Wakulla news

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Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00463

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PAGE 1

Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 20th Issue Thursday, May 16, 2013 Three Sections Three Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Photo page ...................................................................Page 11A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 12A Water Ways....... ...............................................................Page 13A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Arts & Entertainment .......................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 2B Red Clay Footprints............................................................Page 3B Weekly Roundup................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book.................................................Page 5B Summer Camp ............................................................Pages 6-7B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 8B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 8B Comics ...........................................................................Page 11B Delinquent Taxes ......................................................Pages 1-18CINDEX OBITUARIES Charles K. Donaldson Ora Lee Lott Eva Marie Linton TrawickSchool referendum passesLocal veterans travel to Washington By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.net A special referendum on whether Wakulla County citizens wanted to impose a half-mill tax on themselves to support the local school system passed by a slim margin of 15 votes on Tuesday, May 14. A low voter turnout was expected for the referendum and it appeared that roughly 10 percent of Wakullas 18,108 registered voters cast ballots. The referendum asked voters if the Wakulla County School Board can levy a .5 mill tax on property owners for four years. A current .25 mill levy expires in June. A mill equals $1 in tax for each $1,000 of property value. An average Wakulla County home valued at $100,000 would pay about $50 for the levy. The big winner tonight was the students of Wakulla County schools, said Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce. Its all about the students. School Board Chairman Ray Gray commented that for some voters the issue was about money with many apparently opposed to higher taxes. But he said that after election night, Its about the kids. Absentee and early voting was overwhelming opposed to the millage increase 56 percent to 43 percent. But the precinct tallies, especially the Crawfordville precinct, reversed the trend and put more votes for the increase. Technical problems with phone lines added to the drama, with Crawfordville, Ivan and Smith Creek all having to be driven to the supervisors office for counting. Besides the concern about a tax increase, another controversial aspect of the referendum, it seemed, was the cost. Several citizens called The News irate about the estimated $36,900 cost the school board will pay for the referendum. Supervisor Wells said he had also heard from several voters on election day complaining that they had been completely unaware of the referendum adding that he should have sent out sample ballots to all voters as in other elections. Wells said he made the choice not to send out sample ballots to keep costs down.Delinquent Tax list inside this editionBy slimmest of margins, Wakulla voters approve half-mill tax increase for schoolsBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.net On Saturday, May 11, four Wakulla County residents were present aboard a ight dedicated solely to World War II veterans. Edward Benton and Ingram Heuring of Crawfordville, Edward Christie of Panacea and Bonnie Sturchio of Sopchoppy arrived at the Million Air hangar in Tallahassee at 5:30 a.m. in order to catch their 7 a.m. ight to Washington, D.C. Continued on Page 2AEverybody knows Jack Four Wakullans are on Saturdays Honor Flight Section CBy JENNY ODOMSpecial to The News Jack Rudloe arrives at Tuesday lunch hour at Poseys Steam Room and is immediately greeted by staff behind the counter and patrons sitting at tables. He orders iced tea and the fried hamburger steak with two sides. At least two parties stop by during lunch to either razz him about his long-winded storytelling or ask him about the Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, an aquarium and environmental education center in Panacea, his lifelong project. A local celebrity of sorts, Jack Rudloe is a well-known naturalist, outspoken environmentalist, and worldrenowned expert of Gulf marine life. Hes been interviewed on the Today Show, National Public Radio, and Fox News. Articles about him and his work have run in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, Audubon and more. However, it is the collaborative work with his late wife and writing partner, Anne, that speaks to something greater the energy a creative longterm partnership can yield. Two lives, intertwined for 42 years in work, play, and love. Together their published books include The Sea Brings Forth, The Erotic Ocean, The Living Dock, Search For The Great Turtle Mother, Potluck, Butter- ies on a Sea Wind, and Priceless Florida. Sadly, Anne died last April after a seven year battle with cancer. Rudloe ambles through the quiet house they shared, photographs of their family hang throughout. Underfoot are two blackand-white dogs, Lily and Sharkbait, nails clicking on the wood oors. Windows perforate the woodpaneled rooms, filtering in dappled light from the canopy of oak and pine outside. The furniture is arranged to take advantage of a sweeping view of Dickerson Bay. As Rudloe walks into the room that once served as his wifes office, his hand slips out of his pocket and he opens his palm skyward, This is where she died. We set up a place for her here. A sign above the doorway reads Everything No Problem Last words Zen Master Seung Sahn. Rudloe says the banner always hung in their bedroom, but he moved it here for her, and here is where it remains. An annual fundraiser called Sharks and Chablis, held at the Marine Laboratory, was cancelled last year, due to Annes passing. Continued on Page 5A DEBORAH BROWN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWorld War II veteran David Crockett, 88, of Bainbridge, Ga., traveled with Deborah Brown of Wakulla and was surprised when his son, daughter-in-law and grandchildren met him at the World War II Memorial. I believe that was the best part of the trip for him, Brown said. JENNY ODOMGulf Specimen founder Jack Rudloe in a room that will be named for his late wife Anne at the marine labs annual Sharks & Chblis fundraiser on Sunday, May 19. e founder of Gulf Specimen re ects on life a year after losing his wife and partner AnneA Bene t for the Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, 222 Clark Drive in Panacea, on Sunday, May 19, from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. There will be live music, Irish dancing, a silent auction, a venomous snake exhibit, guided tours of the aquarium, a seafood dinner catered by the Seineyard restaurant and a wine tasting. Tickets are $35 per person and can be purchased in advance or at the door. Call (850) 984-5297 for tickets or more information.Sharks & Chablis Thomas Maddiis passionate about his photography Thomas Maddi Thomas Maddi is passionate about is passionate about his photography his photography See page 1B See page 1B WILLIAM SNOWDENJim Griner and Bobby Pearce.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com TM TM TM By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netApalachee Bays 10 new paddlings trails are officially up and running as a ribbon cutting was held Monday, May 13 in St. Marks. A large group of kayaking enthusiasts and project supporters gathered at the St. Marks city park boat launch to learn about the countys newest asset. Tourist Development Council Director Pam Portwood greeted the crowd and was quick to express gratitude for the support of the community and the partnerships that went into the project. Im working out my last couple of weeks with the Tourist Development Council, Portwood began, and I cannot be prouder that this is going to be one of the last things that people are going to say I had anything to do with. She went on to recognize members of the steering committee as she said that is where most of the real work took place. Committee members are Mark Mitchell from Panacea Waterfronts, Mike McNamara from St. Marks Out tters, Rob Baker with T-n-T Hideaway and Wilderness Way, Liz Sparks with FWC Apalachicola River Paddling Trail System, Madeleine Carr who contributed substantially with the maritime history of Apalachee Bay, Don Lesh and Diane Delaney of Applied Sustainability Enterprises, and Doug Alderson with the state Department of Environmental Protection. It was an excellent group of people that worked really hard, commended Portwood. There are segment maps for each of the 10 different trails available in a downloadable format that will be on the Visit Wakulla and Big Bend Scenic Biway websites. There are also laminated versions that will be available at welcome centers, outfitters and business around the boat launches that can be checked out by paddlers during their trips. Portwood made sure to recognize the two main funding partners as well: DEPs Coastal Partnerships Initiative as well as the Department of Economic Opportunity, while local businesses and departments also pledged to promote and support the trails in various ways. Billy Bishop of the St. Marks partnership and Mark Mitchell of the Panacea partnership talked about the two communities working together. I think this shows exactly what waterfront partnership is all about, said Mitchell. Every 85 people that we bring to our community creates a job for our community and that is what this is all about bringing sustainability to Wakulla County. All of you out here are proof that working together really does pay off, added Bishop. This is really going to bene t us and we thank you all. After the ceremony, attendees could choose from a few eld trips that included a tour of the San Marcos de Apalachee State Park, a pontoon boat tour or a guided kayak paddling tour. AMANDA MAYORRibbon cutting held for new paddling trailsDEPs Doug Alderson and TDC Director Pam Portwood cut the ribbon.Local veterans travel to WashingtonFrom Page 1A There were a total of 79 total veterans from the regional area of northern Florida and southern Georgia. The oldest veteran that made the trip was 102 years old and the youngest was 85. Each adorned a bright yellow shirt as to be easily identi able and each was assigned a guardian to accompany them at all times. After landing in D.C. they made their way by bus to many memorials erected specifically to honor their sacri ces including the World War II Memorial, the Iwo Jima Memorial and Arlington National Cemetery. Bonnie Sturchio served in the Marine Corps from 1944 to 1945 during which time she served in Intelligence. She was the only woman on the Tallahassee Honor Flight. Sturchio was accompanied by her grandson, whom she described as a history buff. Im very excited about this trip, Sturchio said the day before she was to leave. It should be very interesting. Deborah Brown was invited to be a guardian on the Honor Flight. Her father was in the U.S. Air Force and served in Japan, Korea, Libya, Thailand and Vietnam. The trip was breathtaking, she said. It was a once in a lifetime event. We had water cannon salutes at both airports and a police escort all day with lights and sirens. At the Baltimore airport, we had a few hundred active duty military shipping out to Afghanistan who stood and cheered for the veterans. Brown was assigned to David Crockett who served in the British Royal Air Force before serving in the U.S. Army Air Corp. He was evacuated from London as a child due to the German bombings. Also among the group was a veteran who helped raise the rst American ag ever raised on Japanese soil. On the same day that 79 regional veterans ew from Tallahassee, four other Honor Flight Network trips ew in from New York, West Virginia, Iowa and Tennessee. The Honor Flight Network is a non-pro t organization created with the intention of honoring Americas veterans and to show them gratitude for all of their sacri ces. According to the groups website they are currently giving top priority to World War II surviving veterans as we lose more than 800 of those war veterans each day. Of all of the wars in recent memory, it was World War II that truly threatened our very existence as a nation and as a culturally diverse, free society, the website says. Our time to express our thanks to these brave men and women is running out. The Tallahassee chapter of Honor Flight was started in the year 2012 and is currently chaired by the director of EMS for Leon County, Mac Kemp. Other officers include Vice-Chair Ed Eckland, Secretary Chief Tom Quillin and Treasurer Tom Napier. The trip was free for veterans, who were not even permitted to make donations. Honor Flight Tallahassee plans to take another trip in the fall, though that date is not yet set. DEBORAH BROWN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSVeterans greeted as they returned to Tallahassee on Saturday night.

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By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netAt their most recent meeting on May 6, county commissioners voted in favor of an ordinance regulating the placement of tobacco products. The ordinance requires vendors to sell tobacco products through vendorassisted transactions and restricts all tobacco products behind a counter in an area accessible only to store personnel or in other areas only accessible to the personnel of the vendor. The proposed ordinance exempts specialty tobacco stores and adultonly establishments. Violations are to be enforced as a civil infraction by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce in accordance with state statutes. Wakulla Middle School S.W.A.T. (Students Working Against Tobacco) club secretary, Ebony Davis, told commissioners: Im here to represent the students in favor of placing candy flavored tobacco products behind the counters and out of the sight of children under 18 years of age, she said. When she was nished, Commissioner Ralph Thomas voiced his opinion that the proposed ordinance would seek to make something illegal that is already against the law. None of us want children to have tobacco products, said Thomas. But I think at the end of the day this ordinance does not solve that problem. Thomas encouraged kids to speak out to their peers against tobacco as the best way to achieve the goals of the ordinance. Such feel good ordinances are not necessary, Thomas said. Government cant solve every problem. Im going to support this, said Chairman Randy Merritt. I dont think this rises to the level of too much government infringement, and I dont think its going to step on anyones toes. The motion in favor of the adoption of the ordinance passed with a 4-1 vote. In other matters before the board: There was a unanimous vote to pass an ordinance amendment pertaining to the imposition of fees for parks and recreation and enforcement. The passing of this ordinance speci cally authorizes the sheriffs of ce to enforce the payment of fees for use of county parks and recreational facilities. Commissioner Richard Harden wanted to clarify that the ordinance does not require the addition of payment to use public recreational facilities. This does not change any current fees, assured Merritt. This puts an enforcement arm on the current ordinance to where we can assess nes or penalties much like a parking ticket, explained County Administrator David Edwards. If someone does not pay their boat access fees, they will be ticketed either by code enforcement of cers or the sheriffs department. The recommendation was to approve and adopt the ordinance, which passed with a 5-0 vote. County commissioners approved a resolution accepting deeds for rightof-way donations on Summerwood Drive. Bret Hammond of Summerwood Drive had been diligently seeking guidance and approval since last May and, as all paperwork and adherences had nally been satis ed, Commissioner Jerry Moore made an immediate motion to approve which was seconded by Harden. I just want to make sure its clear that this will be precedent setting, Commissioner Howard Kessler said. Im in favor of this, I think it should be done, but I think we need to understand that in similar situation where gate roads and areas that were previously not cared for by the county they need to be treated equally. Kessler explained that as other roads apply and are approved for county grading, it will have a signi cant budgetary impact and that he wanted the board to be prepared to shoulder that responsibility. Absolutely, agreed Merritt. If they are willing to do the effort that these guys did, then we will support. Upwards of 15 citizens had filled out speaker cards on the matter, yet waived their time as Merritt assured them that the motion would pass. The vote was passed unanimously and Hammond was loudly applauded for his yearlong diligent efforts. The board voted to continue to allow residents to set up a mobile home on their property to care for sick relatives under the family enclave policy of the Land Development Code. The board removed, but agreed to bring it up later for review later, allowing such temporary housing for nancial hardship. Commissioners also indicated they wanted to look at including recreational vehicles in addition to mobile homes. Under the old policy, residents could apply to have a mobile home set up on their property temporarily to care for a sick relative or one facing nancial hardship. At a meeting last February, commissioners directed staff to begin working on an amendment to the Land Development Code to allow the use of RVs instead of a mobile home in the situation of a family enclave agreement. A family enclave is a type of temporary use permit in which a property owner can obtain approval to have a second dwelling currently mobile home only placed on their property for a period of one year. The second dwelling is to be utilized by a family member during a time of unanticipated nancial or medical hardship. The commissioners went back and forth discussing the amending of the text and modi cation of wording. I would personally like to see us take out the nancial hardship on this, said Merritt. I dont think you need to have both nancial and medical. I think we should leave medical or nancial in, but not have a nancial quali- er, said Thomas. But that concerned Merritt, as it would leave quali cations too ambiguous. I dont think that is the intent of this, Merritt said. I think the intent was to provide a compassionate option for those with medical conditions. I would say remove nancial all together as medical quali cations are very clearly de ned. Financial hardship is a true hardship, insisted Thomas. Especially in todays economy. Harden was in favor of moving both factors all together as having either would provide restrictions for someone trying to care for their family. I would like to see both the nancial and the medical removed, he said. I believe that if someone wants to take care of their family they should be able to provide that. Kesslers opinion was that the ordinance was trying to cover two different issues. Theres the issue of medical hardship and the issue of economic hardship, he said. I dont think this is right the way it is. Moore wanted to see the quali cations restricted to medical and age. Merritt suggested keeping the medical aspect in the terminology as it seemed like there was a consensus on that issue. But weve got to ask ourselves why were doing this, said Thomas. If were doing it to help families then we need to have a mechanism that truly helps them and not ties their hands down the road. My preference would be to give them the choice of a mobile home or the RV. A discussion followed before the motion was made by Kessler to amend the amendment to only include the medical quali- er and to bring back the nancial aspect later on. The motion also included that the terms of the agreement extend a time period of one year, after which application for renewal can be considered. Thomas seconded the motion. This is something more than we have now, though it may not be perfect, said Harden. Im going to vote for it, but I intend to bring this item back. The motion passed unanimously. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Please RecycleRestrictions set on tobacco product displaysCOUNTY COMMISSION Public MeetingsFiscal Year 2014 Fiscal Year 2018 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP)The Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency (CRTPA) is hosting two public meetings to present the Draft Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 FY 2018 Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The TIP contains transportation projects (including roadway, transit, bicycle, pedestrian and aviation) located within Gadsden, Jefferson, Leon and Wakulla counties that have received state and federal funding. The document is available for review on the CRTPAs website at www.crtpa.org. The meetings will provide citizens an opportunity to learn about the transportation projects in the capital region that have received funding in the next five years as well as provide comments. Furthermore, the meeting will also provide an opportunity to learn about the regional transportation planning process and how citizens can become involved. The public meeting/open house events are scheduled for: WAKULLA COUNTY Wednesday, May 22, 2013; 6 7:30 pm Wakulla County Commission Chambers 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL LEON COUNTY Thursday, May 23, 2013; 5 6:30 pm Tallahassee City Hall, Commission Chambers 300 S. Adams Street, Tallahassee, FL Comments regarding the TIP may be provided at the meetings. Additionally, comments may be mailed to: CRTPA, 300 S. Adams Street A-19, Tallahassee, FL 32301 and emailed to greg.burke@talgov.com. Comments can also be provided electronically on the CRTPAs website. All comments should be received by Friday, June 14, 2013. This notice and meeting satisfies StarMetros Program-of-Projects requirements of the Section 5307 Urbanized Area Formula Program Grant as administered by the Federal Transit Administration. This meeting will be held in conformance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you have a disability requiring special accommodations, please contact the Capital Region Transportation Planning Agency at (850) 891-6800 at least three (3) working days prior to the meeting, or contact the Florida Relay TDD Service at 711. Si necesita asistencia en espanol, por favor pongase en contacto con nosotros. For further information regarding this meeting, please contact Greg Burke at 891-6802. will be received until Advertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS REQUEST FOR LETTERS OF PROPOSALS AND STATEMENTS OF QUALIFICATIONS (RFQ)FOR ENGINEERING DESIGN OCHLOCKONEE BAY TRAIL (OBBT) PHASE 5-A DESIGN NUMBER: RFQ 2013-21 --FPID NO 414032-2-38-01MAY 16, 2013 Thursday, May 16, 2013 Friday, May 17, 2013. City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETINGThe City of Sopchoppy 4th of July Committee will be holding a planning meeting Monday May 20, at 5:30 p.m. The meeting will be held at City Hall, 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy. Purpose of the Meeting: Planning for the 2013 4th of July Celebration. Anyone interested in helping with this event is urged to attend.Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the City of Sopchoppy Clerks Ofce at (850)962-4611.MAY 16, 2013

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.readers speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Sheriffs Report for May 9, 2013 Kudzu bugs appear in Wakulla County Riversprings makes it to middle school state championships Warriors and Quiet Waters was a great experience Board votes 3-2 to go forward with YMCA Restoration for Shell Point Church Briefs: Woman, Thou Art Loosed conference, events at Wakulla UMC Sheriffs Report for May 2, 2013thewakullanews.com Follow us on Exploring ways to provide relief on ood insurance rates READERS WRITE: FROM THE COUNTY ADMINISTRATOR: anks for coverage of eventMontford reports on session ank you, commissioners, for SHIP Im still Mamas Baby BoyBy DAVID EDWARDSGreetings, citizens, here are some updates on activities throughout the county: Flood insurance rates will be increasing in the near future. We have been exploring ways to provide relief to affected property owners through improvements to the countys ood insurance score that is part of the national Community Rating System (CRS). Wakulla County has participated in the CRS since 1999. For property owners in the CRS participating communities, ood insurance premium discounts are available of up to 45 percent in ood hazard areas for the highest level of participation; Wakullas current discount is 15 percent. We will continue to seek potential options in an effort to reduce the impacts of expected ood insurance rate increases. The Solid Waste & Fire Services Hardship Application is due by June 1. To learn more about the eligibility criteria for the Hardship Assistance Application and to obtain the Hardship Application, please visit the County website, www.mywakulla.com, or contact Patty Taylor at 926-0919 ext. 701. Last week Gov. Scott announced that the Shell Point Beach renourishment project was one of the projects recommended for funding through NRDA (Natural Resource Damage Assessment). The project still has to go to public comment before the nal award of $880,000 is made. This is one of 16 projects submitted by the County to NRDA for funding. We will continue to pursue funding on the remaining projects that impact our coastal and shing industry. The week of May 5-11 was proclaimed as Public Service Recognition Week. We held our second Annual Employee Appreciation on May 10 and provided certi cates and service pins recognizing those who have provided ve, 10, 15, and 20 years of service. Id like to once again thank all of my staff for their loyalty, hard work, and tremendous dedication to Wakulla County and its citizens. Keep it going, team! The county administration would like to express appreciation to the following local businesses who donated items to help make our Employee Recognition Day such a huge success: ACE Hardware, Auto Trim Design & Signs, AutoZone, Beef O Bradys, Gulf Coast Lumber & Supply, Lori Allen with The Hair Cottage, Myra Jeans, Panhandle Pizza, WalMart, Winn-Dixie, and Wolff Tan.David Edwards is the Wakulla county administrator. Editor, The News: Thank you so much for the great article that Ms. Mayor did on my sexual violence awareness event (Alesia Adams takes on human traf cking, front page, May 2). I really enjoyed meeting her. It made the front page, which shows that you and the paper value victims of human and sexual traf cking. I always appreciate your support on all the issues of domestic and sexual violence that we present at our task force meeting and events. Thank you again. The Wakulla News is a GREAT county paper. Kathy Asbell Refuge House Editor, The News: An open letter to Wakulla County commissioners; Dear commissioners: My name is Andrea L. Mathis and I would like to thank you from the bottom of my heart for allowing the State Housing Initiative Partnership (SHIP) program into Wakulla County. I purchased a home for my 11-year-old daughter that needed a lot of repairs but it was a home that I could afford and my daughter would have a home here in the county we love. I have never received any assistance and never in the my wildest dreams believed that we could have been so fortunate and blessed by this program. An old neighbor told me about the SHIP program and to go to the meeting and ll out the paperwork that you never know what could happen and I had nothing to lose