Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00458

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By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netJames Taylor, who served Wakulla County as an elected of cial and who helped found the local Veterans of Foreign Wars post, died on Saturday, April 6, after a lengthy illness. Taylor, who was 93, served terms on the both the Wakulla County School Board and the Wakulla County Commission, and R.H. Carter said he was the rst person to serve as chairman of both those boards. At his funeral service on Monday, April 8, at the Revels-Nichols Cemetery in Otter Creek, he was remembered as a man who did what he felt was best for Wakulla County. It is his role as a founder of the local VFW post that was his lasting legacy. He was remembered for being in the kitchen on Veterans Day every year, cooking up pancakes and sausage for the posts annual free breakfast, and urging those who were there to eat. Taylor joined the U.S. Army in 1940. He fought at the Battle of the Bulge in 1944. He rarely spoke of his military experiences, although one story, shared with his sons on one occasion while shucking oysters, was of being baited into a boxing match with his commanding of cer. Taylor didnt want to ght the man, but the of cer kept insisting. When the of cer got up from being knocked out,= he treated Taylor with new respect. New superintendent faces challenges faces challenges Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Servi Servi Our 118th Year, 15th Issue Thursday, April 11, 2013 Two Sections Two Sections 75 Cents 75 Cents kulla County For More T h h h an A Century kulla County For More T h an A Centur y Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Sports .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways....... ...............................................................Page 11A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 12A Green Scene/Natural Wakulla ...........................................Page 13A Week in Wakulla................................................................Page 14A Thinking Outside the Book.................................................Page 15A Classi eds .....................................................................Page 16A Legal Notices ................................................................Page 16A Comics ..........................................................................Page 19A Low Country Boil Photos ..............................................Page 20A Wild About Wakulla Week .............................................Section BINDEX OBITUARIES Roberta Colter Martin Marilyn D. Shepherd James Gilbert Taylor Anita Saunders TownsendBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla Coalition for Youth held its annual town meeting last week at the Legacy Cafe and heard several speakers talk about the problems, and successes of Wakullas youth. The theme of this years meeting, held on Wednesday, April 3, was Changing the conversation. Bruce Ashley, president of the coalition, noted that the groups success has become a model for other organizations around the state. He attributed the success to the buy-in from the community and noted that those in attendance at the luncheon included County Judge Jill Walker, Sheriff Charlie Creel, Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce, County Commissioner Jerry Moore and County Administrator David Edwards and dozens of other people concerned about or working with local youth. Coalition Director Gail Campbell noted that the organization started Operation Santa two years ago to help with the needs of the community around Christmastime. That effort grew this year unfortunately, as Campbell put it, since the need also grew. The coaltion was also active the Empty Bowls fundraiser. The coalition gets involved, Campbell said, because of concern when things arent right at home. Tonya Hobby, tobacco program specialist for the county health department, and Molly Clore of Students Working Against Tobacco introduced Erin Erin, a Wakulla High School junior and president of SWAT chapter, who talked about student involvement in the candy- avored tobacco issue. A video made by SWAT youth was shown as well. One of the most moving presentations came from two students in the high schools Advancement Via Independent Determination, or AVID, program. One student told her story of having a baby as a freshman and then working double-shifts to make money for her child while attending school. She credited lessons learned from AVID with keeping her in school and doing her best. In the fall she will attend Bethune-Cookman University where she plans to study to become a nurse. Turn to Page 6AYouth coalition holds town meetingAnita Townsend, longtime county nurse, dies at 93James Taylor, founder of local VFW, is deadBy JENNY ODOMSpecial to The NewsAnita Saunders Townsend, who was public health nurse in Wakulla County for 40 years and cared deeply about the people she served, died peacefully on Saturday, April 6, at her home in Crawfordville surrounded by her family. She was born in 1919 in Brunswick, Ga., and graduated Sopchoppy High School in 1937. Townsend was inspired greatly by Eleanor Woolley, a nurse who was married to Dr. Woolley, for whom Woolley Park is named. Anitas mother, Maddie Trice Sanders, was close friends with Eleanor Woolley and Townsend was drawn to nursing by Woolleys passion for it. The friendship proved to be bene cial in Townsends quest to enter nursing school at Chatahochee State Hospital, where nurses were trained at the time. Dr. Woolley pulled some strings, and Townsend was accepted into the nursing school.Turn to Page 2A By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netBobby Pearce took over the post of superintendent of schools from the man who had served the longest term in the job. In re ecting on his more than four months in of ce, Pearce said it had really become apparent to him while going through superintendent certi cation training how generous former Superintendent David Miller had been with him and other district staff including principals keeping them up-todate on issues facing the district. Every day, Im thankful for the experience, Pearce said. His (Millers) style of leadership really gave me a leg up. One of his own biggest challenges came a few weeks after he took of ce with the Newtown shootings that drew wide public concern about the safety of schools. It was a major impact right away, Pearce said. Its prompted the Florida Legislature to weigh spending $11 million to $14 million for school safety funding. One aspect of that being considered for Wakulla is a buzz-in, buzz-out entrance and exit at schools, plus fencing to funnel people to a central location. The Legislature is also looking at $480 million state-wide for teacher raises. But Pearce is concerned that the current budget language speci es which teachers would get the pay raise. And then theres the local issue that other district employees the support personnel from cafeteria workers and maintenance people to bus drivers have usually been given a raise when teachers get a raise. Pearce said its been viewed as a matter of fairness. But if the state only funds teacher raises, what is the local district to do? One initiative hes been pursuing is a shift back to expanding vocational opportunities. Years ago, he said, the move was to get away from vocational programs and move students to college-bound. Now its clear thats not for everybody, he said. He is working with Lively VoTech in Tallahassee to set up a satellite center in Wakulla that would, the rst year, offer automotive repair and then add other offerings, such as HVAC.Turn to Page 2AWILLIAM SNOWDENSuperintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce at his of ce.Four months into his job as superintendent of Wakulla schools, Bobby Pearce re ects on what hes learned Anita Townsend James Taylor WILLIAM SNOWDENAttendees at the coalition town meeting listen to a presentation by Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell and two Wakulla High School students. Special Section inside this edition.Section B

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsWakulla County Fire Rescue and Wakulla EMS responded to a very serious accident on Wednesday, April 3, involving two SUVs that entrapped both drivers and injured four people in Crawfordville around 3:55 p.m. The two SUVs collided in what appeared to be a near head-on crash. A southbound Ford Expedition occupied by two adults was struck by a Jeep Cherokee occupied by a male driver and his young child. The child was properly fastened in a child safety seat in the back seat which apparently prevented serious injury to him. Wakulla Fire Rescue and EMS had to use hydraulic rescue tools to free both drivers of the vehicles. Both drivers were freed within 20 minutes. Two engines, one squad and two EMS units were used at the scene. Due to the severity of the injuries, the Florida Highway Patrol kept the southbound lane of Crawfordville Highway closed for more than two hours, rerouting traf c on East Ivan Road. Northbound traf c was able to continue past the accident. There was light rain at the time of the accident. All four occupants of the two vehicles were transported by EMS to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital. From Page 1AAt 18, a recent Sopchoppy High School graduate, and not long after being accepted into the nursing program at Chatahochee State Hospital, she met C.L. Townsend. A graduate of University of Florida and 10 years her senior, they met at a peanut boil. At that time he was a vocational agriculture teacher at Sopchoppy and Wakulla High Schools. He had a car then, so that summer he would go around and pick up all the kids to go out to parties and social gatherings. And as time went on, it was always mom who would be dropped off last, says C.L. Townsend, her oldest son. She attended nursing school in Chatahoochee, and in 1939 the two were secretly married. Juanita Rodenberry, of Sopchoppy, Townsends sister, stood as a witness and kept the vows quiet, along with the couple, for years. They had to keep it a secret because at that time if you were married, you couldnt attend nursing school, says Jack Townsend, her youngest son. So it wasnt until after graduating in 1941, when she was pregnant, that they made their marriage public. (They renewed their vows in 1979 at their 40th wedding anniversary during a family celebration at their house.) For about 10 years the couple bounced around, living in Marianna, Chipley, Bethlehem and Holmes County, but always seemed to come back to Wakulla County with each move away. Dad had a University of Florida professor who told him, Go west young man, go west, Jack explains. And so he did take this advice. He went all the way to Sopchoppy, where he went to a peanut boil and met his wife. Then, around 1951, the couple nally settled in Wakulla County and she started working as a public health nurse, rst at the Leon County Public Health Department, later transferring to Wakulla County Public Health Department, where she would work until she retired. She was the only fulltime public health employee in the county for more than 10 years, and it wasnt until 1968 that a second fulltime nurse was hired. Until her retirement, she was the countys main health of cial. Among many accomplishments she implemented hearing and eye screenings for kids entering school, gave immunizations. When I was a student, she gave me my shots at Crawfordville Elementary School, says Leonard Tartt of Sopchoppy. As well, she conducted the mandatory exams for marriage licenses. She created the maternity program to guide young mothers and started a midwife program, training three women to help birth babies throughout the county. I knew Anita Townsend rst as a nurse. In those days, you had to get a physical before you got married, and she was the one who gave me mine, says Betty Green of Crawfordville, a longtime friend. As well, every baby born in the county at that time had to be visited by a County Health Nurse within 24 hours of birth, by Florida law. So, in essence, she saw every baby born in the county and met every new mother. She really built the health department into where it is today. She kept a lot of records, and those records are extremely valuable to our local historians, Green adds. Described as a walking book of knowledge in regards to the sensitive health issues of each family, her sons feel that her integrity was one her greatest gifts. When it came to sensitive issues and privacy, she was unbending in her loyalty to the families she served. A softer voice emerges as Jack reflects on her sensitivity to knowing so much about people she served and having such an intimate relation with so many residents, she carried a lot of professionalism into that moment. Because of this intimacy, the Townsend brothers consider themselves to have a lot of other brothers and other sisters. At her funeral, scheduled for Wednesday, April 10, her eight grandsons will act as pallbearers. As well, 14 other brothers will be honorary pallbearers. I didnt know her so much in a professional manner, but I always loved Miss Anita and her care of and concern for people in the county. Wakulla County is so much the better because of the work she did. I am so thankful she was born and lived here, and I will miss her greatly, says Jackie Lawhon of Sopchoppy, a close friend. On another side, Townsend was also a dedicated football fan, and was not shy to exclaim her passion for the team. Miss Anita was an avid Gator fan and my son, Jim, was an offensive lineman for the Gators from 2004-2008. He sent Miss Anita a signed photograph and displayed it in her house. She was very proud that a local player had gone on to play for the Gators, and was part of two National Championship teams, says Tartt. Fifteen years apart, her sons were more like only children. It was a wish of hers that they work on their relationship as brothers, and remain close. So today, C.L. Townsend, 70, of Plant City and his brother Jack, 55, of Temple Terrace have lunch every Friday. They explain that she had three wants in her life and she verbalized these wants often. She told us, I want to take care of the people of Wakulla County, I want to take care of my boys, and I want to die in my own house, says Jack. We couldnt control the rst two, but we made sure of the last one.Anita Townsend, longtime county nurse, dies at 93 PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe two SUVs after the passengers were removed.Four injured in wreck Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriffs Office (WCSO) and Wakulla Correctional Institution (WCI) staff took part in the annual Law Enforcement Torch Run to support Wakulla Special Olympics Tuesday, April 9. The Wakulla Torch Run began at the sheriffs of- ce and concluded with a ceremony at the Wakulla County Courthouse. The Special Olympians were treated to a lunch by Sonic in Hickory Park after the event concluded. More than 3,000 Florida law enforcement agencies participate in the statewide Torch Run which includes a 1,500 mile relay through nearly all of the counties in Florida. The Torch Run began in March and will culminate with the Opening Ceremonies of the Florida Special Olympic Games in Orlando on May 18. Law enforcement of cials will bring the Flame of Hope into the stadium to signify the opening of the state games. More than 20,000 athletes will compete in Orlando including a group from Wakulla County. Sharon Scherbarth and Patricia Bodiford are the school district program coordinators. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSParticipants in the Special Olympics Torch Run outside the courthouse. Special Olympics Torch Run Special Olympics Torch RunBecause of incorrect information supplied to The News from Tallahassee Community College, a front-page story last week reported that Kevin and Kerry Gaby sold four parcels of land to TCC as the site of the proposed Wakulla Environmental Institute. Actually, Kevin and Kerry Gaby do not own the parcels that were sold to TCC. The college issued a correction stating: In TCCs original news release, we stated that the college purchased the land for the new Wakulla Environmental Institute from Kevin and Kerry Gaby. It has come to our attention that it is more accurate to say that TCC purchased the land from the Gaby family. We regret the error. Correction New superintendentFrom Page 1AAdditionally, the district has been expanding other pathway programs the Medical Academy has been a success, where students come out of the program as a Certified Nursing Assistant, and STEM Engineering is in the works. Pearce is also looking at expanding dual enrollment with Tallahassee Community College so that high school students can take college classes with no tuition or book costs. In some cases, students could graduate from high school at the same time as they earn their Associate of Arts degree. I have to commend Beth ODonnell on that, Pearce said, referring to the districts assistant superintendent for instruction. She and (Wakulla High Assistant Principal) Sunny Chancey are really working hard to make that happen. For Pearce, these expanded programs re ect his thinking about equity for students that the district should provide the same opportunities for different students for them to be successful in life. CHALLENGESFrom a personal standpoint, Pearce said the biggest challenge is that The day is a lot more intense than my days as a principal. As principal at Medart Elementary, he was responsible for one school, he said. As superintendent, youre responsible for all school centers rather than just one, he said. Even though Wakulla County has a new superintendent, we have a veteran school board that knows what were trying to accomplish, he said, adding: And we have a seasoned staff at the district and school level. Overall, Pearce said the challenge hes trying to communicate to his staff is that, while the district does a great job with student testing, he wants to put more emphasis on the whole child. He offers the example of student who may need to see a counselor about things going on in life. I want to pull all that together to do even more on providing services to our kids, he said. It all comes down to creating a well-rounded child who grows up to nd a job they are really ful lled in, he said. Thats what our goal should be. And everyone has heard for years that families moved to Wakulla for the schools. The measure he looks for, to tell that hes been successful, is when he hears people are moving here because they want their child to graduate from Wakulla High School. It means the whole system is running smoothly. DOWNTURN Wakulla is facing a loss of students as part of the ongoing economic downturn, Pearce said. The community was hard-hit in the mid1990s with the passage of the net ban. It drove shers out of the water, but they found work in the booming construction industry until that went bust in 2008. Now families are leaving Wakulla, Pearce said. The numbers show more than 100 students have left the school system over the past year. Still, he said, even with these challenges, being superintendent is a great job working with great people. He said he has appreciated the reaction from the public since the election, and wants the public to know that he is accessible and asks people to call him if they need him.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 18, 2013 Page 9Aeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The NewsRiversprings Middle School science students have partnered with the Department of Environmental Protection to participate in field experiences throughout Wakulla County in the Learning In Floridas Environment (LIFE) program. Researchers from D.E.P. led the sixth, seventh and eighth grade students through labs that t the curriculum being studied by each grade level, and allowed students to have a hands on experience that reinforced what was taught in the classroom. Each grade level attends different sites and participates in labs that are set up speci cally for the area being studied. Carol Broome and Louis Hernandez took the sixth grade students to Wakulla Springs for a field experience. The sixth graders went on a jungle cruise, a Cyprus dome survey and a microinvertebrate lab. The jungle cruise allowed students to see animals and plants that are unchanged by humans. The Cyprus dome allowed students to test the acidity of the stagnant water and to walk out into the water and scoop up organisms for counting. The macro-invertebrate lab gave students the opportunity to test the acidity of the water and to classify and count the macroinvertebrate organisms in the water samples taken from the Wakulla River. Students then compared the types, and numbers, of organisms in each type of environment. This showed students where the cleaner water is located and help lead them to a better understanding of how the water is cleaned and replaced in the ecosystem. Students really enjoyed the opportunity to get into the science and learn. This really brings home a lot that has been done in the classroom says Broome.Special to The NewsAs we welcome the season of new blooms we wait in anticipation and excitement for what to expect at this years upcoming proms. One prom in particular lls the hearts of not only the special participates but also those who are part of the production. Blessed by these students and the joy they bring to so many, we desire to present an exciting evening of dinner and dancing for students with special needs within our community. Promising to be An Evening of Elegance specifically for these special young people along with a guest, their family, teachers and volunteers. Announcing the 5th annual Special Needs Spring Prom, Saturday, April 20th, 7 p.m. 10 p.m. It is being held at Wakulla Springs Baptist Church, 1391 Crawfordville Hwy. Make reservations by Wednesday, April 17th. For more information contact the church of ce at 926-5152 or the event coordinator, Sandi DeRoss at 545-8262 or sdeross@comcast.netJESSICA BRATTAIN Special to The NewsThe Special Olympics Area Games took place Saturday, April 6th at Lincoln High School in Tallahassee. It began with a parade of athletes walking the track from the surrounding counties. The athletes then competed in track and eld events including the running long jump, soccer, relays, softball throw, and tennis ball throw. Izabel Hernandez, of Shadeville, competed in the softball throw and the 50 meter run events.Izabel has been competing for several years and loves to spend time practicing with her family and friends. She took home 1st Place in the Softball Throw and 4th Place in the 50 Meter Run. Izabel says her favorite part about competing in the Special Olympics is trying her best and earning ribbons. The Special Olympics State Games will be held on May 17 in Orlando, FL. Huttons Pauls Pest Rossettii Realty Talk o the town Geo Energy FSU Credit Special to The NewsIts a dark, cold stormy night when a strange group of people gather for a reading of The Last Will & Testament of the late Josiah Travers. Thirteen characters, some related and others complete strangers wonder what old Josiah was up to when they discover that he left his Will in the form of a picture puzzle or what is know as a Rebus. Figuring out the meaning of the Will is only part of the mystery as strange and deadly events begin to take place in the rather odd, eccentric old house of the late Mr. Travers. Monk Ferriss Bone Chiller is a thrilling comedic mystery that will surprise everyone with its many plot twists and turns. Make plans to see the talented students of Wakulla High School as they try to unravel this bazaar mystery and nd the unknown killer. It will also be the last play for seniors Chelsea Austin, Hannah Lanier, Alexander Lewis, Caitlyn Wagner and Hunter Wheatcraft. Bone Chiller opens on Friday, April 19th beginning at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 20th at 7:30 p.m. and a matinee on Sunday the 21st at 2:30 p.m. Doors open thirty minutes prior to curtain where tickets can be purchased. The cost for students is $4, seniors $5 and general public $6. Refreshments will be sold at intermission. Wakulla eld experience enriches at RMSShadeville Elementarys Special Olympics StarIzabel Hernandez shows off her 1st and 4th place ribbons.Special needs Spring Prom this Saturday SPECIAL TO THE NEWSWakulla High School drama students, pictured above, present Bone Chiller, a who dunnit, this weekend at the high school.Bone Chiller comes to WHSSPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Ive got Easter on my mind Sheriffs Report for March 28, 2013 Jackie Turner wins award at Wakulla Springs Ive fallen and I cant get up Chamber Spotlight Watching over Woolley Park Spring Creek featured in NY Times Barwick places at Jiu-Jitsu Tourneythewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Chambers Low Country Boil draws record crowdREADERS WRITE:Learn what it takes to be a Scout First Responders ar e life-savers Fashionology fundraiser is set Early meetings will hurt public By JO ANN PALMER The place to be this past Saturday night was the third annual Low Country Boil hosted by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce at 3Y Ranch. This event began as an idea from past president John Shuff as a way to raise funds for improvements and maintenance to the historic courthouse and fund scholarships for our youth. The funds this year will support scholarships to the TCC Green Guide program. The band Locomotive was rocking the arena as the guests began to arrive. NJROTC cadets were directing cars into parking in the eld. The cooks began planning months ago, thinking for ways to improve on last year and ways to tweak their special recipe. We appreciate all the extraordinary chefs who worked so hard: Paul Nichols, Ray Teague, Larry Strickland, John Shuff, Chris Anderson, and Niraj Patel were the shrimp boil cooks, while Glenn Williams and business partner Andy donated and prepared fresh craw- sh. David Moody prepared an outstanding no-shrimp version to satisfy the palate of those who preferred no shell sh. Sue and John Anderson spent a couple of evenings lling cocktail sauce in individual serving containers. Angelo and Thomas Petrandis helped us obtain and purchase the fresh seafood from our local waters, and Nick Gray helped us secure the sausage and promised to be back next year to help with cooking. By the end of the evening, the cooks had fed 367 people, prepared 280 pounds of shrimp, 160 pounds of sausage, 120 pounds of new potatoes, 720 niblets of corn, 10 pounds of mushrooms, 8 pounds of carrots, 70 pounds of onions, 30 pounds of garlic, 20 stalks of celery, and several bags of lemons and limes. The dinner was topped off by 350 homemade cupcakes donated by Charlean Lanier of Kingdom Harvest Fellowship Church and the Kast Net restaurant. Our premier sponsors were Capital City Bank, Tallahassee Community College, The Wakulla News, and Waste Pro. Our corporate sponsors were Centennial Bank, Wakulla Insurance of Roger, Gunther, Vaughn Insurance Inc., Wal-Mart, Refreshment Services Pepsi, Lamar Advertising, Royal Restrooms, and Skip Young 3Y Ranch. Our table sponsors were BayLeaf Market, Francie Casey Lowe, ESG Operations, Boomerang Restoration, Crawfordville Auto, Wakulla County Democratic Executive Committee, Ed Gardner O.D., Inspired Technologies, Progress Energy, Revell Electric, A New Look Painting, Stow Away Marine and More Inc., and Jared Miller for The White Elephant. Our Ambassador sponsors were Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites, Preble-Rish Inc., Shields Marina & Shields Dry Storage, St. Marks Powder, Wakulla LP Gas and Wave 94. Our Supporters were Ameris Bank, Ameri rst Mortgage, Chris Russell, Larry and JoAnne Strickland, AMS Marine, Brick Launcher, Brooks Concrete, Cook Insurance, Costco, Hydra Engineering, Commissioner Jerry Moore, Rascal Auto Sales, Simply Done Marketing and Talquin Electric. A big thanks to our Special Events Committee; Sharol Brown, Zoe Mans eld, Ethel Jefferson, Larry Strickland, John Shuff, Charlean Lanier, Janice Eakin, Rachel Pienta, Tara Kieser, Mary Wallace and especially Petra Shuff and Jo Ann Palmer. We know many people called at the last minute looking for tickets to the event. Dont miss out next year, mark your calendar: the 4th Annual Low Country Boil will be held April 5, 2014. If you are interested in becoming a member of the Chamber, and joining our quest to preserve our past while building our future contact Petra Shuff at (850) 926-1848 or via email at wakullacochamber@embarqmail. com.Jo Ann Palmer is director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful and helped organize the boil for the Chmaber. Editor, The News: Wakulla County, a Sportsmans Paradise, goes hand-in-hand with the scouting concepts with a wide array of outdoor activities and hometown values. Scouting makes a direct and positive impact on our community by teaching positive values and leadership skills to our youth. Please join us in supporting our local scouting groups Cub Scouts, Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts when they hold an event on May 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in Hudson Park. We will have entertainment, hands-on crafts, food, vendors, silent auction, cake walk and a donation based raf e. Come join us for food, fun, and scouting! Get more information at https:// www.facebook.com/pages/WakullaPack-5-Cubscouts/187146928015343. If you would like to become a vendor, donate an item, or make a donation, please contact Lucy Floyd at lucyblc@yahoo.com. Lucy Floyd lucyblc@yahoo.com. Editor, The News: Model and sponsorship applications are available for Fashionology Wakulla On the Runway. This upcoming charity event will bene t the 4-H Education Enrichment Council, the American Cancer Society Relay For Life, and scholarships for the AVID Scholars Program. The fashion show will have teenagers and adults modeling trendy clothing on a budget. Models can be male or female, ages 12 and up, and organizers particularly want to invite local cancer survivors to participate in the event. We are planning an event that supports great causes, promotes body acceptance, and shares budget-friendly wardrobe choices, said Andrew Bracci, 4-H Education Enrichment Council President. Models are able to choose which charity will receive their entry fees. For only $10, models can choose one of the following categories to participate in, and a second category is only $5 more. Categories include Purple Passion, Country Chic, Project Runway, Everyday Wear and Business Casual, Fashion Remix, Professional, and Formal Attire. Model forms are available on the Wakulla High School, Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce, and 4-H websites and are due by April 12. A rehearsal is scheduled for April 25. The Fashionology event is scheduled for Friday, April 26, at 6:30 p.m., in the WHS Auditorium. Additional entertainment will be provided by the RMS cheerleaders and Spirit Paws, Wakulla Dance Academy, and Studio 88. Sponsors include Anytime Fitness, Talquin Electric Cooperative, Gamerz Paradise, Thirty-One, The Thread Tree, and TigerRock Martial Arts. For more information or for a sponsorship packet, please contact Nancy Floyd Richardson at 9331083/CreativFlo@comcast.net or Kelli Bracci at 294-1314/kbracci@gmail. com.Nancy Floyd Richardsoncreativ o@comcast.net Editor, The News: I have been following the new 2 p.m. board meeting policy change with interest. I read the letters by Chuck Hickman and James Parham, and was not going to comment until I read Parhams letter of last week. His quote, I agree with your (Commissioner Merritt) position: County employees have to stay overtime for our convenience one meeting a month; we can come to a meeting at the convenience of county employees for the other meeting, just surprised me so. Why would anyone congratulate any commissioner for limiting citizen input? And make no mistake, thats what theyre doing. I cannot think of anything less citizen friendly or employee friendly than the 2 p.m. meetings, and agree with Hickman the meetings should be later. Parham forgets something: all county commissioners and employees work for us, they knew the hours required when they were hired or ran for office. The system was not broken and the x to that situation was part of a long, shady slide to limit citizen participation, circle the wagons, keep the public as much in the dark as possible. Just my opinion, of course, but every excuse beyond that is just that an excuse. I have a number of objections to this new 2 p.m. policy. Thus: Almost since being elected, Merritt has tried to curtail or eliminate public participation. Whats the easiest way to do that? A 2 p.m. meeting. He tried to limit speaking on Citizens to be Heard and was stopped, so the next step to the shade was this 2 p.m. meeting business. The whole government things backwards. We dont work for them, they work for us. Remember the board trying to eliminate PowerPoints by citizens? We paid for equipment they didnt want us to use at meetings? Additionally, Parhams comment, If something is important enough, we (the public) will find a way to get to the afternoon meeting, gets it backwards. They work for us. County employees and commissioners both knew the meeting times when hired. We have to remember that we live in a commuting county. Getting to a 2pm meeting will be tough for many so whats the real reason? The overtime issue can be solved simply. Salaried employees can do the job of hourly staff or comp time can be given. If any commissioner had 2pm meetings in their platform, would they have been elected? Why was this vote necessary? Seniors? Driving? If they really felt something for seniors they wouldnt be taxing them to death, would change the extremely low income exemption for the MSBUs for seniors. The subjective nature of the non-controversial agenda items only at the 2 p.m. meeting. Lets remember that the proposed changes to the usage at the community center were non-controversial. Until a lot of citizens showed up to challenge them. Who is going to decide? This irresponsible action by the board is just another attempt to limit citizens participating or watching the meetings. Given the background and history of constant attempts at limiting citizen participation I will never be convinced that the 2pm meeting was done for the bene t of citizens. Taxpayers all across the county, tired of government by fiat, have rebelled in various ways and we do have the power. Id like to suggest that if the 2 p.m. and capricious actions of the board continue that the voters of the county, in 2014, vote against the 1-cent sales tax renewal and all other taxes til the board comes to its senses on open government. I say no more money, no more taxes of any kind, which includes the sales tax we will be voting on. Hugh Taylor CrawfordvilleEditor, The News: The number of dedicated volunteer organizations in Wakulla County is indeed a blessing. That the number has steadily grown over the years makes it even nicer. My husband and I moved to Florida in 1971 and in a very short time we were invited to attend a Coast Guard Auxiliary meeting. After completing the required courses we became Auxiliarists. Then we became members of the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department at Shell Point. More training and then First Responders! We attended the rst class taught by Fran Councill in the upstairs of the old courthouse. Wonderful woman and a wonderful course. The years rolled on and I became involved with other volunteer organizations. I have enjoyed them all, but there is a special warm spot for First Responders. This past week a house guest collapsed. He is a severe diabetic and has undergone numerous operations due to a work-related fall. I had a moment of panic and then calmly picked up the telephone and dialed Debbie Murphy. She is a certified rst responder who lives here in Shell Point. If I didntt know better, I would swear she jumped on a pogo stick and made one humongous leap she was here that quickly. In a matter of minutes she had assessed the situation, called 911 and by the time the ambulance arrived she had obtained all the information needed by-the EMT. On behalf of my house guest and myself Debbie Murphy, thank you, for being a truly dedicated volunteer. Sherrie Alverson Shell Point

