Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00464

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PAGE 1

By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netOn Monday, May 20, members of the Tourist Development Council held a workshop in conjunction with the board of county commissioners on the topic of establishing a new TDC director. As it stands, it is the wish of the TDC members that they be in charge of selecting their own director and that the new director be a contractor rather than a county employee. Currently, Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwoods position is as a contracted individual who directs the TDC, writes grants for the TDC as well as administers the grants once received. However, it seemed to be the wish of some of the commissioners to change the way it all works. I think a different model is needed right now,Ž said Commissioner Howard Kessler who seemed to be in favor of more oversight of the TDC. But Portwood seemed to be confused as to what the issue was with the current model. You have the oversight either way with a contractor or a county employee,Ž explained Portwood. Why do you want to go against what the TDC board is suggesting?Ž It was a good question, but one that didnt seem to get answered during the workshop. Im in favor of keeping the director as a contractor, but having grants be a separate thing done by the county,Ž said Commissioner Richard Harden. Commissioner Ralph Thomas is the elected county of“ cial assigned to the TDC. He seceded that hiring a county employee as the TDC director would be a bad idea. I think were limiting our options if we have a county employee be the TDC director. We have people on that TDC board that we trust. Were required to give the oversight either way and if we dont like whats going on its a re” ection of us not giving the proper oversight. If we have a TDC director I think we need to give the board that we have full con“ dence in the power to decide what they want.Ž There also seemed to be a concern about marketing and advertising dollars, to which Commissioner Jerry Moore had a suggestion. The TDC members are smart enough to choose an advertising agency who can market the county,Ž Moore said. Let them be their own director.Ž Moore was in favor of using the money that would be put toward hiring a director into, instead, hiring someone to market for them. That way the amount available for advertising would greatly increase. However, Moores idea didnt seem to take hold. As discussion continued to unfold, it seemed more and more likely that commissioners would not reach a consensus, but passionate words from Portwood seemed to “ nally push things slightly forward. These arguments should be under the best advice of your Tourist Development Council,Ž Portwood said. If you dont have faith in your council then change your council. As soon as you take away the leverage as to what the council members know, then you may as well be the Tourist Development Council. Im here today to support my TDC members and Im asking you as a tax paying citizen of the county to take advice from your TDC experts and council.Ž Ive got full confidence in our TDC members,Ž said Commissioner Harden. Im supporting their recommendation for a contracted director.Ž The workshop ended with the assignment to bring back an agenda item complete with proposed dollar amounts and details given to Commissioner Thomas. The direction moving forward seemed to be that of honoring the TDC members wishes, however nothing is set in stone yet. A decision needs to be made soon, as the TDC loses Portwood at the end of the month. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 21st Issue Thursday, May 23, 2013 Three Sections 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Photo page ...................................................................Page 11A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways....... ...............................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Weekly Roundup.............................................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Senior Citizens .................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside the Book.................................................Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 4B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 4B Comics .............................................................................Page 7B Delinquent Taxes ......................................................Pages 1-18C INDEX OBITUARIES Joseph Patrick Clark Julie Mae Evans Kenneth ‘Flop’ Allen Hobbs Wilbur Alonzo Kennon Howard Everett McKenzie Katherine Eleanor Schick McKenzie Carlton S. Richardson Robert Joe Soule Blaine Eugene ‘Gene’ Stover Jr. Delinquent Tax list inside this edition Section CBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netSomething very exciting is currently happening just offshore. Below the surface of the water, out of plain site, in flat skinny black crates, oysters are being cultivated through the partnership of the Lovel family and TCCs Environmental Institute together with Bob Ballard. All of whom were present at an oyster tasting held at the Lovel familys Spring Creek Restaurant on Wednesday, May 15. A table adorned with local oyster history in the words of R. Seidler, as well as a description of the process that is currently being used to grow the oysters locally sat front and center for onlookers to take in. The “ rst of which read, Since the beginning of time, Florida coastal dwellers have depended on oysters. The Apalachee, Caloosa, Timucuan and many other unnamed peoples used oysters as their staple diet. There was no agriculture only aquaculture.Ž Currently, a device that looks like two black wire crates, each about two inches thick, sit on top of each other, while the bottom crate rests on some PVC piping. The contraption is held down by a metal rod, which gets driven through the top of the crates down into the waterbed, securing it into place. According to Ben Lovel, this process was started about nine months ago. The oyster cage contained about 1,000 oyster seeds or spatŽ which begin at a size smaller than your pinky nail. Lovel said that about a month later the cage was about half full. It was very exciting,Ž he said. Were really excited about this project and the success that were seeing.Ž Lovel went on to explain that petitions are currently being brought to the state to permit ” oatation devices on the cages. The way they are now, the oysters are much more susceptible to fouling, but current law states that the oyster cages have to be secured 6 inches from the ” oor. The flotation devices come in different sizes and make harvesting the cages much easier as the cages ” oat near the surface, whereas right now, they have to be found, heaved out from the bottom up. With floatation devices it would take less man power, which means larger amounts of oysters could be harvested quicker. The attempt to grow local oysters is part of a large movement to grow local eatery, which in turn creates a more sustainable, ef“ cient Wakulla. Were working with TCCs environmental institute to really get this industry going,Ž said Lovel. This isnt just for us.Ž It seems as if Wakullas people and waters could only bene“ t from the oysters moving in permanently. Oysters are green … they dont leave a footprint ecologically and not only that, but they are natural absorbers of carbon. Another interesting aspect of the oyster project is that small scallops are frequently volunteering themselves to the oyster cages … almost as if the scallops want in on the excitement too. This draws an interesting possibility for Wakullans. Locally grown oysters and scallops to create a diversified and sustainable aquaculture industry in Wakulla County? Only time will tell.Special to The NewsThe crime rate fell in Wakulla County in 2012 while the crime clearance rate went up in Wakulla, according to recently released statistics from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement. The State of Florida crime statistics are down as well and the state cleared slightly more cases on average in 2012 than were cleared in 2011. The FDLE Crime In Florida report measures seven index crimes including murder, forcible sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, larceny and motor vehicle theft. The only areas where Wakulla County had an increase was motor vehicle theft, from 14 to 22, and aggravated assault, from 48 to 57. Overall the index crimes were down by 7.7 percent 841 in 2011 to 776 in 2012. There are a number of factors that led to the reduced crime rate in our county,Ž said Sheriff Charlie Creel. We have streamlined the Criminal Investigations Division (CID) by adding deputies to our Youth and Community Services Division through the COPS grant. This has allowed this group of deputies to concentrate on juvenile issues and cases and allows the other detectives to focus mostly on adult cases. Turn to Page 2AWhat to do with TDC director?With Pam Portwood leaving, county commissioners debate options … to go with contractor or employee Pam Portwood, who is stepping down as TDC director at the end of the month.FILE PHOTO • Advisory board OKs community center contract with YMCA, Page 2A • County audit shows good nancial standing, Page 3A More government news: Crime rate down for Wakulla, state PHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYORSpring Creek unveils local oysters Leo, Ben and Clay Lovel. Th re e Sectio Th T re e e Sectio 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 5 Ce n n t t 7 7 7 7 5 Ce n n t t t P h o t o s Photos, P a g e 5 A Page 5A

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsThe Tallahassee Community College Foundation has announced Susan Payne Turner as the new chair of its Board of Directors. Turner, a resident of Crawfordville, serves as the chief risk of“ cer and senior vice president for Prime Meridian Bank in Tallahassee, and is no stranger to serving the community. Recently appointed as the chair for the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council, she is also treasurer for the Coastal Optimist Club, a past-president of the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce and currently serves on the board for the Chamber, a past-member of the United Way of the Big Bend Committee and a past-board member of the Wakulla County Youth Fair Association. TCC is vitally important to our community,Ž said Turner. Im honored to be a part of the Foundations mission to support the College and expand accessibility to the great education opportunities at TCC.Ž Turner recognizes the “ nancial challenges students face and the role the Foundation plays in making college dreams a reality in the community. She is looking forward to shining a light on the Presidents Circle … honoring donors who make annual donations of $1,000 or more … and other TCC scholarships, such as the Angels of Mercy Scholarship and the Barbara & Ted Judd Theater Scholarship. Were thrilled to have Susans leadership on our Board,Ž said Robin C. Johnston, vice president for institutional advancement and executive director of the TCC Foundation. She has played such an important role in the local community … particularly in Wakulla County … and were looking forward to the vision and enthusiasm shell bring.Ž Turner received her Associate of Arts degree from Tallahassee Community College, a Bachelor of Science from Florida State University, and a Master of Business Administration from Troy University. She also graduated from the Graduate School of Banking at Louisiana State University. For more information on the TCC Foundation, visit www.tcc.fl.edu/ foundation or contact Robin Johnston at (850) 201-8580.By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netThe Community Center Advisory Council met on Friday, May 17, to review and respond to the proposed contract pertaining to the YMCA and the community. It was determined at the May 6 Board of County Commissioners meeting with a 3-2 vote that the county would continue to pursue a contract stating that the YMCA would manage the functions of the community center as a youth and family oriented entity. As of right now, according to County Administrator David Edwards, about $50,000 of the $250,000 that the board voted to reallocate and put into the community center has been authorized for spending on the project. The rest the money will be spent as the project satis“ es certain criteria as set forth in the contract. For example, further major advancement cannot take place until YMCA staff conducts a feasibility assessment of the community center in Wakulla County. The study will cost $6,000 but will objectively measure the likelihood of the success of the community center if run by the YMCA. Spending $6,000 on the study was a contentious matter amongst the commissioners at the May 6 meeting. However, after the capital region YMCA president and CEO Ray Purvis explained further what the purpose, measurements and details of the study were, County Commissioner Ralph Thomas reversed his objection to the county paying a portion of the studys cost. We need to make sure that this project is going to work in our county,Ž said Thomas. Conducting this study will protect our interests as well.Ž It turns out that the county wont be footing the bill for the feasibility study all by itself, but rather it will share the cost with the YMCA. It will look at things like price points and which types of activities, if offered, will appeal to the citizens of the county. There was a sense that the YMCA could be ” exible as to how they operate and what they offered in order to best bene“ t the success of the community center for those in the community … that the feasibility study would help the project maneuver in the right direction. No two YMCAs are exactly the same,Ž explained Purvis. My board is not gong to put money into this without knowing that it is feasible, and I would be surprised if Wakulla County would not want to take the same precaution.Ž It will also look at how far the YMCAs business might ripple out onto the doorsteps of other businesses in Wakulla. The idea is to get as much information as possible for all parties for the protection of all parties,Ž explained Purvis as he touched on a key concern raised by those in the community of how the YMCAs presence might infringe on the business of other health and “ tness centers. According to the contract, after the study is conducted and it is determined that the project is feasible, the YMCAs opening will depend on the sale of 350 memberships. The third condition deals with a targeted opening date of April 1, 2014, and that the YMCA is willing to open sooner, but with two conditions … the “ rst being that the 350 memberships are reached and the second being that the county reimburses the YMCA for any de“ cit in operating revenues. The advisory council diligently and thoroughly went through the rest of the contract, asking questions, clarifying confusion and making minor changes, but in the end, voted 4-0 to approve the contract and move forward. Community Center Advisory Committee Chairman Dr. Jim Hilyer was grateful for the progress. We are very fortunate that the YMCA is even interested,Ž Hilyer said at the conclusion of the meeting. Thank you.ŽAdvisory board recommends approval of YMCA contractCOMMUNITY CENTER Providers from the TMH Family Medicine Residency program see patients in your health department on a regular basis. Our experienced physicians and nurse-midwives provide personalized healthcare to women before, during and after pregnancy. We proudly deliver babies at the TMH Womens Pavilion, the only hospital in the region with a Newborn ICU. To learn more about our services or to schedule an appointment, call us at (850) 926-0400. COMPLETEPrenatal Care IN WAKULLA C OUNTY Having a bay? Want pregnancy care close to home? Florida Department of Health Wakulla County 48 Oak Street Crawfordville, FL 32327 From Page 1AWe also have dedicated law enforcement of“ cers who work extremely hard to make sure we solve as many crimes as possible,Ž Creel said. In addition, we have great cooperation between the WCSO and other law enforcement agencies which help solve cases that involve more than one jurisdiction.Ž Creel added that he is pleased that Wakulla County is ranked as the 14th highest county of the 67 in Florida in crime clearance. Wakulla solved 42.7 percent of its cases in 2012 which was up from 39.1 percent of the cases in 2011. Liberty County ranked as the best county with a crime clearance of 77.1 percent. Bradford County cleared 74.6 percent of its cases and Union County cleared 67.7 percent. Jefferson County and Taylor County were ranked fourth and “ fth respectively. The other counties in the top 14 were Lafayette, Bay, Baker, Washington, Calhoun, Marion, Clay and Putnam. Most of the counties ranked higher for crime clearance than Wakulla were counties with smaller population. The state crime clearance rate was 24.8 percent. During the summer months the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce has an increase in the number of visitors and this does occasionally translate into more transient crime. The WCSO works well with the surrounding counties, particularly the Leon County Sheriffs Of“ ce and Tallahassee Police Department, to address transient issues that come from our north,Ž said Sheriff Creel. Looking at the index crime statistics, murder was down from two in 2011 to none in 2012; forcible sex crimes were down from 34 to 31; robberies were down from seven to four; aggravated assault increased from 48 to 57; burglaries dropped from 167 to 149; larceny dropped from 569 to 513; and motor vehicle theft increased from 14 to 22. Wakulla County reported 841 index crimes in 2011 and 776 in 2012 for a decrease of 7.7 percent. Of the 776 index crimes, 92 were violent crimes and 684 were nonviolent. The WCSO arrested 700 individuals including 663 adults, 560 of which were male and 140 were female. The number of violent crimes increased by one from 2011 to 2012, 91 to 92 cases. The number of nonviolent crimes decreased from 750 to 684 over the same time period. The state estimated a population loss of 106 residents from 2011 to 2012. The reduced crime statistics also reduced Wakulla Countys crime rate considerably. The number of arrests from 2011 to 2012 dropped 34.8 percent from 1,074 to 700. Wakulla County property owners reported a total of $705,780 worth of stolen property value and WCSO detectives recovered $175,948 worth of stolen property. The state statistics were announced by Governor Rick Scott. The report shows Floridas crime rate dropped 6.5 percent compared to 2011. The total number of crimes fell 5.7 percent from last year which translates into 43,536 fewer crimes in 2012. The number of violent crimes was down 4.3 percent or 4,218 fewer crimes reported. Governor Scott said, It is because of the hard work of Floridas law enforcement community that we can celebrate todays great news about Floridas crime rate. Having a low crime rate is important to my goal of creating jobs and opportunities for Florida families, and making our state the best state in the nation to live, work or raise a family.Ž Attorney General Pam Bondi added, The decrease in crime in our state is a direct re” ection of the outstanding job our law enforcement of“ cers and prosecutors do to make Florida a safe home to its residents and guests. With this steady decline in our crime rate for the fortysecond consecutive year, I am hopeful that we will see across-the-board declines, speci“ cally in the number of reported domestic violence homicides and sex-related crimes.Ž Florida Department of Law Enforcement Commissioner Gerald Bailey said, While Floridas population continues to increase, the number of crimes continues to fall. This report is good news for Florida families, businesses and visitors. I commend our law enforcement professionals in their efforts to keep us safe.Ž Florida population increased from 18,905,048 in 2011 to 19,074,434 in 2012. Wakulla Countys population dropped from 30,877 to 30,771. The report also contains information on of“ cers killed feloniously. Two law enforcement of“ cers and one correctional of“ cer died from criminal causes while on duty during 2012. In addition, two law enforcement of“ cers died accidently during the course of duty.Crime rate down for Wakulla, state Susan P. Turner chair of TCC board Susan Payne TurnerFILE PHOTO

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By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netAt their most recent meeting on Monday, May 20, the Board of County Commissioners received their 2011-2012 “ scal year audit given by Richard Powell of Powell and Jones. A slew of large digits and amounts were read off and gone through, but in the end the news was good for Wakulla County and county commissioners. The audit showed that there were positive reserves for the year, although the required level according to the fund balance policy as set forth by the county itself was not quite reached. The report showed that the debt of the county, although roughly $10 million at the end of the 201112 “ scal year, the overall amount had decreased for the second year in a row. It was also noted that, not only had the county continued to reduce its debt, but that most of the countys amortization would be substantially reduced in the next 4-6 years,Ž which Powell labeled as commendable. In loans and liabilities, the county lessened its load by roughly $1 million. In terms of grants, the amount that the county received was $5.7 million, which is just amazing to me,Ž said Powell. You had a lot of grant activity and that naturally adds assets to the county.Ž Powell also mentioned that the long-standing finding against the administration of purchase orders had been cleared up. Finally, the combined management letter of the county was gone over, where it was stated that all prior year “ ndings were corrected and in the current year the only documentation discrepancies that were found during random audit selection were that of minor amounts relating to documentation of stipend payments to volunteer “ remen at the St. Marks “ re department. When we selected some payments at random and traced them back to attendance records, the discrepancy in amounts wasnt big, but they just werent exact,Ž explained Powell. So, we recommend that the fire department verify that all stipend payments are fully documented by attendance records.Ž All in all the report seemed to be positive and encouraging that the “ nancial state of the county was in good standing and improving since years prior. Staff is what got us to a good report,Ž said County Administrator David Edwards. Id like to thank them for a job well done. The county is in good “ nancial standing and I feel like we are being good stewards of the countys money.Ž In other matters before the board: € Mark Mitchell reported that the Panacea Rock the Dock fishing tournament was a huge success.Ž According to Mitchell there were 500 seafood dinners served at the captains meeting that Friday and during the entire event from Thursday to Sunday he estimated that about 5,000 visitors were brought to Panacea. € The board approved an agreement with the Florida Department of Transportations Highway Beautification Council grant agreement. The non-matching grant is for $99,801 for beauti“ cation at Ochlckonee Bay bridge that will obligate the county to an annual maintenance cost of about $5,800. Commissioner Ralph Thomas was opposed to the maintenance expenses. In light of the positive “ scal audit report, Thomas seemed to want to keep the improvements in spending going. Im not opposed to beauti“ cation and Im not opposed to receiving this grant,Ž he explained. It would be nice to have, but its going to cause us to spend additional money and to use additional resources, so Im going to oppose it.Ž The consensus of the other commissioners seemed to be that the positive effects of the project would outweigh the negative. We dont have the means to do this any other way,Ž said Commissioner Richard Harden. The beauti“ cation of our entrances is a necessity, it adds amenities to our county.Ž Commissioner Howard Kessler was for the project as well. I totally agree with what Commissioner Thomas is saying as far as being careful with our spending,Ž he said. But this is an economic descendent that is going to drive people to Wakulla County.Ž This improves the quality of life and pride in my community and I would like to see it happen,Ž agreed Chairman Randy Merritt. The motion to approve passed 4-1 vote with Thomas voting against. € County commissioners voted unanimously to approve an emergency item relating to “ xing the roof of the Panacea fire station. They agreed to go with the higher bidding roo“ ng contractor by $400 as they offered a guaranteed labor warranty for a “ ve year period. € Commissioners voted unanimously to approve the Kimley-Horn individual project order relating to water and sewer revenue suf“ ciency analysis. This analysis is essential in the process of pursuing a grant and loan for the improvement efforts of the Otter Creek wastewater treatment plant. The budgetary impact of the approval is in the amount of $14,500 for approximately 93 hours of work and expenses, which will be an allowable and eligible expense under the pending grant award. € The board tabled a controversial item on the adoption of an overlay zoning district for Greiners Addition, Magnolia Gardens and Wakulla Heights subdivisions. Earlier in the year, the board directed staff to prepare overlay zoning regulations for the subdivisions that would keep the same restrictions held under original ordinances as well as allow mobile homes that were destroyed to be replaced with mobile homes of the same age or newer than that which was destroyed. But county staff determined that discriminating against mobile homes according to their age is strictly and clearly prohibited under Florida Statute, but that local regulations governing aesthetic requirements pertaining to roofing and siding are allowed. Commissioners indicated they did not yet feel comfortable enough to give direction. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 17 … The unemployment rate in Florida dropped to 7.2 percent in April, down from 7.5 percent a month earlier, giving Gov. Rick Scott more fodder for his claim that the administrations efforts are working to return the economy to pre-recession success. The new rate is the lowest it has been since September of 2008, early in the recession and marks several months of continued recovery. The improvement also, however, tracks national gains in employment, though the states jobless rate is now below the national rate of 7.5 percent. The announcement of the April drop in unemployment came as Scott was in Tampa to sign the legislation (HB 7007) that was his top economic development priority of the recently-ended legislative session. The bill allows manufacturers to automatically qualify to buy new equipment without paying sales tax, starting next year. The tax break will be in effect for three years unless lawmakers extend it. Florida‘s families are getting back to work and our state‘s economy is growing,Ž Scott said in a statement. With 16,700 new private sector jobs added last month and an unemployment rate that continues to decline, Florida is once again below the national average at 7.2 percent.Ž Scott also boasted about the manufacturing tax break legislation and the recent announcement by car rental company Hertz that it would move its headquarters from New Jersey to southwest Florida and move hundreds of workers from New Jersey and Oklahoma to Estero. It is clear that our policies to create jobs for Florida families and attract new and expanding businesses to Florida (are) working,Ž Scott said. In December 2010, shortly after Scott was elected, the unemployment rate in the state was over 11 percent. The year-over-year drop in April was the 30th straight month in which the state saw a year-to-year decline. Economists have projected unemployment should continue to drop, returning to as low as 6 percent in Florida by 2016 at the latest. Total non-farm employment in Florida, seasonally adjusted, was just over 7.5 million in April, a 0.2 percent increase over March, and 1.6 percent higher than the same time last year. That tracked a matching 1.6 percent increase in the number of jobs nationally over the same period. The job growth was led last month by the trade, transportation and utility sector. Leisure and hospitality, private education, health services, and construction all saw signi“ cant gains in jobs as well, the state Department of Economic Opportunity said. The Keys continued to have the lowest unemployment rate, at 3.7 percent. Walton, Okaloosa and Alachua counties all had jobless rates under 5 percent. Hendry, Flagler and Putnam counties all recorded unemployment over 9 percent.TALLAHASSEE, May 17 – An annual ritual once again produced a sign of Miami-Dade County’s clout and size: The county took in by far the most money from the state budget, according to a countyby-county breakdown of local projects released Friday by the Legislature. In fact, Miami-Dade’s haul of more than $1.7 billion is about 65 percent more than the county with the next-largest share, Broward, which took in a shade over $1.05 billion. Rounding out the top 10 for state funds were Hillsborough ($695.4 million), Alachua ($688.5 million), Duval ($625.8 million), Orange ($542.1 million), Leon ($507.9 million), Palm Beach ($435 million), Pasco ($252 million) and Lee ($220.7 million). The county with the least to show in direct spending from the budget, which takes effect July 1, is Union County in rural north Florida. It received just $176,225. Only two other counties had less than $1 million: Liberty, which had $218,917; and Wakulla, which takes home $416,884. Rounding out the bottom 10 were Lafayette ($1.2 million), Gilchrist ($1.3 million), Dixie ($2.8 million), Hardee ($3 million), Jefferson ($3.5 million), Franklin ($3.8 million) and Gadsden ($5.1 million).– NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDACOUNTY COMMISSIONCounty audit shows good nancial standing Reserves up, but not as much as county wanted, while debt decreases for second year in a row Notice of Public Hearings Concerning Comprehensive Plan Text Amendment for Public School Facilities Element and Capital Improvements Element Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962.MAY 23, 2013 Jobless rate drops to 7.2 percent as Scott signs tax break Wakulla’s jobless rate in April, down from 5.7 percent in February. Leon’s jobless rate in February, down from 5.8 percent in February. 5.5 5.5Locally: Wakulla at bottom for state projects

