOUTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF GULF BREEZE DRIVE(SAID ARC CONCAVE NORTHERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 243.21 FEET)THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 24 DEGREES 38 MINUTES 21 SECONDS A DISTANCE OF 104.58 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID ROADWAY RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 141.10 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE SET FOR REFERANCE NEAR THE NORTHERLY BANK OF A PROPOSED CANAL THENCE CONTINUE SOUTH 16 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 51.69 FEET,THENCE RUN NORTHEASTERLY ALONG AN ARC CONCAVE SOUTHEASTERLY WITH A RADIUS OF 252.50 FEET,THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 9 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 30 SECONDS A DISTANCE OF 43.96 FEET OF THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SAID LOT 11 (SAID POINT IS IN A CANAL AND UNMARKED).THENCE RUN NORTH 03 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 59.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE REFERENCE MONUMENT LYING ON THE BANK OF A CANAL ,THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 03 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 40 SECONDS EAST 102.86 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, THE PARCEL HEREIN DESCRIBED LYING ACROSS THE EASTERLY PORTION OF HEREINABOVE REFERENCED LOT NO. 11. and commonly known as: 46 GULF BREEZE DR, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse on July 11, 2013 at 11am. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 10th day of May, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, B. X. Thurmond (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Michael L. Tebbi (813) 229-0900 x1346 Kass Shuler, P.A. P.O. Box 800 Tampa, FL 33601-0800 June 20 & 27, 2013 5709-0627 TWN Estate of: McCollum, Elliott Case #13-22-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 13-22-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF ELLIOTT P. McCOLLUM, JR., DECEASED. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ELLIOTT P. McCOLLUM, JR., deceased, whose date of death was August 7, 2012, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division under probate file #13-22-CP, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is requires to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF THE SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of the first publication of this notice is June 20, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ Lorna K. Mc/Collum 118 Imperial Drive, Thomasville, GA 31792 Attorney for Personal Representative: By:/s/ T. Buckingham Bird, Esq. P.O. Box 247 Monticello, Florida 32345 (850) 997-3503 June 20 & 27, 2013 5715-0704 TWN Estate of Smith, Betty Ann File No: 13000047CPAXMX Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO: 13000047CPAXMX IN RE: ESTATE OF BETTY ANN SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of BETTY ANN SMITH, deceased, whose date of death was January 12, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The name and address of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is June 27, 2013. Personal Representative: Lisa Hoyt 4533 SW 37th Avenue, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33312 Stuart E. Bloch, Esq.Florida Bar No.: 886459STUART E. BLOCH, ESQ. 980 N. Federal Highway, Suite 302, Boca Raton, FL 33432Telephone: (561) 338-7299 Email: stuart@seblochlaw.comJune 27 and July 4, 2013 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.comRENTALS• Tallahassee 1309 Larette 2BR/2.5BA $725 Mo., $725. Dep. • 45A & 47B Dispennette – 3BR/2BA, $750 Mo., $750 Dep. No smoking, only outdoor pets with approval and $250 pet fee. • 216 Sam Smith – 2BR/1BA, $600 Mo. $600 Dep. Singlewide on 1 acre. Pets okay with approval and $250 pet fee. • 94 Chickat Trail – 3BR/2BA $750 Mo., $750 Dep. No Pets, No Smoking Available July 1 • 52 Deer Run – 1BR/1BA $700 Mo., $700 Dep., located on Sopchoppy River. Available Aug. 1st Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!6 River Cove $550 mo., 2 BR/1BA, BAY VIEW. Near Community Boat Ramp. Pets Considered. 4395 Hwy. 319 SMALL COMMERCIAL OFFICE on Crawfordville Hwy, in Medart. $550. mo. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 142 Shar-Mel-Re 3BD/2BA, wood ooring in great room, fenced back yard. $900 mo./$900 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets.

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Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 1 13 16 19 26 29 37 40 46 51 57 60 63 2 27 47 3 22 48 4 23 43 17 20 44 14 38 41 58 61 64 5 30 49 52 6 31 53 7 24 32 50 8 25 28 45 21 42 9 15 18 33 39 59 62 65 10 34 54 11 35 55 12 36 56 ACROSS 1. Cooperstown charter member Ty 5. Contracts, as an illness 9. Porker's meal 13. Baltic Sea feeder 14. Jazzman Chick 15. Transport by truck 16. Soldiers who drop into battle areas 18. Grid great Graham 19. "Atlas Shrugged" author Rand 20. Martini's partner 21. Cast a ballot 22. Maine politico Olympia 24. "The Biggest Loser" contestants 26. Whodunit plot element 28. Phone listing abbr. 29. Castle of the ballroom 30. Goya's "Naked __" 33. Thirty minutes of football 37. Not of the clergy 38. Googol's hundred 39 __-Day (vitamin brand) 40. Cornerstone word 41. Off-ramp 42. "__ a million years!" 