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 5A Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-84123383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Dinner 6:45 pm Bible Study Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 We didnt need armed guards, we had Mrs. Ammon OUT TO PASTORBy JAMES L. SNYDER The Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were watching a television news report and I simply broke out into laughter. What are you laughing at? my wife asked. Im just thinking of Mrs. Ammon. When I went to school we didnt need any armed guards, we had Mrs. Ammon and nobody crossed her. The news report went on to say how they were trying to put armed guards at every school in our country. I suppose that is a good idea, I do not know all the ins and outs of the politicalness of that report. Everything these days seems to have some kind of a political angle to it. Now that political angle is intruding itself into the public school system. This is all an attempt to protect our school children. I am all for that. I was thinking, however, that when I was a youngster we did not need that sort of thing. We had Mrs. Ammon and her infamous hickory stick. Very few people remember a time when a teacher had, as one of her tools for education, a hickory stick and knew how to wield it. Somebody may ask how I know about that. Very simply. I am the product of a teacher wielding the hickory stick. It is hard now to remember the occasion that called for the application of that hickory stick. Actually, there was more than one occasion calling for such teacher and student interaction. The old saying was that our teacher would apply the Board of Education to the Seat of Learning. Believe me when I say, I earned a degree in that. Somebody will say, Things have changed. I will agree that things have changed, but most things have not changed for the better. Back in the day when I was a member of the public education system, the teachers were in charge. A basic rule in our house prevailed, If you get a paddling in school, you get a paddling at home. At that time, teachers were too busy to put up with any kind of fooling around in a classroom. Do not get me wrong, my teacher made it fun most of the time. For the ones who, like me, took it too far, she knew how to stop it dead in its tracks. Mr. Snyder, the teacher would say in a very stern tone of voice. Is that you making all that noise? I knew what was to follow. Mr. Snyder, please go to the principals of ce and I will join you shortly. Oh boy. Those familiar words bring back haunting memories of my visit to the principals of ce. You can be sure that Mrs. Ammon would not come into the principals of ce, spank you and then go back to her class. On some occasions, I would have preferred her to spank me and get it over with. The rst thing she had to do was explain to me why what I did was wrong and disruptive to the class. Then she had to explain to me how this paddling I was going to hurt her more than it did me. For the life of me, I could never figure out where it hurt her more than it did me. I knew exactly where it hurt me and for the rest of the day it would be quite dif cult for me to sit down in my chair. Not only did my posterior glow in pain, but the snickers of my fellow students were even worse. At the time of the application of the hickory stick, I really did not like Mrs. Ammon. Looking back, I have a different perspective. I now know that she really had an interest in me as a person. She was trying to discipline me in ways in which I needed discipline from someone like her. Years later, I went back and visited my old teacher, Mrs. Ammon. I took to her some books I had written and published. She said she remembered me, I really do not know if she did or not. I had to do one thing and that was to thank her. I want to thank you, Mrs. Ammon, for teaching me to read and to write. Then I handed her my books. She seemed to be so very happy, but not as happy as I was. This teacher made a difference in my life that I did not realize until I was older. One thing Mrs. Ammon taught me was that I should not get away with anything. There is a moment of accountability everybody must face. Mrs. Ammon was making sure that I was facing up to the realities of life before I did too much damage to my life. It is sad that the politics have taken over our education system today. It is sad that we do not have any Mrs. Ammons with their hickory sticks. When I think of Mrs. Ammon I think of what Solomon writes, He that spareth his rod hateth his son: but he that loveth him chasteneth him betimes (Proverbs 13:24 KJV). It is my opinion that we need more Mrs. Ammons in our school classrooms and less, a lot less, politics.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. Church Briefs Revival at Shady SeaShady Sea Baptist Church is having revival April 17 through April 19 at 7 p.m. nightly. Featured pastors are B.B. Barwick, Glenn Hamel, and Micheal Hall. Come out and see what the Lord is doing in the little church by the water with the big heart for God! Macedonia to hold barbecue, yard sale and bake sale Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven will hold a barbecue, yard sale and bake sale on Saturday, April 13, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the vacant lot between 1831 and 1992 Sopchoppy Highway in Sopchoppy. For more information Delores Nelson 408-7857 or Bobbery Rosier 519-0071. Spring revival at Mount TrialWe welcome you to come out and witness a man of God, Bishop C.W. Maddox of Bridging the Gaps International Minister, will render spring revival at Mount Trial Primitive Baptist Church, 1418 Sopchoppy Highway. Come looking for a blessing, and also being revived.By BETSY GOEHRIG One of the ways we can have a stronger community is to have stronger churches. We all want a great church a bigger, better, growing, exciting church. Most want the ministers to do that somehow, but it takes all of us together, working to build up the Body of Christ. Together, we have the power to create a better church, in partnership with God. Here are a few simple tips, which begin with what YOU can do to help create a better church! GO TO IT One of the greatest gifts you can give your church is to go to it to show up show up for worship services regularly, show up for Sunday School and Bible study, show up for fellowship activities, show up to help and to serve! Your regular participation creates an atmosphere of dedication and commitment! LOVE IT Give your church unconditional love whether its your preference in one thing or another or not! Love your church wholeheartedly and you will nd others will follow your example and love it, too! Reclaim your love, your passion, for following Jesus Christ. Share that excitement and enthusiasm. Youll be surprised at just how infectious that can be and what a difference that can make! SUPPORT IT You can create a better church by supporting it, first and foremost through your prayers pray daily for your congregation, for your leaders, for your ministers and staff, and for the ful llment of the mission and vision of what God is calling us to be and do. Support the ministries of your church through the resources of your tithe of time and money and through your service both in your church and in the community. LEAVE IT Yes, thats right, Im telling you to leave the church. Get out of the church. Every week. Because Christ told his disciples to GO, to share the good news. He didnt say SIT and let the people come to you. We are commissioned to be a people of mission. Every day we are to bear witness to what God is doing in our lives, that we might reach others with the love and compassion of our Lord. As we seek to create better churches, let us embrace the call to reach and make a difference in the lives of others. With that in mind, truly A BETTER CHURCH BEGINS WITH ME (meaning YOU)! And a better community begins with US through the help of THEE! Blessings, Betsy.Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is pastor and New Church Planter with the Disciples of Christ Church. HEAVENS TO BETSY A better church begins with you

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comMarilyn D. Shepherd, 81, of Crawfordville, passed away on Tuesday, April 2, 2013. A former resident of Palm Harbor, she had lived in Crawfordville for the past 12 years. She was a member of Panacea Moose Lodge #2510 and loved playing bingo, sewing and cooking. She loved spending time with her family and friends. Survivors include her daughters, Valerie Nazworth and Patricia Robison both of Crawfordville; a niece, Pamela (Chuck) Roost of Michigan; seven grandchildren, Raynee, Kristie (Chris), Christopher, Victoria, Corey (Stephanie), Kristine, and Sara; three greatgrandchildren, Brittney, Emily, and Lindsey; and a great-great-grandson, Brylan. She was predeceased by her parents, Russell and Doris DeLong; a sister, Carolyn Willis; and granddaughter, Patty Robison. The family gathered for a memorial service on Thursday, April 4, 2013 at Christian Worship Center in Medart with the Rev. Chuck Roost of ciating. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to Big Bend Hospice. Arrangements were under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, (850) 5593380. Please sign the online guestbook at http://www.forbesfuneralhome.net.Obituaries Roberta Colter Martin Marilyn D. Shepherd James Gilbert Taylor Anita Saunders TownsendAnita Saunders Townsend died on Saturday, April 6, 2013, at home, in Crawfordville. She was predeceased by her husband, C.L. Townsend Sr.; two infant sons; her parents, Bill and Mattie Sanders of Sopchoppy; and brothers, W.T. Sanders and J.D. Saunders. She was born on Sept. 4, 1919, in Brunswick, Ga. She graduated from Sopchoppy High School in 1937 and took her nursing training at Chattahoochee State Hospital, becoming an RN in 1941. She had a varied and successful nursing career. Her greatest accomplishment was being the Public Health Nurse for Wakulla County from 1951 until 1989. Under her guidance, many improvements and programs were implemented for the citizens of Wakulla County. Her leadership in professional, church and community activities was recognized and appreciated by many in Wakulla County and the surrounding area. She loved Wakulla County and it loved her. Survivors include her sister, Juanita S. Roddenberry of Sopchoppy; two sons, C.L. Townsend Jr. of Plant City, and Jack Light Townsend Sr. of Temple Terrace, their wives, Ione and Helen; eight grandsons and four great-grandsons; and a multitude of nieces, nephews and adopted daughters and sons. Pallbearers for Anita were her grandsons, Jack Light Townsend Jr., James Austin Jake Townsend, Barrett McCoy Bear Townsend, Nathan Leroy Townsend, Aaron Leroy Townsend, David Leroy Townsend, Heath Harlan Campbell and Jarrod Allen Campbell. Honorary pallbearers are Thurman Roddenberry, Billy Roddenberry, Lagran Saunders, Jack Henderson, Dennis Tucker, Johnny Daniels, Ken Stoney Burke, Don Davis, Jayson Kirk, John Townsend, Dale Townsend, Ralph Coleman, Doug Townsend and Lyn Townsend. In lieu of owers, the family requests donations be made to either The Anita Townsend Nursing Scholarship at Wakulla Academic Boosters, 3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327; or Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308; or Benevolence Fund, First Baptist Church, 3086 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville FL 32327. The family received friends on Tuesday, April 9, 2013 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the First Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, April 10, 2013 at 10 a.m. at First Baptist Church in Crawfordville. Graveside services will follow at West Sopchoppy Cemetery Sopchoppy. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com). Roberta Colter Martin, 42, of Tallahassee, passed away on April 3, 2013 in Tallahassee. A daughter of the late Edward Jackson Colter and Shirley Revell Colter, who survives, she was born Aug. 22, 1970, in Sarasota. She was a Functional Class Coordinator with the Florida Department of Transportation for 23 years. In addition to her mother, Shirley Revell Colter of Conway, S.C., she is survived by her husband of 17 years, Toby Martin of Tallahassee; a son, Nicholas Wayne Colter of Tallahassee; two stepsons, Blake McDowell and Joshua Warren, both of Conway, S.C.; a sister, Ruth Ekker, Raeford of North Carolina; three half-sisters, Brenda Kelley of Clermont, Donna Downing of Charleston, S.C., and Margie Hat eld of Lecanto; special aunts, Carrie Davis and Audrey Hiers, both of Sopchoppy. She is survived by two special pets, Georgie and Chloe. She was predeceased by her father and brother, Eddie Colter. The funeral was held on Friday, April 5, 2013, at Abbey Funeral Home, with interment at Tallahassee Memory Gardens. The family received friends before the funeral. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh.com.James Gilbert Taylor of Panacea passed away Saturday, April 6, 2013, at home with his family gathered around him. James was born July 31, 1919, in McIntyre. He served in the U.S. Army from 1940 to 1945 and fought in the Battle of the Bulge. After returning home from the Army, James became an active member of his community. He was a founding member of VFW Post 4538 in Wakulla County where he served as Post Commander, District Commander and even earned the position of All American District Post Commander 1967-68. He spearheaded many fundraising events through the VFW, helping to raise large sums of money, some of which went to help citizens of the county. Every Nov. 11, James could be seen in the VFW kitchen serving up free breakfasts of pancakes and sausage, smiling, talking and encouraging all those of who came in to eat plenty. He was the rst board member of the Senior Citizens Council and stayed active at the Senior Center until his health prevented him from being able to go. He was a former member of the Florida Highway Patrol and served on the Wakulla County School Board and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners for many terms. He also played a part in starting the rst ambulance service in Wakulla County. He was a current member of the Masons. His contributions and involvement in local and statement government and the impact they had on the county played a large part in helping Wakulla County to grow while maintaining its beauty. Although his greatest passion was the VFW, his wish would be to be remembered for the good he has done for everyone he came in contact with. Survivors include his wife of 68 years, Ruby; his sons, James Jr. Buddy (Heidi), Merritt (Jessie) and Delano; daughters, Lillian Clemons (Robert), Peggy Stribbling (Charles) and Donna Taylor. He is also survived by 12 grandchildren and 16 great grandchildren, all of whom he treasured dearly. He is survived by one brother, Hardy; and one sister, Sarah Roe; and nieces and nephews too numerous to name. Services were held Monday, April 8, at 11 a.m. at the Revels-Nichols Cemetery in Otter Creek. Visitation was held at Bevis Funeral Home in Crawfordville from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, April 7. In lieu of owers, contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice. The family would like to express their thanks to Lynn Vickers, Danielle Vaughn, Deana Murphy and niece Carolyn Wright for their care during his illness and passing. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel in charge of arrangements (850926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com).Anita Saunders Townsend Marilyn D. Shepherd Roberta Colter Martin James Gilbert Taylor From Page 1A The students best friend, also an AVID student, shared her story of being raised by single mother who lost her job and now faces the challenges of poverty. Money she thought would be available for college tuition and books are now being spent for groceries, transportation and necessities, she said. In the face of that, the student said she was very dependent on her AVID family. TCC ENVIRONMENTAL INSTITUTE Bob Ballard, director of Tallahassee Community Colleges planned Wakulla Environmental Institute, discussed progress with the project land for the site has been closed on, plans are developing, and the groundbreaking ceremony is set for Monday, April 15. Ballard anticipated the institute will open in July 2014. Among the facilities to be built are an ecolodge, a training center which could be used as a convention-type center, as well as classrooms on campus. Ballard also noted that students at the high school can dual-enroll to attend classes at the institute. HEALTH INDICATORS Pad Juarez, director of the Wakulla County Health Department, offered a glimpse at some local statistics on youth noting that the rate of births to young mothers is down, and that the number of repeat births to young mothers is leveling down. The rate of sexually transmitted diseases for youth is on an upswing, but has been in decline for the past four years. He noted as well that neighboring Leon and Gadsden counties have the highest rate of chlamydia in the state. Wakullas graduation rate of 89 percent in the top 25 percent in the state a rate that, in the Panhandle, only Okaloosa can match. But the absentee rate for students missing 21 or more days of school is higher than the state average and represents health problems among students, especially asthma. The percentage of children in the county with a high body mass index 16 percent is higher than the state average, Juarez noted. Students at the high school are actually lower in BMI, and the high rate is middle school kids, Juarez noted. COMMUNITY POLICING Ashley, who is with the sheriffs of ce, also talked about Community Oriented Policing, or COPS, and the departments commitment to youth and community services. Ashley was joined by Sgt. Billy Jones and Detective Rob Giddens. Those in attendance were asked to answer three questions posed by the coalition: What concerns you most about Wakulla youth? What outcomes aimed at youth are you most proud to report? What program, project, service or goal is your goal? and who do you need (partnership) to make it happen?Youth coalition holds town meeting Exceptional students who staff Legacy Cafe served lunch at the coalitions town meeting. Bob Ballard shows, with a hand from Bruce Ashley, of TCCs planned Wakulla Environmental Institute. Tonya Hobby, Molly Clore and Erin Hart talk about SWAT.PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 7Ahappenings in our community CommunityBY MICHELLE MCMILLAN KIRBYSpecial to the Wakulla NewsOn April 22nd Florida will commemorate Confederate Memorial Day. A good place to learn about the Confederacys role in the War Between the States is at the Confederate Museum in the heart of Charleston. Descendants of several Confederate veterans, Finley and Jean Booth McMillan of Ochlockonee Bay recently took a trip with family and friends to the Museum and other special sites and events Jean was born in Charleston and lived there in the 1930s and early 1940s during a time when ladies wore hats to church and gentlemen bowed to a lady passing by on Meeting Street. The family enjoyed a private tour of the Confederate Museum by its director, Mrs. June Wells, and Benita Kinlaw, current President of the Charleston 4 Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy. Mrs. Wells is a former President General of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and an expert in Confederate history. She remembers times of mingling with over 30 real daughters and one widow of a Confederate veteran. Mrs. Wells recalls driving many of these ladies to meetings, lacing up their corsets and knows each precious item in the Museum. One of the familys museum favorites included the rst cannon red in the War Between the States. Mrs. Wells explained the veterans fired the cannon each year after the War in a memorial service, shaving eight inches off the barrel each year until it was retired and donated to the Museum. The museum site was the place where many local men reported for duty to serve the Confederacy. That same site is where soldiers returned and donated their personal artifacts after the War. Some say the oor boards creak when no one is walking around. The Confederate Museum has been managed by the Charleston 4 Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy since it opened in 1894. Jean, Michelle and Stalena are members of R. Don McLeod Chapter 2469 UDC in Crawfordville. The ladies of both cities share a very special connection in UDC but also due to Jeans Aunt Irene Zidlick who was an of cer for many years of Charleston 4 and was instrumental in her membership in UDC. McMillan family visits Confederate museumMr. and Mrs. Joe Maltese of LaGrange, GA are pleased to announce the engagement of their daughter, Julie Ann Maltese, to Marc Antonio Eskew, son of Mr. and Mrs. Kurt Eskew of Kansas City, MO. The couple will be married on May 4 at the First Presbyterian Church in LaGrange at 4:30 p.m. The bride is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Newberry of Crawfordville and Mrs. Anthony (Claire) Maltese of Lakeland, FL. She is a 2007 graduate of Callaway High School and a 2011 graduate of Georgia Institute of Technology with a degree in Environmental Engineering. The groom-elect is the grandson of Mrs. James (Marguerite) Eskew of Kansas City, MO. He is a 2004 graduate of Rockhurst High School in Kansas City, MO and a 2008 graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point with a degree in Systems Engineering. He currently holds the rank of Captain in the United States Army and has recently been assigned to the 101st Airborne Division at Fort Campbell. He has served in Iraq and Afghanistan. Special to the Wakulla NewsWakulla Dance Academys Competition Team took the oor at halftime to perform for the Harlem Globetrotters on March 11 at the Leon County Civic Center. The dancers performed their high-energy, disco-themed jazz routine. Competition Team members range in age from 7-15. The routine is choreographed by Hayley Mahaffey, Kristin Weaver and Emily Pack. Over 150 Wakulla Dance Academy supporters attended the event. Dancers who performed at the event are Cadence Brainard, Caylie Bussey, Sara Chambers, Tanasha Cooksey, Emma Dykes, Shawna Gray, Georgia Gumphrey, Mathilda Jensen, Lauren Oglesby, Alex Porter, Madison Salas, Riley Sandberg, Lilly Simons, Annabelle Slayton, Raegan Stewart, Mandalyn Thomas, Tatum Tucker, Remie Vause, Jordan Webster and Danielle Whiting. Engagement announcedSPECIAL TO THE NEWSFront row, Marilyn Long, Benita Kinlaw, President, Charleston 4 Chapter, UDC; back row, Finley McMillan, Michelle McMillan Kirby, Jean McMillan, June Wells, Stalena McMillan Teague Wakulla dancers perform at Globetrotter eventSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc. Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. 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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools SchoolSpecial to The Wakulla NewsThe Wakulla County Housing Authority is celebrating the 45th Anniversary of the Fair Housing Act of 1968. The Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in housing on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, gender, familial status and disability. In celebration of the Fair Housing Act and in an effort to create awareness about the importance of Fair Housing, Wakulla County is conducting a coloring contest throughout the Wakulla County Elementary and Middle Schools, which includes any public, private, or home schools. The contest is only for students in Kth grade and they must be residents of Wakulla County. Participating students must submit an entry form with a drawing to represent what Fair Housing means. Prizes will be presented to the top three most creative drawings during the April 15th Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners meeting. All entries are due no later than Monday, April 1st and should be mailed to the Wakulla County Housing Authority, Attn: Coloring Contest, P.O. Box 13408, Tallahassee, FL, 32317. To obtain the Fair Housing Coloring Contest entry form, please visit the County website www.mywakulla.com or contact Wallisa Cobb at 850-877-1908. Special to The Wakulla NewsRiversprings Middle School came out on top again at this years academic brain brawl which was held on Friday, March 29th. Riversprings took home the rst place ribbons and the trophy for the sixth year in a row. Wakulla Middle School took second place and Coast Charter School took third. The overall highest scorer for the event was Adrian Peacock. Adrian also received the highest scorer ribbon for the RMS team. The highest scorer ribbon for the WMS team went to Mitch Parker. Coast Charter School team highest scorer ribbons went to Troy Farnsworth and Eric Levingston, who tied. Congratulations and thanks also go to the coaches Bill Taylor at RMS, Priscilla Tucker at WMS, and Arianna Morgan at Coast Charter School. Students Win Oratorical Contest The Coastal Optimist Club held their annual Oratorical Contest on Thursday, April 4th at Poseys SteamRoom. Students from Coast Charter School, Riversprings Middle School, Wakulla Middle School and Wakulla High School who previously won their school level speech contest competed against each other. The rst place ribbon in the girls competition went to Kaylee Meyers from Riversprings Middle School. Second place went to Audrey Dutrow from Wakulla Middle School. The runner-up was Makayla Payne from Wakulla High. The rst place ribbon in the boys competition went to Andrew Walker from Wakulla Middle. In second place was Matthew Jackson representing Riversprings Middle and the runnerup ribbon went to Camden Smith of Wakulla High. The topic for the speech was Why My Voice Is Important. The judges were Lucy Carter of WCTV, Dee Woodbury and John Woodberry, Esquire. Kaylee Meyers and Andrew Walker received checks for $100. Audrey Dutrow and Matthew Jackson received $75 each. All the students received certificates which were presented by contest sponsors Steve Pigott and Jo Ann Daniels and by club president Bill Versiga. Meyers, Dutrow, Walker and Jackson will now compete at the North Florida Optimist Regional Competition on May 4th in Marianna. Makayla Payne and Camden Smith will be the alternates. The winner of the Regional competition will compete at the District level to vie for a $2,500 scholarship.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSOptimist sponsor Sally Gandy with Riversprings Middle School Team Elijuh Mullens, Jason Paris, Logan Hicks, Adrian Peacock, Maclellan Hicks, Lucas Briggs, Noah Mullens and Jo Ann Daniels, sponsor.Optimist Club holds Middle School Brain Brawl Fair Housing Coloring Contest FHP Of cer Mike Simmons was on hand to supervise children during their Trike-A-Thon, which raised over $700 for St. Jude Childrens Hospital. Happy Time Trike-A-Thon raises money for charityChildren at Happy Time Instructional Child Care in Crawfordville raised money for the St. Jude Childrens Hospital on Thursday, March 28th by taking part in a Trike-A-Thon. Happy Time Director Linda Wicker said the fundraiser collected more than $700 dollars. The bike event is an annual fundraiser for the children. Florida Highway Patrolman Mike Simmons supervised the children riding laps to raise money and spoke to the group about general bicycle saftey and the importance of wearing a helmet and obeying saftey signs. During the week,the children learned about children with illnesses such as cancer through the story of Bikewell Bear.SPECIAL TO THE NEWS 000EL0O LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org

