Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00454

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By JANICE McFARLANDSpecial to The NewsThink tanks, roundtables, consortiums, meetings, seminars. Call them what you will … they exist to serve a purpose to discuss, present, and exchange ideas. The Sustainable Water Resources Roundtable is one such forum, to share ideas that serve to bring about effective change. The Florida meeting, hosted by the Friends of Wakulla Springs last week at Wakulla Springs State Park, had as a theme Putting Sustainable Water Management to the Test,Ž and featured group panels and breakout session speakers on a variety of supporting topics … discussing climate change and sea level rise, degradation of Florida springs, over-pumping of the aquifer, as well as nutrient contamination. The meeting opened with Ron Piasecki, president of Friends of Wakulla Springs, moderating a panel on regional Florida water issues. Dr. Todd Kincaid of the Wakulla Springs Alliance, spoke on water quality issues. Jim Stevenson with Florida Springs Stewardship and formerly with the Department of Environmental Protection, and Whitney Gray with the Florida Sea Grant and the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, spoke on springs in Florida. Lunch at the Lodge included a talk by Greg Munson, deputy secretary water policy and ecorestoration at DEP. His background in environmental law combined with knowledge from paddling the local rivers enabled him to advise and contribute to water policy issues, a main focus of the department. Turn to Page 2A Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 11th Issue Thursday, March 14, 2013 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Sports ...........................................................................Page 10A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 11A Water Ways....... ...............................................................Page 12A Law Enforcement ............................................................Page 14A Health & Fitness ............................................................Page 15A Natural Wakulla ............................................................Page 16A Green Scene.......................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla.................................................................Page 2B Thinking Outside the Book.................................................Page 3B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 4B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 4B Comics .............................................................................Page 7B INDEX OBITUARIES Linda Loretta Clemmons Coxwell Jerry Paul Minton Ofellon ‘Sue’ SheadSpecial to The NewsMary Frances Alday, 61, of Crawfordville was arrested for four counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and one count of battery following an altercation at Wal-Mart that included four store employees. On Friday, March 1, Alday reportedly became verbally abusive toward a 48-year-old female employee when the employee told Alday she could not use an Internet coupon. Alday allegedly struck the assistant manager with a shopping cart and was escorted out of the store. Alday went to her vehicle and reportedly retrieved a “ rearm in a holster. She allegedly removed the “ rearm from the holster and began waving it at the victim and three other store employees who were there. Alday was arrested during a traf“ c stop at East Ivan Road and Wakulla Arran Road. During the arrest, Alday allegedly refused to follow the commands of Sgt. Danny Harrell and he Tasered her after she refused to get out of her vehicle. During the arrest process, Sgt. Harrell was allegedly struck several times by Alday and she was also charged with battery on a law enforcement of“ cer and resisting arrest with violence. Woman arrested after threats at Wal-Mart Mary Frances AldayTalking waterFrom DEP NewsTALLAHASSEE To enhance water quality protection and restoration efforts for Wakulla Springs, Governor Rick Scott and the Florida Cabinet last week approved a $1,525,000 acquisition of 678.67 acres within the Wakulla Springs Protection Zone Florida Forever project. Wakulla Springs is one of the largest and deepest artesian springs in the world. This parcel will help to close the conservation lands gap between the Apalachicola National Forest and the Wakulla State Forest and will also provide valuable aquifer recharge and surface water quality protection. “The Department continues to focus on acquisitions that address water quality and quantity needs and this land purchase will help to buffer and protect Wakulla Springs,” said DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. “This is another piece necessary for protecting our state’s springs, which DEP staff has been so committed to doing under the leadership of Governor Scott.”Turn to Page 3ALand purchased to protect Wakulla SpringsBy JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThis years Sopchoppy Fourth of July Celebration will honor Bill Stephens for his longtime dedication to the community. Stephens, known as Mr. SopchoppyŽ for his enthusiastic boosterism of the city, died in September. Stephens was the Public Water Systems Operator for many years in Sopchoppy and was an instrumental part of the community. T-shirts have been printed with an image of Stephens as Uncle Sam on the front and a tribute to him on the back. The shirts will be available for purchase during the Independence Day celebration. The towns annual Fourth of July celebration features a parade, arts and crafts and “ reworks. The three-day celebration … July 4 is on Thursday this year … will continue with music in the park on Friday and Saturday with local musicians gathering for some pickin and grinninŽ in honor of Stephens. In other matters: € Alfred Nelson, senior pastor at Macedonia Church of Christ, made a request for a group of volunteers traveling with a United Methodist Outreach Mission, known as NOMADS, to stay in campers at Sopchoppy Park. They plan to arrive in October, reside at the park for two months, and help build the new church. € Nathan Lewis spoke on behalf of the Jesus River Festival, hosted by Wakulla One, proclaiming it was a success with over 500 people coming out to enjoy the one day multidenominational event. € Andy Easton conducted two Public Hearings during the March meeting. He provided and overview of the Community Development Block Grant and presented training materials for the Fair Housing Policy. € After a brief explanation, city commissioners voted to allow Mike Standley, an engineer working on the stormwater project, install posts called bollards instead of using a guardrail along Park Avenue. € Dale Rushton accepted the role of Volunteer Fire Chief, and he has been in training for this position. € City commissioners discussed that Backwoods Bistro, the popular restaurant in town, has been closed while the business looks for a chef. City commissioners expressed concern that the restaurant will not reopen, further diminishing Sopchoppys downtown.Sopchoppy to honor Bill StephensT-shirts of Stephens, known as Mr. Sopchoppy, as Uncle SamCOUNTY COMMISSIONBoard sets new time for second meeting of month By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netOver the strong objections of a number of citizens, county commissioners voted 3-2 to hold its second meeting of the month at 2 p.m. The county commission meets the “ rst and third Mondays of the month, and will continue to hold the “ rst meeting at 5 p.m. Commission Chairman Randy Merritt suggested moving the meeting time as a means to save staff time. The meetings typically last several hours, and many staff members attend the meetings. Several citizens were adamant that the change was motivated by an effort to keep citizens from being heard at the meeting. Citizen David Damon said as much in his comments to the board, and Merritt answered quickly: That is clearly not the intent, sir.Ž Turn to Page 3AWakulla Springs hosts a roundtable on water resources WAKULLA NEWS ARCHIVESBill Stephens as Uncle Sam is an old advertisement for the Fourth of July Celebration. FILE PHOTOA wading bird “ shes in the shallows at Wakulla Springs. JANICE MCFARLANDGreg Munson, deputy secretary at DEP. Commission Chairman Randy Merritt 2013 SWINE SHOW SPECIAL OLYMPICSPage 13A Page 13A

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From Page 1A Munson said the water policy priorities of Gov. Rick Scott are to improve water quality in the Everglades; resolve the dispute with Georgia and Alabama over water ” ow into Apalachicola Bay; and coastal and aquatic issues, including the marine sanctuary in the Florida Keys. Munsons department oversees budgeting, land programs at each of the five water management districts, and an increasing focus on springs, their minimum ” ows and levels. He went into detail on budgeting, funding and costs, and on the land programs in each water management district. He covered the process for accruing additional land for preservation programs, water supply protection, and ” ood control, along with processes and procedures for each. The increasing focus on springs in Florida has opened up a dialogue in seeking data that accurately provides the science to determine facts that affect water policy direction. The question is of how much impact there is to Floridas springs based on differing factors, such as how much is based on long-term cyclic changes in Florida, how much is a rainfalldrought issue, how much impact in pumping vs. short-term and long-term drought, etc. Munson went over the five different water management districts, the springs within each, and each locations issues, and budgeting costs associated with them. The DEP has a budget amount of $2.4 million this year for springs restoration, and $10.4 million has been spent in the last two years concerning water quality and the springs. Basic Management Action Plans as a process are developed in setting prevention and protection strategies. Daily maximum load values are monitored for chemicals in the springs, mainly nitrates. In the Everglades, phosphorus is an issue that is being remediated through their preventive and restorative efforts in south Floridas water management district. Munson said that, 18 months ago, the department began collecting stakeholder input in each water management district, in the continuing process of ensuring water quality and water quantity for everyone. Of the consumptive use permits in each district, 80 percent allocate less than 5 percent of the total water supply, according to Munson. The next phase will include effective ways to save water for utility companies, and working on drought-proo“ ng the water supply. Other areas in this phase include The Tampa Bay areas challenges … such as its desalination plant has cost/effectiveness issues. The growing Jacksonville area and its increasing water needs are another concern. Several breakout sessions were held in the afternoon, including a panel by the Florida Earth Foundation on the highlights of their Water Choices meetings, moderated by Stan Bronson, executive director. Andy Flajole of Florida Power and Light, Ernie Cox, as chairman with Florida Earth Foundation, and Denver Stutler, former Chief of Staff for Gov. Jeb Bush and former secretary of the Florida Department of Transportation, held a discussion on land use in Florida, water choices and policy, stewardship, science, and partnerships. A panel on the Current Management of the Everglades was led by Ernie Barnett, Director of Everglades Policy, for the South Florida Water Management District. Eric Bush, Chief of Planning, USACE Jacksonville District spoke on water supply, and James Charles, Attorney for the Seminole Nation, spoke. The next day, a panel on government policy and practice, moderated by Rodney DeHan, had water management agencies from local, state, and interstate to talk about issues. Angela Chellette of North West Florida Water Management District, and Patti Anderson, Chief, Bureau of Water Programs, Florida Department of Health, spoke on issues such as climate change, budget, and sustainable practices. Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNY ODOMreporter@thewakullanews.netThere is childlike excitement in the voice of Dr. Paul Spitzer as he speaks about his longtime passion, the Common Loon. Spitzer is a Maryland ornithologist who, like the birds, migrates to “ nd his habitat of wonder. He calls this time of year in the Big Bend the spring awakening,Ž when everything is coming alive around us. Live Oak Island is Spitzers home base for a few months as he collects data and observes the patterns of the loons as they begin their migration north. Each morning for the next three weeks he rises at about 5 a.m. to drive to the St. Marks Lighthouse before the sun rises. His destination for the best morning view of the loons is at the observation platform at the lighthouse. He says this view is perfect for spotting and counting the large migratory birds. Like an amphibious aircraft, the Common Loon needs a lot of water to take off and land. Because of this, the large body of water where the St. Marks River ” ows into the Gulf of Mexico attracts the loons … and those who observe it. Even though he has been studying the Common Loon for 25 years, Dr. Spitzer says that this is a pilot study of the Common Loon migration from the Florida peninsula. I started this research as a blank slate, not knowing what I would “ nd,Ž says Spitzer. I had to design the methodology for collecting the data.Ž Spitzer received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1980 and focused his studies mainly on the insecticide DDT and its effect on the osprey population. Spitzer describes himself as an independent scientist and is not af“ liated with any one institution, leaving him free to migrate, like the birds he studies. Summering in Vermont for the last 30 years, he conducts observation and collects data to share with other like-minded ornithologists. For me open collegiality is the bread of life, and I am keen to share my “ ndings with the public. As a self-employed Ph.D., I run a lean, one-man, low-overhead, accountable program. I achieve scienti“ c results directly applicable to conservation biology,Ž Spitzer says. One of the surprises he found during the observation last year is that there are so-called aborted missions.Ž Some birds take off with the intent to leave, but turn back and return for one reason or another within about an hour of takeoff. He determined that smoke, fog and storm clouds will turn them around with certainty. However, there are returns on perfectly clear days as well, and one summation is that the birds are just not physically strong enough yet. They have not ” own in weeks, due to the molting process, and their muscles are still gaining strength for the long ” ight. Good science is about what we dont know,Ž says Spitzer. He is still looking for a few more volunteers to help count birds during the morning take off time which only lasts for about an hour, beginning just before sunrise. To volunteer to assist with the counting process of the loons from March 19 through April 7, send an email to Dr. Paul Spitzer at spitzer_paul@ hotmail.com. By DR. PAUL SPITZERSpecialto The NewsLoons are goose-sized waterbirds that dive for fish. They cannot walk on land, but are masters of water, with ability to dive deep over the Gulf’s continental shelf. Many of them winter far out on the Gulf. They are northern breeders, adapted to function in cool or cold weather and water. Spring brings ice-out to loons’ northern nesting lakes, and they y north across the continent before the Gulf heats up. Their wings are fairly slender, beating three times per second in ight, and this return migration is an energy-intensive marathon for them. It must be undertaken with great care, because they need a watery landing strip that is long enough to taxi back into flight after a stopover for rest and food. Thus the deep indentation of Apalachee Bay at Florida’s Big Bend concentrates loons’ spring migration departure into a dawn yway visible from the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge: They are staying over water as long as possible. To avoid overheating, they leave in the first hour of day. They are careful to select clear, stable conditions for their big gambit. Fog, dense smoke from forest burns, or stormy weather will prevent or reduce a departure; so anyone who wants to witness this natural event must watch the evening weather forecast very closely, and check pre-dawn weather. Some migrants decide not to commit that day. They “abort the mission” and return south to coastal waters during that rst hour. The loons have been ightless for 6 to 8 weeks of late winter during the replacement molt of all their wing feathers. Thus some “aborted missions” probably result when ying loons realize they have not regained enough tness to venture across the continent. Loons don’t initiate breeding until they are 5 to 10 years old, and fledge only one or two young during a successful breeding season. Many loons are in their teens, and some live into their 20s. Their reproductive rate is only somewhat better than the endangered Whooping Crane, but in contrast they are a very successful species, with thousands wintering on the Gulf. The success of this very specialized animal, with its complicated lifehistory and need for critical decisions, suggests “loon intelligence” well beyond instinctive behavior. The reader is invited to watch this migration event at the St. Marks NWR lighthouse. You must be there as the sun breaks the eastern horizon. Daylight saving time will help a bit with your pre-dawn start. Peak ight days are from March 19 through April 7. Typically, 50 to 200 loons are counted in an hour.Dr. Paul Spitzer will conduct a talk titled  e Uncommon LoonŽ at the NWR education center, Sun. March 17 at 2 p.m. e presentation is free, but there is a $5 per car fee at the entrance to the park. Paul Spitzer migrates to study the Common LoonTalking water: Wakulla Springs hosts roundtable on water resources FILE PHOTOAn anhinga dries its wings on a cypress knee at Wakulla Springs. TOM PELTON OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY FOUNDATION/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS LOU KELLENBERGER/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA description of loons, their migration and an invitation to watchDr. Paul Spitzer, above, awaits the dawn loon migration. A loon, below, runs to take off in ” ight. LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.org THRIFT STORE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14 2013 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will host another blood drive featuring the Southeastern Community Blood Center on Thursday, March 14 from 1:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. All blood donors will receive a free movie ticket. Donors may register with Lt. Bruce Ashley at 745-7162 or at bashley@wcso.org. Walk-ins are also welcome. Blood donors must have a photographic identi“ cation and meet minimum weight requirements. The bloodmobile will be located on the south end of the WCSO parking lot.COUNTY COMMISSIONBlood drive is setCounty looks at possibility of loss of ICE prisoners From Page 1A Damon rephrased. The unintended consequence of this will be …  Much better word,Ž Merritt interjected. … to keep citizens from being heard,Ž Damon “ nished. Merritt assurred citizens that the earlier meeting would take up non-controversial items. Issues that are of major interest would be set on the “ rst meeting of the month, Merritt said. That would include planning items, he noted. Chuck Robinson, representing the Chamber of Commerce, was sharply critical of the proposal to move meeting time, saying many business owners would be unable to make it to an early afternoon meeting. Robinson said the idea reflected an attitude of Government for the convenience of itself.Ž Chuck Hess of Concerned Citizens of Wakulla said the idea would not save any real money because staff use comp or ” ex time to make up for the extra hours worked at meetings. Commissioner Richard Harden commented that he believed the board should keep its meeting times unchanged. Im the only member whos not retired or selfemployed,Ž Harden noted. So I have to take time off.Ž Harden is a corrections of“ cer for the state Department of Corrections and works at the Franklin Correctional Institute. Harden and Commissioner Howard Kessler voted against the change. Merritt voted for the change and was joined by commissioners Jerry Moore and Ralph Thomas. The change would go into effect in April, for the April 15 meeting. Board sets new time for second meeting of monthBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla County School Board approved spending $28,000 for a new LED sign a Wakulla High School. The school board approved the spending at their meeting on Monday, March 11. The sign will be used to promote activities at the school. It was also noted by school board members that the sign can be used during emergencies … such as for directing the community to open shelters during a storm. The sign will have the capacity to show pictures and video. The districts facilities engineer, Randy Bristol, also suggested they had a vandal cover to prevent damage to the LED display. The sign will be more than 12 feet tall and eight feet wide. In other matters before the school board: € The calendar for the 2013-14 school year was approved with teachers returning on Aug. 9 and the “ rst day of school for students on Aug. 15. As an academically high performing district, Wakulla schools are exempt from the state law prohibiting school starting two weeks before Labor Day. The last day of school is June 4 with graduation on June 6. The calendar includes a full week off for Thanksgiving. Christmas holidays are Dec. 23 through Jan. 8. Spring break is March 17-21. € Missie Rudd, head of the Wakulla Classroom Teachers Association, repeated the district has the full supportŽ of the teachers union for the May 14 referendum on a half-mill school tax. Rudd expressed concern about the effects of the federal budget sequestration on the district, warning that she had heard of possible 5 percent across the board cuts in education spending. € District food service director Gail Mathers reported to the school board on the summer feeding program. The summer feeding program will be held at Wakulla High School, Medart Elementary and Wakulla Pre-K. The district will feed breakfast and lunch to any child who walks in the door of the facility, Mathers said. They dont have to say where they live or who they are … they just have to be 18 or younger.SCHOOL BOARDBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netOne bit of local fallout of the federal budget sequestration that took place on March 1 has been a reduction in the number of federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement prisoners at the Wakulla County Jail. At a budget hearing on Thursday, March 7, Wakulla County commissioners heard that they have as much as a $1.7 exposure in potential lost revenues if the number of ICE prisoners drop below 40 at the jail. County Administrator David Edwards told commissioners that there were 52 prisoners in the jail on March 7. There has typically been a population of over 100 ICE prisoners at the jail, and the county has made a tidy sum over the years offering the service. The money from housing the prisoners has subsidized the countys budget, and losing that revenue would require one and a half mills in property taxes to replace it. A mill is $1 tax per $1,000 in property value. In Wakulla County, a mill brings in roughly $1 million. Chairman Randy Merritt indicated he felt if there was a revenue shortfall from the ICE prisoners, the sheriffs of“ ce would have to cover it … cutting their budget $1.7 million. Edwards said there was no way … short of shutting down county government … that Wakulla County could take that cut. It was noted that of the 8.5 mills in taxes levied by the county, 7.4 mills of that goes to the sheriffs of“ ce. It was in keeping with the tone of the meeting, Edwards warning the board to be wary in the approaching budget year: it appears expenses will be going up but revenues may be going down. Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkman couldnt offer an official assessment … hes still several months away from “ nishing his appraisal of this years property values. But he told the board that he anticipated values may decrease for another year. I thought we had hit bottom,Ž Sparkman said of last years decreased values. On a brighter note, Sparkman did point out that South Florida property values appear to be rising … and noted that We are typically a couple of years behind them.Ž Edwards warned of other approaching expenses in the coming year, including a $780,000 cleanup required by the state under the boards meeting room. The building was formerly the jail, and a fuel farm was operated there. A plume of contamination is in the ground under the building and moving southward towards the City of Sopchoppys well and tower located near the old Courthouse, where the Chamber of“ ces are located. Edwards stressed the spill does not pose a health hazard, and if it did make it to the water supply it would add a smell to the water that could be easily “ ltered. Edwards urged commissioners to consider a payraise for county employees, saying past budgets had been balanced on the backs of employees. During the meeting, Deputy Clerk Greg James took the board through the current years spending and showed how the budget is tracked. e potential loss of $1.7 million in jail revenues translates to a mill and a half in county taxesFrom Page 3A Wakulla Springs is protected by Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park and Wakulla State Forest. However, enormous caverns that feed the spring spread far to the north and west of the park. The land will be managed by the Florida Forest Service as an addition to the state forest. The site is also designated within the primary rangeŽ for movement and reproduction of the statethreatened Florida black bear and will provide a travel corridor from the Big Bend to St. Marks. This acquisition represents an important next step in the protection of Wakulla Springs, one of northwest Floridas most treasured water resources,Ž said Northwest Florida Water Management District Governing Board Member Jon Costello. As the Governing Board member representing the St. Marks River Basin, I look forward to seeing the District continue to work with state and local agencies to improve water quality in Wakulla Springs.Ž The property is located within the Upper Wakulla River Basin, and this area exceeds the total maximum daily load for nitrate, adopted in 2012. The Basin Management Action Plan, or restoration plan for the basin, is being developed, and acquisition of this property will help protect the spring and lead to its restoration. The total Wakulla Springs Protection Zone Florida Forever project contains 7,438 acres, of which 4,158 acres have been acquired or are under agreement to be acquired. Upon todays approval of this agreement, 3,280 acres, or 44 percent of the project, will remain to be acquired.Land purchased to protect Wakulla SpringsHigh school will get new LED sign Illustration of the planned LED sign. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBobby Pearce at the Chamber meeting.Pearce pitches school tax to ChamberSuperintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce reportedly got a commitment of support from the Chamber of Commerce after appearing the Chamber boards meeting on Tuesday, March 12, to make the case that the money is needed for local schools. He reportedly received a call of support after the meeting. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Public Hearing on March 13, 2012, at 5:30pm MARCH 14, 2013 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 DUX DISCOUNT LIQUOR S DECOY LOUNG E AND 1.75LSMIRNOFF RED LABEL $ 19 991.75LCROWNROYAL $ 39 99750MLABSOLUTEVODKA $ 16 991.75LPOPOVVODKA $ 12 99750MLCROWNRESERVE $ 39 991.75LCAPTAIN MORGANORIGINAL SPICE $ 22 99Prices Good Though March850926-3212 F L 9 9 $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 9 9 O $ $

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• It’s not quantity of life, but quality • Yes to community center • Wildwood Inn sells for $1.8M • Update on rainfall event • Operation Migration pilot speaks at refuge • Low Country Boil is approaching • Crash splits vehicle in two • Underwater Wakulla for March 7, 2013thewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. By SLIM RANDLES Do you feel that itch coming on? Its time, you know. See the kids out ” ying kites? Thats a sign. See little green bladelets in the lawn. Thats a sign too. Its almost full spring, and that itch tells us its time to do something. This is when we need to forget almost all our sensible resolutions about selfimprovement and just concentrate on fun. List your favorite things and then take it one ridiculous step further and there you have it, a renewal of hope and fun and insanity to celebrate the return of the sun. You enjoy ” y “ shing? Okay, build your own pirogue to “ sh from. Racing cars is your hobby? Go race them across a mountain range. Are you a seamstress or a seamster? Sew a ” ag the size of a circus tent and hang it from a giant sequoia. Spring is the trampoline of the entire year. Our thoughts and plans are now unfettered by trying to stay warm and we can emerge from our caves, scratch ourselves, and grunt something like, Public teevee good! Tell me go library. Study individual applications of medieval chemical experiments.Ž Buy some oil paints and some brushes and try to make a blank piece of canvas look pretty. Buy some house paint and try to make the house look pretty. Buy some makeup and try to make the dog look pretty. This last is just for 4-year-olds, and if you tell your mom I suggested it, Ill swear I dont know you. The transition from winter to spring can almost be summed up by calling it a change from Why bother?Ž to Why not?!Ž Spring is the reward we get for having cut all that “ rewood.Brought to you by Home Country (the book). See it at http:// nmsantos.com/Books/ Home/Home.html. HOME COUNTRYSpring is time to have fun St Patricks Day is on its way, and I have decorated our home appropriately, despite the best efforts of my cat Bee Bee to tear down everything I put up. The glittery shamrocks that make up the major portion of the dining room table centerpiece can be found scattered around the house every morning. That cat is forbidden to get on the table and he fastidiously follows this rule every day. Apparently different rules apply at night, which is when he makes his midnight shamrock raids. Since I am sleeping when this takes place and since I was taught that discipline is only effective if done at the moment of the violation, there is little I can do about this. There are two little green leprechauns sitting in the wheelbarrow with a planter of shamrocks on my screened in porch. Bee Bee believes these to be kitty toys and he carries them all over. Finding where they have been deposited each day is as much fun as following the antics of the elf on the shelf. Still, I persevere with my green ” ags, Irish mugs and green pastries. I even set out green bowls with green apples and grapes for any person stopping by who wishes to celebrate the holiday. My mother, who had red hair and green eyes, celebrated this holiday with gusto, even coloring our oleo green back in the day when you bought it white and then worked a color capsule into it. Of course, the color capsule turned the white blob yellow, but mother tossed that and used green food coloring instead. But I digress. Despite all my efforts to make my mother proud by celebrating her favorite holiday with enthusiasm, Nurse Judy, my spoiled alter ego, is unimpressed. She could care less about all my decorating. The only style of decorating that interests her is her dress style. She bugs me all the time about the wearing of the green. What am I going to wear for St. Patricks Day?Ž she whines. It is only one day,Ž I say. Just put on a green scarf or wear a green pin. Its no big deal.Ž She frowns at me. One should wear green the whole month,Ž she says. That would be the proper way to honor the holiday and your mother.Ž (She sure knows how to pull my chain.) Go ahead,Ž I say, and wear something green every day. I dont care.Ž Now the whine becomes a wail. But I dont have anything green to wear … no green dress, no green shoes, no green jacket. What am I to do?Ž I bought you green shoes to wear with a Christmas out“ t and you have a green skirt,Ž I say. Those shoes hurt my feet,Ž she says, and that skirt is dark green, not emerald green like it should be. We need to go shopping.Ž I refuse to buy an entire ensemble for a one day event,Ž I say. What if I can prove its economical?Ž she queries. How?Ž I ask skeptically. She gives me a knowing smile. First, you can always wear it during the Christmas season, which lasts forever as you know. Green shoes would go well with my dress covered with spring ” owers for Easter. You could get lots of mileage out of a new green out“ t.Ž I know you,Ž I say. Come Easter or Christmas and you will be howling for new clothes again.Ž You interrupted me,Ž she says. I wasnt “ nished. I will share my new out“ t with you. How much more economical can it be? You buy one out“ t that will serve for three holidays for two people. I applaud myself for such a great idea.Ž I am ” abbergasted. Her reasoning is so crazy. Still, it does sound good. I havent had a new out“ t in ages. It cant have sequins on it,Ž I say as we head for the car. More later,Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. Her website is at www. nusejudyinfo.com. Judy Conlin Nurse Judy’s Nook The wearing of the green on St. Patrick’s DayREADERS WRITE:Letter on Rep. Southerland was o -base Extension o ce programs are wonderfulEditor, The News: Folks, I feel compelled to respond to the attack on Rep. Steve Southerlands vote on the Violence Against Women Act, or VAWA (Rep. Southerland doesnt get our needs,Ž March 7 letter on Opinion Page). First, the CDC “ gures for domestic violence, states that 40 percent of all domestic violence are perpetrated against men, the numbers are 1.3 million reports of violence against women, and over 800,000 against men. Even the ACLU has some serious questions with the constitutionality of this bill, giving more rights to one group of people over another. There are no protections for men in this piece of legislation, unless you are in a homosexual relationship. This is just a power grab by politicians who bene“ t from the perceived war on women,Ž when in reality its a war on men. Plus, the cost to the taxpayers will be $539 million over the next “ ve years. We have existing laws that treat everyone equal, lets enforce them. I suggest people study the rami“ cations of this bill, and make a decision for yourself. Jimmie Smith Spring CreekEditor, The News: Recently, I participated in several programs sponsored by the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce; water bath canning and the cooking school conducted by the Family and Consumer Sciences extension agent, Shelley Swenson. In water bath canning, we made and canned strawberry jam. I have never made jellies or jams, thinking that it was more efficient to purchase the commercial product. I am now a convert to home canning of jellies and jams. The “ nished jam is much tastier and considerably cheaper to make than the commercial product. I will be making fruit jams often. In our soup cooking class, we made three different soups. I learned a number of principles which I have used repeatedly since then. The nutritious and inexpensive lentil soup we made was a hit with my family and we have enjoyed it several times. These programs have added to our familys quality of life and I strongly recommend them to all. The extension office is a great resource to Wakulla County families. I urge everyone to take advantage of their programs, and I am grateful to our county commission for making their services available to us. Sincerely, Andrea F. Carter CrawfordvilleBy MAURICE LANGSTONSenior Center DirectorSenior citizens in the Sunshine State are the latest to be falling victim to a costly scam that has surfaced in states from Maine to Florida. Seniors are being swindled out of huge sums of money by Jamaica-based con artist who make aggressive and sometimes even threatening phone calls to unsuspecting consumers after promising them huge foreign lottery winnings. One Florida senior in South Florida has already lost more than $370,000 (her lifes savings) to the Jamaican scam artists. Typically, the same begins when Jamaican fraudsters place phone calls to unsuspecting individuals telling them theyve won a foreign lottery. The con-artist then tells his victims to make an advance payment to cover taxes and fees needed to relase the lottery winnings. Over time, the scammers lead their victims along, offering reasons why their winnings have been delayed, while continuing to ask for more money. Once an individual catches on to the scam and stops making payments, the con-artist has been known to impersonate law enforcement seeking to help the victim recoup their lost money. They sometimes even threaten to harm the victims or their family members. Scammers using Jamaicas 876 area code are also calling elderly residents in other states besides Florida and telling them they have won the lottery or a new car … and that they need to send a small fee to get their prize. There have been reports of this type of fraud in at least 21 states. Its very dif“ cult once the phone call is answered to resist being drawn in and scammed. The problem is so widespread that its now on the radar screen of major media “ gures, U.S. senators and the nations biggest senior advocacy group AARP. Sen. Bill Nelson of Florida is the Chairman on the Special Committee on Aging. Sen. Nelsons contact information for his Tallahassee of“ ce information is as follows: U.S. Court House 111 North Adams St. Tallahassee FL 32301 Telephone: (850) 9428415 Fax: 850-942-8450 Here are some things people can do to protect their savings from lottery fraudsters: € If you get such a call hang up immediately. € If you get such an e-mail, delete it. € If you get regular mailings promoting a foreign lottery, rip them up. € Report continued contacts to law enforcement. This foreign lottery scam is an ever growing problem of big-time criminal operators in places like Jamaica and Nigeria preying on our elderly and lonely people with telemarketing and lottery fraud. If the board, director or staff at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Council can be of service, please call us at 926-7145.Maurice Langston is the director of the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center.Don’t get scammed

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 5ABy TARA KIESERSpecial to The NewsTylher Tillman was crowned the 2013 Miss Wakulla County on Saturday, March 9, at the Wakulla High School Auditorium. She competed against 10 other young ladies in the areas of scholastic and community achievement, personal interview, personal style, on-stage question, evening gown and “ nalist question. Shannan Wood was “ rst runner-up, Arien Hart was second runner-up, Carson Strickland was third runner-up, and Savanah Hamilton was fourth runner-up. The winners of the special awards were Scholastic and Community Achievement Award … Savanah Hamilton, Best Interview … Shannan Wood, Most Photogenic … Arien Hart, and Bobbi Broome was voted by the other contestants as Miss Congeniality. The other contestants included Brianna Gubala, Logan Kelley, Ashlyne Sandberg, Joy Howell and Rami McIver. Haley Carlton was crowned the 2013 Jr. Miss Wakulla. Morgan Gray was first runner-up, Brianna Harvey was second runner-up, Hannah Dudley was third runner-up, and Anna Golden was fourth runner-up. The remaining contestants included Morgan Dickens, Amber Peters, Stephanie Ball, Abigail Linton, Holly Ridner, Miriam Hoskins, Jazmine Fields, Danna Richardson, Maci Vernon, Carmen Zachry, Morgan Fagan, Caroline Johnson. Ashley Marin was crowned the 2013 Young Miss Wakulla. Caroline Barwick was “ rst runnerup, Natalie Whaley was second runner-up, Cameron Nichols was third runner-up, and Caitlynn Linville was fourth runnerup. The remaining contestants included Grace Allen, Lilliana Bloodworth, Hannah Bryan, Sandra Carter, Mackenzie Crockett, Selina Crosby, Camryn Grimes, Alyssa Hay, Gabriella Jacobs, Kayla Lee, Nevaeh Lousey, Mikayla Porter, Jayla Sickles and Sara Wallace. Cortlynd Fruggiero was crowned the 2013 Little Miss Wakulla. Hailey Sandberg was “ rst runnerup, Britton Nichols was second runner-up, Trista Mock was third runnerup, and Reese Harvey was fourth runner-up. The remaining contestants included AnnaMarie Carnival, Sheyenne Finch, Lydia Harper, Andriss Hoskins, Mariah Logan, Shaylee Pearcy, Victoria Rhinehart and Hailey Risoldi. Emma Hallaian was crowned the 2013 Tiny Miss Wakulla. Whitlee Harvey was “ rst runner-up, Olivia Green was second runner-up, Amya Herring was third runner-up, and Allison Wilsey was fourth runner-up. The remaining contestants included Olivia Crosby, Vanessa Elderkin, Taylor Fringer, Ayden-Annabell Gallagher, Sophia Jacobs, Rowan Laxton, Kaylee Turner, Dionna Williamson and Mariah Wireman. Karolyn Lewis and Lewis Pollard did an excellent job as the mistress and master of ceremonies. Taylor and Hailee Clark wowed us with their vocal talent, Sloan Barwick played a beautiful piano piece, and Kori Pigott from The Dance Project showed us Diamonds are a Girls Best Friend. WECs Blessings in a Backpack Team provided the concessions this year. Blessings in a Backpack is a unique program that is designed to feed students who are at risk of having little or no food on the weekends. Eighty dollars sends one child home with a backpack full of food each weekend for an entire 38 week school year. The pageant committee appreciates the opportunity to work with such a program. Special thanks to our sponsors as well as in-kind donations from the following businesses: Corbetts Media, Nicoles 31 Gifts, Synovus Mortgage, and Whaley Photography. Committee Members include co-chairs Michelle Davis and Tara Kieser, Brooke Brown, Suzanne Camp, Molly Clore, Pamela Davis, Candace Hicks, Amber McIver, Nicole Singleton, and Vickie Whaley. We enjoyed working with this great group of young ladies and seeing what the future of Wakulla County holds. We would like to thank our families and Wakulla County for their support in making the pageant a success. Miss Wakulla winners crowned SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMiss Wakulla Tyler Tillman, center; Haley Carlton Junior Miss Wakulla. lower right; Ashley Marin Young Miss Wakulla, upper right; Cortlynd Fruggiero Little Miss Wakulla, lower left; and Emma Hallaian Tiny Miss Wakulla.Special to The NewsPalaver Tree Theater Company is presenting The Wakulla VolcanoŽ as part of the annual Wild About Wakulla Week. Visit www.palavertreetheater.org for a synopsis of the play. Performance dates are Friday, April 19 at 7 p.m. and Saturday, April 20 at 3 p.m. Rehearsals begin Saturday, March 16, at the Wakulla County Public Library. Rehearsal times are TBA. Roles needing to be “ lled are Rodney (white male, age 40 to 60), Larry (white male, age 40 to 60), Judge White, Young Brave, Spanish Explorer, Emmett Baird. A stipend for transportation will be offered to participants living outside of the Wakulla area. For more information, contact Herb Donaldson at (718) 682-3870 or email at palavertreetheater@ gmail.com.Actors needed for play about WakullaStaff reportThe Crawfordville Lions Club will hold its eighth annual St. Patricks Day Festival and Parade Saturday, March 16, at Crawfordvilles Hudson Park. The festivities will begin at 8 a.m. with Breakfast in the Park and the “ rst event being the invocation, raising of our National Flag and the singing of our National Anthem at 9 a.m. The parade starts at 10 a.m. and will have over 40 units in it. The festival in Hudson Park follows and there will be more than 30 vendors including food vendors, arts and crafts, community action groups, and activities for the kids. The Crawfordville Lions Club will also be selling raf” e tickets with drawings throughout the day until the grand prize of $250 cash is drawn at 3 p.m. There will also be entertainment on the stage in the pavilion starting at 11 a.m. and continuing until approximately 3 p.m, featuring local cloggers, musicians and entertainers: 11 a.m. Ms. Denise Dance Group. 11:45 a.m. Senior Line Dancers. 12:30p.m. Rick Tittle and John Smith with special guests The Smith Creek Band. 2:15 … 3 p.m. Trafton Harvey. Food vendors will be serving seafood, hamburgers, hotdogs, barbecue, funnel cakes, and more. Tickets for individual events may be purchased on the day of the festival from any Crawfordville Lions Club member. Just look for the distinctive yellow vests.St. Patrick’s Festival is Saturday FILE PHOTO FILE PHOTOAt last years St. Patricks Festival. Two girls with green-painted hair march in last years St. Patricks Parade. We Cater The Best PART IES! LEES LIQUOR & FINE 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9770 W E ARE Celebrating S ERVING YOU!YEARS15 F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F I I I I I I I I I N N N N N N N N N N N N N E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E E WINES NATURAL LIGHT18 PKS $ 11 99 BUSCH18 PKS $ 11 99 C MORIGINAL OR SILVER SPICE 1.75L $ 22 99 POPOVVODKA1.75L $ 12 99 SMIRNOFF RED LABEL1.75L $ 19 99 CROWNROYAL1.75L $ 39 99 JAGERMEISTER $ 19 99750MLThank you for choosing LEES LIQUOR for all your party supplies!We will continue to bring you the lowest prices, friendliest faces and the coldest beer in town!We are now smoke free at the SKYBOX! MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health € Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me “nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED. RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc.