43. Prefix with lead or fire 45. Earth tones 46. Road to conflict 50. Ump's broom 51. Troy, to Homer 52. Run __ of the law 54. "There's __ in 'team'" 57. Disney's "__ & Stitch" 58. Toucan Sam's cereal 60. Seemingly bottomless 61. Gems from Australia 62. Plot unit 63. Wraps up 64. Roly-__ 65. Hebrides islandDOWN1. Barry Manilow song locale 2. Anita who sang with Krupa 3. "West Side Story" composer 4. Playtex product 5. Christmas bird 6 Cupid, to Plato 7. Not so hot 8. Carrier to Oslo 9. Plays b-ball 10. Coffeeshop order 11. External 12. Walks wearily 14. Russell of "Les Misrables" 17. Treasure store 21. Neckline type 23. Knuckleheads 25. S&L offerings 26. Uris's "__ 18" 27. Seaport of Algeria 30. Tex-__ cuisine 31. Meyers of "Kate & Allie" 32. Scribble down 34. Gasoline additive 35. "Star Wars" princess 36. Autograph seekers 38. Tabasco quality 42. Noel who played Lois Lane 44. Fleming who created 007 45. Locks up 46. "An Ideal Husband" playwright 47. "Star Trek" extra 48. Rubbed t he wrong way 49. Mute Marx 50. "__ Bully" (1965 hit) 53. Stable babe 55. C&W mecca, with "the" 56. Words of understanding 58. Stylish dresser 59. Intl. group since 1948 American Prole Hometown Content 6/23/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 234 3516 785 62 59 98 3957 4 53 8679 5714 200 9 HometownContent 815 2963 7 4 923754168 764813259 672 538491 459127836 138649527 241 965783 386472915 597381642 C O P A M I L A W I L D E O D A Y O R A N A L I E N B E R N S T E I N R I L E D B R A N I N C O M P O O P S T R O V E I A N C R O W E Z E S T F O P G O O S E M E X H A R P O E R O S A R I F O A L T E P I D J O T W O O L Y S A S I R A S S H U T S V E E N E I L L S H O O T S H O O P S O A S L A T T E A N T I K N O C K O U T E R L E I A O P R Y P L O D S F A N S I S E E 5671-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 010 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2445Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-086-188-11586-07CWILDWOOD ACRES PHASE II BLOCK C LOT 7 OR 221 P 490 OR 251 P 184 Name in which assessed DANA LYNN HANSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5672-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 011 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2295Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-078-013-10738-000MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK A LOTS 14 & 15 DB 59 P 69 Name in which assessed JOHN W. SMITH said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5673-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 012 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2236Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-014-10434-000GREINERS ADDITION BLOCK 4 LOT 19 OR 10 P 680 Name in which assessed GORDON R WENDORF said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5674-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 013 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2052Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-072-000-10151-003LOT 72 HS P-3-3-M-21A IN NW1/4 OF LOT 72 HS OR 47 P 374 Name in which assessed MARY JANE ROBISON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5675-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 014 5676-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 015 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1742Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-08908-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 21 LOTS 39 & 41 OR 11 P 24 OR 70 P 111 Name in which assessed LULA S HARRIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5677-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 016 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1738Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-08876-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 21 LOTS 3 & 4 OR 2 P 925 Name in which assessed MARION A GRAPPONE said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5678-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 017 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1706Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-08671-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 15 LOTS 27 & 28 OR 257 P 267 OR 790 P 689 Name in which assessed WANDA MOWERY AND JAMES THOMPSON AS JTRS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5679-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 018 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1663Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-034-009-08133-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 2 BLOCK 1 LOT 11 OR 58 P 562 OR 676 P 584 Name in which assessed JOSEPH A CULLEY said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5680-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2290Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-077-021-10667-000TOWN OF CRAWFORDVILLE BLOCK B LOTS 1 & 14 OR 523 P 402 OR 625 P 710 Name in which assessed WAKULLA ANNEX LLC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5681-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 020 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 2047Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-072-259-10149-C04HIGHWOODS PLACE PHASE II BLK C LOT 4 OR 340 P 835 OR 352 P 52 Name in which assessed LESA M EXLINE said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5682-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1917Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-054-081-09928-025WAKULLA