Wakulla news

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Material Information

Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00459

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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 16th Issue Thursday, April 18, 2013 O n e S e c t i o n One Section 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices ....................................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Church................................................................................Page 6 Obituaries ..........................................................................Page 7 Community ........................................................................Page 8 School ................................................................................Page 9 Sports ..............................................................................Page 10 Outdoors .........................................................................Page 11 Water Ways....... ...............................................................Page 12 Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 13 Worm Gruntin Festival Photos ...........................................Page 14 Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 15 Thinking Outside the Book.................................................Page 16 Classi eds ........................................................................Page 17 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 17 Comics .............................................................................Page 20 Red Clay Footprints .........................................................Page 21 Natural Wakulla ...............................................................Page 22 INDEX OBITUARIES Thomas Franklin Anderson John Gerard Burke Ronnie Cruse Zila Odessa Sapp Douglas Lawrence ‘Larry’ Anthony Hayes Joseph Chauncey Hiers Richard Steven Moon Sr. Debra Kay WallinPage 2 By JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThere were holes in the Wood Duck. The 60-yearold Wakulla Springs tour boat was in such bad shape last October, she was literally sinking at the dock. On Wednesday, April 10, Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park re-dedicated the Wood Duck. Custom designed by a team of creative thinkers, the newly restored Wakulla Springs tour boat, is now conservationally succinct with her muse, the Wakulla River. The dedication of the boat kicked off Wild About Wakulla Week, a 10-day celebration aimed to promote Wakulla Countys environment, culture, heritage and aesthetics while striving to improve the well-being of its residents. And the week culminates with the Wakulla Wildlife Festival on Saturday, April 20, hosted by Wakulla Springs State Park. About “ ve months ago, the Wood Duck was pulled from the water and hauled to Tallahassee for refurbishing. It was scraped, welded, sanded and painted. New benches were built and a platform added for wheelchairs. Two new electric motors, new batteries and solar panels were added. The Wood Duck is the second boat in the ” eet of four at the park to become entirely solar powered, with the Alligator being the “ rst one “ nished in December 2011. At a price of about $50,000 per boat, plans are to convert and refurbish the other two remaining boats to solar and electric when the money is raised. Formed in 1996, Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, a non-pro“ t, has raised over $120,000 for the park, and speci“ cally dedicated these funds to maintaining the tour boat experience for visitors. With more than 200 members, the non-profit group is committed to the stewardship of the natural and cultural resources of Wakulla Springs. The boat tours are a main attraction to people visiting the park, but also a major expense. These boats are about as historic as anything in the park, being over 60 years old,Ž says Madeleine Carr, vice president of the friends and one of its founding members. There is always something that needs to be done. This money will always be there to take care of the boats. And these tours enrich the experience of those who visit,Ž says Carr, a retired history professor. About five years ago, Friends members Ron Piasecki, who is president of the group, and Sue Damon, both of Shell Point, were asked to attend a meeting with park of“ cials and all tour boat operators to discuss the tips that tour boat drivers were being offered by passengers at the end of tours. As state employees, its against policy to accept tips. During this discussion, the proverbial lightbulb went off in Damons head. With a background in marketing, she made a suggestion to place donation boxes on each boat, giving passengers the opportunity to give back. When they get off the boat, people are all jazzed about the experience they just had and want to thank someone,Ž says Piasecki. Some initial reluctance was voiced by the drivers that using the donation boxes on the boats would cheapen the experience.Ž Turn to Page 2 By AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netErnest Theurer had been given 15 days from May 12, 2010 to correct the code violations found at his property by the Wakulla County Code Enforcement Board. Though he was noti“ ed that fees in the amount of $150 the “ rst day and $25 per day thereafter would commence after the May 27, Theurer failed to rectify the violations by the time of his death, leaving behind more than $22,200 in “ nes. At their meeting on April 15, county commissioners voted 3-1 to forgive the lien. When it came down to it, the issue was posed as one of fairness. While three commisioners favored forgiving the “ nes, Commissioner Howard Kessler said his concern was one of precedent. The lien goes with the property, not the person,Ž he said, stressing the idea that forgiving this violation will only make it harder to enforce other violations in the future. While Kesslers idea was noted, the other three commissioners at the meeting ultimately voted not to enforce a hefty punishment on someone other than the direct violator. The motion to forgive passed 3-1, with Chairman Randy Merritt voting for it, along with commissioners Richard Harden and Jerry Moore. Kessler cast the lone dissenting vote. Commissioner Ralph Thomas was absent because of illness. Theurers “ nes continued to accumulate even after Aug. 2, 2012, when the Code Enforcement Of“ ce received a copy of Theurers death certi“ cate. Shortly afterwards, Theurers daughter, Jean, was appointed personal representative. She had the property cleaned up and, in October 2012, she contacted the Code Enforcement Of“ ce requesting an inspection to con“ rm compliance, which was con“ rmed, stopping the accumulation of fees. Four days later, the Code Enforcement Of“ ce received payment for administrative charge in the amount of $150 and an application for a full reduction of the liens, which totaled $22,200. The Code Enforcement Board reduced the “ nes $2,175 … the amount accrued during the 87 days between the time of Theurers death and the date compliance was met. Turn to Page 2COUNTY COMMISSIONBoard votes to forgive $20,000 in nesCode violations created “ nes, but property owner died PHOTOS BY JENNY ODOMThe refurbished tour boat, the Wood Duck … out“ tted with solar panels and an electric motor. Refurbished Tour BoatThe Wood Duck is back on the water Park Ranger Jeff Hugo welcomes Madeleine Carr aboard the Wood Duck. Wakulla Wildlife Festival is Saturday, April 20, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Wakulla Springs State Park. The festival is a celebration of outdoor activities and area heritage and includes music, art and “ ne food. Along with boat tours, there will also be living history demonstrations and childrens activities, Bird of Prey and Reptile Shows presented by the Center for Wildlife Education of Georgia Southern University. The day will conclude with a Traditions Dinner Dance beginning at 6 p.m. with music by Tallahassee Swing Band. Reservations are recommended. For a schedule of events and more information go to www.wakullawildlifefestival.org.Wakulla Wildlife Festival is Saturday TCC breaks ground on Wakulla Environmental Institute F A M I L Y O W N E D & O P E R A T E D The Pizza Pe ople The Pizza People CARRY OUT OR DELIVERYCARRY OUT1 LARGE 1 TOPPING PIZZA1 LARGE 3 TOPPING, WINGS & BREAD SIDE $599 $1999 STONE CREEK PIZZA CO. STONE CREEK PIZZA CO. ASK FOR OUR DAILY SPECIALS AND IN-STORE COUPONS. ASK FOR OUR DAILY SPECIALS AND IN-STORE COUPONS. Carry Out or Delivery Carry Out or Delivery We Accept ALL Competitor’s Coupons 850 926-2312850926-2312www.StoneCreekPizzaCo.net • 27 Azalea Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327 +TAX +TAX & DELIVERY FEE MAY APPLY

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com TCC breaks ground on Wakulla Environmental InstituteBy AMANDA MAYORamayor@thewakullanews.netThe Tallahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Environmental Institute project of“ cially got underway Monday, April 15, as key members of the project, adorned with hard hats and shovels, dug the ceremonial “ rst holes as at least 200 supporters looked on. Participating dignitaries included Commission Chairman Randy Merritt, TCC President Jim Murdaugh, institute Director Bob Ballard, state Sen. Bill Montford, Sheriff Charlie Creel and state Rep. Halsey Beshears. The street sign indicating the Wakulla Environmental Institutes new location was also unveiled at the ceremony. Future students, staff and visitors will be going to the Environmental Institute appropriately located on Preservation Way. The event began with expressions of gratitude and recognition for those who have played large parts in the project. Speaker after speaker talked about the positive effects that the environmental institute has already had on Wakulla County, and noting that the county stands to gain not just academic strength, but economic bene“ ts and worldwide recognition as well. After the ceremony, attendees enjoyed live music and a meal catered by Poseys Dockside. All utensils and dishes used for the meal were recyclable. From Page 1 That reduced the amount owed to $20,025. With a dif“ cult decision before them, the Code Enforcement Board requested the direction of the county commissioners. The options laid out before them included whether or not to completely forgive the amount of $22,200, reduce the amount to $2,025 or require Theurers appointed representative to pay the amount in full. In other matters: Commissioners voted transfer ownership of property at 28 Pam Drive in Crawfordville to the county. The property has accumulated more than $47,000 in code enforcement fines. The land is reportedly valued at about $7,500. County staff told commissioners that the land owner would rather give up rights to the propety than pay to come into compliance. County commissioners voted to accept the transfer rather than foreclose or sue to recover costs.$20,000 in “ nesFrom Page 1 But Damon suggested to give the idea a trial run, we could always remove them, but why not give it a try.Ž So Damon, along with husband David and son Gil, an Eagle Scout and a junior at Wakulla High School, built the small unassuming donation boxes, painted them white and added locks. We didnt want them to stand out, but be subtle and only a suggestion,Ž says Damon, also an avid nature photographer and a volunteer tour boat guide. Now, “ ve years later and still in use, the boxes have proven to be a successful addition, with more than $1,000 in additional funds collected each month. The money is used to restore and maintain the aging tour boats and convert them all into solar powered, electric engines. Al Simpler, of Simpler Solar Systems in Tallahassee, designed the ef“ cient system being used on the Wood Duck today. Twelve 240 watt solar panels are mounted to the roof of the boat in order to power the two electric engines. They run off a huge battery pack stored under the seats. Simpler explains that the real beauty in the Wood Ducks solar power system lies in its battery pack. The way solar energy charges batteries, it also cleans them, eliminating almost all maintenance. These batteries should last a long time and save the park a lot of money over the long run,Ž he adds. Prior to their conversion to solar the park was spending about $20,000 a year on new batteries and battery maintenance for the boats. In addition, the gas motors are noisy and cause a lot of vibration and produce smelly fumes. Tour boat drivers say those who have experienced the new more quiet ride have nothing but good things to say about the conversion. The response to the electric motors is very positive,Ž says Park Manager Pete Scalco. Besides the noticeably more quiet ride, the thing that stands out is that here they are taking this scenic tour on this amazing natural resource and the entire ride is being powered by another natural resource, our sun. Its kind of come full circle,Ž he says.Wood DuckTCC President Jim Murdaugh gets a salute during the groundbreaking on Monday, April 15. A reception after the groundbreaking, above, and shovels and hardhats before the ceremony.PHOTOS BY AMANDA MAYOR Day & Overnight Camps Specialty Camps Activities Offered What to Pack How to Register Camp Directory A Special Pull Out Section Including:Call Denise or Lynda at 926-7102CALLING ALL YOUTH SUMMER ACTIVITIES HOSTS! Deadline: April 19, 2013In the May 2 & May 9 edition of Show them how much they mean to us with a Mother’s Day ad in… Recognize Mom’s of Wakulla Call Lynda or Denise at 926-7102or email: denise@thewakullanews.netSend us Her Photo & a Message or Advertise your Mother’s Day Special! Just $25 Deadline: April 26 Publication: May 9

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. PLEASE RECYCLE Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org The Wakulla County Parks Advisory Committee Invites You to a Public Meeting: Purpose: To Announce Proposed Improvements to Azalea Park & Provide an Opportunity for Public Input When: Tuesday, April 23, 2013 @ 7:00p.m. Where: Wakulla County Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., C’Ville, FLAZALEA PARK IMPROVEMENTS“We Want Your Input”If you have any questions, please contact Rod Revell, Parks & Facilities Management Director at 850-926-7227. The Wakulla County Housing Authority announces approximately $750,000 of FFY 2012-2013 funding (which includes 14% administration costs) available through the Florida Small Cities Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program to assist homeowners with rehabilitation/repairs to their property or demolition/replacement of the property that they currently own and reside in. This program is designed to perform general code related repairs and improvements for very low and low to moderate-income homeowners. Items eligible for repair include roofs, heating and cooling systems, plumbing, electrical, and other code related housing systems. The maximum amount of funds that may be awarded per property is $80,000. Applicants are limited to assistance once every (10) years. The Wakulla County Housing Authority will conduct an application workshop on Thursday, April 25, 2013 at 10:00AM in the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Commission Chambers located at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Any questions regarding the CDBG Housing Rehabilitation application will be addressed at this workshop. CDBG applications will be available online at www.mywakulla.com or via the County Administration building located at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 beginning Thursday, April 18, 2013 between the hours of 9:00am and 4:00pm, Monday thru Friday. Applications are due no later than Thursday, May 9, 2013 No applications will be accepted after the designated time. All applications must be mailed to the following address:Meridian Community Services Group, Inc. Attention: CDBG Housing Rehabilitation Program P.O. Box 13408 Tallahassee, Florida 32317Any person with a quali“ed disability requiring special accommodations shall contact the Wakulla County Administration Of“ce at 850-926-0919 at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this of“ce by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). Questions regarding the CDBG program and application process should be directed to Meridian Community Services Group, Inc., at (850)877-1908.Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA)Wakulla County Housing Authority Announces the Availability of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Housing Rehabilitation Funds For FFY 2012-2013A FAIR HOUSING/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/HANDICAP ACCESS JURISDICTION APRIL 18, 2013 Sealed bids for Re-Bid ITB 2013-11, WAKULLA COUNTY FUEL FACILITY TANK & CONTAINMENT RECOATING will be received until 2:00 p.m. on Monday, April 22, 2013. APRIL 11, 18, 2013 Sealed bids for ITB 2013-16, WAKULLA COUNTY MATERIAL HAULING will be received until 2:00 p.m. on Friday, May 10, 2013. APRIL 11, 18, 2013NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on May 6, 2013 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.APRIL 18, 2013 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARINGThe Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on May 6, 2013 at 5:00p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Of“ce at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.APRIL 18, 2013 City of Sopchoppy NOTICE OF MEETING Persons with disabilities needing reasonable accommodations to participate in the proceedings should contact the City Administrator 48 hours prior to the meeting at the address and phone number above.APRIL 18, 2013 The Wakulla News