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Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Gridiron Football Booster Club is gearing up for the 2013 football season! We are all very excited about this upcoming season, and what we can accomplish for our team this year. The booster club provides support to players and coaches at Wakulla High by working to raise money to purchase much needed supplies, equipment, uniforms, and/or items beyond what the schools athletic budget can provide. The main sources of funding for the boosters are the sale of gridiron seats, sale of program ads, quarter sponsors at home games, meal events, and the sale of custom T-shirts, hats, and other items. We have several different advertising packages available this year which include the End Zone Sponsor and Quarter Sponsor. These can be seen on our website wakullagridironclub.com or by contacting Kathi Douin at 850-519-6531. Spring football kicks off May 1, and nishes with the annual Blue and White Game on May 18 and a spring game on May 23 in Ocala. The players will be walking in the Blue Crab Parade on Saturday, May 4, and will be selling tickets to a chicken and rice dinner to go along with the Blue and White Game. Gridiron members will also have a booth outside the festival where you can come and renew your seats for the year. Please note that last years season ticket holders must renew for the 2013 season no later than May 24 in order to keep their same seats. We are also now able to accept credit card payments. The next booster club meeting will be held on Tuesday April 16 at 6 p.m. in the Wakulla High School Football Field House. Come out and support the Wakulla War Eagles Football Team! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 9Asports news and team views SportsBy AMY LEESpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla Lady War Eagles held off Florida Highs late push and held on to win, 8-6. Florida High wasnt able to come back from the big hole it dug after falling behind by five runs in the seventh inning of the game on Tuesday, April 2. Kayla Hussey did her best to jumpstart the offense for the War Eagles, reaching base four times. She singled in the rst, sixth, and seventh innings. Even though Meghan Sarvis allowed six runs over seven innings she still recorded the victory. Sarvis struck out two, walked three and gave up 10 hits. The War Eagles never surrendered the lead after the rst inning, scoring two runs on a passed ball and an RBI single by Kenzie Lee. The War Eagles piled on two more runs in the top of the second. Courtney Flowers double got things going, bringing home Amber Bryant. Florida High scored two runs in the bottom of the sixth to cut its de cit to two. A two-run double gave them life. The War Eagles stopped the rally after Sarvis got the next batter to ground out. The War Eagles increased their lead with three runs in the seventh. The inning got off to a hot start when Bryant singled, scoring Chris Romanus. Florida High scored three runs in the seventh on a two-run home run and a sacrifice fly. Despite its efforts, Florida High couldnt nish the comeback. WAR EAGLES PLACE 4TH IN DOC4LIFE TOURNAMENT The weekend for Wakulla did not get a great start with the Lady War Eagles losing to Bishop Kenny High school 7-1. The offense could not get the bats going with only 2 hits the entire game. Kenzie Lee was 1-1 with 2 walks and Kayla Hussey was 1-3. Kelbi Davis got on base due to error and Kayla Hussey was able to score the teams only run of the game. The War Eagles woke up for their next game vs. Vanguard High School winning 8-5. Kelbi Davis was 2-3 with 2 RBIs, Kayla Hussey was 3-4 with 2 RBIs and a home run, Shelby Harrell was 1-3 with 2 RBIs, and Kenzie Lee was 2-4 with 2 RBIs and a home run. The next morning, the ladies started off well taking down West Port High School 15-2. Once again the bats were hot for Wakulla. Kayla Hussey and Shelby Harrell were 3-5, with Hussey bringing in 3 runs. Kebli Davis was 2-4 with 1 RBI, Kenzie Lee was 2-4 with 3 RBIs and Chris Romanus was 1-3 with 2 RBIs and a home run. Defense was perfect with no errors. The last game of the day was against Fleming Island High School. A win would place the Eagles in third place for the tournament but it was not meant to be. Kayla Hussey was 3-4, Shelby Harrell, 3-4 with 2 RBIs, Courtney Flowers 1-3 with 2 RBs and Ashley Laird was 2-4. The War Eagles were behind 8-2 in the bottom of the seventh and came back 8-7 with a runner in scoring position at third with 2 outs but were unable to put the ball in play. This tournament was pitched by our freshman pitcher Meghan Sarvis, who did a great job pitching in all four games. She was helped out by Shelby Harrell on the mound. It was a great weekend and great practice leading up to districts which will be played in Suwanne County next week. By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track Coach Five members of the WHS track team traveled to Gainesville on Thursday, April 4, to compete in arguably the largest and most competitive track meet in the state. Although the weather forecasters were predicting heavy rain, wind and thunder showers, the athletes took a chance and made the trip anyway, and were greeted with partly cloudy skies and no rain. The excellent conditions and depth of competition led to some superlative performances. The local contingent was once again led by Madison Harris in the 800 meters. She was seeded in section one, the fastest heat, and ran an excellent time of 2:16.26, to nish in fth place out of a total of 70 competitors. The list of competitiors included the winner, Dasha Rogers, from Plantations American Heritage School, who is not only the leading 800 meter runner in the state, but is also ranked 7th in the nation in the event. Rogers took the race out at an incredible pace. She went through the rst 400 meters in 61 seconds and strung everyone else out behind her. Harris ran a more conservative rst 400 and was toward the back of the pack at the halfway point, but she ran an excellent second half and worked her way up to fth place and was closing fast, as the race ended. From the results, it appears that Harris was the highest placing runner from the Big Bend Area at this prestigious meet. Sophomore Lydia Wiedeman also competed in the girls 800 meters and ran to a new personal record of 2:27. Three WHS athletes competed in the 1600 meter run and all ran well. Senior Raychel Gray and junior Margaret Wiedeman both ran new personal records of 6:05 and 5:39 respectively. Sophomore J.P. Piotrowski also had a good run, nishing in 4:55 just three seconds off his all time PR. The local team enters post-season competition this Friday, April 12, with the District Meet at Florida High School in Tallahassee.Gridiron Booster Club seeks supportFOOTBALL TRACK SOFTBALLWar Eagles compete at Florida RelaysLady War Eagles beat Florida High, 8-6This Friday night, April 12, the Lady War Eagles will host their nal regular season game of the year against the Chiles Timberwolves at 7 p.m. It will be a very special night as we celebrate our two seniors, Kelbi Davis and Courtney Flowers. Festivities will start at 6:15 p.m. and concessions will be serving barbecue plates for $6 to raise funds for the team. Please make plans to come join us. Amy Lee PHOTO BY AMY LEE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMeghan Sarvis on the mound for Wakulla.Senior night is Friday Wakullas Robbie Coles making a name at FSUFormer Wakulla standout Robbie Coles is generating a lot of buzz as a closer for Florida State. Coles went to Chipola Junior College before transferring to FSU. Here hes on the mound warming up against Florida Gulf Coast University.PHOTO BY BILL ROLLINS Special to The News the EATIN path OFF Your Guide to Area Restaurants and CateringRoy BassinMarch 2013 WinnerHis name was drawn fromTHIS IS GREAT! OFF The Eatin Path Entry Form Please drop off form at any participating Eatin Place Name _____________________________________ Address ___________________________________ __________________________________________ City ______________________________________ State __________Zip _______________________ Phone ____________________________________ e-mail _____________________________________One Winner!One Meal from Every RestaurantCoastal RestaurantHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken l l a nt n Deli Deli Congratulations Restaurant & Ice Cream Parlorank You So Much!DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKS LLC 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE LETS GET READY I CAN HELP!Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926 or 510 HAVE YOU TRIED ON THAT SWIMSUIT YET? Erectile Dysfunction Drugs May Be Dangerous To Your HealthFREE book by doctor reveals what the www.eddoctor.com. Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer and MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsOn April 28, six warriors from Ft. Benning will be coming to Wakulla County for the week to sh and relax. They will stay at the Wakulla Lodge and will be fishing three days with Capt. Mike McNamara with St. Marks Out- tters and myself, and I will have Capt. David Fife in boat with me. I will take three one day and another three the next. There will be another boat following with medical personnel in case there are any emergencies that arise. All of this is made possible with donations from members and business in the community and in order to bring more of our brave men and women here two fundraisers are coming up. On April 19 at Southwood Golf and Country Club the first Warrior Golf Classic will be held. The price is $100 per player, which will include range balls, green fees, cart, lunch, barbecue dinner and admission to the concert that night to hear Tobacco Road. I was given one of their CDs and I believe that before too long you will be hearing them on your favorite country radio station. Tickets for the just the barbecue dinner and concert will be available also. For more information you can contact Chris at (850) 284-7326 or clundstrom75@gmail.com. For those of you who dont play golf, the rst annual Warrior Bass Fishing Classic will be held the following day, April 20, at Ingrams Marina with weigh-in being provided by the Talquin Hookers. There is a guaranteed $1,000 rst prize with an 80 percent payback. If you dont play golf and you dont fish but would like to make a donation to this great cause or be a sponsor of one of the holes at the golf course you can call Bill Russell at (850) 933-6500. Warriors and Quiet Waters is a 501(c)3 so your donations are tax deductible. To nish out the weekend you can put up that bass boat and get in your saltwater ats boat and fish in the Forgotten Coast Inshore Challenge on April 20 at Rock Landing Marina in Panacea. This is an inshore tournament with proceeds to bene t the Tallahassee Professional Firefighters including the North Florida Childrens Burn Camp. Local heroes competing in the State Police and Fire Olympics will also bene t. For more information call Lee Rutledge at (850) 251-2536. On April 27 and 28 the fifth annual Rock the Dock Fishing Tournament will be held at Rock Landing Maria in Panacea. This is an inshore and offshore tournament with a recreational, kayak and youth category. There will be a captains meeting on Friday, April 26 at the Gazebo next to Rock Landing Marina. Music will be provided by Tom and the Cats. This tournament is drawing more and more interest each year and this promises to be the largest turnout yet. To register or for more information on tickets for raf es you can call Laurie at (850) 528-7610. Now its time to take the kids shing. On May 18 the Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament will be held. This tournament is free to all children and they hope to see all kids leave with a T-shirt and door prize. Last year all the kids left with a free rod and reel. For a $100 donation you can have your name or your company name printed on the back of the T-shirts to be given out. All donations are welcome and you can send your check to Wakulla Childrens Fishing Tournament, PO Box 349, Panacea FL 32346 or call Ann Cooper at (850) 9845501 or Peggy Bennett at (850) 926-7227 and they will arrange to have your donation picked up. This is a non-pro t organization and all donations are tax deductible. Captains are also needed to take some of the kids shing. Tight lines and good shing!Last year my Patti came down to visit me in March, and left in early April and missed the blooming red bud and dogwood. She was too late. This year, upon arriving April 5, she saw a few late booming red bud and caught our dogwood perhaps just after it has peaked in blooming, yet still very much in show. Fully a month later! The cherry blossom festivals up in the Washington, D.C. area are a month later too, and so when we drove yesterday down to Highway 67 north of Carrabelle to observe a spectacle we witnessed last year in early April, we were deprived of the show. In my opinion, this year we were too early! Patti is a professional nature photographer, and was delighted last spring to nd near the junction of Rock Landing Road (part of Tates Hell State Forest) and Highway 67, along the shoulder of 67 covered with blooming thistles, and nectaring on the thistle blossoms were hundreds of butter- ies, often two or three butter ies per blossom! And most were the lovely tiger swallowtail, or the every bit as big Palamedes swallowtail, a basically black butter y. The true smaller black swallowtail were all but lacking, while there were perhaps a couple of hundred Palamedes along about a mile of Highway 67. This last Saturday we joined our local Florida Native Plant Society, Sarracena Chapter (sarracena being the generic name for the pitcher plants) on a field trip to the Sumatra area in extreme northwest Franklin County (west of our Wakulla County) along Highway 65 to observe some of these pitcher plants. Last year (about now) the carnivorous yellow pitcher plants had already bloomed and lost their petals, and the most of tube-like leaves that trap insects were fully grown. This year the leaves were just starting to develop, while the earlier blooms still had their petals, to Pattis delight. They and the rose pitcher plants were producing spectacular blooms. So we lucked out there. But we could have been unlucky, as a few of the 13 in our group came up on a cottonmouth moccasin, but spotted it before it struck. Cottonmouths and the little pygmy or ground rattlers, are always to be concerned about, as well as diamondback rattlesnakes when walking in the pitcher plant bogs. We found a small diamondback killed on the road latter that day. Monday, on our way back to our home in the Smith Creek area, while still on Highway 67 about three miles from Forest Road 13, I saw and pointed out to Patti my rst completely all-black Florida fox squirrel, I was excited! Id seen striped skunks in that part of the national forest, which are rare enough, and other color variations of fox squirrels, but never an all-black one. What a beauty! About four years ago, not a mile from home, I saw an all-black coyote, and that was neat enough one never knows what you might see IF youre looking keenly. Our home is in the national forest, and pretty much surrounded by pines. When Patti called me yesterday to look out our kitchen window at our bird feeders, I was surprised to see the rst two indigo buntings Ive ever seen on our property, as they prefer more open habitat. They were in vivid blue plumage. Which reminds me to remind you that in the next two or three weeks the neo-tropics the songbirds that have been wintering in Central, and South America, and other points south will be migrating (like the indigo buntings) across the Gulf, and through our area. But, if a cold front sweeps through, to avoid ying north into a headwind, many will fall out of the sky while migrating, and stop and feed until the north wind abates. This coming Friday a cold front along with rain is predicted to pass through this area, and if you would enjoy identifying a variety of migrants, try to go to any coastal area where oaks are blooming like Bald Point State Park, the lighthouse by the coast in the St. Marks National Refuge, or the Youth Camp in the state park on St. George Island. In a fall out you might see dozens of hummingbirds, perhaps halfdozen scarlet tanagers, rose-breasted grosbeaks, and yellow-billed cuckoos in one tree at once, as well as many species of warblers and other song birds passing through to nest in northern states and Canada. From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Wakulla Wildlife BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHTaking six warriors out shing later this monthSharing with Patti the wonders of WakullaFundraisers set to raise money for the cause; plus information on other shing tourneys Commissioner of Agriculture Adam H. Putnam and the Florida Forest Service are reminding Floridians to be extremely careful with res outdoors as the states wild re danger continues to increase. This week is Wild re Awareness Week, which recognizes wild res that raged across Florida in 1998, burning more than 500,000 acres and damaging or destroying 337 homes and structures. Wild res generally occur in the spring and early summer months due to a lack of rainfall, low humidity and strong winds. However, Florida is already experiencing a higher than average occurrence of wild res near homes and neighborhoods. is is Fire Awareness Week IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GAG GROUPER OPEN ASHLEY FEED STORE 8056 WAKULLA SPRINGS ROAD for more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY & RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICOAddi onal auc ons: June 8, August 10 Taking consignments. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 11Aa peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiencesCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Rain! We hope the spring rains are over! While most terrestrial folks have seen yards and ditches ll with an abundance of water, the story is entirely different underwater. Yes, we love the rain, but when the swamps over ow as they most certainly have done recently, the discharge nds its way into sinkholes that deliver these tannins and other organics into our caves. Mind you, the residents of these caves are only too happy for the replenishment to their limited diet. Local caves are teeming with blind cray sh and amphipods foraging on the ceilings, walls and oors. The Suwannee River rose so high that Peacock Springs State Park went underwater several weeks ago, back- ushing their springs and caves. And nearly all the caves along the Suwannee are inundated. Little River, a favorite county park was closed when river water covered most of the two stories of steps leading down to the waterfront. I met some desperate British cave divers who swam with a line tied to the ooded steps out into the park in search of the cave opening, which they did nd. It was clear but with a low ow. Manatee Springs, east of Tallahassee in Madison County, is also ooded. There are just too few sites left right now. With the usual Spring Break diving tourists (many from Europe) arriving in the middle of our deluge, they found slim pickings at the usual dive sites. In Wakulla County, the conduit running from Tallahassee to the Gulf of Mexico was very dark and owing fast. I visited Emerald Sink and Whiskey Still Sink to witness these conditions myself. Our visitors also inquired at Indian Springs, now under new ownership and management, to nd conditions there deteriorated. So we sent them to Marianna and Jackson Blue Springs. All of the Merritts Mill Pond dive sites are clear and busy for all divers (within their respective diving quali cations) this time of the year. I have never been so busy with classes on cave and rebreathers during these ooding times. We trained continuously for six weeks either at Jackson Blue, Ginnie Springs east of us over by High Springs, Blue Grotto near Williston and Eagles Nest north of Tampa. We even made a dark dive in Squirrel Swamp near our facility. One class stood out above all the rest. I trained four diving scientists from Bogota, Colombia on rebreathers. They are marine biologists like myself, so we could relate to the many joys a rebreather will bring to their research. In spite of the long drives and challenging visibility, they mastered the skills and challenges required to continue their coral reef studies. They were not coldacclimatized, we had a cold spring weather, and even our year around constant water temperature was a big strain on them. We bundled them up as best as possible and they endured. I have been advised to NOT bring a dry suit when, in September, I am to travel to Cartagena and join them on a coral spawn investigation. Imagine a toasty south Caribbean ocean dive for four hours chasing coral gametes! Nothing could be ner.Thank you to Duane Treadon for submitting the following article this week. This past Saturday several members of Flotilla 12 participated in one of our biggest Public Affairs events of the year, Springtime Tallahassee. Work started early in the morning with set up beginning at 6:30 a.m. While the team was setting up our displays and preparing for the crowds, several interested people, coming early for get a good seat at the parade, stopped by. Along with passing out safe boating information members discussed our upcoming About Boating Safely course being offered April 20 in Tallahassee. Several individuals and families expressed interest and took registration information. There are still seats available for the class. Anyone interested can contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Public Education by email at fso-pe@ uscgaux.net or register online through our website www.uscgaux.net. Being close to Monroe Street on Park Avenue was bene cial with many people coming by after the parade ended. Kids were treated to a nautical arm stamp, stickers and coloring books. There was even some time in the afternoon for kids and grownups alike to try their hand at tossing a heaving line. By the end of the day our members were tired but thankful for the many interested people who took the time to stop by and learn a tip or two on how to be a better and safer boater. Throughout the day, members Tim Ashley, Raye Crews, David Guttman, Mike Harrison, Chuck Hickman, Larry Kolk, Dave Rabon and Duane Treadon all participated. Fellow members Norma and Phil Hill also stopped by to offer support. The Hills were participating in another venue. This weekend is equally busy: on Saturday, April 13, members will meet for our monthly meeting at the Naval Reserve Training Center in Tallahassee beginning at 9 a.m. Also on Saturday several members will present a safe boating class to the Boy Scouts. Details from both next week! As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident! Be prepared and be safe! If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux. net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net. Please contact us for more information on a safe boating class at fsope@uscgaux.net. Our next scheduled class is April 20. Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton Chuck Hickman demonstrates the heaving line at the Auxiliary booth at Springtime Tallahassee. David Guttman and Tim Ashley at Springtime Tallahassee.Auxiliary at Springtime Tallahassee:PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Apr 11, 13 Fri Apr 12, 13 Sat Apr 13, 13 Sun Apr 14, 13 Mon Apr 15, 13 Tue Apr 16, 13 Wed Apr 17, 13 D ate 3.3 ft. 3:43 AM 3.2 ft. 4:18 AM 3.1 ft. 4:54 AM 2.9 ft. 5:31 AM 2.8 ft. 6:13 AM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 9:13 AM 0.9 ft. 9:41 AM 1.1 ft. 10:09 AM 1.2 ft. 10:39 AM 1.4 ft. 11:13 AM 0.3 ft. 12:27 AM 0.5 ft. 1:19 AM L ow 3.8 ft. 3:12 PM 3.8 ft. 3:37 PM 3.7 ft. 4:02 PM 3.6 ft. 4:29 PM 3.4 ft. 4:59 PM 2.6 ft. 7:05 AM 2.5 ft. 8:15 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 10:03 PM -0.3 ft. 10:36 PM -0.1 ft. 11:09 PM 0.1 ft. 11:45 PM 1.6 ft. 11:54 AM 1.8 ft. 12:52 PM L ow 3.2 ft. 5:34 PM 2.9 ft. 6:21 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 11, 13 Fri Apr 12, 13 Sat Apr 13, 13 Sun Apr 14, 13 Mon Apr 15, 13 Tue Apr 16, 13 Wed Apr 17, 13 D ate 2.5 ft. 3:35 AM 2.4 ft. 4:10 AM 2.3 ft. 4:46 AM 2.2 ft. 5:23 AM 2.1 ft. 6:05 AM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 9:24 AM 0.7 ft. 9:52 AM 0.8 ft. 10:20 AM 0.9 ft. 10:50 AM 1.0 ft. 11:24 AM 0.2 ft. 12:38 AM 0.4 ft. 1:30 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 3:04 PM 2.8 ft. 3:29 PM 2.8 ft. 3:54 PM 2.7 ft. 4:21 PM 2.6 ft. 4:51 PM 1.9 ft. 6:57 AM 1.9 ft. 8:07 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 10:14 PM -0.2 ft. 10:47 PM -0.1 ft. 11:20 PM 0.0 ft. 11:56 PM 1.1 ft. 12:05 PM 1.3 ft. 1:03 PM L ow 2.4 ft. 5:26 PM 2.2 ft. 6:13 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 11, 13 Fri Apr 12, 13 Sat Apr 13, 13 Sun Apr 14, 13 Mon Apr 15, 13 Tue Apr 16, 13 Wed Apr 17, 13 D ate 3.1 ft. 4:19 AM 3.0 ft. 4:54 AM 2.9 ft. 5:30 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 10:17 AM 0.8 ft. 10:45 AM 1.0 ft. 11:13 AM -0.1 ft. 12:13 AM 0.1 ft. 12:49 AM 0.3 ft. 1:31 AM 0.5 ft. 2:23 AM L ow 3.5 ft. 3:48 PM 3.5 ft. 4:13 PM 3.5 ft. 4:38 PM 2.7 ft. 6:07 AM 2.6 ft. 6:49 AM 2.4 ft. 7:41 AM 2.3 ft. 8:51 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 11:07 PM -0.2 ft. 11:40 PM 1.1 ft. 11:43 AM 1.2 ft. 12:17 PM 1.4 ft. 12:58 PM 1.6 ft. 1:56 PM L ow 3.4 ft. 5:05 PM 3.2 ft. 5:35 PM 3.0 ft. 6:10 PM 2.7 ft. 6:57 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 11, 13 Fri Apr 12, 13 Sat Apr 13, 13 Sun Apr 14, 13 Mon Apr 15, 13 Tue Apr 16, 13 Wed Apr 17, 13 D ate 2.6 ft. 3:27 AM 2.5 ft. 4:02 AM 2.4 ft. 4:38 AM 2.3 ft. 5:15 AM 2.2 ft. 5:57 AM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 8:52 AM 0.9 ft. 9:20 AM 1.0 ft. 9:48 AM 1.2 ft. 10:18 AM 1.3 ft. 10:52 AM 0.3 ft. 12:06 AM 0.5 ft. 12:58 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 2:56 PM 2.9 ft. 3:21 PM 2.9 ft. 3:46 PM 2.8 ft. 4:13 PM 2.7 ft. 4:43 PM 2.0 ft. 6:49 AM 1.9 ft. 7:59 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 9:42 PM -0.3 ft. 10:15 PM -0.1 ft. 10:48 PM 0.1 ft. 11:24 PM 1.5 ft. 11:33 AM 1.7 ft. 12:31 PM L ow 2.5 ft. 5:18 PM 2.3 ft. 6:05 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 11, 13 Fri Apr 12, 13 Sat Apr 13, 13 Sun Apr 14, 13 Mon Apr 15, 13 Tue Apr 16, 13 Wed Apr 17, 13 D ate 3.4 ft. 3:40 AM 3.3 ft. 4:15 AM 3.2 ft. 4:51 AM 3.0 ft. 5:28 AM 2.8 ft. 6:10 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 9:10 AM 1.0 ft. 9:38 AM 1.1 ft. 10:06 AM 1.3 ft. 10:36 AM 1.5 ft. 11:10 AM 0.3 ft. 12:24 AM 0.6 ft. 1:16 AM L ow 3.9 ft. 3:09 PM 3.9 ft. 3:34 PM 3.8 ft. 3:59 PM 3.7 ft. 4:26 PM 3.5 ft. 4:56 PM 2.6 ft. 7:02 AM 2.5 ft. 8:12 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 10:00 PM -0.3 ft. 10:33 PM -0.1 ft. 11:06 PM 0.1 ft. 11:42 PM 1.7 ft. 11:51 AM 1.9 ft. 12:49 PM L ow 3.3 ft. 5:31 PM 3.0 ft. 6:18 PM Hi g h Thu Apr 11, 13 Fri Apr 12, 13 Sat Apr 13, 13 Sun Apr 14, 13 Mon Apr 15, 13 Tue Apr 16, 13 Wed Apr 17, 13 D ate 2.4 ft. 4:17 AM 2.4 ft. 5:01 AM 2.3 ft. 5:44 AM 2.3 ft. 6:31 AM 2.3 ft. 7:21 AM 2.2 ft. 8:15 AM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 8:38 AM 1.3 ft. 9:02 AM 1.4 ft. 9:29 AM 1.5 ft. 10:03 AM 1.5 ft. 10:46 AM 1.5 ft. 11:44 AM 0.2 ft. 12:53 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 2:29 PM 2.7 ft. 2:54 PM 2.7 ft. 3:24 PM 2.7 ft. 3:59 PM 2.6 ft. 4:40 PM 2.5 ft. 5:28 PM 2.3 ft. 9:11 AM Hi g h -0.1 ft. 9:25 PM -0.1 ft. 9:58 PM -0.1 ft. 10:32 PM 0.0 ft. 11:11 PM 0.1 ft. 11:57 PM 1.5 ft. 1:02 PM L ow 2.4 ft. 6:27 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacApril 11 April 17First April 18 Full April 25 Last May 2 New May 9Major Times 2:14 AM 4:14 AM 2:38 PM 4:38 PM Minor Times 7:51 AM 8:51 AM 9:27 PM 10:27 PM Major Times 3:02 AM 5:02 AM 3:25 PM 5:25 PM Minor Times 8:31 AM 9:31 AM 10:21 PM 11:21 PM Major Times 3:49 AM 5:49 AM 4:13 PM 6:13 PM Minor Times 9:14 AM 10:14 AM 11:14 PM 12:14 AM Major Times 4:38 AM 6:38 AM 5:02 PM 7:02 PM Minor Times --:---:-9:59 AM 10:59 AM Major Times 5:26 AM 7:26 AM 5:50 PM 7:50 PM Minor Times 12:03 AM 1:03 AM 10:47 AM 11:47 AM Major Times 6:14 AM 8:14 AM 6:37 PM 8:37 PM Minor Times 12:50 AM 1:50 AM 11:37 AM 12:37 PM Major Times 7:01 AM 9:01 AM 7:24 PM 9:24 PM Minor Times 1:34 AM 2:34 AM 12:28 PM 1:28 PM Better++ Better Average Average Average Average Average7:14 am 8:02 pm 7:52 am 9:28 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:13 am 8:02 pm 8:32 am 10:22 pm 7:12 am 8:03 pm 9:15 am 11:15 pm 7:11 am 8:04 pm 10:00 am --:-7:10 am 8:04 pm 10:48 am 12:04 am 7:08 am 8:05 pm 11:38 am 12:51 am 7:07 am 8:05 pm 12:30 pm 1:35 am6% 12% 18% 24% 30% 37% 43% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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On March 29, Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and deputies Cole Wells and Will Hudson investigated a 3:26 a.m. disturbance in Crawfordville. Several individuals were ghting and cursing and waking up the neighborhood. Richard Anthony Chadwell, 26, of Crawfordville pounded on the front door of one of the houses after being instructed to keep the peace by law enforcement. Chadwell refused to cooperate with law enforcement and was taken to the ground where he was restrained. He was arrested for disorderly intoxication and resisting arrest without violence. Alicia Lonnie Williams, 26, of Panacea was arrested and charged with battery, battery on an of cer, resisting an of cer without violence and disorderly intoxication. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston was forced to use force to handcuff Williams. Williams had been in an altercation with another female at the time law enforcement arrived on scene. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: MARCH 28 Henry Macolly of Marietta, Ga. reported the theft of a vehicle tag. The tag was lost or stolen off a trailer. It was recovered in Crawfordville in a front yard near a roadway. Deputy Ward Kromer and Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Albert Ponder of Crawfordville and Susan Toole of Carrabelle were involved in a traf c crash in the parking lot of McDonalds. There were no injuries and minor damage was reported to each vehicle. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. A 16-year-old female student at Wakulla High School was involved in a traf c crash with Nichole Williams of Crawfordville. The juvenile struck Williams vehicle as she was attempting to leave the student parking area. There were no injuries and both vehicles were operable once released from the scene by Deputy Scott Rojas. Carl Roach of Crawfordville reported a fraud. IRS contacted the victim to let him know that his Social Security number was used to fraudulently le a tax return. The fraud may have originated in the Miami area. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Blake Ross Nolin, 26, of Crawfordville was arrested for introduction of contraband into a correctional facility. Nolin was a trustee working on the road crew. When he was searched, tobacco was located in his sock and a lighter was discovered in his cell. Deputy Cole Wells and Deputy Lisa Hummel investigated. Julia Crosby of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims vehicle was damaged by a BB gun. Marks were observed on the side of the vehicle and a window was damaged. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. MARCH 29 Thomas Dustin Welch of Crawfordville and James Tyler Griner of Crawfordville were involved in a traf c crash on Shell Point Road. Neither driver reported any injuries. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. On March 29, Deputy Scott Powell investigated the death of an inmate at the Wakulla County Jail recreation yard. Jason Scott Harrell, 39, of Crawfordville was observed playing football before returning to a picnic table prior to collapsing. Jail medical staff responded to the scene along with Wakulla EMS who performed CPR. Harrell was transported to Capital Regional Medical Center where he was pronounced deceased. The inmate had a previous medical condition and the death was not suspicious. Detective Josh Langston, Sgt. Lorne Whaley and Detention Deputy David Lord also investigated. Gomez Carmelo Cruz of Kissimmee reported a brush re at Bobo J Road and J&K Lane in Crawfordville. Cruz was burning logs and yard debris when the re grew out of control. Wakulla County Fire- ghters and state forestry officials were called to the scene. Approximately four to ve acres burned as a result of the re. The victims sewer line was damaged in the re. Damage was estimated at $300. The case was turned over to state forestry of cials. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Vernie S. Hodges of Sopchoppy and Martin J. Harrington of Crawfordville were involved in a traf c crash at 4056 Crawfordville Highway. There were no injuries and minor damage to both vehicles. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Deputy Vicki Mitchell worked a traf c crash at 28 Brown Blvd. in Crawfordville involving Peggy H. Harland of Crawfordville and Jeffrey R. Elkins of Crawfordville. There were no injuries. MARCH 30 Marjorie Larkin of Wakulla Springs State Park reported a structure re. Smoke was reported in the kitchen area. The fire originated from an electric skillet which had rags on it. Damage was estimated at $2,000 and a re sprinkler sprayed water over the entire room. The fire was ruled an accident. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Wayne Rowlett of Bonifay reported a residential burglary in Panacea. A forced entry was observed. A freezer was removed from the porch. Furniture, a television, ceiling fan and a sewing machine were missing from inside the home. Two toilets were stolen from the bathrooms and the stove, refrigerator, washer and dryer were also missing. The air conditioning unit was removed from outside the house. Tools were stolen from a shed following a forced entry. The value of the missing items was $10,000. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Michael Joseph Butler, 54, of Crawfordville was arrested for operating a motorcycle with a suspended license. Deputy Mike Zimba observed Butler stopped at a traf c light and knew Butlers license was suspended as a habitual offender. The motorcycle was turned over to a relative. Dr. Joseph Abal of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone shot the victims mailbox with a shotgun. Damage was estimated at $75. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. Kenneth Adams of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. A suspect, who was identi ed, damaged or removed four aluminum creations from the victims property. The aluminum creations were valued at $135. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. MARCH 31 Clifton Willard Smith, 51, of Crawfordville was arrested for knowingly operating a motor vehicle while license suspended or revoked. Smith was allegedly observed by Deputy Vicki Mitchell traveling at 53 miles per hour in a 35 mile per hour zone on U.S. Highway 319. It was determined that the drivers license was suspended for failure to pay a traf c ne in Leon County. He was issued a ticket for the speed infraction as well as the driver license charge. Jimmy Gibson of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. An entry point was observed at the home, but the victim could not determine if anything was stolen from his home. A suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. APRIL 1 James Holland of Tallahassee reported a residential burglary in Sopchoppy. A forced entry was discovered at the home. The victim noted the loss of $2,955 worth of property including musical instruments, tools, shing equipment, household appliances and consumables. Damag e to the home was estimated at $220 and a suspect has been identi ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. A 13-year-old male at Riversprings Middle School was found to be in possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. A second 13-year-old male student accepted marijuana from the rst 13-year-old and both students were issued civil citations with 32 hours of community service for possession of marijuana. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Micah Glover of Tallahassee reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered unauthorized charges on his bank account. The charges were created at a Target in Mt. Kisco, N.Y. The charges totaled $461. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Michael Crosby of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and jewelry valued at $300 was reported stolen. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Deputy Nick Gray was investigating a disturbance call when he observed individuals of interest pass him on the road. A traf c stop was conducted. Jimmie Ervin Gavin, 65, of Crawfordville failed to stop for the deputy when he rst put his lights and siren on. Gavin didnt have a valid driver license and was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked, habitual offender. A passenger in the vehicle had narcotics warrants out of Albany, Ga., but the arresting agency denied extradition. Tony Lay of Crawfordville and the Wakulla County Recreation Department reported a burglary at the recreation park. A concession stand was broken into and candy and soda were stolen. In addition, a restroom was also vandalized. The value of the stolen items was estimated at $300. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. APRIL 2 Danny Colvin of Crawfordville reported a fire involving a boat. A controlled burn was being conducted near the Crawfordville location where the boat was being stored but there was no evidence to suggest that the boat re originated as a result of the controlled burn. There were no signs of foul play or arson. The property owned declined to report any property loss due to the condition of the boat. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. Sally Hugo of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims Social Security number to le a tax return. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. APRIL 3 Deputy Sean Wheeler observed a motorist driving erratically on Highway 267 as he nearly crashed into another motorist. The deputy conducted a traf c stop and determined that an 87-year-old motorist from New Port Richey was unable to determine where he was or where he was going. The motorist believed he was only a few blocks from his home. Deputy Wheeler called in EMS personnel to assist the driver to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital for medical care. The New Port Richey mans driver license was found to be invalid. His vehicle was stored at the WCSO until a family member could be located. Elaine Feehan of Eastpoint was involved in a single vehicle traf c crash at U.S. Highway 319 and U.S. Highway 98, also known as the Lower Y. The driver damaged her vehicle and a yield sign. There were no injuries. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. Pamela Oliver of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims Social Security number to le taxes. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. Martha Walter of Tallahassee and Belinda Morton of Fayetteville, Ga., were involved in a two vehicle traf c crash at New Light Church Road and U.S. Highway 319. Both vehicles received minor damage and there were no injuries. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Catrina Haddock of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim was passing a school bus traveling in the opposite direction on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road when an object struck her windshield causing it to break. Video evidence will be reviewed to determine if the object was thrown from the school bus. Damage was estimated at $320. Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. James Gatchell of Crawfordville reported shots being red at a pet turkey near his home. The turkey is valued at $100 and spent shotgun shell casings were recovered. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce received 1,119 calls for service during the past week. Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s Report Has Your Bank Charged You Overdraft Fees By Rearranging Transactions?If your bank has charged you overdraft fees as a result of rearranging or reordering your transactions you may be able to pursue a claim against the bank. Our law rm is pursuing cases for consumers throughout the United States. If you would like to discuss your situation with us (without charge), please contact:Stephen J. Fearon, Jr. Squitieri & Fearon, LLP 32 East 57th Street New York, New York 10022 212-421-6492stephen@sfclasslaw.comAttorney advertising. Prior results do not guarantee future performance. Squitieri & Fearon has ofces in New York but its attorneys practice in courts throughout the United States. In states in which Squitieri & Fearon attorneys are not licensed to practice, we have af liations with licensed attorneys in those states in particular cases. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 13A Green SceneBy LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSON April 2013 has seen the arrival of the spring growing season for Wakulla Countys gardeners. Cool evening temperatures and suf cient rain is keeping the remainder of the cool season vegetables going strong and offering the opportunity to plant for summer. Onions are a common cool season root vegetable which grows well in local sandy soils. This native of central Asia handles north Floridas winters with scarcely a challenge to its hardy heritage. Archeologists estimate the onion has been cultivated for between 5,000 to 7,000 years. Its residue has been documented at bronze-age settlements. The easy portability and long shelf-life have made onions a staple across the annals of many cultures through history. Their long ago uses extended beyond being a mere culinary choice. The ancient Egyptians believed onions were a divinely inspired artifact symbolizing eternal life. Pharaohs tombs were supplied with a stock for the afterlife. Athletes in Greece and Rome used onions as a means of improving their competiveness. Medicinal attributes have long been attributed to onions. Baldness cures, headache relief, snakebite remedies and much more have included onions as part of the concoction. While it is true that 21st century onions are found in the garden and pantry not the pharmacy, there is research evidence indicating some of the compounds they contain have a very positive effect on humans. Onions are used in a variety of contemporary dishes. The bulb and the greens are used, and may be served cooked or uncooked. Green onions have a short life for peak quality. They need to be refrigerated in a plastic bag for use as soon as possible. Bulb onions can be stored at room temperature in legs of clean, sheer pantyhose or laid with space between for adequate air circulation. If stored in the hose, tie a knot between each and cut above the knot when ready to use. Onions can be preserved in a number of ways. Bulb onion can be frozen either whole or chopped, but they will not be crisp when defrosted. Onion rings can be prepared and frozen quickly on a tray before packaging. Onions with a 1-inch diameter or less can be canned. They are considered a low-acid vegetable, so preserving under pressure is necessary. Onions are also considered very suitable for dehydrating. There are currently two onion varieties in the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension demonstration garden. The rst is Bejo Seed Companys Parade bunching onion, and there are open pollination red bulb onions. To learn more about growing and using onions in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu.Les Harrison is Wakulla County Extension Director and Shelley Swenson is Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent.Bumble is an adjective which, at the very least, indicates a person or creature is not nimble. Bumble usually modi es an insult to compound its effect, such as bumbling fool, bumbling idiot, and so on. Actors and actresses have made a career in the entertainment industry bumbling to the pleasure and amusement of their respective audiences. W.C. Fields, Don Knotts (Barney Fife) and even Sandra Bullock are just a few of the theatrical bumblers. Nature, however, does not tolerate bumbling. Clumsiness is a quick route to extinction. It is a curious footnote that one of the most ef- cient native pollinators has been hung with the common name bumblebee. Florida has six different member of the Bombus family, three of which likely live in Wakulla County. The name bumblebee may come from the corrupted Middle English term, Humblebee. It may be just as likely the name is a comment on the aerodynamic pro le of the creature which moves in an ungainly fashion from ower to ower collecting nectar and pollen. Bumblebees live in colonies which are commonly smaller in population than those of European honeybees. Mature bumblebee nests will ordinarily hold fewer than 50 individuals. Bumblebees differ from European honeybees in other traits too. The bumblebee queen emerges in the spring and begins collecting pollen and nectar from owers. She locates a suitable nest site which offers protection for her eggs and food stores in or near the ground. The initial nest construction is the responsibility of the single female. When the eggs hatch, the larva feed on the reserves of nectar and pollen. They progress through four phases, getting larger with each molting. At the end of the fourth molt, the larvae spin silk cocoons under the wax covering the brood cells forming a pupa cells. An adult bumblebee will emerge from the cocoon. The process from egg to adult bumblebee may take about ve weeks. Once enough worker bumblebees hatch, the queen focuses on egg production. Unlike European honeybees, the worker bumblebees, can lay eggs which produce only male bees. The queen produces female worker bees and replacement queens. At the end of the season, the new queens nd a place to overwinter and are ready to start the process again in the spring. The colony will survive for only a single season leaving little evidence it ever existed. Bumblebees are proli c pollinators, aided by the bristly hairs covering their bodies. While collecting pollen and nectar for their hive, they move pollen on their bodies to countless blooms. Recent scientific research has determined their incessant buzzing stimulates a reaction in some plants which promotes release of pollen and successful pollination. Because of their buzz pollination capability and they have a one season life cycle which requires little human input, bumblebee swarms are frequently used in greenhouse vegetable production operations. Sometimes bumblebees are confused with carpenter bees. While they look similar, they are a different genus. Carpenter bees nest in wood and can be quite destructive to siding and structural lumber.They can be effective pollinators also. To learn more about bumblebees and other native pollinators in Wakulla County, contact your UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.ufl. edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931.Hardly clumsy, Bumblebees are natural pollinators Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAided by bristly hairs covering their bodies, bumblebees are proli c pollinators. Knowing when a claim of being green is actually true and not an advertising ploy can be dif cult if you are not armed with the knowledge of how to spot a green cleaner. There are a few approaches to nding one, including using a thirdparty certification as a guide, reviewing the ingredients and product label and/or researching the company. There are many different third-party certi cations or ecolabels. Each certi er has a different set of standards to which they adhere. In the next few months, I will provide an overview of some of the popular labels to further your decisionmaking power. The rst to be discussed is the Design for the Environment label. When you see the DfE logo on a product it means that DfE scientists have screened the product for both potential human health and environmental effects. Approximately 2,800 products have been labeled through this program. Based on currently available information, EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) experts consider that DfE-labeled products: Are formulated from the safest possible ingredients. Through this program, they have increased the use of safer chemicals by hundreds of millions of pounds. Include the consideration of solvents, wetting agents and other surfactant ingredients. Are free from masked problematic chemicals including those that result from negative combinations of product components. Are screened for fragrances and dyes that may present health effects and recommends safer substitutes for problematic chemicals. The DfE label is an easy way to know you are choosing products that is as safe as possible for both people and the environment. For more information request the UF/IFAS EDIS Publication FCS8 OH 2010 Cleaning and Sanitizing the Kitchen: Using Inexpensive Household FoodSafe Products. Shelley Swenson is Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent.How to spot a green cleaner By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING In the garden now In the garden now Onions Onions Bunching onions produce tasty bulbs Bunching onions produce tasty bulbs and greens which may be served and greens which may be served cooked or in salads. cooked or in salads.