HEIGHTS UNIT 2 LOT 24 & 25 OR 187 P 508 OR 753 P 452 Name in which assessed KEITH & CRYSTAL TAFT said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5683-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 022 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1843Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-039-224-09766-005WINDSONG SUB RECORDED LOT 5 OR 192 P 365 OR 206 P 231 Name in which assessed CHARLES & MARY SHEFFIELD said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5684-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 023 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1749Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-08934-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 22 LOTS 9 & 10 OR 127 P 405 & 406 OR 301 P 231 Name in which assessed ROSCOE W ROBISON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5685-06237 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 024 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1545Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-035-008-07346-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT I BLOCK 15 LOT 67 OR 15 P 496 OR 197 P 642 Name in which assessed CHARLIE GILLIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida 5686-0627 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 025 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1306Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:35-3S-01E-263-05538-118VILLAGES OF ST MARKS LOT 118 OR 293 P 623 OR 573 P 861 Name in which assessed DAN MILLER DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices 5710-0718 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 13-DR-273 NOTICE OF ACTION Wendy Walker Gregory, Petitioner Jose Miguel Gregory, Respondent. NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE (NO CHILD OR FINANCIAL SUPPORT) TO: Jose Miguel Gregory, Last Known Address: 529 Cooperwood Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Wendy Walker Gregory, the petitioner, whose address is 531 E. Miracle Strip Parkway, #8, Mary Esther, Florida 32569 on or before July 25, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court at 3056 Crawfordville, Hwy., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 before service on the Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Petition. The action is asking the court to decide how the following real or personal property should be divided: NONE Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Courts office notified of your current address. You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915. Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on record at the Clerks office. Dated: June 17, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk June 20, 27 and July 4 & 11, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTC 10L, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #1747 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-043-010-08924-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 21 LOT 58 OR 472 P 369 OR 477 P 475 Name in which assessed JOSEPH C BARRY JR said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 17 day of July, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this2day of May2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy ClerkClerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 – Page 11B 1. LANGUAGE: What’s another word for “legerdemain”? 2. SCIENCE: What is studied in the science of speleology? 3. MOVIES: Who had the starring role in “Mr. Deeds Goes to Town”? 4. PRESIDENTS: Which president banned segregation in the armed forces? 5. FOOD: What is the main ingredient in sauerkraut? 6. HISTORY: Which Mexican revolutionary said, “It is better to die on your feet than live on your knees”? 7. COMICS: Who was the editor of The Daily Planet in “Superman” comics? 8. GEOGRAPHY: What body of water lies between the island of Sardinia and mainland Italy? 9. SPORTS: What is Yogi Berra’s real name? 10. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Which news anchor wrote the book “The Camera Never Blinks”? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Sleight of hand 2. Caves 3. Gary Cooper 4. Harry Truman, in 1948 5. Cabbage 6. Emiliano Zapata 7. Perry White 8. Tyrrhenian Sea 9. Lawrence Peter Berra 10. Dan Rather Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, June 27, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The News This exhibition showcases the artwork of a group of eight talented and celebrated women. Mary Apple, Rosemary Ferguson, Nina Allen Freeman, Rene Lynch, Fran Mathis, Judith Nable, Vivian Sherlock and Pam Talley comprise a long standing collaborative, meeting regularly to support and nurture each other. They share ideas and advice much like the time honored tradition of the quilting bee which provided an opportunity for women to gather and socialize while expressing their artistic capacities. In centuries past, the quilting bee was one of the few accepted social and political outlets for those who could not otherwise overtly express their opinions. Quilting bees also gave women a focused arena to discuss their creativity while exploring their purposes, thoughts, and experiences in producing their art. Though this particular group of women is