by trying. I did go to the meeting and lled out all the paper and we were not only blessed with help but actually a new house instead. I was afraid in our old home after a space heater caught on re in my daughters bedroom one evening and not having the funds to repair for safety, but now we have a beautiful, energy-ef cient, safe and absolutely wonderful home for my daughter to grow up in and stay in Wakulla County. The SHIP program was absolutely great in helping me along with everything I did not understand and answering questions. The contractor, Daniel Godfrey of Godfrey Builders, has been wonderful to work with and took care of everything for us and went above and beyond his duty with the quality and personal touches he added to our house, and dealing with some of the backlash of spiteful residents who did not understand what was going on and that a lot of people truly do not have the money or resources to make their existing home safe. I cannot express enough how thankful and grateful my daughter and I are for what Wakulla County has done to improve our quality of life and caring for its residents. Thank you, Andrea L. Mathis Crawfordville Editor, The News: To Alma Mae Langston on Mothers Day: I am a mamas boy. I love her, revere her, and am grateful that she went down in the valley of the shadow of death to bring me into the world. Ive been a lot of places in my life, places I needed to have been, places I should not have been, but every place I visited, mamas prayers always arrived there before I did. A mothers prayers not only go up to God, but they stick to you like super glue. They hit you in the head and the heart and the gates of hell cant pull those prayers off of you! When she cooked fried chicken on Sunday and there was a chicken breast left on the plate, mama all of a sudden would announce, I dont really care for the breast meat of a chicken, I like the drumstick. I became a man at 21 years of age to all of those in my community and my peers, Ive never been anything but Mamas Baby Boy to her and I still am at 60. A mother is a repository where you dump your hurts, hates and heartaches as a child and she heals the hurts, turns hate into happiness and turns a heartache into a grateful heart; slaps you lightly on the bottom, a kiss on top of the head, and sends you out to play. I was the only boy, therefore I was mamas favorite son. She pampered me! Daddy worked from sun-up to sundown. Mama worked from son-up to son-down. Yes, I was spoiled, but I was never a spoiled brat. Mama is as much a part of me now as she was the day I was born. She gave me life and still gives me life. Maybe Im still being born. But now the roles have somewhat reversed she is inside me; my heart, my mind and my love. The only way anyone could be more alive inside of me would be for me to have a heart transplant. But still, it would not be the same as mother. I love my mama! T.W. Maurice Langston Crawfordville By SEN. BILL MONTFORDThis was a very active and productive legislative session. Our voice was heard, strong and clear, as we advocated for North Floridas hardworking citizens. Sen. Montfords actions can only af rm that he understands our needs and works tirelessly to nd principled, common sense solutions to those needs. Montford participated in the following Florida Legislation: Improvements to education: I truly believe our future is in our childrens hands, and it is this that drives my passion to give them the best opportunities. His passion for education led the Senator to support improvements to Floridas educational system including providing more college and career-ready opportunities, ensuring low performing students needs are met and instituting more local control by reducing unnecessary regulations. He sponsored a very successful deregulation bill that removed unnecessary and duplicative regulation and rules. State employee pay raise: Recognizing Floridas public employees, the legislature mandated that state employees, school teachers and school district employees be given a well-deserved pay raise. These are honest people putting in a hard days work, and they deserve to be rewarded with livable pay. A pay increase is long overdue and its high time we acknowledge how hard our state employees work, Montford said. Preservation of the Apalachicola River Basin and Bay: Montford supported Governor Rick Scotts funding of $3 million dollars towards Water Quality Improvement projects in the Apalachicola Bay and Apalachicola River Basin. The allocation of $400,000 to the protection, restoration and research of natural oyster reefs and beds came as a result of his leadership during the 2013 Legislative Session and budgetary process. Public Work Squads: To ensure the continuation of the public work squads from our prisons a line item of 34 million dollars was added to the budget. This will result in a tremendous savings for the tax payer. FRS Retirement System: After numerous threats to change the retirement system, Senators stood up for the hard working people of Florida and left the retirement system intact. North Florida has something unique and special and it must be recognized and protected. Listed below are some of local projects that were funded in the 2013-2014 that will bene t Wakulla County: Expansion of the Horizon Volunteer Faith and Character Peer-toPeer Program at Wakulla Correctional Institution, $200,000. Restoration of the Oyster Planting Program, $350,000. FDACS Oyster Protection and Restoration Program (Vessel registration fees), $400,000. Wakulla Co Coalition for Youth Inc. Working Waterfronts, $25,000. Sopchoppy High School, $50,000. CR 372 Surf Road Ochlockonee Bay Phase VA Bike Path/Trail, $312,300. Wakulla County Senior Citizen Transit Non-Urbanized Area 5311 Operation, Administrative Assistance, $115,000. Wakulla-Arran Road From SR 369 (US 319) to East Ivan Road to widen and resurface existing lanes, $550,993. Trice Lane CR 61 Shadeville Hwy to SR 369 (US 319) Resurfacing, $369,791. Bostic Pelt Road from Harvey Mill Road to Arran Road to widen and resurface existing lanes, $461,441.Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, represents an 11county district, including Wakulla County, in the state Senate. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAt the county Employee Recognition Day.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 5A 000EWP9 Call 1-877-401-6408or come by 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville 3mo. for ONLY $6 3mo. for ONLY $6 *Keep up with whats happening this summer *In-county, new subscriptions only.From Page 1A This year, the event is back on and it will be held on May 19, with a tribute to Anne. A newly renovated room is being dedicated in her memory. Jack Rudloe graduated Leon High School in 1961 and spent three short months at the Florida State University Marine Laboratory, when it was located at Alligator Point. They didnt like the fact that Id started a little business collecting specimens and selling them, he says with a shrug, I guess I was all full of myself. So with not much more than a net and a bucket, and working out of the back of his car collecting specimens, Rudloe started the Gulf Specimen Company. Rudloe, quite the character in his own right, has been compared to Ed Ricketts, the excentric marine scientist immortalized by author John Steinbeck in the novel Cannery Row. But the comparison is anything but shallow. As a young scientist clearing his own path in marine specimen collection and taxonomy, Rudloe, after reading Steinbecks The Log from the Sea of Cortez, wrote to the famous author. I had this little hammerhead shark on the letterhead for my company that was then called Gulf Specimen Company. He (Steinbeck) got a lot of mail, but the shark caught his eye, since he was a marine biologist too, says Rudloe. A friendship grew. In a 1981 article for The Wakulla News, Rudloe writes about the fouryear correspondence and series of visits between himself and Steinbeck. Long before I ever picked up the book, people were telling me I was Doc in Cannery Row, he wrote. He thinks of Steinbeck as a mentor, and credits the authors encouragement in helping Rudloe push on even when it felt like failure was inevitable. In late 1960s, Jack met Anne at Crums gas station. She was wearing a wet suit, standing next to a parked car. He had stopped to fill up and vaguely recognized her. Curious, he walked over. A past customer, she had collected some specimens she was attempting to identify, and Jack offered to help. They began dating after this encounter, but he explains that he was dating several different women at the time. It was an accident, he recalls, that brought them closer. Anne lost her big toe one day at St. Theresa on Jacks boat propeller. He explains how the boat got away from her and she tried to catch it, but was swept under instead. It almost killed her, he says, It was really bad. She was in the hospital for about two weeks. His face turns soft as he describes setting up a lighted saltwater aquarium in her hospital room full of unique marine plants and sh. She wasnt getting much rest at the hospital because people kept coming by to see the aquarium, he grins. He helped during her recovery. So, the toe accident kinda helped things along with us, he admits. Anne was a writer, a teacher and practiced Zen meditation. She received her Ph.D. in marine biology from FSU in the late s, and taught there for many years. Her research centered around horseshoe crabs, sea turtles, electric rants and mysid shrimp. They eventually married and cobbled a life together of marine collection, road trips and writing. They wrote and published as partners for years, arguing over paragraphs and titles as any two brains would in such a close working situation. Yet they were also living together and raising their two sons, Sky and Cypress. It wasnt always peaches, it was like any marriage, Rudloe says. Anne also wrote extensively about her experience with cancer, facing death with a beautiful acceptance, actually giving thanks for her disease. Her last blog entry is an eloquent and touching reminder that death is simply part of the circle of life. She gives an offering of hope: So I have learned to give thanks for all the tough lessons that teach us what we would never learn voluntarily. When we stop whining, when we realize that this too is part of the experience of living a full life then, when a major disease comes, we can truly give thanks for it. Its an intense and rich way to live, like having a challenging teacher always in your face, forcing you to live at your highest level of insight, ability, and courage. Im oating, Jack says about his current existence. After four decades of sharing a life with someone, hes now trying to gure out how to do it all alone. He sits on a bench at the end of the dock, the wind blows steady through his white hair. A group of students from Valdosta, Ga., can be heard in the background, discussing specimens they just lifted in the collection nets. He ignores the chatter, and looks out, across the water. Rudloe discusses a project hes had in his head for 30 years. Hes writing a book about spheres, circles balls, he calls them, and hes been talking about their relevance for a long time. He says its an autobiography. This doesnt seem like a stretch. My family got really tired of me talking about balls and spheres all the time. One family vacation I was told by all three of them to stop talking about balls, and so I did, he says with excitement, And it was all I could do to keep my mouth shut. Because they are everywhere. Rudloe discusses the universal power of the sphere, suggesting that humans are not really in control. We dont play the ball, the ball plays us, he says. Long ago a childhood accident left Jack with vision in only one eye, his left. Of course, the eyeball is yet another sphere in Rudloes philosophy, in line with a lifetime of challenges and unorthodoxy. He offers one last bit of insight into his partnership with Anne its own spinning ball of energy and a smile wrinkles his face. She always liked to do the driving.Everybody knows Jack Rudloe PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMPhotos of Anne Rudloe on a wall in Jack Rudloes home, above. Jack Rudloe on the dock with his two dogs.

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Now thats news I can use OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDER I have a terrible confession to get off my chest. It is a secret I have tried to hide from family and friends for years. Up to this point, I have been fairly successful in hiding this but I believe the time has come to clear the air. Having a secret is a terrible burden to bear especially around people who know you. You always run the risk that somebody is going to nd out and then tell everybody and then the whole world knows your secret. The purpose of a secret is so that nobody knows. If it gets out, it is no longer a secret. I even tried to keep this from the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage, which comes as close to walking on water as I have ever come. Several times, she has come close to nding out this deep seated secret of mine. Even though this is risky business, I need to make a full confession. Someone has said that confession is good for the soul, but I am not quite sure. My confession is this, and please do not hate me because of it, I love to take afternoon naps. There, I said it. I am not sure what it did for my soul but I do not feel any happier about making this confession. I am a rm believer in what some people refer to as the power nap. The problem is I live amongst a people that believe if you take a nap in the afternoon you are either very young or getting very old. The former is not the issue, and I will take issue with the latter. I must admit that there was a time in my life when I did not take time out for naps. In fact, I had a hard time going to bed before midnight. I hated going to bed and could not wait until morning came so I could jump out of bed and get back to work. Do not get me wrong, I was not a workaholic. I just liked what I was doing. I am not sure when it started but I noticed a few years ago I was not resisting going to bed like before. I did not ght it is much as I used to. If the truth were known, hopefully it wont be, as soon as my head hit the pillow the Sandman started doing his thing. It was not long before I started sneaking 40 winks in the afternoon. I distinctly remember one afternoon when my wife came in and said, Youre not taking a nap, are you? I know lying is not a good thing, especially to your spouse. Sometimes when you are in a x such as I was in at that moment, the truth scampers in the opposite direction. No, I stuttered as she looked at me. I was just meditating. I guess everybody snores when theyre meditating, she said with a smirk on her face. From then on, it was a game trying to get in a nap without getting into trouble. I did nd out that after one of my power naps I was able to do a lot more work. However, I kept that bit of information to myself. Then my whole world changed. Dont you like it when something happens proving you are right? It does not happen very often to me, when it does, I relish it like a freshly baked Apple Fritter. I happened to be watching some television news program. I confess I was half dozing and watching at the same time, but suddenly they said something that got my full salute attention. According to the news story and they cant put it on TV unless its true, right? research showed that there was a great deal of bene ts associated with afternoon naps. That was enough for me and I, like the gentleman I am, called for my wife to come and watch this news story with me. Some things in life should be shared and this was one of them. Afternoon naps drastically reduce the danger of heart attack and improve a persons memory. So, I said to my wife after the story, what do you think of that? She smiled and looked at me and said, Well, it must work because you never forget to take a nap. I will forgive her for the hilarious laughter following her remark. Just so you know, the laughter did not come from me. I may have been smiling on the outside but I was snorting on the inside. For years, I thought taking an afternoon nap was rather beneficial. Now I have the proof and I can indulge in a daily power nap without feeling any sense of guilt at all. I love it when I have been proven right. Now I take great delight in one of my favorite Bible passages. Come unto me, all ye that labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn of me; for I am meek and lowly in heart: and ye shall find rest unto your souls (Matthew 11:28-29). A friend of mine often says, Come apart and rest a while or youll just come apart. An afternoon nap has unashamedly become part of my daily activity.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. Church Briefs Panacea Congregational Holiness to hold revival Panacea Congregational Holiness Church will be having revivial May 19,2013-May22,2013.Services times are Sunday, May 19 at 11 a.m. and 6 p.m. Monday -Wednesday services begin at 7:30 p.m. Guest speaker will be Sis. Grace Day. For more information you can call (850) 984-5579 or (850) 508-1895. Charlotte Faith to host Family and Friends DayCharlotte Faith and Deliverance Temple, 150 Brown Donaldson Road, will hold a Family and Friends Day on Sunday, May 19, at 3 p.m. The pastor is Bishop Alice Williams. For more information, contact Prophetess Deborah Gavin at (850) 745-6054. Woman, Thou Art Loosed conference is setWomen of Courage Ministries Presents the Woman, Thou Art Loosed conference at Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Highway. The conference is free. On May 17, at 7 p.m. the speaker will be Evangelist Tonia Williams of Hallowed Be Thou Name Church in Hyde Park. On May 18, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., speakers will be First Lady Charlean Lanier, Harvest Fellowship Church in Crawfordville and Co-Pastor Stefanie Williams, Holy Trinity Church in Tallahassee. For more information please contact Evangelist Gwen Williams at (850) 817-0056 or Evangelist Vera Hayes at (850) 339-6800.District COCWIH meets in Blountstown BUCKHORN NEWSBy ETHEL SKIPPERThe Tallahassee district of the Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold their 57th district meeting on May 22-May 26, convening in Blountstown at the True Holiness Church of Christ, host pastor Elder L. Brighan. On Friday, May 24, will be Women Day and Night Service. The Day Service at 10 a.m. will be Women in Leadership, and special guest speaker will be Calhoun County Sheriff GLenn Kimbrel. The Night Service will feature District Mother Pastor Elmira David of Marianna with special guest Women of Miracle Deliverance Church of Crawfordville. Pastor Ethel M. Skipper extends a hearty welcome to everyone. Special to The NewsThe Wakulla/Franklin Team of Big Bend Hospice is seeking volunteers to provide respite, companionship and care for our patients and families. Volunteers ll not only a Medicare requirement for the operation of Big Bend Hospice, they play a vital role in the quality of care received by those who have entrusted us to care for their loved one who has been diagnosed with a terminal illness. Our patient/family volunteers provide services that allow the caregiver the opportunity to go buy groceries, to take care of final arrangements, or to simply sit on the front porch and catch their breath. Some caregivers choose to stay at home while a volunteer is in the home and some take this opportunity to take care of things outside the home. Volunteers will often sit with patients and just listen. Caring for patients and their families at the end of life requires special people who have the caring spirit and commitment. Big Bend Hospice is committed to providing the education, tools and work environment to allow you to perform at your best. If you would like to join the Wakulla/Franklin Team of Big Bend Hospice as a volunteer, contact Pam Raker Allbritton at 508-8749 or call our Crawfordville office at 9269308.Big Bend Hospice needs volunteers

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 7AObituaries Charles K. Donaldson Ora Lee Lott Eva Marie Linton TrawickOra Lee Lott, 90, died on Thursday, May 9, 2013 in Crawfordville. She was born in Cullman, Ala., and moved to this area in 1969, coming from Miami. She was a member of Panacea Full Gospel Assembly. The family received friends on Sunday, May 12, 2013, from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held Monday, May 13, 2013 at 2 p.m. at Panacea Full Gospel Assembly in Panacea. Burial will follow at Lake Ellen Cemetery. In lieu of owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include two sons, Gary Lott (Trudy) of Fyfee, Ala., and Mike Lott (Melinda) of Lake City; three daughters, Glenda McCarthy of Crawfordville, Barbara Jennings (Jerry) of Jacksonville, and Debbie Moody (Johnny) of Crawfordville, a sister, Melba Motte (Elmer) of Gardendale, Ala.; ve grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or bevisfh. com).Charles K. Donaldson, 70, died on Sunday, May 12, 2013, in Monticello. He was born to the late Annie Lizzie, and Columbus Theo Donaldson on Jan. 6, 1943, in Wakulla County. Services will be at Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church No. 2 in Medart at 11 a.m. Survivors include ve sisters, Catherine Howard (King Sr.), Alice Jean Williams (Sylvester), Hilly Slater (Joseph), Eunice Donaldson, and Rosa Simmons; four brothers, Herbert Donaldson (Rachel), Allen Donaldson (Wanda), Robert Donaldson (Sharon), and Jeffrey Donaldson (Rosiland); and a host of aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews, cousins, friends, and extended family. Strong & Jones Funeral Home is in charge of the arrangements. Eva Marie Linton Trawick, 63, died on Monday, May 6, in Tallahassee. A funeral service was held on Friday, May 10, 2013, at 2 p.m., at Beggs Funeral Home, 3322 Apalachee Parkway in Tallahassee, with burial at Woodville Cemetery. Family received friends one hour prior to the service. She was born and raised in Tallahassee. She was a Baptist. Survivors include a son, Benjamin Key (Sara) of Tallahassee; two stepdaughters, Vibee Kennedy (Tony) and Audrey Slade of Bainbridge, Ga.: her mother, Wilma Linton of Crawfordville; three brothers, Lester Linton of Jacksonville, Ray Padgett of Bonnell, and Vernon Linton of Grand Ridge; and a sister, Liddy Linton of Crawfordville; seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband, Raymond Trawick; a daughter, Mary Florence Key; granddaughter, Brittney Marie Trawick; her father, Charles E. Linton; and a sister, Phyllis Cody.Ora Lee Lott Charles K. Donaldson Eva Marie Linton Trawick By DR. BETSY GOEHRIGIn just the past few months, my family and I have experienced a few new things in life. We moved to a new house at least new to us. We live in a new community, a new state, have new jobs, a new school, and a new church. Thats a lot of new! But thats life. Life is full of change. So, whats new with you? What new thing is God doing in your life? From Isaiah 61: I will greatly rejoice in the LORD, my whole being shall exult in my God; for God has clothed me with the garments of salvation.For as the earth brings forth its shoots, and as a garden causes what is sown in it to spring up, so the Lord GOD will cause righteousness and praise to spring up before all the nations. You shall be called by a new name that the mouth of the LORD will give. This passage talks about whats new for the people of God new clothes for a new occasion, new growth springing forth from the earth, and a new name that God will give. It is full of praise and rejoicing. Its so easy to praise and rejoice when everything is going great in our lives, isnt it? Its not so easy to praise, rejoice, and be so positive and hope- lled when times are tough. Murphys Law basically states that, Anything that can go wrong, will. No, its not so easy to rejoice and exult in praise when youre experiencing a Murphys law kind of day. Or a Murphys Law kind of week. Or a Murphys law kind of year. Or for some, even a Murphys law kind of life. Its so easy to see when Murphy is there with you. Sometimes its not so easy to see when God is there. Sometimes when were having those everything-is-going-wrong kind of times, God can seem pretty distant. Isaiah reminds us God is still there with us, still there for us, even when everything seems bleak. Isaiah describes a new name and a new status for a people who are in the midst of very disheartening and discouraging circumstances. Jerusalem had been leveled to the ground by the armies of Babylon. After 50-70 years in Babylonian captivity, the Jewish exiles returned to their homeland full of optimism, expecting times of great joy and celebration. The people found the task of rebuilding their once proud homeland next to impossible. They had come home to a forsaken and abandoned city. The walls of Jerusalem lay scattered in broken pieces. The once magnificent Temple was in ruins. It appeared to the people that they had been abandoned and that God was silent. The name of once proud Judah became Azubah, meaning Forsaken. The name of the chosen covenant people became Shemamah, meaning Desolate. It is to this severe disappointment that the prophet Isaiah spoke Gods word. Isaiahs message is a word of hope that was and still is desperately needed. God is doing a new thing in the lives of Gods people, and God is going to give them a new name. God has a history of giving out new names that change lives. Abram became Abraham. Saul became Paul. New names for new lives. Isaiah helped the people of Israel see that God had not forgotten them after all. They really were not alone and there was a renewed life for them. Maybe today you need a word of hope. We certainly are going through a time around our nation and around our world when people feel desperate and forsaken and need a word of hope and a sign of Gods presence. We can be that voice of hope and faith in a hurting world. If God reveals to you a new name, what might that be? Maybe you will be given a new name like Forgiven. Or Healed. Or Strong. Or Blessed. Or maybe God will give you a new name like Leader, Servant, Teacher, or Minister. A new name means a new life, new opportunities, and new responsibilities. So, whats new with you? Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church. HEAVENS TO BETSYSo whats new with you? Special to The News Dianne Flynn, primary case manager for Big Bend Hospices Franklin County team, was awarded the 2013 Carol Pluchino Gaeta-Jaffee Award for Nursing Excellence. This award is given to honor a nurse who has made a signi cant contribution to the Big Bend Hospice nursing practice each year. Nominated by her supervisor, Regina Compton, Flynn was recognized for her professional accomplishments, personal commitment to the care of hospice patients and being a strong patient advocate. When Flynn decided to work closer to home, Big Bend Hospice reaped the bene ts. She came to BBH in 2003 as a seasoned RN after working as a triage nurse for Southeast Urological Associates. Prior to SUA, she worked at TMH in several different units, ranging from Medical Surgical to Oncology. This experience was valuable, considering the large territory she covers as a case manager for Franklin and a portion of Wakulla County in a remote area of the Apalachicola National Forest. Her case load averages 14 to 20 patients at any given time and as a seasoned nurse with a variety of clinical experience and broad knowledge base, she has the critical thinking skills required to help patients and their families navigate the end-of-life continuum. A native of Pensacola Bay, the Franklin County area, with its beaches and coastline, are a second home to her. She appreciates the shing stories and is able to relate well with the diverse population in Franklin and Wakulla counties. For example, communication can sometimes be a challenge with some of the patients. She goes above and beyond to simplify the understanding of the disease process as well as color coordinate the medications to ensure the patient takes them correctly. Consequently, customer and physician satisfaction in Franklin County have increased since she came to Big Bend Hospice in 2003. One patient who lived in the middle of the Apalachicola National Forest had Flynn as her primary case manager. The lady had never complied with physicians orders unless it was convenient for her. With a cardiac diagnosis, many felt her days would end quickly. However, Dianne began spending time with the patient and her spouse educating them on symptom management. They felt that she was on their side and so the patient began weighing herself daily, taking her medications and calling the physician when she felt she needed help. Many months later, this patient graduated from Big Bend Hospice because she did, and is still doing, what Nurse Dianne taught her. Carol Pluchina Gaeta-Jaffee worked her entire professional life as a registered nurse. She graduated from St. Vincents Hospital School of Nursing in Jacksonville in 1967 and was licensed to practice in Florida, Illinois and Louisiana. She worked in various hospitals in Orlando before becoming disabled by an onthe-job accident. After recovering, she worked in the AIDS clinic of the Orange County Health Department, before accepting a position with the AIDS Resource Alliance (ARA). Gaeta-Jaffe moved to Tallahassee in March 1993 to begin work as a Big Bend Hospice nurse. After being injured in a car accident she was unable to work again and retired from nursing. She was a talented cook, caterer and oral arranger who shared her hobbies with the patients she served. She died in Hospice House on Sept. 15, 2004, after a long struggle with Castlemans disease a little known disorder of the lymphatic system. Her husband Reid Jaffe honors her memory with this award. Jaffe surprised Dianne and her husband, Danny, at the Big Bend Hospice staff meeting in February by presenting the award in person. In true Nurse Dianne form, she was humbled by the honor, thanked everyone and then rushed out to meet with her rst patient of the morning. Dianne is a natural at case management and takes her role seriously, says Regina Compton. Many of our patients in rural Franklin and Wakulla request Nurse Dianne to be their hospice nurse. Big Bend Hospice has been serving this community since 1983 with compassionate endoflife care along with grief and loss counselors available to provide information and support to anyone in Leon, Jefferson, Taylor, Madison, Gadsden, Liberty, Franklin or Wakulla counties. For additional information about services, please call (850) 878-5310 or visit www.bigbendhospice.org. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRegina Compton, Dianne Flynn and Reid Jaffee.Dianne Flynn receives the Carol Pluchino Gaeta-Jaffe Award for nursing excellence HARVEST FELLOWSHIP CHURCH MAY 18 7PM, MAY 19 10:30 AM 824 Shadeville Road, Crawfordville, Fl 32327 A Weekend of Worship with Amick and Friends 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE

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Special to The NewsHolly Thomas, received a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration in Marketing Professional Selling Track and a Minor in Health Sciences from the University of Central Florida, College of Business Administration. Holly is a Graduate of Wakulla High School, class of 2009. She is one of 17 students graduating with the prestigious Professional Selling Track designation offered by the Department of Marketing in the UCF College of Business Administration. This program is supported by over 50, top local and national companies and has a 98% hire rate for its graduates. Holly received several job offers prior to graduation. She accepted a position in Orlando, FL into the Sales Development Program at Pepsi. This program was developed by Pepsi specifically for recent college graduates. It is an accelerated path through Pepsis sales force designed to teach all aspects of the sales chain with the ultimate responsibility as a Manager of an assigned territory. Holly Thomas is the daughter of Ralph and Cynthia Thomas of Crawfordville. Holly Thomas Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Cars and Coffees rst cruise-in is SundaySpecial to The NewsLocal Hot Rodders have found a new cruise location that offers non-ethanol gas. Bad Bobs of Sopchoppy has invited local classic car and motorcycle owners to ride down to Sopchoppy and ll up with hard to nd gasoline. Local Sopchoppian, Papa Don Edwards and friend Dave the Bartender Earle have expounded on their offer and have started a Sunday Morning CARS and COFFEE cruise-in. Their idea is cruise to Bad Bobs, top off their tanks, and talk to fellow enthusiasts, while sipping coffee or drinking a refreshing sweet tea! Lisa, Bobs daughterin-law, and manager says, We love the idea of the car guys and gals making our family business part of their Sunday morning routine. We will make sure the coffee is hot and the sweet tea is cold Dave the Bartender started the Sopchoppy Car Show a few years ago, but lost the location when the City built the new city hall building in the empty lot where the car show was. Since then, he has been looking for a way to bring local hot-rodders together. Dave says, This just seems like a good opportunity to get something going again in Sopchoppy. We will start off with two Sundays a month, around mid-morning, and see how much interest we get. For anyone interested in getting out for a nice Sunday mid-morning ride, Bad Bobs is hosting the rst CARS and COFFEE cruise-in on May 19th. Then they will continue to welcome enthusiasts the rst and third Sunday mornings of the month. They are located just north of the Express Lane gas station on 319, at the old Lous Bait & Tackle service station. For additional information call Lisa at 962-1200 Andrew Meister turns 1Andrew Meister will celebrate his rst birthday on Saturday, May 18. He is the son of Jacob and Jessica Meister. Andrew is the grandson of John and Judy Meister and Cindy and Wendell Miller, all of Crawfordville. Andrew is the brother of sister, Madison and three brothers, Mason, Levi and Ethan.Andrew Meister turns 1 on May 18. Holly omas graduates UCFWHS Class of reunion setSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla High School Class of 2003 will hold its 10 year reunion on the weekend of June 21-22. The weekend will begin Friday night at a Tallahassee watering hole and will include a Saturday Funday in the Sun. Festivities will conclude on Saturday night with dinner and dancing at Wildwood Resort located at 3896 Coastal Highway 98 in Crawfordville. Tickets are $45 per person. For more information call 545-0909 or email wakulla2003@ gmail.com. Special to The NewsShowcase 20013 is a recital featuring piano and guitar students from the studios of Mary Updegraff, Kristin Dow and JoAnn Virgin. It will be held on Sunday, May 19, 2 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. Appearing on the program will be Rena Carter, Nathan & Keira Cushard, Josh, Mikaela and Rebekah Fielder; Mia Frick, Travis Harvey-Henderson, Crystal Jedziniak, Gracie Lawhon, Connie Lewis, Emily McMillan, Ali Pearson, Maddie Savary, Emma Vaughn and Elliana Williams. All friends and neighbors are invited to attend.Showcase 2013 is Sunday Special to The NewsAre your children craving some adventure this summer? If so we have the answer. Let them spend a few days exploring St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge through the Jr. Refuge Ranger Camp. Camp is full of fun and educational outdoor activities. This exciting Day Camp is offered to children who have successful completed the appropriate grade levels and ages listed below by the summer of 2013. Applications for Jr. Refuge Ranger Camp are now available at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center or by email request at lori_nicholson@fws.gov A lottery will be held to select the lucky participants for each session. Applications must be hand delivered or received in the refuge of- ce by 4 p.m. on May 23. Space is limited. Three sessions will be offered this year at a fee of $50 for each participant. If the participant attends both days the check will be refunded. If the participant does not attend both dates they are signed up for the check will be forfeited. The sessions are: Session 1: June 4-5, 9 a.m. to noon; pre-k thru Kindergarten, (minimum age of 4). *Participants must be potty trained. (limited to 10 participants) Session 2: June 6-7, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.; 1st 3rd grade, (limited to 15 participants). Session 3: June 1112, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; 4th 6th grade (maximum age of 13, limited to 15 participants). Jr. Refuge Range camp is sponsored by the St. Marks Refuge Association and the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Photo Club. For more information contact Lori Nicholson, Education Specialist, St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge at (850) 9256121. Kids at the wildlife refuge being engaged through photography.Junior Ranger Summer Camp is slated at wildlife refuge Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsKeep Wakulla County Beautiful has awarded the rst two Classroom Grants for the 2012-13 school year. The $100.00 awards were to Deborah Madden and Freebeau Swindel at Wakulla High School and Elena Myhre and Racheal Ryan of Medart Elementary. The proposed project for Wakulla High School will involve students, WHS Staff and community volunteers in creating and maintaining a garden landscape at the school. The carpentry students and their instruction will build, stain and install two trellises in the garden. The garden will be maintained by students who volunteer to work after hours and can be awarded bright futures credits. Community partners are Just Fruits and Exotics and Betsey Smith, Landscape specialist. Medart Elementary will be creating a mural designed by students that will incorporate all Medart students. The goal is to inspire teamwork and leadership. The mural will be centrally located in the main hallway for all students and visitors to see. The focus will be 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and outstanding undertaking to inspire our young citizens. Our next grant period will begin in August for the 2013-14 school year. For more information on Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, visit our website at www://KWCB.org or contact us at helpkwcb@gmail.com.Grants awarded to WHS and Medart Flat Stanley visits CanadaBy MRS. BARTNICKS THIRD GRADE CLASS On Wednesday morning, May 1, our class had a special guest. Her name was Mrs. Geri Savell. She came to our class with Flat Stanley. Flat Stanley is a ctional character who travels around as a paper at boy, exploring the world and reporting back to students nationwide. Mrs. Savell taught us about the culture and customs of Newfoundland, Canada. She and Flat Stanley shared maps, pictures of baked berries, and a moose. She also brought us some Canadian desserts, including steamed pudding which our class had learned about in our cultural holiday study of Newfoundland. While in Newfoundland, Flat Stanley was able to do some mummering (a holiday tradition) and he met the mayor. Mrs. Savells nephew Aidan took Flat Stanley on a sledding adventure in the snow, gave him a smores treat, and let him participate in a snowball ght. Mrs. Kathryn Beaty introduced us to Mrs. Geri Savell so that Flat Stanley could make this special journey. Mrs. Beaty and her sister Becky also joined Mrs. Savell for our special morning of learning. Mrs. Bartnicks Third Grade Class at Crawfordville Elementary. Free sports physicals will be available on SaturdaySpecial to The NewsWakullas health care providers are teaming up to offer free sports physicals to local student athletes on Saturday, May 18 from 9:00 am to 1:00 pm. These medical evaluations will satisfy the annual requirements of the Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA). Students who plan to participate on athletic teams (or cheerlead) at the high school or either middle school during the 2013-2014 school year may take part. NJROTC cadets, Scouts, summer campers, Special Olympians, and other students who need pre-participation physicals will be accommodated as well. Students with no primary care provider or no health insurance are especially encouraged to take advantage of this opportunity. The physicals will be offered at Tallahassee Memorials Family Medicine Of ce at 15 Council Moore Road. This medical of ce is located south of the County Courthouse on the east side of Crawfordville Highway. Several other local clinicians will be participating, not just providers with this practice. Student athletes should check with their coaches to nd out what time they should report to Tallahassee Memorials Family Medicine Of ce. In general, students attending Wakulla Middle School should report between 9 a.m. and 10 a.m., Riversprings Middle School between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m., and Wakulla High School between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. However, some teams are being given speci c times at which to report. Families with children attending two schools may choose the most convenient slot for both students. The medical evaluations on May 18 will include a history, a vision check, measurements of height, weight, heart rate, and blood pressure, and a physical exam by a licensed physician (or PA/ARNP). A parent or guardians signature is required, so parents must either accompany their child or the student must bring the FHSAA form with a parents signature on it. The form is available at the schools or online at: http://www.fhsaa.org/forms/general-forms/generaleligibility/el2 Members of the Wakulla Health Care Task Force are offering free physicals to prevent any student who wants to play sports (or cheerlead) from being denied an opportunity to participate because they lack a family doctor, health insurance, or the ability to pay. In addition to local clinicians, nurses, paramedics/ EMTs, allied health professionals, clerical staff, and other volunteers will be assisting. All of these professionals are donating their time to provide this free community service. For more information, please contact Lynn Artz (320-2158; lynn_artz@hotmail.com). Special to The NewsWakulla Middle School Seventh Grader, Andrew Walker was named Youth Advocacy Board Member for 2012-2013. He served as one of the three representatives for the Northern Region of Florida Students Working Against Tobacco. This was his rst year on the board. Walker is the President of the WMS SWAT Chapter and works in collaboration with the Department of Health's Bureau of Tobacco Prevention Program and Tobacco Free Florida to determine the direction and scope of both the SWAT organization and youth tobacco prevention component of the statewide media campaign. He is an ambitious seventh grader who plays a key role in changing the perceptions about tobacco in our state. He has the energy, compassion and knowledge to create positive results and to in uence both his peers and the community of Wakulla County as a whole. "I am very impressed by Andrew's enthusiasm and eagerness to progress in SWAT", sponsor Deborah Randle says of Andrew. Andrew spoke before the County Commissioners in January detailing the dangers of candy avored tobacco products and his feelings towards keeping them on the shelves. When asked why he participates in SWAT, Andrew says, "I enjoy working with SWAT because I learn how to help keep my friends and family from getting cancer from tobacco use. I enjoy motivating youth and working to make a change in our county." Andrew Walker is named to Youth Advocacy BoardWMS seventh grader Andrew Walker with Cancer Survivor/Activist Rick Bender. Two Campers for the price of one!Field Trips include: Wakulla Springs, Fun Station, The Lighthouse, Junior Museum and more Call now to reserve your spot!4224 Crawfordville Rd., Tallahassee 850656-8575 Precious Years Summer Camp the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringBrian MartinApril 2013 WinnerHis name was drawn fromTHIS IS GREAT! 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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla War Eagles football team began gearing up for the 2013 football season on May 1. They have been working hard and are ready to show you a preview of what the upcoming season holds with the annual Red & Blue football game set for Saturday, May 18, at 6 p.m, with gates opening at 5 p.m. The Wakulla Gridiron Club is sponsoring a chicken pilau dinner for $7 which includes a dinner and admission to the game. This is also a good time to purchase your Gridiron seats or renew your current seats. Current Gridiron seats must be renewed by May 24 in order to keep the same seats. The club will also be selling T-shirts, hats, magnets and baked goods to help with our fundraising efforts. Admission to the game itself is $1. The War Eagles will play their Spring Game on Thursday, May 23 in Ocala against Trinity Catholic at 6 p.m. Please Like us on Facebook at Wakulla Gridiron or visit our website at www.wakullagridironclub.com to learn more about WHS War Eagles football. We hope to see you at the Red & Blue game!Special to The NewsLocal resident, Dr. Joe Abal, had a dif cult time in the recent Track and Field competition of Florida Senior Games but managed to medal in the Powerlifting event. Abal was thwarted in the throwing events by fouling in all six of his throws. Competing in the Tallahassee Senior Games Regional Competition at Godby High School on March 15, he was able to redeem himself by placing with a Bronze medal in the deadlift powerlift competition which qualified his entry into the Senior Games State Competition scheduled for Dec.7-15 in Lee County. By ALAN ROSS A pair of Joe Gibbs Racing Toyotas conquered the Track Too Tough to Tame at least on this night as Matt Kenseth and Denny Hamlin went 1-2 in Saturdays Southern 500 at Darlington Raceway. Kenseth, the sensation of the 2013 season, logged his third win of the year and 27th lifetime in the Cup series. Throughout most of the race it seemed that the third Gibbs entry, the No. 18 of Kyle Busch, would carry the night. But after passing his brother Kurt the polesitter and lap leader for 69 of the rst 82 laps the man who dominated with 265 laps led cut a right rear tire in the run-up to the checkered ag and fell to a disappointing sixth. The early going was a racers delight, with the first yellow not falling until more than a third of the race had been completed around the 367-lap 1.366-mile trek known affectionately/menacingly as The Lady in Black. Busch brie y lost the lead to Jeff Gordon on Lap 186, gaining it back 17 laps later after getting a head of steam coming off Turn 2 to propel himself past the 24. Jimmie Johnson then passed Gordon for second not long after. That order stood with 75 laps to go, still all green ag racing but for the one caution. Then Regan Smith spun on Lap 302, bringing out the second yellow. But as he would on all five restarts, Busch held off every challenger, his level of dominance crushing with 44 laps left. Ever so slowly, though, Kenseth began closing the gap between himself and his front-running teammate, down to under a second with 17 laps remaining. It was clear the race would come down to the two JGR cars, and now Hamlin, yet another Gibbs car, eased into the mix. Then, with 13 to go, Kenseth put a rm pass on Busch and was gone. The most dominant car of the season had just beaten the most dominant car of the night. Gordon nished strong, passing Busch for third with six laps left to come in behind Kenseth and Hamlin. It was Gordons 300th Top Five nish in 700 career starts. Johnson, a fourth-place finisher at Darlington, extended his points lead over Carl Edwards to 44 as the series heads for some all-star fun Saturday night at Charlotte. ROADIDE RAVE: Some awesomely aggressive racing took place for two laps between Kyle Busch and Kasey Kahne, who restarted 1 and 2 after a caution with 38 laps to go. Kahne dove hard under Busch on their second go-round into Turn 1, clearing him before Busch appeared to slightly brush (nearly brush?) Kahne as he slid up the track on exit after a late turn-in on entry. Whether there was contact or whether Busch took the air off Kahne by close proximity, it is not known, but Kahne lost control, hitting the outside wall and bringing out another caution. SPANISH GRAND PRIX: Ferraris Fernando Alonso passed pole-sitter and race leader Nico Rosberg on Lap 13 of the 66-lap Spanish Grand Prix at Barcelona then roared away for his second win of the season and second career Formula One victory before his home countrymen. Alonso, starting fth, ew up to third on the third turn of the opening lap with a daring outside pass of two cars, before heading out after Rosberg and then-second-placerunning Sebastian Vettel. The Spaniard lies in third place in the F1 championship standings behind Vettel and runner-up Kimi Raikkonen, who placed second in Spain. Alan Ross is the author of Speaking of Graduating: Excerpts from Timeless Graduation Speeches. E-mail him at alanross_ sports@yahoo.com. SPONSORED BY: Roddenberry PaintingWITH SPECIAL GUESTTHE RIVER TOWN GIRLS REUNIONSopchoppyOpry.com Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information ALSO APPEARINGREBEKAH AMAN A MEMORIAL DAY TRIBUTE SHOW Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926 or 510 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor BASEBALLWar Eagles fall to Gulf BreezeWakullas season ends with a 3-2 loss in Pensacola in the semi- nalsStaff ReportThe Wakulla War Eagles baseball season ended in disappointment on Tuesday, May 7, as they lost in the semi-finals to Gulf Breeze in Pensacola, 3-2, The War Eagles scored two runs in the first inning, but Gulf Breeze tied it in the bottom of the inning with two runs of their own. Gulf Breeze got the go-ahead run in the fourth and held on to win it. Wakulla produced some offense seven hits, including two each by James Estes and Micah Gray, and War Eagle runners stole three bases, with two taken by Bryan Nichols. Wakulla had only one error, which was scored on pitcher Jacob Walker. Other War Eagles with hits included Dillon Norman, Brandon Geiger, and Bryan Nichols. Even with the offense, Wakulla couldnt generate any more runs after the first inning. Gulf Breeze had four hits in the game and no errors. Senior Jacob Walker pitched five innings and gave up one home run and was charged with the loss. Wakulla finished the year 22-7 with a 10-3 away record. AMANDA MAYOR/FILE PHOTOJacob Walker pitching to Suawannee on April 25. FOOTBALLWakullas annual Red & Blue game is SaturdayJoe Abal earns medal, quali es for stateSENIOR GAMES Joe Abal powerlifting.TEAM SHOT: The Riversprings Middle School Track Team that went to state competition.THE COOL DOWN LAP Kenseth leads Gibbs 1-2 at Darlington; Spanish GP to Alonso T he Wak u lla News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 11AFISH FRY FOR SENIORSU.S. Forest Service re personnel prescribed burned approximately 250 acres near Forest Road 322, west of Highway 319 in Wakulla County on the Apalachicola National Forest on Monday, May 13. This is one of many prescribed burns planned by the U.S. Forest Service for 2013. Motorists are cautioned to drive slowly with lights on while traveling through smoky areas. Drivers should be particularly cautious in foggy conditions, since fog can mix with smoke and decrease visibility further. Bevis Harvey-Young Funeral Home sponsored a sh fry on Saturday to bene t the Wakulla Senior Centers food programs. The fried mullet and cheese grits dinners were sold for a $5 donation and all the proceeds went to the Senior Center. Organizers had planned for 250 meals to be served, but more than 350 were actually served requiring another 50 pounds of mullet to be bought and fried up to satisfy the hungry. The donation table for those buying dinners. Enjoying time with family and friends. Senior Center Director Maurice Langston talks with people in line. Serving up fried mullet and cheese grits, huspuppies and cole slaw.Diners enjoying meals. Clark Nichols and wife Ann frying up hushpuppies.