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, April 11 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. The group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, April 12 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, April 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown organic produce and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, April 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. Monday, April 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. Tuesday, April 16 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. Wednesday, April 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Mah Jongg Club meets every W ednesday from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Precinct 7 voting house on Whiddon Lake Road. Newcomers are welcome; you do not need to know how to play. Thursday, April 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call 5440719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for all, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Monday, April 22 NAMI of Wakulla presents Jennifer Barr with Apalachee Task Force, discussing the topic of Suicide at 6:30 p.m. Open to the public at no cost. Crawfordville Womens Club. For more info call 926-1033. Government Meetings Thursday, April 11 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. TOURISM DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold its regular meeting at 8 a.m. at Wakulla Welcome Center. Monday, April 15 SCHOOL BOARD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will hold its regular meeting at 5:45 p.m. in the School Board Room, 69 Arran Road. WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. at commission chambers. Monday, May 16 WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. at commission chambers. Learn about herbs at the UF/IFAS Extension Of ce, starts at 6 p.m. Worm Grunters 5K Run starts at 8:30 a.m, registration starts at 7:30 a.m. Florida Native Plant Society hosts talk by Miranda Stuart at 6:30 p.m. Mah Jongg Club meets from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at Precinct 7 voting house. ThursdaySaturdayTuesdayTuesday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akullaEmail your community events to jjensen@ thewakullanews.netWeekly meetings Special EventsThursday, April 11 A HOME FOOD STORAGE SEMINAR will be held at 7 p.m. at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Crawfordville. Topics to be covered are long term storage, pressure canning, vacuum sealed containers and cooking in solar ovens. Special guest is Lorraine Rosborough of Marianna. For more information contact 524-0784. BIG BEND GROUP OF THE SIERRA CLUB will hold a discussion on ecosystem recovery in our community and region with John David Tobe, PhD, Director of Conservation and Restoration for Ecological Resource Consultants, Inc. Light dinner and meet and greet 6:30 p.m., lecture begins at 7 pm. Amtrak Building Community Room, 918 Railroad Ave, Tallahassee. Wakulla County United Way Campaign Awards Breakfast will be held from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. at Capital City Bank, 2592 Crawfordville Hwy. UF/IFAS Extension Of ce presents a workshop teaching the basics of growing herbs. It will include site selection, irrigation, pest control, harvesting and storage. To register call 926.3931. Saturday, April 13 WORM GRUNTERS 5K RUN is being held as part of the 13th Annual Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival which will be held in downtown Sopchoppy. Pre-race registration will begin at 7:30am, and the 5K race will start at 8:30am. 13TH ANNUAL WORM GRUNTING Festival will be held in downtown Sopchoppy. There will be live music and other entertainment, games for children and adults, the Worm Gruntin Contest, the Wakulla County Horseshoe Championship, a Hula Hoop Contest and much more. The event begins at 9 a.m. Monday, April 15 A BLOOD DRIVE will be held at Walgreens in Crawfordville from 2 p.m. to 6:00 pm. All donors will receive a $10 gift card for donating from Walgreens. Tuesday, April 16 THE SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society meets Tuesday, Apr. 16, at 6:30 p.m. at Wakulla Public Library. Miranda Stuart of the National Park Service, will present Managing Fire; Managing With Fire. The topic deals with many aspects of application of re on the land for preservation of ecosystems. The public is invited. Saturday, April 20 TRADITIONS DINNER DANCE welcomes the Tallahassee Swing Band to the Wakulla Lodge. There will be two seatings for dinner. Reservations are recommended through the Wildlife Festival web site wakullawildlifefestival.org. Tickets are $39 per person. ST. MARKS YACHT CLUB hosts national film expert, Professor Frank Patterson, Dean of the FSU College of Motion Picture Arts, at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Betty Ann Korzenny will conduct an interview with him during the Close and Personal Spotlight Event at the Yacht Club. WAKULLA WILDLIFE FESTIVAL, a celebration of outdoor activities and area heritage, will be held at Wakulla Spring Lodge from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Local artists will offer creations showcasing the wildlife and heritage of the Big Bend Region. Live music begins in the Lodge at noon featuring folk music, Appalachian Clogging, and Bluegrass. THE FSU COASTAL & MARINE Laboratorys Spring Open House will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The event will include tours of the new 65-ft. research vessel, the RV APALACHEE, interactive displays by scientists, silent auction and food by Seineyard. HEIDES 17TH ANNUAL ROSE Sale will be held Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at 382 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville. Proceeds to go the CHAT Adoption Center to provide food, medicines, vaccinations, and vet expenses for animals at the adoption center. Three gallon containers will be sold for $8 each or three for $21. Tuesday, April 23 WAKULLA COUNTY RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will conduct a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department at Shell Point. THE WAKULLA COUNTY DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE TASK FORCE AND REFUGE HOUSE, INC present guest speaker, Alesia Adams, Services Coordinator Against Human and Sexual Traf ckiing, at the First Baptist Church of Crawfordville at noon. Call 9269005 for more information. Saturday, April 27 NATIONAL ALLIANCE ON MENTAL ILLNESS presents Third Annual Triple Crown Derby Fundraiser starting at 5 p.m. Sponsor a Wakulla County celebrity and watch the races at Camp Indian Springs Equestrian Center on Bloxham Cutoff Road. BBQ dinner to follow. $20 for adults, $7 for children ages 7 15, children 6 and under free. Sponsorship does not include tickets to the event. VOLUNTEER WAKULLA presents the Sixth Annnual Make A Difference Day from 9 a.m. noon, Learn how to create your own hurricane disaster kit at the livestock pavillion. VAUSE REUNION, Ancestors of Ephraim Vause and Margaret Revell Vause will hold a reunion at the Pee Wee Vause Farm in Crawfordville. The event begins with registration at 10:30 a.m. and lunch at noon. Please bring a covered dish to share. For more information contact Claxton Vause at 962-2371. Tuesday, May 7 WAKULLA COUNTY RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will conduct a public meeting at 6 p.m. at Sopchoppy City Hall. This meeting is intended to provide citizens with information on the RESTORE Act, the activities of the Wakulla County RESTORE Act Committee, and a question and answer session. Saturday, May 18 FRIENDS OF WAKULLA SPRINGS STATE PARK will host the annual Wakulla Springs 5K run through the sanctuary, a wilderness area of the state park not open to the general public. Registration begins at 7 a.m., One mile fun run begins at 8 a.m., 5K begins at 8:30 a.m. Find early registration information at www. wakullasprings.org/projects.html. Wakulla Springs State Park, 465 Wakulla Park Drive (15 miles south of Tallahassee on SR 267.) April11-18FILE PHOTOWorm grunting contestants work hard at last years event. The13th Annual Worm Grunting Festival will be held in downtown Sopchoppy Saturday, beginning at 9 a.m.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 15A Acres Always Argue Awful Bigger Carts Child Chosen Classi cation Clean Crest Crowded Cycles Drily Earth Fashion Fatal Fifty Fishing Foods Hours Ideas Index Items Kicks Length Lists Lived Maybe Motor Outside Pence Purposes Relaxed Scenes YOUR AD HERE Segments Shady Sheep Spoons Talented Thrown Times Units Unity Waiting Weary Weigh X-rays The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek!CarsRealEstateRentalsEm p lo y mentServicesYardSalesAnnouncements Todays New Ads Council Estate SaleFinal Clearance Sat 13th 9am-3pm 104 Ben Willis Rd, Crawfordvill, Fl 229-881-4546 Estate, linens, household, doggie items; Truck tool box, tools, washer/dryer, ect. Sat 13th 9am-4pm Sun 14th12pm-3pm 252 Levy Bay Rd, Panacea 850-984-5329 Male Cat approx. 15 to 16 lbs 4 yrs. old. very friendly, tiger striped w/white chest & mouth, both hind legs are solid white. Lost in vicinity of Buck Miller Rd pls call 850-926-5136 Live in Care Giver for your loved ones, Excellent Referrances Call Joyce Ann 850-661-1312 CNAS, LPNS, RNSSt. James Health and Rehabilatation Center APPLYIN PERSON 239 Crooked River Rd Carrabelle, Florida (850) 697-2020 Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com WAKULLA URGENT CARECrawfordvilleMEDICALL ASSISTANT NEEDEDFor very busy medical office. Certification, Experience, and References Required Must be able to draw blood. Able to multi task Please send resume to rachelbrown@wakullaurgentcare.com NO PHONE CALLS Benefits Offered WE ARE A DRUG FREE WORKPLACE AIRLINE CAREERS -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 866-314-3769 AIRLINES AREHIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 COMPUTER TECHNICIANS TRAINING!Train for PC Technical Careers at sctrain.edu No computer Experience Needed! Job placement Assistance HS Diploma/GED a Must Start Immediately! 1-888-872-4677 DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 Driver -Two raises in first year. Qualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. 3 months OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.drive knight.com DRIVERSIN ARUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST AJOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Dont Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE Heavy Equipment Operator Career!3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators.National Certifications. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VA Benefits Eligible! 1-866-362-6497 Growing Auto Repair ShopMechanic position, must have tools. Service writer, experience helpful. Tireman, experience helpful. Apply in person at Crawfordville Auto and Tire, 2235 Crawfordville Hwy. between 10AM-2PM, Mon-Fri. PIANISTCrawfordville United Methodist Church is looking for a pianist. Pianist will accompany the choir and congregational singing and play service music such as prelude, offertory, and postlude. They will also play for weekly choir rehearsal, Sunday pre-service warm up, Sunday service and other special services as needed. Applicant should be able to play hymns in the UMC hymnal, accompany traditional and contemporary choral works and SATB parts at weekly rehearsal. For more information please contact the church office at 850-926-7209. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer and Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-443-5186 www .CenturaOnline. com Council Estate SaleFinal Clearance Sat 13th 9am-3pm 104 Ben Willis Rd, Crawfordvill, Fl 229-881-4546 Estate, linens, household, doggie items; Truck tool box, tools, washer/dryer, ect. Sat 13th 9am-4pm Sun 14th12pm-3pm 252 Levy Bay Rd, Panacea 850-984-5329 Relay For Life Garage SaleApril 13. 68 Lamar Ct. 8:00-noon. Multi-Family. Household items, toys, movies, clothes, and much more. LOSTMALTESE MIX Lost in Carrabelle on March 1st Small white 9 pound male, 3 years old. Toby has fluffy white fur with one ear that stands up sometimes and a flag tail. He is a comfort dog to nursing home patients as well as his owner. $500 reward no questions asked. Please call if you know anything 8502949664 CRAWFORDVILLE4/2,, Doublewide, on 2 acres, nice & well kept 16 x12 storage shed, quiet neighborhood. close to great schools Rent to Own Opt. $850. mo. 144 Leslie Circle (850) 443-3300 Mobile Homes with land. Ready to move in. Owner financing with approved credit. 3Br 2Ba. No renters. 850-308-6473. LandHomes Express.com CRAWFORDVILLE2BR/2BA, 14X70, Central A/C, gas heat & appliances, water furnished. E. Ivan Rd. to Glover Rd., #10 Cutchin Ct. No pets allowed. $350.00/deposit, $525.00/monthly. 850-926-1428, leave message. CrawfordvilleFurnished Cottage 2BR/1BA, kitchen, Liv/DR area. CHA & W/D. No pets/ smoking. $670/mo. + $670 sec dep (850) 926-2293 Buy 1-3bd Homes From $1000/mo! PreForeclosured and Rent2OWN Homes! Bad Credit OK! Only 500 Credit Score Min! To learn more and access local listings call 1-866-955-0621 PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Renovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, screened front porch & open back deck, Small pets considered Excellent fishing! $600/month 850-926-4217 CRAWFORDVILLE3804 Bloxham Cutoff 3BR/2BA, Inground pool 5 miles from Wakulla Springs and elementary School (850) 510-7008 Bankruptcy Auction Onsite & Online Precision Steel Works Corp.Thurs, April 18th at 11am. Preview: Day of Sale 9-11am 3709 NW 81 Street, Miami, Fl 33147 Welding Equipment & Machinery, Vehicles, Forklift, Power & Hand Tools, Warehouse Items, Steel Beams and more! Visit www.moecker auctions.com for Details, Photos and Catalog Moecker Auctions (800) 840-BIDS 10% -13%BP, $100 ref. cash dep. Subj to confirm. Case No.:12-39848-BKC-AJ C AB-1098 AU-3219, Eric Rubin Seeking ATV/ Hunting Property in the heart of Kentucky? Many properties waiting for you ranging from 56 acres to 343 acres. Whitaker Bank (606)663-2283. 5620-0411 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Vehicle will be sold for towing and storage. Charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78 Date of Sale: 05/02/13 Time: 9:00 AM 98 CHRYSLER VIN# 2C3HD4613WH164902 All sales by Hobbys Towing & Recovery 1498 Shadeville Rd Crawfordville, FL32327 850-926-7698 April 11, 2013 5621-0418 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 4/27/13 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, April 27, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Leslie Carnes Emily Nipper Before the sale date of Saturday, April 27, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. April 11 & 18, 2013 5622-0418 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Seminole Self Storage LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDASTATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON APRIL 26, 2013 at 1 1:00am AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTYOF: CARRYMILLER REBAMCKENZIE LES BROWN Before the sale date of APRIL26, 2013 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. APRIL11 & 18, 2013 5612-0411 TWN vs. Bailey, Charles Case No. 65-2011-CA-000009 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000009 CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v. CHARLES T. BAILEY; PAMELA J. BAILEY; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; AND TENANT 1 N/K/A KENT MARLOW, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 25, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65-2011-CA-000009 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 16th day of May, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 29 CASORA ESTATES UNIT NO. 1 (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A 6 INCH ROUND CONCRETE MONUMENT (WITH BRASS CAP) MARKING THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 90, (ALSO BEING THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT 85) OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 24 MINUTES 48 SECONDS EAST 274.40 FEET TO A POINT, THENCE RUN NORTH 16 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST 755.26 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF RUTLAND ROAD FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING AND LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 55 MINUTES 51 SECONDS WEST 428.94 FEET TO A ONE INCH IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 243.32 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679), THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 39 SECONDS EAST 429.99 FEET TO A 4 INCH BY 4 INCH CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED #679) LYING ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF RUTLAND ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 243.98 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 2.40 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH A 1995 FLEETWOOD MOBILE HOME, ID GAFLR75A61585WE, FLORIDA TITLE NO. 67119525. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 Phone: (850) 577-4401 DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 25TH DAY OF MARCH, 2013 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, April 4 & 11, 2013 FL-97004559-10 5619-0411 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: William A.V. Clark Last known address of: 1327 Spring Creek Hwy., Crawfordville, FL32327 Michael J. Butler Last know address of: 463 Quail Run, Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 April 11, 2013 5617-0418 TWN Sale 4/26/2013 Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida Statues, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, April 26, 2013 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Sherri Green Before the sale date of April 26, 2013, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the StowAway Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 April 11 & 18, 2013 5618-0411 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY ANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING : EVENT:Regular School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, April 15, 2013 TIME: School Board Meeting -5:45 p.m. PLACE: School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 April 11, 2013 3Br 2Ba House $950mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba Duplex $850mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $650mo + Sec. Dep RENTALS: Wakulla RealtySpecializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Cant Cant access access The The Wakulla Wakulla news ews online online content? content? Subscribe Subscribe today and today and get full get full access! access!Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.netA-1PRESSURE CLEANING Darin Ezell Lawn Service 850925-3100Call for FREE Estimate HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 REPAIRS TO RESTORATIONSThomas HoseyOwner/OperatorQuality Work Guaranteed850890-0067References available Licensed & Insured Muddy Water Remodeling & Demolition Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f f A A A ll ll ll ll f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L C C C C C N N N d d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured T ree T rimming Stump Grinding Yard Maintenance Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youLICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 17A 5613-0411 TWN vs.Teuton, John Case No. 65-2012-CA-000469 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACIVILACTION CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000469 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST JOHN M. TEUTON A/K/AJOHN MCQUAIG TEUTON A/K/AJOHN Q. TEUTON, DECEASED et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF ACTION TO: THE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST JOHN M. TEUTON A/K/AJOHN MCQUAIG TEUTON A/K/AJOHN Q. TEUTON, DECEASED LASTKNOWN ADDRESS:UNKNOWN CURRENTADDRESS:UNKNOWN ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUALDEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS LASTKNOWN ADDRESS:UNKNOWN CURRENTADDRESS:UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in WAKULLACounty, Florida: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 19, TOWNSHIP2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, (SAID POINT BEING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF LANDS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 267, PAGE 297 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA) AND RUN THENCE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 150.06 FEET ALONG SAID WESTERLY BOUNDARYTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 33 SECONDS EAST 111.74 FEET, THENCE NORTH 89 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 03 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTHERLY BOUNDARYOF PROPERTYDESCRIBED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 92, PAGE 590 OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS, ADISTANCE OF 268.78 FEET; THENCE NORTH 00 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 33 SECONDS WEST 110.88 FEET TO THE SOUTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SAID PROPERTYRECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 267, PAGE 297 OF SAID PUBLIC RECORDS; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 15 MINUTES 58 SECONDS WEST 268.97 FEET ALONG SAID SOUTHERLYBOUNDARYTO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, AND BEING SUBJECT TO THAT PORTION LYING WITHIN THE MAINTAINED RIGHT OF WAYOF RICHARDSON ROAD. TOGETHER WITH A2005 DEST MOBILE HOME ID NO.S DISH00856AAND DISH00856B, TITLE NO. 92579957 AND 92579634. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses within 30 days after the first publication, if any, on Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L., Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 4919 Memorial Highway, Suite 200, Tampa, Florida 33634, and file the original with this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint or petition. This notice shall be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in the The Wakulla News. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court on this 25th day of March, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC-R-lgeddes-Team 1 -F12017053-F12017053 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. April 4 & 11, 2013 5609-0411 TWN V. McReynolds, Deborrah Case No. 65-2011-CA-000302 Notice of Sale IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000302 CITIMORTGAGE, INC. AS SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DEBORRAH M. MCREYNOLDS A/K/ADEBORRAH MCREYNOLDS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF DEBORRAH M. MCREYNOLDS A/K/ADEBORRAH MCREYNOLDS; IF LIVING, INCLUDING ANYUNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SAID DEFENDANT(S), IF REMARRIED, AND IF DECEASED, THE RESPECTIVE UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, AND TRUSTEES, AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE NAMED DEFENDANT(S); CACH, LLC; GE MONEYBANK; CAPITALONE BANK (USA), NATIONALASSOCIATION; WHETHER DISSOLVED OR PRESENTLYEXISTING, TOGETHER WITH ANYGRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, LIENORS, OR TRUSTEES OF SAID DEFENDANT(S) AND ALLOTHER PERSONS CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, OR AGAINST DEFENDANT(S); UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2; Defendant(s) NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure entered in the above styled cause, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situate in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: Beginning at a stob or stake two (2) chains and 89 links North of house on the East side of public road leading from Sopchoppy to Ashmore, and thence running in an Easterly direction the distance of ten (10) chains to a stake; thence South the distance of ten (10) chains; thence West to the public road a distance of approximately ten (10) chains; thence North along public road above referred to a distance of ten (10) chains and/or to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Said land lying and being in the Northeast Quarter of Southeast Quarter of Section 1, Township 5 South, Range 3 West and in the East Half of Southwest Quarter of Section 6, Township 5 South, Range 2 West, in Wakulla County, Florida. To include a: 1969 CRMD VIN 02SFK12W0E1821G 0003589949 1972 FERN VIN 48121794F 0005562884 A/K/A367 Pullback Rd, Sopchoppy, FL32358 at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, in the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL. 32327 at 11:00 oclock, A.M., on May 16, 2013. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Witness, my hand and seal of this court on the 21st day of March, 2013. CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (SEAL) THIS INSTRUMENTPREPARED BY: Law Offices of Daniel C. Consuegra 9204 King Palm Drive, Tampa, FL33619-1328 Attorneys for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Office of Court Administration, 301 South Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. April 4 & 11, 2013 5614-0418 TWN Vs. Coulliette, Steven Case #12-351-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 12-351-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. STEVEN EDWIN COULLIETTE, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 20, 2013 entered in Case No. 12-351-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and STEVEN EDWIN COULLIETTE and MICHELE COULLIETTE, husband and wife, AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11 oclock a.m. on May 16, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Partial Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 20th day of March, 20123. BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/Tamika Peterson As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Begin at the Southwest corner of the Northwest 1/4 of Lot 35 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands of Wakulla County, Florida and from said point run North 71 degrees 15 minutes 30 seconds East 905.2 feet to an iron pin on the Westerly right-of-way of State Road No. 365 and thence North 08 degrees 02 minutes 30 seconds East 252.59 feet to a point which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run South 70 degrees 35 minutes West 166.69 feet to a point, thence North 19 degrees 25 minutes West 140.0 feet to a point, thence North 70 degrees 35 minutes East 239.44 feet to a point on the Westerly right-of-way of State Road No. 385, thence South 08 degrees 02 minutes 50 seconds West (scriveners error -should read South 08 degrees 02 minutes 50 seconds East 157.77 feet) along said right-of-way to a point which is the POINT OF BEGINNING. Otherwise described as Lot Number 12, Block D of an unrecorded Plat of the above described land. April 11 & 18, 2013 5607-0411 TWN Vs. Crowe, Kasie Case No. 09-444 FC Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 09-444 FC, UCN: 652009CA000444XXXXXX BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. KASIE D. CROWE; LEANDRAJ. CROWE; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 21, 2013 and entered in Case No. 09-444 FC, UCN: 652009CA000444XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LPis Plaintiff and KASIE D. CROWE; LEANDRAJ. CROWE; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 16th day of May, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 18, BLOCK F OF SONGBIRD, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 88-92 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on March 21, 2013 BRENTX THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339 1438 Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Service Email: answers@shdlegalgroup.com April 4 & 11, 2013 5616-0418 TWN vs. Seale, Deborah Case No. 65-2009-CA-000259 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000259 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. DEBORAH SEALE et al, Defendant(s). AMENDED NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated March 24, 2010 and entered in Case NO. 65-2009-CA-000259 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and DEBORAH SEALE; ANYAND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTTHE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSE, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the 5615-0418 TWN Vs. Phillips, James Case No. 65-2010-CA-000252 Notice of ReSched Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 65-2010-CA-000252 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST 2006-HE2, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE2, Plaintiff, vs. JAMES W. PHILLIPS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 13, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000252 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Acquisition Trust 2006-HE2, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-HE2, is the Plaintiff and James W. Phillips, Rebekah Taylor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Ownit Mortgage Solutions, Inc., a California Corporation, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 2nd day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 15 & 16, BLOCK 18, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 161 RENEGADE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 13th day of March, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. April 11 & 18, 2013 10-39092 5602-0411 TWN Vs. Tucker, Angela Case No. 65-2011-CA-000022 Notice of ReSched Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO: 65-2011-CA-000022 WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ANGELA TUCKER F/K/A ANGELA NICOLE ROBERSON A/K/A ANGELA N. ROBERSON, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated March 19 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2011-CA-000022 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., is the Plaintiff and Angela Tucker f/k/a Angela Nicole Roberson a/k/a Angela N. Roberson, Timothy L. Tucker, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Capital One Home Loans, Inc., Tenant 1 n/k/a Terry Curtis, Tenant 2 n/k/a Nina Curtis, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 9th day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 15 AND THE SOUTH ONE-HALF OF LOT 14, BLOCK 58, WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT FOUR, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 46, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 60 PROVO PLACE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 19th day of March, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law,Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. April 4 & 11, 2013 10-66647 5603-0411 TWN vs. Sullivan, Roger Case No. 652012CA000117 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000117 THE BANK OF AMERICA, N.A Plaintiff v. ROGER BRIAN SULLIVAN; HEBA ALI SULLIVAN ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS,, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order on Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule foreclosure Sale dated March 19, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65-2012-CA-000117 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 9th day of May, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 34, OF THE REFUGE AT PANCEA, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 18-22 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator; 301 S Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 (850) 577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 19TH DAY OF MARCH, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk April 4 & 11, 2013 FL-97011069-11 5605-0411 TWN Vs. Spivey, Annie Case No. 10-270-FC Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 10-270-FC, UCN: 652010CA000270XXXXXX BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPFKACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LP, Plaintiff, vs. ANNIE B. SPIVEYA/K/AANNIE BELLE SPIVEY; et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated February 19, 2013 and entered in Case No. 10-270-FC, UCN: 652010CA000270XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LPF/K/ACOUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING LPis Plaintiff and ANNIE B. SPIVEYA/K/AANNIE BELLE SPIVEY; ESTHER T. KENNON A/K/AESTHER CLAYTON KENNON; HANCOCK BANK SUCCESSOR TO HANCOCK BANK OF FLORIDA; WILBUR KENNON ALONSO; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 25th day of April, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 4, BLOCK G, SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION, PHASE II, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 113, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on February 19, 2013 BRENTX THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339 1438 Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Service Email: answers@shdlegalgroup.com April 4 & 11, 2013 1183-88475 5604-0411 TWN vs. Love, Laurie Case No. 65 2011 CA 000099 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000099 CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, v. LAURIE TEMES LOVE; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 20, 2013, entered in Civil Case No. 65-2011-CA-000099 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 6th day of June, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the front door of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 25, EDGEWOOD SUBDIVISION, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 83, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Property Address: 138 EDGEWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, fl 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, 301 S Monroe St, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 577-4401 DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 20TH DAY OF MARCH, 2013 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Tamika Peterson, Deputy Clerk April 4 & 11, 2013 FL-97008744-10-FLS 5608-0411 TWN vs. Levering, Francis Case No. 2009-CA-000512 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 2009-CA-000512 CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff, vs. Francis L. Levering; Myrna Y. Miranda-Levering a/k/a Myrna Levering; Old Courthouse Square Homeowners Association, Inc.; Escambia County Housing Finance Authority Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated March 21, 2013 entered in Case No. 2009-CA-000512 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Francis L. Levering; Myrna Y. Miranda-Levering a/k/a Myrna Levering; Old Courthouse Square Homeowners Association, Inc.; Escambia County Housing Finance Authority are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front door of the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 6th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 23, OLD COURTHOUSE SQUARE REPLAT, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 102, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 21st day of March, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. April 4 & 11, 2013 highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 2nd day of May, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 9, BLOCK D OF SPRINGWOOD PHASE I, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGES 74-75, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. 2004 CLAYTON MFG HOME SERIALNUMBER WHC013875GA A/K/A38 AUTUMN WOODS WAY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on March 11, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tamika Peterson, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09067274 WELLSLPS-FHA-Team 1 -F09067274 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. April 11 & 18, 2013 F09067274 Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!56 Blue Heron 2BR/1BA block home on canal to Ochlockonee Bay. Near Mashes Sands Beach and Bike Trail. $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets Considered. No Smoking. 8 River Drive 2BR/2BA Bay front with large covered boat slip. large screen porch and open deck. Fantastic views !!! $1200. mo./$1200 Security Deposit. Pets considered. No Smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo./$700 Security Deposit No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo./$650 Security Deposit Pets Considered 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 mo./$750 Security Deposit 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850 mo./$850 Security Deposit. Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Just $31 per year in Wakulla County $42 per year in Florida $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 Cant Cant access access The The Wakulla Wakulla news ews online online content? content? Subscribe Subscribe today and today and get full get full access! access!