primarily focused on painting, not quilting, the spirit of their meetings is much the same. With insight, humor and honesty, these women discuss and critique each others works in progress, offering suggestions and possible solutions to problems. They encourage risk taking and experimentation and share information about new materials and techniques. Included in the Womens Work exhibition are twenty three watercolor, oil and acrylic paintings, each with a perspective and personality as unique as the woman who created it. While each artist retains her individuality, the nature of this collaborative process strengthens not only their painting but their friendship as well. This exhibition is free and open to the public. Gallery hours are 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. daily inside the Tallahassee Regional Airport. The exhibition is curated by the Council on Culture & Arts Arts in Public Places program on behalf of the City of Tallahassee. For more information about this program, visit www.cocanet.org. For more information, contact Amanda Karioth Thompson at (850) 2242500 or Amanda@cocanet. org.Local artist Fran Mathis part of group show at airportWomens Work on display at the Artport Gallery from June 26 through Sept. 2 Fran Mathis painting Net Fishermen. Winner receives one meal from the following:Coastal Restaurant – AYCE Chicken or Pork Chop Dinner Family Coastal Restaurant – AUCE SHRIMP one person, one location onlyEl Jalisco – Mexican Grilled Chicken Fried or GrilledMyra Jeans – Grilled Chicken Pita with sideSKYBOX – Lunch for 2 order from menuDeal’s Oyster House – Mullet Dinner with fries Coastal Restaurant MOBILE CATERING984-2933Open: urs. Mon. € 6a.m. 9p.m. Tues. & Wed. 11a.m 8p.m. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, Panacea Home of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & ChickenAll you can Eat Chicken $6.99 Mixed Tues. & urs. Kids Eat Free on Wednesday 12 & under 2209 Sopchoppy Hwy., Sopchoppy 850 962-2920 46624 SW State Rd 65, Sumatra 850 670-8441Friday: AUCE Snow Crab Sunday: Lunch Buffet OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place for chance to win. Name ____________________________ Address __________________________ _________________________________ City _____________________________ State __________Zip ______________ Phone ___________________________ e-mail ____________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every Restaurant DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS $8.99 (INCLUDES TEA)785 Port Leon Drive (next to post of“ce) Angus Steaks ~ Seafood ~ Chicken ~ Burgers Oysters on the 1/2 shell, Oyster sandwiches and More! 850 925-7865 (STMK) $ 8 U DES TE A) An gu s St ea k DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLC OPEN 11 AM 9 PM Thurs. thru Sun. SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9771 NEW KITCHEN HOURS 11AM TIL MIDNIGHTCALL IN OR DINE IN Come Have Come Have With Us! With Us! DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE850-926-9771 Open 7 Days Open 7 Days 926-7530 Restaurant 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville 2669 Crawfordville Hwy Downtown Crawfordville GREAT FAMILY DINING OLD FASHIONED MALTS Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner at HOT FUDGE SUNDAES & BANNANA SPLITS 926-4329 mon. Thurs. 11 9:30 Fri. Sat. 11 102481 Crawfordville Hwy. in Bay Springs Plaza 9264329 9 2 6 4 3 29 2 9 Imports Domestics 2 for 1 Tequila Shots Margaritas M-F Dine in only 11-3 Sat-Thurs All Day Fri 11-6PM ELJalisco5@live.com Win One Meal from Every Restaurant! Winner Beverly Councildrawn from Myra Jeans in Crawfordville Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering E A T I N ’ p a t h … EATIN’ path… O F F OFF t h e the E A T I N ’ p a t h … EATIN’ path… O F F OFF t h e the “King of The Grill” a must not miss event at Skybox Sports Bar & Grill!Skybox, the local Crawfordville business established 16 years ago, is always bringing creative and of course delicious ways of entertaining and pleasing their clientele. Horseshoe tournaments, Fishing tournaments, live bands, community wide annual yard sales, best chili contest and many more. A great part of summertime fun is grilling and Skyboxs next great event is King of the GrillŽ. On Sunday, July 7th if you like grilling and you think you are a talented cook, this is your opportunity to be the King or the Queen of the Grill. There are (20) 8X10 spaces available to set up your grill and prepare your best “ nger licking grill recipes of beef or pork and compete to win this contest. Cooking starts at 8AM, judging begins at 2:30 p.m. The Awards Ceremony is at 4 p.m. First place wins a trophy, $150 cash and of course, will be crowned King or Queen of the Grill. There will be other prizes, plus the Best Rib ShackŽ wins a Weekend in Carrabelle! This event is always a winner with great food, drinks, live music, the perfect combination for an all-day-fun event! If you wish to enter this contest, get your grill and apron ready and grab the phone right now to call 926-9771 to obtain more information on how to reserve your spot. We will see you on July 7th at Skybox Sports Bar and Grill. Skybox Bar and Grill is located at 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. in downtown Crawfordville, they open at 11AM for lunch and you can enjoy smoke free indoor dining.