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN Prescribed burning underwayFOREST SERVICE PHOTO BY AARON EDWARDS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsFishing continues to be very, very good and all species are being caught. The only fish that hasnt shown up here in good numbers yet is cobia. Spanish, blues and ladyfish are here in big numbers and the number of small sharks might outnumber the number that were here last year. Mike Falk Jr. called me today and said he was out on the Ochlockonee Shoals in about 3 to 4 feet of water and he had never seen as many Spanish and blue sh as were out there in his entire life. He said they would hit anything you threw at them. He also said he shed the 12 to 15 feet of water for trout and found nothing. I talked to Capt. Randy Peart today and he said he picked his son up from Ft. Benning, Ga., on Friday afternoon as he has just nished his eight weeks basic training. They were over at Lanark Village fishing and said things were slow. I talked with him a little later and he said they went to Dog Island Reef and it was covered up with big Spanish. They were using yrods and said they had a ball. Randy said they also caught quite a few nice trout out there. I asked him about all the blues and Spanish on the Ochlockonee Shoals and he said this time of year they show up there in huge numbers. He has gone out there and lost more jigs and plugs than he likes to remember. One time he was trolling a mackerel tree with ve hooks and the client hooked five Spanish at once. Now that had to be a real circus. Tomorrow morning he is taking his son back to Ft. Benning and he will go to jump school. After that he will go to Ranger school. Ed Clayton from Tallahassee called me tonight and said his sister Chris, an attorney in Jacksonville, was in town and he took her shing. They put in at the lighthouse and ran down to Gray Mare Rock. Fishing with the Gulp under a Cajun Thunder in about 2 half to 3 feet they limited out on trout on the falling tide early in the morning. They had one 25 inch and one 21-inch trout. He said they lost quite a few big trout up near the boat. Phil Sharp from Tallahassee had a doctor friend of his down on Friday and they came in with nine nice trout. He was shing the West Flats out of Shell Point on that late afternoon falling tide. On Saturday he shed by himself and had four nice flounder and two trout. Mark and Louise Prance took Todd and Kim Helams out on Saturday and came in with eight trout and three flounder. He said they caught a lot of small sharks and lost a nice flounder to one of them. They used the Gulp and live shrimp. Capt. David Fife has been catching lot of trout and reds from Smith Island to Piney Island using live shrimp and the Gulp under a cork. David said he saw his first tarpon over the weekend at East Barnacle Channel. Sarah Voland from Shell Point had her son Doug and her granddaughter down from Atlanta over the weekend for Mothers Day. On the way down they stopped in Stockbridge, Ga., and picked up Tyler Fiscus. Doug is an avid freshwater sherman but never shed in saltwater before. They got down late Friday and after being there a short while, Tyler walked down to the dock and started throwing a Red sh magic spinner. After a few casts he hooked and landed a nice sh but didnt know what it was. He hollered to the house and they came down with a ashlight. Turned out to be a 7-pound red. Needless to say he is now hooked. On Saturday and Sunday they went out on the flats and caught lots of trout and Spanish. They wont have to ask him twice if he wants to go back. Alan Lamarche said he got onto the sh that were out on the Shoals and like Mike Falk he said there were thousands and thousands. Earlier in the week they went after kings and limited on kings, caught a lot of Spanish and caught a 40-pound cobia. I shed with Dalbert Fitch, his wife and son Lonnie from north of Atlanta on Thursday and Friday and we caught a lot of trout and Spanish and a very few reds. Mr. Fitch is 86 and his wife is 85. They were great people and loved to sh. They shed with Capt. David Gibbs for years and when David quit shing he gave them my name. We missed a bunch of sh because they didnt set the hook or didnt set it hard enough. When I go I like to put people on a lot of fish and its frustrating when they miss a lot of sh. In this case it didnt bother me. They were great people, had a great time and I just hope when Im their age I am still shing and can set the hook as hard as they do. On Friday Lonnie hooked or should I say jumped a tarpon that weighed about 80 pounds. If you were raised in the s and s, when you grew up you went to the lake, river or ocean and wanted to come back with a tan. There was no such thing as sunblock. We put on Coppertone and mixed in some iodine so we would turn brown. You didnt think anything of burning because you know if you stayed out in the sun enough you were gonna turn brown. Well, things are a little different now. Tomorrow I have my yearly appointment with Dr. Soni, who is with Dermatology Associates in Tallahassee. I have had several places cut off my nose and face and every time I am in there he freezes quite a few spots and takes biopsies of others. He told me at one time I was a really good specimen. I have a very good friend who is out in the sun all the time and I asked several months back if he had ever been to a dermatologist. He said no and I immediately started harping on the fact that he needed to go. He finally got an appointment with Dr. Soni and went in. They did 20 biopsies. Dr. Soni called him at 7:30 at night after he got the results back and told him to be in his of ce the next morning at 7 a.m. Three came back as cancer and once came back as melanoma. Fortunately, they got the melanoma in time and he is gonna be ne. Kind of sore from the 21 stitches but better than the alternative. The reason I am writing about this is to tell you folks out there that you need to see a dermatologist. Whether male of female, if you are out in the sun a lot now or were when you were younger and dont see a dermatologist on a regular basis, Im telling you now, you need to go. I go to Dr. Soni in Tallahassee with Dermatology Associates and I know t here are a lot of other dermatologist around. But when they call you at 7:30 at night, theres something to be said for that doctor. Ed Clayton, who I mentioned earlier in my column, had one of his grandfathers die from skin cancer. He was out in the sun all the time and never used any kind of sun block. When he grew up there was no such thing. If you dont already go, MAKE AN APPOINTMENT WITH A DERMATOLOGIST! This weekend is the Wakulla Kids Fishing Tournament and they are still looking for some folks with boats to take a few of the kids shing. You dont need to have a Captains license but if you do that is great. If you have verbally committed to Bruce Ashley that you would be taking some of the kids fishing please give him a call at 528-0046 to recon rm. Also, if you want to make a donation to make sure all kids receive trophies and shing gear its not to late. Donations can be taken to the sheriffs of- ce or Crums in Panacea. Last week was the Kayak Tournament for the seniors and Meals on Wheels and they had 95 kayaks shing. Next week I will have the results. Remember to know your limits and put on that sunscreen. Good luck and good shing!The shing continues to be very, very good From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL FWC News Scientists with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) have uncovered a new species of black bass in the southeastern United States. Scientists have proposed naming the new species the Choctaw bass and recommended the scientific name of Micropterus haiaka. They revealed their discovery at a meeting of the Southern Division of the American Fisheries Society earlier this year. FWC scientists first noted a DNA pro le that did not belong to any recognized species while testing a bass specimen from the Chipola River in 2007, as part of a broader genetic study of bass. We didnt set out to nd a new species, said Mike Tringali, who heads the genetics laboratory at the FWCs Fish and Wildlife Research Institute. It found us. After confirming the initial discovery, scientists searched for the DNA pro le in bass caught in nearby rivers to determine the species range. They found that the Choctaw bass inhabits coastal river systems in Alabama and along the western Florida panhandle, including the Choctawhatchee River. We chose the name Choctaw bass because the species range overlaps the historic range of the Choctaw Indians, said Tringali. As for our recommended scientific name, Micropterus haiaka, haiaka is a Choctaw word that means revealed. The American Fisheries Society must approve the suggested scienti c name for it to take effect. The Choctaw bass is very similar in appearance to its relative, the spotted bass. The physical differences between the two species are not easily seen with the naked eye, one reason they had never before been distinguished despite decades of bass studies in the region. For more information about how FWC scientists discovered the new bass species, visit MyFWC.com/ Research, click on Freshwater, and select Black basses under Freshwater Sport Fishes.FWC scientists disover new bass species FWC A Choctaw bass. WILLIAM SNOWDENBenjamin Colona, Jeff Dutrow, Robert Baker and Donnie Miley nished second in the recent Kayak Wars shing tournament. Not pictured is team member Michael Ray.Reel-Fin-Addicts win Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S ProShield Complete! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 13Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiencesCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD One mans trash. At an early age I took an interest in the outdoors. This was especially the case with the wilderness areas surrounding my home in Northern Minnesota. As a juvenile adventurer I did my best to research things like wilderness survival, camping, and methods of shing. The result was a rather extensive personal library on these subjects. One of the books I owned early on was called Minimizing Impact on the Wilderness by Michael Hodgson. At an impressionable age this was, no doubt, a key component to building my behaviors today. Last summer I had the opportunity to visit K Tower about 26 miles offshore of our local coast. Gregg Stanton was teaching some basic open water scuba students and between their dives I would dive for a slightly extended period to allow them a proper lunch and surface interval. On both of these dives I went with the intention of shooting video footage, hoping to nd some Goliath grouper and maybe some sharks. This mission ended up taking a back seat to something slightly unexpected. Divers are accustomed to seeing trash, after all its (currently) an inevitable consequence of our existence on this planet, and normally divers are seen removing this trash from our rivers, lakes, and oceans. My dives at K Tower were no different. Rather than the occasional trash bit I found lots, more than I could recover alone on many dives. In these cases I concentrated my efforts on the collection of lead! Yes, that heavy metal that we dont want in our drinking water or on our childrens toys. It seems the tower was covered with it. Between the two dives I lled an ice cream pail with about 58 pounds of the stuff. Where is this lead coming from? Fishermen who have their lines cut or broken tragically lose more than just the shing line, which is bad enough. The lures and weights, used to catch sh, litter the reef-like structure. Ordinarily the trash that divers retrieve has little value but in this case I had about $200 in lead, at a retail value, enough to cover the fuel to get to the tower in any case. Diving in our Gulf waters for any reason can be a low impact activity and by spending an extra minute or two recovering some trash, or in this case a valuable metal, before leaving the bottom helps to lessen the impacts of others and preserves these places for the next generations of both sh and sherman.If any of you have been traveling recently, you may have noticed that there are more and more trailered boats out on the road. You may have also noticed that there are also more trailers that have encountered problems and have been pulled off to the side. More often than not, the reason trailers cause problems are a at tire or bearings that lock up. Improperly in ated tires can lead to sh tailing as well as reduced mileage. It is also important that you make sure your vehicle tires are properly in ated. They will be pulling a lot of additional weight. It does not take long for bearings to heat up either. Without enough grease, they have the potential to lock up and prevent your tires from turning on the trailer. Most trailers have caps that cover the bearings where you can pack grease or you can install buddy bearings to ensure they are properly lubricated. It is also important to check your wench cable and tie down straps to make sure your boat will not shift during trailering. Weight distribution is important to ensure that you do not improperly load your trailer. Once you have all that checked and are ready to hook the trailer to your vehicle, it is critical that you use the proper ball and coupling. Without a snug and proper t, you risk your trailer jumping off the ball. If the trailer should happen to jump off, proper use of the safety chains will help minimize the impact. The chains should form an X under the hitch tongue. This creates a cradle for the hitch should it bounce off. Lastly, be sure to check all lights and make sure that all items are put away so they do not y out during your journey. Excess gear such as tanks for diving can change the weight distribution on your trailer, try to evenly distribute weight. It is also a good idea to check your trailer each time you stop to make sure everything is still on good order. If you would like to talk to us about scheduling a free vessel safety check, please contact Steve Hults, our Flotilla Staff Officer for vessel exams at fso-ve@uscgaux. net. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux. net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. A trailer in good working condition can help set you up for a great day out on the water! Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting David Guttman was out with family and friends last week and could not resist the opportunity to perform a quick mission. You can take an auxiliarist away from the water, but you can never take it out of their heart. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFWC NewsThis report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of May 3-9 in the Northwest Region. OKALOOSA COUNTY: Capt. Mary Sumner, Lt. Mark Hollinhead, and FWC Of cers assigned to Okaloosa and Walton Counties attended a ceremony at the Crestview Police Department honoring fallen of cers. Fallen Game and Freshwater Fish Commission Of cer Ray Lynn Barnes was honored during this years ceremony. On Nov. 21, 1987, Barnes was shot and killed while attempting to arrest a person for illegally hunting deer. The suspect managed to gain control of the officers handgun and shot him. Barnes is survived by his wife and two daughters. JACKSON COUNTY: K-9 Of cer Mike Guy received information concerning several subjects in two separate vessels catching and keeping undersized shellcracker while fishing in Merritts Mill Pond Fish Management Area. Guy contacted plainclothes Of cer Scott Cassels to assist in surveillance of the subjects. Resource inspections revealed subjects from both vessels were in violation and were issued citations for possession of undersized shellcracker and for possession of over the bag limit of shellcracker. GADSDEN COUNTY: While working the Ochlockonee River near Lake Talquin Dam, Lt. Harry Parker cited two men for possession of over the daily limit of speckled perch. The men had 66 speckled perch, 16 over the daily bag limit.FWC Law Enforcement operations 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu May 16, 13 Fri May 17, 13 Sat May 18, 13 Sun May 19, 13 Mon May 20, 13 Tue May 21, 13 Wed May 22, 13 D ate 3.2 ft. 12:58 AM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 12:39 AM 0.6 ft. 1:27 AM 0.8 ft. 2:25 AM 0.9 ft. 3:30 AM 1.1 ft. 4:35 AM 1.2 ft. 5:33 AM 1.3 ft. 6:24 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 7:28 AM 2.9 ft. 8:27 AM 2.9 ft. 9:30 AM 3.1 ft. 10:27 AM 3.3 ft. 11:16 AM 3.5 ft. 11:58 AM 3.7 ft. 12:36 PM Hi g h 1.7 ft. 12:41 PM 1.7 ft. 1:52 PM 1.6 ft. 3:18 PM 1.3 ft. 4:40 PM 0.8 ft. 5:45 PM 0.3 ft. 6:39 PM -0.2 ft. 7:28 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 6:09 PM 2.9 ft. 7:14 PM 2.7 ft. 8:49 PM 2.7 ft. 10:33 PM 2.9 ft. 11:54 PM Hi g h Thu May 16, 13 Fri May 17, 13 Sat May 18, 13 Sun May 19, 13 Mon May 20, 13 Tue May 21, 13 Wed May 22, 13 D ate 2.4 ft. 12:50 AM Hi g h 0.3 ft. 12:50 AM 0.4 ft. 1:38 AM 0.6 ft. 2:36 AM 0.7 ft. 3:41 AM 0.8 ft. 4:46 AM 0.9 ft. 5:44 AM 0.9 ft. 6:35 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 7:20 AM 2.2 ft. 8:19 AM 2.2 ft. 9:22 AM 2.3 ft. 10:19 AM 2.4 ft. 11:08 AM 2.6 ft. 11:50 AM 2.8 ft. 12:28 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 12:52 PM 1.3 ft. 2:03 PM 1.2 ft. 3:29 PM 0.9 ft. 4:51 PM 0.6 ft. 5:56 PM 0.2 ft. 6:50 PM -0.1 ft. 7:39 PM L ow 2.4 ft. 6:01 PM 2.2 ft. 7:06 PM 2.0 ft. 8:41 PM 2.1 ft. 10:25 PM 2.2 ft. 11:46 PM Hi g h Thu May 16, 13 Fri May 17, 13 Sat May 18, 13 Sun May 19, 13 Mon May 20, 13 Tue May 21, 13 Wed May 22, 13 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:30 AM 3.0 ft. 1:34 AM Hi g h 0.3 ft. 1:43 AM 0.5 ft. 2:31 AM 0.7 ft. 3:29 AM 0.9 ft. 4:34 AM 1.0 ft. 5:39 AM 1.1 ft. 6:37 AM 1.2 ft. 7:28 AM L ow 2.7 ft. 8:04 AM 2.7 ft. 9:03 AM 2.7 ft. 10:06 AM 2.9 ft. 11:03 AM 3.0 ft. 11:52 AM 3.2 ft. 12:34 PM 3.4 ft. 1:12 PM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 1:45 PM 1.6 ft. 2:56 PM 1.5 ft. 4:22 PM 1.2 ft. 5:44 PM 0.7 ft. 6:49 PM 0.3 ft. 7:43 PM -0.2 ft. 8:32 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 6:45 PM 2.7 ft. 7:50 PM 2.5 ft. 9:25 PM 2.5 ft. 11:09 PM Hi g h Thu May 16, 13 Fri May 17, 13 Sat May 18, 13 Sun May 19, 13 Mon May 20, 13 Tue May 21, 13 Wed May 22, 13 D ate 2.5 ft. 12:42 AM Hi g h 0.3 ft. 12:18 AM 0.6 ft. 1:06 AM 0.8 ft. 2:04 AM 0.9 ft. 3:09 AM 1.1 ft. 4:14 AM 1.2 ft. 5:12 AM 1.3 ft. 6:03 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 7:12 AM 2.3 ft. 8:11 AM 2.3 ft. 9:14 AM 2.4 ft. 10:11 AM 2.5 ft. 11:00 AM 2.7 ft. 11:42 AM 2.9 ft. 12:20 PM Hi g h 1.7 ft. 12:20 PM 1.7 ft. 1:31 PM 1.6 ft. 2:57 PM 1.2 ft. 4:19 PM 0.8 ft. 5:24 PM 0.3 ft. 6:18 PM -0.2 ft. 7:07 PM L ow 2.5 ft. 5:53 PM 2.3 ft. 6:58 PM 2.1 ft. 8:33 PM 2.1 ft. 10:17 PM 2.3 ft. 11:38 PM Hi g h Thu May 16, 13 Fri May 17, 13 Sat May 18, 13 Sun May 19, 13 Mon May 20, 13 Tue May 21, 13 Wed May 22, 13 D ate 3.3 ft. 12:55 AM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 12:36 AM 0.6 ft. 1:24 AM 0.8 ft. 2:22 AM 1.0 ft. 3:27 AM 1.2 ft. 4:32 AM 1.3 ft. 5:30 AM 1.4 ft. 6:21 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 7:25 AM 3.0 ft. 8:24 AM 3.0 ft. 9:27 AM 3.1 ft. 10:24 AM 3.3 ft. 11:13 AM 3.5 ft. 11:55 AM 3.8 ft. 12:33 PM Hi g h 1.8 ft. 12:38 PM 1.9 ft. 1:49 PM 1.7 ft. 3:15 PM 1.4 ft. 4:37 PM 0.9 ft. 5:42 PM 0.3 ft. 6:36 PM -0.2 ft. 7:25 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 6:06 PM 3.0 ft. 7:11 PM 2.8 ft. 8:46 PM 2.8 ft. 10:30 PM 3.0 ft. 11:51 PM Hi g h Thu May 16, 13 Fri May 17, 13 Sat May 18, 13 Sun May 19, 13 Mon May 20, 13 Tue May 21, 13 Wed May 22, 13 D ate 2.5 ft. 8:17 AM 2.0 ft. 12:10 AM 2.2 ft. 1:35 AM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 12:50 PM 0.3 ft. 12:43 AM 0.5 ft. 1:33 AM 0.7 ft. 2:29 AM 0.9 ft. 3:27 AM 1.2 ft. 4:26 AM 1.4 ft. 5:22 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 6:02 PM 2.5 ft. 8:54 AM 2.6 ft. 9:29 AM 2.6 ft. 10:02 AM 2.7 ft. 10:33 AM 2.7 ft. 11:03 AM 2.9 ft. 11:34 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 2:09 PM 1.1 ft. 3:24 PM 0.8 ft. 4:26 PM 0.5 ft. 5:19 PM 0.2 ft. 6:07 PM -0.1 ft. 6:52 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 7:17 PM 1.9 ft. 8:49 PM 1.9 ft. 10:31 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMay 16 May 22First May 17 Full May 24 Last May 31 New June 8Major Times 6:28 AM 8:28 AM 6:51 PM 8:51 PM Minor Times 12:51 AM 1:51 AM 12:07 PM 1:07 PM Major Times 7:13 AM 9:13 AM 7:35 PM 9:35 PM Minor Times 1:27 AM 2:27 AM 1:01 PM 2:01 PM Major Times 7:58 AM 9:58 AM 8:20 PM 10:20 PM Minor Times 2:02 AM 3:02 AM 1:56 PM 2:56 PM Major Times 8:43 AM 10:43 AM 9:06 PM 11:06 PM Minor Times 2:37 AM 3:37 AM 2:53 PM 3:53 PM Major Times 9:30 AM 11:30 AM 9:54 PM 11:54 PM Minor Times 3:13 AM 4:13 AM 3:52 PM 4:52 PM Major Times 10:19 AM 12:19 PM 10:45 PM 12:45 AM Minor Times 3:50 AM 4:50 AM 4:53 PM 5:53 PM Major Times 11:12 AM 1:12 PM 11:39 PM 1:39 AM Minor Times 4:30 AM 5:30 AM 5:57 PM 6:57 PM Average Average+ Average Average+ Average Average Good6:42 am 8:24 pm 12:08 pm 12:52 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:42 am 8:25 pm 1:02 pm 1:28 am 6:41 am 8:25 pm 1:57 pm 2:03 am 6:41 am 8:26 pm 2:54 pm 2:38 am 6:40 am 8:27 pm 3:53 pm 3:14 am 6:40 am 8:27 pm 4:54 pm 3:51 am 6:39 am 8:28 pm 5:58 pm 4:31 am38% 44% 51% 57% 64% 71% 78% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn May 6, Detective Matt Helms recovered a firearm stolen from Wakulla County in 1993. A special agent for the U.S. Secret Service revealed that a search warrant was executed at a Tallahassee residence on March 8, 2013 and the rearm was recovered. Once the rearm was recovered a computer background check revealed that the .44 caliber revolver was stolen from the Triangle Pawn Shop in Crawfordville and Otho Leroy Lyles on Feb. 15, 1993. The individual who was in possession of the Lyles weapon prior to the execution of the search warrant was found to be deceased. The firearm was placed into WCSO Evidence and Lyles was contacted about picking up the weapon due to the case being closed and the suspects sentenced. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: MAY 2 A 17-year-old Wakulla High School juvenile was arrested for possession of a Schedule II narcotic after she was observed at school with pills that did not belong to her. The female was taken to the Wakulla County Jail and turned over to her grandparent. Deputy Scott Rojas and Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. WCSO Narcotics Unit investigators requested an arrest warrant for Janet Elisa Dean, 47, of Tallahassee in connection with an investigation into obtaining narcotics fraudulently. The Narcotics Unit stopped Dean at a Crawfordville pharmacy after she picked up a prescription. Due to her cooperative nature, an arrest warrant was requested in lieu of a physical arrest. She was charged with possession of a Schedule III narcotic and obtaining a controlled substance by fraud. Elizabeth Metcalf of Panacea reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed at the home and $200 worth of damage was estimated to a door. The victim reported the theft of tools and a trolling motor valued at $815. A suspect has been identi ed and the property was recovered in Leon County. Deputy Billy Metcalf and Detective Cole Wells investigated. Kim Hagen of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim observed two unauthorized charges on her bank card which were valued at $227. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. MAY 3 Deputy Alan Middlebrooks observed a vehicle on Emmett Whaley Road without operating tail lights. He attempted to conduct a traf c stop when the motorist accelerated from the scene to Dreamwood Stables Road. The vehicle nearly crashed into a tree on Dreamwood Stables Road and Deputy Middlebrooks was able to catch up to Randy Douglas Holcomb, 45, of Crawfordville. Deputy Middlebrooks determined that Holcomb did not have a valid driver license and possessed an open alcoholic beverage container inside the vehicle. Holcomb was charged with DUI, eeing and eluding, refusal to submit to a breath test and knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license was suspended or revoked. Deputy Mike Crum and Sgt. Ryan Muse also investigated. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated a report of an ATV crash in Crawfordville where Wakulla EMS was about to transport a 35-year-old Crawfordville man. The victim ipped an ATV and suffered lacerations to his head. The victim was transported to a Tallahassee hospital for treatment of his injuries. MAY 4 Catherine Manning of Crawfordville reported a structure re on Destiny Lane. The victim was cooking on the stove when a re erupted in a pan that quickly got out of control. Damage to the home was estimated at $4,000 around the stove. The fire was ruled accidental and individuals on scene were treated for smoke inhalation by Wakulla EMS. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Scott Gedeon of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A television, leaf blower and beer, valued at $530, were stolen from the back porch area of his home. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff observed a retail theft. A 23-yearold Crawfordville man was allegedly observed removing $35 worth of beer from the store without paying for it. The suspect has been identified. Later, Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Deputy Nick Gray made contact with Gary Robert Jeziorski and issued him a notice to appear in court for petit theft. Deputy Ian Dohme, Sgt. Ryan Muse and Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. Deputy Mike Crum and Deputy Alan Middlebrooks clocked a vehicle traveling 60 miles per hour in a 45 mile per hour zone in Medart. They attempted to conduct a traffic stop but the vehicle accelerated away from the deputies. The suspect turned off his vehicle lights in an effort to elude law enforcement. The suspect vehicle was located at a Medart motel. William Allen Clemons, 30, of Tallahassee was arrested in the parking lot and charged with eeing and attempting to elude, reckless driving, driving while license was suspended or revoked-habitual offender, an active warrant out of Leon County and a traf c citation for speeding. A female passenger in the vehicle was not charged. A clerk at the Wakulla Station Kangaroo store reported a fraud. A $10 bill was received by the clerk that was used to purchase lottery tickets. The bill turned out to be counterfeit. The bill was taken into evidence. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. A 31-year-old Crawfordville victim reported harassing text messages from a suspect who has been identi ed. The case was sent to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. A 16-year-old Crawfordville girl reported a male adult talking to the victim and her friend on the road as they walked. The white male was on a bicycle, in his 50s with a white goatee and red ball cap. The man asked their ages and where they lived. The victims left the scene without incident. A person of interest was identi ed. Sgt. Ryan Muse investigated. Rawling Davenport of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone attempted to vandalize his company vehicle with beer cans on the front windshield. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. MAY 5 George Scates of Douglasville, Ga. reported a residential burglary to his Crawfordville home. Copper wiring was stolen along with household electronics, a propane tank and commercial trash bin. The missing items are valued at $2,050. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. Tena Altman of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from her home. The bike is valued at $80. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. MAY 6 Marie Sherman of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Fraudulent information was observed on an IRS tax return led by an individual in 2009 and 2010. The victim is attempting to identify the individual who led the return. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Atarri Hall-Powell of Monticello reported a credit card offense. An unauthorized transaction was observed on the victims bank card. The charge totaled $40. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated a dog bite case in Crawfordville. A 36-year-old Crawfordville woman reported that her neighbors dog attacked her son while he was playing basketball with friends. The dog bit the victim on the upper arm after knocking him to the ground. The dog was retrieved by the owner. Wakulla Animal Control was contacted and the dog was impounded. Wakulla EMS treated the male victim at the scene. Frank Randolph Johnson, 43, of Crawfordville was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked with knowledge following a traf c stop. Deputy Gibby Gibson observed the Johnson vehicle without tail lights. Johnson told the deputy he had not had a license for approximately 10 years. MAY 7 School Resource Of cers and members of the Youth and Community Services Unit led a report of assisting Wakulla High School students deal with the death of a fellow student on May 3. Food and beverages were served and students were given an opportunity to express their grief at school. The same opportunities were offered to the WHS baseball team. Party Patrols continued through the weekend and the deputies were active May 4 as part of the WHS Prom. The deputies investigated an intoxicated student. Parents of the student were contacted and asked to pick their child up. As many as four other students were discovered to be under the in uence. The alcohol was con scated and disposed of. Florida State University Police, Deputy Joe Page, Sgt. Billy Jones, Sgt. Ray Johnson, Deputy Scott Rojas, Lt. Bruce Ashley and Deputy Evelyn Brown investigated. Cecil Bowen of Crawfordville reported a burglary of a shed. Tools, a gas can and ampli ers, valued at $910, were reported missing. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Derick Lenard Hughes, 45, of Crawfordville was arrested for trespass after warning after being asked to leave a Crawfordville gas station and convenience store by the owner. Hughes refused to leave the business when asked by the owner. Sgt. Lorne Whaley investigated. James Walter Maxwell of Crawfordville and Cheryl Francene Dunlap of Crawfordville were involved in a minor traf c crash in the parking lot of Ming Tree. There were no injuries and minor damage was reported to both vehicles. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. MAY 8 Donna S. Gomez, 50, of Crawfordville was arrested for failure to register as a sexual offender and failure to notify law enforcement of a change of address to another state. Gomez spoke to Detective Josh Langston who determined that Gomez was listed as an absconded sexual offender since 2009. Gomez had been living in Illinois. She was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Sgt. Lorne Whaley also investigated. Joshua L. Kosin of Tallahassee was involved in a single vehicle traf c crash at the Express Lane on Coastal Highway. The motorist backed his semi into a light pole causing minor damage to the vehicle and the light pole. Damage was estimated at $500. There were no injuries. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Detective Nick Boutwell was on patrol on Ashley Hall Road when he observed an open gate with access to the power line. The detective conducted a traf c stop on a suspicious vehicle. The vehicle license plate was expired since 2012. James Kevin Futrell, 50, of Tallahassee was driving the vehicle without a valid driver license. Futrell was transported to the Wakulla County Jail with a charge of driving with a suspended license with knowledge. The vehicle was towed from the scene. A large amount of copper wiring was discovered inside the vehicle. The wiring apparently was from a location in Leon County. Mary Sottilare of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Tools and miscellaneous items were taken from the victims metal building on her property. The stolen property is valued at $9,480. The victim claims that the value of the stolen property may be estimated at $20,000. Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,113 calls for service during the past week including 15 residential and business alarms; 10 assists to other agencies; 51 citizen contacts; 11 disturbances; 9 abandoned E-911 cell calls; three abandoned E-911 regular calls; 26 regular E-911 calls; 56 investigations; 14 juvenile citizen contacts; 47 medical emergencies; 26 school security checks; 384 business and residential security checks; 27 special details; 16 subpoena services 12 suspicious vehicles; 47 traf c enforcements; 144 traf c stops; 20 reckless vehicles; and 23 wanted people. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 for Daniel BarwickBenet Fish FrySaturday, May 18, 2013 11 am 3 pm Panacea Fire DepartmentGood Food and Fellowship Donations accepted Everyone is Invited! Please join us in celebrating:The Rose Ladys 50th Birthdayon Friday, May 17th at DUX Liquors and Lounge, 9pm-until Band: Common Zenz at 9:30pm HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA The Wakulla News The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 15ASpecial to The NewsWakulla Sheriff Charlie Creel recognized four members of his staff and three members of the public for their contributions to making Wakulla County a better place to live. The annual Law Appreciation Day was held Thursday, May 9 with a luncheon at the Wakulla Shrine Club where Sheriff Creel presented the awards. ROB GIDDENS IS LAW OFFICER OF THE YEAR The 2013 Law Enforcement Of cer of the Year was Detective Rob Giddens. Giddens is a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who joined the WCSO in September 2004. He worked his way up from Corrections Of cer Assistant to Deputy Sheriff and transferred from Corrections to Road Patrol in 2005. Giddens has worked in the Criminal Investigations Division serving in property and persons crimes prior to his present assignment on the Youth and Community Services Unit (COPS grant program). Detective Giddens has served as a member of the SWAT Team, Jail Extraction Team, Field Training Of- cer, Drug Lab Response Team, Honor Guard, Dive Team and is a member of the Unites States Marshal Fugitive Task Force for the region. In addition to his regular duties, Detective Giddens is routinely called to assist on tactical arrests and search warrant operations. Sheriff Creel used words such as thorough, professional, disciplined and team work to describe Giddens work ethic. All of Detective Giddens performance evaluations re ect superior ratings, said Sheriff Creel. He takes great pride in his daily efforts and is a true team member of the WCSO. RANDY BARNES IS CORRECTIONS OFFICER OF YEAR Detention Deputy Randy Barnes was selected as the Correctional Officer of the Year. He joined the WCSO in March 2012 and quickly displayed the ability to perform all the tasks required of him. Barnes showed a positive attitude as he displayed pro ciency in every area of the jail including tasks performed by supervisors. Detention Deputy Barnes was recently transferred to the position of Quartermaster within the jail. This position requires the officer to be level headed and have the ability to communicate with both staff and inmates, said Sheriff Creel. Deputy Barnes excels in both areas. The duties of the Quartermaster include making sure all clothing and linens are washed, mattresses are sanitized, trustees are assigned to various jobs and making sure the inmate population is following hygiene requirements. Barnes and his work crew can be observed on cleaning details in the jail and in the administrative area of the WCSO as well as passing out of inmates canteen. What makes Randy Barnes special is, after performing all of his tasks, he never hesitates to help the shift when needed, said Sheriff Creel. He is well respected by both the staff and inmates in the jail. ASHLEY CHAPMAN AWARD FOR COMMUNICATIONS The Communications Officer of the Year was Ashley Chapman. She was hired on July 2, 2009 as a Call Taker. She worked her way up to Certified Call Taker and Certified Telecommunicator during her time with the WCSO. She was promoted to Communications Officer in May 2012. During her time with the agency, she has become a valued employee and someone who can be counted on, said Sheriff Creel. Over the last year as a Communications Officer, she has proven to be someone that meets the needs of the citizens as well as the agency. The award recognizes her commitment to improvement and her desire to become a rst rate communications of cer. CIVILIAN EMPLOYEE Robert Pete Cochran was selected as the Civilian Employee of the Year. Cochran joined the WCSO Maintenance Division as Director on March 7, 2011. He worked as a eet manager for the Hertz Corporation from 1994 to 2011 and has 22 years of maintenance management in his career. Cochran was selected as the civilian employee because of his caring and professional attitude. The time of repairs have been cut dramatically and repeat repairs are almost nonexistent. His efforts have helped reduce the cost of parts and labor and the expected maintenance costs are expected to be reduced by one-third. Since taking over the maintenance division he has worked tirelessly to create a service style atmosphere, said Sheriff Creel. Pete describes other employees as customers and his division strives to provide customer satisfaction. This is a hard task when you are responsible for a 350 bed jail, administrative offices, emergency management, communications center, an offsite annex and a eet of ve dozen vehicles. VOLUNTEER OF YEAR Brandon Willis was recognized as the WCSO Volunteer of the Year. Brandon will turn 24 this year and is the son of Gordon Willis and Lawanna Matthews. He is a lifelong resident of Wakulla County and a Wakulla High School graduate. Brandon began his volunteer work in 2009 as a member of the WCSO Explorers Program as a high school student. He has continued to volunteer at the WCSO Training Center and Firing Range where he compiled more than 2,000 hours of volunteer time in 2012. Brandon is very well thought of at the Range, said Sheriff Creel. He is an integral part of the operation and he has a good attitude while working well with the public. He projects the professionalism that I demand out of my employees when dealing with the public. His volunteer hours nearly match that of a fulltime employee. SPECIAL HERO AWARD Sheriff Creel also gave out a Special Hero Award to Chayton Bussey. Bussey, 13, jumped into a swimming pool in March and rescued his 2-year-old brother from drowning. Later the same day, he rescued another friend who was struggling with his swimming. Chayton is serious about his academics as a member of the AB Honor Roll. He is also a football player and wrestler for the Riversprings Middle School Bears. He has a second degree black belt in taekwondo. APPRECIATION FOR TIM ROSE Tim Rose, owner of Macks Meats in Crawfordville, was also recognized with a Certificate of Appreciation for his donation and support of the Wakulla First Responders Relay for Life team. Tim has been touched by cancer and supported the American Cancer Societys fundraiser by donating food items to support the WCSO members participating in the event.Sheriff Creel recognizes staff, citizens on Law DayTallahassee teens arrested in Wakulla after pursuit Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office deputies assisted Leon County law enforcement in catching two Tallahassee teenagers who were fleeing Leon County during a 2 a.m. high-speed pursuit on Monday, May 13, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. Reginald Reshard Donaldson, 18, of Windy Pine Way in Tallahassee and Tariq Akbar Kareem, 18, of Primrose Lane in Tallahassee were apprehended at U.S. Highway 319 and Highway 267 after attempting to flee law enforcement. The armed suspects were wanted for carjacking in Leon County. WCSO Deputy Sean Wheeler observed a Chevrolet Impala southbound on U.S. Highway 319 at a high rate of speed with two Leon County Sheriffs Office vehicles in emergency pursuit. The suspect vehicle attempted to make an eastbound turn onto Highway 267 but due to the speed of the vehicle, crashed into a convenience store ditch. The two teenagers got out of the vehicle and attempted to ee on foot. Deputy Wheeler maneuvered his vehicle in the path of one of the eeing suspects and chased after Donaldson on foot. Kareem fled into a wooded area and was captured behind the convenience store by a Tallahassee Police Department K-9 Unit. Donaldson fled into the woods as well and was caught by Deputy Wheeler who used his Taser to gain control of the suspect. Deputy Wheeler was joined by a Leon County Deputy in taking Donaldson into custody. Both suspects were cleared by Wakulla EMS and were turned over to Leon County Sheriffs Of ce deputies for arrest and transportation back to Tallahassee. The K-9 Unit recovered a revolver which was found to have been stolen out of Tallahassee. In addition to the Wakulla and Leon County Sheriffs Of ces and Tallahassee Police Department being involved in the incident, the Florida Highway Patrol also assisted at the scene. WCSO Deputy Vicki Mitchell, Lt. Mike Kemp and Deputy Billy Metcalf were also involved.Civilian of the Year Robert Cochran, Volunteer of the Year Brandon Willis, Communications Of cer of the Year Ashley Chapman, Sheriff Charlie Creel, Correctional Of cer of the Year Randy Barnes, Law Enforcement Of cer of the Year Rob Giddens and Undersheriff Trey Morrison. Wakulla and Leon deputies after a high-speed chase in which two armed suspects were arrested.WCSO/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WCSO/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. Antivirus Renewalswe make it as Easy as... Call 1-800-789-6548Receive your renewal numberDONE!1 2 3Easy Renewal by Phone No Downloads All Major Antivirus Brands FREE TECH HELP!Antivirus Service CenterNationwide Service Since 19991-800-789-6548 Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer and MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comThe lush green leaves and perfumed blossoms provide an inviting veneer which covers a menacing reality. It is a jungle out there, even if the predators are small and people are usually on the menu. Lurking beneath the foliage are aggressive and voracious creatures which may attack in near in nite waves with only the thought of reducing their objective to mere twigs. Spring may turn a young mans heart to love (and baseball), but bugs want to eat. For many homeowners, this is the season where natures fury is encountered at its fullest, and most expensive. More than one has made divine entreaties seeking relief from plagues worse than those Ramses II endured. One of the major culprits is aphids. This nearly invisible insect uses stealth and disguise to do its damage to awless landscapes and vegetable gardens of Wakulla County. Points of attack are on the underside of leaves and on the herbaceous new-growth stems. Aphids set up colonies where they pierce the plants vascular system like hordes of tiny vampires. Soon spots appear on the leaves and die-off can occur. To add injury to the infestation, the aphids open the plant to a variety of diseases which are unsightly at best and fatal at worst. While latched to the plants, aphids have a naturally occurring problem of their own, that being ladybugs. The brightly colored insects frequent childrens books and movies as friendly, benign creature always with a cheery smile and kind word. Reality is quite different. These ungainly flyers constantly hunt for juicy aphids whose only defense is a good hiding place and luck. Ladybugs land with a diminutive clatter alerting the aphids to the horrors which will soon be forthcoming. The fast and surprisingly agile, ladybugs quickly acquire a target and close in for the kill. What follows is a tiny version of Jurassic Park on steroids. For the aphids it is not pretty, but for the gardener it is justice delivered for damage done. Unfortunately, ladybugs will fall prey to the use of chemical insecticides along with the offending destructive insect. If the ladybug population is high, give them a chance to clean up the problems before turning to the nuclear option. Nature has delivered some vexing challenges and unusual situations to Wakulla County gardeners who desire to produce fresh vegetables. Those close to the coast on tidal creeks and marshes have a uniquely dif cult problem. The wharf crab is found mostly around pilings, stumps, rubble and shell.It is an intertidal creature and active above the water line at low tide. In natural settings it grazes primarily on detritus and fallen vegetation, though they will scavenge dead marine animals to a lesser degree. The wrack line of seaweed is a common foraging area for wharf crabs, but they are not found on a sandy beach. For local gardeners the tiny crabs are a pest which eats tomatoes and eggplant while still in the garden. About the only hope is a ock of hungry seagulls with a deft touch to take the crabs and leave the vegetables. To learn more about Wakulla Countys lawn and garden pests and how to control them, contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of ce at (850) 9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u .edu. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Its the time of year to battle garden pests Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA ladybug, above, is one of the good guys in the battle against aphids. A wharf crab, below left, and the damage done. Thank You! The Warriors and Quiet Waters Founda on was formed to help and thank our combat injured Warriors. It is our mission to bring soldiers from military hospitals to the big bend coast for recrea onal therapy to restore the body and spirit. The WQW Founda on wants to thank all of our supporters, donors and volunteers. We have had our rst six day visit by our Warrior guests and it was successful. It was so successful that the sta at Ft. Benning is saying WQW has set the bar for all recrea onal therapy programs. This program could not have succeeded without the support of many of our area businesses and individuals. The gathering of support and the fund raising started long before the soldiers arrived at Wakulla Springs on April 28th and it is ongoing. There are far too many people involved in this e ort to list. A few that stand out are the Crum Family and Crums MiniMall, our rst supporters. Ten Oak Farm, Syn-Tech Fuel Master and Ochlockonee Bay VFD; this is all about the soldier and nancial support is a must. Our guides were Jody Campbell and Mike McNamara, they were loved by the soldiers. Angies Marine Supply furnished live shrimp every shing day. Skeeter Boats and Ingrams Marina assisted with our Bass Tournament Fundraiser. Our support came from Wakulla, Leon, Je erson and Gadsden coun es and as far away as California. Warriors and Quiet Waters wanted to help and thank the injured Warriors and the people of our area came together to make it happen. Our next group of Warriors will be coming in October. If y ou would like to be a part of this program as a volunteer or as a donor please contact us; http://www.facebook.com/ WQWSC or http://www.shingwithwarriors.org / our mailing address is 5032 Capital Circle SW STE @ PMB #128 Tallahassee, FL 32305 and our phone number is 850) 597-3419.From all of the soldiers and from the Board of Warriors and Quiet Waters we extend our most sincere Posey Family Sponsors Fishing with Capt. Jody Campbell, volunteer Mary and the soldiers rst redsh. Soldier with the speckled trout he cought. Capt. Fife with soldierSoldier on Capt. Mikes boat Bass Tournament Fund Raiser at Ingrams MarinaArrival of Soldiers at Wakulla Springs LodgeThe catch of the day. F rom al l of the s ol di e rs and f rom the B oard of W ar r i ors and Qui e t W a t e rs w e ext e nd our m ost s i nc e re

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& Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Expedition to Tweeds Cave, GuamRed Clay Footprints, Page 3BSUMMER CAMPSPage 6-7BCourts get busy as lawmakers leaveWeekly Roundup, Page 4BBy JENNY ODOMThe Wakulla NewsAs if the sky speaks to him, local photographer Thomas Maddi shoots with pure intuition. I always feel drawn to go to a certain place, pulled there, he says during an interview at his Crawfordville home. And as Im driving to the spot, my anticipation builds thinking about it, thinking about the shot. Maddi uses air quotes in describing the Old Florida landscape as his subject matter. Drawn to the simplicity of black and white photography, his shooting season, as he calls it, runs from May through September because of the light and the sky. The summer skies in Florida are like no other. There are these huge cumulous clouds that are so magni cent. So many times I get my best shot within minutes of arriving at a place. I get there, set up and its as if the sky is ready for me. I shoot quick because it changes so quickly, he says. Maddi began his photography business in the Florida Keys in the early s, using a large format camera to capture the striking landscapes of the upper and middle Keys. He developed prints in his own darkroom, and sold his work successfully in the area. He also worked the lucrative art show and festival circuit for several years, acquiring honors and awards, including a second place at the prestigious Pigeon Key Art Festival. But about 17 years ago, as more and more people moved to the Keys, Maddi yearned for a less populated and quieter setting. He and his wife, Sandi, relocated to Alligator Point, purchasing a house. About the same time, Maddi renovated a Cracker House along US 98. In it, he ran a successful photography business and gallery until the economy could no longer support it, and he sold the property. Eventually the pair moved to Crawfordville, where they now live with their two daughters, Ashlee, 13 and Abigail, 6, and have a large chicken coop in the backyard. Sandi, besides maintaining the photography business website, teaches at Wakulla Christian Academy. Instead of the large format camera he used for years, Maddi now wields high end digital cameras. He prefers to shoot with a 36-megapixel Nikon D800E and produces his prints on large format archival pigmented ink printers, sizes ranging from 11x14 inches to as large as 40x60 inches. It does not take an art historian to recognize the resemblance between Maddis work and that of famous landscape photographer Ansel Adams. Maddi admits Adams was an early influence and adds that Edward Weston and Clyde Butcher, other pioneers of large format, black and white photography, were early in uences in his decision to develop his craft. Its all about the sky and the clouds. I can nd the sky, but Ive got to nd something to put in front of it, too, he smiles. He describes himself as somewhat of a purist when it comes to manipulating images. I like using the old school techniques of dodging and burning and netuning contrast. All Im doing is all Ive ever done in the dark room, its just that I do it now on a computer in Photoshop, he says. You can see Maddis work locally at Sea Oats Gallery at St. George Island. And, soon, there may be a new venture, as he and his wife have been tossing around the idea of opening a gallery in Apalachicola. Were looking at it, he says with hope and reserve. Its a great little arts community, and its getting exposure from all over the country. And the economy looks like it might be turning around enough to support a gallery again. With a strong connection to the area, Maddi considers his work blossoming from passions both for creating art and for documenting the coastal landscape. He points out an image taken at Mashes Sands a few years ago and notes the impact of the transforming landscape. That place, its just not there anymore, he states. It might be from a storm, or it might be from development, but the land is changing. I feel its an important part of my job as a photographer, in this region especially, to document the change happening right before our eyes. In addition to ne art photography, Maddi runs a commercial wedding and portrait business. For more information about Thomas Maddi Photography, visit his website at www.thomasmaddi. com. See his landscape photographs at Sea Oats Art Gallery, 128 East Pine Street in St. George Island. For information, call (850) 927-2303 or email info@ ForgottenCoastArt.com. Artists of Wakulla is a monthly feature that highlights an individual artist living and working in Wakulla County. If you are an artist who is interested in being featured, please contact Jenny Odom at jenny@iggyart.com.Thomas Maddi Artists of Wakullais passionate about his photography Thomas Maddis photographs Hickory Mound, above, and Cash Creek, below. See Chuck or Bre at Shields Marina (no phone calls) Chris Cra 1982 28 Trojan Boat 1974 32 On the River in St. Marks On the River in St. Marks Shields Marina Shields Marina On the River in St. Marks O O n n t t th th e e R R i i v v e e r r i i n n S S t t t. M M Ma a r r rk rk ks s Great Buy at Owners Loss! Hulls in good shape, both boats in need of TLC & motors. $2,500 each $2,500 each 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, May 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, May 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, May 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, May 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. Monday, May 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. NAMI of Wakulla presents Jennifer Barr with Apalachee Task Force, discussing the topic of Suicide at 6:30 p.m. Open to the public at no cost. Crawfordville Womens Club. For more info call 926-1033. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, May 21 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at 6:30 p.m. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. Wednesday, May 22 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Government MeetingsFriday, May 17 COMMUNITY CENTER ADVISORY GROUP will hold a public meeting in the commissioners conference room at 3 p.m. Monday, May 20 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 2 p.m. in the commission chambers. Tuesday, May 28 WAKULLA COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT will hold a workshop at 2 p.m. at the Commission Chambers. Thursday, May 30 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a Special Public Meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center. CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will conduct a public workshop at 6:30 p.m. to review and discuss its recently initiated Land Development Code Update project. Tuesday, June 11 CITY OF SOPCHOPPY will hold an election for three seats on the Sopchoppy City Council. Polls will open at 7 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. Michelle Snow School of Music spring recital 7 p.m. FREE Sports Physicals at Tallahassee Memorials family medicine of ce 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cars and Coffees rst cruise-in at the old Lous Bait and Tackle service station NAMI Wakulla May public program at the Crawfordville Womens Club 6:30 p.m.FridaySaturdaySundayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.netWeekly meetings Special EventsThursday, May16 WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. THE SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at theWakulla Public Library. Sarracenias guest, IFAS Wakulla Extension Director Les Harrison, will present the feature program on the ecological and aesthetic threat from the worst of the invasive non-native plants. The public is cordially invited. Social time, with refreshments for all, will precede the meeting. Friday, May 17 MICHELLE SNOW SCHOOL OF MUSIC will present their spring recital at 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday at 11 a.m. Youth of all ages will be playing a variety of musical styles and instruments including guitar, violin, piano, drums and voice. Recitals are free and everyone is invited. For more information please call 926-7627. Saturday, May 18 FREE SPORTS PHYSICALS for local student athletes will be held at Tallahassee Memorials Family Medicine Of ce at 15 Council Moore Road from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. These medical evaluations will satisfy the annual requirements of the Florida High School Athletic Association (FHSAA). For more information see page 9a. BENEFIT FISH FRY FOR DANIEL BARWICK will be held at the Panacea re department from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Donations will be accepted and everyone is invited. WHS ANNUAL RED & BLUE FOOTBALL GAME is set to begin at 6 p.m., with gates opening at 5 p.m. The Wakulla Gridiron Club is sponsoring a chicken perlo dinner for $7 which includes a dinner and admission to the game. This is also a good time to purchase or renew your Gridiron seats. Remember that current Gridiron seats must be renewed by May 24 in order to keep your same seats. Admission to the game itself is $1. WILLIAM AND ETHEL CRUM REUNION will be held at Otter Lake in Panacea at 12 p.m. Please bring sides for fried sh or a desert. All family and friends are welcome. Please call Kendall at 545-6080 with any questions. FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK will host the annual Wakulla Springs 5K Run. Registration will open at 7 a.m., after which a one mile fun run will begin at 8 a.m. before the 5K at 8:30 a.m. The mail in registration form can be found at www. wakullasprings.org/projects.html or register online at www.raceit.com. All proceeds from the event will directly bene t Wakulla Springs. Sunday, May 19 CARS AND COFFEEs rst cruisein will be hosted by Bad Bobs. This will be their rst event and will be held just north of the Express Lane Gas station on 319 at the old Lous Bait and Tackle service station. For additional information call Lisa at 962-1200. SHARKS & CHABLIS will take place from 2 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory, 222 Clark Drive in Panacea. There will be live music, Irish dancing, a silent auction, a venomous snake exhibit, guided tours of the aquarium, dinner catered by the Seineyard restaurant and a wine tasting. Tickets are $35 per person and can be purchased in advance or at the door. For tickets or more information, please call (850) 984-5297. All proceeds will benefit the Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory. SHOWCASE 2013 recital featuring piano and guitar students from the studios of Mary Updegraff, Kristin Dow and JoAnn Virgin will take place at Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 2 p.m. Monday, May 20 NAMI WAKULLA will host its May public program at the Crawfordville Womens Club. Dr. Michelle Gamble, Board Certi ed Physician in Holistic Medicine will present a fresh approach to dealing with ADHD. Program begins at 6:30 p.m. Free and open to the public. Wednesday, May 22 CAPITAL REGION TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AGENCY (CRTPA) is hosting a public meeting to present the draft scal year 2014-2018 transportation improvement program. The meeting will take place in the Commissioners Chambers at 6 p.m.Upcoming EventsSaturday, May 25 REBEKAH AMAN will join S outhbound Band and the River Town Girls at 7 p.m. in the historic SHS Auditorium for a Sopchoppy Opry Special Memorial Day Tribute show. Rebekah will perform several patriotic songs in a show dedicated to those who have served our country. Call 962-3711 for tickets. For more information, go to www.sopchoppyopry.com. Tuesday, June 4 WAKULLA DEMOCRATS will hold a bay side political cocktail hour at Poseys Dockside Cafe for area Democrats. The event will feature a buffet of heavy hors doerves, cash bar and will feature State Senator Bill Montford as well as additional special guests TBA. Tickets are $25 per person. Visit wakullademocrats.org for more information. May 16May 23Be sure to take advantage of free sports physicals happening Saturday, May 18. FILE PHOTO