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $32/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Sheriff’s Report for May 16, 2013 • Ribbon cutting held for new paddling trails • Sheriff’s Report for May 9, 2013 • Local veterans travel to Washington • History mystery • Fish fry for seniors • Kudzu bugs appear in Wakulla County • Board votes 3-2 to go forward with YMCAthewakullanews.com Follow us on Editor, The News:My wife and I were deeply saddened to learn of the passing of Mr. Everett McKenzie. Brother Everett was a true Christian gentleman of the old order. I met him through my wife, his cousin, Loyce many years ago when I became an of“ cial shoein to Wakulla County. I remember Brother Everett as a Godly man with a soft voice; a “ rm handshake, the kind of man who would tell you he loved you and you knew he meant it! Jesus said, By their fruits you shall know themŽ (Matthew 7:20). Never have I witnessed this verse of scripture lived out more than in Brother Everett. For years I watched him along with his loving wife Elena, with a handful of other parishioners at their side as they held on to the hope, the promise, and re-birth of a church … one of the old landmarks in Sopchoppy, Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church. My wifes late sister Debbie McKenzie Ingram and her husband Steve were also part of that group. Mr. Everett was just as loving outside the church as he was in it. He would invite you to come go home with him to eat on Sunday, and he meant it. Their years of praying, believing, and standing in faith came to fruition. Mount Beasor, a local church with strong roots in Wakulla County has come alive again with a new Pastor, Brother Bruce Taylor along with his wife Syble. The scripture says, ask for the old paths, where is the good way, and walk therein, and ye shall “ nd rest for your souls (Jeremiah 6:16). Brother Everett lived it, Mount Beasor is continuing it, and I know he would love for you to go and be part of it. We will miss Brother Everett and Sister Elena when we visit Mount Beasor, but every time we walk in that church we cannot help but remember they had a strong hand in building it, and keeping it alive through the years. Brother Everett along with his wife Elena have both now gone to be with the Lord, that they may rest from their labours, and their works do follow them (Revelation 14:13). May God continue to bless and comfort his family, and the work he cared so deeply about. Wilbur Reeves reeveswlrjr@comcast.netLast weeks edition of the Week in Wakulla gave the wrong meeting date for the Sarracenia chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society. The meeting took place on Tuesday, May 21 at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla Public Library. In the front page story last week, School referendum passes,Ž it was indicated that Supervisor of Elections Buddy Wells made the decision not to send out sample ballots for the referendum in order to keep costs down. Actually, the school board made that decision, not Wells. Editor, The News: I thank our local health care providers for their collaboration … and for the compassion and commitment they showed for the health of our community … on Saturday, May 18. Six clinicians and dozens of other volunteers each donated “ ve hours of their time on a Saturday to provide free sports physicals for 165 student athletes. Their goal was to keep local students from being denied an opportunity to play sports because they lack a family doctor, health insurance, or the ability to pay. Dr. Andrea Plagge, Dr. Matthew Standridge, Dr. Christine Chiu, and Cartier Lammert, ARNP (Tallahassee Memorial Family Medicine), Doug Necaise, ARNP (Wakulla Medical Center), and Dr. Howard Kessler provided the medical examinations. Assisting in the clinic were Lois Cook, Sandy DeGennaro, and Susan Register. Volunteers staf“ ng the stations for height, weight, pulse, blood pressure, temperature, hearing, and vision included Mary Ellis, Renda Brooks, Barbara Sutherland, Leigh Key, Anne Van Meter, and two students from the WHS Medical Academy: Tamiya Potter and Jeanna Prisco. WCSO deputies assisted with traf“ c ” ow in the parking lot. Coaches were on hand for crowd control. Tanya English, Brian English, and Jim Hilyer took charge of check-in and paperwork completion. Gail Hickman directed patient ” ow in the waiting room and into the clinic. Sue Morgan and Asiah Thomas collected and copied completed forms. Tanya English coordinated the event for the School District and worked with athletic directors and coaches to get the word out to student athletes. Lynn Artz was responsible for volunteer recruitment and overall coordination. Tallahassee-Memorial Family Medicine generously contributed the use of their facility, equipment, and supplies. The Wakulla County Health Department loaned equipment and donated supplies. Best Neighborhoods provided funding to help defray the cost of medical supplies. The willingness of all these hard-working professionals to help our youth in their spare time was inspiring. I am deeply grateful to all involved. Lynn Artz, MD, MPH Wakulla Health Care Task Force Editor, The News: An open letter to employees of Wakulla EMS: It has been slightly over a year since I began my involvement with Wakulla County EMS. I stated last year, during EMS Week, how impressed I was with the remarkable employees of our service. Attitudes mean a lot, whether dealing with the patient, response, situation, or when overwhelmed with more calls than there are Rescues. Your attitude shows that providing EMS to Wakulla County is more than a job to you. This year I remain impressed and am proud to be part of this organization. Never before have I seen such ef“ ciency from a two-member crew who very rarely see any back up responding. When “ rst witnessed, the quick loading of a patient made me think care was being sacri“ ced but I soon learned that same care is enhanced. With the average mileage to the closest hospital well over 20 miles, transporting quickly is a must. The care one medic renders during that transport outshines what I have seen from two and more in the back of a unit. Continually, and seemingly more often, we receive more calls than we have on duty units. With no mutual aid available our citizens still receive quick response. Placing a Captain Paramedic Supervisor on each shift this past year has helped placing a fourth unit in service. However many times we have an off duty member respond to provide the other crew member. And we still see the nextŽ call come in and YOU provide that coverage leaving your family so that Wakulla gets rapid EMS response. It is truly amazing that a system that mans three ALS units can put “ ve and six units on the road whenever needed and it happens more than some people realize. This past year has seen the implementation of cross-training pay for those that are “ re“ ghters which has allowed for quicker response of apparatus especially in the east part of the county. Now apparatus can respond immediately and volunteers can go direct to the scene. It has also allowed more manpower to be on the scene when we do get a working “ re. Your efforts helping us streamline report submissions has allowed us to be more ef“ cient in collecting user fees. This certainly helps the overall budget for Wakulla County allowing for a larger percentage of the EMS budget to be provided by the user fees. As we celebrate nationwide EMS Week you wont see any extra in your paycheck because of it. You wont receive expensive gifts.You might get some goodies from the medical staff of the receiving facilities but expensive meals will not be provided. Some of you dont even realize the week is any different than the other 51 of the year. But we know you are there when needed. With all sincerity I want to say THANK YOU for what you do for Wakulla County, each and every one of you. Michael Morgan Wakulla Fire Chief Thanks so much for all your love, support, & prayers during the loss our Beloved Husband, Father & Grandfather, Harold H. Strickland, Jr. We appreciate all the visits, phone calls, ” owers, food & love. Please continue to keep us in your prayers. Nettie Strickland & family The family of Ida Jean Metcalf would like to thank everyone for being so helpful during our time of need. Your visits, cards, and gifts of food helped us tremendously, and we thank you. Jesse Metcalf Panacea, Florida By JANICE EAKINHaving been a mother for 56 years, a grandmother for 29 years and a great grandmother for three years, she decided to bring a new baby into her care. We all knew she wanted this but had been resisting since her husband thought she had enough on her plate. But, ever since the loss of her last child about two years ago, she longed for another child. And, last week, four days before Mothers Day, she was “ rst introduced to this little eight week old girl and immediately fell in love, knowing she wanted to be this girls mother. Her husband was initially cautious but saw the immediate change in his wife and supported her decision to adopt. So the arrangements were made and AllyŽ went to live with her new mother and father. Being new parents presented the all so familiar sleepless nights. After a couple of nights being woke up several times during the night, she decided to put Ally in bed with them. Ally slept soundly … next to her husband. Family and friends told them You are making a mistake.Ž And, the new parents knew it but couldnt resist. They were smitten. These new parents are my parents. They now have a 3 pound puppy! And they are loving every minute of it, even the training and new responsibilities. When we were leaving on Mothers Day, mama said, I think Ill give Ally a bath.Ž As I think about how their life changed instantly when Ally went to live with them, I think about how much a new pet is like a child.Ž They are not toys that you can put in a box. They require lots of love, attention, care and “ nancial support. And they give back many times their requirement … if you REALLY want them. So if you are thinking about adoption, think about the responsibilities and expenses that come with it. Its easy to get caught up in the Oh, he is so cute!Ž but remember puppies grow up to be dogs, kittens grow up to be cats, which in my opinion is a good thing, like our babies growing up to be adults. If you would like to add a new member to your family, please check out the pets at CHATs Adoption Center and online at www. PetFinder.com. For more information, call (850) 926-0890 or visit the website at www.chatofwakulla. org and on Facebook at Chat of Wakulla. Janice Eakin is a volunteer with CHAT.A new mother at 77 READERS WRITE:Appreciation for EMS employees ank you for help with sports physicals Families appreciate support Everett McKenzie will be missedCorrections

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 5A PHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYOR

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Church Briefs Pioneer Baptist to hold indoor garage salePioneer Baptist Church will have an indoor garage sale in the Fellowship Hall on Saturday, May 25, from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Many terri c bargains including clothing for the family, electronics, and many items of different categories, Pioneer Baptist Church is located at 486 Beechwood Drive, Crawfordville. Proceeds from the sale will bene t our youth summer camp expenses. We hope to see you on Saturday morning. Sopchoppy Southern Baptist to honor pastorsSopchoppy Southern Baptist Church at 117 Curtis Mill Road, Sopchoppy, would like to invite you to join us in a Deacon Emeritus ceremony honoring Deacon Bernie Kemp and Deacon Fraiser Martin on Sunday, May 26, in the 6 p.m. evening worship service. A fellowship will follow immediately after. Youth fundraiser at Panacea Congregational A youth fundraiser will be held Saturday, May 25, at Panacea Congregational Holiness Church in Panacea. Menu consists of pulled pork sandwiches or hamburgers, with a choice of two sides baked beans, cole slaw, or potato salad. Price is $6 per plate and includes a drink, sweet or unsweet tea. We will begin service at 11 a.m. until. For more information call (850) 9264557 or (850) 984-5579.And I thought I was confused OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDER I have concluded that life, as it stands out in the public arena, is a very confusing thing. As I watched the news and see scandal after scandal unfold and people trying to dance around the facts so that they come out looking good, I am reminded of how that doesnt work for me. I have a new TV show I want to pitch to someone. I am calling it, Dancing with the Idiots.Ž The genius of the show is there is no shortage of contestants. The problem with this show would be who is the idiot to beat all idiots? Since I am not a very good dancer this does not work for me. I think the difference is, I have to answer to the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Believe me, she was not born yesterday but I will not give the exact year for obvious reasons. I used to do that but that is when I learned I could not dance, at all. When I was very young and more confused than I am today I thought I could get away with anything. Believe me, I tried. I could write a book, but then there are so many people I would not want to read it that it would not be worth publishing. One problem is associated with this kind of thinking. If you get away with something, who in the world can you brag to about it? If I do something behind my wifes back and actually get away with it, where is the consolation prize? I think the only thing that really illustrates this is fishing. When I was younger, I loved to “ sh. The wonderful world of angling consists of two kinds of “ shermen: those who brag a lot and those who catch a lot and the twain shall never cross rods. I was an avid “ sherman and it was a long time before I “ gured out that in the 23rd Psalm David is not talking about a “ shing rod when he says, thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.Ž Be that as it may, my “ shing rod did a great deal of comforting me back in the day.Ž When I would go “ shing and come home emptyhanded, I could brag about the big one that got away. Of course, every time I told the story the “ sh got just a little bit bigger. But who is going to correct me on that? Who is to say that it was not really that big? Or, even bigger? When I came home with a bunch of “ sh, the catch spoke for itself. After all, how in the world can you exaggerate something when it is right before you? Who do you think I am? A politician? If you do think you are getting away with something, somebody will see you and share that information with somebody else who will share that information with somebody else until it has come full circle. Thus begins the dizzy world of confusion. Just this week, for example, I was caught. I hate getting caught. I had come home after a long day at the of“ ce and my wife greeted me with, I saw Mrs. Jones who said she saw Mrs. Smith who told her that Mrs. Grant saw you buying an Apple Fritter at Publix. Is there any truth in it?Ž Any husband knows he will never win any argument when there are four women who testify to the contrary of what he is about to say. The best procedure at this point is to fall on the mercy of the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage. Because, I have discovered the great secret to marital bliss. Simply put, when she is happy, I am happy. The trick is to find out what makes her happy. When I am thus caught with the alleged Apple Fritter, she is happiest when I confess and say the magical words, Youre right!Ž Arguments have disappeared. The only thing I have to hear now is, Well, dont let it happen again.Ž And the marital bliss is back on track and I have averted a personal train wreck. A long time ago, I understood the difference between being happy and being right. Yes, there is that time when you need to stand your ground regardless of the consequence. My philosophy of life is to simply pick your battles very carefully. Not every battle is worth the scars. After all, when you are caught with the goods in hand, denying it is the epitome of stupidity. Unless I am a politician, I want to stay away from stupidity as much as possible. The thing about denying the scandal you might be in at the time is, it only prolongs the focus on the scandal. Perhaps some politicians could take my advice and confess fully when caught with the goods in hand. Saying, Im sorry,Ž is the first step in putting something behind you. Someone said that confession is good for the soul. It is good for many other things as well. The Bible is sure good on this aspect of confession. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousnessŽ (1 John 1:9 KJV). The world can be very confusing if we are not willing to fess up and try straightening things out.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. By DR. BETSY GOEHRIG This is Memorial Weekend … a time in which we remember our loved ones who have gone before us, as well as a time to remember those who died in protecting our freedom. And how do WE want to be remembered? What kind of difference do you want your life to make? What kind of legacy do you want to leave? There are many us who have been a part of a family of faith for most or all of our lives. We have worked hard to make a difference in the lives of others through our churches and in our community. If I were to ask, Do you want your congregation and its ministries to continue for generations after you are gone?Žƒ most people would say a resounding, YES!Ž Yet, very few make provisions for that to happen. Based on a nation-wide study, only 6 percent of all citizens leave anything to any charitable organization, with a tiny portion of estates going to churches. Its so easy to do, yet so few think about it when making their plans. How can you leave a lasting legacy of faith? How can you continue to make a difference in peoples lives after youre gone? € By including your church in your will or living trust. You can do this several ways: (a) by designating a speci“ c dollar amount to be given to your church (i.e., $10,000, etc.); (b) by designating a percentage (i.e., 10 percent, 20 percent); or (c) by including the church as a bene“ ciary (i.e., included among your children or other loved ones). € By including the church in your life insurance plans. For a small investment, a signi“ cant contribution can be made through life insurance by naming your church as a bene“ ciary. € By donating property or stock. You may have a vacation house or land or stock you would like to donate, which your church can then sell and use the proceeds for ministry and mission. Providing such a legacy helps ensure a strong, vital ministry through your church to the community for generations to come, making a difference in countless lives! Wont you prayerfully consider this beloved one, your church, in your preparations? Think how much stronger our churches and our community would be if we remember Christ in this loving and lasting way! Have a blessed Memorial weekend!Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church. HEAVENS TO BETSYLeave a lasting legacy