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Amanda Mayor ........................................amayor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• I’ve got Easter on my mind • Sheriff’s Report for April 11, 2013 • Four injured in wreck •James Taylor, founder of local VFW, is dead • Youth coalition holds town meeting • How to spot a green cleaner • Anita Townsend, longtime county nurse, dies at 93 • TCC closes on land for Wakulla Environmental Institutethewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the Editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 =r drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. I’m Amanda Mayor, the new reporter at The NewsREADERS WRITE:Commission meeting wasnt on TV Heide Clifton is special to Wakulla anks to all with Patty Flinkman bene“ tKris Anne Hall was interesting speaker Gene Lambert earns awardBy AMANDA MAYOR My name is Amanda Mayor and I am originally from Crystal River where I graduated from high school in 2008 as a Pirate and ventured three hours north to begin college as a Seminole. I have wanted to make writing a career since the second grade when I was told by a favorite teacher of mine that she knew that I was going to be an author. An arthurŽ is what I went around calling myself for many months to come afterwards. While other kids begged their parents for ice cream or action “ gures, my mom knew not to bother. I would rather have a brand new notebook and a freshly sharpened pencil. Needless to say, I am more than grateful for this opportunity. I grew up loving both school and sports. I lettered in volleyball and softball in high school, I never miss a Seminole football game and diligently follow the highs and lows of Tampa Bay Rays baseball. As an undergraduate student at FSU, I was lucky enough to hold two very in” uential internships. I spent a summer at Tallahassee Woman Magazine gaining valuable insight on the entire publishing process. From brainstorming for issues all the way through to making deliveries during distribution … I got to do it all. Then I spent my senior year interning with the Florida State University Sports Information of“ ce. There, my weeks were spent juggling classes, papers and treks down to the sports information of“ ce located in Doak Campbell Stadium, while my Saturdays were spent in the press box with staff and media. I had a front row seat to game day excitement. I got to interview players, write stories and live behind the scenes. If it sounds like pure Seminole bliss it was. There is something about the thrill of the game from up above, behind those gigantic glass windows that I wish everyone could experience. After four very quick years I had earned two degrees … one in English and the other in Political Science. I learned so very much during those four years, much of which was never taught to me in any classroom. If I had one piece of advice to give anyone under the age of 18, I would tell them to strive for the opportunity to have a college experience. I believe those four years will change your life. Even those who can look back on their years in college and say that they hated all of the work, I dont think any of them could say they didnt learn one thing of value -whether academically or about themselves. I suppose I am still learning about myself … apparently I am fairly passionate about education. Anyway, since graduating from Florida State in April of 2012, I have been working and living in Tallahassee with my dog, Gracie. Shes awesome. A constant shedder, shoe destructor, jumping bean and meal stealer. Girls best friend. In closing, I just want you all to know how grateful I am to those who have already welcomed me so warmly and how much I look forward to getting to know Wakulla County much better. I hope that my reporting proves useful to each and every one of you. Thank you so much.Amanda Mayor is the reporter at The Wakulla News. Editor, The News: Can government get any darker? On April 15th, 2 p.m. I turned on Comcast to watch the “ rst Board of County Commissioners afternoon meeting, and the message on the TV channel said This channel should be available shortly.Ž Which one of our commissioners do we congratulate for this? Sue Damon Shell PointEditor, The News: The Wakulla Free Riders want to say thank you to any and all who participated in making the Patty Flinkman bene“ t a great success. We had an excellent turn out at Hudson Park on Saturday, April 6. We raised some much-needed funds to help pay for Pattys funeral expenses. The yard sale and barbecue alone raised over $3,500, and add that to the money we collected from the donation jugs that we put out and the donations came to well over $4,500. We would like to list everybody who donated to this cause but that would be a very long list, and to be honest I dont think I can remember all of their names. I do know a special thanks needs to go to the vendors who supplied the food, refreshments and the retailers who donated the raf” e prizes for this event. I know some people skip this part of a thank you letter but take a look at this list because you have probably done business with somebody on this list: First off we got Double D Storage that gave us the space to collect and store the donated items for the yard sale. Then we go to the food like Revels Meat Market supplied the chicken and condiments, Refreshment Services Tallahassee gave us the drinks, Poseys Steam Room for the coleslaw, Wild Fire Barbecue for the baked beans and the Iron Ravens mc that got us the bread. Then the raf” e prizes like Brooks Concrete, Big Top #2 Supermarket, Barwicks Seafood restaurant, Mikes Marine Supply, Coastal Restaurant, Food Giant, Ace Hardware in Woodville, Gulf Coast in Crawfordville, Apocalyptic Tattoo Studio, Blackwater Industries, My Way Seafood, Stevens Seafood & Chicken, Angies Marine Supply, Sheer Expressions, Huttons Seafood, Kutz N Kurlz, Dux Liquors, Capt Seaniles Pool & Pub, and Evolution Day Spa. All of these businesses helped the Wakulla Free Riders make this a success. Without the community and these businesses, the event would not have been such a success and we would not have been able to raise the funds that we did. Brian Rudolph Secretary Wakulla Free Riders Editor, The News: Last Thursday something quite special took place at the Wakulla County Public Library and it was all because one Wakullan was inspired enough to go out on a limbŽ and invite a known author, attorney and radio talk show host to speak to the people of this community about a topic that should be very important to every man, woman and child who lives in the U.S. … the Genealogy of the Constitution. Mitch Hampton, a friend and neighbor to many in Wakulla County, heard Attorney Kris Anne Hall while listening to a Florida radio station. He felt that what she was saying was important, called her up and asked her if she would consider speaking to the people of Crawfordville. She said YesŽ and last Thursday she spoke before a standing-room only crowd. Every seat was taken and people were lining the walls. And everyone of those people were riveted to what Kris Anne was saying. She spoke for over an hour and her knowledge of English history, her depth of understanding of the Founding Fathers and their commitment to a ” edgling country and her ability to apply history to the present exposed even the most knowledgeable among us to insights and perspectives that are not heard in a culture that sometimes rewrites history as though it were a TV script. Her ability to speak in laymans terms while imparting powerful information made her both interesting and entertaining. Even the few young people (under 12) sprinkled through the audience were spellbound. It is great when one citizen has an idea that is so inspired it becomes a reality. It is not easy to organize a venue, especially when there is no yard stick with which to measure the probability of success. One truly is out there on a limb. But to each of us who was present at the library on Thursday night, Mitch Hamptons work became a gift that will be remembered. It would be a very good thing if Thursday night was not a “ rst and last for Wakullla County but rather a “ rst of many. Charles Seeley CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: Wakulla is blessed to have many residents who volunteer for charities in our county and one special person is Heide Clifton. Heide has been volunteering for unwanted and mistreated pets for over 30 years. And, for the last 17 years, thousands of dollars have been raised annually at Heides Heirloom Rose Sale with proceeds going to CHAT (Citizens for Human Animal Treatment) of Wakulla. This years proceeds go towards food, medicines, vaccinations and vet expenses for animals at the Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street, Crawfordville. At end of April, Heide takes cuttings from her Heirloom Roses, places them under a misting system for six weeks, and once rooted transfers them to gallon containers. Then she casts her magic spell on them. Her magic spell consists of the proper amount of love, fertilizer, sun and water until they are ready for the rose sale. Heirloom Roses, also known as Heritage Rose or Antique Roses, are wonderful in the landscape, require a minimum of care and will reward you with many months of blooming. This years sale is this coming Saturday, April 20, from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Sunday, April 21, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Your donation of $8 gets you one rose bush or three for $21. You pick the rose bushes you want and there is no limit. A list of the roses for sale this year can be found on CHATs website at www. chatofwakulla.org. Our sponsors this year are The Wakulla News and Just Fruits, who will be joining jus at the sale and donating pro“ ts to CHAT. Membership forms will also be available at the sale and we would love for you to join CHAT in our effort to place healthyŽ stray and unwanted pets in loving homes. Like us on Facebook CHAT of Wakulla. See you Saturday at Heides Rose Sale, 382 Crawfordville Highway, just north of the Pines Storage Center. Janice Eakin Crawfordville Editor, The News: We take great pride in announcing that insurance agent Gene Lambert has been honored with the Farm Bureau Insurance CompaniesŽ award. This prestigious award was presented to only three agents in the state of Florida this year. Gene was selected because of his commitment to integrity, professionalism and service to his policyholders. Genes unsel“ sh dedication exemplifies his pledge to all of the members and policyholders that Helping you is what we do best.Ž Congratulations on a job well done! Lisa Griner Lisa.Griner@ffbic.com Insurance agent Gene Lambert

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 5A presentsSOUTHBOUND BAND SPONSORED BY: Bad Bobs Bait & Tackle WITH SPECIAL GUESTSTEW PARSONS & SPARE CHANGESopchoppyOpry.com Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information ALSO APPEARINGTHE WILD MAN LAMAR BROCK PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENUnited Way staff, supporting businesses and agencies at the celebration breakfast last week.Wakulla raises $86,300 for United WayBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakulla County raised more than $86,300 for United Way, Wakulla campaign chair Courtney Peacock announced at a celebration breakfast at Capital City Bank on Thursday, April 11. The bulk of that came from St. Marks Powder … more than $57,965 … generated by employee contributions and a golf tournament. The total amount of contributions raised by United Way in Wakulla County was down slightly from last year, noted United Way campaign associate Megan Picht. The amount distributed to agencies in Wakulla County typically exceeds the amount collected locally, Picht noted. St. Marks Powder won the Excellence Award. Gold Awards went to Wakulla County Schools, which raised $9,670, and Residential Elevators, $3,100. Silver Awards went to Capital City Bank, $3,800, and the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Council, $2,518. Bronze Awards went to Centennial Bank, $2,256, Shields Marina, $1,768, Wakulla County employees, $1,318, the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office, $1,516, and Wal-Mart Wakulla, $1,244. Megan Picht and Courtney Peacock announce total campaign donations. WILLIAM SNOWDENPainter Dick Moore with his painting as it is being presented to the county historical society. Painter Dick Moore donates to museumLocal painter Dick Moore recently donated his picture of the Homer Harvey vehicles to the Wakulla County Historical Society to be displayed at the local museum. In a ceremony on Friday, April 5, Moore presented the painting to the historical society. Moore painted the picture 15 years ago and it has hung at the Senior Center for the last 10 years. The vehicles are a landmark south of Crawfordville, just off 319, where Harvey arranged the vehicles … old trucks and cars that he saved after they wore out. The vehicles are covered in a patina of rust. Photographers frequently stop and take pictures of the trucks. Brad Harvey, Homers grandson, spoke of what the vehicles represented to him growing up … vehicles that represented a hardworking life, but also a place to play and dream about being on the road. Moore, 91, began painting after he retired 30 years ago. He joked that he always tried to sell the painting to Homer Harvey when he used to visit the Senior Center, but Harvey always refused to buy it. Crawfordville Wal-Mart is getting ready for its annual fundraising drive for Childrens Miracle Network with a moving toilet. This potted toilet will be moving throughout the community. You have Been Potted!Ž is what the sign says. When the potted toilet lands in your yard, we will happily move it to your friends yard for a donation to the Childrens Miracle Network. The goal is to raise $25,000. Sheriffs office gets Potted Toilet in front of the sheriffs of“ ce last week. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer and MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com PACKAGES STARTING AT ONLY$29.99FOR 12 MOS. AFTER INSTANT SAVINGS ENTERTAINMENT PACKAGE/MONTH AUTHORIZED DEALER 1-800-293-1402New Approved Customers Only. 24-Mo Agreement Required.DIRECT*STAR TV Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Family Coastal Restaurant All You Can Eat Seafood Come Join us for our Grand Opening! April 27, 2013$999 AUCE Fried Shrimp 99¢ Appetizersone child 10 and under per adult eats free Drawings, Gift Certi cates and Giveaways!2209 Sopchoppy Hwy., Sopchoppy • 850 962-2920*Limit 1 per person Were getting ready to donate $25,000 to 40 non-pro“ts this year through State Farm Neighborhood Assist’. Get to a better State. Vote for the organization you think should get the money at statefarm.com/neighborhoodassist How can $25,000 change our community? 1301535 State Farm, Home Oce, Bloomington, ILVote and make a difference, right at home. Gayla Parks, Agent 2905 Apalachee Parkway Tallahassee, FL 32301 Bus: 850-222-6208 gayla.parks.hbr4@statefarm.com Avalon Treatment Centers of Tallahassee and Crawfordville, Florida is welcoming back our much missed associate, Joanna Johnson. Ms. Johnson completed her contract in Texas and returned to our of ces on March 25, 2013. This of ce is excited for her return and hope for wonderful and fruitful future. Ms. Johnson has always been a valuable member of our team and will continue to help us provide the outstanding services we have always offered to our clientele. Our of ce staff now consists of Dr. Jerry Burghout, Michael Nash, Joanna Johnson and Nikki Tang. We hope you will help us to welcome her back our practice and community.4395 Crawfordville Hwy. ( 850 ) 727-8728 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Grouchy is as grouchy growls OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDER Did you ever have a day when everything went so well that you could not believe you were awake? I have dreams of times when everything goes perfect. Then, I awake to the reality of the world around me. Last week my dream came true... or almost. For no apparent reason I awoke from sleep feeling quite happy. I had no explanation for this giggly feeling of mine. I do not normally rouse myself from sleep with a chipper attitude. Just ask my wife. On second thought, dont. I just was in such a good mood that I broke out into song, which my wife threatened to end my life if I did not stop it immediately. I did not try to psychoanalyze myself and think that perhaps this was the beginning of senility or something. I just accepted it as a great day to be alive. One of my basic philosophies of life is, dont look a gift horse in the mouth … after all, he might have bad breath. This particular day nothing could bring me back to earth. I was all but literally dancing on the clouds and I cannot dance. But it was a good day to be alive and know it. Very nonchalantly, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage addressed me in a rather semi-informal manner. Would you run to the store and get me something?Ž Being in such a high spirit, I sang my af“ rmative answer to her in spite of her glaring in my direction. I did not care. I would have jumped over the moon if she had asked at the time. Lucky for me, she did not ask. I was in such a good mood that I thought a shopping trip would be okay. Let it be known that when it comes to shopping, shopping and me go together like peanut butter and lobster tail. It was such a wonderful day and I felt so terri“ c I agreed to go shopping for my wife. Not that I needed a new wife, the one I have is “ ne, thank you. When I entered the store, I had a nagging feeling that something was wrong. Being in such a great mood that I was in, I shook it off and rebuked it “ rmly. In record time, I found the item my wife needed. Dancing and singing up the aisle, I went immediately to the checkout counter. When I got there, I found nobody there. On the counter was a bell and next to the bell, a sign that read, Ring bell for cashier.Ž Being in such a great mood, I rang the bell to the tune of the song I was singing at the time. After all, happy is as happy shares, and I had my share of happiness at the time. Then I heard it. All right,Ž growling from the back of the store, I heard ya. Ill be there when I get there.Ž If I would have stopped there, it might not have gotten out of hand. Being in the goosey-kind of mood I was in, I had to take it one step further. I stared at the bell until I could stare no more and then I broke out into song accompanied by the cashiers bell. I wish you could have been there, it was spectacular. I heard you the “ rst time,Ž the voice exploded from the back of the store. Ill get there when I get there and not a second sooner.Ž I smiled to myself and reminded myself that nobody was going to spoil my mood of happiness today. Then I saw her stomping up the aisle towards the cashier counter where I was waiting. If looks could kill, and I am not so sure they cant, I would have died on the spot. I do not think steam was coming out her ears, but I am not absolutely sure about that. I know there was “ re in her eyes, which were focused in my direction like a laser beam. When she got to the counter she growled, Are you the one ringing the bell?Ž With my “ nger on the bell, and nobody else in the store, it was hard to answer in the negative. In fact, it was hard for me to say anything while she was looking at me the way she was looking at me. She stared for a moment, at least it was something close to a stare that burrowed itself deep into my soul and that goosy-kind of feeling evaporated. Its customers like you,Ž she snarled, that makes my day terrible.Ž She then looked at the one item I had laying on the counter for her to ring up. She looked at it, and then looked up at me and then looked back at the item on the counter. Hissing like I have never heard hissing before, Is this what youre making all that racket about?Ž Did you ever have a day when you felt like crawling into a groundhog hole and hiding until next February? On my way home from the store I thought about what David said in Psalm 23. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil: for thou art with me...Ž I can endure anything and anybody as long as God is with me.