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Page 18A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com5610-0411 TWN Estate Weiler, John E. Case No. 13-20-CPNotice to Creditors Public Notice IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTYPROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 13-20-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF JOHN E. WEILER Deceased, NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the Estate of JOHN E. WEILER, deceased, Case Number 13-20-CPis pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. ALLCREDITORS ARE NOTIFIED THAT: All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents Estate on whom a copy of this notice is served within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR THIRTYDAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF ACOPYOF THIS NOTICE TO THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and persons having claims or demands against the decedents Estate must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THREE MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRSTPUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALLCLAIMS, DEMANDS AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILLBE FOREVER BARRED. The date of the first publication of this Notice is April 4, 2013. Personal Representative: /s/ LYNN MCDOWELL 20929 W. McKinney Avenue, Dunnellon, FL34431 Attorney for the Personal Representative: /s/MARYELLEN DAVIS, ESQUIRE Florida Bar No.949884 MARYELLEN DAVIS LAW OFFICE Post Office Box 1720, Crawfordville, FL32326 April 4 & 11, 2013 5591-0418 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 001 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatPLYMOUTH PARK TAX SERVICES LLCthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1096 Year of Issuance 2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 08-6S-01W-283-04862-E01MARINA VILLAGE 5592-0418 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 002 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatSARAH E. HOWELLthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1507 Year of Issuance 2009 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-034-009-08408-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 2 BLOCK 6 LOT 59 OR 567 P 381 OR 579 P 862 Name in which assessedGREGORY P & ERIN B STEMBRIDGE said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 8 day of May, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of March, 2013. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida March 28 and April 4, 11 & 18, 2013 5593-0418 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2013 TXD 003 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatCLYDE K CARTER SRthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate # 1134 Year of Issuance 2005 Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-043-010-08687-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 16 LOT 16 OR 8 P 186 Name in which assessedFRANK WINGARD JR said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 8 day of May, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of March, 2013. Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida March 28 and April 4, 11 & 18, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices OF PANACEA UNIT 2 BLK E LOT 1 & BOAT SLIP F OR 372 P 888 OR 496 P 637 Name in which assessedH CLAY & LINDA W HARRIS said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 8 day of May, 2013,at 10:00 A.M. Dated this 6 day of March, 2013 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida March 28 and April 4, 11 & 18, 2013 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 23 29 33 40 44 53 58 62 68 71 2 24 54 3 25 48 4 20 34 18 30 45 5 15 35 41 49 59 63 69 72 6 26 46 55 7 21 31 50 60 8 27 36 56 64 9 32 42 61 28 37 51 10 16 19 22 43 47 57 70 73 11 52 65 12 38 66 13 39 67 ACROSS 1. Tourney type 5. Tent securer 10. "Don't look __!" 14. Twistable cookie 15. 1998 animated Disney film 16. __-Pei (wrinkly dog) 17. 1991 Bette Midler stag movie? 19. Hospital fluids 20. Mineo of moviedom 21. __ Claire, WI 22. Mos. when World Series begin 23. Reductions in night lighting, in wartime 27. Pocket jingler 29. Sked guess 30. Riga resident 32. Tiny amount 33. Deuce or trey 35. Santa's landing area 37. Zesty dip 40. Jai __ 41. Sudden burst 43. Watch over 44. "__ luck!" 46. Cu linary direction 47. "Zounds!" 48. Brewery stock 50. Mt. Rushmore's state: Abbr. 52. Luau instrument 53. Had on 56. Ticked off 58. Anderson of "WKRP" 59. Hoopster Erving, familiarly 61. Make zigzags, maybe 62. "The joke's __!" 63. 1990 Robert De Niro stag movie? 68. Baseball's Musial 69. Give the slip to 70. Word on Irish stamps 71. "Getting warmer," e.g. 72. Passover dinner 73. Lab procedureDOWN1. Sock-in-the-gut grunt 2. Debate side 3. Sonnet's conclusion? 4. "False!" 5. Ore processors 6. Rub-a-dub-dub site 7. Natu ral emollient 8. Eskimo craft 9. Came after 10. Business partner 11. 1996 Jim Carrey stag movie? 12. Retail centers 13. Rub out 18. Do a trucker's job 23. Stick-on design 24. Author Calvino 25. 1976 Dustin Hoffman stag movie? 26. Subway map points 28. Soph. and jr. 31. Track tipsters 34. Space out 36. Mexican artist Kahlo 38. Viper, for one 39. Tacked on 42. Go to a new school 45. Well-put 49. Marsh plants 51. "Trick" joint 53. Walk through water 54. Loren's husband 55. Teed off 57. Little hooter 60. "The Grapes of Wrath" family name 64. HST's succes sor 65. Get prone 66. "__ longa, vita brevis" 67. Several reps, in the gymAmerican Prole Hometown Content 4/7/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 234 453 3678 5 49 7196 823 53 12 968 7354 00 9 HometownContent 715 2834 9 6 849567213 236941758 651 438972 372159864 498672531 563 894127 924716385 187325649 O O F D E C A L S L O S H P R O I T A L O P O N T I E E R M A R A T H O N M A N N O T S O D I S O R I E N T H A U L A P T S M E L T E R S S E D G E S T U B S T O P S D R O V E A L O E T O U T S J O A D K A Y A K F R I D A D D E E N S U E D T R A N S F E R Y R S K N E E A S S O C I A T E O W L E T T H E C A B L E G U Y L I E M A R T S S N A K E A R S E R A S E A D D E D S E T The Wakulla News