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Special to The NewsWhat does it mean to you to live well? This is one on the “ rst questions a trained facilitator will discuss with you as a part of Big Bend Hospices new program PEACE. PEACE (Planning Early about Care at the End) is modeled after Respecting Choices, a well-developed and proven systematic approach to help people articulate clearly and with those who matter most their wishes for end-of-life health care. The PEACE program uses certi“ ed health care facilitators from Big Bend Hospice who have been trained in helping people have on-going discussions about important issues like what treatment a person would want if they are no longer able to speak for themselves to how would a person like to be remembered by those who matter most to them. These desires are captured on a document like Five Wishes and a reliable system is set in place to ensure the document is available as needed. The goal is to initiate an ongoing discussion that focuses on a persons motivation, knowledge and belief regarding health care at the end-of-life. The assessment helps to articulate preferences, values and goals. Building off of this understanding, people are better equipped to select a person who can speak for them in the event they cannot speak for themselves. Understanding the medical aspect of care for life-limiting illnesses, allows a person to make better informed decisions of what they do or do not want and these decisions can be clearly articulated to their family, doctors, rabbi or minister, and other trusted persons. Personal, cultural, and religious beliefs impact how we live and should be considered in how we die. Even if you have advance directives in place, you might find it helpful to review these plans with a facilitator skilled in evaluating the clarity of the values and wishes expressed. If you would like to schedule a one-on-one meeting with a trained facilitator or have a PEACE representative come and speak with your church or organization, call (850) 878-5310. The service is free. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 7AObituaries Joseph Patrick Clark Julie Mae Evans Kenneth ‘Flop’ Allen Hobbs Wilbur Alonzo Kennon Howard Everett McKenzie Katherine Eleanor Schick McKenzie Carlton S. Richardson Robert Joe Soule Blaine Eugene ‘Gene’ Stover Jr.Julie Mae Evans, 57, of Sopchoppy, went home to be with her Lord on Sunday, May 19, 2013. She enjoyed working more than 20 years as a home health aide. Julie enjoyed “ shing and spending quality time with her grandchildren. She was the daughter of Alice Porter Evans and the late Clyde Evans. She leaves behind a daughter, Jeanie Sorrell and a son, Michael (Charlotte) Sorrell; four grandchildren, Ryan Savary, Russell Simmons, Albrey Sorrell, Clay Sorrell; four brothers: William Evans, Frank (Evelyn) Evans, Fred (Brenda) Evans, Walden (Tricia) Evans; a sister, Alice Ann Evans; and numerous nieces and nephews. Visitation will be on Thursday, May 23, 2013 from 3 p.m. until 5 p.m. with the memorial service immediately following at 5 p.m. at Mount Beasor Church in Sopchoppy. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel of Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. Howard Everett McKenzie, 90, of Sopchoppy, passed away on Tuesday, May 14, 2013. He was born in Sanborn. He had been a member of Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church since 1941 and a Senior Deacon since 1963. He was instrumental in the existence and continued growth of the church. He was humble, loving and was a devoted husband, father and friend to his family and many others. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Friday, May 17, 2013 at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held Saturday, May 18, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. at Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church in Sopchoppy, with burial to follow at Sanborn Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church, 29 Winthrop Avenue, Sopchoppy FL 32358. Survivors include a daughter, Mary Alice Register (David); grandchildren, Rebecca White (Orin), Kimberly Deledda (Sebastian); and great-grandchildren, McKenzie Grace White, Brandon Scott White, and Halen Knox Deledda; brothers, J.C. McKenzie (Pat) and Carl McKenzie (Joyce); sisters, Maxine Bussell (Charles), Carolyn Clark (Broward); Dianne McKenzie, and Margie Ellen Daaboul (Hassan); and brother-in-law, Flavey Mathers. He was predeceased by his wife in March 2013, Elena Falcione McKenzie; his parents, Wattie Everett McKenzie and Alice Beatrice Green McKenzie; and siblings, W.T. and Pauline McKenzie; Anise and Leo King; Hazel and Ralph Fowler; Hilda Mathers; and Gail and Bill Bohannon. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Blaine Eugene GeneŽ Stover Jr., 61, of Shell Point, passed away Saturday, May 11, 2013, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital following a heart attack. He was born July 25, 1951 in State College, Penn., the son of Blaine and Amy Kelleher Stover. He resided in Oil City, Penn., in his early years, before moving along with his parents to Albany, Ga. He attended Albany Junior College and Georgia Southwestern and Florida State University. As an entrepreneur, Gene had many interests. He was a scuba diver and enjoyed living on and near the ocean. He wrote and produced music, was a music copyright agent, and provided sound equipment for concerts as a sound specialist. He had a keen interest in technology which led to various business ventures including online video streaming, chemical cleaning of commercial building exteriors and marketing of various products ranging from hot tubs to beverages. During his career, Gene was associated with SESAC of Nashville, Tenn., as a music licensing consultant, IMPULSE Productions as owner, American Chemical Corp., Gulf Coast Manufacturing and Sub Aquatic as an instructor. He was active in Rotary and youth and community service groups in Wakulla County. He was active in the National Ri” e Association. Gene and Dee Shriver were active partners in Huntmore International, Backdoor Liquor Store and Shell Point Realty. Dee Shriver, a special friend, survives him. Two uncles and three aunts, Cornelius and Pauline Stover of Knox, Carole Stover of Knox, Ginny Stover of Titusville and Dale Stover of Cleveland, many loyal friends and associates, aunts and numerous cousins also survive him. His parents preceded him in death. A memorial service will be on the beach at Shell Point on June 1 at 3 p.m. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department, 1448 Shell Point Road, Crawfordville FL 32327. Kenneth FlopŽ Allen Hobbs, 64, of St. Marks and Wakulla Station, passed away Thursday, May 16, 2013. He is survived by his wife of 36 years, Phyllis Carraway Hobbs. He was born in Louisville, Ga., and had lived in this area 45 years. He was a member of St. Marks First Baptist Church. He was a graduate of Wrens High School in 1967. He was a Mason, and Past Master of Crawford Lodge 294. He loved hunting, “ shing and spending time with his grandson. He was employed at Shell Island Fish Camp for 42 years. The family received friends from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday, May 18, 2013 at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held Sunday, May 19, 2013, at 2 p.m. at St. Marks Baptist Church in St. Marks, with burial to follow at St. Marks Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to St. Marks Baptist Church, P.O. Box 145, St. Marks FL 32355. Other survivors include a son, Anthony Hobbs (Becky), and grandson, Chase Kenneth Hobbs of Wakulla Station; a brother; Wayne Hobbs (Janie) of Thomson, Ga.; sisters, June Glover (Johnny) and Janet Hobbs, both of Augusta, Ga.; honorary brother and sister, Allen Hobbs (Ruthie) and Gail Field (David); and honorary mother, Gazzie Hobbs; sister-in-law, Shirley Rigdon and brother-in-law, Dale Carraway; nieces and nephews, Chris Carraway (Joanna), Justin Rigdon (Dawn), Carol McCorkle (Chess), Dana Esslinger (Jeff), Amy Scherer (Joseph), Jimmy Bevis (Sherie), Brian Hobbs (Samantha), Alana Wholrab (Dan), and a host of great nieces and nephews. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com). Robert Joe Soule, 26, of Huntington, W.Va., died Saturday, May 18, 2013, in Tallahassee. He lived in Wakulla County for most of his life. Survivors include his wife, Krista Soule; his childs mother, Ashley Bowen and son, Robert Soule Jr.; sisters, Mary Sharp, Billy Jean Sharp, and Jasmine Bell; brothers, Tracy Russell and George Sparrow; his grandmother, Mary Clemons; and girlfriend, Melissa Hagan. Memorial services will be announced at a later date.Joseph Patrick Clark, 51, of Crawfordville, passed away on Thursday, May 16, 2013. He was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, and had lived in this area 20 years. He was an inspector for PBS&J. He enjoyed airboats and jeeps. He was a loving husband and father. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., Monday, May 20, 2013, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Services were held Tuesday, May 21, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Medart Assembly of God, Crawfordville, with burial to follow at Council Cemetery. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Covenant Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road Suite 102, Tallahassee FL 32308 or CHAT of Wakulla County, P.O. Box 1195, Crawfordville FL 32326. Survivors include his wife, Tammy Lee Alexander Clark; two children, Dustin and Demi Smith of Crawfordville; a grandchild, Braylnn Smith; a brother, Brian Stephens of Las Vegas; a sister, Cheri Jolley of West Valley City, Utah; and an aunt, Carolyn Kean of Portsmouth, Ohio. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is in charge of arrangements. (850-9263333 or bevisfh.com). Wilbur Alonzo Kennon, 84, passed away Sunday, May 12, 2013 in Crawfordville. He was born in Buffalo, N.Y. Survivors include his wife, Esther Kennon; four sons; one brother; several grandchildren and other relatives. Services will be held at a later date. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, is assisting the family with arrangements. Katherine Eleanor Schick McKenzie, 87, of Medart died on May 14, 2013. She was born in Bridgeport, Conn., on Feb. 22, 1926. After retiring to Medart, she was a volunteer at the Wakulla County Public Library. She is survived by her husband, Grady G.F.Ž McKenzie; four children, Karen, Gary, Gregg and Brad McKenzie; five grandchildren and one great-grandchild; and daughters-in-law, Pam, Tammy and Pacita. The family had a private service on May 19. The Rev. Carlton S. Richardson, 79, died on May 18, 2013 in Crawfordville. He was born to Alberta and William C Richardson on Aug. 11, 1933. He was the pastor of The Lords House located in Medart. Survivors include his wife of 30 years, Tammy Richardson; one brother, the Rev. William C. Richardson; one son, Carlton Allan Richardson; two daughters, Donna Sue Brown and Pamela Marie Timmons, three stepdaughters, Michelle Alexander, Danyell Costly and Renee Harrell; and five grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his mother, Alberta Givens; his father, William C. Richardson; and granddaughter, Amanda Brown.Julie Mae Evans Howard Everett McKenzie Blaine Eugene ‘Gene’ Stover Jr. Kenneth ‘Flop’ Allen Hobbs Robert Joe Soule Joseph Patrick Clark Wilbur Alonzo Kennon Katherine Eleanor Schick McKenzie Carlton S. Richardson Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at 1584 Old Woodville Road, (850) 421-5741. All are welcome. On Sunday, May 26: € 8:30 a.m. … Contemporary Service € 9:30 a.m. … Fellowship, Alford Building. € 10 a.m. … Adult Sunday School. € 11 a.m. … Traditional Service. € 6 p.m. … Youth Group. Tuesday, May 28: € 6 p.m. … Praise Team Practice Wednesday, May 29: € 6 a.m. … Mens Bible Study with breakfast following at 8 a.m. at Savannahs. € 8 a.m. … Breakfast Gathering, Savannahs, Dutch Treat, all welcome. € 7 p.m. … Youth Bible Study. Thursday, May 30: € 10 am … Quilting Group, Alford Building with Dutch Treat Lunch afterwards. Saturday, June 1: € 8 a.m. … Church-wide garage sale.Program encourages important conversations Upcoming events at Wakulla UMC End of School Year CelebrationŽ Youth Harvest Fellowship Church850-926-4798 at with DJ Butch tons of games, food, music and movies All 6th through 12th graders invited. only $10! GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Special to The NewsVolunteerWAKULLA held their sixth Annual Make A Difference Day on April 27. This years focus was on disaster preparedness. Director of Volunteer Leon Jeri Bush and the Emergency Management Director for Leon County Robbie Powers, were on hand to help train volunteers on how to staff a Disaster Volunteer Reception Center (VRC) in Wakulla County. A VRC serves as the check-in point for any individual or group looking to volunteer in postdisaster recovery. Citizens wishing to volunteer would be directed to a physical VRC location or be instructed to sign up online. Each volunteer would be interviewed and referred to a disaster volunteer assignment with partner volunteer organizations active in disaster such as the Salvation Army. Over 60 volunteers came out to learn. Many were from the local ROTC program as well as Boyand Girl Scout Troops. These participants helped to create 50 personal evacuation kits that were given to the Meals on Wheels program and will be distributed to seniors. A raffle was held for “ ve evacuation kits that were sponsored by El Jalisco. the Wakulla Womens Club and LKR Communication & Translations LLC. We would like to thank them for their generous support. All of the items in the Evacuation Kits were donated by local businesses and we would like to thank them for their support of VolunteerWAKULLA and Meals-onWheels: Best Western, Centennial Bank, Costco, Disc Village, Dr. Dennis R. Mooney, Gulf Coast Lumber, Lowes, Alma Quinn, TMH … Crawfordville, Total Care Dental, Volunteer Leon, WalMart and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. Without you this event would not have been possible.Make a Difference Day was a successVolunteers receive training during Make a Difference Day.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Becton Roddenberry graduates Thomas UniversitySpecial to The NewsA record number … 335 students … graduated from Thomas University during its 58th Commencement held Saturday, May 4, in the gymnasium on Thomas Universitys west campus. One of the students was Becton James Roddenberry of Sopchoppy, who graduated cum laude with a Bachelor of Science Degree in nursing. Thomas University was established in 1950 and is a private not-for-pro“ t university of about 1,125 students. It is located in Thomasville, Georgia. TU awards associate, bachelors and masters degrees in traditional classroom settings and through online delivery.Free TLC Prgrams are offeredSpecial to The NewsDo you need help buying your “ rst home? TLC may be able to help with services that are at no cost to you! We are able to help low-income families purchase their “ rst home by providing: € Pre-purchase counseling --TLC will pull your credit report and help you develop a step by step action plan on how to improve your credit and increase your credit scores. € Budget counseling --TLC will work with you to establish sound spending plans. € Homebuyer education --TLC will provide you with education so that you can become a successful homeowner. € Financing Assistance Let us help you achieve the dream of homeownership for your family. Our Office is located at the Wakulla County Library, 4330 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, Florida. Please call (850) 2226609, ext 105 to schedule an appointment or visit www.TallahasseeLenders. org to print a questionnaire and “ nd out more information on TLC. Tallahassee Lenders Consortium is a non-pro“ t, HUD-approved housing counseling agency and a licensed mortgage broker. Happy “ rst Birthday to Houston Franklin Jones on May 16. Houston is the son of Merwyn and Windy Jones of Crawfordville. Maternal grandparents are the late Houston Taff and Beth Taff of Crawfordville. Paternal Grandparents are Merwyn and Pat Jones of Crawfordville. Maternal Great Grandparent is Betty Ann Harvey of Crawfordville.Houston Jones turns 1Houston Jones turn 1 on May 16. the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Brian MartinApril 2013 WinnerHis name was drawn fromTHIS IS GREAT!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKS LLC C C om SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 850926-4222 Free FLIP FLOPS Free FLIP FLOPS MEMORIAL DAY SPECIALOPEN 10 TO 5 MEMORIAL DAY SPECIALOPEN 10 TO 5 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Bradley Grubbs “ rst birthdayBradley Thomas Grubbs turns 1 on May 24. Bradley is the son of Dustin and Jade Grubbs. His maternal grandparents are Mark Oliver, as well as Andy and Lynn of Crawfordville. His paternal grandparents are Larry and Eleanor Grubbs and Kirk and Kathy Gordon all of Crawfordville. Bradley also has maternal great-grand parents Fred and Rachel Oliver and Dave and Peggy Williams all of Crawfordville as well.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsMedart Elementary Schools cafetorium was full of fifth grade students and supportive parents and relatives Wednesday, May 15 as the Mustangs celebrated their fifth grade Substance Abuse Violence Education (SAVE) graduation ceremony. Principal Sharon Kemp said she was pleased by the wonderful level of support given to the “ fth graders as they get ready to move on to Wakulla Middle School as sixth graders. Sgt. Ray Johnson of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office taught the SAVE program to students and presented trophies to the SAVE essay contest winners. The overall winner was Ray Johnson, Jr. and the classroom essay winners were Mikayla Corrigan, Autumn Pearson and Madison Sarvis. Sgt. Johnson also introduced Deputy Evelyn Brown who will be the SAVE instructor at Medart and Crawfordville elementary schools next year. Superintendent Bobby Pearce talked to the students about being responsible with social media, communications and stomping out bullying. Sheriff Charlie Creel spoke to the students about staying out of the juvenile justice system and working hard on their academics to become part of the Honor Roll each grading period. Undersheriff Trey Morrison administered the SAVE Graduate Oath to stay away from drugs and violence; respecting parents and guardians; respecting school, property and the rights of others; showing respect to everyone; showing fairness to everyone; and maintaining law and order in society. After the ceremony concluded, the students and guests enjoyed cake and beverages. The “ nal SAVE graduation ceremony will be held Friday, May 31 at 9 a.m. at Shadeville Elementary School.Medart students graduate SAVESpecial to The NewsFriday, May 3rd Crawfordville Elementary School hosted the annual Fifth Grade Brain Brawl which is sponsored by the Coastal Optimist Club. 10 students representing “ ve homeroom classes competed against each other answering trivia questions about local, state and American history, government, poli tics, geography, science, math, spelling and grammar. Team A claimed victory by a very close margin and was lead by Captain, Ally Harden. Other members included Cameron Goodwin, Gavin Kaufmann, Brandy deMontmollin and Miles Underwood, Alternate. Team B Captain was Wilson Bruce and was supported by teammates Bryan Smith, Lilly Simons, George Harper and Crystal Jedziniak, Alternate. Ally Harden and Gavin Kaufmann were the Overall Top Scorers for Team A while Top Scorers for Team B were Wilson Bruce and Bryan Smith. JoAnn Daniels served as Moderator, Bill Versiga as Time Keeper and Bruce Ashley as Score Keeper. 5th Grade Brain Brawl Sponsors were Trish Strickland and Alisa Adkison. Other “ fth grade teachers are Renee Kelly, Barbara Mingledorff and Brandi Panzarino. School administrators Angie Walker and Laura Kelley and the “ fth grade teachers congratulate all participants in this years 2013 Brain Brawl for their efforts. Crawfordville Elementary holds 2013 Brain BrawlCrawfordville Elementary students with their Brain Brawl medals.Special to The News By ARIEN DANIELLE HART Wakulla High School SWAT PresidentOn Saturday, April 20, as you traveled down Highway 98, you may have noticed a unique event at the Wakulla High School softball “ elds. Crowds that were cheering in the stands, “ erce competition among high school youth and an educational booth displaying the dangers of tobacco. How do the three tie in together you may ask? Well, the bright minds of the S.W.A.T. (Students Working Against Tobacco) chapter of Wakulla High who are led by Instructor Kristi Keith, have masterminded a community event to invite students to participate in healthy competition and educate themselves on the hazardous consequences of tobacco. The fun-“ lled kickball game consisted of six teams playing each other in a single-elimination tournament for the grand prize of 100 Grand, a delicious candy bar. All in all, the kickball tournament was a hit amongst the student body of Wakulla High. The final two teams consisted of National Honor Society members and Straight BallinŽ which was led by Captain Sam Grif“ n, WHS Junior. Straight Ballin ended up winning the tournament. Wakulla County S.W.A.T. Coordinator Molly Clore said the game was truly a school wide event and was de“ nitely a success. There were 6 teams, consisting of over 60 players. Out on the “ eld, there was the Drama Team, the Band Team and National Honor Societyƒjust to name a few and the stands were filled with proud parents and friends. WHS TV Production Instructor Mark Bauerman, volunteered as the referee and Wakulla Middle School students Ebone Davis and Andrew Walker helped him on the “ eld. Riversprings Middle School SWAT Member Brylee Tew helped with set up and keeping the players hydrated. SWAT hired the WHS Digital Design students, under the instruction of Jillian Solburg, to design and create their shirts. Many of the players also wore shirts created by these talented students. Mrs. Solburg says her students create logos, posters, tshirts, banners, and anything else to “ t the marketing needs of the organizations at WHS as well as other various local community-based organizations. S.W.A.T. hopes to hold the Kickball for KickbuttsŽ tournament annually to educate the young people of Wakulla County on the perils of tobacco. Special to The NewsWinning team Straight Ballin.ŽKickball for Kick Butts Day at WHS was a success BIG GED CHANGES 850926-1841 www.wakullaschooldistrict.org/secThe Current version of the GED test expires at the end of 2013 If youve already taken and passed parts of the test YOUR SCORES WILL EXPIRE, too. ACT NOW and you wont have to re-take the parts of the test you have already passed.If you dont feel prepared we can help!Even with your busy schedule, you can prepare, plan, and succeed with Wakulla Adult Education Well get you registered for our prep classes and youll have the support you need to pass the test. The last time for taking the current version of the GED test in Wakulla County is December 3 & 4, 2013DONT WAIT. CALL NOW! EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me “nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health € Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 Bobby PearceWhat a special time of year for our graduating seniors and their families. The Wakulla High School Graduation Ceremony will be Friday evening, May 31, at 7:30 p.m. To insure the respect that these seniors and their families are due, please do not bring any noise devices, such as air horns and cow bells. They infringe on both the attention that the other graduating students are due and on the enjoyment of the ceremony for those around the noise makers. Let us join together in making the 2013 Wakulla High School Graduation Ceremony a class act. Thank you all very much in advance for your cooperation.Superintendent Bobby Pearce requests no noise makers at graduation