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. Church Briefs Revival set at Shady SeaShady Sea Baptist Church is having revival April 17 through April 19 at 7 p.m. nightly. Featured pastors are B.B. Barwick, Glenn Hamel, and Micheal Hall. Come out and see what the Lord is doing in the little church by the water with the big heart for God! Spring revival to be held at Mount TrialBishop C.W. Maddox of Bridging the Gaps International Ministry, will render spring revival from Wednesday, April 17 through Friday, April 19, at 7 p.m. nightly Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church, 1418 Sopchoppy Highway. For more information, contact Elder Bernard Plummer, pastor, at 926-4091. Family and Friends Day at Zion HillZion Hill Primitive Baptist Church will be celebrating its annual Family and Friends Day on April 28 at 3 p.m. Pastor Derrick Nelson and Rocky Mount Church of Christ is in charge of the service. You are invited to come enjoy Jesus with us. Elder Ervin Donaldson Jr. is the pastor. For information, contact Mother Dora Rosier at (850) 962-4651. Heirs of Grace to perform at Pioneer BaptistThe very popular female gospel trio Heirs of Grace will be in concert at Pioneer Baptist Church on Sunday, April 21, at 10:30 a.m. The public is invited to come and worship with us in music. For more information on the trio, visit their website, www.heirsofgrace.net. A “love offering” will be received to assist in their music ministry. Pioneer Baptist Church is located four miles east of Crawfordville, just north of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road and the Spring Creek Highway intersection. The church address is 486 Beechwood Drive, Crawfordville FL 32327. For more information, please contact Pastor Dennis Hall at 878-5224. Joshua Aaron will perform at Tikvat Ami synagogueOn Saturday, April 27, Tikvat Ami Messianic Synagogue (Heritage Academy & Gingerbread Day School), 3324 N. Monroe St. in Tallahassee will have Messianic recording artist Joshua Aaron in concert. Services begin at 11 a.m. with a liturgical time of worship followed by the concert. Aaron’s music sends a message of hope in Yeshua (Jesus), a love of the Jewish people and Christians alike and a desire for the return of Messiah. For more information check out our website at shalomnorth orida.org. Pastor Bruce Taylor and the congregation at Mount Beasor Primitive Baptist Church, 29 Winthrop Avenue in Sopchoppy, extend a cordial invitation to all for a Southern Gospel Concert, scheduled for Saturday, April 20 at 6 p.m. featuring the Shelia Smith Trio! A time of fellowship will follow this free concert. For more information, call 962-3711 or 926-1513.Sheila Smith Trio will appear at Mount BeasorPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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Joseph Chauncey Hiers, 43, died on Saturday, April 13, 2013. He was born on October 7, 1969 in Tallahassee, living much of his childhood in south Georgia before returning to Florida to reside in Sopchoppy. He was a 1992 graduate of Gretchen Everhart in Tallahassee. Joe is survived by his parents, David Arnold and Jean Audrey Hiers of Sopchoppy. He is also survived by his brother, David Hiers Jr. and his wife Nancy, as well as his sister Audrey Gregory and her husband Chris of Glen Burnie, Md. He also leaves behind three nieces, Savannah, Allison, and Logan; two nephews, Andrew and Jacob and one great-nephew, Charley. Joe was not only cherished by his immediate family but also by his numerous aunts, uncles, and cousins. Before our angel returned to Heaven, Joe was catered to lovingly in his last few weeks on this earth by his uncle Jerry Lamar Hiers and Peggy Stratton. The family received friends on Wednesday, April 17, 2013 from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, HarveyYoung Chapel, in Crawfordville. Funeral services will also be held at 2 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel. Burial will follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel of Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com). www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 7AJohn Gerard Burke, born June 23, 1937, in Jamaica Plain, Mass., went to be with our Lord on April 12, 2013. John retired from the Marine Corps after 22 years of active duty. He served as an advisor to the Vietnamese military and as an interpreter. When stateside he served in a variety of assignments with the Marines involving “ scal management. After retiring from active duty he completed over 30 years of service with Wakulla County and the State of Florida. He was a respected authority on cost containment and management of hospitals and prison systems. Throughout his personal life and his years in public service he earned the love and respect of all who came to know him. The family received friends from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Monday, April 15, 2013, at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 3 p.m. at Whiddon Lake Cemetery in Crawfordville. Survivors include his loving wife of 35 years, Nita Welch Burke; his son, Patrick Burke; his daughter, Bridget BurkeWammack and her husband Ken Wammack; Francie Casey Lowe and her husband Brian Lowe; Jim Casey; Lee Casey and his wife, Wendy; grandchildren, Jasmine, Casey, Marina, Cole and Noah; and Zoey, Johns only great-grandchild. John is also survived by his brother, Paul Burke. He was predeceased by his parents, Paul Nerbert and Yolanda Marie Burke. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements. (850-926-3333 or bevisfh.com). Obituaries Thomas Franklin Anderson John Gerard Burke Ronnie Cruse Zila Odessa Sapp Douglas Lawrence ‘Larry’ Anthony Hayes Joseph Chauncey Hiers Richard Steven Moon Sr. Debra Kay WallinRonnie Cruse, 67, of Otter Creek, passed away Monday, April 8, 2013. A lifelong Wakulla County resident, he was a self-made commercial fisherman. He loved building boats, oars, oyster tongs, and many other wooden items. He also loved hunting and was a blue tick hound dog breeder. He loved the chase better than the kill. He enjoyed spending time with his friends and was always a man of his word. He is survived by his daughter, Ronnette Cruse; son, Rodney Cruse (Jenni); sisters, Joyce (Gordon) Millender and Margie Harrell (Arlen) Jacobson; four grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. A graveside funeral service was held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at Revell Cemetery in Sopchoppy. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, (850) 559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at http://www.forbesfuneralhome.net. Thomas TomŽ Franklin Anderson, 65, died on Monday, April 8, 2013. He was born Sept. 14, 1947 in Tallahassee to Raymond Anderson and Lucy Wilder Anderson. He served in the U.S. Air Force, stationed in Guam during the Vietnam War. A visitation was held from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. on Monday, April 15, 2013 at Culleys MeadowWood Riggins Road Chapel, followed by a celebration of life at 11 a.m. Survivors include his wife, Suzy Anderson; and other family, including Greg and Molly Taylor, and their children Errin and Gary Diskerud of Tallahassee, and Dolly Mitchell and Richard Gott of Crawfordville; and his faithful caregiver, Thomas Campbell; as well as a host of nieces, nephews and their grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Lucy and Raymond Anderson; and his sister, Jo Ann Anderson. Lawrence LarryŽ Anthony Hayes, 83, of Crawfordville, passed away April 11, 2013. He was born on Nov. 27, 1929 in Pennsylvania. Survivors include his wife of 62 years, Beverly Jean Hayes; two sons; one daughter; three grandchildren and four great grandchildren.Zila Odessa Sapp Douglas (February 10, 1952) of Crawfordville, lost her battle with cancer and went home to the Lord on Saturday, April 13, 2013. Zila had lived in Crawfordville for almost 30 years, having previously lived in Texas, Tennes see and Alaska. She worked as a nurse for 35 years but her true passion was her family. She is survived by her husband of 39 years, Kenneth W. Douglas, her three children, daughter Christina Thomas and husband Kevin Thomas; daughter, Shelly Thomas and “ anc, Jamie Kinsey, and her son, Shannon Douglas and “ anc, Kim Smith; her four grandchildren and the light of her life, Kevin L. Thomas, Shaylyn M. Barwick, Travis J. Thomas and Hunter W. Douglas and one great-grandchild, Chayston L. Thomas. She also leaves behind three sisters, all of Texas: Eddie Kay Adams and husband Jack, Mable Durrio and husband Carroll, and Sybil Hamscher and husband Mike; and many nieces and nephews and countless friends. However, she will hold a special place in heaven for her best friend of over 30 years and sister by choice, Betty Barton. The family received friends on Tuesday, April 16, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Bevis Funeral Home is assisting family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com). Richard Steven Moon Sr., SteveŽ as everyone knew him, went home to be with his Lord and Savior on April 8, 2013. He was born on Sept. 29, 1953 in Tallahassee to James Hyde Moon and Mary Frances Moon. Steve was a loving husband, father and a soon-to-be-grandfather to his “ rst grandchild. He had been a resident of Crawfordville for the past 18 years. He graduated from Rickards High school in Tallahassee and then joined the U.S. Coast Guard where he served for four years. He dearly loved the Coast Guard. He worked for the Capital Police as a special agent and the Leon County Civic Center Security before going to the U.S. Marshals of“ ce. In 1988 he made his last move to the U.S. Postal Service where he has been employed for the past 25 years. His co-workers at the Post Of“ ce on South Adams Street in Tallahassee were his extended family. Steve was known and loved by many and never met a stranger. He was a very compassionate and caring person. Steve loved saltwater “ shing, boating and FSU football. He was a “ rm believer in the Weather Channel during hurricane season. The family received friends on Thursday, April 11, 2013 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held Friday, April 12, 2013 at 3 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Burial followed at Arran Annex Cemetery. Steve is survived by his wife of 33 years, Anita; sons, Richard Steven Moon Jr. (Aimee Moon) and Matthew Tyler Moon, all of Crawfordville; his brother, Jimmy Moon (Wanda Moon) of Cairo, Ga.; one sister, Heidi Moon and step-mother, Martha Moon, both from Tallahassee and Hilton Head, S.C; as well as several nieces and nephews and many other family members and loyal friends. He also leaves behind two of his very best and most loyal friends, his dogs, Bentley and Tobie. He was predeceased by his father, James Hyde Moon; his mother, Mary Frances Moon; and sister, Kay Frances Moon. Steve will be loved and missed by all. Rest in Peace, dear husband, dad, and friend. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel is assisting the family with arrangements.Ronnie Cruse John Gerard Burke Joseph Chauncey Hiers Thomas Franklin Anderson Lawrence ‘Larry’ Anthony Hayes Debra Kay Wallin Zila Odess Sapp Douglas Richard Steven Moon Sr. Debra Kay Wallin, 50, of Crawfordville, died on Monday, April 15, at her home after a lengthy battle with cancer. She was born in Marion, Ind. She moved to Florida in the early 1970s and graduated from Wakulla High School. She was formerly employed at the deli at Wal-Mart. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, April 20, at Bald Point State Park at 4 p.m. In lieu of ” owers, memorial donations may be made to Florida Wild Mammal Association or Big Bend Hospice. Survivors include her daughter Casey Wallin; two sons, Phillip Joseph Brown and Joshua Wallin; two sisters, Lynda Kinsey and Nancy Walker of Cairo, Ga.; a grandson; and numerous nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her mother, Mary L. Williams.Special to The NewsCovenant Hospice is a proud participant in National Volunteer Week, to be celebrated April 2127 honoring volunteers throughout the country. This year Covenants Tallahassee of“ ce annual volunteer appreciation event will be held on Saturday, April 27, from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. The dinner will be held at Covenants new Tallahassee branch location. Part of the events activities is celebrating Covenants 30th anniversary and honoring our dedicated volunteers who helped to start and continue to support the organization. Covenant Hospice volunteers expand and enhance the care and services provided by the Covenant team,Ž said Sandi Huster, director of volunteer services for Covenant Hospice. Nearly 3,000 volunteers serving Covenants 14 branch locations located in North Florida and South Alabama provide companionship and support to patients and their families, as well as a wide range of development, outreach and administrative support services.Ž Covenant Hospice volunteers served 71 percent of all patients cared for in 2012 and met 99 percent of all requests to support patients and families, saving the organization over $2 million in donated time and mileage. Volunteers rate their satisfaction with volunteering for Covenant at 98 percent highly satis“ ed/ satis“ ed. For information about becoming a Covenant Hospice Volunteer, please contact Kortney Rudd, Volunteer Manager, at 850575-4998. Celebrating its 30th Anniversary, Covenant Hospice is a not-for-pro“ t organization dedicated to providing comprehensive, compassionate services to patients and loved ones during times of life-limiting illnesses. For more information about Covenant Hospice or to make a hospice inquiry, contact the Tallahassee branch of“ ce at 850-5754998 or visit www.covenanthospice.orgCovenant Hospice to honor volunteers and celebrate 30 years of service 000EL0O

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunitySpecial to The NewsProfessor Frank Patterson, Dean of the FSU College of Motion Picture Arts, will be the featured guest at the Yacht Clubs Up Close and Personal spotlight event on Saturday, April 20th at 7:30 pm. In a conversationalstyle interview led by Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny, Adjunct Professor, Florida State University, School of Communication, she and Dean Patterson will discuss highlights from his 25 years of experience as a “ lmmaker, educator & consultant. The audience will have the opportunity to meet Patterson and to ask questions about his extensive involvement in the “ lm world. Dean Patterson received his masters and bachelors degrees in Communication from Baylor University. He has served as the President of The Los Angeles Film School in Hollywood, CA and Director of the School of Film and Television at Chapman University. Currently he leads the Film School at FSU, which The Directors Guild of America has recognized for its distinguished contributions to American Culture. The Hollywood Reporter, a trade publication, named Frank Patterson one of the nations top mentors to a generation of Hollywood “ lmmakers. Frank Patterson has brought incredible energy, vision, technical expertise and aesthetic sense to our Film School. No one has done more to elevate the place of “ lm in the University and among the arts than Frank,Ž said Former FSU Provost, Lawrence G. Abele. The public is invited to this free community event. There will be light refreshments prior to the interview. The Club is located at 36 Yacht Club Lane, St. Marks. In a program called Pennies for PetsŽ and offered through VCA Charities, donations were collected from clients who wanted to round up to help out.Ž VCA Wakulla Animal Hospital matched up to $1000 of donations collected and VCA Hospitals of Crawfordville ended up giving a donation of $2540.54 to CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment).Get Up Close & Personal with noted “ lm expertAvalon Treatment Centers of Tallahassee and Crawfordville, Florida welcome back our associate, Joanna Johnson. Ms. Johnson returned to Avalon on March 25, 2013. We are excited for her return and hope for wonderful and fruitful future. Id like to tell you about a few of the lesser known services that WCPL provides. Things that, on a normal basis, tend to be overlooked. The Florida Electronic Library, which you can access for free through our website, is a great resource for information, articles, and job searches. I used this website often when pursuing my masters degree and it proved to be an invaluable resource. Along with the Florida Electronic Library we also have links to Ancestry and Heritage Quest, two resources for genealogical research, as well as databases for health information and military records. As with all other services we provide, access to these databases are free but you will need a library card. Annual Library Volunteer Dinner Friday As April is Volunteer Month we have an awards dinner to honor the volunteers who help us out daily at WCPL. Last year volunteers gave over 2200 hours of their time helping us shelve materials, process donations, repair scratched CDs and much more. Last year we established the Gloria Hatton Volunteer of the Year Award, named for local resident who has a volunteered at the library for nearly 20 years. On behalf of my staff Id like to thank everyone who takes time out of their busy schedule to volunteer. Youre appreciated and we hope that youll continue your relationship with WCPL for years to come. Wakulla Volcano Play Tickets at WCPL The Palaver Tree Theaters production of The Wakulla VolcanoŽ takes place on Friday, April 19th at 7 p.m. and Sunday the 21st at 3 p.m. in the Sopchoppy School Auditorium. Tickets are $10, $7 for seniors and students and can be picked up at WCPL by asking for me or by calling 718-682-3870. Please come out this weekend and help support Wakullas growing community theatre company! Join Friends of the Library, win gift cardAs part of the Friends of the Librarys annual membership drive this year, the Friends are giving away a $50 Visa gift card to a lucky person who joins up with the Friends. For as little as $10 you can join this great organization that has raised money for and supported the Library for over 30 years. The Friends are looking for new ideas for improving the library, promoting all that the library does, or joining us at great local events. Over the past 4 years has saved the taxpayers of Wakulla County over $80,000 by funding programs and expenses outside of county or state tax dollars. Anybody who joins by May 15th will be eligible to win.Many offerings at WCPL you might not know about By SCOTT JOYNER Library Director Frank Paterson Pennies for Pets raises money for local charity CHAT Johnson returns to Avalon, CrawfordvilleThe April Full Moon Climb at the Cape St. George Lighthouse on St. George Island will be held on Thursday, April 25. The Sunset/Full Moon Climb will take place from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. and includes light hors doeuvres and a sparkling cider toast. Cost is $15 for the general public and $10 for members of the St. George Lighthouse Association. The Cape St. George Light is located in St. George Lighthouse Park Reservations are recommended. Contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 850-927-7745.Full moon lighthouse climb at St. George New Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County OnlyOffer available until 4/30/2013877-401-6408 Special Offer Name _______________________ Phone# _____________________ Address _____________________ City, State ___________________ Zip________Get 10 Months for $20.13 The News Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408straight to your mailbox www.thewakullanews.com Enclosed is my check or money order payable to This is not a trickNO FOOLIN’ Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health € Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 LOCAL SAVINGS.850-778-40001700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson Parkwww.root319salon.com A full service hair and nail salon. W elcomesWelcomes licia erez Now AvailableƒHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! Master Stylist