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 19A 1. LANGUAGE: In English slang what are plimsolls? 2. GEOGRAPHY: What is the capita of India? 3. HISTORY: In what year were Eas t Germany and West Germany unified? 4. MUSIC: Who composed the oper a The Barber of Seville? 5. ANATOMY: What is a synapse? 6. ART: What are putti? 7. QUOTES: Who said, Patriotism i s the last refuge of a scoundrel. 8. NATURAL WORLD: What kind o f creature is a merganser? 9. CELEBRITIES: What was Bo b Hopes real first name? 10. LITERATURE: Who wrote Th e Legend of Sleepy Hollow? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Sneakers 2. New Delhi 3. 1990 4. Gioachino Rossini 5. The point at which a nervous impulse p asses from one neuron to another 6. Figures of infant boys in Renaisa nce paintings 7. Samuel Johnson 8. Duck 9. Leslie 10. Washington Irving Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 20A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comLOW COUNTRY BOIL More photos online at thewakullanews.comPHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN LOCAL NEWSThe Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.comDUX DISCOUNT LIQUORS DECOY LOUNGEAND Prices Good Though April850926-3212750MLABSOLUTEVODKA $ 16 99 1.75LCROWNROYAL $ 39 99 $ $ $ $ 750MLGREY GOOSE $ 27 99 JAGERMEISTER750ML $ 19 99 $ $ 1.75LJIM BEAM $ 23 99 1.75LMALIBU RUM $ 19 99 $ $

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By BILL LOWRIESpecial to the NewsThe 13th Annual Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival is Saturday, April 13. Every year, organizers of the Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival face some major decisions, but the biggest is perhaps picking out our new T-shirt design, which is always unique. In fact, they have become a collectors item for some who have all 12 previous ones. We are particularly proud of this years beautiful new shirt. But just as important is the nominating of a Festival King and/or Queen. Some years there is only a King or only a Queen and other years we have both. We give careful consideration to this choice. We consider folks who have earned the respect of the community and have had some involvement with the practice of worm grunting in their lives. Worm grunting is simply a way to get bait worms to jump out of the ground for your personal shing needs or to sell to a bait shop. On our committee are folks who were born and raised in the Sopchoppy area and others who have lived here for many years so they know a lot of the history and people so always have interesting proposals. Once we decide on the candidate, though, there remains the problem as to whether they would be willing to accept. We struggled with the selection again this year until someone said, You know who would have been a perfect choice if he was still with us? Myron B. Hodge! Then someone else responded, If his family is comfortable with that, Im certain Myron would not have minded. And so we had a nominee and, shortly after, the consent of his family. There are many, many stories about Myron, who passed away in 1976. He had a series of businesses in Sopchoppy including a bait shop to which many locals brought their worm harvest to sell. It is said that Myron would do anything to promote the City of Sopchoppy and one of his major accomplishments was to secure funding from the state to purchase the property for the city park, which is named for him. And, to top it off, Myrons grandfather, John, founded the community of Sopchoppy in 1894. This years festival will have the same format as those in the past. It kicks off at 8:30 a.m. with the 5K race which starts downtown and goes out across the river and back into town. We expect 150 or so participants. You can register on the day of the race at the corner of Rose and Municipal in front of From the Heart Recoding Studios at 7:30 a.m. Over 100 vendors of food and crafts open for business at 9 a.m. and the main program begins at 10 a.m. There will be live music all afternoon and continues until 10 p.m. with the Worm Grunters Ball. Throughout the day there will be games and contests for children and adults featuring the frenetic worm gruntin contest in the morning, the Wakulla County Horseshoe Championship, bait casting, and, nally, the colorful hula hoop contest in the afternoon. Sopchoppy and The Worm Gruntin Festival have received a lot of commentary and notoriety over the years, including coverage by the Associated Press, United Press International, The St. Petersburg Times, The Miami Herald, The Palm Beach Post and local outlets such as The Wakulla News and Tallahassee Democrat. There has also been extensive exposure on TV including CBSs On the Road with Charles Kuralt, Assignment America with Steve Hartman, the show Dirty Jobs, and on the Canadian Broadcast Corporation. Our valued local resource, Robert Seidler of Seidler Productions, created and posted a YouTube video of worm grunting that has been widely viewed. We have also been mentioned on scienceblogs. com and HowToDoFlorida. com. It is our hope that all of this publicity brings tourists to Wakulla to help our struggling economy. For more information on this years festival, check out our ad elsewhere in this issue and visit our website, wormgruntinfestival.com. Its all free and open to the public in downtown Sopchoppy on Saturday, April 13.Bill Lowrie is president of the Sopchoppy Preservation and Improvement Association (SPIA).Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe design for this years Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival T-shirt. FILE PHOTOA couple of youngsters try their hands at Worm Gruntin at last years festival. kicks off on April 13 with the kicks off on April 13 with the Sopchoppy Worm Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival Gruntin Festival NAMI WAKULLASTRIPLE CROWN DERBY FUNDRAISERSATURDAY, April 27, 2013Derby starts at 5 p.m. B-B-Q Dinner to followCamp Indian Springs Equestrian Center 2426 Bloxham Cutoff Road, CrawfordvilleFor tickets call 850-926-1033 Everyones Invited!NAMI WAKULLASTRIPLE CROWN DERBY FUNDRAISER A New Level of Service!!!Contact a BlueWater Agent for ALL of Your Real Estate NeedsReal Estate Sales, Property Management & Rentals or Appraisals (850) 926-8777www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com www.bluewaterrealtyg.com

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Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy MADELEINE H. CARR What began as an event What began as an event to celebrate migrating to celebrate migrating songbirds a dozen or so songbirds a dozen or so years ago, culminates a years ago, culminates a week of tours and special week of tours and special events on Earthday, approevents on Earthday, appropriately at Wakulla Springs priately at Wakulla Springs State park. State park. This Wild About WakulThis Wild About Wakulla Week begins with a la Week begins with a bunch of tickled people bunch of tickled people grunting for worms in Sopgrunting for worms in Sopchoppy, once a destination choppy, once a destination for visitors who wanted for visitors who wanted to continue overland to to continue overland to the mineral springs healthe mineral springs healing qualities at Panacea. ing qualities at Panacea. The little train station is The little train station is restored, and Sopchoppy restored, and Sopchoppy is proud of its worms that is proud of its worms that catch the biggest sh. catch the biggest sh. Talking about fish, Talking about fish, Capt. Jody Campbell, also Capt. Jody Campbell, also a certi ed Green Guide, a certi ed Green Guide, in Shell Point has just in Shell Point has just the day for a rst experithe day for a rst experience shing from a boat. ence shing from a boat. If you havent done this, If you havent done this, dont worry. Hell bait your dont worry. Hell bait your hook, and you might get a hook, and you might get a small shark. Again, dont small shark. Again, dont worry, he deals with these worry, he deals with these little harmless sharks all little harmless sharks all the time. It is a thrill, for the time. It is a thrill, for sure, as is the tour he sure, as is the tour he gives to view birds on Pine gives to view birds on Pine Island. Island. Prefer to paddle your Prefer to paddle your way around our county way around our county but you are a bit intimibut you are a bit intimidated by the large selecdated by the large selection of where to do this? tion of where to do this? Salt water? Fresh water? Salt water? Fresh water? River, bay or marsh creeks? River, bay or marsh creeks? Again, dont worry. Green Again, dont worry. Green Guides are ready to give Guides are ready to give you a serene experience. you a serene experience. Highlighting creatures Highlighting creatures from the deep in touch from the deep in touch tanks is an endless delight tanks is an endless delight at Panaceas Gulf Speciat Panaceas Gulf Specimen Marine Lab. The Wild men Marine Lab. The Wild About Wakulla consortium About Wakulla consortium has put together this varihas put together this variety of events and showety of events and showcases just a click away at cases just a click away at wildaboutwakulla.com wildaboutwakulla.com Celebrate our history, Celebrate our history, the various ecosystems the various ecosystems and our people. Support and our people. Support the week-long events and the week-long events and invite your friends and invite your friends and relatives to spend the relatives to spend the week to see why we all week to see why we all just love our 100 percent just love our 100 percent natural environment. natural environment. Wild About Wakulla Wild About Wakulla week is a tourism showweek is a tourism showcase of all that is best case of all that is best in our county. It is held in our county. It is held the third week of April the third week of April each year and new ideas each year and new ideas and suggestions for other and suggestions for other showcases are always welshowcases are always welcome. come. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA colorful wood duck. Wakulla County has a wide array of natural resources.Inside this guide Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival..... Page 1B What Wild About Wakula is all about... Page 2B Visit St. Marks..... Page 3B Conquistadores in the land of Apalachee... Page 4B Schedule of events... Pages 5-6B The Wakulla Volcano.... Page 7B Musical features Page 8B Wakulla Wildlife Festival.... Page 10BThanks to Madeleine Carr, Herb Donaldson, Bill Lowrie and Jeff Hugo. v A Superior Faith Based Education! v Scholarships Available! v Smaller Class Sizes! v 4K VPK Provider! OPEN ENROLLMENT CONTACT US TODAY @ (850) 926-5583 or www.wakullachris an.comWakulla Chris an School is a fully accredited, private Chris an school that o ers a safe, secure, loving environment to our students. Make an appointment to tour our campus!for3K thru 9th Grade What Wild About Wakulla is all about What Wild About Wakulla is all about