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By AMY LEESpecial to The NewsWakulla High Schools JV and varsity softball teams held their annual awards banquet Monday night, May 20. The banquet was held at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea and great seafood was enjoyed by everyone. Dessert was provided by Karens Bakery in Crawforville. JV special awards were presented to Natalie Henderson for the Most Improved Player of the Year; Micahlyn Jeziorski for Defensive Player of the Year; Kayla Lanier for Offensive Player of the Year; Libby Sutton was presented with the Coaches Award, and Kaylee Taylor was the Most Valuable Player of the Year. Coach Sara Lovestrand and Assistant Coach Mike Smith were recognized for the all the time they each dedicated to the team. Varsity special awards were presented to Chris Romanus for Rookie of the Year. Chris had the 3rd highest batting average on team at .309. Colbi King was presented with the Manager of the Year for having a great attitude and a willingness to do whatever was asked of her. Michael Cooper received the Slugger Award with a slugging average of .545 and three home runs. Kenzie Lee was awarded the RBI Award for leading the team in RBIs. Kayla Hussey was Offensive Player of the year with a batting average of .396, on-base percentage of .421 with 36 hits and two home runs. Michael Cooper was Defensive Player of the Year with an ERA of 1.96 and a “ elding average of .984 with only one error in 63 chances. The Academic Award was presented to Shelby Harrell for maintaining a 3.81 GPA while also attending the Medical Academy at the high school. The Coaches Award was given to Senior Kelbi Davis for being an encouragement to the other players and leading in production. She was second on the team in runs scored and hits and only had 7 strikeouts in 89 plate appearances. Coach Tom Graham and Sally Wheeler were also recognized for their hard work and dedication to the team. At this time we would once again like to thank each of our sponsors : Dr. Carey & Jones, Gene Lambert of Farm Bureau Insurance, FSU Credit Union, Harrison Bail Bonds, Law Office of David Kemp, Law Office of Frances Casey Lowe, Noshoe Firearms, Skybox Sports Bar and Grill, Faith Hughes D.V.M. and Bobby Inlow, AAAA Maxeys Night Owl Bail Bonds, Gowdy Farms, Spider Hunting Gear, M & L Plumbing, Newmans Auto Air, Pigott Asphalt & Sitework, Ken Davis Construction & Roo“ ng, Pow-Pows Lockout Service, Rock Solid Design and Construction, Prodigy Design Solutions, Welch Land Devolpment, Pepsi Services of Tallahasssee, Capital Truck Inc., Comprehensive Energy Solutions, K&S Food Mart, Momma Js Tattooz and Piercings and Best Western Wakulla Inn & Suites. Most importantly a HUGE thank you to all the parents of these young ladies who supported them not only “ nancially but by being at each game and cheering them on! Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports Special to The NewsThe results of the Wakulla Springs 5K held on Saturday, May 18: OVERALL MALE Stanley Linton, Crawfordville, 19, 16:39. OVERALL FEMALE Kate Harrison, Tallahassee, 21, 20:19. MASTERS MALE Bing Xu, Tallahassee, 45, 19:05. MASTERS FEMALE Laura Reina, Tallahassee, 48, 24:03. GRANDMASTERS MALE Felton Wright, Tallahassee, 56, 20:18. GRANDMASTERS FEMALE Sandra Canada, Woodville, 50, 24:38.PHOTO COLLAGE BY SUE DAMON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSResults of Wakulla Springs 5KBack Row-Varsity: Ashley Laird, Michael Cooper, Kayla Hussey, Kelbi Davis, Courtney Flowers, Shelby Harrell, Kenzie Lee Chris Romanus, Amber Bryant, Amber Winkler, Meghan Sarvis, Colbi King; Front Row-JV: Chelsea Johnson, Natalie Henderson Becca Weirback, Chase Davis, Adrianna Graham, Libby Sutton, Mallory Whaley, Micahlyn Jeziorski, Ciara Sanders, Kayla Lanier, Mia Simmons, KK Taylor.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSOFTBALL RUNNINGLady War Eagles celebrate successful season with banquet Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. Pool Supplies Pool Supplies Grand Opening! Grand Opening! Join us for lunch to celebrate the opening of Wakulla Countys only certi“ed Polaris dealer. Certi“ed pool technicians will be on-site to provide information. Grand Opening discount and rebates on Polaris Automatic Cleaners Join us for lunch to celebrate the opening of Wakulla Countys only certi“ed Polaris dealer. Certi“ed pool technicians will be on-site to provide information. Grand Opening discount and rebates on Polaris Automatic Cleaners Saturday, May 25 ALL DAY Saturday, May 25 ALL DAY Let us tighten your pool up!We are licensed, insured and Certi“ed Pool Technicians offering a selection on chemicals, motors, “lter parts, weekly pool maintenance, green pool clean up, one-time cleaning, “lter repairs and more.NORTH POINTE CENTRE 1596 C Crawfordville Hwy. 850926-3600titanpoolsupplies@yahoo.com 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET?