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsRiversprings Middle School science students have partnered with the Department of Environmental Protection to participate in field experiences throughout Wakulla County in the Learning In Floridas Environment (LIFE) program. Researchers from D.E.P. led the sixth, seventh and eighth grade students through labs that “ t the curriculum being studied by each grade level, and allowed students to have a hands on experience that reinforced what was taught in the classroom. Each grade level attends different sites and participates in labs that are set up speci“ cally for the area being studied. Carol Broome and Louis Hernandez took the sixth grade students to Wakulla Springs for a field experience. The sixth graders went on a jungle cruise, a Cyprus dome survey and a microinvertebrate lab. The jungle cruise allowed students to see animals and plants that are unchanged by humans. The Cyprus dome allowed students to test the acidity of the stagnant water and to walk out into the water and scoop up organisms for counting. The macro-invertebrate lab gave students the opportunity to test the acidity of the water and to classify and count the macroinvertebrate organisms in the water samples taken from the Wakulla River. Students then compared the types, and numbers, of organisms in each type of environment. This showed students where the cleaner water is located and help lead them to a better understanding of how the water is cleaned and replaced in the ecosystem. Students really enjoyed the opportunity to get into the science and learn. This really brings home a lot that has been done in the classroomŽ says Broome.Special to The NewsAs we welcome the season of new blooms we wait in anticipation and excitement for what to expect at this years upcoming proms. One prom in particular “ lls the hearts of not only the special participates but also those who are part of the production. Blessed by these students and the joy they bring to so many, we desire to present an exciting evening of dinner and dancing for students with special needs within our community. Promising to be An Evening of EleganceŽ specifically for these special young people along with a guest, their family, teachers and volunteers. Announcing the 5th annual Special Needs Spring Prom, Saturday, April 20th, 7 p.m. … 10 p.m. It is being held at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church, 1391 Crawfordville Hwy. Make reservations by Wednesday, April 17th. For more information contact the church of“ ce at 926-5152 or the event coordinator, Sandi DeRoss at 545-8262 or sdeross@comcast.netJESSICA BRATTAIN Special to The NewsThe Special Olympics Area Games took place Saturday, April 6th at Lincoln High School in Tallahassee. It began with a parade of athletes walking the track from the surrounding counties. The athletes then competed in track and “ eld events including the running long jump, soccer, relays, softball throw, and tennis ball throw. Izabel Hernandez, of Shadeville, competed in the softball throw and the 50 meter run events.Izabel has been competing for several years and loves to spend time practicing with her family and friends. She took home 1st Place in the Softball Throw and 4th Place in the 50 Meter Run. Izabel says her favorite part about competing in the Special Olympics is trying her best and earning ribbons. The Special Olympics State Games will be held on May 17 in Orlando, FL. Special to The NewsIts a dark, cold stormy night when a strange group of people gather for a reading of The Last Will & TestamentŽ of the late Josiah Travers. Thirteen characters, some related and others complete strangers wonder what old Josiah was up to when they discover that he left his Will in the form of a picture puzzle or what is know as a RebusŽ. Figuring out the meaning of the Will is only part of the mystery as strange and deadly events begin to take place in the rather odd, eccentric old house of the late Mr. Travers. Monk Ferriss Bone ChillerŽ is a thrilling comedic mystery that will surprise everyone with its many plot twists and turns. Make plans to see the talented students of Wakulla High School as they try to unravel this bazaar mystery and “ nd the unknown killer. It will also be the last play for seniors Chelsea Austin, Hannah Lanier, Alexander Lewis, Caitlyn Wagner and Hunter Wheatcraft. Bone Chiller opens on Friday, April 19th beginning at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 20th at 7:30 p.m. and a matinee on Sunday the 21st at 2:30 p.m. Doors open thirty minutes prior to curtain where tickets can be purchased. The cost for students is $4, seniors $5 and general public $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. Wakulla eld experience enriches at RMSShadeville Elementarys Special Olympics StarIzabel Hernandez shows off her 1st and 4th place ribbons.Special needs Spring Prom this Saturday SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School drama students, pictured above, present Bone Chiller,Ž a who dunnit, this weekend at the high school."Bone Chiller" comes to WHSSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & WedHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Call Pau l s Well Get Them All TERMITE & PEST CONTR OL P AUL S   ProShield Complete!Ž Pa u u l l s , W W e e l l G G e t Th e e m m A A l l l 222-68081225 Commerce Blvd., Midway We Stand Behind Our WarrantyŽTOTAL PEST CONTROL SERVICEƒ EVERYTHING FROM TERMITES TO MICEService Agreements to Fit Your Needs, Financing AvailableServing The Residents of Wakulla County For Over 30 Years. r r s David HinsonSales Representative Authorized Firm LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach On Friday, April 12, the Wakulla High School track and “ eld teams traveled to Florida High School in Tallahassee for this years District Meet. This competition determines the individuals and relay teams that will advance to the Regional Meet on April 18. The first four finishers, either in individual events or the relays, move on. The local teams had a good meet with three relay teams and eight individuals qualifying for the Regional Meet at Bolles High School in Jacksonville. In the process, two relay and one individual school records were set and three individuals earned District Championships, including Madison Harris who won two individual titles. The 4x800 meter relays kicked off the action. The WHS girls team of Savanna Harris, Savanna Strickland, Breighly Bolton and Marty Wiedeman ran a solid race and “ nished in third place. The WHS boys, who were ranked “ fth coming into the meet, then took to the track and faced a real challege to qualify for Regionals. Lead-off runner, Travis Parks, ran a very solid leg and then the other three runners, J.P Piotrowski, Albert Smythe, and Alan Pearson, followed suit and the boys ran to a fourth place “ nish and set a new school record of 8:47.21 in the process. Keith Gavin and Corion Knight then followed up with a dominating performance in the high jump. The two local jumpers have led the District all season and once again showed why. Gavin eventually placed “ rst with a jump of 66Ž, tying his season best and the school record. Knight, competiting for the “ rst time in almost a month due to an injury incurred at the FSU Invitational, was not quite 100 percent, but still jumped 64Ž easily placing second. The closest competitior to the local duo cleared just 58Ž. Gavin followed up with a superlative effort in his “ rst attempt at the long jump … “ nishing 5th with a jump of 2101Ž. In the girls high jump, senior Breighly Bolton, turned in a great performance, especially considering it was only the second time she had competed in that event. She jumped to a new personal best of 46Ž, a 4Ž improvement, and “ nished in 7th place, actually jumping the same height as the 5th and 6th place girls, but the tie was broken on the number of misses. The local throwers, led by Chris Damitz in the shotput and Nate Jackson in the discus, had solid performances, but did not advance. Shelby Alsup also performed well in both events for the girls. When the finals began at 4 p.m., it was time for the middle distance runners, who have been strong all year, to take the stage and they took advantage of the opportunity. For the girls, Madison Harris once again led the way. She started off with a decisive win, by 13 seconds, in the 1600 meters, “ nishing in 5:23. Junior Margaret Wiedeman secured a spot in the Regional Meet by running a strong 5:37 to “ nish third. A few minutes later, Harris was back on the starting line for the 800 meter run. This was the “ rst time she had ever attempted this double in a meet, but it proved to be no problem, as she took command of the race from the beginning and won handily in 2:22, over 6 seconds ahead of the second place runner. Lydia Wiedeman ran another excellent race, “ nishing in 3rd place and punchng her ticket to Bolles High School. Holli Capps rounded out the scoring in this event by “ nishing in 8th place. Then came the 3200 meter run and the local runners again proved to be factor, as Kayla Webbe and Raychel Gray ran strong, controlled races and worked together to “ nish in 3rd and 4th place respectively and also earned their spot at Regionals. Lilianna Broadway and Connie Lewis “ nished in 7th and 8th places to also score for the team. The “ nal event of the night for the ladies was the 4x400 meter relay. The WHS team was ranked 4th coming into the meet and had been running between 4:25 4:30 all season long, but on this night everyone on the team ran a superb time and the team “ nished in 4th place as predicted, but did so in a new school record time of 4:16.30. The team was led off by Savanna Harris, followed by Lydia Wiedeman, Savanna Strickland and anchored by Madison Harris. Taylor Vaughan also had a good meet, especially in the 100 meter hurdles, where she placed a strong 5th, only .04 of a second out of 4th and teammate, Amber Stewart, placed 8th. For the boys, the middle distance runners also performed well. J.P. Piotrowski led the way with an excellent performance in the 800 meters, “ nishing in 4th place in 2:05.46. His time is also a new school record, eclipsing the old record set by Shawn Morris by .41 of a second. In the 1600 meters, Evan Guarino set a new personal record (PR), but came up short of advancing. The 3200 meter run proved to be a coming out party for freshman Albert Smythe. He went into the “ nals with the second fastest time, but showed a lot of maturity, running a conservative “ rst 1600 meters and then put the hammer down and ran away from the “ eld and won his “ rst District Championship and set a new PR of 10:52.49 in the process. Travis Parks ran to a strong 5th place finish and Mitchell Atkinson rounded out the scoring for WHS with his 8th place “ nish. Overall, the girls finished in 4th place and the boys in 6th. The quali“ ers will travel to the Regional Meet at Jacksonvilles Bolles High School on Thursday, April 18. By CONNOR HARRISONSports correspondentThe Wakulla War Eagles baseball team faced the Rickards Raiders on April 5th where they managed to come out on top 3-1. The scoring “ nally came to Wakulla in the sixth inning when Bailey Metcalf started off the bottom of the inning by ripping the ball down the “ rst base line for a stand up double. The following batter, Micah Gray, bunted the ball, which rolled down the “ rst base line, staying fair allowing Metcalf to advance to third and Gray to get to “ rst base. Jeff Barnes followed up with a bunt of his own, but the ball was “ elded and thrown to “ rst base in time for an out, but this advanced Gray to second and brought Metcalf across home plate, tying the game at one. James Estes was the next batter in the line up and popped a ball high in the air to deep right “ eld, which was caught for an out and didnt advance the runner at second. Next up was Dalton Dugger, but before he could get a hit he was walked, putting a runner at “ rst and second with Brandon Geiger at the plate. Geiger took advantage of having runners on base and knocked both of them in with a good hit that gave him a double and a pair of runs batted in, and gave the War Eagles a two run lead. Wakulla would hold on to this lead for the remainder of the game to win 3-1. Jacob Walker was the starting pitcher for Wakulla and held the Raiders to a single run which came early in the game. Walker would eventually hand the pitching job off to Metcalf, who shut the Raiders out while on the mound for the rest of the game. This win puts Wakulla at 11-5 overall and 2-1 in conference play in the season.BASEBALL TRACKWar Eagles defeat Rickards, 3-1School records fall at district meetWakulla has three relay teams and eight individuals qualify for RegionalsOn Thursday, April 18, at 6 p.m., the Wakulla High School Baseball Team faces Leon on the War Eagle Battle Ground. Thursday’s game is the last regular season game – and is also Little League Night. All Wakulla County baseball players playing Little League baseball or younger get into the game free and get a free hotdog and drink if they are wearing their team shirt. The evening will begin at 5:30 p.m. with the 11 seniors on the team being recognized along with their families. There will be a drawing for an autographed, authentic FSU football helmet at the end of the game. The night is sure to be lled with hard hit balls, spectacular plays, strategic coaching and lots of cheering as the Wakulla players and fans cheer on their favorite baseball team at this last regular season game. Come join the fun and the excitement this Thursday night! Next week Wakulla will host the District Tournament. Those games will be played Monday, April 22 through Friday, April 26.Little League night is Thursday PHOTOS BY CONNOR HARRISONMicah Gray is safe at home, above. Jacob Walker on the mound, below. The Wakulla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. P.O. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsSpring is “ nally here though you couldnt prove it by Sundays weather. Trout are on the ” ats as well as pompano, sharks, Spanish, ladyfish and those stinking hardhead cat“ sh. I guess those cat“ sh have to eat also. The Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament is coming up on May 18 and they are still looking for captains to take some of these kids “ shing and also looking for sponsors. For a $100 donation you will have your name or your company name on 200 shirts to be given out at the tournament. This will be the only time some of these kids will “ sh all year so donate what you can so they can have a good time. You can send donations to Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament, PO Box 349, Panacea FL 32346 or call Ann Cooper at (850) 984-5501 or Peggy Bennett at (850) 926-7227 and they will make arrangements to pick it up. All donations are welcome. Ive always said and truly believe that if you get a kid hooked on “ shing or hunting you wont have to worry about him or her experimenting with drugs. Shell Island Fish Camp was hopping this weekend as the M S & H party came to town. They had a great time and went home with lots of “ sh. Gary Schnake and Shawn Mann had very good days coming in with lots of trout and reds. They weighed in a 5 pound trout and 7-pound red. Capt. Sid Stringer got his Captains License the same time I did. Things got slow around here and he went to work guiding for Alan Hobbs at Shell Island Fish Camp. For 17 years he guided in a boat without a top in the pounding sun and caught more “ sh than most people can imagine. Sid is turning 86 and at the end of the Spring Season he told the folks at Shell Island he was hanging it up. Sid is my hero. I just hope I can still be guiding when Im 85. Good luck in whatever you decide to do. Your charters are gonna miss you. Jimmy said they are getting some pretty shrimp in and will have them until mid July. Capt. JR at the Aucilla River said “ shing is real good. There were still trout in the creeks but he doubts it after the 3-inch rain they had. He said quite a few people from the Kevins Red Trout Shootout “ shed down his way this past weekend and some did well while others struggled. He had a friend down that wanted to catch a redfish and some of the guys from the tournament stopped in before he went. She said lets get a picture with one of their “ sh and I will tell folks I caught one, just in case. JR said get in the truck and lets go. She landed a 27-inch red, which would have been a tournament contender and a big trout. She apologized for doubting JRs ability. JR said he is having shoulder problems and its making it tough to “ sh. I asked if it was from too much fishing and he said from too much catching. Randy Peart is catching lots of big trout at the Econ“ na using the Gulp and Twitch and Rap. He said the bigger trout are close to shore though people are catching plenty in 4 to 5 feet of water, but they are smaller trout. Some reds are being caught but still not what it should be. Trolling in close for grouper is good in 18 to 22 feet of water over the rock piles off the Aucilla and Econ“ na and Spanish are starting to show up. I fished with Morris Brown and Glenn Forrester on Friday and we caught about 20 keeper reds and 7 or 8 trout. We caught everything on live shrimp under a Cajun Thunder. Morris said he went with a friend opening day of grouper season and left the ramp at 8:30 and had the limit of gags by 10:30. They were trolling Stretch 25s and also caught and released two big bull reds. Saturday before last I took Frank Wolf, his wife and two kids. Frank was a customer of the Purple Martin Nursery and when I was in there one day about a year ago he told me he was a nurse in the army and was going to Afghanistan for a year. I told him to let me know when he got back and I would take them “ shing. We caught some big sheepshead, his wife caught a 37-inch red and both of his boys caught 27 and 29-inch reds. I wanted him to catch one but it just wasnt to be. We came in and trout fished the flats though and he started showing off. Every time I turned around he had a keeper or short trout on. It was a great trip with some great people and a true hero in my mind. Two of my childhood buddies came down from Pine Mountain and Dawsonville, Ga., and “ shed with me Wednesday and Thursday. Peter retired last year and I told him I would take he and Alan for Petes retirement gift. They had not seen each other since Alan went in the Marines in 67 and Pete went in the Army in 67 and straight to Vietnam. We caught our limit of reds both days and threw back another 26 keepers. They also took home 28 trout. The trout wanted the white Gulp and the reds wanted the live shrimp. This was the “ rst good day on reds and some of the fish were light colored and had just come in from offshore while others were copper colored. They also fought well and those we released were very happy. I wanted to put a picture in the paper of Mike Falks little 5-year-old Carson but I will do it next week. This little kid has mastered the Zebco and is now casting a spinning rod. He is 5 years old! I take people 55 who cant cast one. The first Annual Big Bend Kayak Classic “ shing tournament will be held May 3 and May 4. There will be a freshwater division, youth division for 16 and under and an adult saltwater division for red“ sh and trout. Registration fee is $75 and prizes include Kayaks and cash money. The proceeds bene“ t Meals on Wheels and other senior services. For more information call (850) 926-7145 or go to www.wakullaseniorcitizens.com. Another great cause. Warriors and Quiet Waters is still looking for sponsors. You can contact Bill Russell at (850) 9336500. Lots of folks are helping and donating for this and I want to personally thank Angie at AMS in Medart and Ronald Fred Crum in Panacea. Dont forget to know your limits and leave that ” oat plan.Good luck and good “ shing!Trout are on the ats Plus pompano, sharks, Spanish, lady sh and those stinking hardhead cat sh From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Holly Wolf with a 37-inch red, and Blake Wolf, 9, and Cameron Wolf, 13, both caught 29-inch reds, “ shing with Capt. Jody Campbell.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS WEEK • The Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin’ Festival on Saturday, April 13 • Wakulla Springs Wild Life Festival Saturday, April 20Special Events are still being Scheduled in each Community • Panacea / Ochlockonee Bay Friday April 12 • St. Marks Sunday April 14 • Sopchoppy Monday April 15 • Crawfordville Friday April 19Adventures Await ... Excitement Builds ... Explorations are Planned!!!Wakulla is the Natural Place to see Wildlife, catch the big one, swim or paddle one of the Remarkable Waters.Discover why Wakulla goes WILD April 12 the 20th. Want to Catch Worms? • Help Tag Birds? Learn About Pirates? Want toTake a Fantastic Eco-Heritage tour of our Woods and Wonderous Waters or Historic Landmarks?Help us Sustain a Vibrant Environment.WildAboutWakulla.comIf your business or Organization would like to HOST an EVENT, Join Others in a Blockparty, offer music, or just offer specials for the Day or Week, Please Contact Cynthia Paulson-850-556-4249, Jeff Hugo 850-561-7286, Lynda Kinsey 850-570-9944 or e-mail Info@WildAboutWakulla.com 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Go Painlessly with THERA-GESIC. G G G Maximum strength analgesic creme for temporary relief from: € Joint and Muscle soreness € Arthritis € Back aches THG-13902

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiencesCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD What is in a ” ag? Apart from the cloth, design and colors, a ” ag is a symbol. Most countries have a ” ag that symbolizes their struggle for independence, their moral values and history. Flags are used as a form of communications to identify nationality, types of activities or letters of the alphabet. Aquanauts use ” ags too. Early in my career I used a ” ag as a current meter below our under ice portal in the Antarctic. The start of every dive began with a surface inspection of the ” ag at 15 feet. When seen ” uttering at full extension, we would postpone the dives. When seen ” apping gently in the current, we took note of its direction to plan our days activity. In 27 degree water, every contingency was carefully considered. For centuries mariners have used a series of code ” ags to describe what is going on around their boat. Chapmans Piloting, Seamanship and Small Boat Handling describes these ” ags in all their colors and shapes. The red diver ” ag for example, appears to be a derivative of the guest ” ag, which was blue with a white diagonal bar, and used when guests were aboard. Perhaps the diver was a welcome guest! Divers inherited two ” ags used to indicate people in the water. The state of Florida adopted one, a red ” ag with a white diagonal bar from top pole to bottom outer tip as the required ” ag to designate a diver is within 100 feet. Boats are not allowed to approach this ” ag within 100 feet under penalty of law. Divers in the water not displaying this ” ag in Florida waters can be “ ned $50. A person need only wear a mask to be de“ ned as a diver so beware snorkel divers while scalloping along our coast. Beyond State waters, 9 miles in the Gulf of Mexico, the federal government requires the blue against the pole, white pennant or Alpha ” ag for similar purposes. Technically these ” ags are not interchangeable. We display the American ” ag high on our radio pole at Wakulla Diving Center. We display the Florida dive ” ag under our sign, a recognition that divers are found here. And we ” y a green ” ag with an orange diagonal bar that designates that technical diving is supported here. These colors represent our blended breathing gas called Nitrox. These days, we produce more Nitrox than compressed air, the other gas divers breathe underwater. This month I am attaching to our technical diving green ” ag an old symbol, the in“ nity or “ gure 8, which represents recirculation, to represent our re-emerging rebreather technology. It was “ rst used by Borelli in the 1700s next to a drawing of a hypothetical rebreather diver. No one took the drawing of the diver seriously and consequently overlooked the bow of a submarine protruding into the picture. Cornelius Dribbles submersible however, successfully used rebreather technology to support his submariners while underwater, and the rest is history. Yes, thats right … technical diving is older than recreational diving by several centuries. And I want our ” ag to represent that proud heritage.Once again, thank you to Duane Treadon for submitting the following report. Last Saturday our Flotilla held its monthly meeting at the Naval Reserve Center in Tallahassee. The meeting was divided into reports of activity from staff of“ cers and member training. During the staff of“ cer reports members were updated on the success of many recent programs and opportunities to participate in future events. Recent past successful programs included the St. Patricks Day parade and festival in Crawfordville and Springtime Tallahassee. During both events members talked with many interested and just curious people about boating safety, what we do in the Auxiliary, and our public education course offering. The Flotillas Pubic Affairs Of“ cer Chuck Hickman commented that these events are important for getting the word out to the public about all the great stuff the Auxiliary does. Also discussed was our upcoming About Boating SafelyŽ class April 20. There were still seats available and anyone interested in taking the class can contact the FSOPE at fso-pe@uscgaux.net to reserve their seat or they can register and pay online at www.uscgaux. net. The course will be taught at the FWC of“ ce building in Tallahassee. Cost is $30 for an individual or $50 for a family up to four. The other big item discussed was the Crew Quali“ cation Exam mission being held April 27. During this mission two members, Dave Rabon and Terry Hoxworth, will be tested on land and on the water in their crew skills. A Quali“ cation Examiner will be coming over from Panama City to evaluate Dave and Terry. Good luck to both Dave and Terry in their QE mission. After hearing all about the exciting things each program area had been participating in the meeting was turned over to Duane Treadon, the Information Systems (IS) staff of“ cer. The primary role of the IS of“ cer is to insure an accurate recording of the members activities in the AUXDATA national database. This is accomplished in part by having the members turn in activity and mission reports to Duane for entry into the database. The forms used to record time can sometimes be confusing so Duane provided members training on proper form completion. It is important that each Flotilla insures an accurate and complete recording of all member activity. Its amazing to run a Flotilla report at the end of the year and see the thousands of volunteer hours donated by our members. When you add in all of the individual contacts members have with the boating and general public through public affairs, education, program visits, free vessel checks, and patrol mission it truly demonstrate the impact the Auxiliary can and does have in promoting responsible and safe boaters,Ž stated Treadon. On Sunday, four members went to Lloyd to provide a safe boating course to several Boy Scouts. Tim Ashley, Gary Owens and Mark Rosen cofacilitated the abbreviated traditional eight-hour ABS class. The 10 scouts and four adults were treated to not only information, but also many sea stories throughout the day! At the end of the day, the scouts all completed the class toward the required tasks for their Motorboating Merit Badge. Thank you to Tim Ashley for the information and Norma Hill for the photos! If you would like to talk to us about scheduling a class, please contact Alex Gulde, our Flotilla Staff Officer for Public Education at fso-pe@uscgaux.net The Flotilla will hold its next meeting Saturday, May 4 at the Crawfordville Fire station starting at 9:30 a.m. Interested in coming by and learning about the Auxiliary please contact Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon at fc@ uscgaux.net or Vice Commander Norma Hill at vfc@uscgaux.net If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux. net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident! Be prepared and be safe! Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Mark Rosen and Gary Owens teaching a safe boating course to Boy Scouts in Lloyd. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Apr 18, 13 Fri Apr 19, 13 Sat Apr 20, 13 Sun Apr 21, 13 Mon Apr 22, 13 Tue Apr 23, 13 Wed Apr 24, 13 D ate 3.0 ft. 12:24 AM 3.2 ft. 1:16 AM 3.5 ft. 2:04 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 2:28 AM 0.8 ft. 3:47 AM 0.7 ft. 4:55 AM 0.7 ft. 5:49 AM 0.7 ft. 6:33 AM 0.7 ft. 7:11 AM 0.8 ft. 7:47 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 9:41 AM 2.7 ft. 10:55 AM 2.9 ft. 11:46 AM 3.1 ft. 12:23 PM 3.4 ft. 12:55 PM 3.6 ft. 1:24 PM 3.8 ft. 1:53 PM Hi g h 1.9 ft. 2:21 PM 1.8 ft. 4:08 PM 1.4 ft. 5:28 PM 1.0 ft. 6:24 PM 0.5 ft. 7:08 PM 0.0 ft. 7:50 PM -0.4 ft. 8:30 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:36 PM 2.6 ft. 9:40 PM 2.7 ft. 11:19 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 18, 13 Fri Apr 19, 13 Sat Apr 20, 13 Sun Apr 21, 13 Mon Apr 22, 13 Tue Apr 23, 13 Wed Apr 24, 13 D ate 2.2 ft. 12:16 AM 2.4 ft. 1:08 AM 2.6 ft. 1:56 AM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 2:39 AM 0.6 ft. 3:58 AM 0.5 ft. 5:06 AM 0.5 ft. 6:00 AM 0.5 ft. 6:44 AM 0.5 ft. 7:22 AM 0.6 ft. 7:58 AM L ow 1.9 ft. 9:33 AM 2.0 ft. 10:47 AM 2.2 ft. 11:38 AM 2.4 ft. 12:15 PM 2.5 ft. 12:47 PM 2.7 ft. 1:16 PM 2.8 ft. 1:45 PM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 2:32 PM 1.3 ft. 4:19 PM 1.0 ft. 5:39 PM 0.7 ft. 6:35 PM 0.3 ft. 7:19 PM 0.0 ft. 8:01 PM -0.3 ft. 8:41 PM L ow 2.0 ft. 7:28 PM 1.9 ft. 9:32 PM 2.0 ft. 11:11 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 18, 13 Fri Apr 19, 13 Sat Apr 20, 13 Sun Apr 21, 13 Mon Apr 22, 13 Tue Apr 23, 13 Wed Apr 24, 13 D ate 2.8 ft. 1:00 AM 3.0 ft. 1:52 AM 3.2 ft. 2:40 AM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 3:32 AM 0.7 ft. 4:51 AM 0.7 ft. 5:59 AM 0.6 ft. 6:53 AM 0.6 ft. 7:37 AM 0.7 ft. 8:15 AM 0.7 ft. 8:51 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 10:17 AM 2.5 ft. 11:31 AM 2.7 ft. 12:22 PM 2.9 ft. 12:59 PM 3.1 ft. 1:31 PM 3.3 ft. 2:00 PM 3.5 ft. 2:29 PM Hi g h 1.7 ft. 3:25 PM 1.6 ft. 5:12 PM 1.3 ft. 6:32 PM 0.9 ft. 7:28 PM 0.4 ft. 8:12 PM 0.0 ft. 8:54 PM -0.4 ft. 9:34 PM L ow 2.5 ft. 8:12 PM 2.4 ft. 10:16 PM 2.5 ft. 11:55 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 18, 13 Fri Apr 19, 13 Sat Apr 20, 13 Sun Apr 21, 13 Mon Apr 22, 13 Tue Apr 23, 13 Wed Apr 24, 13 D ate 2.3 ft. 12:08 AM 2.5 ft. 1:00 AM 2.7 ft. 1:48 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 2:07 AM 0.7 ft. 3:26 AM 0.7 ft. 4:34 AM 0.7 ft. 5:28 AM 0.7 ft. 6:12 AM 0.7 ft. 6:50 AM 0.8 ft. 7:26 AM L ow 2.0 ft. 9:25 AM 2.1 ft. 10:39 AM 2.3 ft. 11:30 AM 2.4 ft. 12:07 PM 2.6 ft. 12:39 PM 2.8 ft. 1:08 PM 2.9 ft. 1:37 PM Hi g h 1.8 ft. 2:00 PM 1.7 ft. 3:47 PM 1.4 ft. 5:07 PM 0.9 ft. 6:03 PM 0.5 ft. 6:47 PM 0.0 ft. 7:29 PM -0.4 ft. 8:09 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 7:20 PM 2.0 ft. 9:24 PM 2.1 ft. 11:03 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 18, 13 Fri Apr 19, 13 Sat Apr 20, 13 Sun Apr 21, 13 Mon Apr 22, 13 Tue Apr 23, 13 Wed Apr 24, 13 D ate 3.0 ft. 12:21 AM 3.3 ft. 1:13 AM 3.5 ft. 2:01 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 2:25 AM 0.8 ft. 3:44 AM 0.8 ft. 4:52 AM 0.8 ft. 5:46 AM 0.8 ft. 6:30 AM 0.8 ft. 7:08 AM 0.9 ft. 7:44 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 9:38 AM 2.7 ft. 10:52 AM 3.0 ft. 11:43 AM 3.2 ft. 12:20 PM 3.4 ft. 12:52 PM 3.6 ft. 1:21 PM 3.8 ft. 1:50 PM Hi g h 2.0 ft. 2:18 PM 1.9 ft. 4:05 PM 1.5 ft. 5:25 PM 1.0 ft. 6:21 PM 0.5 ft. 7:05 PM 0.0 ft. 7:47 PM -0.4 ft. 8:27 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 7:33 PM 2.6 ft. 9:37 PM 2.8 ft. 11:16 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 18, 13 Fri Apr 19, 13 Sat Apr 20, 13 Sun Apr 21, 13 Mon Apr 22, 13 Tue Apr 23, 13 Wed Apr 24, 13 D ate 2.2 ft. 12:08 AM 2.3 ft. 1:20 AM 2.4 ft. 2:24 AM Hi g h 0.3 ft. 1:57 AM 0.4 ft. 3:03 AM 0.5 ft. 4:02 AM 0.6 ft. 4:54 AM 0.8 ft. 5:41 AM 1.0 ft. 6:23 AM 1.1 ft. 7:02 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 10:02 AM 2.3 ft. 10:46 AM 2.4 ft. 11:22 AM 2.4 ft. 11:52 AM 2.5 ft. 12:17 PM 2.6 ft. 12:41 PM 2.7 ft. 1:05 PM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 2:33 PM 1.2 ft. 3:53 PM 1.0 ft. 4:55 PM 0.7 ft. 5:45 PM 0.5 ft. 6:28 PM 0.2 ft. 7:08 PM -0.1 ft. 7:48 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 7:42 PM 2.1 ft. 9:12 PM 2.1 ft. 10:45 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 18 April 24First April 18 Full April 25 Last May 2 New May 9Major Times 7:48 AM 9:48 AM 8:11 PM 10:11 PM Minor Times 2:14 AM 3:14 AM 1:22 PM 2:22 PM Major Times 8:34 AM 10:34 AM 8:56 PM 10:56 PM Minor Times 2:53 AM 3:53 AM 2:16 PM 3:16 PM Major Times 9:19 AM 11:19 AM 9:42 PM 11:42 PM Minor Times 3:30 AM 4:30 AM 3:12 PM 4:12 PM Major Times 10:05 AM 12:05 PM 10:29 PM 12:29 AM Minor Times 4:05 AM 5:05 AM 4:09 PM 5:09 PM Major Times 10:53 AM 12:53 PM 11:17 PM 1:17 AM Minor Times 4:41 AM 5:41 AM 5:08 PM 6:08 PM Major Times --:---:-11:42 AM 1:42 PM Minor Times 5:18 AM 6:18 AM 6:09 PM 7:09 PM Major Times 12:07 AM 2:07 AM 12:33 PM 2:33 PM Minor Times 5:58 AM 6:58 AM 7:13 PM 8:13 PM Average+ Average+ Average Average Average Good Better7:06 am 8:06 pm 1:23 pm 2:16 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:05 am 8:07 pm 2:17 pm 2:54 am 7:04 am 8:07 pm 3:13 pm 3:31 am 7:03 am 8:08 pm 4:10 pm 4:06 am 7:02 am 8:09 pm 5:09 pm 4:42 am 7:01 am 8:09 pm 6:10 pm 5:19 am 7:00 am 8:10 pm 7:14 pm 5:59 am49% 55% 61% 68% 74% 81% 89% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews. com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 13Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn April 9, Swapnilkumar Amin of the Crawfordville Quick Stop reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of lottery tickets and the cashing out of the tickets at several locations. Evidence was collected and a suspect has been identi“ ed. The victim reported the lottery ticket loss at $10,200. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: APRIL 4 € Irma Seaman of Sopchoppy reported the theft of a bank card from her home. A suspect, who has been identi“ ed, used the card to create $400 worth of unauthorized purchases on the card. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Brodrick Alls, 24, of Quincy, an inmate at the Wakulla County Jail, received two pieces of mail from Gadsden County that contained loose tobacco and Spice. The envelopes and contraband contents were seized as evidence. The case was forwarded to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Mike Zimba, Detention Deputy Dewayne Metcalf and Lt. Julie Martin investigated. € Deputy Scott Rojas “ led a report of his investigation from two days earlier of a student at Wakulla High School who was not responsive in class. The student appeared to be under the influence of alcohol or narcotics. Deputy Rojas took the 16year-old male to the WHS Clinic and Wakulla EMS arrived to assist. EMS staff transported the student to Capital Regional Medical Center for treatment. The following day the student admitted what he had taken and from whom he received the narcotic. € Lillian Franklin of Crawfordville reported the theft of a lawn chair from her home. The chair was sitting next to her driveway when it was stolen. It is valued at $15. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. APRIL 5 € A trespass warning was issued against a 43year-old Crawfordville woman and her 17-yearold daughter at El Jalisco restaurant following an incident in which the woman became loud and began cursing patrons inside. The general manager decided to pursue only trespass warnings. Detective Rob Giddens, Lt. Bruce Ashley, Sgt. Billy Jones and Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € Dawn Cooper of Panacea reported the theft of a ladder. The ladder was placed next to a boat and is valued at $150. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. A suspect was allegedly observed taking items from shelves but not paying for the items when she reached the check out area. Amanda Suzanne Davis, 23, of Panacea was observed taking clothing, jewelry and cosmetics, valued at $99. She was charged with retail theft. Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € Angel Rowe of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and household goods, tools, televisions, jewelry, a bed, clothing, furniture and a pool, valued at $7,850, were reported stolen. Deputies Nick Gray, David Pienta and Will Hudson investigated. APRIL 6 € Robin Lindquist of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim discovered egg residue on her home and mailbox. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Luther Kilgore of Sopchoppy reported a grand theft of jewelry from his home. The jewelry is valued at $5,050 and suspects have been identi“ ed. Deputy Randy Phillips, Sgt. Ryan Muse and Detective Matt Helms investigated. € Timothy Pearce of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Tools were taken from the victims garage. The property was valued at $675. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Leaston Strickland of Crawfordville reported a traffic crash at Whiddon Lake Road and Stokley Road. A motorist ran through a cemetery fence and created $300 worth of damage. The motorist was traveling too fast for the conditions and crashed through the fence, looped around the cemetery and left the scene through the hole in the fence. Deputy David Pienta and Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Christal Thompson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of cash from her home. The loss was $800. Deputy Will Hudson and Deputy David Pienta investigated. APRIL 7 € A 74-year-old Ohio man was reported as unresponsive by his 46year-old daughter in the Apalachicola National Forest. Wakulla EMS responded to Forest Road 348B but the victim was declared deceased. The deceased, family members and friends were camping when the victim passed away. Deputies did not “ nd anything suspicious about the death. Deputy Will Hudson, Deputy David Pienta and Detective Matt Helms investigated. € A 14-year-old juvenile from Crawfordville reported a grand theft of an iPad from a vacant crab house on Raker Lane. The iPad and cover was valued at $800 and was entered in the NCIC/FCIC data base. Evidence was obtained regarding suspects. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. APRIL 8 € Major Shepard Bruner of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce was at a stop sign at Alexander Road and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road when he was struck from behind by a vehicle that failed to stop. The vehicle was driven by Stephanie D. Pearson of Crawfordville. There were no injuries and only minor damage to both vehicles. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € Robert Forsythe of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. A total of $100 worth of CDs and a CD case were removed from his vehicle. A second victim reported the theft of cigarettes and a wallet, valued at $25. A third victim reported the theft of her purse and contents, valued at $180. Two juveniles, ages 13 and 14, were interviewed and admitted taking items from the vehicles. They were charged with burglary and theft. Detective Clint Beam, Detective Cole Wells and Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € Joseph Vernon of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of medications and GPS units from two of his vehicles. The medications and GPS units are valued at $360. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Cassandra Peters, 24, of Carrabelle was arrested for retail theft after she was observed putting unpaid for merchandise in bags that contained paid for merchandise inside them. The 75 unpaid for items included clothing, food items, cleaning materials, diapers and more. The items were valued at $341. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Jeannie Ross of Panacea reported the theft of bank checks from her home. The checks were forged and passed at a Panacea business establishment. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € Jason Thompson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A boat motor was stolen from a boat while being used by a friend. The motor is valued at $600. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Linda Flinkman of Crawfordville reported the theft of currency from her home. A suspect was identi“ ed and the victim reported the loss of $1,500. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Tammy Newberry of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed several charges on her bank card. The charges totaled $200 in North Vancouver and Orlando. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. A 16-year-old male stole light bulbs from the store. The juvenile concealed the bulbs in his clothing and attempted to leave the store. The bulbs were for use in a vehicle taillight and are valued at $7. He was arrested for retail theft. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. APRIL 9 € Shelia Holder of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry and a “ rearm were removed from her home. The missing property is valued at $150. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Shannon Nicole Pate, 30, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed removing clothing from the store without paying for it. The merchandise is valued at $48. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Bradley Lalonde of Crawfordville reported the theft of personal property from his home. The missing items included a bicycle, tools, cast net, sand spikes and more, valued at $325. Suspects were identi“ ed. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. APRIL 10 € Chad Puduah of Crawfordville reported the theft of a bicycle from his residence. The bike is valued at $105. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Clarence Cline of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping. The victim had been out of town and returned to “ nd his trash bins full. There was approximately 100 pounds of garbage in the cans. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Donald Krasczyk of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A forced entry was discovered and jewelry and coins were removed from the home. The stolen items are valued at $1,360. Damage to the home is estimated at $200. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Randy Phillips and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. € George Apthorp of Crawfordville reported the theft of two “ rearms. The missing “ rearms are valued at $400. They were entered in the NCIC/FCIC data base. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,152 calls for service during the past week.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce deputies arrested a 29-year-old Crawfordville man Thursday, April 11 in connection with a felony narcotics violation following a traffic stop on Woodville Highway, according to Sheriff Charlie Creel. Shane Alan Shappard was arrested for possession of marijuana with intent to sell and possession of narcotics equipment after deputies spotted him driving a motor vehicle at 70 miles per hour in a 55 mile per hour zone. Deputy Will Hudson conducted a traf“ c stop and detected a strong odor of marijuana emanating from the vehicle. A search of the vehicle discovered multiple individually packaged marijuana bags as well as glass pipes, rolling papers, currency and a digital scale. The marijuana bags were collected and the total weight was 35.3 grams. A pill and orange powdery substance was also con“ scated for analysis. The total U.S. currency con“ scated totaled $207. Shappard was transported to the Wakulla County Jail without incident. Crawfordville man faces felony pot charges Shane Alan Shappard the EATIN’ path… OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and Catering Roy BassinMarch 2013 WinnerHis name was drawn fromTHIS IS GREAT!Ž OFF The Eatin’ Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin’ Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlor ank You So Much! DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKS LLC Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A.• Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comWORM GRUNTIN' FESTIVAL The late Myron B. Hodge was a businessman whose many ventures including buying and selling worms. He a tireless promoter of Sopchoppy who served on the city commission and battled to buy the city park that is now named for him. He was featured in the Charles Kuralt On the RoadŽ segment from 1972 on worm grunting. He died in 1976. Hodge was named 2013 Worm Gruntin King. Worm Gruntin King for 2013Worm Gruntin 5K RaceMyron Hodges family … daughter Rita Hodge, former wife Ann Nichols, and daughter Martha Hodge Evans … after accepting the honor of 2013 Worm Gruntin King. Rita recalled being taken on trips as a child as they took worms to Marietta, then driving back so that he could sleep. He would tell her, Just keep driving til you get to the stop sign and wake me up.Ž Ann Nichols recalled being something of a celebrity after the Charles Kuralt story, even getting invited to go on the Johnny Carson show. But no,Ž she said with a laugh, that was not for them. Too country,Ž she said. Looking for worms during the worm gruntin contest. The weigh-in for the worm gruntin contest. Learning about bears at the wildlife commission tent. People on Rose Street in Sopchoppy visiting vendors at the festival. Congressional candidate Gwen Graham visits the Wild About Wakulla booth.Professional worm grunter Audrey Revell shows a handful of earthworms.Taking on the rock climb. There were 148 participants in the Worm Gruntin 5K. Top “ nisher was Stanley Linton, who ran the course in 15:56. Chris Bach took second in 17:05, and third was Anthony Kucera in 17:28. Top female was Emily Smith in 21:46. The list of prize winning runners will appear in next weeks News on the Sports page. More photos online at thewakullanews.com PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 15A Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, April 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. The group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, April 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, April 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. Monday, April 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Monday, April 22  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853.  NAMI of Wakulla presents Jennifer Barr with Apalachee Task Force, discussing the topic of Suicide at 6:30 p.m. Open to the public at no cost. Crawfordville Women’s Club. For more info call 926-1033. Tuesday, April 23  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at 6:30 p.m.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. Wednesday, April 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS welcomes newcomers at 6:30 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS holds open discussion at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend.  Mah Jongg Club meets every Wednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Thursday, April 25  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for all, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Government Meetings Thursday, April 18  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, May 6  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. at commission chambers. Monday, May 8  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a code enforcement meeting at 5:30 p.m. at commission chambers. Monday, May 13  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a Planning Commission meeting at 7 p.m. at commission chambers. FSU Coastal & Marine Lab’s Spring Open House from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Green Business Expo at TCC will be held from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. Tallahassee Scienti c Society hosts lecture beginning at 7 p.m. Cancer Support Group meets at 7 p.m. at Crawfordville UMC.SaturdayTuesdayThursdayThursday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.net Weekly meetings Special EventsSaturday, April 20 WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL, a celebration of outdoor activities and area heritage, will be held at Wakulla Spring Lodge from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Local artists will offer creations showcasing the wildlife and heritage of the Big Bend Region. Live music begins in the Lodge at noon featuring folk music, Appalachian Clogging, and Bluegrass.  TRADITIONS DINNER DANCE welcomes the Tallahassee Swing Band to the Wakulla Lodge. There will be two seatings for dinner. Reservations are recommended through the Wildlife Festival web site wakullawildlifefestival.org. Tickets are $39 per person.  ST. MARK’S YACHT CLUB hosts national lm expert, Professor Frank Patterson, Dean of the FSU College of Motion Picture Arts, at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny will conduct an interview with him during the Close and Personal Spotlight Event at the Yacht Club.  THE FSU COASTAL & MARINE Laboratory’s Spring Open House will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will include tours of the new 65-ft. research vessel, the RV APALACHEE, interactive displays by scientists, silent auction and food by Seineyard.  HEIDE’S 17TH ANNUAL ROSE Sale will be held Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville. Proceeds go the CHAT Adoption Center to provide food, medicines, vaccinations, and vet expenses for animals at the adoption center. Three gallon containers will be sold for $8 each or three for $21.  FLORIDA LIGHTHOUSE DAY will be observed at the Cape St. George Light on St. George Island, Florida, with free climbing all day on Saturday, April 20, 2013. Florida Lighthouse Day commemorates the 30 remaining lighthouses in the State of Florida that have been, and continue to be, an important part of the state’s maritime history. The Cape St. George Light, located at the center of St. George Island, will be open from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. For more information, please contact the Lighthouse Gift Shop at 850-927-7745, or Terry Kemp at 850-927-2000.Tuesday, April 23  WAKULLA COUNTY RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will conduct a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department at Shell Point.  THE WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE AND REFUGE HOUSE, INC present guest speaker, Alesia Adams, Services Coordinator Against Human and Sexual Traf ckiing, at the First Baptist Church of Crawfordville at noon. Call 926-9005 for more information.  GREEN BUSINESS EXPO is being presented by The City of Tallahassee and Tallahassee Community College. Celebrating Earth Day 2013 with “The Business of Green: Innovating for the Economy and the Environment,” a green business expo from 1p.m. to 8 p.m. at TCC’s Center for Workforce Development. The Business of Green event will feature a Green Business Expo from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. The Expo will showcase businesses, non-profits, governments, and educational institutions that offer green services and products and green job training; Creating Green Poster Competition, 2 p.m. to 6 p.m., challenges high school and college students to create business solutions that address current environmental, economic, and social challenges; Green Businesses Best Practices Conversation 6:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. will be moderated by Kim Moore, Vice President of Workforce Development at TCC. This keynote event will feature area entrepreneurs and business leaders from various sectors of our business community. Thursday, April 25  TALLAHASSEE SCIENTIFIC SOCIETY hosts “Horizons 2013,” a four-month spring speaker series. Archeologist Dr. Maria Jacobsen will present “The H.L. Hunley: Surprising Facts About the Confederacy’s Secret Weapon” at the IMAX Theater within the Challenger Learning Center on Kleman Plaza, Tallahassee. The event begins at 7 p.m. Tickets are $6 each for members, $12 for non-members, and can be purchased at the door or online from the Tallahassee Scienti c Society’s web site at www.tallysci.org or by calling 850-877-0224. Saturday, April 27  NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS presents Third Annual Triple Crown Derby Fundraiser starting at 5 p.m. Sponsor a Wakulla County celebrity and watch the races at Camp Indian Springs Equestrian Center on Bloxham Cutoff Road. BBQ dinner to follow. $20 for adults, $7 for children ages 7  15, children 6 and under free. Sponsorship does not include tickets to the event.  VOLUNTEER WAKULLA presents the Sixth Annnual Make A Difference Day from 9 a.m. – noon, Learn how to create your own hurricane disaster kit at the livestock pavillion.  VAUSE REUNION, Ancestors of Ephraim Vause and Margaret Revell Vause will hold a reunion at the Pee Wee Vause Farm in Crawfordville. The event begins with registration at 10:30 a.m. and lunch at noon. Please bring a covered dish to share. For more information contact Claxton Vause at 962-2371. Saturday, May 4  WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK celebrates Sinkhole di Mayo from 5 to 8 p.m. Advance tickets include admission to the park, food, a boat ride and a couple of interesting talks about sinkholes and the Spanish. Organized by the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park, advance tickets are available online at wakullasprings.org at $25 for adults and $15 for children under 12. For more information contact Elinor Elfner at 5241026. Tuesday, May 7  WAKULLA COUNTY RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will conduct a public meeting at 6 p.m. at Sopchoppy City Hall. This meeting is intended to provide citizens with information on the RESTORE Act, the activities of the Wakulla County RESTORE Act Committee, and a question and answer session. Saturday, May 18  FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK will host the annual Wakulla Springs 5K run through “the sanctuary,” a wilderness area of the state park not open to the general public. Registration begins at 7 a.m., One mile fun run begins at 8 a.m., 5K begins at 8:30 a.m. Find early registration information at www.wakullasprings. org/projects.html. Wakulla Springs State Park, 465 Wakulla Park Drive (15 miles south of Tallahassee on SR 267.) April18-26 SPECIAL TO THE WAKULA NEWSGuitar duo, Carlos and Carlos, will perform at the Wakulla Wildlife Festival from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Alike Atlas Attack Breeze Cared Considerable Curves Drain Drily Eaten Entertainment Explains Extra Flying Gates Girls Hatch Heres Hooks Jagged Kings Knight League Leaving Light Liked Lords Music Opera Piano Poetry Poverty Price Queue YOUR AD HERE Resign Roads Roars Shaken Sheet Silvery Speed Spins Stage Tackle Takes Title T-shirt Twinkle Volume Wildly The Wak u lla Ne ws F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 17A Todays New Ads Multi-Family SaleApril 20th 7am-2pm Furniture, clothing, much much more 66 Dunken Drive, Crawfordville Live in Care Giver for your loved ones, Excellent Referrances Call Joyce Ann 850-661-1312 Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com AIRLINE CAREERS -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES AREHIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Driver -One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months. $0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly Pay, Hometime Choices. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSIN ARUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST AJOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Dont Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Heavy Equipment Operator Career!3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators.National Certifications. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends!Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to OwnNo Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Growing Auto Repair ShopMechanic Position, must have tools. Service writer, experience helpful. Tireman, experience helpful. Apply in person at Crawfordville Auto and Tire, 2235 Crawfordville Hwy. between 10AM-2PM, Mon-Fri. PIANISTCrawfordville United Methodist Church is looking for a pianist. Pianist will accompany the choir and congregational singing and play service music such as prelude, offertory, and postlude. They will also play for weekly choir rehearsal, Sunday pre-service warm up, Sunday service and other special services as needed. Applicant should be able to play hymns in the UMC hymnal, accompany traditional and contemporary choral works and SATB parts at weekly rehearsal. For more information please contact the church office at 850-926-7209. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-443-5186 www .CenturaOnline. com Satellite TV DIRECTV Official TV Deal -Americas top satellite provider! DIRECTV Plans starting at $29.99/mo for 12 months after instant rebate. Get the best in entertainment. 800-253-0519 CRAWFORDVILLE GIANT YARD SALE (50+ Families)Clothing, appliances, furniture, housewares, electronics, toys and much, much more!Saturday, April 20th8:30 am -Until ???CHRIST CHURCH ANGLICANHwy. 98 (East of Wakulla HIgh) Multi-Family SaleApril 20th 7am-2pm Furniture, clothing, much much more 66 Dunken Drive, Crawfordville NEIGHBORHOOD YARD SALE Bridlegate Sat. April 20th 8am-NoonJust South of Walmart off 319 PANACEAEstate, linens, household items, dog crate, Truck tool box, tools, roll around stair case Sat April 20th 9am-4pm 252 Levy Bay Rd, 850-984-5329 Protect your IRAand 401(k) from inflation by owning physical gold or silver! Tax-free, hassle-free rollovers. Free Gold GuideŽ AMERICAN BULLION, (800) 527-5679 LOSTMALTESE MIX Lost in Carrabelle on March 1st Small white 9 pound male, 3 years old. Toby has fluffy white fur with one ear that stands up sometimes and a flag tail. He is a comfort dog to nursing home patients as well as his owner. $500 reward no questions asked. Please call if you know anything 8502949664 CRAWFORDVILLEFor Rent or Lease Purchase 3 BR 2 BATH, DWMH with CAH Near Lake Ellen Boat ramp. Great Condition. $695 + deposit, application, references. Call 850-524-4090 CrawfordvilleFurnished Cottage 2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/DR area. CHA & W/D. No pets/ smoking. $670/mo. + $670 sec dep (850) 926-2293 PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Renovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, screened front porch & open back deck, Small pets considered Excellent fishing! $600/month 850-926-4217 CRAWFORDVILLE3804 Bloxham Cutoff 3BR/2BA, Inground pool 5 miles from Wakulla Springs and elementary School (850) 510-7008 PRIVATE MASTER BEDROOM/BATH FOR RENT-UTILITIES INCLUDED!!!Master Bedroom/Bath $625/Mos. Utilities, Dish TV, Internet INCLUDED! Pets ok. LG Tile Shower/2 sinks/2 LG walk-in closets!! Villages of St. Marks. (4BR/2Bath Large Home) Great for couples, students or professionals! CLEAN! AVAILABLE NOW! 850-510-0391 Aimee Online Only Real Estate AuctionOceanfront Lot in Holden Beach & 17+/-Acre Water Front Tract in Hertford, NC. Direct ICW Access, Selling Regardless of Price in Excess of $399,000 on the Day of the Auction, 4/29 at 8am to 5/9 at 3pm, Iron Horse Auction Co., Inc 800-997-2248. NCAL3936. www.iron horseauction.com HOMOASASSA5+ DEN BEDROOMS. 3 bath. THIS HUGE AND BEAUTIFUL TWO STORYHOME WITH 3 CAR GARAGE IS OVER 3500 SQ. FT. HOME BACKS UPTO ANATURE PRESERVE. HOME IS AFORECLOSURE SHORT SALE AND THE BANK IS WORKING WITH THE SELLERS. THIS HOME WAS BUILTIN 2005. dennis_neff@yahoo.co m 5627-0418 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Doing business as: HIGH COTTON EMBROIDERY at 96 Carriage Dr., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 with a mailing address of 96 Carriage Dr., Crawfordville, Florida 32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 10th day of April, 2013 /s/ Shawna Norris April 18, 2013 5624-0418 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is hereby given that The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority will hold a meeting on April 25, 2013. The meeting will be held at 10:00 a.m. Central Time at Destin City Hall, City Hall Boardroom, 4200 Indian Bayou Trail, Destin, Florida. Any person requiring special accommodations to participate in this meeting is asked to advise the Corridor Authority at least 48 hours prior to the meeting by contacting Alicia Stephen at (850) 429-8905 or alicia.stephen@hdrinc.com. April 18, 2013 5625-0425 TWN Vs. Shaw, Michael Case #12-CA-252 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #12-CA-252 CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. MICHAEL L. SHAW, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 9, 2013, entered in Case No. 12-CA-252 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and MICHAEL L. SHAW; BRILL PROPERTIES, LLC; TUSCANY TRACE HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OLTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on May 23, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: LOT 23, TUSCANY TRACE, a subdivision as per map thereof recorded in plat book 4, page 76, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida 5628-0425 TWN vs. Brackenchase Builders, Inc Case No. 12-CA-1337 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR LEON COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-CA-1337 BRANCH BANKING AND TRUSTCOMPANY, Plaintiff/Counter-Defendant vs. BRACKENCHASE BUILDERS, INC., ETAL., Defendants/Counter-Plaintiffs. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 3, 2013 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder, by public sale, at 11:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the sale may proceed, on May 15, 2013 at the North Rotunda, Plaza Level, Ste. 100, of the Leon County Courthouse, Tallahassee, Florida, the following described property: Lots 1, 2, and 3, Block A; Lots 1 and 22, Block B; Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18, Block C of Villas at Pine Forest, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 18, Page(s) 69-73, of the Public Records of Leon County, Florida. and Lots 31, 32, 33, 35, 36, 38, 39, 40, 50, 51, 52, 54, 55, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 79, 95, 96, 97, 100, 102, 103, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130 and 131 ofTHE PARK, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 24 -28, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated: April 5, 2013. Bob Inzer, Clerk of Court (SEAL) By:/s/J. Randy L. Bartley, Deputy Clerk Wakulla County April 18 & 25, 2013 5630-0425 TWN vs. LeVaughn, Tamara Case No: 65-2009-CA-000285 Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000285 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. TAMARAL. LEVAUGHN et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated April 8, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 65-2009-CA-000285 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and TAMARAL. LEVAUGHN; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 23rd day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 43 AND 44, BLOCK 4, OF LAKE ELLEN ESTATES UNIT ONE, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A37 MONTGOMERYDRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on April 9, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09068548 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC„-Team 1 -F09068548 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. April 18 & 25, 2013 5631-0425 TWN vs.Carter, Jennifer Case No. 65-2013-CA-000065 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2013-CA-000065 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. JENNIFER AMISON CARTER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: JENNIFER AMISON CARTER LASTKNOWN ADDRESS:428 PALMETTO STREET, BOWLING GREEN,FL 33834-4510 CURRENTADDRESS: UNKNOWN ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LASTKNOWN ADDRESS: UNKNOWN CURRENTADDRESS: UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLACounty, Florida: LOTS NUMBER 26 AND 27 IN BLOCK TEN OF WAKULLAGARDENS, AS SHOWN BY THE PLAT OF SAID SUBDIVISION OF RECORD ON PAGE 39 OF PLAT BOOK NO. ONE OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 8th day of April, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, As Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC-R-lgeddes-Team 1 -F13000795-F13000795 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. April 18 & 25, 2013 Wakulla County is an Af“rmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer. Closing date is Friday, April 19, 2013 at 5:00 p.m.RECEPTIONIST/SECRETARY Wakulla County Extension Service Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Darin Ezell Lawn Service 850925-3100Call for FREE Estimate HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 REPAIRS TO RESTORATIONSThomas HoseyOwner/OperatorQuality Work Guaranteed850890-0067References available • Licensed & Insured Muddy Water Remodeling & Demolition Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f f A A A A ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L C C C C C N N N N d d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• Stump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403

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Page 18A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 9th day of April, 2013 BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk April 18 & 25, 2013 5614-0418 TWN Vs. Coulliette, Steven Case #12-351-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-351-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. STEVEN EDWIN COULLIETTE, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 20, 2013 entered in Case No. 12-351-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and STEVEN EDWIN COULLIETTE and MICHELE COULLIETTE, husband and wife, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11 oclock a.m. on May 16, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 20th day of March, 20123. BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/Tamika Peterson As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ Begin at the Southwest corner of the Northwest 1/4 of Lot 35 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands of Wakulla County, Florida and from said point run North 71 degrees 15 minutes 30 seconds East 905.2 feet to an iron pin on the Westerly right-of-way of State Road No. 365 and thence North 08 degrees 02 minutes 30 seconds East 252.59 feet to a point which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 70 degrees 35 minutes West 166.69 feet to a point, thence North 19 degrees 25 minutes West 140.0 feet to a point, thence North 70 degrees 35 minutes East 239.44 feet to a point on the Westerly right-of-way of State Road No. 385, thence South 08 degrees 02 minutes 50 seconds West (scriveners error -should read South 08 degrees 02 minutes 50 seconds East 157.77 feet) along said right-of-way to a point which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. Otherwise described as Lot Number 12, Block DŽ of an unrecorded Plat of the above described land. April 11 & 18, 2013 5616-0418 TWN vs. Seale, Deborah Case No. 65-2009-CA-000259 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000259 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH SEALE et al, Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 24, 2010 and entered in Case NO. 65-2009-CA-000259 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and DEBORAH SEALE; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 2nd day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 9, BLOCK D OF SPRINGWOOD PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 74-75, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. 2004 CLAYTON MFG HOME SERIALNUMBER WHC013875GA A/K/A38 AUTUMN WOODS WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on March 11, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tamika Peterson, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09067274 WELLSLPS-FHA„-Team 1 -F09067274 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. April 11 & 18, 2013 F09067274 5623-0425 TWN vs. Trusik, Brian Case No. 65-2012-CA-000458 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000458 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, v. BRIAN J. TRUSIK.; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF BRIAN J. TRUSIK NKA ALENNA TRUSIK; THE REFUGE AT PANACEA HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated April 1, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000458 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 23rd day of May, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 71 OF THE REFUGE AT PANACEA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 18-22 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Commonly known as: XXX FROGS BECKON COURT, PANACEA, FL 32346 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 S Monroe St, Tallahassee, FL 32301 Phone: (850) 577-4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 1ST DAY OF APRIL, 2013. BRENT THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Tiffany Deschner, Deputy Clerk April 18 & 25, 2013 5615-0418 TWN Vs. Phillips, James Case No. 65-2010-CA-000252 Notice of ReSched Sale PUBLIC NOTICE 5617-0418 TWN Sale 4/26/2013 Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, April 26, 2013 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: 5621-0418 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 4/27/13 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility 5622-0418 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Seminole Self Storage LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDASTATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON APRIL 26, 2013 at 1 1:00am AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTYOF: CARRYMILLER Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, April 27, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Leslie Carnes Emily Nipper Before the sale date of Saturday, April 27, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. April 11 & 18, 2013 REBAMCKENZIE LES BROWN Before the sale date of APRIL26, 2013 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. APRIL11 & 18, 2013 5591-0418 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1096 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 08-6S-01W-283-04862-E01MARINA VILLAGE OF PANACEA UNIT 2 BLK E LOT 1 & BOAT SLIP F OR 372 P 888 OR 496 P 637 Name in which assessedH CLAY & LINDA W HARRIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 8 day of May, 2013,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of March, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida March 28 and April 4, 11 & 18, 2013 5592-0418 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 002 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatSARAH E. HOWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1507 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-034-009-08408-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 2 BLOCK 6 LOT 59 OR 567 P 381 OR 579 P 862 Name in which assessedGREGORY P & ERIN B STEMBRIDGE said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 8 day of May, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of March, 2013. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida March 28 and April 4, 11 & 18, 2013 5593-0418 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatCLYDE K CARTER SRthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1134 Year of Issuance 2005 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-043-010-08687-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 16 LOT 16 OR 8 P 186 Name in which assessedFRANK WINGARD JR said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 8 day of May, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of March, 2013. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida March 28 and April 4, 11 & 18, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Sherri Green Before the sale date of April 26, 2013, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 April 11 & 18, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 65-2010-CA-000252 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST 2006-HE2, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE2, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES W. PHILLIPS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 13, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000252 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Trust 2006-HE2, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-HE2, is the Plaintiff and James W. Phillips, Rebekah Taylor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Ownit Mortgage Solutions, Inc., a California Corporation, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 2nd day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 15 & 16, BLOCK 18, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 161 RENEGADE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 13th day of March, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. April 11 & 18, 2013 10-39092 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 26 Beeler 3 BR/2BA w/1 car attached garage, fenced back yard. Pets okay w/ prior approval & $250 fee. Available May1. $900 mo., $900. Security Deposit. • 47 Andrew Hargrett Sr. Rd. 3BR/2BA on cleared 12 acres. Fenced w/large horse barn. Pets okay w/ prior approval & $250 fee. $1350. mo.m $1350 Security Deposit. Available May 1.• 29C Old Courthouse Sq. 2 BR/2.5 BA Town Home. 2 Master upstairs, $700 mo., $700 Security Deposit. No Smoking, Pets okay w/ $250. fee • 11 Gold nch3BR/2BA $1,150 month, $1,150 Security Deposit, pets ok with prior approval and $250 pet fee. • 26 Manatee Lane3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!56 Blue Heron 2BR/1BA block home on canal to Ochlockonee Bay. Near Mashes Sands Beach and Bike Trail. $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets Considered. No Smoking. 8 River Drive 2BR/2BA Bay front with large covered boat slip. large screen porch and open deck. Fantastic views !!! $1200. mo./$1200 Security Deposit. Pets considered. No Smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo./$700 Security Deposit No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo./$650 Security Deposit Pets Considered 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 mo./$750 Security Deposit 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850 mo./$850 Security Deposit. The Wakulla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s v i s i t u s o n l i n e For local news and photos visit us online w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 19ABrain Teaser 1 14 17 23 27 33 36 44 50 54 59 64 67 2 24 45 3 20 46 4 28 42 51 5 25 37 47 21 38 55 60 65 68 6 15 18 34 56 7 29 57 8 30 52 9 31 48 22 26 49 61 66 69 10 16 19 35 43 58 11 32 39 53 12 40 62 13 41 63 ACROSS 1. Red Bordeaux 6. IOU, of sorts 10. Comic Roseanne 14. St. Theresa's town 15. Prospector's strike 16. Siouan speaker 17. Stun gun 18. Field of expertise 19. Connecticut politico Chris 20. There were thirteen 23. The Windy City, briefly 25. Words from sponsors 26. Hosiery material 27. Composer Arlen 29. Munro's pen name 32. Vane dir. 33. Oscar role for Julia 34. Toughen, as glass 36. There are thirteen 42. The Old World 43. Wash up 44. GI's mail drop 47. NBA arbiters 48. Rad iation-emitting star 50. Sculpted form 52. "Now, where __ I?" 53. Wrap up 54. There are thirteen 59. Sicilian peak 60. Make changes to 61. Stirs up 64. "No Ball Playing," e.g. 65. Model Macpherson 66. Word before ear or tube 67. ITAR-__ (news agency) 68. Timid creature 69. Monopoly stackDOWN1. Shower safety item 2. A sister of Zsa Zsa 3. Make crestfallen 4. Toast topping 5. __ tunnel syndrome 6. Freshman or sophomore 7. Phone, slangily 8. Creative spark 9. Plow puller 10. Mr. __ (victim in the g ame Clue) 11. Coral rings 12. Cowpokes' contests 13. Made over 21. Former Leno announcer Hall 22. Early computer 23. Enjoy bubble gum 24. Mata __ 28. Fairy tale start 29. Salon sounds 30. Poet Sexton 31. Mauna __ 34. Starting on 35. Veg out 37. Impresario Sol 38. Bard's "before" 39. Petroleum-based lubricant 40. __ Picone (fashion name) 41. Uncool one 44. Affirm to be true 45. "The Merchant of Venice" heroine 46. Circular seals 48. Place to crash, perhaps 49. WWW moniker 51. Flips through 52. 10K race handout 55. Place, as in a tourney schedule 56. Hanging around 57. K hartoum's river 58. Top-of-the-line 62. Blazed a trail 63. Most coll. applicants American Prole Hometown Content 4/14/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 2 3 3456 678 5 91 483527 164 9 58 7812 643 200 9 HometownContent 189 6427 3 5 374859621 256137984 625 794318 948315276 713268459 491 523867 537986142 862471593 M A T C H E W A T T E S T E V A H A R I P O R T I A D I S P I R I T O R I N G S O L E O O N C E S C A N S C A R P A L H U R O K E D D E R E S E E D C L A S S A S O F I D L E H O R N S N I P S N I L E I D E A A N N E W A T E R T E A M K E A P A D E N I A C U S E R I D B O D D Y L O L L A O N E A T O L L S V A S E L I N E R O D E O S E V A N L E D R E D O N E N E R D S R S By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 12 … Speaker Will Weatherford might have given the best description of the House budget this week when he called it a dress rehearsal.Ž Lawmakers suited up and jousted back and forth about the $74 billion spending plan, with everybody knowing that the show would end Friday in a vote to pass it. But the main event will come during the next three weeks when House and Senate negotiators get together and work out their differences on a “ nal budget. The dress rehearsalŽ description, however, also applies to other issues that are moving through the House and Senate … but have more-uncertain “ nales. And taking center stage Thursday was a debate about whether lawmakers and Gov. Rick Scott will agree on a plan to extend health coverage to more low-income Floridians. Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, and Rep. Richard Corcoran, R-Land O Lakes, released a plan, dubbed Florida Health Choices Plus,Ž that would provide $2,000 health-care subsidies to low-income parents and some people with disabilities. The plan would reject tens of billions of dollars in federal Medicaid money that otherwise would be available to the state during the next decade through the Affordable Care Act, better known as Obamacare. But it is a stark contrast to earlier proposals offered by Scott and Senate Appropriations Chairman Joe Negron, R-Stuart, with the key difference centered on whether to accept money from Washington. Scott has backed a federally funded expansion of Medicaid, at least for three years, to offer coverage to hundreds of thousands of uninsured people. He also has lent support to a Negron alternative that would use federal money to help that same group of people buy private health insurance. The House plan would rely only on state money, projected to total about $237 million a year. It would provide subsidies to a fraction of the people who would be eligible for a Medicaid expansion or the Negron proposal and would not ensure they receive as much coverage. But Weatherford has long argued that the state cant rely on federal promises about funding the Medicaid expansion, a prospect that he and others say could leave Florida taxpayers on the hook in the future. He described the House plan as sustainable.Ž Weatherford also conjured the memory of former Republican Gov. Jeb Bush by describing the House plan as a BHAG.Ž Back in the Bush days, that acronym was a point of pride because it stood for Big Hairy Audacious Goals.Ž A hairy goal or not, Scott quickly issued a statement Thursday blasting the House plan because it would not tap the federal funds. The Houses plan will cost Florida taxpayers on top of what they are already taxed under the presidents new healthcare law, Scott said. This would be a double-hit to state taxpayers.Ž House Minority Leader Perry Thurston, D-Fort Lauderdale, also scoffed at the notion that the House plan was needed because it was more sustainable than relying on federal funding. This thing about being sustainable … thats just a joke, Thurston said. NO BUDGET TRAGEDY THIS YEAR After several years of looking for ways to cut spending, this springs legislative session has been notable for its relative lack of budget drama. Sure, the House and Senate still will have to work out myriad details of a spending plan for the 2013-14 “ scal year. But the Senate unanimously passed its version of the budget Wednesday, and the House approved its plan Friday by a 99-17 margin. A brightening economy has funneled more money to the state, which makes everybody in the Capitol a little happier. Dont worry about cutting education funding … the question is how much will lawmakers provide to boost teacher pay. When I look at the two budgets side by side, these are issues that can easily be resolved with good faith discussion between the House and the Senate,Ž said Negron, the Senate appropriations chairman. Two of the biggest debates that emerged this week in the House and Senate involved pay increases for state workers. In the House, that involved a Republican decision to give $1,000 salary increases and possible $400 performancebased bonuses … instead of $1,400 across-the-board hikes. That decision, which came in an amendment, angered many Democratic House members, along with Republican Rep. Mike Fasano of New Port Richey. What this amendment does is take away a commitment, a promise we made early on that we were going to help our state workers,Ž Fasano said. Other Republicans, however, focused on the positive: After six years without raises, state workers will wind up with fatter paychecks. In the Senate, meanwhile, the debate focused on corrections officers, who were left out of a list of law-enforcement employees who would get tiered pay increases. Some senators urged leaders to come up with $30 million for the issue. Lets “ nd the money,Ž said Sen. Charlie Dean, R-Inverness. Negron and others said they would work on the issue during budget negotiations with the House. PENNIES FROM HEAVEN (OR ADAMS STREET) One intriguing subplot during the final weeks of the session will be Weatherfords attempt to overhaul the states campaign-“ nance laws. The Senate Rules Committee on Tuesday ditched a proposed increase in the $500 limit on individual contributions to political candidates. The House, meanwhile, has backed increasing the limit to $5,000 for statewide candidates and $3,000 for local and legislative candidates. Weatherford has made a priority of the issue, calling for the higher limits while banning a type of fund-raising vehicle known as committees of continuous existence.Ž But Scott has signaled that he opposes the increases, which also have drawn skepticism from Senate Ethics and Elections Chairman Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater. If the governor has the “ nal word on it, and if hes not going to sign a bill that changes that, then why pursue it any longer?Ž Latvala said. Lets get down to the other issues that we can resolve.Ž Whatever the result of negotiations on the issue, campaign-finance reports filed this week showed that the $500 limit hasnt been too much of a hindrance for lawmakers planning to run again in 2014 and 2016. Incumbents raked in contributions during the weeks leading up to the legislative session, with a few topping $100,000 each. STORY OF THE WEEK: House Republican leaders proposed an alternative to expanding Medicaid under the federal Affordable Care Act. The House plan would reject billions of dollars from Washington and provide $2,000 subsidies to targeted groups of low-income parents and people with disabilities. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This is a joyous time. Were able to give our valued employees a raise.Ž … Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)It’s show time in TallahasseeBy JIM TURNERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, April 12 – Internet caf games are now illegal, but police around the state are taking different approaches to enforcing the new law. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement has issued advisories to law enforcement agencies regarding the new law intended to crackdown on the strip center businesses, which critics say are “storefront-casinos.” Meanwhile, local agencies appear to be taking more deliberate approaches to the law that sped through the Legislature and was signed Wednesday, April 10 by Gov. Rick Scott. (All of the Internet cafs in Wakulla County were closed on Thursday, April 11.) Bradenton police are giving Internet caf owners 30 days to comply with the law, while the Manatee County Sheriff’s Of ce, anticipating legal action will be taken against the law, intends to see what the courts do, according to local media reports. The new law, which requires machines to be coin-operated and caps prizes at 75 cents, basically af rms that gambling is illegal in Florida unless authorized by the state. The FDLE handout says owners and employees of businesses that provide the unlawful games face a third degree felony. Also, misdemeanor charges could be applied for the possession of the gambling devices and for simply playing the games.Ban on Internet cafes starts slowly

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Page 20A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 1. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Who was Time magazine’s first Man of the Year in 1927? 2. MOVIES: Who was the male star in the film “Risky Business”? 3. LITERATURE: In which novel does the character of Pip appear? 4. LANGUAGE: What is the full name of the group known as OAS? 5. TELEVISION: What was the name of the Dukes’ car on the show “The Dukes of Hazzard”? 6. HOLIDAYS: What did Veterans Day in the United States used to be called? 7. MEDICINE: Dr. William Harvey is famous for what medical discovery? 8. AUTOMOBILES: Who set up the first auto manufacturing company in the United States? 9. PERSONALITIES: What is TV chef Emeril’s last name? 10. MUSIC: Which Billy Joel song contains the following line: “It’s nine o’clock on a Saturday. The regular crowd shuffles in”? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Charles Lindbergh 2. Tom Cruise 3. “Great Expectations” 4. Organization of American States 5. The General Lee 6. Armistice Day 7. Circulation of blood 8. Charles and Frank Duryea 9. Lagasse 10. “Piano Man” Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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& www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 – Page 21A We Provide Award Winning Service Gatortrax Services, LLC General Landscaping Lawn Maintenance Flower Bed Specialist Storm Clean-up Dump Trailer Service Firewood Licensed & Insured (850) 545-6760 www.gatortraxservices.com Professional Property Maintenance TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2011 TheNews Wakulla Readers Choice2012 Saturday, April :30 … 2:00 Sunday, April 21 0 … 4:0017th Annual Rose Sale 17th Annual Rose Sale Mark your calendar for the much anticipated sale of Heide Clifton’s heirloom roses. Proceeds to go to the CHAT Adoption Center to provide food, medicines, vaccinations, and vet expenses for animals in the adoption center.Just Fruits will be joining us and donating profits to CHAT.382 C ra w fordv i l l e Hwy. C r awford v ille, FL 382 C ra w fordv i l l e Hwy. C r awford v ille, FL CHAT of Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326 www.chatofwakulla.org A copy of the official registration CH-13163 and financ ial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply endo rsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. Event sponsored by: Sponsored in part by: Three gallon containers $8 each or three for $21 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . n t IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GAG GROUPER OPENI want to tell you about three very “ ne men who used to work on my daddys fishing dock at St. Marks during the 1950s. These were black men who, during that period of our history were very much limited, except for manual labor, in what they could do to earn a living and support their families. Im writing about them because the work they did was critical to the success of the “ shing business at St. Marks, and they deserve to be remembered in the history of our county. No doubt they have passed away by now, and the party boat business is not what it used to be so few, if any, have taken their place in their line of work. Jim Donaldson was on the dock more than Railroad and Lem because my dad hired him to do other general chores around the dock. Jim had worked for my dad for many years and was well liked by my dad and the other men who owned and operated boats from the dock. That is not to say the others were not well liked too, it just seemed to me that Jim had special status because he had worked there for so long. I thought of Jim as being more worldlyŽ than the others too, as I recall him talking about how he had worked up northŽ when he was young. If Im not mistaken, I think Jim had served in the military in World War I. Railroads last name was Harper, I believe. No doubt RailroadŽ was a nickname as he must have, at some time in his life, worked on the railroad. He had two sons that I recall, Jet and Samuel. We referred to Samuel as Little JetŽ because he was the younger of the two boys. They both worked on the dock from time to time by assisting their daddy. Little Jet and I were about the same age and were friends. I have written an article in the Wakulla County Heritage book, The Greens and Cornbread of Wakulla CountyŽ about a tarpon “ shing trip Little Jet and I went on up the Wakulla River at the mouth of Boggy Creek. I was sad to see an obituary in the Tallahassee Democrat which reported, Samuel G. Harper, 62, who retired from the U.S. Army, died Wednesday, March 16, 2005.Ž Lem was Lemuel Lamb. Lem was a peg leggedŽ man, who, as I recall, reportedly lost his leg in a saw mill accident when he was young. He wore a peg on his leg from about the knee down. I remember people telling the story about how Lem, right after his leg was amputated was sleeping at home when the sawmill whistle woke him up. Lem supposedly forgot about his missing leg, thought he had overslept, jumped up out of bed to go to work, and fell down. From what I knew about Lem, I could believe its true. Lem was a very conscientious, hardworking man. Lem and Railroad cleaned fish, that was their job. Every day of the week during the summer, they would come down to the dock, sometimes accompanied by Jet and Little Jet, about three in the afternoon, before the deep sea fishing boats came in. And let me tell you, when those boats started coming in, nobody was busier than Lem and Railroad. They kept their “ let knives so sharp you could shave with them and they were experts at dressing out the “ sh. Behind them was an old bath tub with ice and water in it and they would toss those “ llets in there as they “ nished with them. There was, nearby, a large set of scales on which they weighed the washtubs of “ sh, calibrated to deduct the weight of the empty tub, and on pieces of brown paper, Lem would write something like this, 300 @ 3 centsŽ, and pass it to my dad in his office. Dad would then know to charge the customers three cents a pound for 300 pounds and pay Lem and Railroad that amount. Most boats brought in at least that amount of “ sh, and you could then multiply the amount of pounds cleaned by eight or 10 boats a day. They would clean “ sh, constantly, from about 5 p.m. to 8 or 9 p.m. As each partys “ sh were cleaned, they would be iced down in layers in lard cans, which were silvercolored metal can about three feet high with about a 12-inch opening and “ tted lid. Thus packed, the “ sh were ready for their journey, usually back to Georgia, where most of our customers were from. The customer was charged a penny a pound for the ice, or about twenty-“ ve cents per lard can. I want history to know that Jim, Lem, and Railroad were as “ ne as anyone in St. Marks at that time. They were upstanding members of their community, great parents and role models, and most of all, worked very hard for what little they had. Love was in their hearts and homes, and in that respect, they did very well in the eyes of those who counted most for them. They deserve to be remembered for the contributions they made. I owe that much to them, and thats why I wanted to tell something of their story. Please, also, I really do not know a lot about their personal stories and backgrounds. I hope that any of their descendants, or others, who read this and may be able to contribute more, will write to The Wakulla News in their memory. Red Clay Footprints By John RobertsSt. Marks' Jim, Lem, and Railroad E.W. Roberts and Jim Donaldson in St. Marks in the early 1940s.

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Page 22A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com DUX DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Prices Good Though April850926-3212750MLABSOLUTEVODKA $ 16 99 1.75LCROWNROYAL $ 39 99 $ $ $ $ 750MLGREY GOOSE $ 27 99 JAGERMEISTER750ML $ 19 99 $ $ 1.75LJIM BEAM $ 23 99 1.75LMALIBU RUM $ 19 99 $ $ Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org As spring progresses in Wakulla County, the palette of colors changes by the week. Flowering trees, shrubs and wildflowers provide a Technicolor display for anyone willing to spend the time to take it in. The hues cover the spectrum and some blooms come with pleasant perfumes to offer the viewer a distraction from contemporary life. The blooms are also a lure to the native pollinators. European Honeybees and, to a lesser degree, bumblebees are widely known for their pollination work, both in nature and commercial agriculture. Additionally there are legions of lesser known pollinators which work unseen and are rarely acknowledged for their efforts. All these lesser known pollinators make contributions to the cycle of life which begins with a germination or emergence from a winter nap by the areas plant life. The symbiotic relationship between the plants and insects is a win-win situation for all involved. Nectar and pollen are dietary staples for butter” ies. Adults consume only liquids threw a straw-like structure curled on the front of their head. Butter” ies receive a concentration of sugars and other nutrients from the nectar in flowers. Their strenuous, but short lives require the intense energy for the showy aerial gymnastics. Many butter” ies are migratory, such as the widely known Monarch which passes through Wakulla County on the way to Mexico. A successful migration is timed to take advantage of nectar laden blooms before setting out over the water. Plants benefit for the feeding frenzy because the butter” ies carry pollen from bloom to bloom on their bodies. While not moving as much pollen per insect, butter” ies move pollen over much greater distances than honeybees. This wide geographic dispersal improves the genetic pro“ le of many plants. Local wasps are marginally effective pollinators with an unpleasant reputation. The droning buzz and the wasp pro“ le near a bloom is a sting avoidance warning. Wasps, however, provide a necessary, if often unrecognized, service which far outweighs their foul temperament. Many wasp larvae begin life as parasites on a variety of insect pest species. When the wasps reach maturity, they will visit ” owers for the nectar. As with butter” ies it serves as an energy source. Pollen is caught on the body hairs of the wasp and may be deposited on other blooms as it lazily moves from bloom-to-bloom. Wasps tend to be territorial so pollen is not widely dispersed. Flies are another group of accidental pollinators. These sometimes-pests have no teeth, so they must subsist on a liquid diet and ” ower nectar is quite attractive. Their days are spent moving among various food sources, dropping pollen haphazardly as they go. Individually the transfer of pollen is negligible, but collectively their local efforts add up to a small but respective percentage. Native ants also help with pollination while scavenging for an easy meal. They will trek in single “ le along branches holding blooms in their search for aphids to milk. Scouts for the ant nest search bloom to bloom, scattering pollen as they go. As with ” ies, their individual effect is in“ nitesimal, but there are millions of ants and other insects depending on and unconsciously working to insure Wakulla County keeps blooming in the future. Contact the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” .edu/ to learn more about native pollinators in Wakulla County. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931.There are other, less recognized, pollinators – such as butter ies, wasps, ies and even ants Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSButter” ies, above and below, are native pollinators. “Tallahassee Swing Band”Saturday, Apr il 27, 2013 @ 7pm33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville Dance Music, Hors d ’ oeuvres, and Cash Bar $15 per person / $30 per coupleFor more information or to purchase tick ets please call Shelly Homan at (850) 926-7145 ext. 221 All proceeds support our senior center meal programs. C h o c o l a t e F o u n t a i n R a f f l e P r e s e n t s W a k u l l a S e n i o r C e n t e r F r i e n d r a i s i n g C o m m i t t e e