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 3B On Sunday, April 14 On Sunday, April 14 Visit St. Marks Visit St. MarksBy MADELEINE H. CARR There is no telling how many hundreds of thousands of visitors claim to know St. Marks. Annually, it is true; about 300,000 people go to the expansive St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Its iconic lighthouse, the trails to see wildflowers, salt works, and birds galore are what attracts those day visitors. There is another St. Marks away from the refuge. Thousands arrive at one of Floridas oldest small port communities on a bicycle, or a Harley Davidson. Others park their vehicle and get onboard some kind of boat (kayaks, small fishing boats, pontoons can be rented). It is a fair bet that sightseers at both locations are in for a big surprise when they discover that the lighthouse isnt at the St. Marks riverfront, and that the Spanish fort ruins are not at the lighthouse. Wild About Wakulla week is about both locations. The week highlights communities such as the Town of St. Marks in our far-flung county. Sopchoppy, Crawfordville and Panacea have their special days (see separate articles) during this annual, third-week in April celebration. Showcasing St. Marks ties to boating, the Waterfront Florida committee opens all the stops on Sunday, April 14 starting at 10 in the morning. This community incorporated on four different occasions because its population at times fell below a certain threshold has a legitimate reason to call itself a Viva Florida 500 location. Here, at the con uence of the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers, the last Outpost of Empire protects so much history it would take a week to explore just that corner of St. Marks. Instead, savor the day at the first Marine Flea Market, Boat Show and Fish Fry. Have something to sell? Anyone can bring unused nautical items and turn them into cash. This event starts at 10 a.m., ends at 6 p.m. Individuals can set up a table at no cost; businesses, $50. All that strolling gets the gastric juices owing and the St. Marks Waterfront Florida and businesses serve the freshest sh at a Wild About Wakulla sh fry that begins at noon. Part of these proceeds will be used for a childrens shing rodeo the following Saturday, April 20. Of course, other opportunities for food are available along the waterfront, and at the charming Sweet Magnolia Bed and Breakfast Inn. Again, history is so over the top you wont believe what this sturdy building has been through. It has served as a church, a brothel and City Hall. It was even used to unload bottles of whiskey during prohibition. The Sweet Magnolia Inn opens its historic doors at noon. Then, at 2 p.m., listen to jazz on the front porch, sip homemade Sangria and re ect on the Spanish connections all around you. Even non-boaters can appreciate the view from Shields Marinas balcony. Step inside, and ask about the artifacts on display. There is no reason to continue to confuse the lighthouse with the Town of St. Marks. Old-timers, including the Shields family at the marina, and two other iconoclastic remnants of Old Florida, Bo Lynns Grocery and the Shell Island Fish Camp, gladly brag about the shing, the old town thats been flooded so many times it is a wonder its still hanging on, and the huge barges that ply upriver occasionally, competing with stone crabbers. Sadly, those floods killed one of the bestknown destinations, Poseys Oyster Bar. To the towns credit, recent beautification efforts include sidewalks, vegetation, streetlights, historic signs and a spirit of the people in St. Marks to make all visitors want to return often. So get a taste on April 14 and plan to spend a day of wonder and realization that Wakulla Countys rst Spanish conquistador, Pan lo de Narvaez, built the rst boats right in this area in 1528. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBo Lynns Grocery is an iconic symbol of St. Marks. Stop in and meet Miss Joy. New Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County OnlyOffer available until 4/30/2013877-401-6408 Special OfferName _______________________ Phone# _____________________ Address _____________________ City, State ___________________ Zip________Get 10 Months for $20.13 The News Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408straight to your mailboxwww.thewakullanews.comEnclosed is my check or money order payable to This is not a trickNO FOOLIN 850-925-6158 www.shieldsmarina.comWe rent Bicycles, Pontoon & Float Boats, Kayaks & Stand-up Paddle Boards Come to the marina and check out our Wild about Wakulla specials on both new and used boats large selection to choose from.You wont nd a beer deal anywhere else! On the River in St. Marks On the River in St. Marks Shields Marina Shields Marina IN HOUSE BOAT SHOWCome visit us at Shields Marina and enjoy River Watching on our Veranda! Family owned and operated boarding facility with over 10 years experience and a veterinary technician on-site. Indoor and outdoor boarding facilities for dogs small and large, cats and birds. Large and secure play areas with hands-on attention daily and friendly service we are sure to accommodate your needs. Whether you and your family are going on vacation, an extended stay or just away for the day, we are here for you. No duration is too long or short and our rates cant be beat! Livestock care at your farm or home is available!Personal care is given to each and every animal every day. Play time is our favorite time!(We do not make breed restrictions)Proud supporter of local rescues! Stefan Pedler, Owner1886 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 www.BloxhamBoardingKennel.com (850) 597-1739

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy MADELEINE H. CARR By now it is apparent to many that Florida, for hundreds of years, was a Spanish province. The Apalache natives even learned to write the Spanish language until the British invaded and everything changed, yet again, for the Indians whose ancestors had lived here for tens of thousands of years. But nobody spoke English. During the short 20year British interval, some 16,000 folks were subjects of the British Crown, but they too were forced out along with their language. And so languages reverted to Spanish, and variations of the Muskogee linguistic group, including those spoken by the Lower Creek, and Scottish and French. Spanish laws prevailed, protected at a Spanish garrison at the con uence of the Wakulla and St. Marks rivers. During Wild About Wakulla Week, on April 18 and 19, at San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park in St. Marks I will, probably for the last time, offer tours called Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalache. The fun part of interpreting the area right at those two rivers is that visitors can also see the old fort walls from the river. The Conquistadors experience extends to the history of the area that lies in todays national wildlife refuge. Reservations for both the land and the water portions should be made in advance as these are popular tours that begin at 10 a.m. Planning your immersion into Wakullas natural and heritage tours couldnt be easier palmettoexpeditions.com is the one-stop planning site for all events during this annual Wild About Wakulla event. For the Conquistadors land portion, please wear comfortable walking shoes and sunscreen. Park admission is included in your tour cost. On Thursday, April 18 and Friday, April 19 On Thursday, April 18 and Friday, April 19 Conquistadores in the Fabled Conquistadores in the Fabled Land of the Apalache Land of the Apalache FILE PHOTOSSan Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park in St. Marks, above, and historian Madeleine Carr, right, talks about the history of the area on a recent tour as she stands at the con uence of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers. S a t u r d a y S a t u r d a y A p r i l 1 3 A p r i l 1 3 9 a m 1 0 p m Afternoon 12:30 Music by Hot Tamale 1:00 Registration for Horseshoe Championship 1:30 Music by Frank Lindamood 2:00 Worm Grunters Horseshoe Championship (Cash Prizes) 2:30 Music by The Kudzu Kats 2:30 Bait Casting Contest 3:30 Hula Hoop Contest 5:00 Music by Brett Wellman & The Stone Cold Blues Band WORM GRUNTERS BALL 6:00 Music by Paving Blue 7:00 Music by Rick Ott Band 8:15 Music by Wakulla Rising 9:15 Music by Sopchoppy All Stars Morning 7:30 5K Worm Grunters Race Registration 8:30 5K Worm Grunters Race 9:00 Vendors Open 9:30 Music by SayOn 10:00 Opening Ceremonies & 5K Race Results 10:30 Worm Gruntin Contest (Cash Prizes) Ages 12 and under NOON Crowning of the Worm Grunters KING 10:15 Worm Gruntin Demonstration by Gary Revell, Professional Bait HarvesterS C H E D U L E S P O N S O R SF R E E O u t d o o r F e s t i v a lB r i n g a C h a i r o r B l a n k e tU n i q u e 2 0 1 3 F e s t i v a l T S h i r t s 1 0 0 + V e n d o r s 5 K R a c e L i v e M u s i c G a m e s & C o n t e s t s C r o w n i n g o f W o r m G r u n t e r s K i n g Tourist Development Council Tobacco Free Florida.com STOW AWAY MARINE 850-926-BOAT4815 Coastal Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327www.stowawaymarine.netYOUR ONE-STOP MARINE STORE! For your Boats, Motors & TrailersMechanic on Duty!Fishing Gear Marine Supplies Parts DepartmentOils, Batteries, Prop Service & much more!

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Friday, April 12 Sunrise at 7:08 a.m., sunset at 8:06 p.m.Panacea Ochlockonee BayPanacea Mineral Springs Panacea, a historic waterfront village long recognized for its commercial seafood industry, is located along Dickerson Bay nestled between the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge and Apalachicola National Forest. In the early 1900s, Panacea was a popular destination known for the healing attributes of its mineral springs. The area boomed with hotels, restaurants, health spas, baths, boardwalks, piers and pavilions, until it was hit by the 1920s Depression and a major hurricane in 1928. Panacea now lures visitors with the promise of fresh seafood, excellent shing, and an abundance of opportunities for wildlife observation. Home to the Blue Crab Festival held the rst Saturday of May. Panacea is proud of its maritime history and expanse of undisturbed natural areas. The Wakulla Welcome Center and the Big Bend Maritime Center are located here. Please plan to stop by our HOSPITALITY HUB at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea from 10:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Welcome Center hosts will be on hand to welcome you, provide area maps, attractions, restaurant & tour information, and to answer your questions. Saturday, April 13 Sunrise at 7:12 a.m., sunset at 8:04 p.m.Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin FestivalIts a blast from the past in the historic streets of downtown Sopchoppy. Join us for our 13th Annual Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin Festival, a oneday outdoor event in the streets of historic downtown Sopchoppy, Florida. This annual event is held each April from 8:00AM when the booths open for business, with the fun continuing until 11:00PM when the dance ends. Throughout the day there will be a wide assortment of live music and other entertainment including games for children and the Wakulla County Horseshoe Championship. We will also crown our Worm Monarch! (It might be a King and/or a Queen this year.) In the evening, celebrants of all ages and points of view will dance under the stars at the Worm Grunters Ball with one (or both) hands waving free while their pets scramble about wondering what in the world is going on. Free Admittance. Tots on Trails Join this ranger-led walk at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge on Saturday morning from 11 a.m. until noon. The walk, which introduces children to enjoying nature safely, will begin at Natures Classroom (the refuge education building). Reservations are required and can be arranged by calling 850-925-6121. Sunday, April 14 Sunrise at 7:07 a.m., sunset at 8:06 p.m.St. Marks Community ShowcaseFifteen years after Ponce de Leon in 1513 named the peninsula he discovered La Florida, another Spanish expedition landed near Tampa Bay. Conquistador Pan lo de Narvaez traipsed north in 1528 ending in the Nation of Apalach. Located between the Aucilla and Ochlockonee rivers, this hapless explorer sought to escape from the fearless Apalachee and ended up on the coast near todays port city of St. Marks. This small port at the con uence of the St. Marks and Wakulla rivers brims with history. Its an easy 30 to 40-minute jaunt south of Tallahassee. That is if you arrive by car. Hundreds of bicyclists also arrive at St. Marks on the states first rail-trail that follows the historic railroad bed. Either way, the CR 363 dead-ends at St. Marks. So what is there to do in this historic place other than discovering good food, camaraderie and Spanish ruins? Awesome history, awesome fishing, stunning sunsets, friendly people, and splendid food await you in the oldest existing river town in North America. Special Activities 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Marine Flea Market/ Boat Show/Fish Fry All Day Visit Shell Island Fish Camp All Day Meet Mrs. Joy at Bo Lynns Grocery All Day Visit Shields Marina 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday Afternoon Jazz at Sweet Magnolia Inn 7:30 p.m. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Sunset Lighthouse Tour Marine Flea Market Boat Show Fish Fry 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. If you love the sea or have a love for things nautical, come on down to St. Marks for the Marine Flea Market, Boat Show and Fish Fry. Anyone can bring their unused nautical items and turn them into cash. Individuals can set up a table at no cost, businesses are asked to remit $50. The sh fry will begin at noon and continue until 6 p.m. Proceeds will go to St. Marks Waterfronts Florida Partnership, a 501 (c)(3) corporation, to fund activities in St. Marks. Part of the funds will be used to pay for the expenses of a childrens shing rodeo on April 20, 2013. Co-sponsored by St. Marks Waterfronts Florida and the businesses of St. Marks. Visit Shell Island Fish Camp All Day Of course, you could wish for a perfect fishing experience on a Wild about Wakulla day. St. Marks has plenty of opportunity. The famed Shell Island Fish Camp is one of the last of the coastal sh camps. No experience or equipment needed. The Shell Island Fish Camp is a family owned and operated piece of old Florida located in the quaint shing village of St. Marks. The camp overlooks the pristine Wakulla River, which features a well-marked, easy to run channel. Just 18 miles south of Tallahassee on State Road 363, Shell Island Fish Camp has been in the Hobbs family since 1962. Visit the camp and check out the cabins or soak in some free shing tips. Meet Miss Joy at Bo Lynns Grocery All Day Step back in time at Bo Lynns Grocery. Rambling down the streets, you cant miss it. This landmark grocery store has been in operation since 1936. Miss Joy, who has owned the store for the past 45 years, will pull out some old pictures and tell you some stories about St. Marks. Come on by to meet Miss Joy and have a Coke in the 6 ounce bottle. Sunday Afternoon Jazz at Sweet Magnolia Inn 2 p.m. This charming bed & breakfast inn has a very colorful past in the pages of St. Marks history, 803 Port Leon Drive. In older days, it was marked as the strongest building in St. Marks and was used for a storm shelter. It has served as a church, a brothel and City Hall. It was even used to unload bottles of whiskey during prohibition. The Sweet Magnolia Inn will open its historic doors at noon. Stop by and say hello! Live jazz begins at 2 p.m. Set a spell on the front porch as you take in the smooth sounds echoing from this charming bed and breakfast. Stroll the picturesque gardens, delight in the koi pond, and have a homemade sangria with a light snack. The music will play on until 8 p.m. Call (850) 9257670 for details. Reservations suggested. San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park So wheres the real history? Much of it is in the water (hurricanes). Some of it has been carted off as foundations for a hospital. And that is where youll nd the states San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park. See artifacts, exhibits and an awardwinning video inside the museum built atop the old foundation of a marine hospital that dates back to before the civil war (1861-1865). Then take a relaxing walk with archaeologist Phil Gerrell. Trace the old Spanish Fuerte San Marcos walls, stop atop those walls for a glorious view across the two rivers, Wakulla and St. Marks. Climb the stairs up the Confederated bomb proof. $2 admission. Visit Shields Marina All Day Come visit us at Shields Marina sit on our veranda and enjoy river watching. We have a wide selection of drinks and snacks, an extensive display of artifacts, plus some great specials on new and used boats. We also rent bikes, pontoon boats, oat boats and kayaks. Visit our web site at www.shieldsmarina.com. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Sunset Lighthouse Tour 7:30 p.m. St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (west on U.S. 98 across the St. Marks River) is offering a rare opportunity to visit the St. Marks Lighthouse in the evening. Hear what Lighthouse keepers and their families experienced in the 19th century at the St. Marks Lighthouse. Also learn about some of the great storms and heroes of the Lighthouse Service. Free tour, $5 vehicle entrance fee applies. Space is limited, so please call (850) 925-6121 for reservations, or visit St. Marks Lighthouse, Lantern Tour for details. Monday, April 15 TCC Groundbreaking CeremonyOf cial public ground breaking ceremony for Tallahassee Community Colleges Wakulla Environmental Institute will be held at 5 p.m., south on S.R. 319, follow signs on left of road. Live entertainment with Hot Tamale. Spring Creek Shell Point Community ShowcaseSpring Creek, 30 miles south of Tallahassee, is famous for its springs that well up into the brackish Apalachee Bay. Fishing is king, but also paddling up Spring Creek into the National Wildlife Refuge. Where there is so much nature, can a restaurant resist? Spring Creek Restaurant is a true Old Florida establishment serving only the nest local seafood available. Since 1977, the Lovel family has taken great pride in every dinner they have prepared and served. From their own boats they provide mullet and softshell crabs, obtaining other seafood only from local shermen, shrimpers and crabbers through the fresh seafood markets of Floridas Big Bend. SHELL POINT BEACH: Drive 3 miles east from Spring Creek and Shell Point opens its expansive view onto the Apalachee Bay. The county maintains a family-friendly public beach favored also by sail borders. Daydream as you watch boats navigate into the Gulf of Mexico, or watch ospreys, seagulls, porpoise, pelicans in this golf cart community. Shell Point got its name because it once was a shell mound until developers prepared the many canals in the 1950s. The famous mullet run in the fall brought fishers and visitors to watch shers hauling in the seine nets. Tuesday, April 16 You will not want to miss April 16th! It is sure to be a day packed full of entertainment; there are myriad historical and ecological tours as well as rst rate entertainment. Try visiting the Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park in the morning. Take a ride in one of the Riverboat Jungle tours, swim in the crystal clear cold waters, enjoy a nice meal in the lodge, or even stay the night in the hotel! The wildlife in Wakulla is astounding! Take a tour of Apalachee Bay. Spot manatees. Or you can spend your afternoon walking on the beach at Mashes Sands, feeling the sand beneath your toes. Or paddle one of the rivers or hike at Ochlockonee River State Park. Or visit the Gulf Specimen Marine Lab. Whether you are 6 or 60, you will enjoy this interactive aquarium. Play with a starfish. Pet an urchin. Experience nature at your ngertips. Your options are potentially limitless! Wednesday, April 17 Sunrise at 7:10 a.m., Sunset at 8:05 p.m.St. Marks National Refuge History TrailWe suggest you discover the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge History Trail. You can begin this self-guided driving and hiking tour at the Refuge Visitor Center where you will nd full information and details about the trail. Allow at least two hours minimum, but you can certainly spend all day. Pack a picnic lunch or immerse yourself in a local authentic culture at Ouzts Too Oyster Bar and Grill on the banks of the St. Marks River at Newport serving lunch and dinner daily Wednesday through Sunday. Home to abundant and rare wildlife and providing many recreational opportunities, the St. Marks NWR also encompasses and manages signi cant cultural resources. The mission of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service is to conserve, protect, and enhance sh, wildlife, and plants and their habitats. This includes protecting, conserving, and interpreting many important national resources. Did you know that St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge contains a rich history that dates to Paleo Indians and includes seineyards, salt works, Spanish explorers, powerful storms, three lighthouses, and even a ghost town? The St. Marks Wildlife Association has completed the installation of six history and culture kiosks. In addition to viewing the images and text, brochures are available at each kiosk. The history trails begins at Wakulla Beach and end at the Goose Creek Seineyard and ends at the Aucilla River. Many of the sites are along the seven-mile road that leads to the historic St. Marks Lighthouse. There are interesting side hiking trails including the Plum Orchard Trail and the Mounds Interpretative Trail. For more information, location of signs, brochures, and a history time line, visit the new History Page on the St. Marks Refuge Associations website http:// www.stmarksrefuge.org. The refuge is open year round during daylight hours. The Visitor Center is open weekdays from 8 a.m. and 4 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Closed most federal holidays. A $5 per car entrance fee is collected at the St. Marks Unit of the National Wildlife Refuge. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 5BSchedule of Events FILE PHOTOThe crowd at last years Worm Gruntin Festival in Sopchoppy. Phone 926-8245926-2396 Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Guilday, Schwartz, Simpson, West, Hatch & Lowe, P.A. &Real Estate Closings Title Services Quiet Title/Partition Actions Estate Planning Probate Corporate/Transactional Franchising We would like to THANK YOU for your business and encourage you to experience3042 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville 32327 p WAKULLA ild about WeekFRIDAY, APRIL 12 THRU SUNDAY, APRIL 21As always, client service is our ultimate priority. WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comTHURSDAY, APRIL 18 Sunrise at 7:06 a.m., sunset at 8:07 p.m.Sopchoppy Showcase DayThe town of Sopchoppy actually began on the west side of the Sopchoppy River, but moved to its present location when the CT&G Railroad Company (later reincorporated as GF&A) laid out the town, beside their newly constructed tracks on their own property. The depot was built in 1893 and Sopchoppy became a bustling railroad town. The restored depot is the only one remaining between Tallahassee and the south end of the line terminating at the coast.Viva Florida 500Conquistadors in the Fabled Land of the Apalachee What is Viva Florida 500? In 2013, Florida reaches a signi cant milestone, the 500th anniversary of Juan Ponce de Lens arrival on Floridas east coast. What makes this anniversary so unique is that Ponce de Lens convoy of explorers was the rst group of Europeans to document such a landing and give a name to Florida La Florida. They were also the rst recorded Europeans to explore any part of whats now the continental U.S. Floridas documented material history dates back more than 15,000 years to American Indians, who were the original pioneers. But Spains claim in 1513 began a new era in human history that saw many nationalities come together as the foundation that eventually formed the United States of America. The legacy of Spanish Florida started with Ponce de Len. At St. Marks, Panfilo de Narvaez, the second conquistador to explore La Florida, arrived in 1528. His expedition is a harrowing tale of encounters with the Apalachee and a failed escape. Hourly, from 11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., climb aboard with Certi ed Green Guide Master Capt. Joey Tillman. Get set to be thoroughly entertained during an amusing, historic account of contact between the Apalachee and Spaniards on this entertaining 45 minute cruise. $10 per person. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., remains of this 17th-century Spanish fort are seen on a walking tour through the historic forti cation ruins and grounds. Join local historians as they walk you through 500 years! $10 per person. Palmetto Expeditions. FRIDAY, APRIL 19Crawfordville Showcase DayCrawfordville, county seat of Wakulla County, had its earliest beginnings in the riverside town of Port Leon, located on the eastern side of the St. Marks River not far from the present day town of St. Marks. In 1843, a devastating hurricane and tidal surge destroyed Port Leon. Subsequently, the county seat along with the surviving townspeople moved upriver to the new town aptly named New Port Leon. After the Civil War in 1865, Senator John L. Crawford donated land in the Shell Point District, the courthouse was picked up and moved in 1892, and Crawfordville is the county seat today. This Historic Courthouse was completed in 1894. It is solidly constructed of heart pine with a cupola graced by a unique cypress weather vane, hand carved in the shape of a mullet, a commercial sh important to the history of Wakulla. The Old Wakulla Courthouse is listed in the National Register of Historic Places, one of the only three existing wooden courthouses in the state. Across the street stands the Old County Jail. Built in 1947-48, the jail operated there until 1972. The building was saved from proposed demolition to make way for a courthouse parking lot. It now houses the Wakulla County Archives and Museum operated by the Wakulla County Historical Society. Inside the fully functional museum are historic displays, a museum shop, and a genealogy room for research. Festivities Wakulla County Historical Society is excited to announce a partnership with the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce. Join local historian Betty Green as she leads a guided tour of the historic Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville on Friday, April 19 at 10 and 11 a.m.. The tour is free. You can just show up, call the museum at (850) 926-1110 to reserve a spot on the tour (leave a message), or email 24research@gmail.com. Be sure to stop in across the street and visit The Old Jail Museum, open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Besides the many curiosities of the museum itself, be certain to investigate the gift shop for mementos, books, and art unavailable anywhere else. You can also join the ever-intriguing historic Wakulla County cemetery tour. What better way to get to know a community than by visiting those residing in its cemeteries? Join Wakulla County Historical Society President Cal Jamison on a journey that breathes life into the place names and last names of county ancestors. Delve into the contributions and mysteries of the areas forebears to understand who we are and where we are going. Meet the van at the Old Jail Museum at 1 p.m. The tour ends where it started at 4 p.m. A $5 donation to the Historical Society is requested and can be remitted at the start of the tour. To sign up call (850) 926-1110 and leave a message to reserve a spot or email 24research@gmail. com.Palaver Tree eater Presents e Wakulla VolcanoEnjoy the tale of a young man, working on a pirate ship, sailing the Gulf from Key West to Mexico, in search of other ships to rob. From here, his tale is one of murder, greed, and a 50-year-old secret about a treasure map where gold can be found on an island, up a river, near a volcano. The Wakulla Volcano. This original play brings the legend of the Wakulla Volcano to the historic Sopchoppy Auditorium beginning at 7 p.m. Herb Donaldson, the founder of Palaver Tree Theater Company wrote and directed the play specifically for Wild About Wakulla Week activities. SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Sunrise at 7:04 a.m., sunset at 8:08 p.m.Wakulla Wildlife Festival at Wakulla SpringsThe annual Wakulla Wildlife Festival will be held Saturday, April 20, at Wakulla Springs State Park. The festival is a celebration of outdoor activities and area heritage. Local musicians, artists, and experts offer festival participants one-of-a-kind experiences, helpful advice, and personal enrichment in a neighborhood family atmosphere. The festival continues to include the ever-popular premium guided tours, living history demonstrators and childrens activities. Special Bird of Prey and Reptile Shows presented by the Center for Wildlife Education of Georgia Southern University are always crowd pleasers. Exhibitors on the main festival grounds will introduce guests to a wide assortment of outdoor activities and provide close encounters with area wildlife. Bluegrass music will also enliven events on the main festival grounds. The beautiful and historic Wakulla Springs Lodge will host music, art and ne food. Beginning at 10 a.m. and continuing until 6 p.m., local artists will offer creations showcasing the wildlife and heritage of the Big Bend Region. Live music begins in the Lodge at noon. Folk music, Appalachian Clogging, and Bluegrass ll the early afternoon. The festival celebrates Viva Florida 500 with the acoustic guitar ensemble of Carlos and Carlos in the late afternoon. The festival finishes with the Traditions Dinner Dance (extra fees apply) in the Wakulla Springs Lodge. It features a sumptuous buffet followed by the electrifying sound of the Tallahassee Swing Band. Be carried back in time as you feast and dance at this classic Wakulla Springs event. A $6 per vehicle donation to The Friends of Wakulla Springs supports the festival shows and programs.Florida Lighthouse DayCelebrate Florida Lighthouse Day with a visit to a Wakulla County landmark the St.Marks Lighthouse. From 10 a.m. until 3 p.m., enter the ground oor level of the lighthouse and peer up at its winding staircase (for safety reasons the tower cannot be climbed). Step into the adjacent Lighthouse Keepers Residence and imagine what living in this outpost was like. Interpretive exhibits will open your familys eyes to a vastly different way of life. SUNDAY, APRIL 21Ochlockonee River State ParkThe Ochlockonee River State Park is a jewel of a park and a great place to get away for a weekend or a weeklong vacation. Spend a lazy afternoon picnicking or swimming at the scenic point where the Ochlockonee and Dead rivers intersect. You may even spy one of the white squirrels for which the park is well known. Ochlockonee means yellow waters. Here the river waters are a mix of brackish, tidal surge, and fresh water. Trails allow visitors to explore the park and see the diverse wildlife, including the red-cockaded woodpecker, and natural communities such as pine flatwoods and oak thickets. A boat ramp provides easy access to the river. Both freshwater and saltwater fish inhabit the waters around the park, including largemouth bass, bream, cat sh and speckled perch. For overnight visitors, there are full-facility campsites with access to restrooms and showers. Youth group camping is also available. Schedule of Events By CYNTHIA PAULSON Spring, indeed would not be spring in North Florida without showcasing nature during the annual Wild About Wakulla celebrations. For 10 days in April special events highlight Wakulla Countys cultural and natural heritage. Wild About Wakulla begins with the annual renowned Sopchoppy Worm Grunting Festival (wormgruntingfestival.com) on April 12 and ends at Wakulla Springs State Park with the celebrated Wildlife Festival on April 20 (wakullawildlifefestival.org). Birds are part of the attraction and certi ed Green Guides are on hand to spot them for you. The guides will also spot sh if you prefer, or take you on a canoe or kayak down one of the countys four rivers. Who knows? The manatees might still be here for a special treat. The talents of the green guides are put to the test as they arrange, each year, another aspect that might bring the countys resources into focus. In addition, music and art play a major part of Wild About Wakulla week. The legend of the Wakulla Volcano deserves a dramatic interpretation. The Palaver Tree Theater Company production is scheduled at the historic Sopchoppy auditorium on April 19 and 20. Floridas 500th anniversary of discovery gets a special treatment both at the ruins of the Spanish fort at San Marcos de Apalache Historic State Park at St. Marks, and at Wakulla Springs State Park. To commemorate Viva Florida 500, the presence of Spanish conquistadors is the focus of two special guided tours both on land and on water at the fort; and a nod to Spanish musical culture is planned at the Wakulla Springs lodge with the guitar duo of Carlos and Carlos. Many of the tours are very popular and annually sell out early. For a full listing of the week-long visit wildaboutwakulla.com, palmettoexpeditions.com or wakullawildlifefestival.org where reservations for the various events can also be made online.Wild About Wakulla returns SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBlacksmithing at the Wakulla Wildlife Festival at Wakulla Springs. SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL SATURDAY, APRIL 13THFROM 9 P.M. 1 A.M.Bring Your Dancing Shoes!! LIVE BAND NO COVER 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 7BBy HERB DONALDSON Early last year I was asked to speak at a Wakulla Rotary Club meeting. I did so and in the process met the wonderful people involved with the group. A few months later they invited me to come back and hear a different speaker whose subject was the Wakulla Volcano. Id heard about this local phenomenon only a few times and knew absolutely nothing about it. It quickly became, in my mind, another mystery of the county that found its place along the shadowy backdrop of history, lingering and most likely, perishing with the other legends. My mother and I attended the Rotary meeting held at the Senior Center in early afternoon. Upon entering, we saw two long tables bearing an assortment of papers, maps, printed photos and other material that added to the mystery of an actual volcano or, at the very least an unexplained, spark- lled, ery eruption in, or close to, the Wakulla area. Being the natural skeptic, my eyebrow (the left one to be exact) went upward in a severe, pointed arc. My mother on the other hand, a Wakulla woman to the core, was overtaken by an almost childlike conniption fit complete with oohs and aahs. Between the two tables a podium had been prepared where, presently, stood a tall man whose hair and matching mustache were a shock of snow and silver: Rodney R. Letchworth. Rodney is a fth generation native of Leon County, a graduate of Leon High School, and FSU. He has a postgraduate degree from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif., and George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and served in the U.S. Marine Corps for 21 years, retiring as a lieutenant colonel. As a naval aviator he ew 289 combat missions in Vietnam. He currently lives in Tallahassee with his wife, Martha. Energetic and robust, Rodney began to unravel for those in attendance the story of his Uncle Mike, who passed away in 1986. And how later, Rodneys brother, Larry, told Rod about their Uncle Mikes fishing trips. It appears that Uncle Mike wasnt really fishing at all. Uncle Mike was in search of buried pirate treasure said to be on an island, up a river, near a volcano. These were the words written on a map that existed in the mid1800s, and belonging to a man (a former pirate), who drew it so as not to forget where he and a friend buried a wealth of stolen gold coins. After more than 50 years of keeping this buried secret, the two old pirates returned to the treasure place to retrieve another years worth of gold to live on. It was on this trip that their ship was destroyed, the friend died, and the lone pirate was left to wander the Florida swamplands for almost three days. He happened upon the homestead of a quiet and simple family. Weary and near death, the pirate told them his story, gave them a bag of coins along with the map and promptly died at sun-up. Their descendant, a grandchild from this humble and newly stunned family, would years later become close friends with (you guessed it) Uncle Mike, Rodneys uncle. Rodney and his brother pick up the search where their uncle left off. But along the way, details are uncovered about this so-called volcano, and whether or not it was ever located in Wakulla at all, that open wider the door to more mysterious speculations. From as far back as the 1500s explorers were said to have seen a pillar of re, that served as a virtual lighthouse toward, or around, the St. Marks area. There are stories of people walking up to the top of the old capitol building in Tallahassee, and looking towards Wakulla to view the reworks. The legend spread as far north as New York. Rewards were issued for anyone who could locate the volcanos exact location with proof as well as the source of its re and smoke. Some attempted to nd it, but either gave up their search, or never returned from the swampy depths. By the end of Rodneys speech, there was no question of what should happen next. There needed to be a presentation that brought this story to life on the stage. But first, it was important to understand what others in the county knew about this folkloric footnote. As host of the Wakulla Sunday Radio Program, Ive interviewed a number of people on a range of subjects. Turn to Page 8B On Friday, April 19 and Sunday, April 21 On Friday, April 19 and Sunday, April 21 The Wakulla Volcano The Wakulla VolcanoTHE WAKULLA VOLCANO Based on an essay by RODNEY LETCHWORTH. Adapted for the stage by HERB DONALDSON. FEATURING: Debra Dix Bishop, Andrew Bracci, Constance Clineman, Ken Clineman, William P. Hill, Drew Hudson, Doug Jones, Scott Joyner, Desmond Maxwell, Helen McLaughlin, Murray McLaughlin, and Taryn P ster. PRE-RECORDED MUSIC: Sammy Tedder and Frank Lindamood. LIVE MUSIC PERFORMANCES: Ernest & Sarah Toole. LIGHTS & SOUND: Mike Shurlock. STAGE MANAGER: Tawanna Williams. WHEN: Friday, April 19, at 7 p.m. Sunday, April 21, matinee at 3 p.m. TICKETS: $10 (Regular), $7 (Seniors & Students). Call (718) 682-3870 or visit the Wakulla County Public Library and ask for Scott Joyner. WHERE: e Old Sopchoppy High School, 164 Yellowjacket Ave., in Sopchoppy. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSActors at a rehearsal for The Wakulla Volcano. Were New Construction Commercial Residential Trenching Service Industrial Remodels Wiring Service WorkOver 33 Years Experience WAKULLA ild about WeekFRIDAY, APRIL 12 THRU SATURDAY, APRIL 20 See our inventory at TitaniumMotorCars.comOwned and Operated by Marty and the Libby Family since 20031468 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville, FLCALL MARTY OR J.R. CHOICE OFFREE TOOL BOX or SHOTGUN*with each Vehicle Purchased DURING MOTORCARS TITANIUM MOTORCARS TITANIUM *Must be 21 to participate in offer