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 11ABy ALAN ROSSFor 80 laps of the 90lap NASCAR Sprint AllStar Race at Charlotte Saturday night it looked for all the world like a Busch brothers showdown, with each of the stock-car-racing siblings winning two of the “ rst four 20-lap segments. But in the “ nal 10-lap dash to the checkered flag, it was old Mister Five-Time, Jimmie Johnson, who ran away with the $1 million stakes that accompany the victor of the non-points exhibition. Johnson broke a tie with Jeff Gordon and Dale Earnhardt Sr. in setting the new standard for most all-star wins, with four. Kurt Busch, starting second to pole-sitter Carl Edward, dominated the “ rst 20-lap segment, leading all 20 laps. In the second installment, Ricky Stenhouse Jr., who won one of the two transferŽ slots for the “ nal in the preliminary 40-lap quali“ er before the big race, hit the wall and smacked Mark Martin across the in“ eld grass on the rebound. On the restart, Kyle Busch worked his way around leader Clint Bowyer and ” ew away from the “ eld. In the third segment, Kyle Busch fell to fourth after pitting, but just as he had in the second segment, he soon blew by everybody, with brother Kurt in tow, the latter having to fend off Jimmie Johnson as the two raced each other hard over the “ nal few laps. At the 60-lap point of the 90-lap feature, Kyle Buschs winning average “ nish over the three segments was an astounding 1.3, Kurt coming in with the second best average at 2.3. Kasey Kahne, opting for a two-tire change, took the early lead in Segment 4 but ultimately fell to Kurt Busch, as the “ nal 20 laps came down to Busch vs. Busch. Kurt took the checkered ” ag, and now both brothers each had two segment wins. With the “ nal 10-lapper looming, it looked for a dead certainty to be a Busch vs. Busch burst to the ” ag. But the anticipated Busch brothers duel instead became a race between two Hendrick Motorsport cars … Kahne and Johnson … who left the brothers behind on pit row when both suffered poor final pit stops. The HMS pair raced neck-and-neck for two laps before Johnson, who started 18th in the 22-car “ eld in the opening segment, pulled ahead with eight laps to go. Joey Logano then picked off Kahne and set sail for Johnson. But no one would head the 48. And the Busches? Kyle rallied for third behind Logano, but Kurt was unable to “ nd the earlier speed that had put him in front much of the night. He “ nished “ fth. Johnson and the rest of the Cuppers remain in Charlotte for this Sundays World (Coke) 600. INDIANAPOLIS 500 POLE DAY: Surprises galore “ lled the front row of the starting grid for this years Indianapolis 500, with little-known Ed Carpenter shocking the masses with a four-lap sequence of 228.762 mph around the historic 2.5mile Indianapolis Motor Speedway oval. The expected heavyweights … Penske and Ganassi … were locked out of the front row, with rookie Carlos Munoz and Andretti Autosport veteran Marco Andretti claiming second and third on the starting grid. Three-time Indy 500 champion Dario Franchitti quali“ ed 17th, while his Ganassi teammate, Scott Dixon, the 2008 race winner, qualified 16th; both slot into Row 6. Penskes Will Power and Helio Castroneves, another three-time winner, gained spots in the second and third rows respectively. The 97th Indianapolis 500 is this Sunday. Alan Ross is the author of Speaking of Graduating: Excerpts from Timeless Graduation Speeches. Email him at alanross_sports@ yahoo.com.Johnson wins record fourth all-star race; Carpenter a surprise on Indy 500 poleTHE COOL DOWN LAPThe Rays won the Wakulla Cal-Ripken Little Major League 2013 Tournament for the 11-12 age group. The Rays “ nished the season 5-5 and seeded third in the tournament. They defeated the Giants 15-3 in the semi“ nal and the Yankees 11-1 in the championship. The Rays are Gabe Keith, Jonah Lawhon, Dalson Pope, Bo Brown, Walker Hammelman, Trevor Hart, Garrett Harvey, Josh Kirkland, Hayden Lenk, Tanner Marlow, and Ian Walker. Coaches are Carl Lenk, Travis Walker, and Jason Lawhon. Special thanks to team sponsor, Inspired Technologies.RED AND BLUE GAME Rays win tournamentSPECIAL TO THE NEWS FRANKS TO FRANKS: QB Feleipe Franks throws a long pass to his brother, receiver Jordan Franks. The pass would be broken up. Stretching for an extra yard. Coach Scott Klees talks with quarterback Feleipe Franks.Feleipe Franks kicks one of several “ eld goals.By WILLIAM SNOWDEN Parents and Boosters turned out for the Red and Blue game on Saturday, May 18, to see next years War Eagles scrimmage … and eat chicken pilau. The game was played in anticipation of this years spring game, which is on the road against Trinity Catholic on Thursday, May 23, in Ocala. Head Coach Scott Klees said he was very pleased with the performance of his players at the scrimmage. The thing about this years team is maturity,Ž Klees said, anticipating that his young players will have to come together as a team.Ž The talent is there, as Klees noted. Quarterback Feleipe Franks appears ready to take over the role as starter after playing backup his freshman year; and hell also take over kicking duties. Receivers Jordan Franks and Keith Gavin looked good, as did running back Monterious Loggins. More photos online at thewakullanews.com PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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I will just say one thing about our “ shing. It just cant get much better. Last week was the “ rst ever Big Bend Kayak Classic. They had a great turnout with 95 anglers from all over the Southeast from South Carolina to Mississippi. After a day of “ shing both salt and freshwater the weigh in at 3-Y Ranch was followed by over 100plus at the low country boil. Lots of fish were weighed-in and many won prizes including kayaks and cash. All proceeds from this tournament benefit the Wakulla Senior Center Meals on Wheels. They serve over 800 meals a week in Wakulla County. The tournament will be held again next year around the same date. For more information go to www.bigbendkayakclassic.com. John Swanson, founder of Fishing for the Brave in Wakulla County, just got his captains license. Congratulations. They are currently working on the 501(c)3 status. John “ shed the Rock the Dock tournament with two heroes. They also had a booth at the weigh-in. They were at the Blue Crab Festival and at Armed Forces Day Celebration at Millers Ale House in Tallahassee. On May 25 and 26 John is going to the Florida Keys and taking some of the heroes from down there “ shing. He has set up three boats to take “ ve warriors out “ shing. If you would like to help sponsor this you can contact John at fishingforthebrave@ live. com. Anything will help. This young man served six years in the U.S. Marine Corps and when he got out thought those that have served this county to make sure we could go “ shing and sleep at night and not worry about being attacked, should be rewarded. This is a small token of gratitude and I salute John. He gets no money for what he does and all those who help are volunteers, just like Warriors and Quiet Waters. On June 10, I am taking Shane Marshall from Tallahassee and his two sons “ shing. Shane was in the marines and made it back safely from his tour or tours in Afghanistan. Warriors and Quiet Waters plans to bring more warriors to Wakulla County “ shing in October. I am so looking forward to that. A good friend and good client live in Pine Mountain, Ga., which is about 30 minutes from Fort Benning. When I told him what I was doing with Warriors and Quiet Waters he said he wanted to do a barbecue for about 40 of them at his house. Right now it is in the works and Capt. David Fife and I plan on going up to help. They are waiting for the army legal system to approve it. Dont forget: The Big Bend Saltwater Classic is coming up on Fathers Day weekend. With Memorial Day Weekend coming up there are gonna be a lot of people on the water so be extremely careful out there. Put on that sunscreen, wear a hat and sunglasses and drink plenty of water. Tight lines and good “ shing! Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsThe Big Bend Kayak Classic was great From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Special to The NewsThe May Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Friday, May 24. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. and will include light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast to the full moon. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The sun will set at 8:31 p.m. and the moon will rise at 8:14 p.m. on May 24. After sunset, people are invited to climb to the top of the lighthouse for a breathtaking view of the full moon, as space and time permit. Cost is $10 for the general public and $5 for SGLA members. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park at the center of St. George Island, where Island Drive (the road off the bridge) ends at Gulf Beach Drive. Parking is available in lots at either side of the park. Because space is limited, reservations are recommended. For reservations or more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at (850) 927-7745. BASS LURESBass dont strike a lure because they think its cute. They strike it because the artificial appears to be something worth eating. A few carefully selected lures that imitate crayfish or some kind of forage fish will take bass in a variety of situations. Whatever lure you select, it must be fishableŽ in the area you cast it to. Be sure to have lures for use in heavy weeds, moderate cover, and open water. Retrieve speed is another crucial factor. Aggressive bass will run down a fastmoving lure, while bass in a negative mood require a slow presentation. Colors, rattles, and scent are far less important than retrieve speed. Select a handful of baits and work them until you develop confidence. Purchase other lures as you realize what you need in specific fishing situations. Kevin VanDam is a member of the Bass Pro Shops National Fishing Team For more tips, log onto basspro.com and click on News & Tips Full moon climb set at St. George Light PHOTO BY JIM KEMP/ SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe St. George Lighthouse will be open to climb on Friday, May 24. 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 A healthier you is the “rst step to a healthy baby.To get tips for a healthy pregnancy, visit www.text4baby.org. Find parenting resources at www.ounce.org. Baby steps to better health can deliver big results. Before, during and even after pregnancy, take a multivitamin containing folic acid every day, get regular medical checkups and screenings, and maintain a healthy weight with daily physical activity and a balanced diet. P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 13Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiencesCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD CO2 in water. Few people caught the milestone we passed a few weeks ago, where an observatory on Mauna Loa volcano in Hawaii registers Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere at 400 parts per million, or 0.04 percent of the entire atmosphere. It was not that long ago that we were all taught in school that the atmosphere has a steady CO2 level of 0.03 percent. Our worlds industrial output dumps a high load of CO2 into the atmosphere, resulting from the mining, production and use of petroleum products, natural processes that generate methane, and our generation of energy from fossil fuels, just to name a few. This increasing trend is not expected to end any time soon. So what does increased levels of CO2 mean to our underwater world here in Wakulla County? Water is an enormous CO2 sponge, probably the greatest CO2 absorbing body on the planet. When water absorbs CO2 it becomes more acidic. We were aware of the damage acid rain had on ecosystems around early industrial centers. Acidic oceans inhibit marine life embryology. We also know that our caves were created by acidi“ ed water dissolving limestone at the water table. We live in a karst environment here in Wakulla County, by de“ nition, an area of subsurface dissolved limestone formations covered by a thin sand veneer. When the underground passageways get too big to carry the overburden (sand and rock), they collapse, creating windows into our aquifer called sinkholes. Those of you who have property know we have plenty of sinkholes in Wakulla County! I am often asked by anxious landowners to inspect their sinkholes, both new and old. They all ask the same question: will sinkhole formation change and can anything be done about it? Speliogenesis, the dynamic formation of underground caves, is usually driven by the abundance of acidic water. New passage is crated by a change in the water table, enlarged passage is created by long standing existing water tables. Both are driven by elevated CO2 in the water. As long as the atmosphere CO2 is increasing, cave formation can be expected to increase. We have been “ lling in sinkholes with all manner of debris, but the sad truth is that ” owing water eventually washes everything away unless the area of the lost overburden can be capped. Two thousand feet into Jackson Blue cave in Marianna is a trash room made up of relic garbage dating back to the 1930s. The ceiling is now blocked, capping the lost overburden that when dropped at one time resulted in a sinkhole. The ” oor of this cave area is indistinguishable from the rest except for the few relics sticking up from the mud. One owner (not in our county) “ lled his sinkhole for years, only to “ nd from divers invited to inspect that he was “ lling a giant void several hundred feet deep. Imagine, if his house was near the lip of this expanding sinkhole, what would happen in the course of time. Later this week, the National Speliological Society Cave Diving Section will hold its annual convention at Wakulla High School. They will fan out around the area looking for caves to investigate. This is an international sport, much like kayakers who love to investigate our local above ground waterways. Talk to them, invite them to inspect your sinkhole. They are a wonderful source of revenue to the county, when given the chance. Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies By DON MORROWSpecial to The NewsSpring shorebird migration is in progress and many shorebirds are in their breeding plumage. Black-bellied Plovers show their stark blackand-white pattern. Dunlin live up to their old name, Red-backed Sandpiper. Many of these birds are headed to arctic breeding grounds. In our winter months shorebirds may seem dif“ cult to identify. Just gray birds feeding along the waters edge. However, 90 percent of the shorebirds you will commonly encounter will be one of eight species: Willet, Short-billed Dowitcher, Dunlin, Least Sandpiper, Western Sandpiper, Semipalmated Plover, Black-bellied Plover or Greater Yellowlegs. Microhabitat separation helps. Willet, Greater Yellowlegs and Short-billed Dowitcher typically feed in deeper water, while Dunlin and Western Sandpiper feed in shallow water or at the waters edge. Least Sandpiper, Semipalmated Plover and Black-bellied Plover feed on mud” ats. There are other shorebirds in winter. Twenty of the 32 regularly occurring shorebirds may be found along Wakulla shores in the winter. Starting your identification search with the eight most common species will make winter shorebird identi“ cation much easier.St. Marks Refuge birding report Memorial Day is upon us and for many that is the of“ cial beginning of their summer. Seasoned boaters and novices alike will be out and about on the water. It is inevitable that someone will break down or get into a situation that was unintended. Other than life jackets that are “ tted and accessible for all people on board, one of the other critical pieces of safety equipment is a VHF radio. If you encounter a problem, a radio can be your best chance for assistance. Cell phones are wonderful, but not always reliable out on the water. If you are out and do “ nd yourself in an emergency, channel 16 is the direct line to the Coast Guard. Many of you may have heard Station Panama City remind mariners that channel 16 is a hailing and distress only. It is monitored 24/7! When using the radio, a few simple tips can help you get the help you need in a timely manner. When you are talking hold the transmitter button down, but release it once you are done. While this sounds simple, a microphone that is locked in the open position does not allow anyone to respond. This can signi“ cantly delay help arriving. If you are in a true emergency, on channel 16 state: MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY. This is the (call name of vessel).Ž If you know your position, provide that as well along with the emergency, how many people are on your boat and any other important information that could help. When you are done, state OVERŽ and release the microphone transmitter. The Coast Guard will ask for information that they need and remain in contact with you as long as possible, hopefully until help arrives. Everyone who is onboard should know how to use the radio. You never know what will happen out on the water. Children are especially important to teach as there have been cases where a child called for help and saved lives. If you would like to talk to us about learning more on safe boating, please contact Alexander Gulde, our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for public education, at fso-pe@uscgaux. net. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux.net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@ uscgaux.net. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. A radio in good working order can be your lifeline if you get into a jam. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu May 23, 13 Fri May 24, 13 Sat May 25, 13 Sun May 26, 13 Mon May 27, 13 Tue May 28, 13 Wed May 29, 13 D ate 3.4 ft. 1:52 AM 3.5 ft. 2:42 AM 3.6 ft. 3:30 AM 3.6 ft. 4:15 AM 3.5 ft. 5:00 AM 3.3 ft. 5:44 AM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 7:11 AM 1.4 ft. 7:54 AM 1.5 ft. 8:36 AM 1.5 ft. 9:18 AM 1.5 ft. 10:01 AM 1.5 ft. 10:46 AM -0.4 ft. 12:03 AM L ow 3.9 ft. 1:14 PM 4.1 ft. 1:53 PM 4.3 ft. 2:33 PM 4.3 ft. 3:14 PM 4.3 ft. 3:57 PM 4.0 ft. 4:42 PM 3.2 ft. 6:29 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 8:15 PM -0.9 ft. 9:01 PM -1.0 ft. 9:46 PM -0.9 ft. 10:32 PM -0.7 ft. 11:17 PM 1.5 ft. 11:38 AM L ow 3.7 ft. 5:32 PM Hi g h Thu May 23, 13 Fri May 24, 13 Sat May 25, 13 Sun May 26, 13 Mon May 27, 13 Tue May 28, 13 Wed May 29, 13 D ate 2.6 ft. 1:44 AM 2.7 ft. 2:34 AM 2.7 ft. 3:22 AM 2.7 ft. 4:07 AM 2.6 ft. 4:52 AM 2.5 ft. 5:36 AM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 7:22 AM 1.0 ft. 8:05 AM 1.1 ft. 8:47 AM 1.1 ft. 9:29 AM 1.1 ft. 10:12 AM 1.1 ft. 10:57 AM -0.3 ft. 12:14 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 1:06 PM 3.1 ft. 1:45 PM 3.2 ft. 2:25 PM 3.2 ft. 3:06 PM 3.2 ft. 3:49 PM 3.0 ft. 4:34 PM 2.4 ft. 6:21 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 8:26 PM -0.6 ft. 9:12 PM -0.7 ft. 9:57 PM -0.7 ft. 10:43 PM -0.5 ft. 11:28 PM 1.1 ft. 11:49 AM L ow 2.8 ft. 5:24 PM Hi g h Thu May 23, 13 Fri May 24, 13 Sat May 25, 13 Sun May 26, 13 Mon May 27, 13 Tue May 28, 13 Wed May 29, 13 D ate 3.2 ft. 2:28 AM 3.3 ft. 3:18 AM 3.3 ft. 4:06 AM 3.3 ft. 4:51 AM 3.2 ft. 5:36 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 8:15 AM 1.3 ft. 8:58 AM 1.3 ft. 9:40 AM 1.4 ft. 10:22 AM 1.4 ft. 11:05 AM -0.6 ft. 12:21 AM -0.3 ft. 1:07 AM L ow 3.6 ft. 1:50 PM 3.8 ft. 2:29 PM 4.0 ft. 3:09 PM 4.0 ft. 3:50 PM 4.0 ft. 4:33 PM 3.1 ft. 6:20 AM 3.0 ft. 7:05 AM Hi g h -0.5 ft. 9:19 PM -0.8 ft. 10:05 PM -0.9 ft. 10:50 PM -0.8 ft. 11:36 PM 1.4 ft. 11:50 AM 1.4 ft. 12:42 PM L ow 3.8 ft. 5:18 PM 3.4 ft. 6:08 PM Hi g h Thu May 23, 13 Fri May 24, 13 Sat May 25, 13 Sun May 26, 13 Mon May 27, 13 Tue May 28, 13 Wed May 29, 13 D ate 2.7 ft. 1:36 AM 2.8 ft. 2:26 AM 2.8 ft. 3:14 AM 2.8 ft. 3:59 AM 2.7 ft. 4:44 AM 2.6 ft. 5:28 AM 2.5 ft. 6:13 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 6:50 AM 1.4 ft. 7:33 AM 1.4 ft. 8:15 AM 1.5 ft. 8:57 AM 1.5 ft. 9:40 AM 1.5 ft. 10:25 AM 1.5 ft. 11:17 AM L ow 3.1 ft. 12:58 PM 3.2 ft. 1:37 PM 3.3 ft. 2:17 PM 3.4 ft. 2:58 PM 3.3 ft. 3:41 PM 3.2 ft. 4:26 PM 2.9 ft. 5:16 PM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 7:54 PM -0.8 ft. 8:40 PM -1.0 ft. 9:25 PM -0.9 ft. 10:11 PM -0.7 ft. 10:56 PM -0.3 ft. 11:42 PM L ow Thu May 23, 13 Fri May 24, 13 Sat May 25, 13 Sun May 26, 13 Mon May 27, 13 Tue May 28, 13 Wed May 29, 13 D ate 3.5 ft. 1:49 AM 3.6 ft. 2:39 AM 3.7 ft. 3:27 AM 3.6 ft. 4:12 AM 3.5 ft. 4:57 AM 3.4 ft. 5:41 AM 3.3 ft. 6:26 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 7:08 AM 1.5 ft. 7:51 AM 1.6 ft. 8:33 AM 1.6 ft. 9:15 AM 1.6 ft. 9:58 AM 1.6 ft. 10:43 AM 1.7 ft. 11:35 AM L ow 4.0 ft. 1:11 PM 4.2 ft. 1:50 PM 4.4 ft. 2:30 PM 4.4 ft. 3:11 PM 4.3 ft. 3:54 PM 4.1 ft. 4:39 PM 3.8 ft. 5:29 PM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 8:12 PM -0.9 ft. 8:58 PM -1.1 ft. 9:43 PM -1.0 ft. 10:29 PM -0.8 ft. 11:14 PM -0.4 ft. 12:00 AM? L ow Thu May 23, 13 Fri May 24, 13 Sat May 25, 13 Sun May 26, 13 Mon May 27, 13 Tue May 28, 13 Wed May 29, 13 D ate 2.4 ft. 2:45 AM 2.6 ft. 3:47 AM 2.6 ft. 4:42 AM 2.6 ft. 5:33 AM 2.6 ft. 6:19 AM 2.5 ft. 7:02 AM 2.5 ft. 7:40 AM Hi g h 1.6 ft. 6:13 AM 1.7 ft. 7:01 AM 1.8 ft. 7:46 AM 1.8 ft. 8:31 AM 1.8 ft. 9:21 AM 1.7 ft. 10:18 AM 1.6 ft. 11:28 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 12:08 PM 3.1 ft. 12:46 PM 3.2 ft. 1:29 PM 3.2 ft. 2:15 PM 3.1 ft. 3:06 PM 3.0 ft. 4:02 PM 2.7 ft. 5:05 PM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 7:38 PM -0.6 ft. 8:24 PM -0.6 ft. 9:11 PM -0.6 ft. 9:59 PM -0.5 ft. 10:48 PM -0.2 ft. 11:38 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 23 May 29First June 16 Full May 24 Last May 31 New June 8Major Times --:---:-12:08 PM 2:08 PM Minor Times 5:15 AM 6:15 AM 7:04 PM 8:04 PM Major Times 12:37 AM 2:37 AM 1:08 PM 3:08 PM Minor Times 6:05 AM 7:05 AM 8:11 PM 9:11 PM Major Times 1:38 AM 3:38 AM 2:10 PM 4:10 PM Minor Times 7:02 AM 8:02 AM 9:17 PM 10:17 PM Major Times 2:42 AM 4:42 AM 3:13 PM 5:13 PM Minor Times 8:04 AM 9:04 AM 10:18 PM 11:18 PM Major Times 3:44 AM 5:44 AM 4:15 PM 6:15 PM Minor Times 9:10 AM 10:10 AM 11:14 PM 12:14 AM Major Times 4:45 AM 6:45 AM 5:14 PM 7:14 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:17 AM 11:17 AM Major Times 5:42 AM 7:42 AM 6:09 PM 8:09 PM Minor Times 12:03 AM 1:03 AM 11:23 AM 12:23 PM Better Best SEASONS BEST Better Good Average Average6:39 am 8:28 pm 7:05 pm 5:16 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:38 am 8:29 pm 8:12 pm 6:06 am 6:38 am 8:30 pm 9:18 pm 7:03 am 6:38 am 8:30 pm 10:19 pm 8:05 am 6:37 am 8:31 pm 11:15 pm 9:11 am 6:37 am 8:31 pm --:-10:18 am 6:37 am 8:32 pm 12:04 am 11:24 am85% 93% 99% 91% 83% 76% 68% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer and MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn May 10, Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated a case where three male teenagers were living at a Crawfordville home without parental supervision. The teenagers, ages 14, 15 and 18, have been staying with friends and eating at the homes of friends. Sgt. Johnson found the home to be clean although one of the teenagers said the mother visited on May 9 after not visiting for approximately 10 days. The case was reported to the Department of Children and Families. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: MAY 9 € Braxton Harvey of Crawfordville reported recovering a missing safe while working on a Crawfordville residents property. The small safe was reported missing on April 19 and was located in some woods. The safe was returned to the owner who inspected it to see if anything was missing. A forced entry into the safe was observed. Detective Derek Lawhon, Deputy Alan Middlebrooks and Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. € A bicycle reported stolen by Tena Altman of Crawfordville on May 5 was recovered. The bike was returned to the victim. No suspect information was obtained. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Thomas Allen Davis of Tallahassee and Betty Ann Harvey of Sopchoppy were involved in a two vehicle traf“ c crash on U.S. Highway 319 near the Wakulla Shrine Club. Harvey struck the back of the Davis vehicle as Davis slowed down. There were no injuries but Harveys Volkswagen was towed from the scene. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Joel Norred of Apalachicola and Raymond Metcalf of Sopchoppy were involved in a two vehicle traffic crash at Crums Mini Mall. Norred backed into Metcalfs parked vehicle. There were no injuries. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Ronald Edmondson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed and the home had been ransacked. The victim reported the theft of $320 worth of currency and coins. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. MAY 10 € Scott Payne of St. Marks Powder reported suspect cannabis inside a vehicle within the parking lot. A suspect has been identi“ ed. He is employed by a Tallahassee contractor. The cannabis was seized and submitted to the Evidence Division. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Kip Wilson of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim noted three unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges totaled $327. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. MAY 11 € John David Corathers, 26, of Panacea was arrested for DUI and driving while license is suspended or revoked following a traf“ c stop. Deputy Gibby Gibson observed the motorist swerving with an erratic driving pattern. The driver was transported to the Wakulla County Jail and the vehicle was turned over to a licensed driver. € Deputy Mike Zimba observed a female motorist nearly crash her vehicle on U.S. Highway 98 near Walker Farm Road. Jillian Frances Sousa, 26, of Crawfordville was experiencing vehicle problems but was able to avoid a traf“ c crash. However, she did not have a valid driver license and was arrested for driving with a license suspended or revoked with knowledge … habitual offender. The vehicle was turned over to a family member. FHP Trooper Josh Greene assisted at the scene. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Brian Davis Heath, 43, of Tallahassee was arrested for retail theft after store employees allegedly observed him take a box knife, shotgun stock and wrist watch, valued at $119, without paying for the items. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Suzanne Leigh of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Electronic games and a player as well as other miscellaneous items were reported missing from the home. The property is valued at $710 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Detective Rob Giddens and Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated a noise complaint in the area of Mimosa and Dogwood streets in Crawfordville. The odor of burning cannabis was reportedly noticed by the law enforcement officials as they stopped at the home where the noise was coming from. A glass pipe was allegedly observed on a table and the drug paraphernalia was seized as evidence. The music was turned down and no charges were “ led. MAY 12 € Robert Timmons of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Six pairs of shoes were cut with a razor at his home. The shoes are valued at $300. A suspect has been identified. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. MAY 13 € A clerk at the Medart Petro reported a gas drive-off. A motorist pumped $15.50 worth of diesel fuel and left without paying. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Lerinzo Smith of Crawfordville and Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church #2 reported a burglary. A forced entry was discovered and damage to a door was estimated at $150. An undetermined amount of money was taken from the church. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Store staff allegedly witnessed Lisha Dawn Rivers, 48, of Sopchoppy take multiple clothing items and place them in a Wal-Mart bag. Rivers reportedly walked past the last point of sale without paying for the items. She was detained by store staff and the items, valued at $95, were recovered. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € Troy C. Andrews of Tallahassee and Tina M. Brown of Crawfordville were involved in a twovehicle traf“ c crash at the 1500 block of U.S. Highway 319. Both vehicles were damaged but there were no injuries. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. MAY 14 € James Smith of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash. A motorist left the roadway and struck the victims mailbox. The mailbox was destroyed. During the crash a vehicle head lamp was recovered near the scene. Evidence was collected on a suspect vehicle. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € A 17-year-old Crawfordville male reported the theft of his wallet from the Wal-Mart parking lot. The victim did not lock his vehicle while inside the store. The wallet and contents are valued at $75. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Melaina Kinch of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims personal information to steal $410 out of the victims account. The fraud was committed in Miami. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft as a suspect proceeded past the last point of sale with a shopping cart full of merchandise. The stolen items included electronics, food, clothing, medications and miscellaneous items valued at $1,062. Pamela Blanch Man, 41, of Crawfordville was charged with felony retail theft. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Thomas Hunt of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victims identity was compromised through a tax return. Someone attempted to “ le tax returns using the victims personal information. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. € Deputy Scott Rojas recovered a plastic bag with two pills in it at Wakulla High School. The pills were con“ scated for analysis. € David Miller of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of two gas containers, gasoline and a chain saw from his property. The stolen property is valued at $446 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. € Carol Walden of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims credit card at an online site and spent $289. Deputy Mike Crum and Detective Randy Phillips investigated. MAY 15 € The WCSO worked three back-to-back-toback mental health investigations involving two males and a female. The subjects were transported to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital after it was determined that they posed a threat to themselves or others. Deputies Marshall Taylor, Elisee Colin and Mike Zimba investigated the cases. € Deputies Richard Moon and Scott Powell investigated a possible intoxicated driver in Crawfordville and observed the motorist exit his vehicle. Matthew Alan Hayes, 55, of Crawfordville gave deputies consent to search the vehicle and they discovered alcohol in the vehicle. He was charged with felony DUI and driving while his license was suspended or revoked. € Roger Haddock of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his home. Two suspects were identified in the theft and were captured following a vehicle and foot pursuit in another section of Crawfordville. Charges against the two suspects are pending the victims willingness to prosecute. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated a traf“ c crash on East Ivan Road and Lonnie Raker Lane. Eldon Theodore Hicks, 31, of Panacea, reportedly became belligerent toward Deputy Mitchell and assisting Deputy Sean Wheeler on scene. Hicks also allegedly attempted to leave the scene of the crash prior to the conclusion of the investigation and had to be detained by the deputies. Hicks refused to cooperate with the investigation and to get into the WCSO patrol vehicle. He eventually got into the vehicle and began attempting to knock out a window with his head. He was charged with disorderly intoxication and resisting arrest without violence. € Paul Donaldson of Tallahassee reported a grand theft of his boat from a Crawfordville storage center. The pontoon boat, trailer and motor were valued at $18,015. The property was entered into the NCIC data base as stolen. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Michael Bailey of Crawfordville reported the possible theft of a firearm. The firearm is valued at $225 and the location of the loss or theft has not been determined. It was entered in the NCIC/FCIC data base. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Deputy Sean Wheeler and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated a Panacea disturbance and arrested Fred Warren Bradford, Jr. 33, of Panacea. As deputies attempted to calm down their subject they discovered three grams of marijuana on him. Bradford was charged with disorderly intoxication, resisting arrest without violence and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Bradford refused to get out of the patrol vehicle at the Wakulla County Jail and three correctional officers assisted in placing the subject in a holding cell. € Kenneth Adams of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his home. An aluminum boat, gas grill, medication and aluminum ornaments, valued at $590, were stolen. A broken window was observed. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 1,072 calls for service during the past week including 20 business and residential alarms; 12 disturbances; 20 E-911 abandoned cell calls; four E-911 abandoned calls; 25 E-911 regular calls; 65 investigations; 51 medical emergencies; 38 subpoena services; 60 traf“ c enforcements; 118 traf“ c stops; 11 reckless vehicles; and 17 wanted people.Special to The NewsTwo Crawfordville men were arrested for ” eeing and attempting to elude law enforcement of“ cers Wednesday, May 15 after Wakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies spotted the men with a stolen motorbike in the back of their vehicle in the Crawfordville area, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. Lorenzo Larell Randolph, 22, and Reuben Jerome Randolph, 20, both of Crawfordville, were arrested in the Wakulla Gardens area of Crawfordville at 4:17 p.m. A concerned citizen reported observing two suspicious men removing a motorbike from a home in the Lake Ellen area in Medart. Deputy Stephen Simmons issued a BOLO for a black Chevrolet Silverado pickup truck and the two suspects. While patrolling in the Wakulla Gardens area, Deputy Richard Moon observed the suspect vehicle and attempted to make a traf“ c stop. The truck accelerated away from Deputy Moon who continued in pursuit until the truck crashed into a fence on H.T. Adams Avenue. The two men ” ed the vehicle on foot and Reuben Randolph was apprehended a short distance from the crash scene. A Wakulla Gardens resident observed Lorenzo Randolph hiding in a wooded area and contacted the WCSO. Detective Derek Lawhon located Lorenzo Randolph hiding in some woods. The Florida Highway Patrol was contacted to investigate the vehicle crash. The truck was registered to a resident of Lawtey. During follow-up interviews, Reuben Randolph admitted to being the driver of the vehicle and not possessing a valid driver license.Two men arrested after chase for theft Reuben Randolph Lorenzo Randolph all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches THG-13903 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 15ABy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 17 … Gov. Rick Scott must have dreamed of a day like Friday. Not only could Scott tout an unemployment rate at its lowest level since September 2008, but the jobs, jobs, jobs governor also signed a tax-break bill for manufacturers that was one of his top legislative priorities. Its a great day for our state, Scott said. I feel great for all the families that are getting jobs in our state.Ž Scott will never be known for riveting sound bites. But to punch up Fridays news about the 7.2 percent unemployment rate, his of“ ce sent out a link to a slick, campaign-style video featuring background music, graphics and Scott recounting steady job growth during his two-plus years in of“ ce. Make no mistake, Scotts 2014 re-election campaign is well underway. Remember Scotts Lets Get to WorkŽ ads that seemed to be on an endless TV loop in 2010? Get ready for a barrage of ads during the next 18 months with the theme, Its Working.Ž Democrats, of course, wont give Scott a pass. In a recent email invitation to the partys upcoming JeffersonJackson Dinner, state Democratic Chairwoman Allison Tant said it is important for Democrats to come together to celebrate the historic gains we made last year and to turn our efforts to defeat the most unpopular Governor in the nation … Rick Scott!Ž But at least for now, Scott has the “ eld virtually to himself. The willhe-or-wont-he speculation about former Gov. Charlie Crists possible entrance into the race dominates discussions about Democrats. Meanwhile, Scott spent Monday and Tuesday of last week traveling to businesses across the state to celebrate passage of the bill that includes a sales-tax exemption for manufacturing equipment. That came after a similar victory tour last week to celebrate passage of a plan to increase teacher pay, another one of Scotts legislative priorities. And by the way, Scott took some time Thursday to champion the addition of $36 million to provide services to people with disabilities who have been stuck on a waiting list. Put all of the pieces together, and it looks like a campaign. GOBBLE, GOBBLE The biggest issue facing Scott is next Fridays deadline for signing the state budget and issuing vetoes. With the governor and an entourage leaving late Monday for a trade mission to Chile, it remains unclear when he will make his decisions. But Florida TaxWatch, a group that makes recommendations each year about vetoes, issued a report this week that came up with nearly $107 million in budget turkeysŽ … the Tallahassee term for pork-barrel spending. TaxWatchs biggest gobbler, weighing in at $14 million, was a budget item for a science, technology, engineering and math building at Gulf Coast State College, which is in the district of Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville. In all, TaxWatch targeted 107 items in the proposed $74.5 billion budget for the fiscal year starting July 1. We dont give the leaders a pass, we dont hold them to a higher standard or a lower standard,Ž TaxWatch researcher Kurt Wenner said. The TaxWatch list, which takes into account issues such as whether lawmakers stuck projects in the budget during “ nal negotiations and whether projects were recommended by agencies, is an annual staple in Tallahassee. But the report released Thursday drew harsh criticism from Gaetz and Senate Appropriations Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart. Gaetz issued a statement that seemed to almost border on apoplexy. Heres the “ rst paragraph: The TaxWatch list is built on the unconstitutional perversion that if an appropriation isnt recommended by unelected agency of“ cials it shouldnt be considered in conference by elected legislators,Ž Gaetz said. This is an arrogance of the elite who spend too much time in Tallahassee and Washington listening to the echoes of their own invented wisdom and thinking theyre hearing the voice of God.Ž And that was just the start. Heres another snippet: If our founders had shared the slavish devotion of TaxWatch to unchallenged decisions and dictates of faraway bureaucrats, wed all be drinking English tea and singing God Save the Queen. A good song. But not an American song, Gaetz said. The Constitution obligates and empowers elected legislators, who come from communities and go home to communities, to write the states budget. If TaxWatch staffers want to test their budget theories in the public square, let them stand up in front of conference committees and testify in public.Ž It remains to be seen what projects Scott will veto … or whether he will draw a similar reaction from legislative leaders. He shed little light Friday about his plans. My job is to make sure I represent the taxpayers of the state, I dont want to waste any of their dollars, Scott said. I want to make sure we go through every line. Make sure the dollars are spent well.Ž MONEY TALKS While Scott talks about jobs for Florida families, he might not have to worry about two groups of people who sometimes cross paths in the Capitol … lobbyists and statecollege presidents. At least thats the take-away from numbers released this week. Five lobbying “ rms collected at least $1 million in legislative lobbying fees during the first three months of the year, while 11 others collected between $500,000 and $999,999, according to reports “ led by a Wednesday night deadline. Meanwhile, a report issued by Scotts chief inspector general, Melinda Miguel, found that presidents at the 28 state colleges are making between $143,866 and $630,157 during the current “ scal year. Miguel said it was sometimes dif“ cult to figure out how much the presidents make and called for changes. Therefore, we recommend that the boards of trustees, in consultation with the Division (of Florida Colleges), jointly establish the parameters upon which the presidents total compensation is determined, document the factors upon which compensation is based and standardize the methodology across state colleges,Ž Miguel said. But that idea drew pushback from some college of“ cials. With a system as diverse as ours in terms of size, geography, community demographics and businesses, which leads to varying mix of programs to meet those local needs, it is dif“ cult to imagine that a one size “ ts all formula for presidential compensation would be very effective,Ž wrote Lake Sumter State College Board Chairman Timothy Morris in a response. If, for example, size were a limiting factor, colleges like ours would become training grounds for new presidents who would soon move on to the next opening at a larger school. Such a model would be destabilizing for our college and others like us.Ž STORY OF THE WEEK: Floridas unemployment rate dropped to 7.2 percent in April. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: It is little wonder that TaxWatch is irrelevant 364 days a year.Ž … Senate President Don Gaetz, in a statement railing on TaxWatchs annual budget turkeyŽ list.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Jobs report is no turkeyBy DAVID WHITE This past weekend in Sonoma County, California, 17 vintners gathered for a wine tasting they dubbed The 7 Percent Solution.Ž As the organizers explained, roughly 93 percent of Northern California vineyard acreage is planted to eight major grape varietals. The remaining 7 percent is home to numerous lesserknown varietals, [which] are “ nding anchor with a small but growing number of winemakers.Ž The event enabled consumers to explore the wines being produced by Californias revolutionary vintners -those willing to embrace the states vast and varied climate by avoiding popular grapes and bottling the obscure. Whether theyre producing unusual varietals or exploring unheralded regions, these winemakers are worth celebrating. That certain regions of California might be better suited to, say, Albarino than Chardonnay makes sense. Across the globe, commercial wine is produced from a whopping 1,368 different grape varieties. It de“ es logic to assume that grapes native to central France will thrive in all the worlds new vineyards. This topic was explored at this years Drink Local Wine conference by Joseph Fiola, Ph.D., a University of Maryland professor who has spent over 25 years researching and teaching about experimental viticulture. During his lecture, Fiola spent a great deal of time praising the Old World for its commitment to growing varieties that are adapted to local growing conditions. Local varieties have been growing in those areas for hundreds, maybe thousands of years,Ž he explained. Year in year out, they get ripe. Year in year out, winemakers can control production. Those areas know how to grow the grapes; they know how to make good wine. And its the local grapes that are the best. [Winemakers] arent going to grow Cabernet Sauvignon all over Italy because people know the name!Ž Fiola went on to compare southern Italys climate to southern Marylands. Yet he acknowledged the temptation to focus on well-known varieties. Trying to convince a Maryland winery that has to worry about marketing to people who can barely pronounce Chardonnay to sell Nero dAvola, Negroamaro, Sagrantino?Ž he asked, naming three esoteric varieties from Italy. That presents a challenge,Ž he conceded. Europe has an advantage, of course. The continent has been producing wine for thousands of years, so vintners there understand which grapes do best. In France, for example, winemakers in Burgundy know to focus on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Just as German vintners recognize that Riesling thrives in the countrys Mosel region, Spanish vintners recognize that Albarino thrives in Galicia. Wine production in the United States is still in its infancy. But winemakers know that American consumers enjoy Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, Merlot, Pinot Noir, and Sauvignon Blanc, so thats what most produce. Only the most courageous vintners would eschew these varieties. One of these courageous vintners is Matthew Rorick of Forlorn Hope, who poured at this weekends tasting in Sonoma. Since 2005, he has been producing rare creatures from appellations unknown and varieties uncommon.Ž His rare creaturesŽ are truly unusual. He produces delightful reds from Sangiovese and Barbera, two Italian grapes that few California winemakers take seriously. He produces a delicious Verdelho, a white wine thats typically associated with Portugal. He produces the nations only 100-percent St. Laurent, a thought-provoking, highly aromatic red thats almost impossible to “ nd outside Austria and the Czech Republic. Each year, he crafts more than a dozen different wines … and virtually all are produced in lots of fewer than 2,500 bottles. The fact that 17 vintners like Rorick were able to “ ll a room this past weekend is a testament to the fact that an increasing number of winemakers are willing to take risks. And, perhaps more importantly, American consumers are growing more comfortable exploring the unknown. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist. com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine (PalatePress.com). WHITE’S WINESEmbracing the obscure -Janet