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 3B The Wakulla NewsMy Red Clay Footprints have been scattered all over the creation, and this time I want to relate something that may be of interest to our readers about an adventure of mine on the small U.S. Possession of Guam. I will take you all clear around to the other side of the world to Guam in the Western Pacific ocean. In 2003, I had come out of retirement as a Special Agent, Naval Criminal Investigative Service (NCIS) to augment that service following the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. In that regard, in 2003, I was sent to Guam to assist the NCIS Resident Agency located there. Some of you, no doubt, who are veterans, are aware that there is a U.S. Naval Base at Andersen Air Force Base on Guam. Before I left for Guam, I did a little bit of research on the island since I had never been there before. I learned that Guam had been attacked and seized by Japanese forces on Dec. 8, 1941, and that a Navy Radioman First Class (E-6), and ve other sailors had decided to ee into the surrounding jungle rather than become Japanese prisoners of war. The radioman was George Ray Tweed, and of the sailors who took to the jungle, all but Tweed were captured and beheaded by the Japanese. With the help of the locals and a remote cave, Tweed was able to evade capture until July 10, 1944, when he was rescued by a U.S. Navy destroyer. The ship was part of advance U.S. forces offshore prior to the liberation of Guam from the Japanese. From his hideout on a cliff overlooking the ocean, Tweed, who was pro cient in Morse code, signaled the ship by ashing light and they sent in a motor whale boat during the night to rescue him. This intrigued me, and fortunately, soon after my arrival on the island, I found Tweeds book, Robinson Crusoe USN, at a bookstore. As I read the book, I was very pleased to nd in it a rough map of the general location of his cave, drawn by Tweed. I was determined to nd that cave. From studying the map, I was able to gure out that the cave was high up on a cliff overlooking the ocean, and that it was on land currently occupied by the Naval Computer and Transmitter Site, and NASA has satellite tracking facilities nearby. As I was on the verge of my 61st birthday, I was a little reluctant to enter the remote jungle terrain alone, so I mentioned my plan to another NCIS agent. He said he might be able to go with me, but as it turned out, it was Easter Sunday and the agent went to church. I was anxious to get underway early to beat as much of the hot, tropical heat as I could. I did not want to wait and so set out on my own. I left at 10 a.m., later than I had planned, and picked up a pair of cotton garden gloves and some Off mosquito spray at the local K-Mart. I wore a web belt with a machete and a one quart canteen lled with water. I was wearing a knit short sleeved shirt, denim trousers, and rubber walking shoes, and had a small rst aid kit in my pocket. I left my cell phone behind as I gured it wouldnt work in that remote area. I arrived at the Navy Transmitter Site at noon, and checked in with the sailor on watch at the quarterdeck. I told him of my intentions and he told me in so many words that he didnt think it was a good idea as the cave was in a very remote and isolated area, up high on a cliff. He did say it wasnt that dif cult to climb to, but he didnt think going alone was a good idea. I told him I was in good health and gured I could do it with no problem. The sailor then told me hed make a deal with me. I am on watch until 1800 (6 p.m.), you check back in with me when you come out, and if you dont, Im going to send someone in to look for you. I liked that idea, and told him he had himself a deal. Off I went. In the interest of saving time and words, I will not go into all the details of my expedition, suf ce it to say that I was lucky to come out alive. It was a long and dif cult walk through the jungle in sti ing heat, I was immediately perspiring heavily, and although I tried to ration my water intake, that little quart canteen was empty before I reached the base of the cliff. By the time I got up near Tweeds cave, I was severely dehydrated and dizzy. I had my camera with me, but by that time my thoughts were on how I was going to get out of there and I never took a single picture of the cave. I did take a few pictures on the way, and will try to nd one to include with this article. I struggled through the jungle on my way out and when I found the trail leading out, I was so tired I just laid down on it and rested. The return trip was up the very steep trail, and I could not go far without getting faint. My clothes were soaking wet with sweat, and I only made it out by going short distances at a time, always laying down in shady spots on the trail to catch my breath and build up my stamina. I kept thinking about how if I passed out, the rescuers could nd me on the trail. Somehow, I finally made it out to my car. I got in and turned the air conditioner wide open on my face. When I got back to the quarterdeck at about 5 p.m. to check out, as I staggered in, the sailor was shaking his head, and said, I told you so. I could barely speak but asked for water and he directed me to the water fountain. I got back to my room and took a very good cold shower best shower I ever took! I certainly had a very good understanding as to why the Japanese never were able to nd Tweed and his remote cave! Also, if you are interested in such things, I will highly recommend that you go to amazon. com or other web site and get yourself a copy of Tweeds book, Robinson Crusoe USN. I went to church that Easter evening and thanked the Almighty for letting me get to Tweeds Cave and bringing me out safely. The congregation sang The Old Rugged Cross, and I was so thankful to be alive! Red Clay Footprints By John RobertsEaster 2003 Expedition to Tweeds Cave, Guam JOHN ROBERTS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe coastline viewed from the vicinity of Tweeds Cave in Guam. History mysteryDo you know this lady or the baby? Call Betty Green at 926-2405 or email at bgreen@nettally.com.WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETYSpecial to The NewsMonticello native Rebekah Aman will join Southbound Band and the River Town Girls on Saturday, May 25 at 7 p.m. in the historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium for a Sopchoppy Opry Special Memorial Day Tribute show! Rebekah will perform several patriotic songs in a show dedicated to those who have served our country. Call 962-3711 for tickets. For more information, go to www.sopchoppyopry.com. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRebekah Aman to perform at Sopchoppy OprySinger Rebekah Aman.Special to The NewsDoes your son, daughter, granddaughter, or grandson like to draw or paint on every surface including your walls? Children ages 5-12 are invited to the Gadsden Arts Centers World of Art summer art camp, where sometimes they can even draw on the walls. Experienced teachers and artists will help children learn to express their unique creativity through painting, drawing, sculpture, and collage while learning about art of famous artists around the world and world cultures. Campers will build their own leaning tower of Pisa, reenact ancient Greek plays with homemade puppets, design a Chinese paper lantern and learn its history, paint melting clocks in the style of Spanish artist Salvador Dali, and create an inspiring Claude Monet landscape. Camps run from June 3 through July 12, with week one scheduled to complement VBS at First Presbyterian Church. Tuition for each week is $65, with $35 deposits due at registration. For older students, ages 13-17, Gadsden Arts offers teen aide positions, an excellent opportunity for students to earn Bright Futures community service hours. Full day camps are also available by also enrolling in camp at the Legacy School for Performing Arts (850-662-1811) or the Quincy Music Theater (850-875-9444). Call 627-5023 to ask about tuition scholarships. For more information, contact Anissa at (850) 627-5023 or email anissa.ford@gadsdenarts.org, or visit www.gadsdenarts.org/gacnew/ learn/summerartcamp.aspx. The Gadsden Arts Center is located on Quincys historic Courthouse Square at 13 N. Madison St. Hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $1. The Tomato Caf is open Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.to 4 p.m. For tours and information, call (850) 875-4866 or email www. gadsdenarts.org.Gadsden Arts o ers World of Art summer art camps SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA group of recent campers at Gadsden Arts.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, May 10 The party circuit has slowed, there are fewer lights burning into the night at the Capitol and the traf c is (a little bit) better. And with the Legislature heading out of town after the two-month sessions largely successful conclusion, news in Tallahassee has slowed to a trickle. Not that theres nothing going on in the world of politics and government. The Florida Supreme Court heard the latest legal spat growing out of the Fair Districts amendments. In the farthest northwestern corner of the state a few hours drive from the Capitol candidates in the House District 2 special election are vying for the seat held by the late Rep. Clay Ford, who died in March. And a former governor continues to make noises that lead many to speculate that he will run for his old job with a different label and a different outlook. But things have quieted down for the time being. And aside from the scribes of the Tallahassee press corps, there arent too many complaints about that. THE COURTS KEEP HOPPING It was a busy week for the courts, starting Monday with a ruling by an administrative law judge that horse barrel racing shouldnt have been approved by a state agency for wagering in Florida. The issue stems from a decision by the Department of Business and Professional Regulation, Division of Pari-Mutuel Wagering, to approve a license in October 2011 for Gretna Racing, in Gadsden County, to run the contests. But Division of Administrative Hearings Judge John Van Laningham said that because the Legislature has not approved barrel racing as a form of pari-mutuel horse racing, the license violated state law. The Divisions issuance of an operating license to Gretna Racing unmistakably implemented and unambiguously communicated a significant new policy, which is that (barrel match racing) is a licensable pari-mutuel wagering activity, Division of Administrative Hearings Judge John Van Laningham wrote in an order signed Monday. Wesley Cox, chairman of the North Florida Horsemens Association, which races horses at Gretna, said that only technical changes will be needed to acquire future licenses. Meanwhile, a threejudge federal panel said Florida cant have its own rules restricting business with Cuba. That ruling upheld a preliminary injunction barring the state from enforcing additional restrictions approved in 2012 on business with Cuba. Writing for the threejudge panel of the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Judge Stanley Marcus said the state had overstepped its authority. The Florida legislation con icts with U.S. law, which Marcus said is already sending a message to Cuba. When the State of Florida promulgated the Cuba Amendment, it plainly was not operating in an area where the federal government has been asleep at the switch, Marcus wrote. The Florida Supreme Court heard oral arguments on two cases including one on whether lawmakers can face another lawsuit over the state Senate districts drawn in 2012, and one on an infamous murder. The rst case involved the Fair Districts amendments aimed at stopping political gerrymandering. The Supreme Court upheld a second draft of the Senate map in 2012, but a coalition of citizens and voting-rights groups want to gather more evidence and sue again. Lawmakers and some justices are worried that allowing that will drag out the process of settling maps with repeated lawsuits. This just never ends, said Chief Justice Ricky Polston, who could just as easily be speaking about what the battle over the states political boundaries. Meanwhile, nearly nine years after the grisly discovery of six bodies in a central Florida home, an attorney for one of the convicted murderers told the court that a mistrial should have been sought in the case. Christopher Anderson, an appellate attorney for Death Row inmate Troy Victorino, told the Florida Supreme Court that another defendant in what became known as the Xbox murders refused to be cross-examined while testifying during the trial. But justices seemed skeptical. Justice Peggy Quince scoffed at the suggestion that Victorino might have only gone to the Deltona home with the intent to rough people up and get belongings he thought were there. So he went in to rough up people with a baseball bat? she asked. SPEAKING OF HORSE RACES Perhaps no Florida politician has evolved over the last few years as much as former Gov. Charlie Crist, a Republican turned independent turned Democrat. And Crist, now a potential candidate for his old job in 2014, appears to be following President Barack Obamas famous evolution on gay marriage. In a message posted on his Facebook page, Crist described as great news a decision by Delaware of cials to become the 11th state to allow same-sex marriage. I most certainly support marriage equality in Florida and look forward to the day it happens here, Crist said in the message, initially reported by the political site SaintPetersblog. Crist, of course, had already signed a petition supporting a 2008 ballot initiative that put a ban on same-sex marriage in the state Constitution. Meanwhile, the man Crist might try to bookend, Gov. Rick Scott, was busy touting the decision by the Hertz Corporation to relocate from Park Ridge, N.J., to Estero in Lee County. State, local and utility performancebased incentives start around $19 million for the project, but could hit $84 million in all. Every project like this weve got to get a return on investment, its no different than a return for shareholders, Ive got to get a return for the taxpayers, Scott said on CNBCs Squawk Box. The bene t for Florida? A $60 million headquarters, 700 high-paying jobs and a boost to Scotts drive to beat Texas as the most business-friendly state in the nation. The Hertz package includes: $3.4 million a year, for up to 20 years, through the Capital Investment Tax Credit. $945,000, Quick Response Training program, reimbursement for training costs. $7 million, Quick Action Closing fund, paid out based on specific performance-based criteria. $3 million, Quali ed Target Industry Tax Refund, once the company meets job and salary criteria. $4.6 million, Lee County incentives. Enterprise Florida estimates the local incentives could top $5 million. $125,000 a year, for four years, through an economic development rate reduction from Florida Power & Light Co. A slightly more overtly political question for Scott is who will serve as lieutenant governor after Jennifer Carroll resigned earlier this year. Scott said he would consider the question after the session, and he told WFLA in an interview broadcast Friday that he still hasnt made up his mind. And he said creating one new job wasnt all he w as considering. Im going to find somebody that can do a great job and help make sure that were the number one state for job creation and the number one state to get an education, Scott said. ALL HE EVER GETS IS BILLS Scott was also beginning to consider a slate of bills that the Legislature began sending him, including the $74.5 billion budget (SB 1500), elections bill (HB 7013) and a manufacturing tax cut measure that was one of Scotts top priorities (HB 7007). Scott has tipped his hands on very few bills this year, but hes almost certain to sign the elections and tax-cut bill. The question is what he might ax from the budget using his lineitem veto pen. But he could target a 3 percent boost in tuition at the states colleges and universities. Tuition in our state has gone up close to 70 percent over the last ve years, Scott told WFLA. Im very concerned about tuition increases. STORY OF THE WEEK: Rental car company Hertz announces it will move its headquarters to Florida. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: I hope everybody rents more Hertz cars so we can add more jobs in Florida.--Gov. Rick Scott, on the rental giant moving its headquarters to the stateWEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Courts get busy as lawmakers leaveBy DAVID WHITE Is a bottle of wine ever really worth $100? This is a question Im regularly asked by friends who arent obsessed with wine. My answer is always the same. Of course, I begin. For starters, theres supply and demand bottles sell for what the market says theyre worth. But to your real question, I continue, no one is dropping that sort of money simply because a wine tastes so good. On those special occasions when you splurge whether for a $25 bottle, a $50 bottle, or even something that costs $100 or more youre hoping for something beyond deliciousness. Youre hoping for a wine that makes you think. Regardless of a wines price tag, this answer helps explain how wine enthusiasts approach wine. Those of us who obsess over what we drink arent just looking for something tasty; were looking for an experience. Whether a bottle costs $15 or $150, were hoping for something great. And a great wine makes you think. This concept was made clearer last month while listening to Abe Schoener, an iconoclastic California winemaker, deliver a lecture in Washington, DC. Until 1998, Schoener was a professor of ancient Greek philosophy at St. Johns College in Maryland. That year, he headed to the Bay Area for a sabbatical and met John Kongsgaard, a Napa Valley vintner who was quickly gaining a reputation for making interesting wines. Kongsgaards children were interested in St. Johns, so the two men linked up. They quickly hit it off. Even though Schoener didnt plan on staying in Northern California, he soon became Kongsgaards protg. Fast-forward 15 years, and Schoener is still in California. He makes wine as if hes still a philosophy professor, now teaching students about the limits and possibilities of wine. Like a vinous Socrates, Schoener explores wine by constantly questioning established conventions. Unsurprisingly, the results bottled as the Scholium Project are extremely unusual. The name is derived from the Greek word for school or scholar, so quite literally, the wines are a scholarly endeavor. Some are hits; some are misses. All make you think. Thanks to the wines and a captivating personality Schoener has developed somewhat of a cult following. So hes touring the country on a sold-out lecture series. In Washington, Schoener asked attendees to ponder several oil paintings from the National Gallery of Art as he discussed precision and transparency in winemaking. That Schoeners lecture would spark a dialogue about the purpose of wine isnt surprising. Nor is such a dialogue unusual. Consider the wisdom of legendary winemaker Jacques Lardire, who recently retired after 42 years with Maison Louis Jadot in Burgundy. When you drink wine, you must realize you are drinking something more than wine, Lardire explained to a recent gathering of oenophiles in New York City. Its a very meditative beverage. That meditative element is what inspires and fascinates wine enthusiasts. Obviously, a delicious wine doesnt have to make you think. Inexpensive New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, Provenal Ros, and reasonably priced Argentine Malbec are just some examples of wines that are typically consumed thoughtlessly. And there are many unappetizing wines that demand contemplation. For my palate, some skin-fermented whites and purposefully oxidized wines fit this bill. So do a few of Abe Schoeners projects. Great wines are both delicious and thought-provoking. That combination is what wine enthusiasts seek, regardless of price. One might compare this pursuit to music. Itd be hard to contend that listening to a song is worth much more than a dollar iTunes highest priced songs are $1.29. But virtually everyone is willing to pay a premium to see his favorite artist perform live. Bruce Springsteens newest album, Wrecking Ball, can be purchased for $13; tickets during his recent tour were priced at $98 each. At Springsteen concerts, attendees undoubtedly get their moneys worth. Next time you pull a cork, think about what youre drinking. Perhaps youll discover a great wine. David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine (PalatePress. com). WHITES WINESThinking while drinking

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 5B Aside Bases Birds Clams Considered Contributions Cries Crowd Dared Death Delivery Drunk Ducks Effect Excuses Fried Given Guard Indeed Large Leader Middling Noted Nouns Of ce Opportunities Peacefully Petals Plait Planets Pressed Programs Recorder Retire Return Ruler Scare Scraps Sharp Spade Spent Spray Stout Touches Vapor Walks Widely The Waku l la News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comSome programs are offered at no cost, some have a fee, and Scholarships are noted where available. HAPPYTIME INSTRUCTIONAL DAYCARE CENTER Offering Full or Part Time Childcare year around AND before and After School Programs SUMMER CHILDCARE Includes a wide variety of eld trips and adventures for you children. We enjoy skating, museums, movies, bowling and so much more. Locally owned and operated by Linda and Chuck Wicker since 1983. Monthly, Weekly and Daily rates available Call to for our very affordable pricing 926-5226, Crawfordville Highway North. Registration for the Wakulla County Public Library FUN DAYS Reading Programs offered throughout the summer are Thursday, June 6 6-8 p.m. and Friday, June 7 10a.m. to 2 p.m. Ages Pre-K to Middle School. Book Babies, Book Bunch, Book Nook, Book Blast and more. Wakulla County Public Library Scott Joyner, Library Director 850-926-7415 See Monthly schedule below for other Library happenings for all ages Cinematics, Summer Performers, Magic Workshop for teens, Storytellin, Make Believe Theater, Talent Show. Teen Film Festivals and so much more. BEFORE AND AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM ACTIVITIES: Arts, crafts, eld trips, Gulf World, swimming, movies, bowling, skating, and so much more! AGES: Pre-K 5th grade June 3 August 9 Monday Friday 6:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Children meet at The Wakulla Senior Citizens Center Contact: Debbie 926-7145 $125/week or $25/day plus activity fees. Drop ins welcome! SWIMMING LESSONS Gena Davis, Instructor Red Cross Certi ed Day or evening classes. Two week sessions Beginning the end of May offering sessions throughout the summer. Private pool $50. per person All ages. 926-7685 or 510-2326 CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Overnight Summer Camps June 9 August 15 Ages: 7-16 $500. per week Location: Camp Indian Springs 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Contact: Derek Hart 850-926-3361 Info@Campindiansprings.com SCOUTING Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Venturing Ages 1st grade to age 20 to Learn more about scouting for our area Contact: Marcus Floyd cubmaster@wpack5.com or David Damon, BSA Unit Commissioner 850-251-4166 GAMERZ PARADISE SUMMER CAMP Video Games, Pool Tournaments, Ping Pong Tournaments, Foosball and more. All in an air conditioned and supervised environment. Kinect, X-Box Live, PS3, Wii and WiFamily owned and operated 850-926-9100 INTERNATIONAL GOLD GYMNASTICS IGG A funlled themed week full of gymnastics, eld trips, crafts, movies, games, indoor and outdoor play. Lunch to be brought from home. Snacks are provided. Age: 5 12 Hours : 7am-6pm, Carol McAliley or Stephanie Burton at 926-4431 Email: go-iggc@hotmail.com, 54 Feli Way, Crawfordville Weekly rates: full day campers $145; half day campers $75; drop in campers $35/day, 10% discount for second child. The LEAERNING CURVE TUTORING SUMMER CLASSES Call us for Enrichment & Test Prep Ages: Kindergarten through College. Classes offered all summer Reading, Math, ACT & SAT Prep EOC Remediation and So Much More! Location: North Pointe Center, Crawfordville Call Melisa Taylor to Register 850-926-2179 or visit www.tlctutoring.wordpress.com for summer pricing and schedule WERE ALL SO PRECIOUS SUMMER CAMP! Field trips to: Wakulla Springs, Fun Station, the St. Marks Lighthouse, Jr. Museum and more. Bkf., Lunch & Snack Included Monday Friday 6:15 a.m. to 6:15 p.m. Family Owned and Operated 22 Feli Way Contact: Mindy Zinser FREE SUMMER CAMP SHERIFFS YOUTH RANCH If you love being outside, meeting new friends, eating good food. participating in awesome activities, and learning how to become a better leader, CARUTH CAMP is for you!!! Includes Arts and Crafts, Challenges, Swimming, Sports, Canoeing, Nature Hikes, Camp res, Skits and Songs, Environmental education, High Ropes Course, Games and Archery. Contact: Lt. Bruce Ashley 850-745-7162SUMMER OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUTH Its time to relax and have some needed downtime. The Wakulla County Coalition for Youth is proud to sponsor this Summer OPPS section. Recognizing that young people seek to nd their place in the wider world through many ways and means, the community hopes the following Summer OPPS hit the intended mark with many Wakulla youth. Positive youth development refers to activities and programs that nurture young people and help them build on their strengths. Positive youth development is not about xing kids problems. Rather, it helps young people nd positive things to say yes to. Positive youth development happens anytime an individual or a program teaches young people skills, connects adults and young people in a meaningful way, involves young people in the life of the community, and gives them a sense of belonging and accomplishment. In Wakulla there are many places that young people can nd this kind of nurturing. Wakulla has its own unique network of people, groups, churches, clubs, teachers, businesses, and agencies that help young people grow into competent adults. The nurturers might be piano teachers, soccer coaches, neighbors, Big Brother and Sisters, YMCA, church youth group leaders or grandparents this secion of the paper is intended to help you decide how to spend a bit of your time this summer.All Summer LongJune 3 June 7 CHEYENNE COUNTRY Camp Cheyenne CountryHORSEBACK RIDING summer camp for children ages 7-14. They will learn and improve riding skills, grooming techniques, safety and more. They also get hands on activities and live demonstrations! Dates and Times: All camps are a week long from 9 am to 5 pm. More dates may be added. Cost: $300 per camper /wk Ages: 7-14 Location: 151 Triplett Rd., Crawfordville Contact: Stephanie Hattaway 850-509-9149 June 6 & June 7 Wakulla County Public Library FUN DAYS REGISTRATION for Reading camps Thursday 6/6 at 6:00-8:00, Friday 6/7 10:00-2:00 Starting Tuesday 6/11 (each Tuesday except 7/2) Book Bunch (preschool) 10:30-11:30 Book Blast (K-2) 10:30-11:30 Starting Wednesday 6/12 (each Wed. except 7/3) Book Babies (0-3 yrs) 10:30-11:30 Book Nook (3rd-5th grades) 10:30-11:30 Cinemanics (Middle School) 12:00-1:30 Contact: Scott Joyner Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415 Beginning June 9 August 15 CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Overnight Summer Camp Ages 7-16 $500. week Location: Camp Indian Springs 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, Fl. 32327 Contact Derek Hart 850-926-3361 info@campindiansprings.com June 10 -14 Wakulla County 4-H CAMP CHERRY LAKE Traditional rustic cabin camping experience at 4-H Camp Cherry Lake in Madison Florida 4-H Its Out of this World Leave Monday 8 a.m. and return Friday 12 p.m. noon Ages: 8-13 Cost $230. Partial Scholarships available Location: 4-H Camp Cherry Lake, Madison, Florida Contact: Sherri Kraeft 850-926-3931 sjkraeft@u .edu SUMMER PERFORMERS June 13 Wakulla County Public Libray Tutuola Dance Company 7:00 Contact: Scott Joyner Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415 June 17th-21st CHEYENNE COUNTRY Camp Cheyenne CountryHORSEBACK RIDING summer camp for children ages 7-14. They will learn and improve riding skills, grooming techniques, safety and more. They also get hands on activities and live demonstrations! Dates and Times: All camps are a week long from 9 am to 5 pm. More dates may be added. Cost: $300 per camper /wk Ages: 7-14 Location: 151 Triplett Rd., Crawfordville Contact: Stephanie Hattaway 850-509-9149 JUNE 18 SAVARY ACADEMY SUMMER CLASSES Need to make up a class, recover credits, or make up the algebra EOC? Algebra Boot camp Date: TBA Do not need to be enrolled at Savary during regular school year to take advantage of summer program. Classes are Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Grades: 7 12 Contact: Donna Savary 850-926-9977 Location: 70-A Feli Way, Crawfordville www.savaryacademy.com JUNE 19 SUMMER PERFORMERS Wakulla County Public Library Atlantic Coast Theatre for Youth Presents Sherlock Holmes and the Opera Mystery 7:00 Contact: Scott Joyner Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415 June 24 27 Wakulla County 4-H BEEZ ARE THE BUZZ The focus is on Honeybees, honey production and pollination in our area. Cost is $90. Partial scholarships are available Wakulla County Extension Of ce Contact: Sheri Kraeft 850-926-3931 sjkraeft@u .edu June 27 Wakulla County Public Library Bits & Pieces PUPPET THEATRES The Sel sh Giant 7:00 Contact: Scott Joyner Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415JuneMay 11 SCOUTING Ages 1st grade to age 20 Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, Venturing Learn What it Takes to be a Scout 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hudson Park, Crawfordville Entertainment, local scouting groups, hands on crafts, food, vendors, silent auction, cake walk. Learn more about scouting for our area Contact: Marcus Floyd cubmaster@wpack5.com or David Damon, BSA Unit Commissioner 850-251-4166 May 18Wakulla Health Care Task Force FREE SPORTS & CAMP PHYSICALS Physical exams for students to participate in FHSAA Sports Also exams for Campers, Scouts, NJROTC, and Special Olympians 9 a.m. 1 p.m. Middle and High School students including rising 6th graders 9 a.m. for WMS Students 10 a.m. for RMS Students 11 a.m. for WHS students Tallahasse Memorial Health Care 15 Council Moore Rd. Contact: Tanya English 850-926-0065 x 253 Tanya.englisdh@wcsb.us or Lynn Artz 850-320-2158 lynn_artz@hotmail.comMay 18 FREE CHILDRENs FISHING TOURNAMENT Wakulla County Sheriffs Department Open Boys and Girls Ages: 3 15 Fish out of Panacea Harbor Marina Fleet boats 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. Weigh in 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Woolley Park, Panacea Lunch provided to participants11 a.m. to 3 p.mGames, rides and exhibits all at Woolley ParkChildren shing from family or friends boats should register at Woolley Park from 10 a.m. to Children may sh at Mashes Sands Pier, Otter Lake, Woolley Park or any other legal shing site. Contact the Wakulla County Sheriffs Department for all tournament guidelines. Wakulla County Sheriffs Department Wakulla County Parks and Recreation 850-926-7227 Contact: Lt. Bruce Ashley 850-745-7162May Wakulla County Coalition for YouthDont let fees stop you. If tuition assistance is needed, call 926 3526 for an application which will be reviewed by a select few Coalition leaders to determine eligibility.