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comSpecial to The NewsThe largest spring event at Wakulla Springs State Park is getting attention from area corporations. Since its beginning four years ago, the Wakulla Wildlife Festival, a Friends of Wakulla Springs-sponsored event in collaboration with park staff, has seen a steady increase in corporate sponsorship. There are two stellar events at the park from which the Friends of Wakulla Springs State Park receives project funding. The April 20 Wildlife Festival is a day-long family affair, said Friends President Ron Piasecki. The other is a co-sponsored 5K run May 18 with Gulfwinds Track Club. Supporting the projects for which funds are used are more than 22 business partners. These organizations have either offered cash or in-kind services of more than $500. We want to thank our growing number of business partners for standing behind protecting our most valuable resource, our water, Piasecki added. The public is encouraged to select from the many events scheduled during the Wildlife Festival and pre-register online at wakullawildlifefestival.org. A full listing of all sponsors is available at that address, as is a breakdown of free and moderately priced premium tours. The Wakulla Wildlife Festival begins at 10 a.m. and continues throughout the day with some evening tours and musical performances scheduled later in the day.When the lodge at Wakulla Springs State Park stopped the New Years Eve celebrations with a big band many wished this tradition would continue. Well, it is not New Years Eve. But that wish is a reality as the Traditions Dinner Dance welcomes the Tallahassee Swing Band to the lodge on Saturday, April 20. The lodge staff is preparing a special buffet for the occasion as well and I heard the food is just part of this exciting evening. As a courtesy to customers, there will be two seatings and reservations are recommended through the Wildlife Festival web sites. Just click on tours/events at wakullawildlifefestival. org and the dinner dance pops up for you to choose either 6 p.m. or 7 p.m. seating. Its easy to pay the $39 per person ticket charge right there as well. So while the ticket ordering isnt traditional, the music certainly will be. Madeleine CarrFrom Page 7B After hearing Rodneys speech, I began to tie up my interviews with the question: Have you ever heard of the Wakulla volcano? The responses were usually no. But there were a few who knew of it, or had been in search of it themselves as a pet project of sorts. I noticed that the more mature people of the area were quick to say it was on this or that side of town, or other places that, had I gone looking, would have taken me, possibly, on an unwanted trip to the Keys. One man, Michael, whose last name I hesitate to give because he seems to be something of a recluse, built an entire website dedicated to the volcano, complete with documents, photos and scanned images of news articles from the 1800s depicting the mystery. Also listed were books from the period where the volcano makes a guest appearance or two. Unfortunately, Michaels site is no longer available for online viewing, but I hope he starts it up again. Its much too fascinating of a subject to let go. The younger generation, I learned, becomes highly excited upon learning that a volcano of any sort may have existed in the area. Some, including our videographer, Brett, who is 20, attempted to gather a small tribe of their own for an expedition. The interest was most de nitely there. And, like most mysteries, everyone wanted to solve the puzzle. The more my mind oated around the idea, I began to see the future possibilities of such an endeavor. For example, the local schools could hold a countywide science contest around who can build and set off the best volcano. In Wal-Mart, I can imagine people drifting past me along the aisles wearing Seek ye rst the Wakulla Volcano T-shirts. Or, maybe, a Smokin Wakulla Volcano festival where hikers, tired and worn from their searchand-find mission tour (sponsored by the Florida Green Guides), would return to Hudson Park for hot lava cocktails. Or smoothies. The letters WV smeared across their foreheads in ash. But until then, well settle for a fun and informative little play based on Rodneys essay. The Wakulla Volcano will be performed on Friday, April 19, with a Sunday, April 21, matinee, at the Old Sopchoppy High School as part of the annual Wild About Wakulla Week. Musicians Sammy Tedder and Frank Lindamood have offered a few of their pre-recorded selections for the play, while Ernest and Sarah Poole will perform live. So get your tickets now, before they all go up in pillar of re and smoke. By MADELEINE H. CARRSometimes I wonder if we humans are the only ones whose body reacts to music. It cant be. Music to our ears is surely also music to other animals. Is there any wonder that the Wakulla Wildlife Festival offers such a wonderful variety of music from 10 in the morning almost until 10 in the evening? What better way to celebrate Earth Day than to share our joy at the natural world in which we live than through music? We celebrate with music. At the park, the main spring is venerated through music. On Saturday, April 20 the wild side comes alive to rhythms from the Americas. The guitar duo Carlos and Carlos bring this salute to our Latin rhythmic heritage, playing in the lobby in the afternoon. Wrapping up the days events, this duo reminds us of Floridas close ties to a Spanish heritage. The Tallahassee-based duo will become a favorite (returning May 4 for a Springs Serenade). But for now, between 4 and 6 p.m., all ears will be tuned to an array of traditional and contemporary Latin American styles, borrowed from Mexican, Brazilian, Afro-Peruvian, Andean, and Afro-Caribbean traditions among others. This year, the festival music begins at 10 a.m. outside on the green. Anyone preferring a traditional inside event will be pleased that the Tallahassee Swing Bands reprise of big band swing returns to the lodge for a dinner dance starting at 6 p.m. e Wakulla VolcanoMusic will be featured at the Wakulla Wildlife FestivalCommunity support grows for events at Wakulla Springs SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe guitar duo Carlos and Carlos will perform at the festival.Tallahassee Swing Band will host a dinner dance Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Little Tupper Lake in New Yorks Adirondack State Park. WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 Page 9B WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA PHOTOS SPECIAL TOTHE NEWSSaturday, April :30 2:00 Sunday, April 210 4:0017th Annual Rose Sale 17th Annual Rose Sale Mark your calendar for the much anticipated sale of Heide Cliftons heirloom roses. Proceeds to go to the CHAT Adoption Center to provide food, medicines, vaccinations, and vet expenses for animals in the adoption center.Just Fruits will be joining us and donating profits to CHAT.382 C ra w fordv i l l e Hwy. C r awford v ille, FL 382 C ra w fordv i l l e Hwy. C r awford v ille, FL CHAT of Wakulla Inc. PO Box 1195 Crawfordville FL 32326 www.chatofwakulla.org A copy of the official registration CH-13163 and financ ial information may be obtained from the FL Division of Consumer Services. Registration does not imply end orsement, approval, or recommendation by the State. Event sponsored by: Sponsored in part by: Three gallon containers $8 each or three for $21 WereWILDabout Oysters & Smoked MulletU.S. Coastal Hwy., 98 At the Bridge, Newport(850) 925-6448 U.S. Coastal Hwy., 98 At the Bridge, Newport (850) 925-6448Visit our Website www.OuztsToo.com Open Wednesday Sunday $1 Drafts Join us for April 12 April 21 J J J o i n u s f o r r r r A A A A A A p p p p p p p r r r r r r r r r i i i i i i l 1 2 A pr il 2 1 W AKULLA ild about WEEK

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Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, April 11, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy JEFF HUGO The Florida Department of Environmental Protections Wakulla Springs State Park will host the Wakulla Wildlife Festival on Saturday, April 20. The event showcases the rich heritage and outdoor opportunities that envelop the Wakulla Springs Watershed. Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park will be the hub of activities designed to educate, inspire and empower people by connecting them with their natural and cultural resources. The Wakulla Wildlife Festival caters to the diversity of its participants by offering ne art, living history demonstrations, exceptional music, activities for children and families, and environmental experiences both rare and compelling. All will enjoy viewing the wildlife and heritage of the region through the eyes of gifted artists at the festival Art Show held on the terrace of the Wakulla Springs Lodge. There will be ne pottery that creates the essence of past cultures. The photography, paintings and drawings will hold in suspended animation the magical moments of the region. And artisans will offer fine hand-crafted jewelry. The silent auction is a favorite way to support the Wakulla Wildlife Festival. It is also a great way to view samples of the artists work and acquire fine art at a consumer determined value. Bidding begins at 10 a.m. and ends at 6 p.m. Winners are welcome to claim their prizes at the end of bidding. A visit to the Lodge on Saturday is not only a must for the ne art, but also for an opportunity to revel in the music provided by local talent. Beginning at noon, the folk music of Ernest Toole will illuminate the colorful history of the Big Bend. The fancy footwork of The Hot Pepper Steppers and their band Rockertoe will get guests hearts a pumpin during midafternoon. The traditional and contemporary styles of Latin American music are embodied in the technical precision of the acoustic guitar ensemble of Carlos and Carlos. They will be a must-listen from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. The evenings signature event will be the Traditions Dinner Dance. Festivities begin with a sumptuous buffet dinner provided by the Wakulla Springs Lodge. There will be two seatings for dinner one at 6 p.m. and another at 7 p.m. The music for the evening begins at 8 p.m. and will be provided by the Tallahassee Swing Band. Be prepared. You may feel like youve been whisked back to the World War II era for which the lodge is legendary. Tickets for the Traditions Dinner Dance are limited and are available on line at www.WakullaWildlifeFestival.org or by calling (850) 561-7286. Premium Guided Tours (additional fees apply) offer nature lovers an opportunity to hone their wildlife-watching skills and senses. Visitors might seek the unexpected on a night cruise down the Wakulla River as the ruby-red eyes of alligators glow in the re ected light of a ashlight. Others may prefer to quietly celebrate a serene sunrise with morning light dancing through the silvery strands of Spanish moss dangling from ancient cypress limbs. Still others would choose to be escorted to the seldom seen windows into a submerged underground cave system. Others are vivi ed as they join a group of photographers to utilize that new camera for capturing moments of outdoor splendor. Children squeal with delight as they play a game, create a craft or get their faces painted under the Childrens Activities tent. The childrens activities are part of the many exhibitors who introduce visitors to magnificent wildlife, area nature centers and museums, and recreational opportunities. Living history demonstrators will present a proud heritage of ingenuity and hard work. There will be the brutal power of the blacksmith as he bends iron to his whim and the gentle grace of the spinner as she creates thread from various bers. All the while, bluegrass music will quicken the pulse and set toes to tapping on The Green of the festival grounds. Excited festival guests return year after year to enjoy the phenomenal Bird of Prey and Reptile shows presented by the Center for Wildlife Education, Georgia Southern University. Guests are mesmerized as they discover the mysterious yet vital role snakes and lizards play in our world. Eagles, hawks and owls swoop overhead while their handlers present predator/prey relations and raptors as indicators of environmental health. The shows are interactive with considerable audience participation. It is easy to become part of the celebration. Simply visit www.WakullaWildlifeFestival.org for a complete listing of activities on April 20. Please register online early for the premium tours and your place for the Traditions Dinner Dance. Make the Wakulla Wildlife Festival a time to get outdoors and make memories with family and friends! Out-of-town guests can discover true Southern hospitality during a stay at the Wakulla Springs Lodge (www.wakullaspringslodge.com), the Inn at Wildwood (www.InnatWildwood.com) or the Best Western Wakulla Inn and Suites (www.bestwestern.com/wakullainn). Visitors can also enjoy the taste of locally fresh caught seafood at many area restaurants. Wakulla Springs State Park hosts annual festival A foggy morning on the Wakulla River.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA photo tour on a river cruise at Wakulla Springs. W AKULLA ild about L A A WEEK CHARLENE & BILLY BISHOP St. Marks, FLHang Gang Wallpaper Co. has been continuously in business for 27 years, 24 years in the Big Bend. The Company is owned and operated by Charlene & Billy Bishop. We do all types of residential and commercial installation and removal. The company also sells commercial wallcoverings, several specialty wallcoverings and sound proong products. Free estimates are offered to help you budget your project. The Hang Gang is a member of the National Guild of Professional Paperhangers, Inc. HANG GANG WALLPAPER CO. HANG GANG WALLPAPER CO. CALL US FOR ALL YOUR RESIDENTIAL OR COMMERCIAL WALLCOVERING 850-933-1718hanggangwallpaper@embarqmail.com WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA WILD ABOUT WAKULLA