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comThe weather continues to warm and school is within days of the summer recess. The list of anticipated and planned summer activities ” oats in daydreams of every student as the academic countdown comes to a climax. High on the list of outdoor pursuits is “ shing. Wakulla County and the surrounding area are blessed with an abundance of ideal freshwater “ shing sites which require nothing more than a cane pole and the right bait. Wakulla County has long been the home of many worm grunters of international acclaim. This fact is not in dispute, but the choice of the correct bait has been contentiously debated since the dawn of mankind. Will it be earthworms, crickets, or bacon which will catch a “ sh “ t for bragging and exaggerated tales? Arguably, the ultimate freshwater bait native to Wakulla County is the large and juicy Catawba Worm. The Catawba Worm, or Catalpa Worm as it is sometimes known, is actually a caterpillar of the Catalpa Sphinx moth. The moth is brown with a circular band of dark brown or black surrounding its thorax. Its two-inch wide forewings have a white dot within a small dark mark towards the wings center. Ceratomia catalpae was given its common name based on the Catalapa farm near Troy, Ohio. As a footnote in aviation and agricultural history, an infestation of Catawba Worms became the “ rst target of a crop dusting airplane on Aug. 3, 1921. As part of an interagency technology development program, U.S. Agriculture Department and the U.S. Army Signal Corps sprayed lead arsenate on the caterpillars. The experiment was declared a success and within a few years commercial crop dusters were in business nationwide. Cooperative government agency efforts notwithstanding, Catawba Worms still flourish. They spend their days as a larva munching on Catawba, or Catalpa, tree leaves. These larvae are a very pale color when first hatched, but become larger and darker as their life cycle progresses. The Catawba Worm caterpillars complete their larval stage in a showy two inch long lemon yellow, white and black form complete with spots and stripes. It takes about four weeks from the point their eggs are laid to the emergence of a moth. Eggs are deposited in groups of 100 to 1,000 on a leafs underside, with smaller bunches deposited on branches on the Catawba tree. Eggs incubate and hatch after “ ve to seven days, but the process may be accelerated to two weeks if multiple generations are laid together. Like the Catawba Worm, the Catawba tree is native to Wakulla County and much of the lower southeastern United States. Initially, the tree was the basis for folk remedies to a variety of ailments. The trees lineage is traced through Europe and Asia where similar species are found today. Fossil records indicate the tree existed in the Miocene epoch about 23 million years ago. The trees primary use is in contemporary landscapes is as a ” owering ornamental, and as a bait collection point for dedicated “ shermen. To learn more about Catawba worm and trees in Wakulla County contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce at (850) 926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.ufl. edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Catawba worm is (debatably) the best bait Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCatawba worms, above and below, are actually caterpillars of the Catalpa Sphinx month. Call 1-877-401-6408or come by 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 3mo. for ONLY $6 3mo. for ONLY $6 *Keep up with what’s happening this summer *In-county, new subscriptions only. Because we work for our members instead of a pro“t, we can offer you better loan rates on vehicles, houses, boats and more. B B B B E E E E T T T T T T T T E E E E R R R R L L L L O O O O O A A A A N N N N R R R R A A A A T T T T E E E E S S S S S FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Better Banking for Crawfordville With no minimum balance and no monthly fee, a checking account from Gulf Winds can save you money every day. F F F F F R R R R R E E E E E E E E E E C C C C C H H H H H E E E E E C C C C C K K K K K I I I I I N N N N N G G G G G F F F F I I I I N N N N A A A A N N N N C C C C C I I I I A A A A L L L L P P P P L L L L A A A A N N N N N N N N I I I I N N N N G G G G G F F F I I I N N N A A A N N N C C C I I I A A A L L L L P P P L L L L L L A A A A A N N N N N N N N N I I I I N N N N N N G G G G G The team of advisors at Gulf Winds offer an extensive array of investment alternatives and services, and will create a “nancial plan that works for you. Gulf Winds has been recognized for nearly 19 years as a 5-Star rated institution by BAUER FINANCIAL, Inc., the nations leading bank and credit union rating and research “rm. Come see us in Crawfordville at 11 Preston Circle, or visit us online at Account opening subject to approval. Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds F ederal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GAG GROUPER OPEN

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life By MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center DirectorIve never seen a more hellish disease than Alzheimers. The name of the disease strikes terror in the lives of the victims and their families. Caring for an Alzheimers patient is a process that will utterly consume the lives and well-being of the people giving care, just as the disorder consumes its victims. I guess every family has been affected by this disease or some form of dementia. I know I am not supposed to hate but I hate Alzheimers. It is one of the most horri“ c things because, you have a loved one and you have loved that one dearly for maybe 30-40 years or longer, and suddenly, that person is gone. Theyre gone. There they are right in front of you yet they are gone. That personality you have known you no longer know. Ive been told that personality is made up of mind, emotion and will. This disease takes who they are from you and from themselves while breath is left in their body. The family photo albums, the babys scrap book, the love letters from the war, the marriage license on the wall, the personal diary, and the stories once told, even the memory of the grandchildren fade now into some haze, mist or fog bank. I spent 32 years of my life working traumatic cases from murders to terrible car wrecks involving children and adults alike. While I was sometimes surprised at what I saw, I was never shocked. Alzheimers shocked me. About the time I thought I was desensitized to most of the things my eyes could see. In steps Alzheimers and sat me in my chair. Yet families deal with it until they are no longer able to provide hands-on care, and then the professionals step in and families still have to deal with it just on another level, be it a higher level or a lower level, but nevertheless another level. As their loved one digresses, the family is confronted with death many times a day and at some point comes to the conclusion … there are some things worse than death! The fact is not so much a thought as it is a realization. Turn to Page 8B By MICHELLE HUNTER and ANGEL CARTEROf the Senior CenterApril was the month we honored many including Mother Earth. April 22 was the of“ cial Earth Day, so throughout the month we incorporated activities focusing on the concepts of recycle, re-use and re-purpose, to sustain planet earth. The dining room was transformed with many re-purposed decorations to encourage the trash to treasureŽ concept which has been the wave of the future for sustaining the planet. Our senior population is of the generation that believes in not throwing anything away because you will always “ nd a purpose for it. So when the large ” ower arrangement decorated the front wall, they were very surprised and pleased to see that it was made of re-used items. Tamara Byrnes worked her magic to transform wrapping paper into very large and colorful ” owers, the branches are made of brown paper packing material that came in a shipping box (we save the strangest things sometimes), and the leaves are made from wallpaper samples. A large portion of our decorations come from the many donations we receive from the public, and we truly appreciate each and every one of them. Tamara carried the theme forward on Craft Day with flower arrangements made with recycled silk ” owers and containers. Sherri Kraeft and Shelley Swenson of the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce taught the seniors about beekeeping, and making laundry soap and fabric softener the old fashion and inexpensive way. Mother Earth would be so proud of these ladies and what they are doing for our community and the planet. Sherri is a wealth of knowledge on beekeeping and why bees are so important in the production of our food. Many of the seniors spoke of growing up with bees as part of crop production to feed their families. Turn to Page 8BAlzheimers: Capture every moment, every moment SPECIAL TO THE NEWSART DONATION: A painting by Dick Moore was donated to the Wakulla County Historical Society. On hand were Brad Harvey, Betty Green, Dick Moore, Maurice Langston and Sandra Vidak.In April seniors celebrated Earth Day, beekeeping, sustainability, Volunteer Appreciation Day and more Rebecca Addison Edna Adkins Don Allen Pat Allen Shirley Anne Pat Ashley Robert Baker Katie Barrett Kyle Beckett Dick Bickford Lorraine Bickford Becky Black Liz Blais Greg Blakney Jeannie Brodhead Kathie Brown Sharol Brown Peggy Bump James Burke Mary Butera Carol Campbell Juanita Cantrell Donna Card Ann Casseaux Judy Cerwin David Chapman Cynthia Christen Billie Davis Cathy Davis Stanley Davis Virginia Davis Eileen Debish Fred Dockham Neil Eichholz Fran Fletcher Paula Fluty Sharon Fox Pat Gardella Bonnie Grause Shannon Grif“n Carolyn Grubbs Joey Grubbs Tracy Guy Diane Hamilton Mary Hampton Joel Harrison Judy Harrison Faye Harrod Brad Harvey Rhonda Harvey Jean Heaton Ann Henderson Lynn Henderson Viola Henderson Guy Hogan Dave Hove Terri Humphries Shirley Hutto Doug Jones Jane Jones Mary Kelly Mike Kemp Eiko Kerns Norma Kirby Kathy LaMarsh Carolyn Lambert Judy Langston Maria Lentz Tony Livingston Marcia Majeu Annette Malik Greg Mathers Floria Mathis Sheryl Mattison Earl McCalvin Chuck McElroy Anna McLaughlin Peggy McLaurin Mike McNamara Danny Metcalf Jerrell Metcalf Charlotte Miller Mark Mitchell Dick Moore Ida Moore Frank Newman Donna Newman Ammie Osborne Leslie Owens Joanne Palmer Terry Palmer Dorothy Pate Norman Peak Gerald Peck Mike Peckham Ester Pelt Bill Petty Pat Politis Sherry Potter Rita Powell Linda Price Ellen Prvitt Glenda Prvitt George Rainer Mr. James Revell Mrs. James Revell Harriet Rich Dr. Mel Ringelberg Mrs. Ringelberg Tony Rizzo Dora Rosier Kim Ruiz Joanie Shareman Dick Shepard Charlie Slaughter Jay Sloan Buddy Smith Charles Smith Joan Smith Donnie Sparkman Lori Steele Alice Stokely Joanne Strickland Kitty Strickland Jeff Suber Yvonne Taylore Julia Thornton Rich Tittle Charles Tully Mary Updegraff Joan Vaillencourt Alice Vesman Mary Ward Elaine Webb Buddy Wells Agatha Williams Lassie Williams Mattie Williams Louis Williford Jason Winn Sharon Wolfe Brittany Woodard ToWakulla County Senior Citizens Center VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR 2013 DICK BICKFORD A volunteer is that rare person not only willing to give of their time, but of their heart. One person can make a difference, improving lives and communities.If you are interested in volunteering opportunities at the Wakulla County Senior Center, please call Ann at (850) 926-7145 To all of our wonderful volunteersƒ Congratulations! Congratulations!Thank You!