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 Excuse me, but I just gotta be me HEAVENS TO BETSYBecoming faithfully “ t OUT TO PASTOR By JAMES L. SNYDER I refuse to answer for anybody else because it is a fulltime job trying to answer for myself. I must confess, though, I sometimes cannot give a good answer for myself. I can give an answer, but not a good one, and when it comes to answers, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage demands good ones. How do you explain yourself to someone when you cannot even explain yourself to yourself? I do not pretend to be a man of mystery, but many things about Yours Truly I certainly do not understand. For one, I am not an actor. I want to make that very plain to all and sundry. Within the con“ nes of my presence, are absolutely no acting skills. I have some friends who are always acting like a fool. I am assuming they are acting and give them the bene“ t of the doubt. Another friend of mine at certain times acts dumb. I have known him for a very long time and I can usually tell when he is acting. By the way, he is a very good actor. Many of my friends are excellent actors and if they ever were competing for some Oscar or Emmy award, they would come pretty close to winning. I am another story. It is very dif“ cult for me in the area of acting. With me, what you see is what you get. I suppose when you boil it all down, I am just not smart enough to be a good actor. I am not even smart enough to be a bad actor. Putting all of this in context, I must confess that my wife believes I am a great actor. I have tried to dissuade her from this opinion, but up to this point, I have not been successful. When she thinks of me she always says, And the Emmy goes to...Ž How she came to this point, Im not quite sure. No matter what I do, she still holds to this personal opinion of me. I keep telling her that I am not that good of an actor, which she keeps smiling and nodding her head in my direction. Some examples need to be given here to show my point. Just the other night we were at a restaurant with some friends, having a good time, or so I thought. I must say when Im on a roll, Im on a roll. But all during my roll,Ž I kept feeling somebody under the table kicking me. I ignored it thinking perhaps our friends did not quite know what they were doing. Never once did I suspicion my companion with this action. I kept rolling on. Finally, both of them excused themselves to take a break and when they were out of listening distance, my wife said to me, Will you stop acting so foolish?Ž I looked at her, not quite knowing what she was referring to, and said quite innocently, But, my Precious, Im not acting.Ž She gave me one of those looksŽ and said, Stop acting foolish.Ž This is what I admire about my wife. She has the highest opinion of my abilities particularly in the area of the thespian arts. Our friends were coming to the table when I was about to tell her I was not acting foolish, it just came natural. Another example comes to mind. I remember she was trying to explain something to me one time. I do not know what it was now. It was something to do with something in the garage, a place I have not been for years, and I was not connecting the dots, as they say. She was going into a long dissertation on what needed to be done and I was just standing there staring at her. I was trying to understand what she was saying, but nothing was clicking upstairs, if you know what I mean. In the middle of her dissertation she stopped, looked at me intensely, placed both hands on her hips and said, Dont act so dumb.Ž Smiling broadly I whispered, My Precious, Im not acting.Ž With a glare that could have intimidated good old Goliath, she quipped, Im coming to believe youre right. You are not acting. Youre just naturally dumb.Ž Somebody once sang a song called, I gotta be meŽ which has become my theme song. What you see is what you get, when you are dealing with me. I am not smart enough to act and I am too old to play. Therefore, it all boils down to this one thing, I am what I am, like it or lump it. I do not like it when people pretend to be something they are not. I want people to be real with me. This is doubly true with my relationship with God. He is honest with me and I want to be absolutely honest with him. If a man say, I love God, and hateth his brother, he is a liar: for he that loveth not his brother whom he has seen, how can he love God whom he has not seen?Ž (1 John 4:20 KJV). Many people say they love God and yet it is all an act. It is easy to love somebody you cannot see but hard to love a brother right in front of you.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@att. net. By BETSY GOEHRIG Many of us remember exercise guru Jack LaLanne, who passed away in January 2011. I read how he would rise at 5 a.m. everyday, head to the gym and log in a vigorous two hour workout. At the young age of 95, he spent an hour and a half in the weight room and a half-hour swimming. When he began promoting the virtues of sound nutrition and regular exercise in the 1930s and 40s, people thought of him as a nut and many people made fun of him publicly. But his big break came in television when the Jack LaLanne ShowŽ began in the 1950s, and the world started to hear about the importance of “ tness. He said, You get out of the bed in the morning tired and with aches and pains, but this body works for me. Its my slave. I take care of it. Many older people complain that they are too old to exercise or they really like to eat. They have so many excuses. They are thinking about the good old days. The good old days are today.Ž In Luke 10:27, Jesus says, You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.Ž To love the Lord your God with all your strength, puts the focus on our bodies, our physical beings. Ask yourself, am I loving God with all my strength? With all of my body? What can I do to become stronger, that I might love God more, in this area of my life? What do I need to do to become faithfully “ t? No matter how old we are, or how young we are, its never too soon or too late to start some kind of “ tness plan to strengthen our bodies. Regardless of age, how you take care of your body makes a difference. I want to challenge our community … as well as myself … to become more faithfully fit. In one year, we can make a remarkable difference in this aspect of our lives, as well as in our community and our nation! (I have dropped 25 pounds in the past year. Im working on a repeat performance this year. So this preacher is preaching to herself, as well as to others!) We know the bene“ ts of physical exercise and nutrition, but maybe we hadnt thought about them as an important part of our spiritual lives. If you had to rate your physical fitness, where would it be, on a scale of 1 to 10, with one being of poor physical health and “ tness, poor eating habits and no exercise, up to 10, with being in great physical shape and fitness, eating healthy and exercising regularly? Turn to Page 7AMacedonia holds banquetBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsStill standingŽ is a more than apt phrase to describe the spirit of the historic Macedonia Church of Christ Written in Heaven. Having undergone a series of setbacks to their house of worship during Tropical Storm Debby, the true heart of the church … the people and their willingness to serve … has remained fully intact. That was made evident this past Saturday evening when the church held its fundraising banquet, Bridging the Gap: Where do we go from here?Ž Undersheriff Trey Morrison gave an introduction of the evenings guest speaker, Sheriff Charlie Creel, who touched on the issues of building trust between the community and the sheriffs of“ ce by making sure all were treated equally under the law. Turn to Page 7A HERB DONALDSON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSheriff Charlie Creel with wife Cheryl.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14 2013 – Page 7AObituaries Linda Loretta Clemmons Coxwell Jerry Paul Minton Ofellon ‘Sue’ SheadLinda Loretta Clemmons Coxwell, 82, died on Tuesday, March 5, 2013. She was born in Altha, on June 20, 1930 to Dewey Lee and Ruby Barber Clemmons. She lived in Blountstown until moving to Crawfordville and then to Thomasville, Ga. After retiring, she, her husband, a Southern Baptist minister, and their son, Sammy, returned to Crawfordville. Survivors include her son, Ashley (Melissa) of Callahan; her daughters, Dr. Deborah Coxwell-Teague (Everett) of Tallahassee and Alicia Crittenden (Bill) of Acworth, Ga.; her sister, Juanita Clemmons Temple of Callahan; her brother, Dewey Lee Clemmons Jr. (Talitha) of Williamsburg, Va.; and 14 grandchildren, two great-grandsons, a niece, and several nephews. She was predeceased by her husband of 62 years, the Rev. Samuel Ancil Cowell; their son, Samuel Ancil Coxwell Jr.; her parents; and her sister, Hilda Clemmons Alford. A graveside service was held at Crawfordville Cemetery in Crawfordville at 10:30 a.m. on Monday, March 11, 2013. Adams Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. Phone (850) 6745449. Online condolences may be made at adamsfh.com. Ofellon SueŽ Shead, 81, died on Monday, March 11, 2013, at her home in Whigham, Ga. A private family service will be held at a later date. She was born May 7, 1931, in Cook County, Ga., to Robert Stephens and Martha Pritchard Stephens. She was married to Frank Shead, who preceded her in death. She worked as a loving wife and caregiver. She was of the Pentecostal faith. Survivors include her daughter, Janice Pinion Clark of Whigham, Ga.; grandchildren, Teresa Pinion of Crawfordville, Connie Trevino (Ricky) of Whigham, Kristina Pinion of Vidor, Texas, and Renea Whitmire (Mitchell) of Whigham; 11 great-grandchildren and three great-greatgrandchildren. Sue was predeceased by her parents; her husband; a son, Gary Pinion; a grandson, Lil Kenny Whitmire; and a greatgrandson, Austin Whitmire. On-line condolences may be sent at www.coxfuneral.net. Jerry Paul Minton, 79, peacefully left this earthly home to enjoy a heavenly reunion on Sunday, March 3, 2013 at his home in Sopchopppy. He was born in Atlanta on Jan. 2, 1934. He was proud to be a veteran having served as a paratrooper with the 82nd and 101st Airborne Unit. Upon retirement from Marta Transit in Atlanta in 1986, he and his wife Shirley retired to Sopchoppy where he enjoyed fishing. He also served as a bailiff for Wakulla County. Jerry took great delight in sponsoring young ladies at the Lighthouse Childrens Home, enjoying their singing as well as the gospel music performed there. He was a faithful member of the Panacea Full Gospel Church. He was preceded in death by his wife, Shirley, his parents, and two brothers. Survivors include a son, Rick (Carmen), a daughter, Robin, and sister, Jean (Franklin) Roberts, six step children and several grand children. He leaves behind close friends and neighbors Buster (Elmira) Mathis, Barney (Diane) Harrell, Paul Tryee, brother-inlaw, who called him every other Sunday morning, and Edna Reynolds. Jerry will be remembered for his quick wit and bright smile. His willingness to help others will be greatly missed. Services were held at the Panacea Full Gospel Church on Thursday, March 7, 2013 with burial at the Sopchoppy Cemetery, where he was presented with an honor guard by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Department. Memorial gifts may be made to the Panacea Full Gospel Church, Panacea FL 32346 or the Lighthouse Childrens Home, 7771 Mahan Dr., Tallahassee FL 32311.Linda Loretta Clemmons Coxwell Ofellon ‘Sue’ Shead Jerry Paul Minton The Christian Worship Center will host a Homecoming Dinner at 4 p.m., on Saturday, March 16, immediately followed at 6 p.m. by the Drummond Family in Concert. On Sunday, March 17, the Drummonds will perform again at 11 a.m. The week of March 18 through March 22 is the Homecoming Revival at 7 p.m. nightly with Pastor Dennis Hanvey and his wife Sherry from Florence, Ala. Both events will take place at the Christian Worship Center at 3922 Coastal Hwy. (Hwy 98) in Medart. Everyone is invited to join us. For more information, call pastor Steve Taylor at (850) 509-6031.Gospel group, revival set at Christian Worship Center From Page 6AIf were not where we want to be, there is no better time than right now to make some changes to that. For some, that may mean eating healthier, exercising more, drinking more water, developing stress relief techniques, taking vitamins/supplements, or getting more sleep. For others, it might mean giving up something unhealthy … junk food, cigarettes, alcohol, other substances, or sexual promiscuity. For different people, loving God with all your strength, with all your body, being as physically strong as possible, will mean different things. This challenge is not about judgment or condemnation. Its about liberation! God wants to help us and give us strength. With Gods help, we can be set free and overcome anything. The most successful programs are those that are faith based, because in our greatest weakness we can “ nd our greatest strength from leaning upon the One who not only saves us eternally but who saves us when we need it most on this earth. Each day God gives us is a fresh opportunity to renew our bodies which are fearfully and wonderfully made. Almost all of us need to take better care of ourselves, in some way. The most important change you can make is in your perspective, by treating your body as a TEMPLE which houses Gods Holy Spirit. Most of the time we dont internalize this truth, we dont focus on it, we dont live it. Our bodies are living temples of the Holy Spirit. And this gives our bodies great value. Our bodies are something special, because God is living inside! Realizing that can help motivate us to take better care of our physical being. There are a lot of ways we can grow in this aspect, so that we may love the Lord our God with all our strength. And yet, in spite of all that we do, the truth is, physical health may still decline. No matter how much we exercise, no matter how many vitamins we take, no matter how well we eat, no matter how clean we live, sometimes our bodies still grow weak. But we can still love God powerfully with all our strength, even in our greatest weakness. May we be committed to take the very best care we can of the bodies we have been given. Let us be faithfully fit so our bodies may represent Christs body, as we serve in Christs name, becoming his hands, his feet, his lips, through our very own. The Rev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is an ordained minister with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ).Goehrig: Becoming faithfully “ tFrom Page 6ACreel also stressed the need for diversity within the department so that it re” ected the community. He was sure to note that those in the department were not hired because of color, but because of their proven ability to get the job done right. He then introduced Capt. Jackie Martin, who was recently promoted in rank at Wakullas detention facility. Capt. Martin, a vibrant and energetic man, spoke brie” y about working with the youth in the community, and how the work of the Sheriffs department is merely a byproduct of the work that should be done in our homes. He chose not to glorify the negative, but highlight the positive aspects of our youth, and how it was the responsibility of every adult to get involved in the public meetings and issues pertaining to the young people of the county. Elder Gwendolyn Thomas presided as Mistress of Ceremonies for the affair. Poetry, guest singers, and praise dancing were on the program. Pastor Alfred Nelson Sr., offered “ nal remarks for the evening, giving special thanks to those on the event committee that helped bring them one step closer to rebuilding their church. Macedonia holds banquet PHOTOS BY HERB DONALDSONWilliam Green, left, with an award for volunteerism. Capt. Jackie Martin, above, of the sheriffs of“ ce. www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. 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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community SPECIAL FOR THE NEWSLocal dog racing team, Jacks BŽ Quick Race Team, went to Navasota, Texas, to compete, at the Texas Two Step Racing Trials. Travis Hallman took his old girlŽ Heartbreaker, entering her in the regular adult class, along with his new pup Lil Bug, racing pups under a year of age. Lil Bug placed “ rst in both ” ats and hurdles and then raced in the puppy championship, and won. I have a feeling well be reading articles about her blue ribbon sessions on the racing track in the future,Ž said Hallman. Heartbreaker placed “ rst in the ” ats and the hurdles and in the end was crowned the adult champion at the Texas Two Step. Hallman said, This was one of the best race days, ever.Ž Hallman and his dogs brought home eight blue ribbons and four championships. Jacks BŽ Quick would like to express our appreciation to Dr. Griggs and the staff at Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital, Luther and Betty Watford of B & L Auto Parts, and PMI Exclusive Dog Food.SPECIAL FOR THE NEWSWhat do you get when young people, ice cream and leadership are combined? The answer is Wakulla Countys record setting banana split, 20 feet long, produced by 4-Hers during leadership training for the upcoming 2013 4-H summer camp season. It was fun and we learned how to be good 4-H camp counselorsŽ said TJ Parramore. He was one of 14 teens who worked together to plan and construct the dessert masterpiece, and then proceeded to consume it all. Chris Paris, a fourth year veteran of the 4-H Camp Cherry Lake camping program said I think the new counselors will do well and Im really looking forward to camp this summer.Ž Counselor-in-Training Hannah McKenzie said, I learned a lot and had fun while doing it.Ž This summer will be Hannahs rookie year as a 4-H Camp Counselor at 4-H Camp Cherry Lake in north Madison County. Camp Cherry Lake is a week-long residential camping experience. The 4-Hers participate in classes, learn crafts, engage in team sports, and swim in Cherry Lake. Counselors are older 4-Hers who help the volunteers and camp staff as part of developing the necessary life skills the 4-Hers will need in the coming years. We are helping train the responsible adults of tomorrow, today,Ž said Sherri Kraeft, UF/ IFAS Wakulla County 4-H Agent. All Wakulla County 4-H programs are designed to give young people the opportunity to develop life skills and form positive relationships with both their peers and caring adults. If you would like further information regarding camps, community clubs or ways that you can be involved with the Wakulla County 4-H program as a volunteer, please contact the Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or Sherri Kraeft at sjkraeft@ u” .edu. Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County was awarded a $500 contribution from Corporation Service Company, through fundraising efforts. The funds will assist with the next home build. Corporation Service Company will also be providing volunteers to work on the next home build. Corporation Service Company (CSC), a privately held business and legal services organization that provides matter management, corporate compliance, and trustee services for companies and law “ rms worldwide. To learn more about CSC, visit www.cscglobal.com. If you are interested in “ nding out how you can be involved in Habitat for Humanity of Wakulla County please stop by the Habitat ReStore at 940 Shadeville Road or call 926-4544.SPECIAL TO THE NEWSTravis with Little Bug and Heartbreaker, show the blue ribbons they won at the Texas Two Step Racing Trials. Dogs win big in Texas 4-H’ers go bananas at counselor trainingSPECIAL TO THE NEWSTravis Harvey-Henderson and Bryson Nichols, look pretty serious about building the giant sundae. Susan Schatzman, Peggy Mackin and Lynette Coleman at Habitat for Humanity StoreHabitat donationSPECIAL TO THE NEWS Christian Worship Center invites you to their Saturday, March 16 at 4pmThe Drummond Family in ConcertSharing Gods love in word and song onSaturday March 16 at 6pm and Sunday March 17 at 11am.Everyone is cordially invited to share with us these series of events that will take place at the Christian Worship Center, 3922 Coastal Hwy. (US Hwy. 98), in Medart. If you need more information, please call Pastor Steve Taylor at 850-509-6031with Pastor Dennis Hanvey and his wife Sherry, of Florence, Alabama. Both have been pastoring for 25 years and will share with us the gospel of Jesus Christ from March 18th through the 22nd at 7pm nightly. Hours:Tu-W & F 10 6 Th 12 8 Sat 8 NOON Sun & Mon Closed850.926.83192809 Crawfordville Hwy across from Hudson ParkRoot319.com A full service hair and nail salon. W elcomesWelcomes imberly oukoulis Now AvailableƒHave a Manicure or Pedicure in between your color sk bout our pecials! 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 9Aeducation news from local schools School SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Superintendent Bobby Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the service these individuals give to the children of Wakulla County, their commitment to the schools and communities they serve. LOU ANN HAMES Lou Ann Hames, March Teacher of the Month, has been working as an ESE teacher at Crawfordville Elementary since September 2005. Prior to starting her career as a teacher she served as an ESE paraprofessional. Originally from Indiana, Pennsylvania she graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania where she received her BS degree in health and physical education. I teach because I love working with kids and making a difference in their lives. I love seeing their eyes light up when they “ nally understand a dif“ cult concept. Students are the most unpredictable creatures on the planet. They can be goofy, silly, annoying and frustrating as well as amazingly kind, generous, thoughtful and creative. As a teacher I learned to take the sugar with the salt.Ž Mrs. Hames contributes to the school as a whole as a member of the PLT committee, math committee and parent involvement committee. Crawfordville Principal Angie Walker adds, Together with her co-teacher, Mrs. Harvey, they have developed an inclusion based classroom that runs like a perfectly pitched baseball game … close-accurate and no free walks.Ž AMANDA BUTLER Amanda Butler, a Riversprings Middle School sixth grade teacher since 2005, was also selected as a March Teacher of the Month. Butler attended Tallahassee Community College on a softball scholarship. She then attended and graduated from Flagler College. While teaching at Riversprings, Butler has also coached volleyball, softball, girls basketball and girls soccer. She is a mentor teacher and a member of the LCD reading grant team. I enjoy working with the middle school age student. It is very rewarding when former students come back to let me know how things are going for them and allow me to celebrate their accomplishments with them,Ž says Butler. RMS Principal Dod Walker notes, Mrs. Butler came to RMS hoping to be a PE coach but has proven to be an outstanding 6th grade classroom teacher. She is a pleasure to work with and I am proud to call her a Bear.Ž DANA CARPENTER Wakulla Pre-K has selected Dana Carpenter as March Employee of the Month. She moved in Wakulla County in May 2007. Carpenter has been a song leader at the Pioneer Baptist Church for “ ve years. Originally from Ocala, Florida, she graduated high school from the Ocala Christian Academy. Carpenter shares, I love working with children. They make me laugh on a daily basis. I love watching children learn and grow. I am not from Wakulla County, so it has been nice making new friends while working.Ž Three applauded as outstanding teachersLou Ann Hames, Amanda Butler and Dana Carpenter are recognized as the March Teachers of the Month for Wakulla County. Speech By Jodie Martin On behalf of the other Teachers of the YearŽ and all of the hard working and dedicated teachers in the state of Florida, I would like to thank Governor Scott and the cabinet for this special recognition. I would also like to say that I am very appreciative of the Governors interest in education. The Governors Families First BudgetŽ is very generous to education and I am hopeful that the legislators have the same spirit and also support all of the devoted teachers of Florida. Teachers do not choose to teach for the yearly salary. Teachers are professionals that make a commitment to work long hours to better the future of our youth. Floridas teachers have been working hard to make big steps in preparing Floridas youth to be Floridas future. Florida is now seeing national success and all of our hard work is paying off. Teachers do not teach subjects, excellent teachers teach students. That means taking every students situation into consideration when planning lessons. That cannot be done in an eight hour work day or a “ ve day work week. Personally working in an area hit hard by the current economy, I can say the children are suffering from the situation. I have students who come to school hungry and in need of clothing. Teachers spend their own money to provide food, clothing, school supplies and even Christmas presents. I have never minded packing an extra sandwich or granola bar each day. That is just what teachers do! However, teachers must also make a wage that supports their own families to be able to provide this type of support to others. The Governor understands this and his budget to increase the funds to education is essential to maintaining Floridas level of excellence. Families FirstŽ is just that, it is supportive of families. Thank you again Governor Scott, your support is appreciated. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAssistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell, Superintendent Bobby Pearce, Teacher of the Year Jodie Martin, Medart Principal Sharon Kemp, and Assistant Principal Belinda McElroy.Martin gives speech, thanks Governor Scott If gas prices have you seeing less green and more red, try ridesharing. Carpooling and vanpooling can reduce your commuting costs by 50% or more. You’ll also be contributing to cleaner air and reduced traffic congestion. Commuter Services of North Florida can help you locate neighbors and co-workers with whom you can possibly share the ride, and the service is free. Simply visit www.commuterservices.org to request a free matchlist or call us at 1-888-454-RIDE for personalized assistance. Want to get moremilesper gallon?COMMUTER SERVICESof north florida “Like us” on Facebook during the month of March and become eligible to win an iPad courtesy of Commuter Services of North Florida. “Share” with your friends to earn extra entries. Visit www.commuterservices.org/giveaway for details or simply scan the QR code below. Win an iPad!

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By PAUL HOOVERWHS Track CoachThe Wakulla High School track team had a busy schedule last week as they attended two local meets. The WHS girls team, who captured the first four places in the 1600 meter run, were led by Madison Harris, Marty Wiedeman, Kayla Webbe and Liliana Broadway. Raychel Gray won the 3200 meter run, with Kayla Webbe “ nishing a close second. In the 800 meters, Lydia Wiedeman “ nished in second place, with Breighly Bolton placing fourth and Raychel Gray nabbing “ fth. Additionally, the 4x800 and 4x400 relay teams ran well to place first. In the 300 meter hurdles, Amber Stewart had her best effort of the year, capturing “ rst place. Thrower Shelby Alsup also had another good meet, “ nishing second in the discus and sixth in the shot. Sprinter Dazaha Jackson ran a solid 200 meter dash to “ nish in fourth place. The boys were led by first year track athlete Corion Knight, who won both the 200 meters and high jump. In the high jump, he cleared the State Elite height of 62Ž, easily out-jumping his closest competitor who cleared 58Ž. Junior Aaron Smith had another good meet, placing “ rst in the 1600 meters and stepping down for a rare appearance in the 800 meters, where he placed second. Mitchell Atkinson also logged his “ rst high school win in the 3200 meters. J.P.Piotrowski also had a good meet, logging a fast leg on the 4x800 meter relay, as well as placing second in the 1600 meters. In the sprints, John Sanders ran to a strong third place “ nish in the 100 meters, with Malik Thomas “ nishing in fourth place. The local runners dominated the 200 meters. Knight led the way with Dontavious White close behind in third and Monterious Loggins in “ fth and Antonio Morris in sixth. In the relays, the boys placed second in the 4x100 meters, the 4x400 meters and third in the 4x800 meters. In the long jump, Vonte Ervin jumped just over 18 feet, to place a solid sixth. On Thursday, it was the youngsters time to shine when the teams attended the First Annual Rickards Freshman/ Sophomore Meet at Rickards High School in Tallahassee. The meet kicked off with the “ eld events and high jumper Keith Gavin set the tone for the WHS boys. Gavin turned in another superb effort with a winning jump of 64Ž which is a National Elite BŽ Standard height. He followed that up with a fourth place “ nish in the 100 meters and another win in the 200 meters. Nathan Jackson also performed well, placing second in the discus and sixth in the shot put. Then it was the middle distance runners time to perform and they did. The boys 4x800 meter team ran an excellent race, wnning in a season best time of 8:55, only four seconds off the school record. J.P. Piotrowski ran the fastest leg, but Alan Pearson ran a superb leg and closed 6 seconds in the last 400 meters on the lead runner from Rickards. Piotrowski also in the turned in a winning performance in the 1600 meters and 800 meters! Pearson also followed up with a win in the 300 meter hurdles. In the 3200 meters, Albert Smythe ran a good race to “ nish second and he was followed by Travis Parks (3rd), Mitchell Atkinson (4th) and Riley Welch (5th). The girls were once again led the middle distance runners and thrower, Shelby Alsup, who opened the meet with a second place “ nish in both the discus and shotput. Lydia Wiedeman, Savanna Strickland and Holli Capps place “ rst, third and fourth in the 800 meters. Lilliana Broadway had a good night, running a leg on the winning 4x800 relay, winning the 3200 meter run and placing second in the 1600 meters. The team of Wiedeman, Strickland, Broadway and Connie Lewis won the 4x800 meter relay. The girls 4x400 meter relay team included two runners, DaZaha Jackson and Khadjzia Stokley, who had never run on the relay before, but they both turned in really sold performances and helped ensure the win for the WHS squad. Interestingly, the girls relay team almost beat the Madison boys team, “ ghting them the whole way and “ nishing only two seconds back. The next competition for the WHS teams will be another Freshman/ Sophomore Meet at Chiles High School on Thursday and a limited number of athletes are scheduled compete at the huge Bob Hays Meet in Jacksonville on Saturday, March 16. Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views SportsBy AMY LEESpecial to The NewsThe War Eagles held off a late push by Pensacola Tate to hold for a 3-2 win. Pensacola Tate wasnt able to come back from the big hole it dug itself into against the War Eagles, and Pensacola Tate lost 3-2 after falling behind by two runs in the sixth inning. Pensacola Tate scored one run in the seventh on an RBI double. Michael Cooper was a workhorse in the circle while bagging the win for the War Eagles. Cooper pitched seven innings and allowed two earned runs, three hits and two walks while striking out three. The War Eagles pushed one run across in the fourth inning to start the scoring. The War Eagles scored on an RBI single by Kenzie Lee. The game was never in doubt after the “ fth, as the War Eagles scored one run on an RBI single by Courtney Flowers and another one run on an RBI single by Ambler Winkler. LADY WAR EAGLES TAKE OUT SICKLES WITH HELP FROM HARRELL, 6-1 The War Eagles beat Sickles 6-1 in seven innings on Friday at Messer behind Shelby Harrell who went 2-2. She doubled in the third inning and singled in the “ fth inning. Michael Cooper was a strong in the circle while bagging the win for the War Eagles. Cooper allowed one earned run, “ ve hits and two walks while striking out “ ve over seven innings of work. In the fourth inning, Sickles pushed across its only run of the day on an RBI double. The lead stayed with the War Eagles after the “ fth, when they scored three runs on a three-run double by Kayla Hussey. The War Eagles piled on three more runs in the bottom of the sixth. Cooper homered, scoring Kelbi Davis to start the inning and Sickles was unable to answer. The War Eagles lose to Countryside High despite huge last inning at bat for Amber Bryant, 2-3 The War Eagles were unable to keep the winning streak alive on Saturday despite big at bats by Chris Romanus, Meghan Sarvis and Amber Bryant. Wakulla never held the lead but in the last inning Amber Bryant crushed one to left-center which scored two runs … but she was tagged out after rounding second to end the game. WAR EAGLES FALL 6-0 TO NICEVILLE DESPITE SARVIS EFFORT The War Eagles wound up on the wrong side of a 6-0 score on Saturday afternoon at Messer, tasting defeat at the hands of Niceville. Meghan Sarvis was solid at the plate for the War Eagles. Sarvis went 1-2. She singled in the third inning. Nicevilles pitcher pitched seven shutout innings. Struck out three, walked one and gave up two hits. Nicevilles three top players led the team. They combined for six hits and three RBIs. Niceville tacked on another four runs in the “ fth. Wakulla managed only two hits the entire game, one from Kayla Hussey and the other from Meghan Sarvis. The War Eagles play Madison and Leon this week. Friday nights game will be bring District challenger Suwannee High School to our home “ eld. JV will play at 5 p.m. and varsity plays at 7 p.m.SOFTBALL BASEBALL TRACKLady War Eagles place 4th at North Florida ClassicTeams have two meetsThe rst statewide rankings of the current season were released last week and WHS had seven athletes ranked in the top 50 in 2A in their respective events. They included Keith Gavin, 2nd in high jump; Corion Knight, tied for 3rd, high jump; Madison Harris, 3rd, 800 meters; Lydia Wiedeman, 26th, 800 meters; Aaron Smith, 37th, 3200 meters; Margaret Wiedeman, 43rd, 3200 meters; and J.P. Piotrowski, 50th, 800 meters. Riversprings Middle School middle distance ace Bryce Cole is also ranked statewide 6th in the 1600 and 7th in the 800 meters. – Paul Hoover7 Wakulla athletes ranked By CONNOR HARRISONSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla High School War Eagles baseball team has started the season off strong with seven wins in their “ rst 10 games. After a 2-3 start, the War Eagles have had a “ ve game win streak. On March 8, the War Eagles went up to Tallahassee to play the Rickards Raiders for their “ rst district game. Wakulla came out swinging and drove in four runs in just the “ rst inning. The Raiders lone run came in the fourth inning, right before the War Eagles batted “ ve runs in the next inning, making the score 11-1 in favor of Wakulla where it remained for the rest of the game. Wakullas season batting average is .279 so far with Brandon Nichols having a batting average of .424, leading the team. Nichols has also hit a pair of home-runs this season and leads the team in RBIs with 12. Jake Walker has faced the most batters while on the pitchers mound with 89 batters faced. Out of these 89 batters Walker has struck out 19 of them. The batting average of the opposing batters when Walker is pitching is .205. He has two wins and no losses. When it comes to “ elding the ball, as a team the War Eagles have a “ elding percentage of .847. There are six players with at least 10 total chances to make a play on the ball with James Estes having the most at 33. There are a couple of players who are perfect on stolen bases with four attempts and each one being successful. Nichols is one of the players and the other one being Jeff Barnes. The entire team is 18 of 21 on stolen bases.War Eagles on 5-game win streak New Subscribers and renewals in Wakulla County OnlyOffer available until 4/30/2013877-401-6408 The News Wakulla P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32327Phone (877) 401-6408straight to your mailboxEnclosed is my check or money order payable to This is not a trickNO FOOLIN’ Special Offer Name _______________________ Phone# _____________________ Address _____________________ City, State ___________________ Zip________Get 10 Months for $20.13 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONFiduciaryTax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals Angelique and Bryan NOW LOCATED AT 4432 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville(850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Start working out NOW! CALL TODAY! LET US MAKE YOURGena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 FitnessResolutiona Reality

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 11Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsIve just returned from a 24 day visit to wild Africa in Kenya and Tanzania. Though we traveled through a few towns and cities (another whole article) our main objective was to view the immense diversity of African mammals and birds. We observed over 40 different species of mammals and by our visits end I had seen and become somewhat familiar with 340 birds … many spectacular. Normally in four weeks of game drivesŽ (where a driver-guide drives one around looking for various critters in the national parks and game reserves) one would see from 6 to 26 cheetahs … we saw 14 … and if one is lucky, a couple of leopards … we saw 5 or 6. But the big show has always been to “ nd many lions, sometimes at a killŽ or more commonly at rest. Perhaps in the past one would see a total of 100 lions, and take lots of photos. When my long time friend (and now partner) Patti “ rst visited Kenya and Tanzania in 1971 she saw, as an example, roughly 120 lions. Things now have changed, so the recent trip she and I took to Kenya (12 days) and Tanzania (12 days) we only saw a total of 12 lions, which included one adult and one immature male. Patti has been to Africa many times and reads about its problems, and like me and many others is saddened by the decline in many species. And so I will let her continue on this subject. George called me from Florida and said, I have written an article on our safari to Kenya and Tanzania, and I want you to “ nish it, writing about the lion situation.Ž Are you sure?Ž I responded. Anyway, let us look at the king of beasts, lions. Who does not love these magnificent charismatic big cats? I fell in love with lions when I was very young, but not the living mammal. My introduction to lions came through a favorite story I read repeatedly, the Aesops fable, Androcles and the Lion.Ž For years I dreamed of seeing lions in Africa, not just at a zoo setting. And the thrill of seeing my first luxuriously maned lion with his majestic and proud demeanor resting in the famed Serengeti overwhelmed my senses. In 1971 and during the next couple of decades lions were common predators in many Kenyan and Tanzanian parks and reserves. Then a rapid decline ensued. Numbers dropped and sightings became fewer. On the safari George and I took, I had wanted him to witness lions in action, hunting successfully and their interactions as they enjoyed the spoils of the catch. But that did not happen. Prey on the hoof … over a million wildebeest and three quarters of a million common zebras walked the plains, but the absence of predators surprised me greatly. In the midst of the great migration we saw only a single lioness. Watching a hunt and the drama afterwards unfold is truly a magical experience … that is if a little gore does not bother you. Hyenas come to the kill and grab what they can, while diminutive jackals wait on the sidelines to snatch any loose scraps. After mammals feast, the sky and surrounding vegetation “ lls with the scavengers … the various vulture species. The great birds “ ght and squabble among themselves as a melee unfolds. It is a sight that is the epitome of the African wilds. Now, however, numerous problems have dimmed the show. Depending on whose “ gure you listen to, the subSaharan lion population declined from around 200,000 to less than 20,000 in the last 20 years. Kenya lions have gone from 30,000 to 2,000 in the last 10 years. Causes range from habitat loss to human predator con” icts over livestock … lions that attack domestic herds are killed … to diseases and poisonings. Due to the increase in human population the parks today are surrounded with people living next to protected areas borders, and herders illegally bring their livestock of cattle, goats and sheep into these areas. This closeness is the cause of disease transmission. Lions have caught canine distemper from domestic dogs, and Bovine Tuberculosis from cattle. Many lions have an immune suppressed condition similar to human AIDS. And then a horrible poison, Furadan, has been in use to kill nuisance predators, especially lions. Furadan is not selective. All who eat a poisoned dead animal die. Furadan has also decimated the vulture population … natures important clean up crew. In Kenya the vulture population in down 60 per cent from a few years ago. Many eagles “ nding these poisoned kills have fed and died, even the aristocratic Crowned Eagle. What a terrible loss. Africa is still a wonder to visit and I dont want to discourage anyone from witnessing the grandeur that still exists. Over a million wildebeest hooves pounding the earth and females dropping babies show a sign of renewal.Wandering Weymouth BY GEORGE WEYMOUTHAn African safari turns up few lionsYouth turkey season opened Saturday, March 9, and Molly Jones, 9, bagged her “ rst gobler on opening morning of the youth turkey hunt with her dad, Kyle Jones, in Smith Creek.Brag Book: SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMolly Jones and her “ rst turkey.Molly Jones bags a gobblerArtifact ring bustedA two-year undercover operation has recently busted what of“ cials said was an extensive, statewide ring of individuals trading in illegal historical artifacts, largely from Native American sites. Thirteen people from two states were charged with a total of more than 400 felony counts, including 216 alone against Jacky Fuller of Fortson, Ga., accused of violating historical resources, dealing in stolen property and dealing stolen property over the Internet. Fullerton was one of two Georgians arrested. The 11 Floridians snared by state of“ cials lived everywhere from the north Florida community of Havana to Big Pine Key. The message I think were trying to get out of here today is that this isnt just stealing of artifacts,Ž said Robert Bendus, director of the Division of Historical Resources. This is stealing the history of this state. ... And when you loot, youre irrevocably destroying the history of this state.Ž Bendus said stealing artifacts rips them out of the context of archaeological sites and can damage efforts to document what happened there. Of“ cials say more than $2 million of artifacts might have been recovered in Operation Timucua, including arrowheads and pottery. *Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.Sometimes its nothing more than excessive ear wax. We use our state-of-the-art Video Otoscope to look inside your ear canal. You can watch on a video monitor as it happens.ANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGIST TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL1500 Apalachee ParkwayToll Free 1-866-942-4007EVERY THURSDAYCRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDINGCall for an appointment 850-942-4007NOT HAPPY WITH YOUR CURRENT HEARING AIDS? 3 YEAR WARRANTY!FREE Hearing Test FREE Ear Canal Inspection $27WE OFFER HEARING HELP AS LOW ASper monthwith approved credit. $1,000For your old Hearing Aids Dead or Alive$500 Per Hearing Aid. Limit 2. Not available with any other discounts, oers, or prior purchases.Expires March 28, 2013 Introducing ClearVation: The Next Generation Of Miracle Ear Technology Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs Huttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Hwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, & Fri 10-7. Sat. 10-7 Closed Sun. & Wed.Join us for our5 YEAR ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION!Saturday, March 16 from 10AM-7PMMullet Dinners $5.99Soft Shell Crab Burgers$5.99 IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14 2013 www.thewakullanews.coma peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysLocal writers share their experiencesCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Merritts Mill Pond. The Merritts Mill Pond in Marianna, Jackson County, was once off limits to cave diving. Built at the turn of the last century to drive a mill stone, the pond is a ” ooded valley that once had many springs. For years only a special few could dive their inundated caves, especially those of the Mill Pond known as Jackson Blue, Twin Cave and Hole-In-The-Wall. During the mid-1980s, Parker Turner took me to the “ sh camp mid-pond and rented a small aluminum jonboat, which, after hours, we paddled across to the opposite side, to a land cave on the bank. Folks called it Hole-In-the-Wall because there was a hole above an underwater cave. At that time, a small landing nailed between two trees made water entry with our heavy kit less likely to sink the boat. The entrance was a narrow restriction at 20 feet after which a vertical shaft took us to horizontal passages going upstream or downstream. We would tie our safety reel to either one and explore huge clear passages that extended for thousands of feet. Back then we mostly used open circuit air. Nitrox was just introduced and took a lot of time to blend. Fortunately these sites usually did not go deeper than 100 feet so narcosis was manageable. At the end of the dive, we would slowly surface and scan the Mill Pond with our lights. Our activity back then did attract the attention of the toothed kind, evidenced by twin re” ected eyes staring back at our light beams. We would slowly move over to the platform and quickly climb out. Several years later, the Jackson County Commission decided to open the headwaters or JB as it had become known to divers, to cave diving. They had already created a public park at this beautiful site complete with picnic tables, lawns, a beach and a diving board right over the cave entrance. For a fee, cave divers were permitted to dive only during the winter, when the park was closed to the public or after hours during the summer. We had to drive to the far end of Marianna to the sheriffs of“ ce, “ le a waiver, cave diver card and pay a fee, sign in and secure a key to the gate. When we “ nished the dive, we had to drive back to the sheriffs of“ ce and let them know we were safely out. Edd Sorenson was introduced to the area almost two decades ago, fell in love with cave diving and purchased a house with docks mid-pond. Typical to most cave support enthusiasts, he was soon “ lling cave cylinders from his garage and running pontoon boats to caves along the pond. With support available and caves to dive, cave divers came! And they brought their money as well. Edd became the gatekeeper of the pond, cooperating with local authorities to keep diving safe in the area. Then someone let an unauthorized person into the park who became entangled in a tight passage and drowned. The sheriff threatened to shut down cave diving in the county. But the National Speleological Society and the National Association of Cave Divers visited the county commission with data demonstrating that, since the park had opened to cave divers, these folks provided the bulk of their income. To the surprise of everyone, the commission not only kept the caves open, but also extended the diving opportunity year around, built cave diver-dedicated parking and buildings, and made check in/out easier by moving it to Edds place mid-pond. Today, cave diving is recognized as the second largest income generation activity in Marianna and an internationally recognized dive destination. We like it. Every one of our students completes at least one day of training in Marianna. During the summer we spend a lot of time explaining what we do underwater to the multitude of enthusiastic children with whom we share the park. Members of Flotilla 12 met once again at the Naval Reserve Training Center in Tallahassee as our regular meeting location is still under renovations. We had 10 members and one guest present. Several of our other members were attending the Fort Gordon Johnston activities in Apalachicola. During our meeting, several upcoming activities were discussed including the St. Patricks Day parade in Crawfordville this weekend, Springtime Tallahassee and the Antique Boat Show in Apalachicola. As a ” otilla, we enjoy being an active part of events in our area and supporting those who support us. If you have an event and would like to request our participation, please contact Chuck Hickman, our ” otilla staff of“ cer for Public Affairs at FSO-PA@uscgaux.net, or Duane Treadon, our Flotilla Commander at FC@uscgaux.net. Also upcoming from the flotilla are three scheduled vessel inspection ramp days. Our vessel examiners set up at the Fort in St. Marks as well as visiting other local marinas. We will be doing free vessel exams on Memorial Day weekend, July 4th weekend and Labor Day weekend. Exact dates and times will be published, as each day gets closer! Our next scheduled Safe Boating Class will be held on April 20 in Tallahassee. If you are interested in attending or know someone who is, please contact Alex Gulde, our ” otilla staff of“ cer for public education at FSOPE@uscgaux.net. As our business meeting concluded, Phil Hill, our operations staff officer, presented our required operations workshop. As a part of the Coast Guard, we are required to maintain annual trainings to ensure that we have the skills we need to do our job. Several points Phil made during our workshop are good for every boater to know. One of the most important points made was to be knowledgeable of your boat. We perform a preunderway check off every time we go out, even if we are all seasoned crew on a facility. Something might have changed. Additionally, all members need to adapt, not adoptŽ to situations. Meaning, as things change throughout the day (rain, tides, injury) everyone has to adapt to the changes rather than trying to adopt normal responses. While it may seem elementary, it was stressed that when at the helm, the operator of the boat should not be on a cell phone. Many recent laws have demonstrated that use of a cell phone while operating a car limit your response time and can increase risk for accidents. The “ nal part of the workshop stressed how we as auxiliarists are to help boaters in distress. The ultimate rule is that we offer assistance within our abilities and capabilities … we do not want to become part of a larger problem. Everyone should be familiar with the Good Samaritan Law that offers legal protection to individuals who provide reasonable assistance to those who are injured, ill, in immanent danger, or incapacitated. This law is an effort to reduce bystanders hesitation to assist for fear of being sued. Even if a bystander is unable themselves to offer the assistance, they are required to call for help and remain with the individual if at all possible. We have seen this in our area several times. Most often, when we offer to assist, the Good Samaritan is more than willing to remain a part of the process. We live in a great area with great people. As Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident, but if you see someone in distress, it is your duty to offer as much assistance as you are able. Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Please Recycle SPECIAL TO THE NEWSNorma Hill and Duane Treadon. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. SCHEV authorized.MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com The Wakulla News Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Mar 14, 13 Fri Mar 15, 13 Sat Mar 16, 13 Sun Mar 17, 13 Mon Mar 18, 13 Tue Mar 19, 13 Wed Mar 20, 13 D ate 3.1 ft. 3:32 AM 2.9 ft. 4:09 AM 2.7 ft. 4:48 AM 2.4 ft. 5:34 AM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 9:11 AM 0.7 ft. 9:36 AM 1.0 ft. 10:02 AM 1.2 ft. 10:31 AM 0.3 ft. 12:03 AM 0.6 ft. 1:16 AM 0.6 ft. 2:52 AM L ow 3.6 ft. 3:11 PM 3.5 ft. 3:34 PM 3.4 ft. 3:58 PM 3.2 ft. 4:25 PM 2.1 ft. 6:37 AM 2.0 ft. 8:15 AM 2.2 ft. 10:03 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 9:56 PM -0.1 ft. 10:32 PM 0.1 ft. 11:13 PM 1.4 ft. 11:07 AM 1.7 ft. 12:04 PM 1.9 ft. 1:51 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 4:58 PM 2.7 ft. 5:45 PM 2.5 ft. 7:17 PM Hi g h Thu Mar 14, 13 Fri Mar 15, 13 Sat Mar 16, 13 Sun Mar 17, 13 Mon Mar 18, 13 Tue Mar 19, 13 Wed Mar 20, 13 D ate 2.4 ft. 3:24 AM 2.2 ft. 4:01 AM 2.0 ft. 4:40 AM 1.8 ft. 5:26 AM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 9:22 AM 0.5 ft. 9:47 AM 0.7 ft. 10:13 AM 0.9 ft. 10:42 AM 0.3 ft. 12:14 AM 0.4 ft. 1:27 AM 0.4 ft. 3:03 AM L ow 2.7 ft. 3:03 PM 2.6 ft. 3:26 PM 2.5 ft. 3:50 PM 2.4 ft. 4:17 PM 1.6 ft. 6:29 AM 1.5 ft. 8:07 AM 1.6 ft. 9:55 AM Hi g h -0.2 ft. 10:07 PM -0.1 ft. 10:43 PM 0.1 ft. 11:24 PM 1.1 ft. 11:18 AM 1.2 ft. 12:15 PM 1.4 ft. 2:02 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 4:50 PM 2.0 ft. 5:37 PM 1.8 ft. 7:09 PM Hi g h Thu Mar 14, 13 Fri Mar 15, 13 Sat Mar 16, 13 Sun Mar 17, 13 Mon Mar 18, 13 Tue Mar 19, 13 Wed Mar 20, 13 D ate 2.9 ft. 4:08 AM 2.7 ft. 4:45 AM 2.5 ft. 5:24 AM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 10:15 AM 0.7 ft. 10:40 AM 0.9 ft. 11:06 AM 0.1 ft. 12:17 AM 0.3 ft. 1:07 AM 0.5 ft. 2:20 AM 0.6 ft. 3:56 AM L ow 3.3 ft. 3:47 PM 3.2 ft. 4:10 PM 3.1 ft. 4:34 PM 2.2 ft. 6:10 AM 2.0 ft. 7:13 AM 1.9 ft. 8:51 AM 2.0 ft. 10:39 AM Hi g h -0.2 ft. 11:00 PM -0.1 ft. 11:36 PM 1.1 ft. 11:35 AM 1.3 ft. 12:11 PM 1.6 ft. 1:08 PM 1.7 ft. 2:55 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 5:01 PM 2.8 ft. 5:34 PM 2.5 ft. 6:21 PM 2.3 ft. 7:53 PM Hi g h Thu Mar 14, 13 Fri Mar 15, 13 Sat Mar 16, 13 Sun Mar 17, 13 Mon Mar 18, 13 Tue Mar 19, 13 Wed Mar 20, 13 D ate 2.4 ft. 3:16 AM 2.3 ft. 3:53 AM 2.1 ft. 4:32 AM 1.9 ft. 5:18 AM 1.7 ft. 6:21 AM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 8:50 AM 0.7 ft. 9:15 AM 0.9 ft. 9:41 AM 1.2 ft. 10:10 AM 1.4 ft. 10:46 AM 0.5 ft. 12:55 AM 0.6 ft. 2:31 AM L ow 2.8 ft. 2:55 PM 2.7 ft. 3:18 PM 2.6 ft. 3:42 PM 2.5 ft. 4:09 PM 2.3 ft. 4:42 PM 1.6 ft. 7:59 AM 1.7 ft. 9:47 AM Hi g h -0.2 ft. 9:35 PM -0.1 ft. 10:11 PM 0.1 ft. 10:52 PM 0.3 ft. 11:42 PM 1.7 ft. 11:43 AM 1.8 ft. 1:30 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 5:29 PM 1.9 ft. 7:01 PM Hi g h Thu Mar 14, 13 Fri Mar 15, 13 Sat Mar 16, 13 Sun Mar 17, 13 Mon Mar 18, 13 Tue Mar 19, 13 Wed Mar 20, 13 D ate 3.2 ft. 3:29 AM 3.0 ft. 4:06 AM 2.7 ft. 4:45 AM 2.4 ft. 5:31 AM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 9:08 AM 0.8 ft. 9:33 AM 1.0 ft. 9:59 AM 1.3 ft. 10:28 AM 0.4 ft. 12:00 AM 0.6 ft. 1:13 AM 0.7 ft. 2:49 AM L ow 3.6 ft. 3:08 PM 3.5 ft. 3:31 PM 3.4 ft. 3:55 PM 3.3 ft. 4:22 PM 2.2 ft. 6:34 AM 2.1 ft. 8:12 AM 2.2 ft. 10:00 AM Hi g h -0.3 ft. 9:53 PM -0.1 ft. 10:29 PM 0.1 ft. 11:10 PM 1.6 ft. 11:04 AM 1.8 ft. 12:01 PM 2.0 ft. 1:48 PM L ow 3.0 ft. 4:55 PM 2.8 ft. 5:42 PM 2.5 ft. 7:14 PM Hi g h Thu Mar 14, 13 Fri Mar 15, 13 Sat Mar 16, 13 Sun Mar 17, 13 Mon Mar 18, 13 Tue Mar 19, 13 Wed Mar 20, 13 D ate 2.2 ft. 3:47 AM 2.1 ft. 4:37 AM 2.0 ft. 5:31 AM 1.9 ft. 6:34 AM 1.9 ft. 7:47 AM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 8:36 AM 1.0 ft. 8:58 AM 1.1 ft. 9:24 AM 1.2 ft. 9:57 AM 1.3 ft. 10:43 AM 0.1 ft. 1:01 AM 0.2 ft. 2:18 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 2:50 PM 2.5 ft. 3:15 PM 2.5 ft. 3:45 PM 2.5 ft. 4:22 PM 2.4 ft. 5:06 PM 1.9 ft. 9:09 AM 1.9 ft. 10:20 AM Hi g h 0.0 ft. 9:20 PM 0.0 ft. 10:01 PM 0.0 ft. 10:48 PM 0.1 ft. 11:47 PM 1.4 ft. 11:57 AM 1.4 ft. 1:41 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 6:01 PM 2.2 ft. 7:12 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacMarch 14 March 20First March 19 Full March 26 Last April 2 New April 9Major Times 3:34 AM 5:34 AM 3:58 PM 5:58 PM Minor Times 9:16 AM 10:16 AM 10:42 PM 11:42 PM Major Times 4:22 AM 6:22 AM 4:45 PM 6:45 PM Minor Times 9:55 AM 10:55 AM 11:38 PM 12:38 AM Major Times 5:09 AM 7:09 AM 5:33 PM 7:33 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:35 AM 11:35 AM \Major Times 5:57 AM 7:57 AM 6:21 PM 8:21 PM Minor Times 12:31 AM 1:31 AM 11:19 AM 12:19 PM Major Times 6:45 AM 8:45 AM 7:09 PM 9:09 PM Minor Times 1:22 AM 2:22 AM 12:05 PM 1:05 PM Major Times 7:33 AM 9:33 AM 7:57 PM 9:57 PM Minor Times 2:10 AM 3:10 AM 12:54 PM 1:54 PM Major Times 8:21 AM 10:21 AM 8:45 PM 10:45 PM Minor Times 2:56 AM 3:56 AM 1:45 PM 2:45 PM Good Average Average Average Average Average Average++6:47 am 6:45 pm 8:17 am 9:44 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set6:46 am 6:45 pm 8:56 am 10:39 pm 6:45 am 6:46 pm 9:37 am 11:32 pm 6:44 am 6:46 pm 10:20 am --:-6:43 am 6:47 pm 11:06 am 12:23 am 6:41 am 6:48 pm 11:55 am 1:12 am 6:40 am 6:48 pm 12:46 pm 1:57 am17% 23% 29% 35% 41% 47% 53% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 13A2013 Swine Show Awards Presidents Excellence Award (sponsored by Wakulla Soil and Water Conservation Board)Johnny and Branden Piland Spirit Award (sponsored by Talquin Electric) Oliver Green Herdsman Award (sponsored by Broken R Ranch) Lincoln Porter Grand Champion (sponsored by Walmart) Gracie Lawhon Reserve Champion (sponsored by Vause Mechanical Gabriel Gowdy Class winners Jonah Lawhon, Gracie Lawhon, Kristen Chew, Caitlyn Linville, Jaren Lawhon, Cole Gowdy Showmanship Winners Branden Piland, Lincoln Porter, Oliver Green, Gracie Lawhon, Parker Lawhon 5 years consecutive showing Cole Gowdy, Lincoln Porter, Hunter Lawhon, Landon Turner 10 years consecutive showing Johnny and Branden Piland Highest Ticket Sellers Johnny and Branden Piland Projects 7 year olds First place, Mason Jarmon Second place, Chase Linville Third place, Anna Green 10 year olds First place, Sarah Beth Williams Second place, Oliver Green 11 year old First place, Caitlyn Linville 15 years and older First place, Kristen Chew Second place, Branden and Johnny Piland Judging Individuals Junior (6-10) First place, Gracie Lawhon Second place, Chase Roberts Third place, Kanoa and Kane Tucker Intermediate (11-13) First place, Landon Turner Second place, Oliver Green Third place, Lincoln Porter 3rd Senior (14-18) First place, Alex Porter and Kristen Chew Second place, Johnny Piland Third place, Branden PilandSPECIAL OLYMPICS 2013 SWINE SHOW THE WAKULLA NEWS Special Olympics were held on Friday, March 8 at Wakulla High School. The athletes participated in track and “ eld events and enjoyed games at the Olympic Village.Ž The Area Olympic Games will be held in Leon County on April 6. The Florida Special Olympics will be held May 17 to May 19 in Orlando. Photos by WILLIAM SNOWDEN The 47th Annual Youth Fair and Swine Show was held at the Livestock Pavilion in Crawfordville on Saturday, March 9. A special thank you to Ashleys Feed Store and Mike Duncan for all of your support. More photos online at thewakullanews.net Photos by LYNDA KINSEY More photos online at thewakullanews.net

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn March 1, Brandon Eugene Taff, 28, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving while license suspended or revoked third or subsequent conviction and possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana following a traf“ c stop. Lt. Jimmy Sessor was running radar at Shadeville Highway and Trice Lane and observed Taff traveling 55 mph in a 35 mph zone. The motorists driver license was suspended. During the vehicle inventory, a small amount of marijuana was discovered in the vehicle and remains of three marijuana cigarettes were also discovered. The marijuana weighed 1.8 grams. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: FEBRUARY 28 € Bonnie Brinson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A “ rearm and coins were stolen from the victims home. The stolen property is valued at $625. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft after Whitley Nicole Todd, 18, of Crawfordville was allegedly observed removing tags from clothing and leaving the store without paying for the merchandise. The clothing is valued at $40. Todd was charged with larceny and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. MARCH 1 € David Ray Gray, 68, of Crawfordville, a registered sex offender, failed to register his address in February as required by Florida Statute. Gray told Detective Rachel Wheeler that he forgot and he was arrested and charged with failing to register. Criminal Investigations Analyst Angie Gardner also investigated. € Ashley Watford of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief and arson where a 32-yearold male suspect burned the victims clothing. The victim was next door at a friends home when she saw the “ re. The suspect was reportedly observed ” eeing the scene. Damage was estimated at $190. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € William Dickman of ABC Storage in Crawfordville reported a burglary. The security fence was cut and three boats were burglarized. Two motors and a boat cover were taken. The boat cover is valued at $850 and is owned by Travis Brock of Tallahassee. A boat motor owned by Steve Latham of Tallahassee was stolen. It is valued at $12,000 and was entered into the FCIC/ NCIC data base. Gerald Wheeler of Tallahassee reported a boat motor theft. The value of the motor is $10,000. Deputy Clint Beam, CSI Rae Eddens, Deputy Sean Wheeler and Detective Matt Helms investigated. € Stacy Holley of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le her taxes and someone had already used her Social Security number. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € On March 1, Torey Nunn of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim attempted to “ le her taxes and was informed that her Social Security number and other personal information were already being used. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Diane Tallent of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone “ led taxes using the victims personal information. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € A 14-year-old juvenile wrecked his four-wheeler on Otter Lake Road in Panacea. The victim received a laceration to his head and was transported to a Tallahassee hospital for treatment. The subjects injuries were not life threatening. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Randall Garrett Phillips, 20, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana and possession of narcotics equipment after Deputy Mike Zimba investigated a complaint at a Crawfordville apartment complex. Deputy Ian Dohme joined the investigation and discovered the drug paraphernalia in plain view. The marijuana weighed “ ve grams. € Deborah Manning of Tallahassee struck Scott Howell of Crawfordville with her vehicle on Crawfordville Highway. The motorist heard something strike her vehicle mirror and observed the victim in the ditch. Howell was riding a bicycle when he was struck by the mirror but was not seriously injured. EMS staff cleared Howell on the scene. The vehicle mirror was damaged. Deputy Bill Metcalf investigated. MARCH 2 € Brandi L Knight and Lakisha L. Jefferson were involved in a two-vehicle traf“ c crash in the parking lot of Gulf Breeze Credit Union. There were no injuries and damage was deemed minor. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Marion A. Allen of Fort Valley, Ga., reported a boat burglary where tools were stolen in Panacea. The tools are valued at $1,160. Suspects have been identi“ ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson and Sgt. Danny Harrell investigated. € Jerry Raker of Attapulgus, Ga. reported a grand theft in Crawfordville. A well and well pump were removed from one of the victims parcels of land and a well pump, tank, cattle gates, air conditioning units and fence posts, valued at a total of $5,100, were reported missing on a second parcel. A person of interest has been identi“ ed. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Orlando Hero of Crawfordville was arrested for introduction of contraband into the jail facility. Hero was working with the litter control unit and when he returned to jail to be searched, he was in possession of two cigars in his shoe. Deputy Steven Par“ tt and Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € John Taylor of Panacea reported a grand theft. Someone removed a pitching machine and tri-pod stand from the victims property. The property is valued at $2,100. The stand was recovered nearby by Lt. Brent Sanders. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. MARCH 3 € Lisa Varnum of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone broke a vehicle window and rummaged through her vehicle. Damage was estimated at $100. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft after Robert Lloyd Crawford, 26, of Crawfordville, was allegedly observed taking Magic Cards, valued at $43, and leaving the store without paying for them. Crawford was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. MARCH 4 € Carol Roach of the Wakulla Parks and Recreation Department reported “ nding a bicycle in a wooded area in Sopchoppy. The bike is valued at $50 and was placed in the WCSO impound yard until the owner can be located. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Tim Williams of Panacea reported the theft of household goods and appliances, valued at $2,990. The property was stolen from a rental property and suspects have been identi“ ed. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. € Deputy Cole Wells investigated an animal bite reported by Nancy Campbell of Crawfordville. EMS staff treated the victim at the Crawfordville scene. A dog attacked the victims dog on her property. During the altercation, the victim suffered multiple puncture wounds. Animal Control Director Ivanhoe Carroll was called to investigate. The owner of the attacking dog has been identi“ ed. MARCH 5 € Traci Lingel Chipman, 48, of Tallahassee was arrested for driving while license is suspended or revoked and possession of Schedule II narcotics after she was discovered unresponsive in a vehicle in the road inside the Songbird subdivision. Deputy Will Hudson allegedly discovered a variety of pills in a container after conducting a search. Chipman was unable to provide a prescription for some of the narcotics and was driving without a valid license with knowledge. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks also investigated. € Deputy Ryan Muse discovered a possible stolen credit card while a search warrant was executed in St. Marks. Deputy Muse is attempting to determine if the card was stolen due to the suspect who possessed the card being wanted for stolen credit cards out of New Jersey. The card was turned into the Evidence Division and contact was made with the credit card company. € Michael Carter of Panacea reported a fraud. The victim discovered that someone opened a cell phone account in his name which had an outstanding balance of $900. The account was opened several months prior to the victim discovering it. Deputy Alan Middlebrooks investigated. € Elizabeth Gray of Panacea reported the theft of a postal package. A phone case, valued at $60, was removed from the victims mailbox. A suspect has been identified. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Kendrick Adams of Crawfordville reported a vehicle theft. A van was stolen from the victims residence. Evidence at the scene determined that the van was removed with towing apparatus. The van was entered into the FCIC/ NCIC data base. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Dennis E. Whiddon and John R. Moore, both of Crawfordville, were involved in a minor traf“ c crash at the intersection of U.S. Highway 319 and Casora Drive. There were no injuries. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Sheryl M. Smythe of Carrabelle and Diane B. Marquis of Crawfordville were involved in a traf“ c crash on Wakulla Arran Road. Smythe allegedly failed to yield exiting a parking lot driveway and struck the Marquis vehicle. There were no injuries. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Jose J. Morales of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Someone used the victims personal information to open an account and purchase $700 worth of merchandise in South Florida. Suspect information has been obtained. Deputy Richard Moon investigated. € Justin Putnam of Crawfordville reported a traf“ c crash on Wakulla Springs Road. The victim struck a deer. There were no injuries to the driver or passengers, but the vehicle had to be towed from the scene. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. MARCH 6 € Garland Landers of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Someone broke the windshield on his relatives vehicle. A person of interest has been identi“ ed and damage is estimated at $200. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Terry Pafford of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $2,200 worth of jewelry and coins. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Jessica Taylor of Panacea reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was discovered and $335 worth of household goods and electronics were taken. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Deborah OConnor of Crawfordville reported a fraud. A $47 transaction was observed on the victims bank account from Kansas. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Alicia Williams of the Crawfordville Shell Station reported a retail theft. Someone pumped $133 worth of diesel fuel and drove off without paying for it. Video evidence is being reviewed in an attempt to identify a suspect. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,038 calls for service during the past week including 26 business and residential alarms; 79 citizen contacts; 20 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 10 E-911 abandoned calls; 19 regular E-911 calls; 49 investigations; 42 medical emergencies; 15 school security checks; 335 business and residential security checks; 22 special details; 33 subpoena services; 26 traf“ c enforcements; 100 traf“ c stops; 10 disabled vehicles; 14 reckless vehicles; and 20 wanted people. Tuesday, March 12th or 19th, 5:30 Registration 6:00-7:30 Presentation John H Curry is not affiliated with the Florida Retirement System or the Division of Retirement. John H Curry, CL U , ChFC, AEP, MSFS, CLTC Registered Representative and Financial Advisor of Park Avenue Secur ities LLC ( PAS), 3664 Coo lidge Court, Tallahassee, FL 32311. Securities products/services and advisory services are offered through PAS, a Registered Broker-Dealer and Investment Advisor. 1 (850) 562 -9075. Brian is a Registered Representative and Financial Advisor of Park Avenue Securities LLC (PAS). Securities products/services and advisory services offered through PAS, a registered broker-dealer and investment advisor. Bi ll is a Registered Representative of PAS.. All are Financial Representatives, The Guardian Life Insurance Company of America (Guardian), New indirect, York, NY. PAS is an wholly owned subsidiary of Guardian. North Florida Financial Corporation. Is not an affiliate or subsidiary of PAS or Guardian. PAS is a member FINRA, SIPC. To maximize your success, dont think about hiring a fi nancial planner / investment advisor or investing your DROP rollover, Deferred Compensation, IRA, 401( k) or 403(b) until you attend this presentation. Why? You need proven reliable advice to maximize your fina ncial resources. The real secret to financial success in tough economic times is to identify what you have, analyze what is working or not working, and implement the changes needed to move you forward toward your fina ncial goals. You must make your resources work for you every step of the way. This is more important now than ever. You may be near retirement or retired. Either way, you ll be shown step-by-step what actions you can take to help prepare for a secure retirement. Guest Presenter: John H. Curry, CLU ChFC, AEP, MSFS, CLTC Learn How to Plan and Prep are for a Secure Retirement. 7 Mistakes Most People Make when Preparing for Their Retirement 1. Underestimating Life Expectancy 2. Paying Too Much in Taxes 3. Not Planning on the Impact of Inflation (The Silent Thief) 4. Relying on Government and Employer Retirement Plans 5. Not Preparing for Health Care Expenses and Long Term Care 6. Not Saving Enough Money on a Personal Basis 7. Focusing on Financial Products Instead of Strategic Planning. Johns mission is to help you prepare for a secure retirem ent. His Father and Grandfather both retired under the State of Florida Pension Plan. John saw first hand the cons equences of them not receivi ng the proper information and advice leading up to retirement. John has helped thousands of people prepare for a s ecure retirement through his seminars, speeches, DVDs, CDs, books, Special Reports, and pe rsonal client consultations. John H Curry Author of Preparing for a Secure Retiremen t Location: Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn and Suites 3292 Coastal Hwy Crawfordville, FL 32327 RSVP TO ENSURE YOUR RESERVATION Seating Is Limited … Refreshments Will Be Served RSVP to: nancy_thomas@glic.com or Call (850) 926-7487 Bill and Brian would like to invite you to a powerful and informative meeting. You will be provided information and strategies that can be used to achieve financial confidence in these troubled times. William F. Versiga Brian C. English ChFC, CLTC Gauges Messed Up?Call the Gauge Doctor in Tallahassee OTHER AUTOMOTIVE ELECTRONICS SERVICES ALSO AVAILABLE www.GaugeDoctor.com850510-7391 HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 15A Like us on newsThe Wakulla The fourth Xtreme Amateur Championship (XAC) was hosted by World Triumph Martial Arts and the event was held at the Florida National Guard Armory in Tallahassee. This event hosted athletes from all over Florida in boxing, kickboxing, and Mixed Martial Arts. The XAC is becoming one of the fastest and largest amateur leagues in the nation. During competition there were over 30 athletes competing ages from 8 to 47 years old in all three divisions. Among these athletes, there were several competitors from Wakulla County … Jonathan Daily won the 185lb MMA title and is currently 4-0. One of our favorites, Martin Valencia Moreno won in his second boxing match and is now 2-0 in his amateur career. Louis Vargas and Billy Barwick both competed for their first boxing match. Both received a split decision loss, they both displayed skill, technique and heart in the ring and will continue to challenge and train for their next competition. All the Wakulla competitors are trained by the head trainer-coach Shane Weinischke, owner of World Triumph Martial Arts in Tallahassee. These athletes showed true class in the ring whether win or defeat and will working with these and help them gain experience in order to succeed amateur and pro-competitions,Ž said Weinischke. If anyone is interested in learning one of these combat sports, please contact WTMA Tallahassee at www. WTMA.info or (850) 508-1132. ZUMBA FOR CHAT On Mondays and Thursdays, Bodyteks 6PM Zumba class proceeds are being donated to C.H.A.T. of Wakulla. This is a great opportunity to get “ t and help a local organization that help save lives! For more information you can visit www. chatofwakulla.org or contact Bodytek at 850926-2348.Pamela Chichester is a CFT at Body-Tek 24-Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348.HEALTH & FITNESS In modern day life, most of us strive to achieve everything in balance. We aim to create enough time and energy for our work, friends, family, hobbies, social life, rest and play. Wouldnt it be wonderful if we could provide an equal amount of our dedication to each of these aspects of life? Things arent always that easy, but there are steps we can take to help balance out the distribution of our devotion. When we are imbalanced, we suffer both mentally and physically. Yoga aims to bring body, mind and spirit into balance and rectify any imbalances we may be experiencing. Yoga literally translated means unionŽ (of body, mind, spirit, breath) and it helps to bring harmony and balance to all our elements. So, lets talk about the breath. Regarding balance, the breath can help keep us in balance but it is also important for the breath to be in balance. Our emotions affect the strength of our inhale and exhale. Fear can stop the breathing, anxiety may quicken the breath, as with many aspects of our physical practice and our pranic practice (breathing), they can in” uence and affect our everyday lives through the form of our emotions. So having breath balance is having life balance. During asana or posture work, we can sometimes notice ourselves being out of balance physically. If you find yourself unable to stop the incessant wobbling during tree pose, or maybe youre a little unsteady on your feet in Warrior 1, dont worry, it happens to the best of us. Interestingly, when we are off-kilter emotionally, we often “ nd physical balances difficult. This is because physical strength, stability and balance rely on our focus, concentration and lack of distractions. If you fall out of tree pose, take a moment to consider … were you really there, present in the moment, focusing on the pose, or is there something on your mind, are you feeling stressed or anxious about something that could be affecting your balance both physically and emotionally? If we are feeling a lack of stability in strength or balance poses, we can use something called the bandhas. Bandha literally translates as energy lockŽ and there are two primary ones which can help you. The first bandha is named Mula Bandha and is located at the perineum or pelvic ” oor (dont know where that is? Imagine you really have to go to the bathroom. Now imagine theres no bathroom for miles around. Hold it in by clenching that muscle.) This will engage the mula bandha, and help keep strength in the lower body. The other bandha is named the uddiyana bandha and it is located at the navel, engaging this just means drawing your navel up and back towards the spine so that your abdomen strengthens. This will help to keep stability in your upper body. Using these bandhas can help you create a practice which is strong, stable and balanced, therefore emotionally you will start to see a stronger, more stable and more balanced persona! Try it! We often hear the words balanced dietŽ referring to something we should do, or something we should aspire to. What it should really be called is a balancing diet.Ž The food and drink we consume, both for survival and for pleasure all hold various uses and are utilised in different ways. The idea is not to make the diet balanced, but to create a diet that balances you. We can use the same theory for our yoga practice. It should not be about balancing our practice, but about finding a practice that balances us. Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher at Studio 88 in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Life is a balancing actWakulla competitors win at Xtreme Amateur Championship GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLouis Vargas and Martin Valencia Moreno. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comRecent rains have water standing on some Wakulla County real estate that had been dry for several years. Ponds, natural and dug, are brimming with water reflecting the generous outpouring from the slow and wet weather system which passed listlessly over the county. The rainwater excess is also “ lling the natural low points known as swamps or wetlands. A swamp is de“ ned as a forested wetland. Some occur along the flood plain of rivers, where they are dependent upon surplus ” ow from upstream and from local runoff. Other swamps appear adjacent to ponds in shallow depressions which “ ll during wet periods. Their landscape is covered by aquatic vegetation or trees and plants which tolerates periodical inundation. Historically, swamps have an image problem. Legend has all sorts of unsavory creatures, degenerates, and ghosts inhabiting the locale waiting for the unsuspecting traveler. Even the proper British used the term as a pejorative to describe Francis Marion during the American Revolution. The Swamp Fox engaged in guerilla warfare against the conventional forces and hid in the swamps to avoid capture. Economically, these watery regions have had very low values. Their only signi“ cance was as site for trapping, hunting or for logging in dry years. Medically, swamps were seen as a quick and painful way to the grave. There were all those creatures which could in” ict pain … leeches, snakes, gators and the like. Then there was disease. As an example, the term malaria originated from the swamps of southern Europe where it meant bad air in medieval Italian. The mosquito connection was unknown until the early 20th Century. Hollywood piled on the problem with a series of swamp monster movies. One, The Creature from the Black LagoonŽ was partially “ lmed at Wakulla Springs. Reality, as is often the case, is quite different than the initial perception. Even the term swamp has fallen out of favor in some circles, being replaced with wetlands. Swamps or wetlands serve a variety of functions in Wakulla County. Possibly the most critical is as a “ ltration system for the water table. Excess rain is held in these shallow depressions and allowed to percolate or “ lter slowly through the soil. The screening effect of the soil and subsoil layers along with the slow progression cleanses the water of numerous impurities from the surface. Without the holding capacity of local swamps most rain water would end up in streams and rivers. In addition to being a loss for the water table, the excess water would cloud waterways with a glut of surface debris and nutrients. It is true mosquitoes favor the still swamp waters, but so do many birds, “ sh and animals. Swamp rookeries are the nesting home for many wading birds. Mosquito larvae are an important link in the food chain which supports much of the life in the swamp, and beyond. Even some of the swamps most ostracized residents, snakes, have an important part to play in the overall environmental balance. These reptiles control the population of many destructive insects and rodents. To learn more about the importance of Wakulla Countys swamps and wetland, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Swamps serve a purpose to lter water Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA Wakulla County swamp, “ lled after recent rains. A brown water snake. Dark swamp water. 926-9802 www.shepardaccounting.com SHEPARD ACCOUNTING & TAX SERVICEA Certified Public Accounting FirmMitzi, Lorra, Jessica Celebrating DONT DELAY, COME BY AND SEE US OR CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT We always look at last years tax return at no charge. INDIVIDUAL TAX BUSINESS TAX COMPETITIVE PRICESMention this Ad for a discount OTHER SERVICES CONGRATULATIONS JESSICA S. REVELL FOR PASSING THE CPA EXAM!!!

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Green Scene Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013For the last of our cooking school series, an Herb Workshop will be offered on April 11 at 6 p.m. at the Extension Of“ ce. Trevor Hylton, WakullaLeon FAMU Horticulture Agent will lead the workshop section that will involve information on how to successfully grow herbs in containers or areas outside. I will offer a sample buffet featuring dishes which depend on added herbs for their outstanding ” avor. The workshop will be hands-on so there is limited enrollment. You will leave the workshop with a variety of potted herbs. Call the Wakulla County Extension of“ ce today to ensure that you have a place reserved. There is a $15 registration fee to attend. Speaking of Herbs, the use of herbs in cooking dates back thousands of years. During that time, it was thought that herbs and spices had properties that were beneficial to human health, but it was not until recent years that scientists established just how good herbs are for you. Early settlers brought herbs to the new world to use as remedies for illnesses, to store with linens, and to mask the bland ” avors or spoiling of food. Colonists introduced each other to the herb gardening style known as kitchen gardens,Ž which involved growing herbs in gardens just outside the kitchen door for convenience and safety. Herbs are the leaves of temperate climate plants. Temperate climates have summers and winters of similar length. Examples of herbs include basil, thyme, sage, rosemary, and oregano. Today, herbs often are used in cooking to enhance the ” avor of food without the addition of extra fat, sugar and sodium. This should be especially important to those who are trying to curb their need for salt as a ” avoring agent. Salt has been proven to be linked to high blood pressure, stroke, and heart attack for many. Flavor is an important component of the enjoyment of any food. A famous gourmet once said, Flavor is the soul of food: and herb, seasonings and spices are the soul of ” avor.Ž Remember you can substitute different forms of herbs in recipes. When substituting fresh herbs, 3 teaspoons (1 tablespoon) is equal to 1 teaspoon dried crushed herbs. One teaspoon of a dried, crushed herb is equal to teaspoon powdered herbs. The ” avor of powdered spices and herbs is released immediately, so they can be added about 15 minutes before the end of the cooking period. Timing is especially important in long-cooking foods so that ” avor will not be changed by prolonged heating. Whole spices are best in long-cooking dishes. Add at the beginning of the cooking period so that long simmering can extract the full taste and aroma. Tie the whole spices in a cheesecloth bag for easy removal. Perhaps you would like to follow up by securing the UF/IFAS EDIS Publication entitled, Cooking with Fresh HerbsŽ, FCS8932. It is “ lled with great information that I believe you will “ nd helpful. I do hope that you will consider attending the Herb Workshop. Call today to enrollShelley Swenson is a Wakulla County FCS Extension Agent. She can be reached at sswenson@ u” .edu.Do yourself a ” avor at herb workshop By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING By LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSON March 2013 is extending the winter growing season for Wakulla Countys gardeners. Frosty mornings and night temperatures in the low 30s keep the cool season vegetables going strong. Carrots are a tasty casein-point of a popular cool season root vegetable which grows well in Floridas Big Bend region. This native of Asia Minor handles the mild days and occasionally frosty nights with few problems. Carrots are in the same plant family with wellknown herbs parsley, fennel, dill, and cumin. Originally, the leaves were eaten and the root discarded. This dietary staple has been cultivated and selectively bred for over 2,000 years. The wild carrot, Daicis carota, was likely “ rst used in Iran or Afghanistan where they are still commonly found. Over the centuries carrot seeds have been traded widely and travelled to almost all points on the globe. There are now eastern carrots and western carrots, each with its own distinctive characteristics. Eastern carrots tend to be purple or yellow and have multiple roots. Western carrots are commonly orange with a single root. There are also red, white and multicolored carrots. The orange color of many western carrots was selected as a political statement to gain favor with the Dutch House of Orange in the 17th Century. As it turned out, they were popular for their taste and numerous orange carrot varieties are still grown and marketed today. Even today carrots are an economical, nutritious choice “ lled with vitamin A, and low in calories. Some preparation ideas: € Carrot Casserole. Combine shredded carrots, low-fat shredded cheese and a small amount of margarine. Top with crumbled whole wheat crackers. Bake at 350F for 30-45 minutes. €Power Smoothie. Blend carrots, pineapple juice, low-fat yogurt and honey into a bright orange concoction. Just add the quantities and proportions to the desired taste or have on hand. €Homemade Asian Take-out. Combine sliced carrots, brown rice, one egg, and other favorite vegetables with a small amount of low-sodium soy sauce in a wok. Stirfry and then enjoy a simple Asian-” avored main dish. € Add a Sweet Glaze. Combine 100 percent orange juice, a small amount of brown sugar and butter in a frying pan. Saut until combined. Roll cooked carrots in mixture, let cool and enjoy. € Sweet and Spicy. Combine sweet carrots with stimulating spices to get an irresistible, tasty surprise. Propagating this plant is relatively simple, inexpensive and will reward the grower with an ample supply of tasty and nutritious roots. Insect problems are few this time of year, but moles and voles can damage the roots. The most common mistake gardeners make is sowing the seed too thick. If this happens, thinning the plants is necessary. The four varieties (purple, white, yellow and orange) being grown in the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Demonstration Garden are offered by Bejo Seed Company. They were planted in early December 2013. To learn more about growing carrots in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” edu.Les Harrison, is Wakulla County Extension Director and Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent.In the garden now – carrots Some of the varieities of carrots being grown at the demonstration garden at the extension of“ ce.PHOTO BY LES HARRISION SPECIAL TO THE NEWS We Serve St. Patricks DayParade & FestivalSaturday, March 16, 2013Sponsored by the Crawfordville Lions Club Parade begins at 10.a.m.Free entertainment beginning at 11:00 a.m. will feature many local cloggers, musicians and entertainers, including but not limited to: 11:00a.m. ..........Entertainment 11:45a.m. ..........Senior Line Dancers 12:30p.m. ..........Recording artists Rick Tittle, and John Smith with special guests The Smith Creek Band 2:15–3:00p.m. ....Recording artist Trafton HarveyA wide variety of activities for the young and young at heart will be on hand. Artisans will be demonstrating their crafts and marketing their wares. Food vendors will be serving seafood, hamburgers, hotdogs, barbecue, funnel cakes, and more. Raf”e Tickets may be purchased all day, just look for the LIONS in their YELLOW VESTS. Drawings will be held all day, $250. GRAND PRIZE drawing at 3 p.m. Need not be present to win. Law Oce Est. 1998 Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator WEEK • The Sopchoppy Worm Gruntin’ Festival on Saturday, April 13 • Wakulla Springs Wild Life Festival Saturday, April 20Special Events are still being Scheduled in each Community • Panacea / Ochlockonee Bay Friday April 12 • St. Marks Sunday April 14 • Sopchoppy Monday April 15 • Crawfordville Friday April 19Adventures Await ... Excitement Builds ... Explorations are Planned!!!Wakulla is the Natural Place to see Wildlife, catch the big one, swim or paddle one of the Remarkable Waters.Discover why Wakulla goes WILD April 12 the 20th. Want to Catch Worms? • Help Tag Birds? Learn About Pirates? Want toTake a Fantastic Eco-Heritage tour of our Woods and Wonderous Waters or Historic Landmarks?Help us Sustain a Vibrant Environment.A Special Section will be produced in The Wakulla News to Publish and Advertise EventsIf your business or Organization would like to HOST an EVENT, Join Others in a Blockparty, offer music, or just offer specials for the Day or Week, Please Contact Cynthia Paulson-850-556-4249, Jeff Hugo 850-561-7286, Lynda Kinsey 850-570-9944 or e-mail Info@WildAboutWakulla.com

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular Meetings Thursday, March 14  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE TAX PREPARATION will be available from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library. AARP Tax Aide provides free tax preparation for low-and moderateincome individuals, with special attention to those 60 and older.  BIG BEND SIERRA CLUB will hold its next meeting from 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. at the Amtrak Station in Tallahassee. Dave Cullen, the Florida sierra Club Chapter lobbyist, will discuss top environmental issues for 2013 legislative session. Friday, March 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, March 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, March 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, March 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. Tuesday, March 19  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277.  NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. Wednesday, March 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, March 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  FREE TAX PREPARATION will be available from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library. AARP Tax Aide provides free tax preparation for low-and moderateincome individuals, with special attention to those 60 and older. Special Events Saturday, March 16  ANNUAL ST. PATRICK’S DAY FESTIVAL AND PARADE will be held at Hudson Park. Parade will line up at 9:30 a.m. and start promptly at 10 a.m. Sunday, March 17  ST. MARKS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE welcomes Dr. Paul Spitzer, a visiting ornithologist who will be collecting data during the next three weeks at the lighthouse. He will conduct a talk, titled “The Uncommon Loon,” at the education center this Sunday, March 17 at 2 p.m. The presentation is free, but there is a $5 per car fee at the entrance to the park. Tuesday, March 19  THE SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY meets Tuesday, March 19 at 6:30 p.m. at Wakulla Public Library. Sarracenia’s guest, Miranda Bjorklund, will have a presentation on the Florida Water and Land Legacy Amendment (2014) and opportunities for citizen involvement in the campaign. The public is cordially invited. Saturday, March 23  SOPCHOPPY TOUGH LITTLE MUDDER will beheld at 10 a.m. at Sopchoppy City Park. This is a series of obstacles stretched over a 1-mile trail that challenges individuals and promotes teamwork. All proceeds go to the Warriors and Quiet Waters foundation (Southern Chapter) and FSU Autism Institute. It open to ages 5-18 under 10 must be accompanied by teammate who is 16 years or older. The minimum Team Pledge is $100, individual is $40. For information contact Joey at (850) 566-2634 or bone shjoe@hotmail.com.  SEVENTH ANNUAL LIFEWALK by the Wakulla Pregancy Center will be held at Wakulla Station Historic Railroad Trailhead Park. Registration begins at: 9 a.m. and the walk starts at 9:30 a.m. There will be a bake sale, a silent auction and fellowship. Pastor Bill Jenkins from Sopchoppy Southern Baptist will lead an inspirational prayer. For more information, call (850) 210-1276.  EASTER EGG HUNT, Saturday, March 23, 2013 at Hudson Park. Registration at the Hudson Park Pavilion from 9:30 to 10:30 am. The Egg Hunt starts at 11:00am. Age groups: 0-3 years old, 4-6 years old and 7-10 years old. A drawing from each age group will win an Easter Basket. Sponsored by Wakulla County Parks & Recreation and Co-sponsored by Walmart of Crawfordville. For more information call 850-926-7227 or email www.wcprd.com. Tuesday, March 26  International Green Drinks – Hosted by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful, Free, 6:30 p.m.at Wakulla Springs Lodge. KWCB Board member, Cynthia Paulson will update us on the new activities that are planned for the Wild About Wakulla Week. For more information please contact helpkwcb@gmail.com or call 745-7111.  WAKULLA COUNTY RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE These public meetings are intended to provide citizens with information on the RESTORE Act, the activities of the Wakulla County RESTORE Act Committee, and a question and answer session. The meetings will be held March 26, 6 p.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea; Wednesday, March 27  WAKULLA CHAMBER will hold its monthly Networking Luncheon from noon – 1:15 p.m. at Barwick’s Seafood, 1349 B Coastal Highway, Panacea. Cost is $12 per person (checks and cash only.) Agenda includes introduction of new chamber members, network with other business owners, and member spotlight. Please bring promotional materials, coupons and/or a gift for drawing – a Chance to Win 1/8 page Ad from The Wakulla News. Please RSVP to Chamber of ce no later than Monday, March 25th. Thursday, March 28  RIVERS AND ROADS 4-H CLUB will hold its rst meeting from 3 to 5 p.m. at Riversprings Middle School in Mrs. Broome’s room. All interested youth ages 10—18 are invited to attend. Those who like to kayak, canoe, bike, hike and be outdoors will enjoy this club. For further information, contact Sherri Kraeft, 4-H agent, at sjkraeft@u .edu or 926-3931. Friday, March 29  WAKULLASTORY Heritage Play will be presented at 7 p.m. at the Wakulla County Courthouse. It is presented by the Wakulla County Historical Society and Palaver Tree Theater. The play will be a courtroom drama on the Forbes Purchase. A performance will also be held on Saturday at 2 pm. Saturday, March 30  WAKULLASTORY Heritage Play will be presented at 2 p.m. at the Wakulla County Courthouse. It is presented by the Wakulla County Historical Society and Palaver Tree Theater. The play will be a courtroom drama on the Forbes Purchase. Monday, April 1 SIXTH ANNUAL WAKULLA NJROTC Unit Golf Tournament starts at 8 a.m. at Wildwood Country Club, and will be a Select-a-Shot format. A delicious lunch is included and cash prizes will be awarded. $1,000 donation will get 2-teams, be identi ed as Tournament Sponsors; $800 will be tax-deductible; $300 donation is the entry fee for a four man team, $200 of that will be tax-deductible; $100 donation to sponsor a hole, of which $100 will be tax-deductible; $75 donation for the individual golfer who just wants to play golf; $50 will be tax-deductible. To register please make your check payable to: “Wakulla NJROTC.” Send to: 3237 Coastal Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. For more information call (850) 926-1944 Saturday, April 6  THIRD ANNUAL LOW COUNTRY BOIL will be held at 3Y Ranch. Enjoy great food and live music by Locomotive. To sponsor, purchase tickets, or reserve a table, call the Chamber of ce (850) 926.1848. Individual tickets are on sale for $35, table $350, seats eight. Government Meetings Thursday, March 14  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, March 18  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold a workshop to discuss the sale and distribution of avored tobacco products at 3:30 p.m.  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. at Commission chambers. Quilters Guild meets at Public Library at 9:30 a.m. St. Patrick’s Day Parade and Festival at 10 a.m. Migrating loons at St. Marks NWR Education Center at 2 p.m. Native Plant Society meets at Public Library at 6:30 p.m. FridaySaturdaySundayTuesday W e e k Week i n in W a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorWed like to remind everyone that were constantly adding to our e-book collection along with building what we hope is the most diverse, educational, and entertaining physical collection in the area. Were adding new materials to both collections weekly for readers of all ages and interests so please stop by or go online and check out all we have (pun intended). If you need help getting started with e-books at WCPL please come by or give us a call. Were always willing to help! As always, we take patron suggestions under advisement when building our collection so tell us what youd like to see at your library! Friday Night Movie Were happy to present this Friday, an Academy Award nominated animated “ lm from Walt Disney Animation Studios. Starring the vocal talents of John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and many more, this PG (for some rude humor & mild action/violence) tells the tale of a villain in a videogame who decides he wants to be a hero. His plans wreak havoc on the arcade his game is in. Although our Public Viewing License doesnt allow me to name the “ lm here, I can tell you that while featuring characters from many classic games, this family friendly tale will bring back fun memories from children of the 80s (like myself) along with laughs and fun for the young at heart. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. for the 7 p.m. showing. Come see us at the Parade! For the second year in a row, WCPL will have a ” oat in the St. Patricks Day parade this Saturday. Like last year the float will be designed by the children who come to our enrichment programs throughout the week and those kids will be riding on the ” oat. In addition, the Friends of the Library will have a tent on hand at the park with plenty of information on the library, events, and some books to giveaway. Come out for all the fun! Computer classes through Mid April We have a new schedule of computer classes up on our website with offerings through mid April. Learn about Pinterest on March 20 at 5 p.m. Other classes will be offered through mid April with additional classes being added soon. Check out our website www. wakullalibrary.org, stop by, or give us a call to sign up. Seating is limited and all classes require early registration. Drop off caps for C.H.A.T. Bring by your bottle caps from Pepsi products to the library to raise money for C.H.A.T. of Wakulla. The Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment have been serving Wakulla County since 2001 by assisting in the health and adoption of domesticated animals. Each cap raises a nickel for C.H.A.T. We have a can at the front desk so please donate today! For more information about C.H.A.T. or this program please call 926-0890.Library News...

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 3B Agreed Amount Angry Balcony Beggar Boxer Cared Chair Chords Claws Cling Clubs Congratulating Curls Eight EitherEnvironmentError Flown Forms Guitar Halls Hostile Italy Likes Loser Masks Mathematical Mound Naval Nearest Nickel Nuclear Pearl YOUR AD HERE Plurals Raises Refrigerator Rides Rings Ripen Rusty Stanza Super Teething Thirds Truck The Wak u lla Ne ws F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars € Real Estate € Rentals € Employment € Services € Yard Sales € Announcements 877-676-1403 Todays New Ads CrawfordvilleSat, March 23rd 7:30am to 2pm stationary bike, girls bike hswrs, clothes, books etc 45-ADisPennette Dr. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL3 bedroom. 2-1/2 bath. Townhouse located behind Myra Jeans in Crawfordville. 1800 square feet, one car garage, screened in back porch, and small fenced in yard. Available April 15. email: lisa_sweatt3@yahoo.com or cell: (850)766-5386 Lost Chocolate LabFemale, name Maddie She was last seen in the Ocklochnee bay area and should have a green, yellow, or red collar on. 4 years old (850) 984-4714 SMALLDOG 10lb Male, long haired, white, Maltese mix,lost in vicinity of Carabelle 850-294-9664 RECEPTIONIST NEEDEDFor very busy medical office Insurance verification and billing experience a must. Able to multi task Reference required Please send resume to: rachelbrown@wakulla urgentcare.com NO PHONE CALLS Benefits Offered Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com AIRLINE CAREERSTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES AREHIRINGTrain for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Now accepting applications forEXPERIENCEDFRONT DESK/ NIGHT PERSON & EXPERIENCED HOUSEKEEPER Apply in person. Best Western Plus Wakulla Inn & Suites. 3292 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville (across W.H.S.). DriverQualify for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in 1st year. 3 months OTR experience (800)414-9569 www .driveknight.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW!Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDL Training. Job ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSIN ARUT? WANT A CAREER, NOT JUST AJOB? Train to be a professional truck driver in ONLY16 DAYS! The avg. truck driver earns $700+/wk*! Get CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved for Veterans Training. Dont Delay, Call Today! 866-467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 Heavy Equipment Operator Career!3 Week Hands On Training School. Bulldozers, Backhoes, Excavators.National Certifications. Lifetime Job Placement Assistance. VABenefits Eligible! 1-866-362-649 7 Beulah Baptist Churchis a local, independent, New Testament church, searching for a godly man as pastor of our church. He should be called of God to preach and meet the scriptural qualifications set forth in I Timothy 3:1-7 and Titus 1:5-11. Total compensation will be $1,500 to $2,000 per month. Applications are available at: beulahbaptist cwc.com or upon request by calling 850-926-7711 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-443-5186 www .Centura Online.com MEDICALBILLING TRAINEES NEEDEDTrain to become a Medical Office Assistant. NO EXPERIENCE NEEDED! Online training gets you Job ready ASAP. HSDiploma/GED & PC/Internet needed! (888)374-7294 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET In Original Plastic, Never Used, Org $3000, sacrifice $975. CHERRYBEDROOM SETSolid Wood, new in factory boxes Org. $6000, sacrifice $1995. Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET In Original Plastic, Never Used, Org $3000, sacrifice $975. CHERRYBEDROOM SETSolid Wood, new in factory boxes Org. $6000, sacrifice $1995. Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. CRAWFORDVILLESaturday March 16th, 8:30 am-Until 132 Fish Hawk Trace Electronics, Misc. Houseware, golf clubs, glassware, books, CDs, Misc. Clothes, Tools, ETC. Too Many Items to List SHELLPOINTLarge loft-style furnished apartment close to the beach. Full size kitchen. Washer/dryer in unit. Pets ok. $650. mo. Call 850-273-2633 SOPCHOPPY RIVERCharming, furnished 2story Loft on private pond. Great for individual, includes all utilities, W/D, TV, w/satellite. 1.5 BA. Wildlife habitat, secluded. $750/mo. 850-962-2849. Crawfordville Wakulla Trace ApartmentsNow Accepting Applications ForBEAUTIFUL 1 BEDROOM APARTMENTSfor persons 62 years of age or older Handicapped/ disabled regardless of age. Must meet income requirements. Rental assistance based on availability. Located at 3 Celebrity Lane Beside Senior Center (850) 926-0207 TDD 800-955-7771 Equal Housing Opportunity Commercial Building for Rent61 Rose Street Historical Downtown\ Sopchoppy Florida(850)962-4226 PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Renovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, screened front porch & open back deck, Small pets considered Excellent fishing! $600/month 850-926-4217 CRAWFORDVILLE3 Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 CRAWFORDVILLE, FL3 bedroom. 2-1/2 bath. Townhouse located behind Myra Jeans in Crawfordville. 1800 square feet, one car garage, screened in back porch, and small fenced in yard. Available April 15. email: lisa_sweatt3@yahoo.com or cell: (850)766-5386 ABALAUCTION .COM 3 BR/2BA SFRRing Tailed Eagle Dr. CrawfordvilleBid Online NOWABAL Auction Real Estate (850) 926-9160AB2387 Lic. RE Broker POLARIS2010, 500 Sportsman, 4 wheel drive, less than 30 hours, $4,500. (850) 926-1118 5574-0314 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Doing business as: ATTALA FOREST MANAGEMENT at 78 HOG HEDGE LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 with a mailing address of 78 HOG HEDGE LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 4th day of March, 2013 /s/ Steven L. Jennings March 14, 2013 5566-0314 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA 69 Arran Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL ABusiness-Community (ABC) School Program, Wakulla County RFP# 13/14 -01 The School Board of Wakulla County requests interested parties to submit formal sealed bids/proposals for the above referenced bid. SCOPE OF WORK: The School District of Wakulla County, Florida is seeking proposals from qualified businesses with operations in Wakulla County, Florida interested in partnering with the District in ABusiness-Community (ABC) School Program. The proposal is for the Business to provide the facility, including the associated operating and upkeep expenses, in which the Wakulla County School District (WCSD) will provide an educational program for the children of the businessemployees for 6.5 hours per day or as consistent with the Wakulla County School Board (WCSB) approved elementary school hours and calendar. ABusiness-Community (ABC) School is defined as a public school offering instruction to students from kindergarten through third grade in a facility owned or leased and operated by a business. The Department of Education 2013-2014 average class size requirement is eighteen students. Eighteen is also the minimum average class size to achieve the effective, efficient use of the taxpayers educational and fiscal resources. Proposals that commit to meeting the maximum and minimum class size criteria or that provide for reimbursement to the Wakulla County School District for any loss in FTE educational funding revenues resulting from the failure of the business to achieve the minimum enrollment will receive the highest consideration. Students in need of or enrolled in special programs or that require special services can best be served at the Wakulla County Schools that offer those programs and services identified in the studentsindividual educational plan. Parents shall be responsible for providing all transportation to and from school or to other WCSD facilities during, before and after school for the students enrolled in ABusiness-Community (ABC) School. Florida Business-Community (ABC) Schools shall comply with the constitutional class size requirements. Facilities to house a Florida Business-Community (ABC) School must comply with the State Uniform Building Code for Educational Building Construction adopted pursuant to section 1013.37, Florida Statutes, and must meet state and local health, environmental, and safety laws and codes. ORDERING INSTRUCTIONS: This package can be requested by mail at Wakulla County School Board, Post Office Box 100, Crawfordville, Florida 32326 or by calling 850-926-0065. DOCUMENT COST: $1.50 BID BOND: None PRE/BID PROPOSALCONFERENCE: Pre-Proposal Conference Wednesday, March 27, 2013, 10:00 A.M. Wakulla County School Board Administrative Offices Conference Room 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 DUE DATE/TIME: April 10, 2013 @ 2:00 P.M. Eastern The School Board of Wakulla County, Florida must receive bids no later than said date and time. Bids received after such time will be returned unopened. CONTACT: WILLIAM R. BRISTOL 850-926-0065 March 7 & 14, 2013 3Br 2Ba House $1250mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1Ba House $700mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $450mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $495mo + Sec. Dep. RENTALS: Wakulla RealtySpecializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker 13 Gulf Coast Residential & Commercial Lots RowellAuctions.comA MarkNet Alliance Member € GAL AU-C002594 € 10% Buyers PremiumRowell Auctions, Inc.800-323-8388 For Complete Details Visit RowellAuctions.com Tuesday, March 26th at 2:00 p.m. Online Bidding Available2884 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Waterfront 3 BR/2 BA Home w/Dock 3149 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Gulf View 3 BR/2 BA Home 3153 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle Nice Gulf View Lot 2390 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 0.8 Acres Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 1 Acre Waterfront Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL 9,576 SF Comm. Bldg. U.S. Hwy. 98 E Nice Gulf View Lot U.S. Hwy 98 E, Carrabelle, FL (2) Comm. Bldgs. 202 NE 7th St., Carrabelle 6,400 SF Metal Bldg. NE 7th Street, Carrabelle Commercial Lot 3157 U.S. Hwy. 98 E, Carrabelle 2 BR/2 BA Home & 1BR/1 BA Cottage 57 Seventh St, Apalachicola, FL Triplex, (3) 1 BR/1 BA UnitsAuction Site: St. James Bay Golf Resort 151 Laughing Gull Ln, Carrabelle, FL Open House: Sunday, March 17th 2-5 p.m. 5 Sales in 5 Cities March 19„March 26 Tuesday, March 19, Americus, GA Wednesday, March 20, Tifton, GA Thursday March 21, Brunswick, GA Saturday, March 23, Savannah, GA Tuesday, March 26, Atlanta, GA Live & Online Bidding Broker Compensation 10% Buyers Premium For Complete Information Johndixon.com 800.479.1763 GAL # 2034, FLAL # AB-0001488 ALAL # 1481 NCAL # 6397 ABSOLUTE A U C T I O N Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 A-1PRESSURE CLEANING HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 REPAIRS TO RESTORATIONSThomas HoseyOwner/OperatorQuality Work Guaranteed850890-0067References available • Licensed & Insured Muddy Water Remodeling & Demolition Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 North Florida Lawn & Landscapes p Commercial • ResidentialProfessional Mowing, Mulch, Sod, Weed-eating, Edging, Debris removal, Landscaping, Pressure Washing, Roof Blowing, Grounds Management 850 509-7467 Licensed & Insured for All of Your Lawn Care Needs! Free Quotes! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461 f f f f f A A A ll ll ll ll f f f f f Y Y Y Y Y Y L L L C C C C C N N N d d d d d ! ! Call PAT GREEN ’ S LAWN SERVICE Locally Owned and Operated Licensed and Insured• T ree T rimming• Stump Grinding• Yard Maintenance• Flower Beds Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽLICENSED AND INSURED

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 5B 5563-0314 TWN Vs. Dozier, William Case No. 2011-000305-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.:2011-000305-CA SUNTRUSTMORTGAGE, INC. Plaintiff, v. WILLIAM C. DOZIER; DIANE DOZIER; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION PROPERTYOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 19, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 12, BLOCK GŽ, SONGBIRD SUBDIVISION, PHASE II, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 113, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 43 NUTHATCH TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale on March 28, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19thday of February, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court 5564-0314 TWN vs. Hoffman, Kimberly Case No. 2012-CA-000275 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2010-CA-000275 JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KIMBERLY J. HOFFMAN; MICHAEL T. HOFFMAN, II; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II, and any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors, and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under any of the above-named Defendants, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: KIMBERLY J. HOFFMAN 100 MELODY LANE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 MICHAEL T. HOFFMAN, II 100 MELODY LANE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 UNKNOWN TENANT I 100 MELODY LANE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 UNKNOWN TENANT II 100 MELODY LANE CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN And any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the above-named Defendant(s), if deceased or whose last known addresses are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: Lot 5, Block N, MAGNOLIA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION, as per Map or Plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 37, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Mark W. Hernandez, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando, Florida 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 19th day of February, 2013. In accordance with the Americans With Disabilities Act, persons with disabilities needing a special accommodation to participate in this proceeding should contact Court Administration at 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida 32328, telephone (904) 926-0905, not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding. If hearing impaired, (TDD) 1-800-955-8771, or Voice (V) 1-800-955-8770, via Florida Relay Service. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk DefaultLink, Inc. Attn: Publication Department 330 North Andrews Ave., #102 Ft Lauderdale, FL 33301 Fax: (954) 974-7487 Email: marym@defaultlink.com March 7 & 14, 2014 B&H #287852 5567-0314 TWN vs. Wagner, Seth No. 65-2010-CA-000180 Notice of Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000180 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. SETH WAGNER et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 20, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000180 of the Circuit Court 5571-0321 TWN vs. Stephens, Sarah Case No. #65-2011-CA-000379 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY CIVIL DIVISION Case No.65-2011-CA-000379, Division BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOMELOANS SERVICING LP Plaintiff, vs. SARAH E. STEPHENS AND UNKNOWN TENANTS/OWNERS, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Final Judgment of Foreclosure for Plaintiff entered in this cause on February 20, 2013, in the Circuit Court of Wakulla County, Florida, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida described as: LOT 7, BLOCK KŽ, HUDSON HEIGHTS, UNIT NO. 3, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA and commonly known as: 33 DOGWOOD DR. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 ; including the building, appurtenances, and fixtures located therein, at public sale, to the highest and best bidder, for cash, Sales are held in front foyer at the Wakulla County Courthouse, on April 4, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Any persons claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 20th day of February, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, B. X.Thurmond (COURT SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk March 14 & 21, 2013 286750/0913637B/rph 5572-0321 TWN vs. Paiano, Robert M. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000327 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000327 WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. ROBERTM. PAIANO et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 20, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000327 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NASUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE, INC. is the Plaintiff and ROBERTM. PAIANO; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 4th day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 9, ELLENWOOD, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 10 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH A1994 CHAD DOUBLEWIDE MOBILE HOME ID NO. GAFLR05A22269CW AND GAFLR05B22269CW, TITLE NO. 68381477 AND 68361478 A/K/A211 EMMETT WHALEYROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on February 20, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. March 14 & 21, 2013 F10062331 5573-0321 TWN vs. Bromley, Lori Case No. 65-2010-CA-000145 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000145 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, 5575-0321 TWN Vs. West, Phyllis Case No. 12-10-FC Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 12-10-FC, UCN: 652012CA000010XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. PHYLLIS H. WEST; et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated March 4, 2013 and entered in Case No. 12-10-FC, UCN: 652012CA000010XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and PHYLLIS H. WEST; DOROTHYM. GORDON;L STATE OF FLORIDADEPARTMENTOF REVENUE; WAKULLACOUNTYCLERK OF CIRCUITCOURT; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTA NAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANY RIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 18th day of April, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: LOT 99 OF THE REFUGE AT PANACEA, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGES 18-22, OF THE PUBLIC OF WAKULLA COUNTYFLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on March 4, 2013 BRENTX THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339 1438 Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Service Email: answers@shdlegalgroup.com March 14 & 21, 2013 5578-0321 TWN vs. Poore, James, II Case No. 652012CA000087CAXXXX Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO.: 652012CA000087CAXXXX CITIMORTGAGE, INC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC Plaintiff, vs. JAMES M. POORE, II, et al Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE RE-NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Granting Plaintiffs Motion to Reschedule Foreclosure Sale filed February 26, 2013, and entered in Case No. 652012CA000087CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC, is Plaintiff, and JAMES M. POORE, II, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the courthouse lobby, in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 04 day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Lis Pendens, to wit: Lot 16, Block D, Songbird Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 88, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel Identification Number: 00-00-074-272-10223-D16 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, this 7th day of March, 2013. PHELAN HALLINAN,PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/ Sim J. Singh, Esq., Florida Bar No. 98122 Attorney for Plaintiff CITIMORTGAGE, INC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC c/o Phelan Hallinan, PLC, Attorneys for Plaintiff 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 954-462-7000 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. March 14 & 21, 2013 5582-0404 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN RE: VIN #1B4GP45R0VB329864 CASE NO: 13-23-SC IN THE COUNTY COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA NOTICE OF ACTION TO: Alice Mansell YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for establishment of ownership of personal property described as: 1997 DODGE VAN VIN #1B4GP45R0VB329864 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Plaintiff, JOE R. PERRY, whose address is: 50 NORTHWOOD CT., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327, on or before April 9, 2013, and file the original with the Clerk of this Court immediately thereafter; otherwise a Default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. DATED on March 11, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Michelle Christensen, Deputy Clerk March 14, 21, 28 and April 4, 2013 Plaintiff, vs. LORI L. BROMLEYA/K/ALORI BROMLEY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 20, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000145 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC*, is the Plaintiff and LORI L. BROMLEYA/K/ALORI BROMLEY; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONT FOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00 AM, on the 4th day of April, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 8, BLOCK 10, WAKULLAGARDENS, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A40 FEATHER TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on February 20. 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Ronald R. Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10022209 CHASE DIRECT-CONV -TEAM 3 Plaintiff name has been changed pursuant to order previously entered. March 14 & 21, 2013 of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NAis the Plaintiff and SETH WAGNER; KATHYWAGNER; DEER TRAIL ACRES HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLA COUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 6th day of June, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 5 OF DEER TRAILACRES PHASE II, AS PER MAPOR PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 117, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A281 ACORN TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on February 20, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10029832 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC„-Team 1 -F10029832 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. March 7 & 14, 2013 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 11 Gold nch3BR/2BA $1,150 month, $1,150 Security Deposit, pets ok with prior approval and $250 pet fee. • 52 Cruse3BR/2BA MH, $775mo./ $775 Security Deposit. No Pets. • 29C Old Courthouse Square2 Bedroom and 2 1/2 bath town home. (Two master suites upstairs) $700 per month with $700 deposit. No Smoking. Pets ok with $250 fee. Call Cristy 519-9039. • 5 Susquehanna2BR/1BA $700. mo./$700 Security Deposit. Pets O.K. with prior approval and $250 fee. No Smoking. • 26 Manatee Lane3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo, includes all utilities Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!56 Blue Heron 2BR/1BA block home on canal to Ochlockonee Bay. Near Mashes Sands Beach and Bike Trail. $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets Considered. No Smoking. 8 River Drive 2BR/2BA Bay front with large covered boat slip. large screen porch and open deck. Fantastic views !!! $1200. mo./$1200 Security Deposit. Pets considered. No Smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo./$700 Security Deposit No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo./$650 Security Deposit Pets Considered 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 mo./$750 Security Deposit 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security Deposit. No smoking. No Pets. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850 mo./$850 Security Deposit. Please report orphaned or injured wildlife 363-2351 LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 26 31 36 39 45 48 54 58 61 2 27 46 3 28 42 4 29 43 5 23 40 55 59 62 18 37 56 6 15 32 57 7 30 49 8 24 47 9 25 44 10 21 41 60 63 22 38 50 11 16 19 33 51 12 34 52 13 35 53 ACROSS 1. Takes a siesta 6. Pays to play 11. Horace's "__ Poetica" 14. Imam's deity 15. "My fault!" 16. Asian holiday 17. Fashion designer's favorite actor? 19. "Fore" site 20. Maximilian and Charlemagne 21. Angelou's "Still __" 23. Ride the ump 24. Took the lead 26. Frequent striker 30. Defat, whaler-style 31. Attu dweller 32. Many mall rats 33. Unaffiliated pol: Abbr. 36. Verbal assault 37. Positioned 38. Mold-ripened cheese 39. Kramden laugh syllable 40. "... I __ my way" 41. Go on and on and on ... 42. Kic ked off the show 44. Conked with a fastball 45. Like old movies 47. Dallas NBAer 48. "Chinatown" screenwriter Robert 49. Stuffs to the gills 54. Suffix with bull or bear 55. Narrow escape for a fashion designer? 58. Bull Run victor 59. Tucker of country 60. Beethoven dedicatee 61. Bard's nightfall 62. Mill output 63. Held swayDOWN1. Steak order 2. Jack of old oaters 3. Take a spill 4. Easy to manage 5. Cool treat 6. Houston pro 7. Loaded Londoners 8. Play about Capote 9. Drop an easy one 10. Aleppo re sidents 11. Fashion designer's automotive tool? 12. Ebbets Field great 13. Knight's ride 18. The Koh-i-__ diamond 22. $200 Monopoly props. 24. Winter fall 25. Work the bar 26. Big do 27. Southwestern stew 28. Fashion designer's favorite Dion and the Belmonts tune? 29. Abner's radio partner 30. Stinking to high heaven 32. __ over (helped through difficulty) 34. Mudville complement 35. Scout's doing 37. Trig function 38. Two cups? 40. Sniffs out, say 41. Plan maker 43. Give no stars to 44. Make less intense 45. Of value 46. "Long ti me __!" 47. Taj __ 49. Lid malady 50. Rights org. 51. Act the PI 52. Ultimatum ender 53. Iditarod vehicle 56. Long. crosser 57. Sacagawea denomination American Prole Hometown Content 3/10/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 23 4567 21849 7 45 96 632 32 745 4931 568 200 9 HometownContent 619 4728 5 3 485369712 273158649 137 246598 942587136 856931274 328 714965 764895321 591623487 R A R E B A S H U T I L E E L A M O L L A N O S E E S L I P W E A R O R W H E N T A M E L U M P A N S H E R B E T D E T E C T S N O O R S I N E L A T A S T R O T I D E D O N E N O B S F E T I D S T Y E T R U S L E E T M A H A L E R R T E N D B A T E S Y R I A N S D E V I S E R R R S B R A A C L U A T T I R E I R O N T A I L R E E S E N I N E E L S E S T E E D D E E D S L E D (Seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHAWELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALLTDD 1-800-955-8771. March 7 & 14, 2013 617111461 5557-0314 TWN Vs. Hicks, Thomas Case #2012-CA-274 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #2012-CA-274 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank Plaintiff, v. THOMAS GERLAD HICKS, et al, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure as to Count IV dated February 6, 2013, entered in Case No. 12-CA-274 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and THOMAS GERLAD HICKS, SR., a/k/a TOMMY HICKS; BRENDA SUE HICKS; CALVARY PORTFOLIO SERVICES, LLC; UNKNOWN TENANTS #1 and UNKNOWN TENANTS #2 are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on March 28, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: LOT 6, WHIDDON LAKE ROAD ESTATES, AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 99 AND 100 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 7th day of February, 2013 BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk March 7 & 14, 2013 5558-0314 TWN Vs. Hicks, Thomas Case #2012-CA-274 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE#2012-CA-274 CENTENNIAL BANK, as successor in interest to Wakulla Bank Plaintiff, v. THOMAS GERALD HICKS, et al, Defendant. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure as to Count II dated February 6, 2013, entered in Case No. 12-CA274 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and THOMAS GERLAD HICKS, DR., a/k/a TOMMY HICKS; BRENDA SUE HICKS; CALVARY PORTFOLIO SERVICES, LLC; UNKNOWN TENANTS #1 and UNKNOWN TENANTS #2 are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, at 11:00 oclock a.m. on March 28, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment on Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 7th day of February, 2013. BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT A Commence at a concrete monument being used as the Southeast corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and thence run North along the East boundary of said Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter (as monumented) a distance of 992.43 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 47 minutes 18 seconds West 332.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 87 degrees 43 minutes 56 seconds West 340.42 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the West boundary of the East half of said Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter, thence run North 00 degrees 19 minutes 45 seconds East along said West boundary (as monumented) 369.78 feet to a concrete monument lying on the North boundary of said Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter, thence run South 89 degrees 47 minutes 18 seconds East along said North boundary (as monumented) 338.03 feet to a re-r od (marked #4261), thence run South 382.00 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN EASEMENT DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: Begin at the Northeast corner of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, and run South along the East boundary of the Southwest quarter of the Southeast Quarter of said Section 25, the distance of 118 feet to a point on the North boundary of the Arran to Wakulla Public Road, thence Westerly along the North boundary of said road 30 feet, thence run North parallel with the East boundary of said Southwest Quarter of the Southeast Quarter 120 feet, thence East 10 feet to a point 20 feet from the Southeast corner of property deeded to Joseph D. Olah and Harriet Gwaltney Olah at Official Records Book 45, Page 01, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 610 feet more or less, along the West boundary of an easement reserved in said deed recorded at Official Records Book 45, Page 01, said easement runs parallel to and 20 feet from the east boundary of property described in said deed at Officials Records Book 45, Page 01, thence run West 312.00 feet along the South boundary of property described in deed to Y.J. Love and Lidamay Love, his wife and recorded official Records Book 40, Page 81 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida to the Southwest corner of said property, thence continue West 15 feet thence North 5 feet to the Southeast corner of property deeded to Leonard P. Hicks and Jewell L. Hicks, his wife in Official Records Book 42, Page 826 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, thence run North 377 feet more or less along the East boundary of property described in said deed to the South boundary of subject property described in this deed, thence run East 15 feet along the South boundary of subject property to the West boundary of property described in deed to Y.J. Love and Lidamay Love, his wife and recorded in Official Records Book 40, page 81 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, thence run South 357 feet more or less to a point 15 feet from the South boundary of said property described in Official Records Book 40, Page 81, thence run East 332 feet more or less to the East boundary of said Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of said Section 25 (as monumented), thence run South 630.00 feet more or less along East boundary of said Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter to the Southeast corner of the Northwest quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 25, Township 3 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida and the POINT 5560-0314 TWN vs. Sardinas, Otoniel M. Case No. 65-2010-CA-000191 Notice of Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE 5561-0314 TWN Vs. Hill, Adrienne Case No. 65-2009-CA000118 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000118 U.S. BANK, N.A. Plaintiff, v. ADRIENNE N. HILL; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ADRIENNE N. HILL; JOHN DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; JANE DOE AS UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 19, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOT 22 AND THE WESTERLYHALF OF LOT 23, BLOCK 56Ž, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT V, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 67 SUMMER BROOKE LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 at public sale on March 28th, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of February, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Tamika Peterson, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHAWELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALLTDD 1-800-955-8771. March 7 & 14, 2013 665102578 5562-0314 TWN Vs. Loomis, Robert Case No. 65-2011-CA000214 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO.: 65-2011-CA-000214 U.S. BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION Plaintiff, v. ROBERTW. LOOMIS; JULIE A. LOOMIS; UNKNOWN TENANT1; UNKNOWN TENANT2; AND ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTTHE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S), WHO (IS/ARE) NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIM AS HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, LIENORS, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES, SPOUSES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; FLORIDAHOUSING FINANCE CORPORATION Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated February 19, 2013, in this cause, I will sell the property situated in WAKULLACounty, Florida, described as: LOTS 193 AND 194, BLOCK 37 (A/K/AALLOF BLOCK 37) OF TOWN OF SOPCHOPPY EAST ADDITIONS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. a/k/a 37 DUSTYLN., SOPCHOPPY, FL32358 at public sale on March 28, 2013, at eleven o`clock a.m., in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse located at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327, to the highest bidder for cash, except as prescribed in paragraph 4, in accordance with Section 45.031, Florida Statutes. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, Florida, this 19th day of February, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (Seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk DOUGLAS C. ZAHM, P.A.. 12425 28th Street North, Suite 200 St. Petersburg, FL33716 (727) 536-4911 phone / (727) 539-1094 fax IF YOU ARE APERSON WITH ADISABILITYWHO NEEDS ANYACCOMMODATION IN ORDER TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROCEEDING, YOU ARE ENTITLED, AT NO COST TO YOU, TO THE PROVISION OF CERTAIN ASSISTANCE, PLEASE CONTACT LETHAWELLS, (850) 926-0905 EXT 222, WITHIN 2 WORKING DAYS OF YOUR RECEIPT OF THIS TEMPORARYINJUNCTION. IF YOU ARE HEARING OR VOICE IMPAIRED, CALLTDD 1-800-955-8771. March 7 & 14, 2013 665112331 5570-0321 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION FILE NO. 2013-13-CP IN RE: ESTATE OFALETHIA P. DICKSON, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of ALETHIA P. DICKSON, deceased, whose date of death was February 11, 2013, is pending in the Circuit Court for Wakulla County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the Personal Representative and the Personal Representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT SO FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIOD SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is March 14, 2013 Personal Representative: WALTER B. DICKSON 97 North Lake Ellen Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Attorney for Personal Representative: MARION D. LAMB 217 Pinewood Drive, Tallahassee, Florida 32303 (850) 385-0501, Florida Bar No.: 0500951 March 14 & 21, 2013 5577-0321 TWN Sale 3/29/2013 Stow Away Center-Crawfordville PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given pursuant to Florida Self Storage Facility Act Florida StatuesŽ, Chapter 83, part IV that the Stow Away Center will hold a sale by sealed bid on Friday, March 29, 2013 at 12:00 pm at the junction of Highway 98 and Spring Creek Hwy for the contents of a Self Storage Unit containing household items of: Christopher Montgomery Heather Simmons Before the sale date of March 29, 2013, the owners my redeem their property by payment of the outstanding balance and costs by paying in person at the Stow Away Center, 2669 Spring Creek Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 March 14 & 21, 2013 5579-0321 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Seminole Self Storage LEGALNOTICE NOTICE IS GIVEN PURSUANTTO FLORIDASELF STORAGE FACILITYACT, FLORIDASTATUES, CHAPTER 83, PARTIV THATSEMINOLE SELF STORAGE WILLHOLD A SALE BYSEALED BID ON MARCH 29, 2013 at 1 1:00a.m AT2314 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327, OF THE CONTENTS OF MINI-WAREHOUSE CONTAINING THE PERSONAL PROPERTYOF: KENNETH REDDING CASEYLARSON ROSS LANGFORD Before the sale date of MARCH 29, 2013 The Owners may redeem their property by payment of the Outstanding Balance and cost by mailing it to 2314 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 or Paying in person at the warehouse location. March 14 & 21, 2013 OF BEGINNING. Together with that certain mobile Home a 1987 Destiny Omni ID # OM10461 and Title #44597497. March 7 & 14, 2013 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000191 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC Plaintiff, vs. OTONIELM. SARDINAS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated February 18, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000191 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC1, is the Plaintiff and OTONIELM. SARDINAS; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF OTONIELM. SARDINAS N/K/AMIREDITH SARDINAS; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 28th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 31, BLOCK 50, WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT 5, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A95 EJ STRINGER ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on February 18, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Becky Whaley, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10027834 CHASEDIRECT-FHA„-Team 3 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. March 7 & 14, 2013 F10027834

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 – Page 7B 1. GEOGRAPHY: In which country is Mount Ararat located? 2. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel The Color PurpleŽ? 3. DANCE: Who wrote the score for the American ballet RodeoŽ? 4. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Which president served as a congressman in the House of Representatives after finishing his presidential term? 5. HISTORY: What was the year of the first Thanksgiving feast in the New World? 6. MEASUREMENTS: How many inches are in a hand? 7. MEDICAL: What is a common name for the medical condition alopecia? 8. TELEVISION: What was the theme song to The Mary Tyler Moore ShowŽ? 9. ART: In what U.S. city is the National Gallery of Art located? 10. MOVIES: What was the name of the 2004 movie with the tagline, A True Underdog StoryŽ? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Turkey 2. Alice Walker 3. Aaron Copland 4. John Quincy Adams 5. 1621 6. Four inches 7. Baldness 8. Love Is All AroundŽ 9. Washington, D.C. 10. DodgeballŽ Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, March 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, March 8 … As Gov. Rick Scott helped launch the legislative session Tuesday, his message boiled down to this: Its working.Ž That likely will be a common refrain through the 2014 gubernatorial election, as Scott touts the addition of jobs, jobs, jobs and casts himself as leading the state out of the economic desert of the Charlie Crist era. Two years ago, Florida was losing jobs and many Florida families were losing their dreams. ... The short-sighted policies of borrowing on our future had led to disaster,Ž said Scott, who, not coincidentally, could “ nd himself running for re-election against the Republicanturned-Democrat Crist. But Scotts State of the State address Tuesday spurred the Florida Democratic Party to describe the governor as being in a state of denial.Ž Today, with a carefully crafted and poll-tested message, Gov. Rick Scott delivered his State of the State and tried to remake himself, Democratic Chairwoman Allison Tant wrote in a fundraising email. But Scott is in a State of Denial if he thinks he can run from his record.Ž By now, everyone knows that Scott … who got elected in 2010 on a Lets Get to WorkŽ theme … will use public appearances to focus on job creation. And Tuesdays address was no different, with Scott, for example, singling out Northrop Grumman, which had announced it would add 1,000 jobs in the state. Similarly, Scott used the address to pitch his plan to eliminate the sales tax on manufacturing equipment, a move he says would help the state compete for jobs. Scott, however, also set aside a good chunk of the address to call for giving $2,500 raises to teachers. That idea has faced skepticism from some Republican legislative leaders, who question the wisdom of giving across-the-board raises. But Scott said he sees paying teachers more as an investment in the states future. We dont want a war on teachers, Scott said. We want a war on failure.Ž MEDICAID MORASS While not a major part of the address, Scott reiterated his controversial stance that the state should expand Medicaid under the federal Affordable Care Act. That stance involves going ahead with the expansion for three years --a period in which Washington is supposed to pay all of the tab --and then revisiting the issue. I concluded that for the three years the federal government is committed to paying 100 percent of the cost of new people in Medicaid, I cannot, in good conscience, deny the uninsured access to care,Ž Scott said. That stance drew heavy applause from Democrats gathered in the House chamber. But it also came shortly after House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, made clear he wants nothing to do with the expansion, describing the federal approach as destined for failure. I believe it forces Florida to expand a broken (Medicaid) system that we have been battling Washington to “ x, and I believe it will ultimately drive up the cost of health care,Ž Weatherford said. This in” exible plan, thrust upon us by the federal government, is not aimed at strengthening the safety net. It pushes a social ideology at the expense of our future.Ž With Weatherford and other House Republicans digging in against the expansion, Senate President Don Gaetz, R-Niceville, said it appeared the House had shut the lights offŽ on the issue. But House and Senate Republican leaders also said they were looking for ways to provide a health-care safety net, which could mean that the Medicaid issue will lurk throughout the session. While House and Senate Democrats are ready to move forward with adding hundreds of thousands of people to Medicaid, Senate Republicans have not publicly tipped their hands about the issue. Meanwhile, the hospital industry and advocates for Medicaid bene“ ciaries are continuing to push for the expansion. Hospitals contend, in part, that extending Medicaid coverage to more people would reduce the amounts of uncompensated care they have to provide. Governor Scott and the Legislature face very dif“ cult public-policy choices on how to proceed with implementation of the federal Affordable Care Act, Tony Carvalho, president of the Safety Net Hospital Alliance of Florida, said in a prepared statement Tuesday. We believe that Governor Scott reached a logical conclusion that extends vital health coverage to nearly a million Floridians and assures our citizens get a return on some of the federal tax dollars that they are sending to Washington.Ž A Senate select committee is scheduled to meet Monday to discuss the Medicaid expansion, which might give a sign about how the Senate will move forward with the issue. The committee likely will hear about new estimates that the Affordable Care Act would cost Florida about $5.2 billion over the next decade, with about $3.5 billion stemming from Florida having to pick up part of the Medicaid expansion costs after the “ rst three years. PRIORITIES, PRIORITIES The Medicaid issue might be a huge question mark, but House and Senate leaders made clear on the “ rst day of the session that they want to pass changes to improve ethics and “ x problems in the elections system. The Senate unanimously voted for an ethics package that includes steps such as trying to slow the revolving door between the Legislature and the lobbying industry and trying to prevent lawmakers from using fund-raising vehicles known as committees of continuous existenceŽ to pay personal expenses. A lot of this wouldn‘t be necessary if we all conducted ourselves, if everyone that was elected to of“ ce in the state of Florida conducted their lives and themselves in of“ ce, by just using a little common sense,Ž said Senate Ethics and Elections Chairman. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater. A little later Tuesday, the House voted 118-1 to pass a bill that would address some of the controversial voting issues from the 2012 elections. For example, the bill would allow elections supervisors to hold up to 14 days of early voting … an increase from the current eight … and would add to the number of sites that could serve as early-voting locations. I think the Legislature has some responsibility for some of the challenges we had in 2012,Ž Weatherford said. I readily admit that, and thats why we passed it on the “ rst day.Ž The House and Senate still need to reach agreement on the “ nal details of the ethics and elections bills. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott gave his State of the State address Tuesday to start the 2013 legislative session, pushing for raises for teachers and elimination of the sales tax on manufacturing equipment. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This is now the third time I have had the opportunity to address you to report on the state of the great state of Florida. And after two years of hard work, this update can be summed up in two words: Its working.Ž --Scott during Tuesdays address.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Taking care of business Subscribe to your local newspaper! Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com C a n ’ t Can’t a c c e s s access T h e The W a k u l l a Wakulla n e w s ews o n l i n e online c o n t e n t ? content? S u b s c r i b e Subscribe t o d a y a n d today and g e t f u l l get full a c c e s s access!