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 7BEach Week from June 9 August 15 CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Overnight Summer Camp Ages 7-16 $500. week Location: Camp Indian Springs 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, Fl. 32327 Contact Derek Hart 850-926-3361 info@campindiansprings.com July 1-5 CHEYENNE COUNTRY Camp Cheyenne Country HORSEBACK RIDING summer camp for children ages 7-14. They will learn and improve riding skills, grooming techniques, safety and more. They also get hands on activities and live demonstrations! Dates and Times: All camps are a week long from 9 am to 5 pm. More dates may be added. Cost: $300 per camper /wk Ages: 7-14 Location: 151 Triplett Rd., Crawfordville Contact: Stephanie Hattaway 850-509-9149 July 7-10 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs & Iris Garden Club of Wakulla SEEK CONFERENCE Environmental conference for teens from across Florida, includes eld trips and outdoor fun in groups. Cost is $225. Ages of entering grades 10-12 Full Scholarships available Location: Wakulla Spring State Park & Lodge Contact Dorothy Pate, pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 850-320-2158, Lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 11 Wakulla County Public Library Tommy Johns Underground MAJIC WORKSHOP (for teens) 4:30-5:30 followed by Dig a Little Deeper Magic Show for everyone at 7:00 July 18 Mama Kokus Storytellin 7:00 Contact: Scott Joyner Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415 July 15-18 Wakulla County 4-H SO FUN TO SEW Basic sewing skills including fun projects for clothing and home items. 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Ages: 10-18 Fee: $60. Partial Scholarships available Location: Wakulla County Extension Of ce Contact: Sherri Kraeft 850-926-3931 sjkraeft@u .edu July 21 -24 Florida Federation of Garden Clubs & Iris Garden Club of Wakulla SEEK CONFERENCE Environmental conference for teens from across Florida, includes eld trips and outdoor fun in groups. Cost is $225. Ages of entering grades 10-12 Full Scholarships available Location: Wakulla Spring State Park & Lodge Contact Dorothy Pate, pate26888@embarqmail.com or Lynn Artz 850-320-2158, Lynn_artz@hotmail.com July 22 25 Wakulla County 4-H ADVANCE QUILTING Learning all about the art and science of quilting and fabric arts. Must pass a basic sewing skills competency exercise to participate 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m. Age: 10-18 $60. Partial Scholarships available Location: Wakulla County Extension Of ce Contact: Sherri Kraeft 850-926-3931 sjkraeft@u .edu July 25 Wakulla County Public Library Sean Driscolls Storyships Diggery Diggers ROCK AND ROAR DINO SHOW. 7:00 p.m. Contact: Scott Joyner, Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415JulyAugust 1 Wakulla County Public Library Katie Adams MAKE BELIEVE THEATER Pirate Tales 7:00 Contact: Scott Joyner, Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415 August 8 2nd Annual WCPL Childrens TALENT SHOW 7: p.m. Contact: Scott Joyner, Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415 August 5th-9th CHEYENNE COUNTRY Camp Cheyenne Country HORSEBACK RIDING summer camp for children ages 7-14. They will learn and improve riding skills, grooming techniques, safety and more. They also get hands on activities and live demonstrations! Dates and Times: All camps are a week long from 9 am to 5 pm. More dates may be added. Cost: $300 per camper /wk Ages: 7-14 Location: 151 Triplett Rd., Crawfordville Contact: Stephanie Hattaway 850-509-9149 August 9 1st Annual TEEN FILM FESTIVAL 7: p.m. Contact: Scott Joyner, Library Director Location: Wakulla County Public Library 850-926-7415 June 9 August 15 CAMP INDIAN SPRINGS Traditional Overnight Summer Camp Ages 7-16 $500. week Location: Camp Indian Springs 2387 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, Fl. 32327 Contact Derek Hart 850-926-3361 info@campindiansprings.comAugustJune 11,12,13 June 18,19,20 June 25,26,27 July 9,10,11 12-4pm ARTFUL TRUTH Wakulla County Health Department Wakulla County Students Working Against Tobacco Art education/ raising students awareness of visual media. Participants will create an art project that will be on display in the community No Cost Ages: Entering 6th Grade Fall of 2013 Location: Wakulla County Public Library Contact: Molly Clore 926-0400 x 207 Molly_clore@doh.state. .us JUNE 3 8 OR JUNE 10-15 LEARN TO BUILD YOUR OWN BOAT BOAT BUILDING SUMMER CAMP Offered by Big Bend Maritime Center Two 6 Day Sessions Monday Friday 8 a.m. to 5p.m. Saturday morning Launch with parents and choose who takes home the boat $125.00 /week per student Offered to Girls and Boys Ages: 1216 Work in Small Crews Bring your own Lunch and Snacks Water and Gatorade provided Location: Woolley Park Contact: Roger Pinholster 850-728-2121 rpinholster@gmail.com OFFERED: ALL SUMMER VICTORY WAKEBOARDING INSTRUCTION MAKE YOUR SUMMER AWESOME WakeBoarding WakeSkating WakeSur ng Skiing Tubing Birthday Parties Ages: All Ages Location: 4 Gretchen Lane, Sopchoppy Contact: Brian Blackwell 615-970-0137 info@Victorywakeboard.comDONT MISS OUT ON THESE ADDITIONAL LISTINGS OF CAMPS AND PROGRAMSSpecial to The NewsA roaring camp re is often a staple of the camping experience. A campfire to cook food or keep warm is an asset at any campground, and in the evening hours, a re can provide a sense of security against inquisitive forest animals. A burning re can also illuminate a campsite, which makes maneuvering around the site easier. Although there are many bene ts to having a camp re, its important to note that res, especially in very dry conditions, can be dangerous. It is essential to check a particular campsite or parks posting about drought conditions to avoid an accident. In the wrong conditions, a cozy re for toasting marshmallows can grow into an out-of-control wild re in a matter of seconds. STARTING A FIRE When you are ready to start a re it is important to keep safety in mind. Pick a safe spot to light the re. Many camp- res have re rings for campers to use. If you are selecting a re location on your own, choose an area away from brush or other easily ignitable material. Make a ring with large rocks to keep the re from spreading. Keep the re several feet away from your tent. Gather materials during the day so you will not be scrambling for them after dark. You will need both tinder and kindling to light a re and keep it roaring. Tinder is any small, highly ammable material that can light and burn quickly. Fibrous plant material, small twigs and newspaper make good tinder. Kindling is small pieces of wood that will burn long enough to catch larger logs of wood on re. Finally, you will need a few logs of thicker wood that will sustain the re. Have plenty of material on hand to be able to continue the re, or you may nd yourself foraging in the darkness when the re goes out. Create a teepee or X pattern for a well-burning re. Layer your tinder as the rst level of the re. Stack a few pieces of kindling on top of the tinder in an X or teepee shape. Ensure there is enough air to move freely through the re to make ignition easier. Light the tinder from four compass points to get it all to light. Slowly blow air into the re to allow it to burn hot enough to catch the kindling. Continue to add small pieces of kindling until you have a nicely sized fire. Then you can add larger pieces of dry wood for a big blaze. Do not use accelerants when starting a re or keeping it going. Avoid the use of chemicals, including lighter fluid and other accelerants in your camp re. Do not use chemically treated paper or plastic materials in kindling, as they can produce noxious fumes and smoke. Accelerants can cause the fire to burn out of control. Keep the re contained to what you can manage, and always keep a watchful eye on the re. MAINTAINING THE FIRE You may need to ddle with the re from time to time to v ent it and allow for equal burning. Having an ample amount of wood on hand will enable you to feed the re easily. Its much easier to keep a fire going than start from scratch once it has burned out, especially in the dark. Be mindful of embers that drift in windy conditions. Also, do not put your face or body directly over a re. If the wood pops, you could be burned. Children should be carefully supervised when around a camp re. EXTINGUISHING THE FIRE After building your camp re, completely put it out when you are done. Thousands of acres of wilderness are burnt from carelessness with regard to camp res. Put out the fire a half hour to an hour before you plan to leave the campground. There should be mostly ash and few chunks of coal left if you have planned accordingly and started to wind down the re before extinguishing it. Use a stick to stir up the wood and ash and distribute the burning coals and embers. This is to extinguish any remaining flames as much as you can. Pour water over the hot ashes to drown all embers. Its not just the red embers you have to worry about. Pour water until all the hissing sounds stop. Avoid standing directly above the re when you pour the water because it will generate a lot of steam and smoke. If you do not have water on hand, mix dirt or sand with the embers to smother the ames. Continue to do so until the material is cool. Stir the ashes again with a shovel or stick to further ensure the re is not still burning. Make sure everything is wet and cold to the touch before you leave the campsite. If the re area is too hot to the touch, its too hot to leave it because a re may reignite. Once you feel that everything is cool, you can scoop the coals and ash into a bag and carry it out of the woods for disposal. Knowing how to safely light, maintain and extinguish a re is an essential component of safe camping.How to safely light and extinguish a camp re PHOTO BY METROGRAPHICS

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com py Todays New Ads 15 YR. OLD REGISTERED QUARTERHORSE GELDING, 15-2 hands $500. 11 YR. OLD SML PONY w/saddle & bridle $250. Western Roping Saddle, pd $750. w/sell for $450. 850-926-2807 DENTISTPart Time Dentist Needed!! Mid America Health is seeking a Dentist to work 1 day per month at the Wakulla County jail. This position offers competitive compensation, is a low stress alternative to private practice and malpractice is provided. Duties include screenings, exams and extractions. Apply today at www.mahweb.com!! FT DRIVERFerrellgas is looking for a full time driver in Carrabelle. Requirements: ability to lift 75 lbs, HS Diploma, 1 yr driving exp, Class Aor B CDLw/ hazmat/tanker, clean driving record. Apply online at ferrellgas.com/Careers EOE/AAP/M/F/D/V Todays New Ads Seth Scotts Heating & Air State Lic.Contractor #CAC1817434 Honest & Dependable Service, Installation, Repair & Maintenance: Residential & Commercial 12 years experience 850-509-2405 Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com AIRLINE CAREERS -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES AREHIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Driver -One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE FT DRIVERFerrellgas is looking for a full time driver in Carrabelle. Requirements: ability to lift 75 lbs, HS Diploma, 1 yr driving exp, Class Aor B CDLw/ hazmat/tanker, clean driving record. Apply online at ferrellgas.com/Careers EOE/AAP/M/F/D/V PIANISTCrawfordville United Methodist Church is looking for a pianist. Pianist will accompany the choir and congregational singing and play service music such as prelude, offertory, and postlude. They will also play for weekly choir rehearsal, Sunday pre-service warm up, Sunday service and other special services as needed. Applicant should be able to play hymns in the UMC hymnal, accompany traditional and contemporary choral works and SATB parts at weekly rehearsal. For more information please contact the church office at 850-926-7209. DENTISTPart Time Dentist Needed!! Mid America Health is seeking a Dentist to work 1 day per month at the Wakulla County jail. This position offers competitive compensation, is a low stress alternative to private practice and malpractice is provided. Duties include screenings, exams and extractions. Apply today at www.mahweb.com!! Attend College Online 100%. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, *Web. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid for qualified students. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www.Centura Online.com MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDEDTrain to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HSDiploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 CRAWFORDVILLESat. 18th, 8a-2p Too Many Items to Mention 44 Windy Court FRENCH BULLDOG Pups,11weeks,2Males,house broken,shots,$800each adriansmith17@aim.com 352-795-5310 Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effective against hook & roundworms by US Center for Veterinary Medicine.PET STOP(850) 926-7949 www .happy jackinc.com 15 YR. OLD REGISTERED QUARTERHORSE GELDING, 15-2 hands $500. 11 YR. OLD SML PONY w/saddle & bridle $250. Western Roping Saddle, pd $750. w/sell for $450. 850-926-2807 CRAWFORDVILLEFor Rent or Lease Purchase 3 BR 2 BATH, DWMH with CHA Near Lake Ellen Boat ramp. Great Condition. $695 + deposit, application, references. Call 850-524-4090 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $475/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 CrawfordvilleFurnished Cottage 2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/DR area. CHA & W/D. No pets/ smoking. $670/mo. + $670 sec dep (850) 926-2293 PANACEA SUMMER TRACE APARTMENTS 45 Otter Lake Rd 1 Bedroom UnitsNow Available with rental assistance if qualifyCall (850) 984-4811TDD 1-800-955-8771This institution is an Equal Opportunity Pr ovider and Em ployer Equal Housing Opportunity. CRAWFORDVILLE3BR, 1BA, Wakulla Station Savannah Rd. New Appliances, no smoking, no pets, 1st, Last and dep. due at lease signing References Checked Call (850)408-1235 or (850) 510-1144 PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Renovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, screened front porch & open back deck, Small pets considered Excellent fishing! $600/month 850-926-4217 CRAWFORDVILLE3804 Bloxham Cutoff 3BR/2BA, Inground pool 5 miles from Wakulla Springs and elementary School (850) 510-7008 Crawfordville3BR/2BA w/2 car garage. 1.25 acres, paved, sub-division in Wakulla Station, 20-mins. to Tallahassee, fenced backyard, $875/mo. plus security/cleaning deposit. Avail. May 1st Please Call (850) 566-5165 (850) 926-6115 LAND AUCTION Greenbrier County, WV. 1,894+/-acres pasture and timber land offered in 24 tracts. Barns & out buildings for cattle operations. One tract has a beautiful 8 bedroom house with indoor pool. Open and wooded land with magnificent views. Auction Thursday, May 30 in Lewisburg, WV. Woltz & Associates, Inc., Roanoke, VA, Real Estate Brokers & Auctioneers (WV#1000). Go to www.woltz.com or call 800-551-3588 for property and auction details. Seth Scotts Heating & Air State Lic.Contractor #CAC1817434 Honest & Dependable Service, Installation, Repair & Maintenance: Residential & Commercial 12 years experience 850-509-2405 Professional House/ Office Cleaning Reasonable Rates 850-766-5931 5654-0516 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING : EVENT:Regular School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, May 20 2013 TIME: School Board Meeting -5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 May 16, 2013 5655-0516 TWN City of Sopchoppy Public W orkshop Notice for City of Sopchoppy Land Development Code Update The City of Sopchoppy will conduct a public workshop to review and discuss its recently initiated Land Development Code Update project. As part of the update, the City is developing a downtown overlay district and input from local residents, property owners and the general public is needed. The workshop will be held at the City of Sopchoppy City Hall located at 105 Municipal Avenue, Sopchoppy, FL 32358 on May 30, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. The workshop is intended to provide the public with information about the Citys land development code and to obtain comments on how the code can be improved. For more information concerning the workshop contact Ms. Jackie Lawhon, City Clerk at 850-962-4611. A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL/OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION May 16, 2013 5652-0523 TWN vs. Family Tides Case No. 2011-165 CANotice of Foreclosure sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2011-165 CA HANCOCK BANK, Plaintiff, v. FAMILYTIDES INVESTMENTS, LLC, BRADLEYR. WILL, BRIAN K. WILL, DOUGLAS A. WILL, RICHARD GENTRY, and DOUGLAS MARK HOLLEY, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE BYCLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT Notice is hereby given that the undersigned, BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on June 6, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern Time, at 5653-0523 TWN Vs. Ward. Luciana Case No: 2013-CA-000042 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 2013-CA-000042 CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY Plaintiff, vs. LUCIANAB. WARD A/K/ALUCYWARD F/K/ALUCYB. BEAM; TED BEAN; PHILIPWARD; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TED BEAN; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAON BEHALF OF SECRETARYOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; OYSTER BAYESTATES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TED BEAN 56 OYSTER BAYDRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 OR: 197 WOODVILLE HIGHWAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 LASTKNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENTRESIDENCE UNKNOWN And any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the above-named Defendant(s), if deceased or whose last known addresses are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBYNOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: THE LAND DESCRIBED HEREIN IS SITUATED IN THE STATE OF FLORIDA, COUNTY OF WAKULLA, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: LOT THREE (3), BLOCK C OF UNIT I, OYSTER BAYESTATES, AS SHOWN BYPLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 70, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Latasha Moore-Robinson, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 2nd day of May, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 Fax: (954) 974-7487, Email: marym@defaultlink.com May 16 & 23, 2013 5Br 3Ba TWMH $1,000mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $900mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Duplex $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $700mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $675mo + Sec. Dep. RENTALS: Wakulla RealtySpecializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker LOTS OF EVERYTHING!! Appliances, furniture, electronics, tools, housewares, books, clothes, home decor, kitchenware. . and lots more!at the SKYBOX May 18, 8AM-2PM MUST NOT MISS!!LARGE COMMUNITY-WIDE YARD SALE 8AM 2PMNO EARLY BIRDS!BIGMAY 17 & 18ANOTHERYARD SALE Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Darin Ezell Lawn Service 850925-3100Call for FREE Estimate HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f A A A ll ll ll f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L L C C C C C N N N d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured T ree T rimming Stump Grinding Yard Maintenance Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED LAWN CARE Husband & Wife Team Call Dave 850-443-9427Since 1995 Lic & InsAffordable

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 9B the Wakulla County Courthouse, Courthouse Lobby, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes offer for sale, and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder, the following described real property situated in Wakulla County, Florida: Real Property LOT 20, OF FIDDLERS COVE, PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 84, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure in a case pending in said Court. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim with the clerk of the court within 60 days after the sale. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled at no cost to you to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the undersigned attorney at least seven (7) working days or immediately upon receiving this notification.. If you are hearing or voice impaired call 1-800-955-8771. WITNESS my hand and the official seal of this Honorable Court this 17th day of April, 2013. BRENTX. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court [SEALOF THE COURT] By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk May 16 & 23, 2013 5643-0516 TWN vs. Black, Rebecca Case No. 12-335-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 12-335-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, Plaintiff, v. REBECCA G. BLACK, individually; REBECCA GREEN BLACK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE GEORGE THOMAS BLACK REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST dated January 4, 1995; UNKNOWN BENEFICIARIES OF THE GEORGE T. BLACK REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST dated January 4, 1995; ALEX255, L.L.C., a Florida limited liability company; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY-INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; and UNKNOWN TENANT #2, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Final Judgment dated April 18, 2013, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, June 6, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with Florida Statutes .031, the real property located at Highway 98, Carrabelle, Franklin County, Florida 32322, which has the following legal description: The East Fifty (50) Feet of Lot 14, Block C, of Saint James Island Park Unit No. 1, A subdivision as per map or plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 19, of the Public Records of Franklin County, Florida. And the real property located at 145 Dogwood Drive, Crawfordville, WakullaCounty, Florida 32327, which has the following legal description: Commence at the Northeast Corner of the Northwest Quarter of Lot 77of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 77 a distance of 420.50 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING (said point being referenced by an iron pipe offset 13.81 feet southerly on the westerly boundary of herein described). From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 17 degrees 23 minutes 35 seconds East 220.00 feet to an iron pipe, thence North 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds East 100.00 feet to an iron pipe, thence North 17 degrees 23 minutes 35 seconds West 220.00 feet to a point on the Northerly boundary of said Lot 77 (said point being referenced by an iron pipe offset 12.31 feet southerly on the easterly boundary of herein described), thence run South 72 degrees 12 minutes 00 seconds West along the Northerly boundary of said Lot 77 a distance of 100.12 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING, containing 0.505 acres, more or less in the Northwest Quarter of said Lot 77, Hartsfield Survey, and subject to a public road lying along the Northerly boundary. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY (SEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk May 9 & 16, 2013 5644-0516 TWN vs. Southpoint Ind. Case No. 12-100-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO: 12-100-CA CENTENNIAL BANK f/k/a WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, v. SOUTHPOINT INDUSTRIES, INC., a Florida Corporation; REBECCA G. BLACK, Individually; REBECCA GREEN BLACK AS SUCCESSOR TRUSTEE OF THE GEORGE THOMAS BLACK REVOCABLE LIVING TRUST dated January 4, 1995; EMPIRE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, a North Carolina Corporation, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER CHAPTER 45, FLORIDA STATUTES NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT, in accordance with the Final Judgment dated April 18, 2013, in the above-styled case, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 on Thursday, June 13, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., in accordance with Florida Statutes .031, the real property located at 872 Coastal Highway, Panacea, Wakulla County, Florida, 32348 which has the following legal description: Commence at the Northwest corner of Section 36, (also being the Southwest corner of sections 25), Township 5 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and run South 01 degrees 02 minutes 40 seconds West along the Westerly boundary of said Section 36, a distance of 500.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run South 88 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds East 360.33 feet to the Westerly right-of-way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 98, thence run South 17 degrees 22 minutes 59 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 447.74 feet, thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 88 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds West 510.00 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 22 minutes 59 seconds East 447.74 feet, thence run South 88 degrees 57 minutes 20 seconds East 149.67 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 5.03 acres, more or less. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY (seal) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk May 9 & 16, 2013 5647-0523 TWN Vs. Shuler, Sylvia Case No. 13-31-CPNotice to Creditors IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA DIVISION PROBATE CASE NO. 13-31-CA IN RE: ESTATE OFSYLVIA A. SHULER a/k/a SYLVIA SHULER Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of SYLVIA A. SHULER, deceased, whose date of death was March 23, 2013, file number 13-31-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327. The names and addresses of the personal 5648-0523 TWN Vs. Carnivale, Kenneth Case No: 652012CA000350CAXXXX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652012CA000350CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH CARNIVALE A/K/AKENNETH C. CARNIVALE A/K/AKENNYCARNIVALE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH CARNIVALE A/K/AKENNETH C. CARNIVALE A/K/A KENNYCARNIVALE; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; KELLYCARNIVALE A/K/AKELLYM. CARNIVALE, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 30th day of May 2013, at 11am at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 6, Block 5, of WAKULLAGARDENS, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 9th day of April, 2013, AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954) 779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Latasha Moore-Robinson Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 May 16 & 23, 2013 5649-0523 TWN Vs. West, Clinton Case No: 652012CA000349CAXXXX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 652012CA000349CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. CLINTON R. WEST; MICHELLE R. WEST; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANTII; CAMELOTTOWNHOME OWNERSASSOCIATION, INC., and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 30th day of May 2013, at 11am at the Front door of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: LOT 37, OF CAMELOT, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 122, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 9th day of April, 2013, AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc., Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102, Ft Lauderdale, FL33301 DLIPublications@defaultlink.com (954) 779-2766 ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Latasha Moore-Robinson Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 May 16 & 23, 2013 5650-0523 TWN vs. Earnhart, Paul Case No. 2008-CA-000279 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 2008-CA-000279 MERRILLLYNCH CREDITCORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. PAULM. EARNHART, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 11, 2013 and entered in Case No. 2008-CA-000279 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein MERRILLLYNCH CREDITCORPORATION is the Plaintiff and PAULM. EARNHART; FRANCES W. HARLEY; FARMERS AND MERCHANTS BANK; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTY COURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 13th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 18, PANACEASHORES UNIT NO. 2, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 32, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A35 BLUE CRAB LANE, PANACEA, FL32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on March 11, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11018976 CENDANT-CONVcpadilla-Team 4 -F11018976 **See Americans with Disabilities Act 5651-0523 TWN vs. Arnett, Shawnda Case No. 12-203-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-203-CA CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. SHAWNDA ARNETT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SHAWNDA ARNETT; CITIFINANCIAL EQUITY SERVICES, INC.; and LONNIE WILLIAMS Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on January 17, 2013 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on June 6, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, the following described property: All that certain land situate, lying and being in Wakulla County, Florida, described as follows: Commence at the Northeast corner of Lot 101 of the Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida, which point is on the South boundary line of Lot 92 Hartsfield Survey; thence run South 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds West along said South boundary, 1183.28 feet to the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning, run North 17 degrees 45 minutes 29 seconds West, 330.18 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5518; thence South 72 degrees 57 minutes 25 seconds West, 132.47 feet to an iron rod with Cap #5516; thence South 17 degrees 50 minutes 23 seconds East 330.47 feet to a point lying on the aforesaid South boundary of Lot 92; thence run North 72 degrees 30 minutes 00 seconds East, along said South boundary, a distance of 132.00 feet to the Point of Beginning. LESS AND EXCEPT the following: Commence at the Northeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to Lonnie Williams and Mollie Taylor by John E. Beasley and Eva Crosby Beasley, his wife, dated March 21, 1967, and recorded on Page 398 of Official Records Book 15, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida; and thence run Southerly along the Easterly boundary of said tract of land, 89.00 feet; thence run West 100.00 feet to the East side of a road; thence run North along the East side of said graded road, 64.00 feet; thence run Easterly 100.00 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 1/4 of an acre, more or less, in Lot 92 of Hartsfield Survey of lands in Wakulla County, Florida. TOGETHER WITH that certain 2003 Value Made mobile home with Identification/Serial Numbers: CO2840AGA and CO2840AGB. Property Address: 242 Carter Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: April 30, 2013 Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk, Wakulla County Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, as Deputy Clerk May 16 & 23, 2013 Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. May 16 & 23, 2013 F11018976 representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is May 16, 2013. Personal Representative: DONNA SHULER CRONWEL L 2652 Pretty Bayou Island Drive, Panama City, Florida 3240 5 Attorney for Personal Representative: George H. Gwynn, Florida Bar No. 0357537 Williams, Gautier, Gwynn, DeLoach & Sorenson, P.A. 2010 Delta Boulevard, Tallahassee, FL 32303 Telephone: (850) 386-3300 May 16 & 23, 2013 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 26 Beeler3 BR/2BA w/1 car attached garage, fenced back yard. Pets okay w/ prior approval & $250 fee. Available May 1. $900 mo., $900. Security Deposit. 216 Sam Smith 2 BR/1BA Singlewide on 1 Acre. Pets okay with prior approval + $250. fee $650. mo., $650. Security Deposit 29C Old Courthouse 2BR/2.5 BA, 2 masters upstairs. $700 mo., $700 security deposit. No smoking, pets okay with $250 fee. Call Becky Today850-294-8653becky@bluewaterrealtygroup.com beckybwr@comcast.netRealtorI grew up in Tallahassee and 20 years ago chose to move to Crawfordville to raise our family. Ive worked in Wakulla County for the past 20 years handling mortgage loans, and managing properties for Wakulla and Centennial Banks. Im excited to be working for the #1 Real Estate Company in Wakulla County, and would love to help you to sell your home, or nd that perfect property you are looking for. I will meet you at your convenience, so give me a call or shoot me an email!Welcomes Rebecca (Becky) Moore Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $550 mo./$550 Security Deposit Pets Considered 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront home Alligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,200 mo./$1,200 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850 mo./$850 Security Deposit. 142 Shar-Mel-Re 3BD/2BA, wood ooring in great room, fenced back yard. $900 mo./$900 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com For local For local news news and and photos photos visit us visit us online online www.TheWakullaNews.com www.TheWakullaNews.com

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 23 28 32 37 40 46 49 52 59 62 2 24 47 3 25 43 4 26 44 5 20 41 18 38 50 53 60 63 6 15 33 54 7 29 51 8 30 48 9 21 31 45 22 27 42 61 64 10 16 19 39 55 11 34 56 12 35 57 13 36 58 ACROSS 1. "Thou __ not 6. Invader of old Rome 10. Cyberjunk 14. "Look out __!" 15. "Dancing Queen" pop group 16. "Beloved" writer Morrison 17. Turn-of-the-century decor 19. Safe havens 20. Zebras, to lions 21. Teensy 23. Part of a ship's rigging 27. Stove feature 28. Goofs 29. Seles of tennis 32. Star's rep 33. Fodder storers 34. Beatty of "Deliverance" 37. Talk back to 38. Bar fare 39. Lower-left phone button 40. Coast Guard officer below LTJG 41. Sweetie 42. Assault on Troy, e.g. 43. Puts up 45. Pain tings on walls 46. Elks and Lions 48. Purse items 49. "Eh Cumpari" singer Julius 51. The middle-sized bear 52. Comics light bulb 53. French statesman nicknamed "Le Tigre" 59. Well-executed 60. Get jaded 61. Untagged? 62Beardedbeasts 63. Nostradamus, e.g. 64. On top of thingsDOWN1. Entrepreneuraiding org. 2. Boating pronoun 3. Cockpit datum: Abbr. 4. Actor Chaney 5. Divided in halves 6. Judge's rapper 7. Do as directed 8. Pending, on a sched. 9. Fisherman's take 10. Sign of bad reception 11. Blend of two words 12. Common sprain site 18. "The Haj" author 22. Inflammatory suffix 23. Poke fun at 24. The Phantom's instrument 25. Media news source 26. Princes, e.g. 29. Marathon's 26+ 30. Skin care brand 31. Nonverbal affirmation 33. Concrete ingredient 35. Sharp-eyed raptor 36. Vera Wang creation 38. Sun, personified 39. Knights' titles 41. Greet the villain 42. Stephen Foster title g irl 44. Maritime hazards in WWII 45. Silent performer 46. Hold tight 47. Burdened 48. Whip-cracker 50. Does somethi ng 51. "A __ bagatelle!" 54. Fairway position 55. Moon jumper of rhyme 56. LAX posting 57. Tire filler 58. Beehive State nativeAmerican Prole Hometown Content 5/12/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 2 32456 74851 5 92 43 871 29 631 82945 16 00 9 HometownContent 951 7628 4 3 382451796 764938512 135 894267 247516938 698273154 529 647381 816329475 473185629 S B A T E A S E C L I N G H E R O R G A N L A D E N A L T P R E S S B U R E A U L O N S O N S U B O A T S T W O P A R T H I S S U R I S S O L A C T S G A V E L S A N D L I E O B E Y M I L E S M E R E T B A O L A Y T A M E R H A U L N O D M I M E I T I S S U S A N N A S T A T I C S I R S C O W P O R T M A N T E A U E T A A N K L E E A G L E A I R M I S E R D R E S S U T E 5635-0516 TWN vs. BARNES, ROMAINE CASE NO 65-2011-CA-000292 NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000292 THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUST COMPANY, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FKA THE BANK OF NEW YORK TRUST COMPANY, N.A. AS SUCCESSOR TO JPMORGAN CHASE BANK N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR RAMP 2006RS1 PLAINTIFF, VS. ROMAINE P. BARNES, ET AL., 5636-0516 TWN Vs. Copperhead Construction Case No. 12-338-CANotice of Foreclosure Sale Public Notice IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO: 12-338-CA CENTENNIALBANK,as successor in interest to WAKULLABANK, Plaintiff, vs. COPPERHEAD CONSTRUCTION, INC. n/k/a KEN DAVIS CONSTRUCTION AND ROOFING, INC., a Florida corporation, AMERICAN BUILDERS & CONTRACTORS SUPPLY CO., INC., trading as ABC SUPPLYCO., INC. f/k/a BRADCO SUPPLYCORPORATION, and PREMIER BANK, a Florida Banking Corporation Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 18, 2013, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Lobby of the Clerks Office, of the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida on May 30th, 2013, at 11:00 a.m., the following described property: Lots 41 and 42, Block 49, WAKULLAGARDENS, Unit 5, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 56, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. SUBJECT TO restrictions, easements, and reservations of record, if any, not specifically reimposed or extended hereby. PARCELID Number: 00-00-034-012-09584-000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner(s) as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED ON April 18, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk LAWYER FOR PLAINTIFF: Mary Ellen Davis, Esquire 17 High Drive, Suite C, P.O. Box 1720 Crawfordville, FL32326 (850) 926-6003 May 9 & 16, 2013 5642-0516 TWN Vs. Scott, Amber Case No: 12-CA-000343 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO: 12-CA-000343 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. AMBER V. SCOTT; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF AMBER V. SCOTT; THOMAS M. DUDLEY, JR.; CATHERINE SHERRILLBLANKENSHIP; UNKNOWN TENANTI; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE is hereby given that the undersigned Clerk of the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, will on the 23rd day of May 2013, at 11am at the Front lobby of the Wakulla Courthouse located in Crawfordville, offer for sale and sell at public outcry to the highest and best bidder for cash, the following-described property situate in Wakulla County, Florida: Lot 38, Block O, MAGNOLIAGARDENS, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. pursuant to the Final Judgment entered in a case pending in said Court, the style of which is indicated above. Any person or entity claiming an interest in the surplus, if any, resulting from the foreclosure sale, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens, must file a claim on same with the Clerk of Court within 60 days after the foreclosure sale. WITNESS my hand and official seal of said Court this 8th day of April, 2013 AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL32301; 850.577.4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT (COURTSEAL) By:/s/Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEYFOR PLAINTIFF: Latasha Moore-Robinson Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 S. Conway Rd., Ste. E Orlando, Florida 32812 (407) 381-5200 May 9 & 16, 2013 5646-0523 TWN Estate of Donaldson, Louise File No. 13-CP-34 Notice of Admin PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION File No. 13-CP-34 IN RE: ESTATE OF LOUISE DONALDSON, also known as LUERAY LOUISE DONALDSON, Deceased. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION The administration of the estate of Louise Donaldson, deceased, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, file number 2013-CP-34. The estate is intestate. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. The fiduciary lawyer-client privilege in Section 90.5021 applies with respect to the personal representative and any attorney employed by the personal representative. Any interested person on whom a copy of the notice of administration is served who challenges the validity of the will or codicils, qualification of the personal representative, venue, or the jurisdiction of the court is required to file any objection with the court in the manner provided in the Florida Probate Rules WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the date that is 3 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on that person, or those objections are forever barred. A petition for determination of exempt property is required to be filed by or on behalf of any person entitled to exempt property under Section 732.402, WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the later of the date that is 4 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on such person or the date that is 40 days after the date of termination of any proceeding involving the construction, admission to probate, or validity of the will or involving any other matter affecting any part of the exempt property, or the right of such person to exempt property is deemed waived. An election to take an elective share must be filed by or on behalf of the surviving spouse entitled to an elective share under Sections 732.201 -732.2155 WITHIN THE TIME REQUIRED BY LAW, which is on or before the earlier of the date that is 6 months after the date of service of a copy of the Notice of Administration on the surviving spouse, or an attorney in fact or a guardian of the property of the surviving spouse, or the date that is 2 years after the date of the decedents death. The time for filing an election to take an elective share may be extended as provided in the Florida Probate Rules. Personal Representative: Clyde A. Poole, Sr. 1711 9th St. W., Palmetto, Florida 34221 Attorney for Personal Representative: Deirdre A. Farrington, Esq., Attorney for Clyde A. Poole, Sr., Florida Bar Number: 488690, Farrington Law Office P.O. Box 392, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 Telephone: (850) 926-2700 Fax: (850) 926-2741 E-Mail: deirdre@farrington-law.com May 16 & 23, 2013 5645-0516 TWN Sale Date 05/25 Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, May 25, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Jennifer Pitts Timothy White Bryant Withers William Cotton Before the sale date of Saturday, May 25, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. May 9 & 16, 2013 5638-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 004 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #161 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:11-4S-02W-000-01888-002 THE N1/2 OF THE S1/2 OF THE S1/2 OF THE NE1/4 OF SEC 11 P-3-2-M-49C OR 127 P 650 OR 293 P 856 Name in which assessed Heirs of Melissa Meyers said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12 day of June, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this26 day of April, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 5639-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 005 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #723 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:01-6S-02W-000-03588-002 1-6S-2W P-23-M-55 LOT LYING BETWEEN WILLIAM BROTHERS LUMBER CO LOT & TROY FAIN LOT ON RIVER IN SW1/4 OF SEC 1 Name in which assessed Panacea Coastal Prop Inc said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12 day of Juneat 10:00 A.M. Dated this 26 day of April, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 5640-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 006 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10 U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #615 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:25-5S-02W-046-03432-001 AQUA DE VIDA BLOCK L LOT 17 & 18 OR 296 P 240 & OR 336 P 523 Name in which assessed J. DONALD NICHOLS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12th day of June, 2013.at 10:00 A.M. Dated this29day of April 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 5641-0530 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2013 TXD 007 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that TC 10U, LLC the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #510 Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #:24-5S-02W-057-03123-000 PANACEA MINERAL SPRINGS 1ST UNIT BLOCK 9 LOTS 12 & 13 OR 530 P 99 OR 535 P 659 Name in which assessed JUDITH L. DOWE & FRANCIS G. DINARDI said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 12th day of June, 2013,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this29day of April 2013Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida May 9, 16, 23 & 30, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices DEFENDANT(S), NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 17th, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000292 in the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida wherein The Bank of New York Mallon Trust Company, National Association fka The Bank of New York Trust Company, N.A. as successor to JPMorgan Chase Bank N.A. as Trustee for RAMP 2006RS1 was the Plaintiff and ROMAINE P. BARNES, ET AL., the Defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 30th day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 1 OF DONELLA HEIGHTS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 5 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS OF THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER, AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS, MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN SIXTY (60) DAYS AFTER THE SALE. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk Wesley L. Ridout, Attorney for Plaintiff Pendergast & Morgan, P.A. 6675 Corporate Center Pkwy, Ste 301 Jacksonville, FL 32216 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm. 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, (850) 577-4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. May 9 & 16, 2013 The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 Page 11B 1. ANIMAL KINGDOM: By what other name are a cats whiskers known? 2. ANCIENT WORLD: Where is the Acropolis? 3. HISTORY: Who was the commanding Union general at the Battle of Gettysburg? 4. MEDICINE: What is scoliosis? 5. GEOGRAPHY: What two countries share Niagara Falls? 6. MOVIES: What was the name of Gary Coopers character in High Noon? 7. ENTERTAINMENT: What kind of horse was Trigger, Roy Rogers trusty steed? 8. SCIENCE: What metal is liquid at room temperature? 9. ANATOMY: Where is the medulla oblongata located? 10. LITERATURE: Who created the Tom Swift series of novels? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Vibrissae, or tactile hairs 2. Athens 3. George Meade 4. Curvature of the spine 5. U.S. and Canada 6. Will Kane 7. Palomino 8. Mercury 9. Lower part of the brain stem 10. Edward Stratemeyer Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, May 16, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsImagine if a slew of lmmakers, playwrights, art enthusiasts, actors, and screenwriters abandoned their concrete jungles for a more natural setting, where all took part in a festival meant to jumpstart the creative energies of a small southern county. Scene in Wakulla, a three-day event of workshops, film-screenings, play readings, and forums is the start of something like that. Or, at least, it can be. A rst time endeavor for the Palaver Tree Theater, and sponsored by Best Western Plus Wakulla Inns & Suites, Scene in Wakulla promises to be unlike anything the county has seen since Tarzan and Creature from the Black Lagoon came to town. The festivities begin Thursday, June 20 with an opening night party in the downstairs and courtyard areas of Wakullas Best Western Plus. Workshops, discussions, and readings begin the next day, continuing through Saturday, June 22. Writer and lmmaker, Karamu Kush will work with a limited number of aspiring lmmakers from Wakulla and abroad in an effort to help develop their craft. Kushs lm, Salvation Road, claimed the Directors Guild of America Jury Prize, the Caucus Foundation Gold Circle Award, and was later acquired by HBO, making its television debut on the network in 2012. His award-winning work has been featured at Cannes, Sundance, Hamptons, Tribecca, and Los Angeles film fests. Hes also a teaching Professor at New York Film Academy at Universal Studios in Hollywood, and Professor-Lecturer on the Theatre Arts faculty at Howard University. For those who desire to be in front of the camera instead of holding it, veteran actor and master teacher John DAquino will teach his On-Camera Performance workshop. An FSU alumni, John was discovered by Sam Weisbord, President of the William Morris Agency, and hired as one of the leads in the ABC/Disney series, Wildside. Most know him from his recurring roles on numerous television series, such as Hannah Montana, CSI, JAG, Cory in the House, Third Rock from the Sun, and Seinfeld. Hes also a consultant for the Disney Channel. A bit of local avor is added to the mix with the Alive OnStage Workshop taught by director Kevin Carr, along with cast members from the Canopy Roads production of Raisin in the Sun, fresh from their performances at the Monticello Opera House, and most recently, the Southside Arts Complex, in Tallahassee. Its all about stories and developing techniques those innate abilities that allow one to tell and reveal in such a way that something within the mind of the viewer is awakened, leading to deeper re ection and thought. Nothing does this better than the true-life story of Agnes Furey. Some may remember her from an article printed in the Tallahassee Democrat over a year ago when she sat with a group of inmates in the Wakulla County Jail facility. Her story could be seen as one of horror. Instead it over ows with hope. Agnes daughter and grandson were murdered by a man her daughter was trying to help in the late 1990s. Agnes reached out to the perpetrator in the hopes of nding answers and, eventually, closure. But, like most of lifes dramas, her narrative took a different turn, which included intense correspondence over a number of years with Leonard Scovens, the man convicted for the crime. Later, a book titled Wild owers in the Median, which they wrote together, was published. Wild owers has been adapted into a play, the reading of which is included in the Scene lineup. Scenes play readings and panel discussions are free and will take place in different areas of the county. There is a charge for the workshops. Although the seats are limited, participants can receive a discount on all classes until May 25, along with discounts for stay at Wakullas Best Western Plus. As always, sponsorship and donations are encouraged. Information on workshops, artists involved, times and costs can be found online at www. palavertreetheater.org.Scene in Wakulla is coming in JuneFestival will feat ure workshops, lm screenings, play readings and moreThursday, June 20 Welcome to Wakulla Opening night party. Friday, June 21 Directing For Film Workshop. On Camera Performance Workshop. Directing Consequence Panel discussion.Saturday, June 22 Alive Onstage Workshop. Act/ Write Panel discussion. A Matter Of Seconds Play reading.Wild owers In The Median Play reading. Scene in Wakulla AWARDS5K Overall & Masters M/F & 3 deep in 5 year age groups 1 Mile given to top 3 male & female finishers In ages 9 and under and the 10-14 age groups ildwood he nn esort &R FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARKWill host the annualWAKULLA SPRINGS 5K RUNRun through the Sanctuary, a wilderness area of the state Park not open to the general public. Wakulla Springs State Park 465 Wakulla Park Drive (15 miles south of Tallahassee on SR 267) Mail in registration form www.wakullasprings.org/projects.html Online registrationraceit.comT-shirts guaranteed for registrations received by May 2nd. After May 2nd, first come, first-served.Saturday May 18th, 2013We do appreciate our sponsors who make our race a success. All proceeds from the event will directly benefit Wakulla Springs. WE ARE HEREFOR YOU For more Information and to Schedule a Portfolio ReviewTrustYourPlan.comBob Beargie, Wealth Advisorbob.beargie@raymondjames.com 850-562-6702Securities offered through Raymond James Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC, and are: Not deposits; Not insured by NCUA or any other governmental agency; Not guaranteed by Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union; Subject to risk, may lose value. Gulf Winds Federal Credit Union is Independent of RJFS.The Raymond James Wealth Advisors at Gulf Winds are ready to help you create a Life Well Planned. 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