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, May 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, May 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, May 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, May 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  NAMI of Wakulla presents Jennifer Barr with Apalachee Task Force, discussing the topic of Suicide at 6:30 p.m. Open to the public at no cost. Crawfordville Women’s Club. For more info call 926-1033.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, May 21  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at 6:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. Wednesday, May 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsTuesday, May 28  WAKULLA COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT will hold a workshop at 2 p.m. at the Commission Chambers. Thursday, May 30  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a Special Public Meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center.  CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will conduct a public workshop at 6:30 p.m. to review and discuss its recently initiated Land Development Code Update project. Monday, June 3  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commissioner’s chambers. Tuesday, June 11  CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will hold an election for three seats on the Sopchoppy City Council. Polls will open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. Thursday, June 13  CITY OF ST. MARKS will conduct a second reading of an ordinance amending ordinances 68-13, Amd. 5, sec. 7, adopted Feb. 10, 2005 providing for solid waste collection at 788 Port Leon Dr. at 7 p.m. Book signing at Bay Leaf Market 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Save a Youth, Save a generation at Hudson Park 7 p.m. Captain Jack Fishing Tournament at the Alligator Point Fire Station Sopchoppy Opry Special Memorial Day Tribute Show at 7 p.m.FridayFridaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net Weekly meetings Special EventsFriday, May 24  BOOK SIGNING for April Petty’s second edition of “Kundalini Rising,” which adds focus on recovering from injury or illness, will be held at Bayleaf Market from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.  SAVE A YOUTH, SAVE A GENERATION will be held at Hudson Park at 7 p.m. Please bring a ashlight and a lawn chair. Saturday, May 25  REBEKAH AMAN will join Southbound Band and the River Town Girls at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy School auditorium for a Sopchoppy Opry Special Memorial Day Tribute show. Rebekah will perform several patriotic songs in a show dedicated to those who have served our country. Call 962-3711 for tickets. For more information, go to www.sopchoppyopry.com.  CAPTAIN JACK FISHING TOURNAMENT will be held at the Alligator Point Fire Station. Entry pricing: offshore fee is $350 per boat, includes 4 anglers $30 per additional (for shirt & captain’s dinner), inshore fee is $175 per boat $30 per additional (for shirt and capt. dinner). For more information or to register, contact captainjacktournament@gmail.com. Contestants: checks and registration forms not received by May 15 are not guaranteed T-shirts.  FREE DINNER FOR LESS FORTUNATE will be offered at St. Nora Primitive Baptist Church, 1994 Sopchoppy Highway, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. For information, call Sister Shirley Baucham at (850) 745-8226 or Elder David Gabriel Hogan at (850) 567-9742. Monday, May 27  MEMORIAL DAY OPENING CEREMONY will be held at the Wakulla County courthouse at 10 a.m. This Memorial is dedicated to the lasting memory and sacred honor of the brave veterans of Wakulla County who gave their lives in the service of our Country. Thursday, May 30  WORKFORCE plus invites you to attend our quarterly Lunch and Learn Series – Power Hour. This quarter’s topic is “All About Jobs” and will be held at 11:30 a.m. This informative workshop will take a brief look at data for the Big Bend region that is helpful to employers in making hiring decisions. RSVP to reserve your spot today! RSVP to wfp@wfplus.org or via phone at (850) 414-6085.Upcoming EventsSaturday, June 1  NORTH FLORIDA BUTTON CLUB, members of National Button Society will meet at 11 a.m. at the Sunset Coastal Grill in Port St. Joe. For more information, call Sherrie Alverson at 926-7812 or Don or Barbara Lanier at 729-7594, or email bardon56@aol.com.  COVENANT HOSPICE is seeking individuals and groups to join its award-winning volunteer team. A training workshop will be held from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. The workshop is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be provided. Tuesday, June 4  WAKULLA DEMOCRATS will hold a bay side political cocktail hour at Posey’s Dockside Cafe for area Democrats. The event will feature a buffet of heavy hors d’oerves, cash bar and will feature State Senator Bill Montford as well as additional special guests TBA. Tickets are $25 per person. Visit wakullademocrats.org for more information. Saturday, June 8  LUPUS SUPPORT NETWORK meets every second Saturday from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the B.L. Perry Library located at 2817 South Adams in Tallahassee. This group provides information, education and mutual support for people with lupus and related autoimmune diseases. Thursday, June 20  SCENE IN WAKULLA begins with an opening night party in the downstairs and courtyard areas of Best Western Plus / Wakulla Inns & Suites. The cost is $10. The weekend will hold directing for film and acting workshops, on camera performance workshops, readings and panel discussions. Visit www.palavertreetheater.org to nd out more and to view this year’s line-up of workshops and performances, writers, actors, directors and lmmakers. Weekend of June 22-23  APALACHEE BAY COMMUNITY SAILING announces its 2013 sailing lessons for adults. Lessons will be offered at Shell Point at the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club and will consist of classes on both Saturday and Sunday starting at 9:00 a.m. and ending at 3:30 p.m. each day. The classes will be taught by a Certi ed US Sailing Instructor. Each day will include classroom instruction and on-the-water drills taught to US Sailing Standards. These adult lessons are provided by Apalachee Bay Community Sailing at no charge. Optional written course materials may be purchased by students. Apalachee Bay Community Sailing is an educational and charitable organization formed by the Apalachee Bay Yacht Club to encourage both youth and adults to learn about and enjoy sailing. We are also accepting donations of serviceable used boats and trailers to support the expansion of this program. May 23May 29Library News... Keep an eye out this week as well be dropping off brochures at the local schools telling everyone about our Summer Program of Events for the children of Wakulla County. In addition to enrichment programs for infants through 8th grades, well also have our annual roster of great performers to entertain the entire family. Great entertainment from dancers, to magicians, to storytellers, to actors … all of whom will encourage audience participation that will get the entire family involved. Well end the summer with our 2nd annual talent show for children up through 5th grades and are attempting a new program for teens where they can, at the end of the summer, show a short “ lm they have made based upon their favorite book. All of these programs are free to the public and sponsored by the Friends of the Library. Feel free to contact me with any questions. Our annual Registration Fun Days will be on Thursday, June 6 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday, June 7 from 10 a.m. until noon. SUMMER READING BOOKS As we do every year, we have ordered multiple copies of all of the summer reading and Sunshine State books assigned by the Wakulla County Schools. Those that are available from our e-book vendor are available in that format as well. We encourage everyone to check out the books early to avoid long waiting lists as the summer moves along. These books are not eligible for renewal and must be read in the 3 week checkout period in order for the most students to have access. We appreciate your patience this summer as we continue to do all we can to provide the students of Wakulla County with their summer reading materials. FRIDAY NIGHT MOVIE This Friday well be showing the “ lm based upon the best selling novel Safe HavenŽ by Nicholas Sparks. This PG-13 “ lm stars Juliannee Hough and Josh Duhamel and tells the story of a young woman with a mysterious past who lands in Southport, N.C., where her bond with a widower forces her to confront the dark secret that haunts her. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing.By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 3B Access Advertisements Amuse Basin Bells Bring Cereal Clerk Dense Disease Ditch Domes Dozen Easel Editor Essay Factors Feared Fears Fleet Human Intense Landed League Least Level Lever London Mayor Merry Mighty Newly Parents Patrol Script Seating Sells Shade Shark YOUR AD HERE Sheer Slave Smells Sounds Splash Stage Style Suits Supplies Teams Unions Verse Vital The Wak u l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com The Wakulla News

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Todays New Ads HUGE YARD SALE Vendors Welcome Crawfordville9am -Fri, May 24th Sat, May 25th & Sun, May 26th Lots of Mens Stuff @ 2627 Spring Creek Hwy @ ShellPoint Realty (850) 926-8120 Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com AIRLINE CAREERS -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES AREHIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Driver -Two raises in first year Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.drive knight.com FT DRIVERFerrellgas is looking for a full time driver in Carrabelle. Requirements: ability to lift 75 lbs, HS Diploma, 1 yr driving exp, Class Aor B CDLw/ hazmat/tanker, clean driving record. Apply online at ferrellgas.com/Careers EOE/AAP/M/F/D/V PIANISTCrawfordville United Methodist Church is looking for a pianist. Pianist will accompany the choir and congregational singing and play service music such as prelude, offertory, and postlude. They will also play for weekly choir rehearsal, Sunday pre-service warm up, Sunday service and other special services as needed. Applicant should be able to play hymns in the UMC hymnal, accompany traditional and contemporary choral works and SATB parts at weekly rehearsal. For more information please contact the church office at 850-926-7209. DENTISTPart Time Dentist Needed!! Mid America Health is seeking a Dentist to work 1 day per month at the Wakulla County jail. This position offers competitive compensation, is a low stress alternative to private practice and malpractice is provided. Duties include screenings, exams and extractions. Apply today at www.mahweb.com!! Attend College Online 100%. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, *Web. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid for qualified students. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.Centura Online.com MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDED!Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HS Diploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 HUGE YARD SALE Vendors Welcome Crawfordville9am -Fri, May 24th Sat, May 25th & Sun, May 26th Lots of Mens Stuff @ 2627 Spring Creek Hwy @ ShellPoint Realty (850) 926-8120 Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine.PET STOP(850) 926-7949 www .happy jackinc.com 15 YR. OLD REGISTERED QUARTERHORSE GELDING 15-2 hands $500. 11 YR. OLD SML PONY w/saddle & bridle $250. Western Roping Saddle pd $750. w/sell for $450. 850-926-2807 CRAWFORDVILLEFor Rent or Lease Purchase 3 BR 2 BATH, DWMH with CHA Near Lake Ellen Boat ramp. Great Condition. $695 + deposit, application, references. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $475/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 CrawfordvilleFurnished Cottage 2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/DR area. CHA & W/D. No pets/ smoking. $670/mo. + $670 sec dep (850) 926-2293 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621 CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom, 2 Baths $800 mo. + deposit Wakulla County Schools 59 Pixie Circle Available June 1st 850-766-0170 Crawfordville3BR/2BA w/2 car garage. 1.25 acres, paved, sub-division in Wakulla Station, 20-mins. to Tallahassee, fenced backyard, $875/mo. plus security/cleaning deposit. Avail. May 1st Please Call (850) 566-5165 (850) 926-6115 Chiefland By Owner -5 Fenced Acres, Nice little one bedroom house, Big Pole Barn w/electric & water. Grandaddy Oaks, park like setting, Very Private. $78,500 firm. Call 813-285-0182 Seth Scotts Heating & Air State Lic.Contractor #CAC1817434 Honest & Dependable Service, Installation, Repair & Maintenance: Residential & Commercial 12 years experience 850-509-2405 5658-0530 TWN vs. Erdmann, Linda Case No. 65-2009-CA-000013 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 65-2009-CA-000013 CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. LINDAJ. ERDMANN A/K/ALINDAERDMANN; ROBERTC. ERDMANN; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); JOHN DOE; JANE DOE; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of WAKULLACounty, Florida, I will sell the property situate in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 13, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON THE SOUTHERLYRIGHT OF WAYOF STOKLEYROAD; THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT OF 5659-0530 TWN vs. Michalski, Marc Case No. 65-2012-CA-000339 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000339 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. MARC R. MICHALSKI; AMY L MICHALSKI; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 17, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000339, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION is Plaintiff and MARC R. MICHALSKI; AMY L. MICHALSKI; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; CAMELOT TOWNHOME OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 20th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 28,CAMELOT, A SUBDIVISION A PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 17th day of April, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486 Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com May 23 & 30, 2013 12-06839 JPC 5660-0530 TWN Vs. Giglio, James Case #: 2010-CA-000053 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2010-CA-000053 BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, -vs.James Joseph Giglio a/k/a James J. Giglio; Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as Nominee for Countrywide Home Loans, Inc.; Knight & Dwyer, LLC; Midland Funding LLC as successor in interest to Chase Bank USA, N.A.; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated April 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2010-CA-000053 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P., Plaintiff and James Joseph Giglio a/k/a James J. Giglio and Christel Giglio are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, AT 11:00 A.M. on June 13, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: LOTS 20 AND 21, OF BLOCK 8, OF WAKULLAGARDENS UNIT TWO, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk of Court ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 May 23 & 30, 2013 09-158887 FC01 CWF 5661-0530 TWN Vs. Bobkowski, Eric Case #: 2009-CA-000365 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2009-CA-000365 U.S. Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificate for WMALT2006-AR4 Trust Plaintiff, -vs.Eric E. Bobkowski; Linda N. Bobkowski; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order dated April 17, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 2009-CA-000365 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein U.S. Bank, National Association as Trustee for WaMu Mortgage Pass-Through Certificate for WMALT2006-AR4 Trust, Plaintiff and Eric E. Bobkowski are defendant(s), I, Clerk of Court, Brent X. Thurmond, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTDOOR OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, AT11:00 A.M. on June 13, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit: TRACT NO. 36, SUMMERWOOD (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 5, ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ADISTANCE OF 1300.00 FEET ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT 3.62 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 296.73 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE CURVE 201.65 FEET (CHORD NORTH 19 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 197.80 FEET) TO APOINT OF REVERSE CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING ARADIUS OF 296.82 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE CURVE 205.28 FEET (CHORD NORTH 18 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 201.21 FEET) THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 314.03 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT 708.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 367.82 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST 627.28 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 367.82 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST 627.28 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE SOUTHERLY30 FEET OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTYBEING SUBJECT TO A60.00 FOOT. ROADWAYEASEMENT. AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED BYARECENT SURVEYPREPARED BYEDWIN G. BROWN & ASSOCIATES, INC., DATED OCTOBER 18, 1990, JOB NO. 90-305, AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 5 ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ADISTANCE OF 1300.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT 3.62 FEET TO APOINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT HAVING ARADIUS OF 296.73 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND CURVE 201.65 FEET (CHORD NORTH 19 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 08 SECONDS WEST 197.80 FEET) TO APOINTOF REVERSE CURVE TO THE RIGHT HAVING ARADIUS OF 296.82 FEET, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID CENTERLINE CURVE 205.28 FEET (CHORD NORTH 18 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 201.20 FEET) THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 314.03 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT 708.58 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 367.82 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 628.19 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 367.97 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 32 SECONDS WEST 627.92 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. THE SOUTHERLY30 FEET OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED PROPERTYBEING SUBJECT TO A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk of Court ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 May 23 & 30, 2013 09-149398 FC01 W50 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 5Br 3Ba TWMH $1000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Duplex $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. RENTALS: Wakulla RealtySpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerA-1PRESSURE CLEANING LAWN CARE Husband & Wife Team Call Dave 850-443-9427Since 1995 Lic & InsAffordable HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f f f A A A A ll ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L L C C C C N N N N N d d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• Stump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 5B WAYAS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 984.39 FEET TO AROD AND CAPFOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 89 DEGREES 49 MINUTES 43 SECONDS WEST 274.50 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT OF WAY RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 299.09 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 12.42 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 521.61 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 56 SECONDS EAST 259.19 FEET TO AROD AND CAP; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 10 MINUTES 37 SECONDS WEST 820.74 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTAINING 5.00 ACRES MORE OR LESS. A/K/A: 69 STOKLEYROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale, at in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL. 32327 at 11:00 AM, on the 27th day of June, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 1st day of May, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive Tampa, FL33619-1328 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL32303, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 23 & 30, 2013 81064 5650-0523 TWN vs. Earnhart, Paul Case No. 2008-CA-000279 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2008-CA-000279 MERRILLLYNCH CREDITCORPORATION, Plaintiff, 5651-0523 TWN vs. Arnett, Shawnda Case No. 12-203-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-203-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. SHAWNDA ARNETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHAWNDA ARNETT; CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC.; and LONNIE WILLIAMS Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 17, 2013 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on June 6, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, the following described property: All that certain land situate, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 101 of the Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida, which point is on the South boundary line of Lot 92 Hartsfield Survey; thence run South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West along said South boundary, 1183.28 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning, run North 17 degrees 45 minutes 29 seconds West, 330.18 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5518; thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 25 seconds West, 132.47 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5516; thence South 17 degrees 50 minutes 23 seconds East 330.47 feet to a point lying on the aforesaid South boundary of Lot 92; thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East, along said South boundary, a distance of 132.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT the following: Commence at the Northeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to Lonnie Williams and Mollie Taylor by John E. Beasley and Eva Crosby Beasley, his wife, dated March 21, 1967, and recorded on Page 398 of Official Records Book 15, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; and thence run Southerly along the Easterly boundary of said tract of land, 89.00 feet; thence run West 100.00 feet to the East side of a road; thence run North along the East side of said graded road, 64.00 feet; thence run Easterly 100.00 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 1/4 of an acre, more or less, in Lot 92 of Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2003 Value Made mobile home with Identification/Serial Numbers: CO2840AGA and CO2840AGB. Property Address: 242 Carter Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 30, 2013 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk, Wakulla County Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, as Deputy Clerk May 16 & 23, 2013 5652-0523 TWN vs. Family Tides Case No. 2011-165 CANotice of Foreclosure sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2011-165 CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, 5653-0523 TWN Vs. Ward. Luciana Case No: 2013-CA-000042 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2013-CA-000042 CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. LUCIANAB. WARD A/K/ALUCYWARD F/K/ALUCYB. BEAM; TED BEAN; PHILIPWARD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TED BEAN; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BEHALF OF SECRETARYOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; OYSTER BAYESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TED BEAN 56 OYSTER BAYDRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 OR: 197 WOODVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 LASTKNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN And any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the above-named Defendant(s), if deceased or whose last known addresses are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: THE LAND DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, COUNTY OF WAKULLA, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT THREE (3), BLOCK CŽ OF UNIT I, OYSTER BAYESTATES, AS SHOWN BYPLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 70, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Latasha Moore-Robinson, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 2nd day of May, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 Fax: (954) 974-7487, Email: marym@defaultlink.com May 16 & 23, 2013 5656-0530 TWN vs. Eubanks, Jeanne Case No. 12-315-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 12-315-CA JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. JEANNE D. EUBANKS; BOBBY J. EUBANKS; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 19, 2013, and entered in Case No. 12-315-CA, of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA County, Florida. JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL AS5657-0530 TWN vs. Williams, Travis Case No. 2009-CA-000508 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO.2009-CA-000508 Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Carrington Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2005-NC5 Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Plaintiff, vs. Travis C. Williams; Melia P. Williams, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated May 6, 2013 entered in Case No. 2009-CA-508 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Deutsche Bank National Trust Company, as Trustee for Carrington Mortgage Loan Trust, Series 2005-NC5 Asset-Backed Pass-Through Certificates is the Plaintiff and Travis C. Williams; Melia P. Williams;New Century Mortgage Corporation; Old Courthouse Square Homeowners Association, Inc., are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 20th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 54, OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE REPLAT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 102, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Dated this 6th day of May, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner As Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. Jessica L. Fagen, Esquire, Brock & Scott PLLC 1501 NW 49th St., Suite 200, Fort Lauderdale, FL33309 FLCourtDocs@brockandscott.com May 23 & 30, 2013 SOCIATION is Plaintiff and JEANNE D. EUBANKS; BOBBY J. EUBANKS; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are defendants. I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT DOOR OF THE COURTHOUSE, AT 3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA 32327, at 11:00 A.M., on the 13th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 9, BLOCK GŽ, SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 113, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY FLORIDA. A person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 19th day of April, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of said Court (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No. 2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). Kahane & Associates, P.A. 8201 Peters Road, Ste.3000, Plantation, FL 33324 Telephone: (954) 382-3486/ Telefacsimile: (954) 382-5380 Designated service email: notice@kahaneandassociates.com May 23 & 30, 2013 12-02398 v. FAMILYTIDES INVESTMENTS, LLC, BRADLEYR. WILL, BRIAN K. WILL, DOUGLAS A. WILL, RICHARD GENTRY, and DOUGLAS MARK HOLLEY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BYCLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on June 6, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Property LOT 20, OF FIDDLERS COVE, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the undersigned attorney at least seven (7) working days or immediately upon receiving this notification.. If you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 17th day of April, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Cour t [SEALOF THE COURT] By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Cler k May 16 & 23, 2013 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 20 Liberty – 3 Bedroom/2BA, $800 per month with a $800 security deposit. No smoking, only outdoor pets with approval and $250.00 pet fee. Available June 1st. • 45A Dispennette – 3 Bedroom/2BA, $750 per month, $750 security deposit. No smoking, only outdoor pets with approval and $250.00 pet fee. • 47B Dispennette – 3 Bedroom/2BA, $750 per month, $750 security deposit. No smoking, only outdoor pets with approval and $250.00 pet fee. Available June 1st. • 216 Sam Smith – 2 Bedroom/1 BA, $650 per month with a $650 security deposit. Singlewide on 1acre. Pets okay with approval and $250 pet fee. • 36 Shawnee – 3 Bedroom/2 BA $900 per month, $900 Security deposit. Pets ok with approval and pet fee. Available June 1st OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY 2pm-4pm OP E N H OU S E S A T U R D AY 2 p m 4 p m Susan Jones, GRIRealtor 566-7584 16 DuncanBeautifully maintained home, inside and out. 4BD/2BA on 0.79 acres. Above ground pool w/deck, hot tub & screened back porch. Spacious split oorplan. Gorgeous master suite that boasts, large bay window w/storage, huge walk-in master closet w/custom organizer. Indoor laundry room offers ample custom storage. Extra Carport in backyard perfect for boat storage. Sold As-Is. $199,900. OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2pm-4pm 15 Excalibur, Crawfordville Immaculate 3BR/2BA townhome. Open and spacious. Master bedroom downstairs. Upstairs are two spacious bedrooms featuring a jack-and-jill style bath with extra vanity space. Covered front porch and garage. Convenient and close to downtown. Only $95,900! Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $550 mo./$550 Security Deposit Pets Considered 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850 mo./$850 Security Deposit. 142 Shar-Mel-Re 3BD/2BA, wood ooring in great room, fenced back yard. $900 mo./$900 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com vs. PAULM. EARNHART, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 11, 2013 and entered in Case No. 2008-CA-000279 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein MERRILLLYNCH CREDITCORPORATION is the Plaintiff and PAULM. EARNHART; FRANCES W. HARLEY; FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 13th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 18, PANACEASHORES UNIT NO. 2, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A35 BLUE CRAB LANE, PANACEA, FL32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on March 11, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11018976 CENDANT-CONV„cpadilla-Team 4 -F11018976 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. May 16 & 23, 2013 F11018976 5644-0516 TWN vs. Southpoint Ind. Case No. 12-100-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 12-100-CA CENTENNIAL BANK f/k/a WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. SOUTHPOINT INDUSTRIES, INC., a Florida Corporation; REBECCA G. BLACK, Individually; REBECCA GREEN BLACK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE GEORGE THOMAS BLACK REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST dated January 4, 1995; EMPIRE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, a North Carolina Corporation, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Final Judgment dated April 18, 2013, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, June 13, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with Florida Statutes §45.031, the real property located at 872 Coastal Highway, Panacea, Wakulla County, Florida, 32348 which has the following legal description: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 36, (also being the Southwest corner of sections 25), Township 5 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and run South 01 degrees 02 minutes 40 seconds West along the Westerly boundary of said Section 36, a distance of 500.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run South 88 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds East 360.33 feet to the Westerly right-of-way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 98, thence run South 17 degrees 22 minutes 59 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 447.74 feet, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 88 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds West 510.00 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 22 minutes 59 seconds East 447.74 feet, thence run South 88 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds East 149.67 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 5.03 acres, more or less. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY (seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk May 9 & 16, 2013 5647-0523 TWN Vs. Shuler, Sylvia Case No. 13-31-CPNotice to Creditors I N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION PROBATE CASE NO. 13-31-CA IN RE: ESTATE OFSYLVIA A. SHULER a/k/a SYLVIA SHULER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of SYLVIA A. SHULER, deceased, whose date of death was March 23, 2013, file number 13-31-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 16, 2013. Personal Representative: DONNA SHULER CRONWELL 2652 Pretty Bayou Island Drive, Panama City, Florida 32405 Attorney for Personal Representative: George H. Gwynn, Florida Bar No. 0357537 Williams, Gautier, Gwynn, DeLoach & Sorenson, P.A. 2010 Delta Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32303 Telephone: (850) 386-3300 May 16 & 23, 2013 5648-0523 TWN Vs. Carnivale, Kenneth Case No: 652012CA000350CAXXXX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652012CA000350CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH CARNIVALE A/K/AKENNETH C. CARNIVALE A/K/AKENNYCARNIVALE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH CARNIVALE A/K/AKENNETH C. CARNIVALE A/K/A KENNYCARNIVALE; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; KELLYCARNIVALE A/K/AKELLYM. CARNIVALE, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 30th day of May 2013, at 11am at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 6, Block 5, of WAKULLAGARDENS, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 9th day of April, 2013, AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if 5649-0523 TWN Vs. West, Clinton Case No: 652012CA000349CAXXXX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652012CA000349CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CLINTON R. WEST; MICHELLE R. WEST; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; CAMELOTTOWNHOME OWNERSASSOCIATION, INC., and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 30th day of May 2013, at 11am at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 37, OF CAMELOT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 9th day of April, 2013, AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954) 779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Latasha Moore-Robinson Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 May 16 & 23, 2013 5646-0523 TWN Estate of Donaldson, Louise File No. 13-CP-34 Notice of Admin PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-CP-34 IN RE: ESTATE OF LOUISE DONALDSON, also known as LUERAY LOUISE DONALDSON, Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of Louise Donaldson, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, file number 2013-CP-34. The estate is intestate. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. The fiduciary lawyer-client privilege in Section 90.5021 applies with respect to the personal representative and any attorney employed by the personal representative. Any interested person on whom a copy of the notice of administration is served who challenges the validity of the will or codicils, qualification of the personal representative, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court is required to file any objection with the court in the manner provided in the Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on that person, or those objections are forever barred. A petition for determination of exempt property is required to be filed by or on behalf of any person entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, WITHIN THE 5638-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 004 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #161 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:11-4S-02W-000-01888-002THE N1/2 OF THE S1/2 OF THE S1/2 OF THE NE1/4 OF SEC 11 P-3-2-M-49C OR 127 P 650 OR 293 P 856 Name in which assessed Heirs of Melissa Meyers said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12 day of June, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26day of April, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, FloridaMay 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 5639-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #723 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:01-6S-02W-000-03588-002 1-6S-2W P-23-M-55 LOT LYING BETWEEN WILLIAM BROTHERS LUMBER CO LOT & TROY FAIN LOT ON RIVER IN SW1/4 OF SEC 1 Name in which assessed Panacea Coastal Prop Inc said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12 day of Juneat 10:00 A.M. Dated this 26 day of April, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 5640-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 006 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10 U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #615 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:25-5S-02W-046-03432-001 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK L LOT 17 & 18 OR 296 P 240 & OR 336 P 523 Name in which assessed J. DONALD NICHOLS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12th day of June, 2013.at 10:00 A.M. Dated this29day of April 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 5641-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 007 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #510 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-5S-02W-057-03123-000 PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS 1ST UNIT BLOCK 9 LOTS 12 & 13 OR 530 P 99 OR 535 P 659 Name in which assessed JUDITH L. DOWE & FRANCIS G. DINARDI said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12th day of June, 2013,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this29day of April 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954) 779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Latasha Moore-Robinson Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 May 16 & 23, 2013 TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the later of the date that is 4 month s after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on such person o r the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involvin g the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any othe r matter affecting any part of the exempt property, or the right of such person to ex empt property is deemed waived. An election to take an elective share must be filed by or on behalf of the surviv ing spouse entitled to an elective share under Sections 732.201 -732.2155 WITHIN TH E TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 month s after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on the survivin g spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedents death. The time for filin g an election to take an elective share may be extended as provided in the Florid a Probate Rules. Personal Representative: Clyde A. Poole, Sr 1711 9th St. W., Palmetto, Florida 34221 Attorney for Personal Representative: Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq., Attorney for Clyde A. Poole, Sr., Florida Bar Number: 488690, Farrington Law Office P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 Telephone: (850) 926-2700 Fax: (850) 926-2741 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com May 16 & 23, 2013 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 27 33 38 41 47 51 58 62 65 2 28 48 3 29 44 4 30 45 5 23 42 18 39 52 59 63 66 6 15 34 49 60 7 24 31 61 8 25 50 53 9 21 32 46 22 26 43 64 67 10 16 19 40 54 11 35 55 12 36 56 13 37 57 ACROSS 1. Apartment window sign 6. Be obsequious 10. Fun house sound 14. Mentally acute 15. Orchestral reed 16. Lumbago, e.g. 17. Formal military attire 19. PC pic 20. Drugged to sleep 21. Glossy fabric 23. Outdoes in competition 26. Piglike 27. Dangerous cargo, for short 31. Catchall category 33. For the birds? 34. Makes java 35. Letter after pi 38. Optimistic view 39. Dollars and cents 40. Worth a D 41. More than none 42. Part of RAF 43. "The Bridge" poet Hart 44. Started the show 46. Colossus site 47. __ out (produce hurriedly) 49. "Sweet" O'Grady of song 51. Larger-than-life figures 53. Whales and wombats 58. Small brook 59. Fisherman's max 62. "Each Dawn __" (Cagney film) 63. Simple Lionel train layout 64. Sans support 65. Nurses at a bar 66. Washington's Vietnam Memorial, e.g. 67. Assailed on all sidesDOWN1. Little shavers 2. Shrek, for one 3. Told a whopper 4. Hostess Maxwell 5. Nuclear treaty subject 6. Does origami 7. __ Simbel 8. Great sorrow 9. "The Untouchables" protagonist 10. Skier's leg covering 11. Way to a highway 12. Wingtips, e.g. 13 Director Marshall 18. Borscht ingredient 22. "Rag Mop" brothers 24. Transport to Oz 25. Iron-carbon alloy 27. Mirthful syllables 28. Mary Kay competitor 29. "Hush!" 30. Dogpatch's Daisy __ 32. Numbered rte. 34. Charles of "Gaslight" 36. Apply to a whetstone 37. Blast furnace input 39. Many a legal holiday: Abbr. 40. Con's opposite 42. Coty of France 43. HS experiment site 45. Lower class in "1984" 46. Money in Abadan 47. Newsman Matthews 48. Johanna Spyri heroine 50. Like some talk or print 52. Like a change-up 54. Event not run in the Olympics 55. Author Oz 56. Conga feature 57. Leave be, editorially 60. Mendes or Longoria 61. Guy's date American Prole Hometown Content 5/19/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 234 53 2678 48 265 19 35726 5 637 94 6851 200 9 HometownContent 816 2537 9 4 795481623 324967581 478 326159 562149837 139578246 251 634978 983712465 647895312 T A D S H A H A C H R I S O G R E A V O N H E I D I L I E D Z I P Y O U R L I P E L S A M A E P R O L E S T E S T B A N R E N E B E E T M O N S L O W F O L D S B O Y E R E V A A B U T O R N A D O G A L W O E S T E E L S M A L L N E S S H W Y R I A L A M E S C H E M L A B G A I T E R P R O M I L E A C C E S S R O A D A M O S S H O E S H O N E L I N E P E N N Y O R E S S T E T

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 – Page 7B 1. HISTORY: Who was the last president of the Soviet Union? 2. FAMOUS QUOTATIONS: What famous writer once said, “Any idiot can face a crisis — it’s day to day living that wears you out”? 3. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capital of South Carolina? 4. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What are the wild dogs of Australia called? 5. BUSINESS: What company’s slogan is, “Don’t leave home without it”? 6. ASTRONOMY: What is our solar system’s sun composed of? 7. HOLIDAYS: When was Mother’s Day declared a national U.S. holiday? 8. THEATER: What city was the setting for the original “The Phantom of the Opera”? 9. COMICS: What comic strip had an imaginary character called “Stupendous Man”? 10. WAR: What was the last former Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union after the Civil War? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Mikhail Gorbachev 2. Anton Chekhov 3. Columbia 4. Dingos 5. American Express 6. 98 percent hydrogen and helium 7. 1914 8. Paris 9. Calvin and Hobbes 10. Georgia Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 23, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comFrom Page 1B Ive seen some wonderful people who I would love to be able to plug into, highlight, copy, and cut and paste their memories on a page. Ive heard stories of family asking their loved ones with Alzheimers if they have had breakfast yet? The response was; I havent had breakfast in days. Why dont you cook me some! Only to learn the facility just served them breakfast. However, they remember a pet from their childhood but presently are unaware of the poodle (Prissy) being kept by her son. Other times she remembers the visits of suitors who came courting and wooing in her younger days. But says she hasnt seen her son for months although he visited her last night. When “ rst confronted with this disease in an older person I was stumped and stupe“ ed. A woman from my church whom I had never seen angry or heard utter a cussword in her life had turned the treatment facility air around her blue, so to speak. It was worse than any Tourettes syndrome I had encountered. I realized then the disease had stolen the woman I once knew, but I still loved and respected the woman that she had become … I just didnt understand her. Early on I thought how she must have been terrorized by the diagnosis and being aware that she was not always aware anymore. Did she feel she was living in the shadow of someone else, peeking out a few times on her good days? Was it hard workŽ for her to try and remember during the onset of the illness? When someone reminded her of a pleasant and recent past memory, did she smile and act like she remembered when truly she did not? You really know how old she is, but at what age is she living? She left a legacy while she could and was in good health. We must not forgetŽ her legacy ourselves. Alzheimer patients are patients but for us many times they are still family. I was told by a husband of many years how he went to see his wife today but she didnt remember him. But maybe she does remember him, but doesnt recognize him. Perhaps shes living in the early years of marriage and he did not look the same to her as he did then. Jolene Brackley writes of a gentleman by the name of Bud who had this encounter with his wife now suffering from Alzheimers. He took his wife to a park where they once sat as young lovers. Bud leaned over and touches her face and said, I love you!Ž Her response: Im sorry, sir, but my heart is for Bud.Ž He was thrilled, elated and returned and proclaimed, She did not recognize me today, but she remembered me today. Priceless. I just wanted to let you know that if your loved one has this disease, they may not recognize you, but they may still remember you, even if it was in a former decade or so. We try too hard to make them come back to our time; they may not, ever. So lets make an attempt to figure out what time they are in and drop back into their earlier time. It could mean the difference between a brief connection vs. no connection at all. While reading and researching this dreadful disease one writer posed this scenario to the readers: You (the reader) have Alzheimers, but you dont remember you do. You think youre “ ne. You are 85 but think you are 25. You wake up in a strange place every morning, its a whole new world every day. You know you have children but are perplexed that you cant “ nd them near you. You ask a stranger, where are my children? They tell you the truth, they live in Alabama and that is where you are too but dont worry everything will be “ ne. Not so, everything is not “ ne. Now you are in a panic. This is not your home, and you think that the nurse/stranger is lying to you. Now you are frightened.Ž Now that weve stepped out of that world back into our present world possibly you can see the mental condition of this 24-yearold mother who has lost her children, is in a strange place with strangers lying to her. Maybe this is why a patient can go into a rage, curse like a young sailor and cry like hungry newborn babies. I presented that scenario to you because there is no reasoning with a person with Alzheimers. You will NOT be able to make them live in your reality. They will never choose your reality so theres only one thing to do in my opinion … choose to live in theirs. Also, they make the same mistakes many times a day all day long. They ask the same questions all day long. Why? I believe they are searching for their right answer. Anything that triggers a positive response write it down. Before long you will have a diary full of correct responses. You may be wondering; is he asking me to lie? Its not lying if you are responding to their truth! Remember, its not your truth but it is theirs and they perhaps are living in a different decade. You want them to change but they are not going to so someone in this formula has to change. You! Ive seen families who are always correcting their loved one/patient. When they act like children we tend to treat them like children and correct them like children. They are not and will never again be children. Perhaps we should ask ourselves three questions: € What they are doing right now? € Is it hurting them? € Is it hurting me or someone else? If the answer is no, leave them alone. Why correct them? Maybe its what they want to do and you are the only one that feels uncomfortable. After all, you and I do what we want to do! If you come to the realization that you are wrong and they are right then anxiety, arguments and aggravation subsides. I guess our role in this is to take care of their basic needs and as many wants as we can. Provide for them security,Ž we all want security. Finally provide them love unconditionally. Unconditional love is what everyone everywhere wants. So all in all you change what you can and manage what you cant! A person can either respond or react to any given situation. To respond is a positive outcome while a reaction is negative because its sometimes a knee-jerk reaction. Never react … respond. I told my wife not long ago, when Im old I may forget you but I know you will not forget me. Or, if by chance you forget me, I will never forget you. Capture the moment, every moment!Maurice Langston is the director of the Senior Center.From Page 1B Shelley Swenson has a passion for community sustainability and how we can live easier and less expensive. The many classes she teaches at the extension of“ ce support these ideas. She taught the seniors how you can make approximately two gallons of laundry detergent for about $4 and fabric softener from water, vinegar, and hair conditioner. You can reach Sherri and Shelley at (850) 926-3931 for more information on the classes they teach. During the Volunteer Appreciation Day luncheon the names of all the volunteers were acknowledged by Cheryll Olah, a member of our Board of Directors, and each one received a thank you gift.Ž Dick Bickford was named our Volunteer of the Year for 2013 and received a plaque of recognition from our Executive Director Maurice Langston and R.H. Carter, our past director and honorary speaker for the day. We could not do all that we do here without the dedication and hard work of these volunteers. We would like to say thank you from all of the staff and the Board of Directors. One of our long time seniors, Dick Moore, presented a beautiful watercolor painting to the Wakulla Historical Society. He painted the Rusty Old Trucks on 319Ž about 15 years ago and it has been hanging on the walls of the senior center for the last 10 years. Moore presented it to members of the Historical Society, and it will now hang in the Wakulla Historical Museum in Crawfordville. Betty Green, a member of the Historical Society spoke about the history of the trucks owned by Homer Harvey. Brad Harvey, Homers grandson, reminisced about playing in the trucks and the journeys he and his cousins pretended to go on. On April 27, Pam Mueller of Volunteer Wakulla, donated 40 disaster buckets to the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. These buckets were put together by many volunteers to provide the basic emergency necessities: flashlight with batteries, toilet paper, cleaning supplies, and even emergency weather alert radios. These disaster buckets are in the process of being distributed to our seniors. Special thanks to Greg Fogleman and the Boy Scout Troop 5 in Crawfordville, Nancy Culp and her Girl Scouts Troop, ROTC led by Hunter Conway, the Volunteer Wakulla Board led by Pam Mueller, Scott Nelson who is the Emergency Management Director and all other individuals who devoted their time to putting this special project together. We would also like to thank all the item donors: Best Western, Centennial Bank, Costco, Disc Village, Dr. Dennis R. Mooney, Gulf Coast Lumber, Lowes, Alma Quinn, TMH Crawfordville, Total Care Dental, Volunteer Leon, Wal-Mart, and WCSO. We send our thanks to Sheriff Creel and the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce who brought the Work Release Unit to the Center to help with our gardening chores. They raked, shoveled, pulled weeds and appeared to have fun doing it. Congregate meals are served daily in the dining room at noon. Please let us know by 9:30 a.m. if you will be here for lunch. Meals on Wheels are also provided through the center for those that are homebound. Call 9267145 ext. 223 for more information. On June 26 we are having a Health Fair at the center. There will be blood pressure and blood sugar checks, eye glass checks, balance testing, hearing test, and more. Put the date on your calendar and plan to attend. If you have any questions or need information regarding activities or services at the center please call 926-7145, or stop by and pick up a calendar of events. On Saturday night, April 26 we had a grand time of dancing, dining, and being delighted by the Tallahassee Swing Band. The blues, songs of the 50s and vocalist wooed and wowed us as we danced the night away. The food was prepared by Chef Wendy and the chocolate fountain was the site where we baptized fresh strawberries, marshmallows and assortment of cakes. The lights were low at 8:00 p.m. and as soon as the music started the dance ” oor was occupied until 10:00 when Splish SplashŽ closed out the evening. The orchestra struck up the tune The Alabama Bugle Boy From Company BŽ left me breathless. The Swim, The Chicken, The Twist and I must admit a few moves I have never seen before captured the attention of all. This program has been a staple in providing Meals on WheelsŽ, Food for Life ClubŽ and other in-home services of the Wakulla County Senior Center. We thank all who attended to make this a success. The board of directors, the friendraising committee, and our staff want to thank our Sponsors who brought the Tallahassee Swing Band back to the R. H. Carter Senior Citizens Complex, at 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville, Florida to bene“ t Wakulla Seniors. Our sponsors were Capital City Bank, Commissioner Jerry Moore, Commissioner Randy Merritt, Commissioner Richard Harden, Gene and Carolyn Lambert, Maurice and Judy Langston, Ochlockonee Bay Realty Inc., R.H. and Beverly Carter, Becky Black and Southpoint Industrial, Susan Jones of Blue Water Realty Group. Thanks to the Tallahassee Swing Band for an amazing performance. We will see you next year. By MAURICE LANGSTON The name Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council Inc., has been synonymous with caring for and sharing with seniors through our Meals-On-Wheels program. Year after year the Senior Citizens Council hosts successful events to assure that not one senior goes unserved. The events are packed with excitement, creativity and fun for our targeted groups. On May 3 and 4, the Wakulla County Senior Citizens hosted the “ rst Big Bend Kayak Classic, our most ambitious event to date and we are proud to announce that because of YOU and your sponsorship that it was a tremendous success. I am writing today on behalf of the Board of Directors, the Staff, and our Senior Citizens to thank you for your partnership and sponsorship. We are proud to partner with your business and we look forward to continuing to build a valuable and mutually bene“ cial relationship. As a result of your sponsorship we will be able to feed moreŽ senior citizens. As you may have seen on the national news, Meals on Wheels is one of the targeted reductions in the sequestration. Because of your support and generosity, you enabled us to raise $12,642.00 for Meals on Wheels. Without you, it would have been impossible for us to succeed. It is our sincere hope that you will partner with us again in 2014 for the second annual Big Bend Kayak Classic. Together we can create an even greater success for Meals on Wheels for senior citizens. Big Bend Kayak Classic was a successLangston on Alzheimers: Capture every momentIn April seniors celebrated Earth Day, moreTallahassee Swing Band performs SPECIAL TO THE NEWS SPEcIAL TO THE NEWSFlower arranging class. LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt