Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00450

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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 7th Issue Thursday, February 14, 2013 One Section One Section 75 Cents 75 Cents k h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe Wakulla Sports, 11Public Notices ....................................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Church................................................................................Page 6 Obituaries ..........................................................................Page 7 Community ........................................................................Page 8 School ................................................................................Page 9 Sports.............................................................................. Page 10 Outdoors .........................................................................Page 12 Water Ways ......................................................................Page 13 Sheriffs Report ............................................................. Page 14 Green Scene .................................................................... Page 15 Health & Fitness............................................................ Page 16 Week in Wakulla...............................................................Page 17 Weekly Roundup............................................................... Page 18 TThinking Outside the Book.............................................Page19 Classi eds ....................................................................... Page 20 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 20 Comics .............................................................................Page 23 Natural Wakulla ...............................................................Page 24INDEX OBITUARIES Henry Jackson Harvey Rhonda Gail Pope Holder Dorothy Dot Hilliard SloanBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netSen. Bill Montford and Rep. Halsey Beshears were in Wakulla County on Tuesday, Feb. 5 to hear from the people. The legislative delegation meeting is intended to allow citizens a chance to voice their concerns and opinions prior to Legislative Session, which begins March 5. The county commission chambers was full of constitutional of- cers, city and county commissioners, school board members, county employees and citizens. Many were there to thank the pair for coming, while others asked for support from the delegation. One of the larger topics of the evening focused on teacher pay. Gov. Rick Scott has included a pay raise for teachers in his budget. School board member Melisa Taylor asked for Rep. Beshears and Sen. Montfords support of the pay raise and asked them to take into account that teachers in Florida are paid poorly compared to other states. Wakulla Classroom Teachers Association President Missy Rudd said any increase in pay is welcomed, but she asked that other school employees not be left out, like those in reading, media, guidance, transportation, cafeteria, administration, etc. Superintendent Bobby Pearce agreed and said, It takes a whole team to ensure the success of our children. There was also some discussion about the Value Added Model scores, which is a teacher evaluation that is based on student performance and how well students do on the FCAT schoolwide, and the hope that will be re-evaluated this session. Montford, who is a former teacher, principal and superintendent, said these scores are used to determine if a teachers contract should be extended. Tenures have been done away with, so a new hire is only hired for one school year. The problem with the VAM is that not all students take the FCAT. So a rst-grade teacher who does not administer the FCAT is being evaluated based on scores of students they may have never taught or even seen before, he said.Turn to Page 2 JENNIFER JENSENState Rep. Halsey Beshears and Sen. Bill Montford listen to issues of local concern at the legislative delegation meeting in the commission boardroom last week.Legislative delegation hears local concernsBy HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsOn Springhill Road, not far across the Leon County line, is a hidden piece of Wakullas black history that stands just over ve feet tall and has stood strong for 95 years. In 1917, World War I had yet to reach its end; J. Edgar Hoover was just beginning his stint with the Department of Justice; and Lacie (Hill) Hudson was born in Wakulla County. Her grandfather, John Hill, was born here also, back in 1849. During slavery, says Hudson, he was the boy that would transport water for the slaves to drink. The stories of her life are both hilarious and harrowing, such as the one about her grandmother that took place during the World War I. There was the Durrance (General) Store, in Medart, she recalls. Some of the soldiers started coming home. My grandmother had left church one Sunday and went to the store to buy her a can of sardines. She was sitting on the porch eating them, and a soldier was outside showing other people how they shot their guns in the war. His gun went off, hit her. I was a little baby had just been born, and my mother couldnt go to her funeral. Almost 40 years into the Jim Crow era, in which laws were passed that demanded the segregation of whites from people of color in schools, transportation systems, bathrooms and more, Hudson grew up in a world where knowing ones place within the southern terrain had to be quickly grasped in order to survive. Back when I was growing up, she explains, you had to do what the white man say do or else. I did maids work. All my life, all I did was clean someones house. Youd enter through the backdoor. You could eat, but not in the house, at the table, where the family ate. You had to sit on the back porch and eat. You could sweep-off the front porch, but when you got ready to leave, you went out the backdoor. Turn to Page 5 Eight War Eagles get scholarships on National Signing DayBLACK HISTORY MONTHThe story of Lacie HudsonTeacher pay raises are among issues discussed SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLacie Hudson, left, with a sister sometime in the 1930s. BASEBALLWar Eagles have big hopes for this seasonBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netWakulla baseball coach Mike Gauger says that perhaps last years team didnt live up to expectations. A year earlier, the War Eagles had gone to the Final Four and were within a game of playing for the state championship. But last years team was young there were only three seniors on the team, and a lack of experience. And, Gauger says, a lack of leadership. But this years team Gauger cant think of enough positive things to say about them. As the team headed for its season opener against Leon on Tuesday, Feb. 12, Gauger says he gets the sense that the seniors on the team feel like theyve got something to prove. However far they go this year, Gauger says, they wont fail for lack of giving it everything theyve got. I expect them to leave it on the eld, he says. This years seniors were 10th graders on that team that went to the Final Four two years ago and theres a bakers dozen of them, offering leadership and support to fellow team members. And Gauger admits, standing on the practice eld at Wakulla High School as the team stretches, that his players are such good kids, hes become fond of them. Theyve been around so long Ive gotten attached to them. Theyre just a good group of boys. It makes it fun to come out here and work. Asked about his expectations for the season, Gauger smiles and says, Hopefully, just get better every day. But then he adds, Its always our goal to try to win a state championship. Hes got ve senior pitchers hes looking for good things from: Jake Walker, Jacob Walker, Raleigh Strickland, Hunter DeRoss and leftie Garrett Woofter. In last weekends pre-season games, Gauger was pleased with the War Eagles showing against a very good North Florida Christian pitcher, though Wakulla lost 2-1 in eight innings. Later they blew out Godby, 9-0. Turn to Page 10 War Eagle Baseball Coach Mike Gauger WILLIAM SNOWDENLEADERS: out elder Jeff Barnes, pitcher Jake Walker and catcher Dalton Dugger.

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Page 2 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 926-9802 www.shepardaccounting.com SHEPARD ACCOUNTING & TAX SERVICEA Certified Public Accounting FirmMitzi, Lorra, Jessica Celebrating DONT DELAY, COME BY AND SEE US OR CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT We always look at last years tax return at no charge.INDIVIDUAL TAXBUSINESS TAX ALWAYS ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS ALWAYS ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS COMPETITIVE PRICESMention this Ad for a discountOTHER SERVICESFrom Page 1 Monford believed there would be an effort this session to change it. Its got to be done fairly, he said. During the meeting, County Administrator David Edwards listed the priorities for the county and asked for support and funding for these projects. One of these projects was the countywide wastewater treatment plant upgrade and expansion. Edwards explained that the county has reached a critical point and must upgrade and expand, but does not have the resources and is seeking help with funding. Other projects include corridor improvements along U.S. Highway 319 and the completion of the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail. The county was also asking for support from the delegation for Highway 319 to be designated a Strategic Intermodal System, which would make this segment from U.S. Highway 98 to the Tallahassee Regional Airport considered a priority for state and federal funding. At the closing of the meeting, each delegation member thanked those in attendance. We take these to heart, Beshears said. He added that many of the comments made have also been expressed in other counties and they are taking steps to work on those issues.Legislative delegation hears concernsBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter the Wakulla County Commission voted to repeal an ordinance banning the sale of flavored tobacco, it decided a workshop was needed to discuss alternatives for keeping this product out of the hands of children. One of these alternatives was product placement. Tonya Hobby, tobacco program specialist for the county health department, said many stores keep these products on their counters. My 5-year-old can see that, Hobby said. The whole goal is to not have children be targeted by these tobacco products which look very similar to candy, she said. The county plans to look at ordinances from other counties to try and get some ideas on product placement. Some ideas include no open displays, all signs, yers and banners must be at least 4 feet high, products must be behind the counter, and only vendor-assisted sales. Lt. Bruce Ashley, president of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, said this has put the issue in the spotlight and he hopes for more conversation. I think its already done some good, Ashley said. The workshop will be held on March 18 at 3:30 p.m. in the commission chambers. In other matters: There was some discussion about septic tank inspections and possibly designing a targeted inspection of older septic tanks within the Wakulla Springs protection zone. Commissioner Randy Merritt suggested the idea after some concerns were voiced from Tallahassee and Leon County about Wakullas changes to the septic tank ordinance which went into effect on Oct. 1, 2012. These changes included performance based septic systems only being required within the Wakulla Springs Special Planning Area for properties that are smaller than 5 contiguous acres. It will also be required for properties where the total acreage is less than 0.229 acres and those where the system will be installed within 150 feet of the high water level of any surface water, wet sink, swallet or within 300 feet of a rst of second magnitude spring. Another change was the requirement that nitrogen levels must be reduced by 90 percent to the state standards of 50 percent. Also, repairs and modi- cations to existing septic systems are allowed without requiring an upgrade to performance based septic systems. Merritt suggested the county perform inspections of the older systems. If the system is found to be failing then they would need to repair it. He added that if the person is on a low income, maybe the county can set up a program to help them with the cost. Commissioner Jerry Moore said Wakulla County probably only has around 1,000 septic tanks in that area and even fewer that are older than 1975. If there is a septic tank that is polluting, then the county could possibly step in and help if the owner is in the low income level, he said. He added that Wakulla County only contributes .76 percent of the nitrogen found in Wakulla Springs. I think the birds in the Gulf are contributing more than that, Moore said. Commissioner Ralph Thomas said he wanted to know how much this could potentially cost the county and needed more data to make a decision. Commissioner Howard Kessler said. I think its worthwhile to look at. County Administrator David Edwards said the county could look at grants or using RESTORE Act funds to try and set up a program for this. He added that the county staff will determine how many homes are on septic tanks in that area and come back at a future meeting with more concrete numbers. The next commission meeting is Tuesday, Feb. 19 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.COUNTY COMMISSIONWorkshop set on issue of candyavored tobacco JENNIFER JENSENWakulla Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce at the podium to speak to Rep. Beshears and Sen. Montford. Special to The NewsA 20-year-old Crawfordville man was arrested and faces two felony charges and four charges overall after leading deputies on a high speed chase on Wednesday, Feb. 6. Zachary Pryce Taylor was arrested for eeing and eluding a law enforcement of cer at a high rate of speed, driving while license is suspended or revoked with third or subsequent conviction, resisting an of cer without violence and possession of drug paraphernalia. Deputy Sean Wheeler observed Taylor operating a motor vehicle at a high rate of speed from Highway 267 to Lonnie Raker Lane, which is posted at 35 mph. Traveling at 55 mph, Deputy Wheeler was unable to keep up with his suspect. Deputy Clint Beam was conducting stationary radar on Lonnie Raker Lane and Boynton Court and clocked Taylor at 86 mph in the 35-mph zone. Taylor entered Boynton Court at such a high rate of speed that he reportedly turned his vehicle sideways. The vehicle continued at a high rate of speed and entered a residential yard by passing around a downed tree and stopped in the back yard. Taylor ed from the vehicle on foot and Wheeler deployed a Taser to stop the subject. During the search of the vehicle, deputies Wheeler and Beam discovered a marijuana pipe and marijuana grinder inside the vehicle. They also determined that Taylor did not have a valid driver license. Taylor was medically cleared by Wakulla Emergency Medial Services and was transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Taylor posted a $12,000 bond and was released early in the morning of Feb. 7.Driver arrested after high-speed chase

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PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 3 Join The Nature Conservancy to plant a billion trees, one tree at a time, in the ght to end climate change at plantabillion.org Your source for everything local3119-A Crawfordville Hwy. 926-7102 www.thewakullanews.com OFF F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F F the EATIN patha monthly page inThe WakuulanewsYouve got questions we have answersQ: Where are the best places to eat?A: Check out theBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netTo try and help more of those living on an extremely low income within the county, the county commission recently increased the income limits for someone to be eligible for hardship assistance for the solid waster and re services assessments. Commissioner Richard Harden said the initial income limits that were released have not been updated for 2013, which went up slightly, according to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. One person making $13,850 or less would qualify for assistance, a two-person household making $15,800 would qualify and a four-person household with an income of $19,750 or less would be eligible for assistance. Commissioner Jerry Moore said some senior citizens who were not paying the assessments recently saw a slight increase in social security and now must pay those assessments. I just feel for our senior citizens, Harden said. For those on a xed income, this will help alleviate some of that nancial burden, he said. County Administrator David Edwards said when the exemption was put in place it included speci c numbers, instead of being based on the current years extremely low income limits. From now on, those limits will be based on the current years data. To apply for hardship assistance, residents must complete an application prior to June 1 and return it to the county administration of ce. For more information or for an application, visit the countys website at www.mywakulla.com or call Administrative Coordinator Katie Taff at 926-0 919 ext. 704.Income limits are increased for hardship assistance Public Information Meeting The Northwest Florida Transportation Corridor Authority (NFTCA) will conduct a series of four (4) Public Information Meetings for the purpose of presenting data and analysis for projects being considered for inclusion in its 2013 Master Plan. All interested persons are invited to attend. The public meetings will be held in an open house format from 6:00-8:00 pm and will include a formal presentation at 6:30 p.m. Staff will be available to address questions throughout the meeting. Public participation is solicited without regard to race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, disability or family status. Persons who require special accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act or persons who require translation services (free of charge) should contact Alicia Stephen, HDR Engineering, Inc., Senior Administrative Manager, phone: (850) 429-8905, or via email at Alicia.Stephen@hdrinc.com at least seven (7) days prior to the meeting. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact the Florida Relay Service, 1(800) 955-8771 (TDD) or 1(800)955-8770 (Voice).Tuesday, February 19, 2013TIME: 6:00pm to 8:00pm (CST) PENSACOLA CIVIC CENTER, Room C-1 201 East Gregory Street Pensacola, FL 32502Tuesday, February 19, 2013TIME: 6:00pm to 8:00pm (EST) GULF COUNTY COMMISSION CHAMBERS Robert Moore Administration Building, Room 302 1000 Cecil G. Costin, Sr. Boulevard, Port St. Joe, FL 32456Thursday, February 21, 2013TIME: 6:00pm to 8:00pm (CST) CITY OF DESTIN ANNEX 4100 Indian Bayou Trail Destin, FL 32541Thursday, February 21, 20136:00 pm to 8:00 pm CST BAY COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 898 W. 11th Street Panama City, FL 324051 2 3 4 FEBRUARY 14, 2013The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners is Seeking Two Members to Serve on the Industrial Development Authority Capital Area Community Action Agency will be at Sopchoppy City Hall THIRD THURSDAY OF THE MONTH Beginning February 21, 2013 9:00 a.m. 12:00 noon BY APPOINTMENT ONLY (No Walk-Ins) TO MAKE AN APPOINTMENT OR FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL 850-926-3122 SOPCHOPPY RESIDENTSFEBRUARY 7, 14, 21, 2013 THE CITY OF ST. MARKS WILL HOLD A PUBLIC HEARING Community Redevelopment Area Board Date: February 14, 2013 at 6:50 pm Location: 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks 32355The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.FEBRUARY 14, 2013 City of St. Marks will hold a Special Meeting on February 21, 2013 at 6:00 pm to install commissioner for Seat 5The City of St. Marks located at 788 Port Leon Drive, 9 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 925-6224. Persons needing special access considerations should call the City Of ce at least 24 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Ofce may be contacted at (850) 925-6224.FEBRUARY 14, 2013By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe City of Sopchoppy has already begun work to clean up three parcels that were donated to the city last year and could be the future home of a park or trailhead. The property on Rose Street was donated by Robert Beasley to the city. The city commission hopes this location will be developed into a trailhead for the Ochlockonee Bay Bike Trail. This 13mile trail will extend from Mashes Sands Park to the train depot in Sopchoppy and eventually connect to the Capital City to the Sea Loop. However, the portion of the trail that runs from the intersection of Surf Road and U.S. Highway 319 and ends in Sopchoppy has not been funded. But the city commission still plans to be ready once funding does become available. There are a few structures located on the property and city employees have begun to remove those. At the commission meeting on Feb. 11, the commission agreed to spend money to clear the underbrush. I think its important to get it done, said Commissioner Lara Edwards. So we can be in a position where we are ready to move ahead. The other commissioners agreed and all voted unanimously to do the cleanup as long as it costs no more than $1,000. The commission also discussed holding a workshop to get input from the citizens about what they would like to see at the trailhead park. In another matter, the commission agreed to spend around $12,000 to pay for asphalt resurfacing along Gulf Street and Park Avenue. The city was awarded a $600,000 Community Development Block Grant to improve drainage at Gulf Street and Park Avenue and that project is nearly complete. The last remaining work is cleanup. During this project, several cracks formed along the asphalt. City Clerk Jackie Lawhon said the roads just werent stable enough to handle the work. A portion of the grant funds are left over which might be able to go towards the resurfacing. A change order would need to be sent and approved by the state. Lawhon said she is afraid if the city just patches the cracks, the road will fail in a few years and cost a lot more than $12,000. Edwards agreed and said it makes sense to resurface that area since that is where most of the traf c comes from entering the city park. The commission agreed to go ahead and resurface the roadway now.SOPCHOPPYDonated Rose Street property being cleaned up for use on bike trail The Wakulla News

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Page 4 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Dont Miss the Signs unveiled Rotary Valentine Festival is Saturday Garbage sorting facility in Panacea? Beware, O ye blasted hacker, whomsoever thou art Businessman Joe Barry dies The power of prayer Largest crowd ever turns out for Chambers January luncheon Low Country Boil fundraiser set thewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Biletnikoff Banquet was a moving experienceEditor, The News: The family of Blonzie Mills Carter would like to thank all the friends, co-workers, church members and extended family who became a rock of support for us in our time of grief and loss. Our mother, grandmother and loved one, Blonzie, would have been proud of how everyone came together to celebrate her life, share fond memories, while becoming better friends and neighbors in the process. Wed also like to express our thanks to Eden Springs Rehabilitative Center, and Big Bend Hospice, who gladly lled in at our loved ones side on the days we were absent. We are greatly thankful to you all for the kindness shown. Four days after Blonzies funeral, her son, Jessie J. Ransom, also passed away. Again, our family has found itself in the midst of mourning. Jessies widow, Rhonda Ransom, is reaching out to the family and community to help fund the costs of his burial. If you are so moved to help, please contact Strong & Jones Funeral Home at (850) 224-2139, to make a donation to the burial fund for Jessie J. Ransom. Thank you, The family of Blonzie Booth Ransom Mills Carter and her son Jessie J. Ransom Jennifer Jensenjjensen@thewakullanews.netEditor, The News: An open letter to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commissioners: Dear Commissioners: As the coastal commissioner for Wakulla County, I want to thank you for providing a spring gag grouper season for 2012 in the Big Bend State Waters. This spring gag grouper season came at a time when our coastal businesses were struggling to survive a depressed winter economy. I spoke to you at your recent Apalachicola meeting, and I want to thank you for throwing another lifeline to our Big Bend coastal business community by providing for another gag grouper season this spring in our state waters. You will be taking nal action on this important issue next week in Orlando. I regret that I will be unable to attend the Orlando meeting, but I want to thank you in advance for your unanimous vote to help save our Big Bend coastal businesses. Sincerely, Jerry MooreWakulla County CommissionerDistrict 4 Editor, The News: I hope the people and citizens of Wakulla County are much smarter than the people of Hillsborough County and do not give up their weapons to anyone for a mere token of the value and protection of themselves by maintaining these for their own protection, not listening to the Obama Administration and law enforcement. Government is trying to eliminate all your constitutional rights, thus you will have nothing to defend yourself with. S.P. Rogers CrawfordvilleFamily appreciates kindness shown Hopeful for spring gag grouper season Dont give up your weapons Why no turn on Trice Lane at 319?READERS WRITE: HOME COUNTRY Editor, The News: Can someone give me a logical reason why you can not take a left into or out of Trice Lane at Highway 319/Crawfordville Highway? There is a turn lane on 319 so why or to whom is this street so special? Dianne Graffeodgraffeo@powerpe.netWhen my husband and I were invited by one of our friends to attend the 2013 Biletnikoff Award Banquet held this past weekend, I was extremely excited. For one thing, it is a major banquet in the world of college football. It is the banquet held for the award given to the top receiver in college football. And two, we were going to meet NFL hall of famer Larry Csonka. He was the keynote speaker for the evening. As a huge Miami Dolphins fan from birth, I was ecstatic. Csonka, AKA Zonk, was a fullback for the Fins from 1968 to 1974, then had a brief stint with the Giants (which I will overlook) and ended his career with the Fins in 1979. He was on the team which had a perfect season. He is also my dads all-time favorite player. So when we sent him a picture of us with Zonk, my dad was in awe and extremely jealous. I think we were all in awe to get a chance to meet one of the greats. This was an amazing moment for anyone who loves football, especially a Dolphins fan. However, there were others that also left me in awe at the banquet and have stuck with me even more than meeting Zonk. These people were the 16 high school seniors who were honored at the banquet for receiving scholarships from the Tallahassee Quarterback Foundation. Each one of these Foundation scholars had overcome some emotional, physical or mental obstacle in their short life to get where they are. Those in attendance at the banquet were given a chance to hear their stories of inspiration and triumph. We heard about a girl who learned both her parents had been diagnosed with cancer, another who bounced around foster homes and was abused and one who lost one of their parents to suicide. All 16 stories were heart wrenching. While these students faced major barriers that would have left many in shambles, these students picked themselves up and carried on to excel on the academic and extracurricular levels. Hearing each story made you feel for the student and all they have endured. But they also left you inspired and in complete awe of them and all their accomplishments. They left me with tears in my eyes, but also pride in my heart for these amazing students. Two of Wakullas own were recipients of one of these elite scholarships, Savannah Harris and Joey Briggs. Harris is a senior at Wakulla High School. She is also the captain of the soccer team, on the track team, student body president and has a weighted GPA of 5.09. She has achieved all of this while dealing with Scoliosis. Briggs was the recipient of The Brooks Rogers Memorial Scholarship. He lives in Crawfordville, but attends Rickards High School because Wakulla does not have a swim team. He is the captain of the swim team, and was named Big Bend Swimmer of the Year. He has a weighted GPA of 4.6 and recently accepted a scholarship to swim at the University of Florida. Prior to getting where he is today, he had serious surgery in March of his sophomore year on a torn tricep. Following his surgery, he could not go in the water for three months and couldnt attend a full practice for six months. He was told it would be a full year until he could swim a decent meet. Through hard work and determination, he achieved personal best times sooner than expected and earned a scholarship. These were some of the most impressive students in the Big Bend. They should all be extremely proud of what they have accomplished. After these stories were told, the audience was introduced to the winner of the Biletnikoff Award, University of Southern Californias Marqise Lee. Both of Lees parents are deaf. His father has been in and out of his life and his mother was forced to relinquish custody of him when he was a child. Both of his older brothers were in gangs, one was murdered by a rival gang and the other is in prison. Lee was tossed from foster home to foster home until he was informally adopted by one of his friends parents in high school. He then earned a football scholarship to USC. After his story was told, Lee made his way to the podium to accept his award and offered a few remarks. He told the crowd that he hoped he would be back next year and didnt want to disappoint the Foundation. He was extremely humble, in spite of all he has accomplished, and you could tell was grateful to have received this award. I felt honored and privileged to have heard all of these stories. The kind of stories that make you want to be better, motivate you to do more, inspire you to change, dare you to dream and challenge you to achieve the impossible.Jennifer Jensen is the reporter at The Wakulla News.By SLIM RANDLES In the week before Valentines Day, Marvin Pincus had two new customers for his (free of charge, of course) love advice and y-tying consultation services. He tied up a midge for one client, a salmon streamer wrapped in lead for another, and wished them well. This was his busy time, of course. He knew another would come in mid-May, in desperate anticipation of June weddings. Marge, he said, sipping coffee and looking out at the snow, I think we need a vacation. Marjorie Pincus smiled. Theyd both been retired and on permanent vacation for years now. Ill go if it means I dont have to make the beds or do the dishes, she said. The only thing is, what if someone needs the y-tying love advice service while were gone? This bothered Marvin. A man who spent more than 40 years being dependable every day cant be expected to just turn it off like a faucet. Honey, Marge said, maybe you could designate someone to be on call? Like a doctor does? You know? Marvin thought about that and buttered some toast. Only one I can think of who could tie ies well enough would be Delbert McLean, our chamber of commerce. Knowing him, instead of giving love advice, hed talk them into starting a business here. You have a point, Marjorie said, laughing. But what would be wrong with just going away for a week and letting people gure out their own love lives for a while? Marvin sat quietly and Marjorie looked at him and thought how maybe she should be his customer. She was under no illusion about her looks. She was old. Old and wrinkled. She was hoping Marvin wasnt just married to her because he was used to it. She studied his face, and strangely, didnt really notice his wrinkles. Marvin smiled at Marjorie then. Any vacation ideas? She shook her head. He saw in her the years of love and friendship, and he saw, right in front of him, the same gorgeous, sexy young woman he was once ready to kill for. She hadnt changed a bit. He took her hand. How about we drive for a hundred miles, get a motel room, watch old movies and eat take-out pizza? Youre on!Brought to you by A Cowboys Guide to Growing Up Right, for young people of all ages. Read a sample at www.slimrandles.com.Love advice for Valentines Day

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 5Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Christian Coalition is sponsoring the annual Black History Month Celebration this weekend. Starting from Friday, Feb. 15t evening to Sunday, Feb. 17, well be having our events, said Bossie Hawkins, treasurer of the group. The Arthur Andrews scholarship banquet at the Senior Center is on Friday evening, the parade followed by activities in Hudson Park on Saturday, and the AfroAmerican Read-In on Sunday. Its usually fun and interesting at the same time, said Jennie Jones, Wakulla Coalition President. The Wakulla County Christian Coalition has presented our programs for a few years now, said Jones. We use any money generated after our expenses to fund scholarships. Traditionally, the coalition has funded at least two $500 scholarships for worthy students through their activities. We do this for students regardless of race, Jones remarked. We care about all the students. Along with having fun, we encourage literacy and education with our young people. Friday nights banquet will be at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. The speaker will be Dr. Osie eld Anderson, retired head of the mathematics department at Florida A&M. Fred Lee will be our entertainment, said Ruth Francis, secretary of the group. Tickets are still available. The fun part is Saturday, celebrating heritage and history with a parade and a fun day in the park. Well have music, food and other vendors, Jones said. The parade will start at 11 a.m. and then we will have our gathering in Hudson Park around noon, with food vendors and a variety of activities. The literacy part is Sunday, with the AfroAmerican Read-In from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The public is invited to bring readings of their favorite Afro-American authors to the event. Local and regional authors also participate, reading from their work. Smaller children will also have a chance to read or to be read to, in a separate room. Tickets for the banquet are still available. Come hear a great speaker and good singing said Jones. Tickets are $30 for individuals and $55 for couples and can be obtained by calling Ruth Francis at 926-6058, Jennie Jones, 926-7547, or Hugh Taylor, 926-6058. We have the banquet to raise scholarship money and everyone is invited although there is a fee. All other events are free and open to the community, said Jones. Additionally, the WCCC will be having a Day of Service on Saturday, Feb. 23, cleaning M.L. King Road. Everyone is invited. Meet at 9 a.m. at 1357 M. L. King (the pink home with the New Wakulla Mastodon). *Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.Sometimes its nothing more than excessive ear wax. We use our state-of-the-art Video Otoscope to look inside your ear canal. You can watch on a video monitor as it happens.ANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGIST TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL1500 Apalachee ParkwayToll Free 1-866-942-4007EVERY THURSDAYCRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDINGCall for an appointment 850-942-4007NOT HAPPY WITH YOUR CURRENT HEARING AIDS? 3 YEAR WARRANTY!FREE Hearing Test FREE Ear Canal Inspection $27WE OFFER HEARING HELP AS LOW ASper monthwith approved credit. $1,000For your old Hearing Aids Dead or Alive$500 Per Hearing Aid. Limit 2. Not available with any other discounts, oers, or prior purchases.Expires March 28, 2013 Introducing ClearVation: The Next Generation Of Miracle Ear Technology 000DW5BFrom Page 1 It was not uncommon for Hudson and her mother, Minnie Green Rosier, to walk three miles to a familys home, wash and hang their clothes and then travel three miles back home. The going rate for their work: 50 cents a day. At 14, Hudsons father moved the family to the Helen area, where he secured a job working on one of the farms of a white family. Three miles down the road from where she currently lives is the site of the Helen Lumber Company. Not far from it was a hotel many years ago where she washed dishes on weekends. I washed dishes for a dollar a week. Back then, if you had a dollar, you had a lotta money. The laws limiting associations between the blacks and whites of the south tended to be a bit mind-boggling. Their relations outside of the public eye were rather friendly and familial. Hudson recounts a family she and her family worked for: The S family. The girls, both black and white, practically grew up together and considered each other friends. They (the S family) had a daughter named Helene, Hudson remembers. She had gotten married and left here. So one day, I asked Mrs. S, what happened to Helene. She said, Lacie, Helene is a full-grown woman now. Shes married. That meant for me to call her Mrs. Helene. Lacies response didnt make the situation any better. I said, She should be full-grown, because her and my baby sister played together. My baby sisters a grown woman and married too. I had let her know that I knew exactly what she meant: When the white children got a certain age, you called them Mr. or Mrs. The son of the same family, whom Lacie knew well, became a different person when among his peers. My sister and I were walking along the road, she says, and whenever you saw the white peoples cars coming you had to move quick and get off the road cause they would drive toward you, or throw things at you out the window. Mr. Ss son was riding in the car with another white boy, and they would yell jokes like, I think its gonna rain today cause I see two dark clouds rising. In 1939, her rst husband, Joseph Franklin, was killed in an automobile accident. He was on his way to work at about 5:30 in the morning, she remembers. There was a wreck, he was thrown from the car and broke his neck. On the heels of this rst agony would follow an even graver disappointment. The company he worked for wouldnt give me the money hed worked and made outright before he died. They didnt help to pay for anything dealing with the accident or his death. She now has ve children and one stepson and recalls the days when she became active in bettering their future during the civil rights period of the 50s and 60s. Every time Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. came to Tallahassee and held rallies with Rev. C.K. Steele, I was right there. She would often stay with her sister-in-law and catch the bus down to what was then called the city barn, to meet up with her husband at the time, to attend meetings. While pregnant with her fth child an incident occurred that she was never to forget. I was riding the city bus and there was no room for me to sit. When I nally had a seat, I had to stand up for a white man to sit down and Im the one expecting. Later on, a few FAMU students got on the bus. They were told to go to the back. The students refused. An argument broke out and they took that bus driver, beat him up, threw him off the bus, and left. These incidents, abrupt and anger- lled for the times, did not ring as loudly as the personal implosions between two people forced to adjust in a world of unjust laws. You had a certain place that you could go in the dime stores of Tallahassee, she remembers, The black people wasnt allowed to eat there. I went in to buy me a pair of stockings and shoes and was gonna write a check. Back then, writing a check meant you had to tell what color you were. So the sales clerk asked me my name, how old I was, and my race. I told her I was a darkskinned white lady. I didnt laugh or change it. She hasnt asked me anything since. What must it be like to live so many years, and see so much change in the world? I feel like, frankly, all my friends are leaving, and have left me behind. But theres always someone calling, wanting to know something. And I say Thank you, Jesus for that. Thats why Hes keeping me here. To give somebody else information. After all the things shes seen in Wakulla, what was running through her mind when Barack Obama became the rst African-American president? I was so happy, says Hudson, that I did not know what to do. Im still praying that the Lord will give him the wisdom, the knowledge, understanding and courage to do what needs to be done. To deliver him from those trying to stop him. If God can take care of Moses, He can take care of Barack Obama, she says.Black History Celebration events are this weekendBlack History: e story of Lacie Hudson FILE PHOTOA parade oat from last years Black History Parade.

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By BETSY GOEHRIGAs I sat at lunch with members of Wakulla Rotary last week, I listened to a story told by Alice Veasman. She told us about her children who are in California and Colorado. She said there was a time she wondered if anyone would even know if something happened to her, so Alice and a friend made a pact that they would call each other every day to check on each other. What a simple yet beautiful gift to give one another the gift of presence and care. And that gift is so needed in a community and a state where so many people are from somewhere else and live here without their family. There are many people on this Valentines Day who will celebrate love and romance. But there are also numerous people on this day who will feel very alone and may even question what difference their lives make and wonder if theyd even be missed if anything happened to them. As many exchange gifts today, remember that the greatest presents are your presence. The greatest gift you can give is Gods love. The greatest Valentines you can have is to realize that your life makes a difference and that you still have something to offer. You have Gods love to share not just today, but every day. You may ask, What can I do? Im just a kid. Or What can I do? Im too old. Or Im too busy or too this or that, whatever label you choose for yourself. If youre on this earth, you have a reason for being here that is greater than your own existence.My belief is that if youre on the planet, theres something you still have to be, to do, to give that makes a difference. I want to share the story of Miss Cleo, whose life I found to be a great inspiration. When she was in her 60s, she had cancer and had many of her internal organs removed and was told she wouldnt live a year. A wise old doctor told her if shed give up sugar, salt, fried foods, red meat, and processed foods and only ate grilled or baked chicken and sh with fresh fruits and vegetables she could live to be 100. She made those simple changes and came close. She outlived that one year prognosis and made it to 94! Miss Cleo became seriously ill when she was about 85 years old, and the Visiting Nurses Association came in and took care of her. She wasnt expected to pull through once again but she did. She told them they had helped her so much she wanted to do something for them she wanted to volunteer. Turn to Page 7 Page 6 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In PrintFREE Standard Obituaries in The Wakulla News & Online (850) 926-7102 Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 By JAMES L. SNYDER February is the month we celebrate romance. Actually, the only romantic things about me are my love handles, which is why I have spent so much energy developing them over the years. You think somebody would appreciate them. For some people, romance is an easy, if not natural thing. Others, like me, find it complicated and elusive. It is not that men are less romantic than women are; they just have different ideas of romance. For most women, romance is owers and candy in heart shaped boxes. For men it is a Big Mac with fries and a soda ... and SUPER SIZE it, please. Why are women so complicated and men so simple? I do not think that came out the way I meant it. If it were not for women, romance would have died a long time ago. There is nothing quite like springtime with a hint of romance in the air with a delicate dash of chivalry. People from Hollywood try to define romance for us, but their idea of romance is raw sex and lurid lust. Hollywooders would not know romance if it nibbled on their ears. Romance is not a ing in the spring, but a lifelong relationship, experiencing all the ups and downs of life together and no growing apart! There is no picture quite as refreshing as a couple still together after all those years of turmoil and temerity. The easiest thing in all the world is to fall in love for a few years and then, when it gets dif- cult, bale out. What kind of thing is that? Ill have you know that romance has not been a stranger at the parsonage. I met my wife (actually, she wasnt my wife then) when I went away to Bible college in 1970. At the time, I was functionally romance challenged. Before I left home for college, I prayed for a wife. I had the good sense to know that a minister needs a good wife to support him in the ministry. I prayed something like this, Father, I need a good wife and I dont know how to go about it. Let the rst single girl I meet at Bible college be the wife of Your choosing. Now, I know this is a crazy and dangerous prayer to make. Some would take the high road of romance, but I took the low road of prayer. I may have been a bit desperate, but nobody could doubt my earnestness. I also gured that prayer was a lot cheaper than dating. After all, I am a Pennsylvania Dutchman. The day of my arrival on campus came and found me a bit anxious. I remembered my prayer and wondered just how God would answer it. As I pulled into the mens dorm parking lot, a young woman exited from the building. Remembering my prayer, I immediately amended it. God, this doesnt count. Ive not stepped out of the car yet. Have you ever noticed that God has a marvelous sense of humor? The young woman emerging from the mens dorm de ed description. Do you remember when women rolled their hair up in big rollers? Well, this young woman had rolled her hair up in tomato cans! Nothing prepared me for such a sight. She actually looked like some space alien. I do not know what she was wearing or even what she looked like. All I could see were those tomato cans on her head. At the time, I did not know much about romance, but I knew this was not it. The next few days I did everything to avoid the womens dorm for fear I would run into her. Whenever I did see her, I crossed to the other side of the street. But the more I tried to avoid her, the more I ran into her. Prayer makes strange partners. Thinking I was making progress in my plan of avoidance, the inevitable happened. One week after arrival, my roommate invited me to come along with him and his girlfriend to a restaurant. Being the neurotic naive that I am, I said, Sure, Id love to come along. After all, I had nothing else to do and it seemed like some fun. When my roommate went to the womens dorm to pick up his girlfriend, who do you suppose was standing with his girlfriend waiting? Thats right. The young woman with the tin cans on her head. She turned out to be the sister of my roommate. It was a whirlwind romance. I met her in September and in February she asked me to marry her. In August of that year, I found myself at a church altar mumbling, do. The Bible makes this promise: Whoso ndeth a wife ndeth a good thing, and obtaineth favour of the LORD (Proverbs 18:22 KJV). A good wife is the nd of a lifetime, as long as God is in charge of the search. Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at 1-866-552-2543 or email jamessnyder2@att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com.True love trumps a romantic fling every time HEAVENS TO BETSYWhat di erence does my life make? OUT TO PASTOR Are you ready for change? Join us for a Revival with Guest Speaker Douglas Chason Jr. on the following dates: Sunday, Feb. 17, at 10:30 a.m. and 7 p.m., and Monday, Feb. 18, through Wednesday, Feb. 20, at 7 p.m. Harvest Fellowship Church, 824 Shadeville Rd., Crawfordville. For more information call 850-926-4798 or revfredL@yahoo.com. New Bridge Hope Missionary Baptisdt Church will celebrate Black History Month with a program on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 11:30 a.m. Elder Kenneth Jones and his choir of St. Peter Missionary Baptist Church of Chaires will render the service. Church BriefsRevival set at Harvest Fellowship Black History program at New Bridge Hope M.B. Church

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 7Henry Jackson Harvey, 71, of Crawfordville, passed away on Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2013, in Crawfordville. He was born in Cairo, Ga., and was a lifelong resident of Crawfordville. He was a supervisor for Centel for 38 years and was a U.S. Army veteran. Family received friends on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home Harvey Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services were held at 2 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 8, 2013, at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville. Memorial contributions may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308 Survivors include two sons, Henry J. Hank Harvey and Hagan Dewey Harvey; one brother, Allen Harvey (Monica); two sisters, Lettie Harvey and Pam Powell; ve grandchildren, Amber Chason (William), Dillon, Courtney and Kaitlin Harvey and Alex Reardon; many nieces and nephews and great-nieces and greatnephews. He was predeceased by his parents, Hayward Harvey and Hazel White Harvey; and a sister, Bettye Pitman. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel was in charge of arrangements (850-926-3333 or www. bevisfh.com).Obituaries Henry Jackson Harvey Rhonda Gail Pope Holder Dorothy Dot Hilliard SloanRhonda Gail Pope Holder, 52, of Crawfordville, died on Thursday, Feb. 7, 2013, at her home after a battle with cancer. Survivors include her husband, Darrell Holder; two daughters, Gina Pope Rudd and Sheila Holder; a son, Nathaniel Holder; and six grandchildren; all of Crawfordville. She was predeceased by her parents, Glenn Pope Sr. and Mary Harvey Pope. A memorial service was held on Sunday, Feb. 10, 2013, at First Baptist Church of Crawfordville. Burial will be at Arran Cemetery in Crawfordville at a later date. Family is handling all arrangements. Dorothy Dot Hilliard Sloan, 62, of Crawfordville, died on Monday, Feb. 4, 2013, at home with family and friends. She was born in Raleigh, N.C. She was a hairdresser for more than 30 years. Survivors include a brother, Robert Bobby Bond; and a niece, Brittany Brooks, both of Virginia. She resided with her close friend and caregiver, Rita Allred of Crawfordville. Her last days were made comfortable by Covenant Hospice. She was predeceased by her husband, Stuart Wayne Sloan. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel is assisting the family with arrangements (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com).Rhonda Gail Pope Holder Dorothy Dot Hilliard Sloan Henry Jackson Harvey Eden Springs supports Covenant Hospices kids programBy ERIK PERSSONof Covenant HospiceAs the holiday season winds down and the last present is unwrapped, it gives us a moment to reflect on the gifts of family, friends and community. In our community, Covenant Hospice provides support to children with potentially life-limiting conditions. The special program, called Partners-In-Care: Together-For-Kids program provides pediatric palliative care (pain and symptom management) in partnership with Childrens Medical Services. Many children and families benefit from support when faced with a potentially life-limiting condition. Cancer, heart and lung conditions or Sickle Cell disease are just a few examples of the medical issues. Currently, the program serves 50 children throughout the eight county region. Sometimes during the holidays, people need extra help. Many families in our area have experienced nancial dif culties and it can be even harder if you have a child with a potentially lifelimiting condition. The money is spent traveling to doctors appointments or on extra medical supplies. In most cases, money just isnt there for Christmas gifts or holiday treats for the kids. At the end of the month, you are lucky if you have enough left over to take the kids out to a fast food restaurant for a special treat. For two special families, the caring staff (more like a family) of Eden Springs sprung to the holiday rescue when they heard of these two familys struggles. Initially, Margie Hamilton, activities director, gave a Thanksgiving holiday gift basket to one family. Excited and wanting to do more, she contacted Covenant Hospice about ways she and staff of Eden Springs could further help these children and their families enrolled in the PartnersIn-Care: Together-For-Kids program. Her excitement to help these families quickly spread throughout Eden Springs. Two Heart of Hospice awards were presented after the holidays. One was to Hamilton (Ms. Claus) for initiating and overseeing the collection of gifts. The second award went to the entire staff of Eden Springs Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. They possessed an infectious spirit of giving which was evident by the large stack of gifts ready to be delivered several days before Christmas. Erik Persson, LCSW, shared with Eden Springs the excitement and joy the children opening the gifts on Christmas morning. One child, quickly after opening his R/C helicopter; landed it on the roof. Erik shared that it took a large broomstick and minor acrobatics to retrieve the prized toy down off the roof! Overall, Eden Springs brought Christmas morning smiles and laughter to seven children from two families The real gift is seeing how the community can come together and help families in need. The new partnership between Eden Springs and Covenant Hospice is exciting and full of wonderful possibilities. If you want to know more about Covenant Hospice, a not-for-pro t organization and the Partners In Care: Together For Children program, please call (850) 575-4998.Margie Hamilton, Eden Springs activities director, above, surrounded by gifts. Erik Persson, LCSW of Partners-InCare: Together-For-Kids, left, presenting the Heart of Hospice to Chuck Cascio, Eden Springs administrator. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWS From Page 6She said they looked at each other and she could tell they were thinking, Whats this 85 year old woman who lives alone and is con ned to a wheelchair going to do for U.S.? She said, Well, I can use a phone, cant I? So Miss Cleo was given two people under the care of the Visiting Nurses Association to call each day to check on them. They continued to increase the number of patients she contacted, until she had 27 or 28 people she would call every day up until she died at 94 years old. (She also called 14 others from her church every day!) If the patient didnt answer the phone at their designated time, she would call back in 15 minutes. If they didnt answer that time, the next call was immediately to 911. One lady had fallen and broken her hip she got help only because of Miss Cleo, as it wasnt the nurses day to come. Another person had a heart attack and her life was saved only because of Miss Cleos call to 911. Miss Cleo made a huge difference in peoples lives, right from her own home. She even saved peoples lives people shed never met face-to-face, because she had a passion to help others and use what gifts she had at her disposal to do just that. Whatever your gifts and resources, however simple they may seem, God can use them. Regardless of your limitations, God can empower you to make a difference. On this Valentine Day, reach out with the love of God to be Gods presence in the life of someone who needs a word of hope and encouragement and to know their life matters! Giving love away lls your own life with an amazing, overflowing love and purpose. Blessings for today and every day! BetsyRev. Dr. Betsy Goehrig is an ordained minister in the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), having served as Pastor, Associate Regional Minister, Police Chaplain, and Hospice Chaplain.Goehrig: What di erence does my life make?Covenant Hospice celebrates 30 yearsSpecial to The NewsThroughout 2013 Covenant Hospice will celebrate its 30th Anniversary with various events and celebrations in memory of the more than 60,000 patients that the not-forprofit organization has had the honor serving. In 1980, ve hospitals in the Pensacola area, including the Naval hospital, appointed a volunteer steering committee to develop a community based, not-for-pro t hospice program. On Dec. 15, 1983, Florida of cials issued a license to begin operations as a free standing hospice and the first patient was admitted in January 1984. The corporate name became Covenant Hospice Inc. in 2001 to better re ect the promise of care provided to patients and families. In July 2003, hospice expanded its operations into the eight counties of Gadsden, Franklin, Jefferson, Liberty, Leon, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla served by the central branch located in Tallahassee with a community support center located in Perry. For more information about Covenant Hospice or to make a hospice inquiry, contact the local branch of ce at (251) 6265255 or visit www.covenanthospice.org. all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts Color F acial Waxings Specialty Cuts F lat T ops F eather Locks Color P erms Highlights MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. 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Page 8 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community Community Call 962-3711 for Ticket Information SPONSORED BY: Quiggs Tax Service WITH SPECIAL GUESTJOSH NOLAND & FRIENDSALSO APPEARINGRICK KNOWLES TRACY & JEANNIE PEREZSopchoppyOpry.comSOUTHBOUND BAND LOCAL SAVINGS.850-558-52521700-14 N Monroe St Tallahassee Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image 1999-2012. 2012 GEICO850.224.4960www.fsucu.org MISS WAKULLA COUNTY PAGEANTYou may also call Michelle (926-8754), Tara (294-5955) or email us at misswakullacounty@yahoo.comOpen to Wakulla County young ladies age 4 through 8th gradeApplication deadline: February 19, 2013For more information on how to enter, please visit MissWakullaCounty.blogspot.comMarch 9, 2013Young paddlers clean up the Sopchoppy River Special to The NewsThe Florida Youth Conservation Centers Network held its rst Paddle Pickup on the Sopchoppy River, Saturday, Feb. 2. The City of Sopchoppy recently became a FYCCN partner, joining a statewide network of partners to provide places where youth and their families can participate in outdoor activities and safely share experiences that inspire lifelong support for sh and wildlife conservation. The river cleanup provided the opportunity and training needed for youth paddlers to assist in restoring and protecting all rivers. Nine youth paddlers and their family members, along with FYCCN counselors, had a fun and productive morning removing boatloads of debris from the river. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe nine members of the Florida Youth Conservation Center Network, counselors and family members collect an entire dumpster full of trash from the Sopchoppy River, including a TV. After seeing dog on Facebook, couple adopts RosieSpecial to The NewsOn Thursday, Feb. 7, Katrina Cochran of Progress Energy visited the Florida Wild Mammal Association to present them with a check for $1,000 to sponsor their 2013 T-shirt fundraising effort. Cochran was also taken on a tour of the facility and was very impressed with the facility and services the FWMA provides to the wildlife. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSProgress Energy donates to Florida Wild Mammal Special to The NewsA woman and her husband recently came from Connecticut to rescue and adopt a dog that had a very slim chance of ever nding a home. Rosie had been abandoned in the Wakulla County Animal Shelters drop box with only a note that gave them her name. No reason for surrendering her and no name of the owner. She climbed out of the kennel and was running around the re grounds next door. She was terri ed and no one couldnt catch her. Finally, they set a trap for her and caught her. She was so afraid that when anyone entered the shelter, she would run to the back of the kennel and just cower by the gate. The adopter, Lisa, saw Rosie on the Friends of Wakulla Animal Shelter Facebook page and instantly felt a connection to Rosie. This story has a happy ending and it demonstrates the positive power of social networking, said Ivanhoe Carroll, director of Animal Control. After many emails and telephone conversations, she decided that Rosie needed to live with her and her husband, Bruce. They took a week off from work, ew to Jacksonville, rented a car, drove to the shelter and drove her back to Connecticut. She was such an excellent passenger on the long trip to Connecticut, Lisa said. Never a sound. Upon arriving at her new home, she met her new siblings, ve cats, and a dog. Rosie stays by my side all of the time, Lisa said. Wherever I go, she comes along. She is wagging, and letting her face relax and taking affection and last night she rolled over for me to pet her tummy. They took her to the veterinarian who said she is no older than 2 years and in good health. She has also been spayed. This is one of many success stories at the shelter. According to Carroll, director of Animal Control, they have not put a dog to sleep for space reasons since August of last year. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRosie is picked up at the animal shelter by her newly adopted parents from Connecticut, at left. Above, Rosie relaxes at the her new home. Free tax preparation is o ered Special to The NewsThe BEST Project, an initiative of the United Way of the Big Bend is offering free tax preparation through its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). Each year, VITA offers free tax preparation by IRScerti ed volunteers at sites throughout the Big Bend. This fast, free and con dential service is available to Wakulla County residents who need help with their basic, current year tax returns. Wakulla County VITA Sites: Wakulla County Library, 4330 Crawfordville Highway. Site opened Feb. 2. Thursday: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday: 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wakulla Senior Center, 33 Michael Drive. Site opened Feb. 6. Wednesday: 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Sites are operated by BEST Project community partners, AARP Tax Aide. The BEST Project also offers a free, online ling service for families and individuals whose total household income does not exceed $57,000. Please visit www.MyFreeTaxes.com/thebestproject or click here for more information. For more information or to get a list of other VITA locations, dial 2-1-1 or visit www.theBESTproject. org.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 9education news from local schools School Full Menu & Specials will be Offered Thursday,Februar y Walk-ins Welcome J OIN Come Woodville 850 421-9191 8056 Woodville Hwy. Four Locations to Serve You! Open: Thurs. 11-9 Fri. & Sat. 11-10 Sun. 11-9 850 697-9191 850 933-2695 Accross from Lake Ella in the Publix Shopping Center Restaurants Open Sun. Thurs. 11 A.M. 9 P.M. Fri. & Sat. 11 A.M. 10 P.M. 11 AM 9 PM Captains Platter for two Tallahassee 850 386-9191 850 556-1865 Mobile Kitchen WINE & BEER Also Available Live Music Surf & Turf Fresh Flounder Crab Claws Maryland Style Crab Cakes Thurs. & Sat. 11-8 In Between Rose Alley & The Animal HospitalComplimentary glass of wine or beer with entree! Crawfordville holds Creat ive Writing Bowl Special to The NewsCrawfordville Elementary School recently held its annual Creative Writing Bowl headed up by third grade teacher Kim Bartnick and assisted by art teacher Jennifer Brooks. The contest began with students in third through fth grades participating in a class writing competition. There were two winners chosen from each class to compete for the schoolwide title. An art sample was selected by both Bartnick and Brooks then students wrote a creative story on the art work selected. They were given 60 minutes to write the story and the winners were selected from the group of 28-32 students participating. To compete in the writing bowl, a student must have a creative mind; must be well read; have a keen vocabulary; be an excellent speller and understand the formality of sentence structure. This year, our eldest Cougars showed that they had the most mature and creative writing skills. The winners of the 2013 Creative Writing Bowl were Gracie Bruce taking rst place, George Harper with second place and Keira Cushard taking third place. Our community partner, Ace Hardware donated the beautiful trophies for our contest. The school appreciates their continual support. Crawfordville is proud of all of the students who participated in this years competition, but we would like to offer a special congratulations to Gracie, George and Keira, said Principal Angie Walker. Way to go, Cougars! SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCreative Writing Bowl winners are Gracie Bruce, George Harper and Keira Cushard. 22 achieve honor roll Special to The NewsStaff at Providence Christian Academy are pleased to announce the names of the students who achieved honor roll status during fall semester. Students who achieved the Principals (A) Honor Roll by completing their required units of study as well as scoring an average of 94 to 100 percent during the first nine-weeks on all their written tests are Daniel Abraham, Liliana Abraham, Thomas Bryant, Cody Folsom, Kara Folsom, Justin Gunn, Lakota IbarraBass, Hannah Jowers, Isaac Medina, Hannah Wells, Hunter Wells and Matthew Wilde. Students who scored between 88 and 93 percent and completed all their required units of study to make Supervisors (B) Honor Roll are Joy Aviles, John Braden, Savannah Causseaux, Paul Croley, Rebecca Durrance, Shelby Isman, Alex Johnson, Amber Mispel, Jake Taylor and Ashley Turnbow. I so excited for these students who worked diligently to complete all their work, and also scored so high, said Pastor Folsom. Their scores contribute to Providences continuing status as a model school and is a re ection of their character as a student and a young person striving to follow Christ. Providence Christian Academy, a ministry of Central Baptist Church, is located at 710 Shadeville Road, two miles northwest of the Wakulla County Courthouse. For more information about the school or available scholarships, call 926-2456 or visit www. centralbaptistcf.com. THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDABACK TO SCHOOL EARLY School districts could start the school year earlier if needed for students to complete all their coursework and tests by ve days before Christmas under a bill led in the House on Tuesday. The measure (HB 657), sponsored by Rep. Larry Metz, R-Yalaha, says school districts can start the year early as necessary to reach that goal. Currently, public schools in Florida cant begin the school year until 14 days before Labor Day. BRANDES BILL CALLS FOR LOCKDOWN DRILLS Schools would be required to hold lockdown drills under a bill sponsored by Sen. Jeff Brandes, R-St. Petersburg. The measure (SB 790) would require schools to hold the same number of lockdown drills as they do evacuation drills, though it says schools arent required to hold more total drills than they do now. Police and re ghters would be encouraged to take part in the drills. A school employee would have to le a report with the school district on the drill. As a military of cer I used after-action reports as an invaluable tool to improve my units performance, Brandes said in a statement. It is my expectation that this tool will also improve the safety procedures at our educational institutions. SCHOOL BUS CAMERA BILL AIMED AT BUS STOP SIGN IGNORERS A bill that would let school districts put cameras on school buses with the hope of getting pictures of drivers who dont observe the school bus stop signs when children are boarding was led Tuesday in the House. The measure (HB 669) by Rep. Ed Hooper, R-Clearwater, was also led last year but died in committee. Under the bill, for which there is no Senate companion yet, the images or video recorded by a school bus safety camera could not contain the faces of people driving through the stop sign. The ne for getting caught blowing through a school bus stop sign under the legislation would be $250.School briefs School News: Email school news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews. net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available.

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Page 10 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports Low Country Boil Low Country Boil Presented by April 6, 20136pm -10pm 3Y Ranch at 195 Harvey Young Farm (Off Rehwinkel Road, Crawfordville) www.3yranch.com Live Music By: Locomotive Locomotive $ 35 per ticket (incl. dinner & entertainment) CASH BAR For information and tickets call (850) 926-1848 PROCEEDS GO TOWARDS CONTIN UED IMPROVEMENT OF THE WAKULLA HISTORICAL COURTHOUSE TICKETS AVAILABLE AT CHAMBER OFFICE, CAPITAL CITY BANK, THE WAKULLA NEWS Annual Annual Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 926-3281 Promise LandOpen 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. -----Color Tag 50% Tues. ----------Seniors 25% Thurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthousewww.promiselandministries.orgTHRIFT STORE Start working out NOW! CALL TODAY! LET US MAKE YOURGena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 FitnessResolutiona Reality 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERECall 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com From Page 1 Gauger moderates his optimism, noting that the team has a tough schedule against some good district opponents. But we should have a pretty good chance to do something pretty good, he says. Whatever happens, he says, you know these guys will go down trying. Three senior leaders on the team are out elder and pitcher Jeff Barnes, pitcher Jake Walker and catcher Dalton Dugger. Barnes, who missed most of last season after he broke his ankle in the second game, said hes looking forward to the team coming together. His goal: Repeat what we did our sophomore year and make it through the playoffs. Walker pitched in that Final Four game two years ago, and says he wants to get the most of himself out there on the eld. His goal: Go as far as we can in the playoffs. Dugger had a bit of a reverse take on it: Having seen the eyes of the seniors last year, he doesnt want his season to end that way. He thinks they can go further, if we play to our potential. Walker adds, I know we have a good team and we just want to play well. Im excited about the season, Barnes said.War Eagles have big hopes for this seasonWRESTLING9 War Eagles headed to state nalsSpecial to The NewsWakulla War Eagles wrestling traveled to Bolles High School this past weekend for regionals. Thirty schools participated and Wakulla took second place just 19 points behind Clay high school. Wakulla quali ed nine of 14 wrestlers for the state series set for this weekend in Lakeland where the top 16 wrestlers of Division-1A will compete. Advancing to state are: Austin Runyan 106lbs., Zach Malik 113lbs., DyJuan Carney 120lbs., Bill Morgan 126lbs., Kevon White 132lbs., Drew Delong 182lbs., James Douin 195lbs., Keith Godden 220lbs., and Chris Grif n 285lbs.. PHOTOS BY ROBERT DOUIN/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS Wakulla wrestlers in action at last weeks regionals in Jacksonville.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 11 NATIONAL SIGNING DAYEight War Eagles sign football scholarships PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENThe eight scholar-athletes at a signing ceremony at the Wakulla High School auditorium on Wednesday, Feb. 6. Quarterback Caleb Stephens signed with the Brevard University Tornadoes, a Division II school in North Carolina. Defensive back Mikal Cromartie signed with the Coffeyville Red Ravens, a community college in Kansas. Linebacker Fred Cummings signed with the Coffeyville Red Ravens, a community college in Kansas. Linebacker Kevin James signed with the Coffeyville Red Ravens, a community college in Kansas. Offensive lineman Chris Grif n signed with the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets, the Division I school in Atlanta. Running back Demetrius Lindsey signed with Southeastern University Fire, an NAIA school in Florida. Linebacker Dalton Bohannon, left, signed with the St. Francis Fighting Saints, an NAIA school in Illinois. Offensive lineman Jonathan Chunn, left, signed with the Washington University of St. Louis, a Division III school in Missouri. 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. . n t LUNCH PARTNER R R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS MARK OLIVER (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nichols pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you850519-7238 850926-3065LICENSED AND INSURED

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Page 12 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsFrom DEP NewsTALLAHASSEE The Florida Cabinet, sitting as the Board of Trustees of the Internal Improvement Trust Fund, recently approved the modi cation of a lease agreement between Palace Entertainment and the state of Florida, allowing the property to become part of Floridas state park system on Oct. 1. Palace Entertainments lease to manage the Silver Springs Attraction ran until Dec. 31, 2029. Through negotiations with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the state has secured $4 million in work by Palace Entertainment in order to restore the property to its natural condition, as originally intended by the Board of Trustees. Palace Entertainment will continue to manage the property until Sept. 30 and during that time the Silver Springs Attraction will be open. We are pleased that the Governor and Cabinet have decided to approve this agreement so that the Department can return the property closer to its natural state, involve the community in recreation opportunity decisions and continue our efforts of improving water quality in Silver Springs, one of Floridas most iconic treasures, said DEP Secretary Herschel T. Vinyard Jr. The Department will begin implementing the Interim Facilities and Operations Plan that was presented to the public Jan. 14 by the Florida Park Service. The long term unit management plan, which is required by Florida Statutes, is anticipated to be completed by September 2014. Floridas 171 state parks, trails and historic sites are pleased to welcome the Silver Springs property into our family of resource-based recreation areas and historic and cultural sites, said Donald Forgione, DEPs Florida Park Service Director. We look forward to working with Palace Entertainment during the transition and to opening the gates on Oct. 1 as a state park. Turning the property into a state park is another step the Department has taken to restore Silver Springs. Also Wednesday, the Departments Division of Environmental Assessment and Restoration held the first meeting to nalize a basin management action plan for Silver Springs -the rst such restoration plan to reduce nitrates affecting the springs. Department research and monitoring led to designating Silver Springs and the Upper Silver River as impaired for nitrate, a form of nitrogen that causes excessive algae growth in the spring system. Last November, the Department finalized the total maximum daily load or, in this case, the maximum acceptable concentration of nitrate, at 0.35 milligrams per liter. This is the same restoration target that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has adopted for springs based on the Departments data and that has been upheld in both state and federal courts. Meeting the restoration target will protect aquatic life and bring the system back into balance. The Florida Department of Environmental Protection expanded its efforts to restore Silver Springs last July, committing more than $1 million to water quality improvement projects. The Department, Marion County and the St. Johns River Water Management District have identi ed the rst project to bene t from this funding, committing $300,000, $300,000 and $100,000, respectively, toward the project. The project will eliminate a wastewater discharge from the Silver Springs Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, which is within 1.5 miles of the main boil of Silver Springs. It will redirect wastewater to the Silver Springs Shores Wastewater Treatment Plant, which provides higher level treatment and is 10 miles from the head spring. In a subsequent phase of the project, a series of small package wastewater treatment plants also will be connected to the central facility, which will provide better treatment and reduce pollution. Implementation of these actions collectively will eliminate more than two tons of nitrogen currently going into the Silver Springs system every year.From FWC NewsThis report represents some events the FWC handled in the Northwest Region over the week of Feb. 1 through Feb. 7 but does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Just after midnight, Lt. Brian Lambert checked two individuals at the Quintet Boat Ramp on the Escambia River. The subjects had just returned to the ramp and their vessel was still in the water. They were in possession of a ri e, shotgun, and a spotlight. One of the individuals was acting nervous, stepped behind the vehicle, and attempted to dump something out of his pocket. The subject was found to be in possession of cannabis and drug paraphernalia, and was issued a notice to appear citation for the violations. Both subjects said they were camping and returned to their vehicle to get more food and alcohol. OKALOOSA COUNTY: Lt. Mark Hollinhead and Of cer Phillip Grif th responded to a complaint of dogs pursuing deer in the still hunt area of Blackwater WMA. Lt. Hollinhead and Of cer Grif th were given a detailed description of the two vehicles involved. The vehicles and subjects were located exiting the management area. When the of cers tried to identify a passenger in one of the vehicles, he was evasive, very nervous, and stated he did not have any identi cation. When the subject pulled out his trouser pockets, in an attempt to show the of cers he did not have his identi cation, drug paraphernalia dropped to the ground. Realizing his error, he quickly ed on foot into a wooded area. As the subject dove head rst over a barbed wire fence, his wallet dropped to the ground. The wallet contained an identi cation card. Once he was identi- ed, the of cers discovered he was a habitual felony offender and had active warrants for felony drug possession and driving while license suspended. The Okaloosa County Sheriffs Department responded with a K-9 Of cer and searched for the subject until the of cers determined he got a ride from a nearby residence and left the area. The subjects vehicle was located and discovered to have an altered tag attached which was not registered to the vehicle. The Sheriff Departments K-9 alerted on the vehicle, and a subsequent search con rmed the vehicle contained illegal drugs. Contents of a methamphetamine lab were removed from the vehicle and residue on items tested positive for methamphetamine. Charges will be direct- led with the State Attorneys Of ce for manufacturing methamphetamine, possession of methamphetamine, possession of drug paraphernalia, hunting violations, possible possession of a rearm by convicted felon, and resisting arrest without violence. Silver Springs to become state park following Cabinet approvalMaking Silver Springs Attraction a state park allows the Florida Department of Environmental Protection to continue its water quality work in the springs basin.PHOTO BY DEPPalace Entertainment s lease is terminated; the Silver Springs property will become a state park on Oct. 1 FWC Law Enforcement operations Guest Speaker Douglas Chason Jr Are You Ready For Change? RevivalSunday, February 17 10:30 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Mon.-Wed. February 18-20 7:00 p.m.850-926-4798 Harvest Fellowship IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle GET READY FOR Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 13Some say you cant teach an old dog new tricks, but this weekend Flotilla 12 had the opportunity to prove that wrong. Members came together at the Navy Reserve Center in Tallahassee for our monthly meeting and training. For some, it was a normal procedure to enter into a military facility, for others, this was new territory. Saluting and asking permission to come aboard by crossing the deck was a learning curve. The Navy personnel were more than gracious to all of us. In addition to 17 members present, we had three prospective members. In preparation for the upcoming boating season, we set the date for our next Boating Safety Class: March 23. If you are interested in attending, please contact Alex Gulde, our Flotilla Staff Officer for Public Education at FSO-PE@ uscgaux.net. We will also be out at Springtime Tallahassee on April 6 if you would like to learn more about us and safe boating. We are also preparing to resume water sampling for red tide as we begin our regularly scheduled patrols. This year will be an exciting one for many of us. Every three years those of us who are crew qualified are required to requalify by demonstrating skills while out on the water under the watch of a Quali cation Examiner. This QE cannot be from our own otilla, so it involves a good amount of coordination. Dave Rabon discussed the continued efforts of the detachment in St. George Island. They also have several interested individuals. As we concluded our meeting, awards were presented to Chuck Hickman for 5,250 total hours of sustained service, Larry Kolk for 5,250 hours of sustained service, Carolyn Treadon for 10 years of membership and 6,000 hours of sustained service and Duane Treadon for 7,500 hours of sustained service. Following our meeting, Mark Rosen presented our annual Team Coordination Training. This mandatory training is required for all members who participate in operations on the water, including radio watch. Throughout the training, a scenario is presented and successes as well as errors are discussed. This year, the primary focus was on the importance of effective communication and following proper procedures. Following the Auxiliary TCT training, Tim Ashley, Bob Asztalos, Mark Rosen and Duane Treadon presented a Safe Boating class to six sailors attached to the Navy Reserve Unit: Naval Security Force Panama City. All six sailors passed the course and Auxiliarist personnel signed off relevant Boat Handling Training in their Harbor Security Personal Quali cation Standards. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. If you are interested in becoming involved in the Auxiliary, check out our website at www.uscgaux. net for membership information or contact our Flotilla Staff Of cer for Human Resources Fran Keating at fso-hr@uscgaux.net.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Mark Rosen teaching Navy Reservists. Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon and Auxiliarists.When you rst take an open water training class it is a bit like drinking from a re hose. You will be bombarded with information, terminology and equipment, all the while you are daydreaming about that upcoming vacation. Much of what youre force-fed only comes to realization much later in your diving career. One of those things is decompression. A term often shrouded in fear, misunderstanding and disappointment. Those who know nothing about it usually fear it, those who know very little usually avoid it, and those who are familiar with decompression tend to be disappointed by encountering it. Decompression, or deco, is the term divers have given to stopping their ascent at speci ed incremental depths and for calculated amounts of time to allow the inert gasses that has accumulated in their system during the dive to be released safely. The concept is often compared to opening a bottle of soda. Open it slowly and the gas is released and few bubbles are observed, open it fast and bubbles can over ow the top. As divers we dont want to bubble as it would literally make the blood boil. Decompression stops are usually unnecessary when diving within the recreational diving limits, which is part of the de nition of recreational diving in contrast to technical diving. The practice of a safety stop was developed to allow your body to equalize a bit with the lessening pressure, typically at 15-20 feet deep. Your body undergoes the largest pressure change during the transition from the rst atmosphere underwater, about 33 feet, to the surface. This safety stop is about half that distance to the surface, a critical point for one to ensure their ascent is controlled and the air spaces in the body can catch up with the pressure change. While not an explicit decompression stop the safety stop nonetheless minimizes bubble formation, and is a healthy practice. Some instructors will teach that every dive is a decompression dive, which is technically true. More often than not that is the last and only time the subject is mentioned in an entry level class. In single cylinder diving decompression is not recommended, as these mandatory stops often require ample breathing gas and prevent an immediate ascend to the safety of the surface. That being said, if the water is warm enough, decompression stops are usually my favorite portion of the dive. I am able to relax, watch the local wildlife if present, or play games underwater. Some people even take books to read on dives where long decompression is planned. Deco time can be enjoyed on a wall dive in the ocean, tucked out of the ow in a cave passage, on a shot line in the great lakes, and anywhere in between. You have paid for the breathing gas, fuel, food and other expenses associated with diving so why be in a hurry to leave the water? Instead of doing two or three short dives in a day you could do one that is longer than the short dives combined and spend the rest of the day enjoying your vacation. This of course requires additional training and equipment but it can provide for a new way to explore and enjoy the underwater world when you are no longer as concerned with beating the clock of staying within the recreational limits. Rebreathers ad an interesting twist to the subject. Suddenly you can do that extra long dive and still not acquire mandatory stops at the same rate of an open circuit diver. How about diving to 70 feet all day and never having a deco stop pop up on your dive computer? See you on deco. UnderwaterWakullaBy Travis Kersting P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FLMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.mikesmarineorida.com MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Feb 14, 13 Fri Feb 15, 13 Sat Feb 16, 13 Sun Feb 17, 13 Mon Feb 18, 13 Tue Feb 19, 13 Wed Feb 20, 13 D ate 2.7 ft. 4:26 AM 2.4 ft. 5:10 AM 2.1 ft. 6:04 AM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 10:10 AM 0.7 ft. 10:35 AM 1.1 ft. 11:02 AM 0.4 ft. 12:55 AM 0.5 ft. 2:28 AM 0.3 ft. 4:03 AM 0.1 ft. 5:09 AM L ow 3.2 ft. 4:15 PM 3.1 ft. 4:39 PM 2.9 ft. 5:06 PM 1.8 ft. 7:25 AM 1.8 ft. 9:30 AM 2.0 ft. 11:04 AM 2.3 ft. 11:51 AM Hi g h 0.0 ft. 11:02 PM 0.2 ft. 11:51 PM 1.3 ft. 11:36 AM 1.6 ft. 12:37 PM 1.8 ft. 2:34 PM 1.6 ft. 4:27 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 5:40 PM 2.5 ft. 6:36 PM 2.4 ft. 8:40 PM 2.5 ft. 10:31 PM Hi g h Thu Feb 14, 13 Fri Feb 15, 13 Sat Feb 16, 13 Sun Feb 17, 13 Mon Feb 18, 13 Tue Feb 19, 13 Wed Feb 20, 13 D ate 2.0 ft. 4:18 AM 1.8 ft. 5:02 AM Hi g h 0.3 ft. 10:21 AM 0.5 ft. 10:46 AM 0.1 ft. 12:02 AM 0.3 ft. 1:06 AM 0.3 ft. 2:39 AM 0.3 ft. 4:14 AM 0.1 ft. 5:20 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 4:07 PM 2.3 ft. 4:31 PM 1.5 ft. 5:56 AM 1.4 ft. 7:17 AM 1.3 ft. 9:22 AM 1.5 ft. 10:56 AM 1.7 ft. 11:43 AM Hi g h 0.0 ft. 11:13 PM 0.8 ft. 11:13 AM 1.0 ft. 11:47 AM 1.2 ft. 12:48 PM 1.3 ft. 2:45 PM 1.2 ft. 4:38 PM L ow 2.2 ft. 4:58 PM 2.0 ft. 5:32 PM 1.9 ft. 6:28 PM 1.8 ft. 8:32 PM 1.9 ft. 10:23 PM Hi g h Thu Feb 14, 13 Fri Feb 15, 13 Sat Feb 16, 13 Sun Feb 17, 13 Mon Feb 18, 13 Tue Feb 19, 13 Wed Feb 20, 13 D ate 2.5 ft. 5:02 AM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 11:14 AM 0.0 ft. 12:06 AM 0.2 ft. 12:55 AM 0.3 ft. 1:59 AM 0.4 ft. 3:32 AM 0.3 ft. 5:07 AM 0.1 ft. 6:13 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 4:51 PM 2.2 ft. 5:46 AM 1.9 ft. 6:40 AM 1.7 ft. 8:01 AM 1.7 ft. 10:06 AM 1.9 ft. 11:40 AM 2.1 ft. 12:27 PM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 11:39 AM 1.0 ft. 12:06 PM 1.2 ft. 12:40 PM 1.5 ft. 1:41 PM 1.6 ft. 3:38 PM 1.5 ft. 5:31 PM L ow 2.9 ft. 5:15 PM 2.7 ft. 5:42 PM 2.5 ft. 6:16 PM 2.3 ft. 7:12 PM 2.2 ft. 9:16 PM 2.3 ft. 11:07 PM Hi g h Thu Feb 14, 13 Fri Feb 15, 13 Sat Feb 16, 13 Sun Feb 17, 13 Mon Feb 18, 13 Tue Feb 19, 13 Wed Feb 20, 13 D ate 2.1 ft. 4:10 AM 1.9 ft. 4:54 AM 1.6 ft. 5:48 AM Hi g h 0.4 ft. 9:49 AM 0.7 ft. 10:14 AM 1.0 ft. 10:41 AM 0.4 ft. 12:34 AM 0.4 ft. 2:07 AM 0.3 ft. 3:42 AM 0.1 ft. 4:48 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 3:59 PM 2.4 ft. 4:23 PM 2.3 ft. 4:50 PM 1.4 ft. 7:09 AM 1.4 ft. 9:14 AM 1.6 ft. 10:48 AM 1.8 ft. 11:35 AM Hi g h 0.0 ft. 10:41 PM 0.2 ft. 11:30 PM 1.3 ft. 11:15 AM 1.6 ft. 12:16 PM 1.7 ft. 2:13 PM 1.6 ft. 4:06 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 5:24 PM 2.0 ft. 6:20 PM 1.9 ft. 8:24 PM 2.0 ft. 10:15 PM Hi g h Thu Feb 14, 13 Fri Feb 15, 13 Sat Feb 16, 13 Sun Feb 17, 13 Mon Feb 18, 13 Tue Feb 19, 13 Wed Feb 20, 13 D ate 2.8 ft. 4:23 AM 2.4 ft. 5:07 AM 2.1 ft. 6:01 AM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 10:07 AM 0.8 ft. 10:32 AM 1.1 ft. 10:59 AM 0.4 ft. 12:52 AM 0.5 ft. 2:25 AM 0.4 ft. 4:00 AM 0.2 ft. 5:06 AM L ow 3.2 ft. 4:12 PM 3.1 ft. 4:36 PM 3.0 ft. 5:03 PM 1.8 ft. 7:22 AM 1.8 ft. 9:27 AM 2.0 ft. 11:01 AM 2.3 ft. 11:48 AM Hi g h 0.0 ft. 10:59 PM 0.2 ft. 11:48 PM 1.5 ft. 11:33 AM 1.7 ft. 12:34 PM 1.9 ft. 2:31 PM 1.8 ft. 4:24 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 5:37 PM 2.6 ft. 6:33 PM 2.4 ft. 8:37 PM 2.6 ft. 10:28 PM Hi g h Thu Feb 14, 13 Fri Feb 15, 13 Sat Feb 16, 13 Sun Feb 17, 13 Mon Feb 18, 13 Tue Feb 19, 13 Wed Feb 20, 13 D ate 1.8 ft. 4:32 AM 1.6 ft. 5:33 AM 1.5 ft. 6:46 AM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 9:35 AM 0.7 ft. 9:57 AM 0.9 ft. 10:22 AM -0.0 ft. 12:49 AM -0.1 ft. 2:08 AM -0.1 ft. 3:21 AM -0.2 ft. 4:21 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 4:16 PM 2.3 ft. 4:42 PM 2.3 ft. 5:14 PM 1.4 ft. 8:20 AM 1.5 ft. 10:24 AM 1.6 ft. 11:52 AM 1.8 ft. 12:32 PM Hi g h 0.1 ft. 10:40 PM 0.0 ft. 11:38 PM 1.0 ft. 10:53 AM 1.2 ft. 11:43 AM 1.3 ft. 1:40 PM 1.3 ft. 3:25 PM L ow 2.3 ft. 5:54 PM 2.2 ft. 6:44 PM 2.2 ft. 7:47 PM 2.1 ft. 9:00 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacFeb. 14 Feb. 20First Feb. 17 Full Feb. 25 Last March 4 New March 11Major Times 3:57 AM 5:57 AM 4:20 PM 6:20 PM Minor Times 9:44 AM 10:44 AM 11:00 PM 12:00 AM Major Times 4:43 AM 6:43 AM 5:06 PM 7:06 PM Minor Times 10:20 AM 11:20 AM 11:55 PM 12:55 AM Major Times 5:30 AM 7:30 AM 5:53 PM 7:53 PM Minor Times --:---:-10:59 AM 11:59 AM Major Times 6:17 AM 8:17 AM 6:41 PM 8:41 PM Minor Times 12:49 AM 1:49 AM 11:41 AM 12:41 PM Major Times 7:04 AM 9:04 AM 7:28 PM 9:28 PM Minor Times 1:41 AM 2:41 AM 12:25 PM 1:25 PM Major Times 7:53 AM 9:53 AM 8:17 PM 10:17 PM Minor Times 2:31 AM 3:31 AM 1:12 PM 2:12 PM Major Times 8:41 AM 10:41 AM 9:05 PM 11:05 PM Minor Times 3:19 AM 4:19 AM 2:02 PM 3:02 PM Average Average Average Average Average Average+ Average7:17 am 6:25 pm 9:44 am 11:01 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:16 am 6:26 pm 10:22 am 11:56 pm 7:16 am 6:26 pm 11:00 am --:-7:15 am 6:27 pm 11:42 am 12:50 am 7:14 am 6:28 pm 12:26 pm 1:42 am 7:13 am 6:29 pm 1:13 pm 2:32 am 7:12 am 6:29 pm 2:03 pm 3:19 am28% 34% 41% 47% 53% 59% 65% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. PLEASE RECYCLE

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Page 14 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsIn other activity reported by the sheriffs of ce this week: JANUARY 31 John Cooper of Inverness reported an illegal dumping in Crawfordville. The victim last visited his property four months ago and it has since been used by individuals to dump construction debris and auto parts. The debris was spread out over the victims four lot location. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. A 14-year-old male was found in possession of marijuana at Wakulla High School. Assistant Principal Simeon Nelson conducted a search of the student and discovered less than 20 grams of marijuana inside a medicine bottle in a book bag. Deputy Scott Rojas issued the student a notice to appear in court for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. The marijuana weighed one gram. Riversprings Middle School Assistant Principal Michele Baggett reported that a 14-year-old juvenile was smoking marijuana in a school bathroom. The male student was interviewed by Baggett and turned over a bag with marijuana, marijuana residue and a lighter. The student was suspended from school and issued a civil citation for 32 hours of community service. The marijuana weighed 2.5 grams. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. The WCSO discovered four marijuana plants in a home occupied by James Levi Myers, 39, of Crawfordville. Florida Department of Law Enforcement agents conducted a search warrant with the WCSO for child pornography. Myers had property seized at the home and was charged with six counts of distribution of child pornography, 15 counts of possession of child pornography and four counts of cultivation of marijuana. The search warrant was served at 690 Crawfordville Highway. Myers remains in the Wakulla County Jail under a $135,000 bond. Detective Rob Giddens investigated along with members of the FDLE Cybercrime Squad at the Tallahassee Regional Operations Center. The four marijuana plants were seized by law enforcement. FEBRUARY 1 Jason Rawlins of Tallahassee reported a vehicle burglary on Mashes Sands Road. A VHF radio was stolen out of the victims boat. The boat was stored under his residence and the radio is valued at $175. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Patricia Candler of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim led her tax return and was informed by the IRS that the agency had already received a return with her Social Security number on it. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Katina Rosier of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Eighteen purchases were made using the victims bank card. The total value of the fraud is $8,021 at various locations in Orlando. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Matthew Ainsworth of Crawfordville reported the theft of a fuel transfer pump from his vehicle. The pump is valued at $100. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Larry L. Cook of Lake City reported a fraud. A suspect, who has been identi ed, created a phone line and added a phone on the victims telephone account. The value of the fraud is $500. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Michelle Leo of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Jewelry, tools and a computer, valued at $3,550, were reported missing. A forced entry was discovered. Deputy Mike Zimba, Detectives Lorne Whaley, Nick Boutwell and Derek Lawhon and Deputies Scott Rojas and Billy Metcalf investigated. FEBRUARY 2 Kimberly Perez of Crawfordville reported the theft of $200 from her vehicle. The vehicle was left unlocked by a friend who borrowed the vehicle. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Christy Brooks of Crawfordville reported a fraud. Two charges were discovered on the victims bank card from Dublin, Ireland. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Robert Lee Hill of Sopchoppy was arrested for possession of a weapon by a convicted felon. Lt. Brent Sanders and Deputy Mike Zimba responded to a disturbance call and discovered a ri e on Hills property. Deputy Billy Metcalf also investigated. Brandy Campbell of Crawfordville reported a grass re. A re originated in a trash barrel and damaged a non-functioning vehicle. The vehicle is valued at $400. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Kevin Yuri-Jan Satchell of Crawfordville was arrested for driving with a driver license that was suspended or revoked as a habitual offender. Deputy Rachel Wheeler observed Satchell drive through the Savannahs parking lot at a high rate of speed. The deputy conducted a traf c stop and determined that the suspect has four prior DWLSR charges. Deputy Wheeler also issued the driver a warning for cutting through the business parking lot to avoid the traf c light. Steven Harris of Crawfordville reported a grass re. Wakulla Fire ghters extinguished the brush re. The re originated in a re pit that got out of control. The re jumped the pit and caught a small wooded lot on fire. Approximately one-quarter acre worth of land was damaged. The property owner was contacted in Georgia and no charges were led. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Roger Lee Keith of Crawfordville reported a traf c crash on Highway 61 and Grif n Road. The driver was temporarily blinded by the sun and in an effort to avoid another motorist he ran off the road and struck a telephone box. The vehicle suffered minor damage. Damage to the phone box was approximately $2,000. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. FEBRUARY 3 Devon Chovan of Crawfordville reported the theft of a tag from her vehicle. The victim believes the tag was stolen from an area inside Wakulla Gardens. It is valued at $75. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Rodney Kirk Brightbill, 54, of Crawfordville was observed driving erratically on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. Deputy Clint Beam conducted a traf c stop and also conducted eld sobriety exercises. The suspect was charged with DUI and refused to submit to a breath test. FEBRUARY 4 Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Richard Moon investigated a minor traf- c crash in the Wal-Mart parking lot. The driver of a sweeper truck hit a parked vehicle causing minor damage. Charles Fowler of Crawfordville and Randy Wyckoff of Thomasville, Ga., were involved in a two vehicle crash on Woodville Highway. Fowler was unable to stop as Wyckoff was stopping to make a left hand turn. Fowler struck a trailer being pulled by Wyckoff. There were no injuries but the Fowler vehicle had to be towed due to the damage. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. A grand theft was reported by Bruce Durden of Crawfordville. A utility trailer and contents, which were located at the victims residence, was stolen. The trailer and contents is valued at $ $7,530. The trailer and a generator were entered into the FCIC/NCIC data base. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Velvet Deese of Crawfordville reported a credit card fraud. The victim reported a fraudulent charge on her bank card which was created in Spain. The fraudulent charge was valued at $127. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. John Johnson of Crawfordville reported a cr edit card offense. The victim discovered two unauthorized charges on his bank card out of Las Vegas, Nev. The charges totaled $75. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Richard Melton of Crawfordville reported the theft of a dog. The male poodle was stolen from outside his home. An anonymous female caller told the victim that a female suspect had the dog. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Jeffery Taff of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle tag from his truck. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Larry Roberts of Sopchoppy reported a criminal mischief to his mailbox. The victim reported what appeared to be food smeared on the outside of his mailbox. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Kari Hemphill of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim became part of a scam where she received a $1,000 check in the mail to become a secret shopper. She was asked to deposit the check in her bank account and keep $300 for herself while sending the remaining money to the unknown suspect. The victims bank determined that the check was fraudulent and caused the victims account to be overdrawn. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. Brian Johnson of Tallahassee reported a credit card offense. The victim received correspondence from a credit card company that he was late on his credit card payment. The victim does not possess a card from the credit card company and never opened the account. The credit card company reported that the account was opened in Crawfordville while the victim was out of town. The company is seeking $1,105 from the victim. A suspect has been identi ed in the case as a person of interest may have acquired the victims personal information. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. FEBRUARY 5 Deputy Elisee Colin conducted a traf c stop in Crawfordville for failure to stop at a stop sign. Deputy Colin allegedly smelled marijuana coming from inside the vehicle. A search of the vehicle was conducted and marijuana and drug paraphernalia was seized. The marijuana weighed 5.5 grams and Devin Alan Anderson, 18, of Crawfordville was arrested for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Anderson was given a verbal warning for failure to stop at a stop sign. Sgt. Jeremy Johnston and Deputy Nick Gray also investigated. Brenda Smith of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed unauthorized charges on her bank account for a total of $3,479. The charges were created in Pennsylvania and through a cancer foundation. Danny Colvin of Crawfordville reported the theft of car batteries. Twelve batteries were being stored by the victim when they were stolen. The batteries are valued at $298 and a person of interest has been developed. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Daniel Shiver of Eastpoint and Rebecca Long of Endicott, N.Y., were involved in a two vehicle traf c crash at U.S. Highway 319 and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. Both vehicles were damaged in the crash but there were no injuries. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. A 15-year-old Wakulla High School male was discovered in possession of marijuana at school. The students teacher smelled cannabis in the classroom and a search of the student was conducted. The marijuana weighed .8 of a gram. The student was issued a civil citation and was suspended from school for 10 days. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Katherine Nichols and Andrew S. Wilson, both of Crawfordville, were involved in a minor traffic crash on Spring Creek Highway. There were no injuries. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Rosemary Riggins of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed unauthorized charges on her bank account. The charges were created at a clothing company in Africa and totaled $1,878. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Richard Rawls of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported the theft of money from his bank account. A charge of $566 was observed from a satellite television provider along with other charges. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. David Mercer of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim received a counterfeit $100 bill at his business. A person of interest was identified. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. A suspect, who was identified, was accused of taking $93 worth of consumables from the store without paying for them. The suspect was detained by store of cials but fled on foot before deputies arrived on the scene. The case was forwarded to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. Amy Lee of Crawfordville and James Metcalf of Sopchoppy were involved in a minor two vehicle traffic crash at Wakulla High School. There were no injuries. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. FEBRUARY 6 Joseph Lawson of Panacea reported the theft of firewood from the Shadeville area. The victim placed two cords of split oak on a vacant lot. The wood is valued at $200. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Thomas Beyer of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victims credit card was used at a motel in Bloomington, Minn. The charges totaled $215. A person of interest has been identified. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. Cecil Carraway of Crawfordville and Betty Willis of Crawfordville were involved in a two vehicle traf c crash at Murphy Oil. Carraway backed into the Willis vehicle causing minor damage to her vehicle. There were no injuries. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 1,066 calls for service during the past week including 14 residential and commercial alarms; 11 assists to other agencies; 68 citizen contacts; 18 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 5 E-911 abandoned calls; 8 regular E-911 calls; 12 frauds; 54 investigations; 11 loud music/noise complaints; 34 medical emergencies; 376 residential and commercial security checks; 20 special details; 38 subpoena services; 15 suspicious people 120 traf c stops; 10 reckless vehicles; and 23 wanted people.Sheri s Report GIANT Benets FLORIDA WILD MAMMAL ASSOCIATIONThurs March 7 ~ 8am 3pm (Set Up) Fri March 8 ~ 8am 3pm Sat March 9 ~ 8am 1pmAt Townsends Nads Mini Storage, 59 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville All Donations Greatly Appreciated Donations can be dropped at Unit 34 at Nads or brought to the Yard SaleFor more information about FWMA visit our website: www.wakullawildlife.org 100% of contributions are retained by FWMA for use in pursuing our mission: Dedicated to the rescue and rehabilitation of injured and orphaned wild mammals and birds. HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Come Have Come Have With Us! With Us! SKYBOXSPORTS BAR & GRILL 2581 Crawfordville Hwy. Downtown Crawfordville 926-9771We are now smoke freeDOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE850-926-9771 WE ARE Celebrating S ER VING Y O U!Y EARS11NEW KITCHEN HOURS 11AM TIL MIDNIGHTCALL IN OR DINE INStop by and let us know how we did! The Wakulla News For local news and photos visit us online For local news and photos visit us online www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 15 ww ww w w. th th th h ew e ew ew k ak ak ak a ak l l ul u ul ul ul l l la a la la la a la ne ne ne ne ne ws ws ws w ws ws c c .c .c .c om om om o om m o Green Scene How many of you remember using a wringer washer or a scrub board to wash clothes? Do you remember the saying, Man may work from sun to sun, but a womans work is never done? How was laundry done in the good old days? Lets visit laundry day at a family farm during the early part of the 20th Century. Like most people in Florida during this time, Martha Brown lived on a farm near a small town. It is Monday morning, wash day. Martha learned how to wash clothes from her mother and the process is inflexible. Martha knows that each step is necessary to have clean, bright clothes. The appearance of her familys clothes is a mark of success as a homemaker. She and her neighbor often compare how white their washes look. Wearing clothes until they were soiled was acceptable in earlier times. By not having a large wardrobe and making frequent changes, there were fewer to wash and iron. While the cleanliness standards are quite high, clothes are worn several days and washed no more than weekly. Many clothes had ground-in-dirt and stains. Almost everything in the family wash was cotton except tablecloths and handkerchiefs which were linen. All fabrics were natural for manmade bers had not been invented. Dyes were natural too, and were usually not colorfast. Clothing types ranged from delicate embroidered, handmade items to heavy work clothes. Consider what has to be done to produce clean, fresh-smelling clothes without todays labor-saving devices, without hot running water, or without running water at all. Here are the laundry principles that Martha kept in mind on laundry day in 1921. They make me tired; how do you feel after reading them? Martha got up early to build a fire in her wood-burning kitchen stove. She carried water from rain barrels. Three tubs were set up: one for washing and two for rinsing. Rain water was used instead of well water because it was softer. Heavily soiled items were soaked overnight to help loosen ground-in soil. Martha sorted the clothes allowing her to wash the cleanest clothes first because the same water was used again and again until all batches were washed and rinsed. She had to carefully sort the clothes because most dyes were not colorfast. She used cool water on those to protect colors. While the water in the boiler was heating, Marsha made starch. Powdered cornstarch was mixed with a little cold water, then boiling water was poured from a tea kettle. Quick stirring kept lumps from forming. The starch was covered after cooking so lm did not form and leave a starchy lump on clothes. By now the washing water was hot enough. She put hot water into the washtub for washing the first load of white clothes. Her hands were tough from hard chores and were accustomed to the very hot water which made her white clothes whiter. She used as hot water as she could stand because pure soap worked best with it. Now the hard work began. She placed a bar of homemade soap and washboard in the tub. She handled each item separately and rubbed soap over soiled areas. She scrubbed until they were clean and then ran the bar of soap lightly over the rest of them. Some dirt and soap stayed in the water as Martha rinsed each item in the wash water. She then wrung out the excess water. In some parts of the South, a battering board was used in place of a washboard. Soiled clothes were placed on the battering board and beaten with a stick to loosen soil. Turn to Page 16 e balancing act in the laundry By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING By LES HARRISON and SHELLEY SWENSONOf the Extension Of ce February is teasing Wakulla Countys gardeners with visions of sunny spring days. The smell of the earth and the prospect of spring vegetables come to mind as the temperature rocks between seasonal averages. There are, however, some vegetable which are still in the garden and providing fresh options from last years efforts. Radishes are a prime example of a popular cool season root vegetable which grows well in Floridas Big Bend region. This native of northern Europe handles the mild days and occasionally frosty nights with few problems. Radishes are in the same plant family with turnips, cabbage, broccoli and several other cool season crops. This ancient crop was developed over 2,000 years ago and is noted for its quick-growing characteristics. Radish production is currently worldwide activity in the 21st century. An almost in nite variety of cultivars have been developed to meet local preferences. Propagating this plant is relatively simple, inexpensive and will reward the grower with an ample supply of tasty and nutritious roots. No more than 60 days is required from planting to picking. Insect problems are few this time of year, but will increase as the days lengthen and the temperatures rise. There have been some reports of cutworm problems in Wakulla County with the unusually warm January. Disease and molds can be a problem if the plants remain damp and cool for too long a period. There are treatments for these conditions, but many times the expense outweighs the potential bene ts. The variety being grown in the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Demonstration Garden is Reover F1 (Bejo 2739) and is offered by Bejo Seed Company. It was planted in early December 2013. Radishes are lled with antioxidants which are linked to improved blood vessel functioning in humans. Antioxidants serve as a vacuum cleaner eliminating free radicals. Over time, free radicals cause signi cant damage to cells and can lead to a number of diseases associated with aging. Radishes should be thoroughly cleaned when brought from the garden. They should last up to two weeks when refrigerated. To learn more about radish production and use, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u .edu/ To get hands-on gardening experience, sign up for the 2013 Master Gardener Class the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce. Classes will begin in February.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. Shelley Swenson is UF/IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent. They can be reached at (850) 926-3931. PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRadishes in the garden. Fresh radishes. This ancient crop was developed over 2,000 years ago and is noted for its quickgrowing characteristics.Whats in the garden now Radish ATTORNEY ADVERTISING. Prior results do not guarantee a similar out come. We may associate with local firms in states wherein we do not maintain an office. If no recovery, no fees or costs are charged, unless prohibited by State Law or Rule. Weitz & Luxenb erg, PC is licensed by, and a member of good standing of the New York State Bar. Lawrence Goldhirsch, Esq., member, FL Bar. P.C. LAW OFFICES &WEITZ LUXENBERGASBESTOS |DRUGS/MEDICAL DEVICES | ENVIRONMENTAL |NEGLIGENCEWe are also investigatingFOSAMAXFEMUR / HIP FRACTURES1.888.411.LAWS |www.weitzlux.com700 BROADWAY| NEWYORK, NY 10003BRANCH OFFICES IN NEW JERSEY & CALIFORNIA Weitz & Luxenberg can help you understand your legal options. For a free and discrete consultation please call us today at 1-888-411-LAWS (5297) or visit us on the web at www.HipDeviceRecall.com.Have you experienced failure of your hip implant, resulting in pain and disability that may have required revision surgery to replace the failed component? Common symptoms include groin pain, dislocations, instability, and pain associated with loosening of the device and the release of metal particles into the joint. We are accepting cases for injuries caused by certain hip replacement component products manufactured by several companies. www.HipDeviceRecall.comAre you suffering from aDEFECTIVE METALONMETAL HIP REPLACEMENT? Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. 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February is Valentines month. The month of LOVE. There is no better way to show your spouse, children or anyone else that you love them, than to take better care of yourself! Getting in shape not only makes you look better, it will make you feel better too! You will have more energy to play with the kids, take them to and from all those various activites, and cheer them on when youre there. You will not be the mom or dad who only sits and watches your kids play on the playground you will play too! Exercise and weight loss are proven weapons in the ght against high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. You want to be around as long as possible, right? And to be able to enjoy life as long as you are around too. Being in shape also makes your everyday jobs easier. Lifting dogfood, taking out the garbage, all those little chores that seem dif- cult now will be a breeze after youve been exercising for a while. Its hard to imagine something that not only makes you feel better, look better and be healthier. People would pay lots of money for something guaranteed to do all that. You have that something right at your ngertips. Its as easy as getting off the couch and going for a walk. Play a game outside with your kids. Take the dog for a walk, or better yet, a run. Just DO SOMETHING! You will be glad you did. And so will the people who love you!Gena Davis is a CFT at Body-Tek 24Hour Fitness Center in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (850) 926-2348. Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESS From Page 15 The clothes from this rst load go into the boiler on the stove to disinfect them. While the water and clothes boiled for about 30 minutes, there was time to clean the clothes line with a damp cloth, place the clothes basket, and get the clothespin apron ready to use. After the rst load had been boiled, Martha removed them with a wooden stick and put them in the first rinse tub. She churned the clothes in the rinse water to get out as much leftover soap as possible. If left it turns fabric yellow when ironed. In the nal rinse water, bluing was added to mask the gray and yellow soap left on the fabrics, making white fabrics look whiter. Then the clothes were put on the line to dry. The whites were hung in bright sunlight while the colored were put in the shade. Each load of laundry went through the same process and in the end if the water looked clean enough, a load of throw rugs was washed. So how did this process impact the environment? In warm months, the rinse water is poured in the garden or on the owers. Wash water was poured somewhere in the yard the soap she made was completely biodegrade, though Martha never heard of the word. Lets relate the cleanliness formula to this laundry practice from the past. The formula is cleanliness = water + heat energy +chemical energy + physical energy. There was very little cost to the laundry practices in the early 20th Century because so much of the effort was provided by humans. What was the environmental impact? Except in cities, environmental impacts were probably negligible. Almost everything used in the laundry process in rural areas where most people lived was recycled. Lets compare this to today. When we apply the cleanliness formula to todays practices, it is estimated that our cost is over $400 a year to provide the water, sewer, heat, equipment, and chemical energy. Environmentally, events of the past 20 to 30 years have brought about a slow recognition of both limited resources (water and energy) and environmental impact. This is especially true of water which is often a non-renewable resource. Want to consider how to make some changes in your laundry practices? Go to www.edis.ifas.ufl and request the publication FCS8OH2010 to review ideas on how to make your own cleaning products. Request additional materials at your Wakulla County Extension Of ce, 926-3931. Shelley Swenson is UF/ IFAS Wakulla County Family and Consumer Sciences Agent. She can be reached at (850) 926-3931.Swenson: e environmental balancing act in the laundryWe all know that yoga does a body (and a mind) good. But until recently, no one could really say with any degree of certainty why or even how it improves conditions as varied as depression and anxiety, diabetes, chronic pain and even epilepsy. Now a group of researchers at Boston University School of Medicine believe they discovered yogas secret. In an article published in the May 2012 issue of Medical Hypothesis Journal with an impossibly longtitle, Chris Streeter,Ph.d, and his team hypothesized that yoga works by regulating the nervous system. And how does it do that? By increasing vagal tone the bodies ability to successfully respond to stress. Most of us do not even know we have a vagus nerve that needs toning, but we most certainly do. The vagus nerve, the largest cranial nerve in the body, starts at the base of the skull and wanders throughout the body, in- uences the respiratory, digestive and nervous systems. Often thought of as our air traf c controller the vagus nerve helps to regulate all of our major bodily functions. Our breath and digestion as well as our ability to take in, process and make sense of our experiences are all directly related to the vagus nerve. We know when the vagus nerve is toned and functioning properly because we can feel it on different levels. Our digestion improves, our heart functions optimally and our moods stabilize. We have an easier time moving from the more active and often stressful states of being to do more relaxed ones. As we get better at doing that, we can manage lifes challenges with the right blend of energy, engagement and ease. We can consistently when we can consistently maintain this flexible state that we are thought to have a high vagal tone. A low vagal tone, on the other hand, brings with it a sense of depletion. Our digestion becomes sluggish, our heart rate increases and our moods become more unpredictable and dif cult to manage not surprisingly, low vagal tone is correlated with such health conditions as depression, post traumatic stress disorder, chronic pain and epilepsy. Not coincidentally, the same conditions that show improvement with yoga practice. Researchers hypothesize that it is a vagal stimulation through yoga that improves these conditions. To test their theory, the researchers investigated practices they believed would increase vagal tone. For example, they found that resistance breathing, such as ujjayi pranayama (the ocean sounding breathing technique) increased the relaxation response as well as heart variability (another marker of resilience). A pilot study conducted on more experienced yogis showed that chanting om out loud increased vagal tone and the relaxation response more than chanting it silently to oneself. Studies such as this one began to reveal how different yoga practices impact human physiology in different ways. Try it for yourself. Hhummmmm...ommmmm. Mommmmm, hommmmme... Chew on the mmmmm.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher at Studio 88 in Crawfordville. She can be reached at (228) 3800140. GET FITBy GENA DAVIS YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Study shows bene ts of yoga in dealing with stressTake better care of yourself for ValentinesSpecial to The NewsLosing some weight is a goal for many people regardless of age. Shedding weight after the age of 50 is not always easy. As a person ages, muscle mass tends to dwindle while body fat has a tendency to increase. Since fat burns fewer calories than muscle, weight gain as a person ages is bound to happen. But that doesnt mean such weight gain is inevitable. In fact, men and women willing to make certain changes with regard to diet and exercise can shed pounds after 50 while preventing future weight gain. DIET Men and women need fewer calories as they age. For example, men and women in their 40s may need as many as 200 calories more per day than they will when they reach their 50s. Counting calories might seem dif cult, so men and women in their 50s and older who dont think they can count calories can try to eat more low-calorie foods like fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Consuming fewer calories often requires changing dietary habits, not only with regard to what youre eating but also how youre eating and even how you shop for food. For those who nd theyre frequently too exhausted to cook each night, they can prepare meals in advance to have healthy, homemade meals waiting instead of always ordering takeout or delivery. EXERCISE Exercise is another essential component to shedding pounds after 50, though men and women over 50 should always consult a physician before they begin a new exercise regimen. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention points out that regular exercise can help older men and women prevent the onset of a host of ailments, including heart disease and diabetes. Maintaining that independence into older adulthood is a goal for many men and women, and its a goal thats far more realistic for men and women who exercise than it is for those who dont. According to the CDC, older adults need at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity, such as brisk walking, every week and musclestrengthening activities on two more days a week. These muscle-strengthening activities should work all the major muscle groups, including the legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms. Muscle-strengthening activities include lifting weights, working out with resistance bands, exercise such as push-ups and sit-ups that use body weight for resistance, and yoga. Even gardening that involves digging and shoveling can be considered a musclestrengthening activity. Weight gain is often an expected side effect of aging. But men and women dont have to gain weight as they get older. Some simple dietary changes and a commitment to routine exercise is all it takes to shed weight after 50 and keep that weight off once its gone.Shedding pounds after 50 MILLENDER ACCOUNTING & TAX PREPARATIONFiduciaryTax Preparation Bookkeeping Payroll Services for Businesses & Individuals Angelique and Bryan NOW LOCATED AT 4432 Crawfordville Hwy. Crawfordville(850) 926-8272 (850) 926-1316

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 17 Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Feb. 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE TAX PREPARATION will be available from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library through the BEST Project, an initiative of the United Way of the Big Bend and its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). Friday, Feb. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Feb. 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. FREE TAX PREPARATION will be available from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library through the BEST Project, an initiative of the United Way of the Big Bend and its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). Sunday, Feb. 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Feb. 18 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimers Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. Tuesday, Feb. 19 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness, will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. NAMI CONNECTION, a support group for people diagnosed with a mental illness,will meet at 10:30 a.m. at the library. SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at library. Scott Davis will present Native Plants for the Palate. The presentation will explore table uses of many local species. The public is invited. Social time, with refreshments, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Feb. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. FREE TAX PREPARATION will be available from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the senior center through the BEST Project, an initiative of the United Way of the Big Bend and its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). Thursday, Feb. 21 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the 26 Walker Street, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. FREE TAX PREPARATION will be available from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the library through the BEST Project, an initiative of the United Way of the Big Bend and its Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Program (VITA). WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP meets in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7:00 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050.Special EventsThursday, Feb. 14 WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, Steering Committee, will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the libray. The guest speaker is Amy Ritter of Florida Watch Action Inc. Friday, Feb. 15 EVENING OF RAGTIME DELIGHTS featuring the world renowned ragtime pianist Bob Milne will be held from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Proceeds will bene t NAMI Wakulla. Tickets are $35 and include a buffet dinner of roast beef, turkey, salad, vegetables, dessert and drink. Call 926-1033 for tickets. SENIOR EXEMPTION ASSISTANCE will be available at the senior center every Friday in February from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wakulla County Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkmans staff will be there to educate and assist with senior exemption and any other exemptions to which they may qualify for. ARTHUR ANDREWS SCHOLARSHIP BANQUET will be held at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. The speaker will be Dr. Osie eld Anderson, retired head of the mathematics department at Florida A&M University. Fred Lee will provide the entertainment. Tickets are $30 each, $55 for couples. For tickets, call Ruth Francis at 926-6058, Jennie Jones at 926-7547 or Hugh Taylor at 926-6058. Saturday, Feb. 16 JAMS AND JELLIES FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. The cost is $5. Call 926-3931 for more information or to register. PHOTO TOUR ON THE WAKULLA RIVER will be held at Edward Ball Wakulla Springs State Park from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Space is limited to 25 participants. Call (850) 561-7286 to make a reservation. The cost is $10 for adults and $7 for children (ages 12 and under). BLACK HISTORY PARADE AND CELEBRATION will be held at Hudson Park. The parade starts at 11 a.m. There will be food, vendors and activities following the parade. Sunday, Feb. 17 AFRO-AMERICAN READ-IN will be held from 3 to 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. The public is invited to bring readings of their favorite Afro-American authors. Local and regional authors also participate, reading from their work. Smaller children will also have a chance to read or to be read to, in a separate room. Monday, Feb. 18 FREE FAMILY-TO-FAMILY EDUCATIONAL COURSE will be held by NAMI Wakulla for 12 weeks, starting today at 5:30 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant, Crawfordville. This course is free for family members, partners, signi cant others, and friends of individuals with a mental illness. This 12-week educational course is structured to help caregivers understand and support individuals with serious mental disorders. To register, call NAMI Wakulla at 926-1033 or e-mail namiwakulla@centurylink.net. WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC WOMENS CLUB will hold meet from 6 to 8:30 p.m. at Beef O Bradys in Crawfordville. The guest speaker is Stephanie Kunkel, former Womens Vote director for Florida Obama Campaign and current legislative chair for the Democratic Womens Club of Florida. Wednesday, Feb. 20 FREE WORKSHOP on Foundations of Marketing for Successful Advertising will be held at the Chamber Of ce, 23 High Drive, from 3 to 5 p.m. It is sponsored by Wakulla Chamber of Commerce Education Committee, FOCUS Wakulla, and Small Business Development Center at Florida A&M University. The instructor is Christine S. Urban, business analyst. This workshop will focus on basic marketing concepts that need to be addressed before advertising. To participate, register at https://clients. oridasbdc.org/workshop.aspx?ekey=100330004. FREE WORKSHOP will be held by the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and Franklins Promise and Volunteer Florida from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. The workshop will focus on asset based community development (using Empty Bowls and Operation Santa as examples). The afternoon will be devoted to grant writing. Lunch will be provided. Call Gail Campbell at 926-3526 for more information. Thursday, Feb. 21 CHAMBER AFTER HOURS NETWORKING EVENT will be held from 5:30 to 7 p.m. at the Farrington Law Ofce, 3038-A Crawfordville Highway. Refreshments will be served. RSVP to Chamber of ce is requested by Friday, Feb. 15. Call 926-1848. CAPITAL AREA COMMUNITY ACTION AGENCY will be at Sopchoppy City Hall from 9 a.m. to noon by appointment only. To make an appointment or for more information, call 926-3122. They will be there the third Thursday of every month. Friday, Feb. 22 SIXITH ANNUAL STONE AGE PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Ochlockonee River State Park, 429 State Park Road, Sopchoppy. There will be primitive weapon demonstration, int knapping and arrowhead making, hide tanning, basket weaving, archery and atlatl competition, pottery making, shell, bone, antler and wood carving. The festival will also be held on Saturday and Sunday. Visit www. knapfest.com. MYSTERY DINNER THEATRE will be held at the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center to bene t senior citizen services. It will be performed by Wakulla High Dramatis Personae, directed by Susan Solburg. Doors open at 7 p.m. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $30 per person which includes dinner, beer and wine and entertainment. Cost for students is $10 and includes dinner, drinks and entertainment. SENIOR EXEMPTION ASSISTANCE will be available at the senior center every Friday in February from 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wakulla County Property Appraiser Donnie Sparkmans staff will be there to educate and assist with senior exemption and any other exemptions to which they may qualify for. CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for North Florida Financial Corp. will be held at 11:30 a.m. They are located at 119 B Crawfordville Highway, next to The Wakulla News. Saturday, Feb. 23 WALK TO DEFEAT ALS will be held at Tom Brown Park in Tallahassee. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and the walk starts at 10 a.m. The purpose is to raise funds and awareness for ALS, also known as Lou Gehrigs Disease. Proceeds raised will support patient care and comfort, as well as research for treatments and a cure. For more information go to www.WalktoDefeatALS.org, or call 888-257-1717, ext. 115. SALSA PARTY WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. A class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be offered if participation merits a second session. The cost is $5. SIXITH ANNUAL STONE AGE PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Ochlockonee River State Park, 429 State Park Road, Sopchoppy. There will be primitive weapon demonstration, int knapping and arrowhead making, hide tanning, basket weaving, archery and atlatl competition, pottery making, shell, bone, antler and wood carving. The festival will also be held on Sunday. Visit www.knapfest.com. WINTER SOCIAL will be at 6:30 p.m. at the Moose Lodge, 44 Jer-Be-Lou Boulevard in Panacea, held by the Coastal Optimist Club and the Moose Lodge. It will feature the band, Locomotive. Band plays at 8 p.m. Admission is $10 and includes hors doeuvres. There is a cash bar. DAY OF SERVICE will be held by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition. They will be cleaning Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road. Everyone is invited. They will meet at 9 a.m. at 1357 Martin Luther King Jr. Road. Sunday, Feb. 24 SIXITH ANNUAL STONE AGE PRIMITIVE ARTS FESTIVAL will be held from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Ochlockonee River State Park, 429 State Park Road, Sopchoppy. There will be primitive weapon demonstration, int knapping and arrowhead making, hide tanning, basket weaving, archery and atlatl competition, pottery making, shell, bone, antler and wood carving. Visit www. knapfest.com. Government Meetings Thursday, Feb. 14 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Tuesday, Feb. 19 COUNTY COMMISSION will meet at 5 p.m. for its regular meeting in the commission chambers. Thursday, Feb. 21 ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its installation ceremony at 6 p.m. at city hall for reelected commissioner Gail Gilman. Ragtime Delights featuring Bob Milne at 7 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge. Arthur Andrews Scholarship Banquet at 6 p.m. at the Senior Center. Black History Parade and Celebration at Hudson Park. Parade at 11 a.m. Afro-American Read-In at the library from 3 to 5 p.m. FridayFridaySaturdaySunday Week Week in in Wakulla akulla Wakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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Page 18 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy DAVID WHITE On Super Bowl Sunday, some 1.25 billion chicken wings were consumed alongside 11 million pounds of potato chips, 4 million pounds of pretzels, and 2.5 million pounds of nuts. Massive quantities of beer helped wash all that down -nearly 50 million cases worth were sold on Sunday alone. Its no wonder Anheuser-Busch purchased four and a half minutes of ad space during the big game. Americans also drank wine. While 42 percent of Super Bowl viewers told Nielsen they planned on consuming beer during the game, 33 percent told pollsters they planned to drink wine. This number caught me by surprise. Sure, the United States surpassed France as the worlds largest wineconsuming nation in 2010. But wine still intimidates many consumers. Fortunately, as the Super Bowl statistics help demonstrate, this is quickly changing. For evidence, look no further than your closest grocery store. Thirty years ago, the local market sold little more than jug wine like Gallos Hearty Burgundy -if wine was even stocked. Today, the average upscale supermarket carries 1,500 wine selections or more. The number of breakfast cereals pales in comparison. As the number of choices has increased, so has bewilderment. As Mike Veseth, an economics professor in Washington, once explained, Wine buyers have never had it better in terms of the number of choices available from around the world. And weve never had it worse regarding the possibility of confusion and the pressure to find our perfect wine. Its the Age of Anxiety for wine. But consumers are eager to learn. And the market is responding. Consider the rise of specialty wine shops. Across the country, boutique retailers are filling their shelves with interesting, small-production wines and helping consumers learn about wine by paying attention to their preferences, offering foodand-wine pairing advice, and answering questions without judgment. High-end restaurants are also approaching wine differently. Whereas sommeliers were once glori- ed sales agents who intimidated guests by pushing expensive, predictable wines, todays sommeliers are wine educators, eager to share their passion and palates. Most are keen to help patrons nd the perfect wine, regardless of budget. This list could go on. Bookstores are now packed with easy-to-navigate wine guides. Wine classes are more popular than ever before. The world of wine is clearly changing. Chain restaurants arent just profiting on Americas growing interest in wine -theyre leading the charge. Consider Olive Garden. With 730 locations, its no surprise that the chain serves more than 600 million breadsticks and 165 million bowls of salad annually. But the restaurant also serves more wine than any other chain in the United States. In 2006, Olive Garden sold more than 500,000 cases of wine. In part, Olive Garden sells so much wine because it takes education seriously. As Mike Veseth has written, many restaurants expect that their wait staff will pick up wine knowledge -Olive Garden really works at it, by providing literally hundreds of thousands of hours of training. The restaurant also gives away free samples, where legal. In 2006, it gave away 30,000 cases of wine, which equates to 4.5 million pours. Several years ago, I stumbled into a conversation with David Kent, who at the time was president and CEO of The Wine Group. The company, which makes brands such as Cupcake Vineyards, FishEye, and flipflop, is the third-largest wine producer in the world. As we chatted, he described his vision for American wine. He began by asking me to picture a group of 20-somethings at a beach house. He then asked me to visualize the cooler theyd pack before heading to the beach. As you might guess, my mental sketch included sandwiches, chips, and a few dozen light beers. One day, Kent hopes that group will instead bring a few bottles of wine. Thats an optimistic future, to be sure. And were still a long way off; Americas beer market is nine times larger than the wine market. But its a future worth rooting for.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine. -Janet WHITES WINESWines futureBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Feb. 8 Florida this week won approval to begin shifting low income, longterm care residents to managed-care plans amid broader questions about whether it will go along with the federal government in expanding Medicaid. Federal approval this week of the long-term care changes brought Republican backers a step closer to the Holy Grail --a federal waiver allowing the state to shift virtually all Medicaid patients to HMOs or similar plans. Meanwhile, lawmakers returned to preparation for a session that although not scheduled to begin for more than a month feels in full swing. Pensions, foreclosures, and ethics reform were just some of the big issues already being tackled by lawmakers. While those issues along with the death penalty, search and seizure laws and juvenile justice, sparked lively debate, Gov. Rick Scotts budget proposal got a yawn from many lawmakers, or polite acknowledgement, along with more than a little skepticism. The only chillier response, perhaps, was a House committees icy reaction to a bill repealing the states death penalty, which was known to be dead on arrival but sparked lively debate before being shelved for at least the year. Outside the capital, Progress Energy Florida announced it would shut down its nuclear reactor in Crystal River after a botch do-it-yourself repair project damaged critical portions of the 35-year-old plant. Environmentalists, meanwhile, led a legal challenge to a deal giving a pair of south Florida sugar growers 30-year leases north of the Everglades MEDICAID WAIVER APPROVED The week started off well for Scott and Republican leaders who have been wrangling with federal health care of cials over how the state delivers medical care to low income and nursing home residents. Federal officials on Monday approved a key part of Floridas effort to transform its Medicaid program by allowing Medicaid-eligible seniors who need long-term care to be enrolled later this year in HMOs and another type of health plan known as a provider service network. The Republican-controlled Legislature approved wide-ranging bills in 2011 aimed at shifting to a statewide managedcare system in Medicaid. The plan was to make the changes in two phases -- rst for seniors who need long-term care and then for the broader Medicaid population. Backers of a statewide system argue it would help hold down Medicaid costs and better coordinate services for bene ciaries. But critics have long argued that the shift will result in managedcare plans squeezing care to save money. Such Medicaid proposals require approval by the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services before they can take effect. PENSIONS Legislators on both sides of the Capitol continued a two-track debate on retirement bene ts for public workers. The Senate has taken the lead on how to handle the funding of some local pensions, while the House is pushing ahead with a bill on the state retirement system -a key priority for House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel. In the Senate, lawmakers are working toward a consensus on giving cities more exibility in using revenues from insurance premium taxes to fund police and re ghter pensions. But the effort is running into resistance from cities, which want to repeal any restrictions on which bene ts they can pay with the tax revenue, in keeping with a new interpretation of the state law governing the funding of pensions following a dispute in Naples. Lawmakers have signaled hesitance about that approach. Anger on the part of employees and Democrats is more pronounced on the House bill dealing with state pensions. That bill would require workers hired on or after Jan. 1 to enroll in a 401(k)-style defined contribution plan instead of a traditional, de ned bene t pension. Supporters say moving now will allow them to avoid cutting current employees bene ts. But opponents blasted Republicans for moving forward with the bill before a study on the effects of the proposal was complete. SCOTTS BUDGET MAKES THE ROUNDS Gov. Scotts $74.2 billion spending plan made the rounds this week and one of the centerpieces of the proposal, a $2,500 across-the-board raise for Florida public school teachers, was met with polite skepticism. The governors proposal seems to treat different employees differently, and we have some consternation about that as it relates to teachers being treated differently than corrections of cers being treated differently than other state employees, said House budget chairman Rep. Seth McKeel R-Lakeland. Other aspects of Scotts proposal, including sales tax cuts for manufacturers, appeared to fall on more receptive ears, but budget builders were careful not to commit too strongly to much. FORECLOSURE BILL MOVES The House this week took another crack at speeding up the foreclosure process, a controversial topic in a state that leads the nation in the percentage of homeowners facing losing their homes. Sponsored by Rep. Kathleen Passidomo, RNaples, the bill (HB 87) aims to shorten the time period involved in a foreclosure proceeding and relax restrictions on who can request an expedited procedure and the standards for what can be led. Passidomo said the bill would help remedy a problem that extends far beyond the state and of which the state has limited authority: the relationship between lenders and those who borrow from them. The bill would reduce from ve years to one the length of time a lender could pursue a claim after a foreclosure action and require lenders to provide more. The bankers are concerned about that. Homeowner advocates, meanwhile, are skeptical of changes making it easier for a judge to forgo further proceedings if the paperwork is in order. ETHICS/ELECTION BILLS INTRODUCED, ADVANCE Lawmakers dealt with both election and ethics issues this week as they debated measures to expand early voting more accurately track contributions and more aggressively investigate suspected unethical behavior. A Senate ethics bill passed the Senate Community Affairs Committee on Wednesday, apparently queued up for quick action when lawmakers return in March. The measure (SB 2) would limit the jobs elected of cials could take with state agencies, give the Ethics Commission more power to collect nes and strengthen con ict-of-interest laws. The committee appr oved an amendment that would bar elected of cials from taking a job with a government agency if the of cial knows he or she is getting the job because of their elected position. On the nance front, the House Ethics and Elections Subcommittee heard testimony on a bill (HB 569) that would prevent committees of continuous existence, or CCEs, from accepting contributions after Aug. 1. The bill, which is expected to come up for a vote in the committee on Monday, also raises individual contribution limits from $500 to $10,000. House Speaker Will Weatherford, R-Wesley Chapel, has made getting rid of CCEs one of his main goals on ethics reform. Early voting issues also came up with a bill (SB 80) by Sen. Arthenia Joyner, D-Tampa, to add more early voting days discussed in the Senate Ethics and Elections Committee. The bill is among a handful of measures in response to long voting lines in the November election. COURT ACTIONS PENDING Legal challenges to a recently penned Everglades agreement and a proposed utility rate hike were led this week. Environmentalists called on a state administrative law judge to rescind a pair of 30-year leases awarded to Florida Crystals and A. Duda and Sons on about 14,000 acres in the Everglades Agricultural Area. The Florida Wildlife Federation led the challenge with the Division of Administrative Hearings, saying the long-term leases will further degrade water quality in the River of Grass. Meanwhile, Floridas utility consumer watchdog led a challenge with the Florida Supreme Court, arguing that a recently approved $350 million rate hike requested by Florida Power & Light is invalid. STORY OF THE WEEK: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services approves a waiver allowing Florida to place Medicaid bene ciaries needing long-term care into managed care plans. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: This bills been around nearly as long as Ive been alive. Rep. Matt Caldwell, R-Lehigh Acres, who is 31, talking about the annual ght between optometrists and ophthalmologists about the things each profession is allowed to do. WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Hello long-term care, goodbye Crystal River nuke plant

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 19 Africa Ages Apple Away Barn Bits China Clown Corn Ease Edge Egypt EnvyExperimentingFace Fine Fire Five Flag Float Glistening Grade Infected Intent Into Isnt Jaws Lava Lies Light Lime Lion Might Mile Mined Miss Nail Nests Nets Noon Oars Oils Operations Organized PassRefrigeratorsRent Said YOUR AD HERE Sake Sand Sewing Some Sour Speak Stalk Stress Tear Term Thin Those Time Tops Tubes Urban Virus The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photos www.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.com

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$399 Cancun All Inclusive Special Stay 6 Days In ALuxury BeachFront Resort With Meals And Drinks For $399! www.cancun5star.com 888-481-9660 Todays New Ads 53 EVANS AVE 4/2 1500+sqft Home has been beautifully maintained. Great location near downtown Crawfordville. privacy fence, landscape yard, split plan, open living home has craftsman inlayed ceilings in living area and master bedroom, large bedrooms and laundry room, 1 car garage, an oversize window in dining area that gives home a lot of natural light. LP 143,900 Courtney Roberts 850.251.6975 Courtney@Ketcham Realty.com Ketcham Realty Group, Inc LOSTvicinity of Crawfordville & Woodville, Very Special Engagement Ring w/attached ring guards please call 850-926-7807 or 850-408-3737 Wakulla County Tourist Development Council Grant Cycle Opens The Wakulla County Tourist Development Council is pleased to announce the opening of the Wakulla County TDC Grant Program application cycle. The purpose of the grant program is to provide limited funding to organizations that sponsor and promote tourism activities in Wakulla County. Requests for funding from the TDC for local tourism events/projects will not be received by the Council except through the grant application process. Application forms and criteria can be obtained by contacting Pam Portwood, Director, Wakulla County TDC, P.O. Box 67, Panacea, Florida 32346, pportwood @mywakulla.com Applicants must use the application form provided and all applications must be received by 5:00 p.m. on March 1, 2013 Applications (in Word or pdf format) can be emailed to pportwood @mywakulla.com If application is submitted in hard copy, applicants must submit five (5) copies to the above address. Maximum funding request is $1000. Funded projects must be complete by 9/30/13. Questions or requests for additional information should be directed to Pam Portwood, Director, Wakulla County TDC, P.O. Box 67, Panacea, Florida 32346, pportwood @mywakulla.com Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com NOW HIRINGRN SUPERVISIORS $30 -$32 HR, CNAS $10 -12 HR STJAMES HEALTH & REHAB IN CARRABELLE FL. PLEASE APPLYIN PERSON. ALL APPLICATIONS WELCOME. Wakulla County Senior Centeris accepting applications forCNA or Direct Service Worker Positions.Part time positions. You may pick up applications at 33 Michael Dr., Crawfordville, Forida, 32327 AIRLINE CAREERSBecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE TRAIN IN MONTHS, NOTYEARS. FINANCIALAID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALL CENTURAINSTITUTE ORLANDO (877) 206-6559 St. James Health and Rehabilatation CenterSEEKING SOCIAL SERVICE DIRECTORAPPLY IN PERSON 239 Crooked River Rd Carravelle Florida or email brenda.smith @saberhealth.com Driver $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Daily or weekly pay. CDL-A, 3 months current experience (800)414-9569 www .driveknight.com DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE TIRED OFLIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 2012 DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends!Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to OwnNo Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 LOCAL BUSINESSTaking Applications for Interns. Seeking highly motivated, goal oriented individuals apply in person@ 3743 Crawfordville Hwy,On Sat, February 23rd between 2-3 pm ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 888-203-3179 www .Centura Online.com DISH Network. Starting at $19.99/month (for 12 mos.) & High Speed Internet starting at $14.95/month (where available.) SAVE! Ask About SAME DAY Installation! CALLNow! 1888-685-4144 Medart used Waterpump & tank. Make offer (850) 751-8037 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, In Original Plastic, Never Used, ORG $3000, Sacrifice $975. CHERRY, BEDROOM SET S olid Wood, new in factory boxes$895 Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. Sale at Posh Java this Saturday,February 16, during the Growers Market, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Merchandise, furniture, etc., will all be on sale at reduced prices. For information, contact Debbie Dix Bishop at poshjava@gmail.com or phone 528-5838 for more details. Early Valentines day sale on jewelry and other store items by appointment on Wednesday and Thursday. WALK-IN BATHTUBS Save Additional $500 in February! Buy NOW! Local Company, Made in the USA. Call Before You Fall! (800)317-8827 for Pricing or http://www .SBS T ubs.com CRAWFORDVILLE2 BR/2 BA, SW Why rent when you can buy for $350. mo. 100% owner finance Nice size lot Near Lake Ellen (850) 443-3300 SOPCHOPPY2 BR, 1 BA, Large Lot on paved road Screen porch, city water and sewer. $485.mo. + Deposit. Call (850) 566-4124 CRAWFORDVILLEMobile home for rent or Sale by owner 3/2, DWMH CAH, fenced yard, laundry, covered porch, 1 block to the lake $695/month purchase for same with deposit to buy. Employment, references, application. Available February 850-524-4090 CRAWFORDVILLE2 BR /2 BA Singlewide In Lake Ellen Nice and Well Kept. 100% Owner Finance $49,000. Only $350 Month, 3% Interest (850) 443-3300 PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1, Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets considered Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 MEDARTStudio House on four lots, $550/per month, plus deposit. Revel Realty 850-962-2212 SHELLPOINT2 bedroom/2 bath. Waterfront furnished townhouse with personal hot tub on deck. New carpet, tile, paint, excellent condition. Pool on property with extended carport. Hard wood floors, 3 decks, everything provided if needed. $950/mo. 850-544-9003 53 EVANS AVE 4/2 1500+sqft Home has been beautifully maintained. Great location near downtown Crawfordville. privacy fence, landscape yard, split plan, open living home has craftsman inlayed ceilings in living area and master bedroom, large bedrooms and laundry room, 1 car garage, an oversize window in dining area that gives home a lot of natural light. LP 143,900 Courtney Roberts 850.251.6975 Courtney@Ketcham Realty.com Ketcham Realty Group, Inc SACRIFICE Canal Home46 Gulf Breeze Drive, First Canal, Oyster Bay 3bd/3ba, custom kitchen, plantation shutters thru-out, a must see! ***$175k*** call 850-926-2015 Condo AuctionOverlooking Destin FL harbor-luxurious 2420+/sq ft, furnished unit in East Pass Towers with guaranteed owner financing. March 1, 1:00pm. See website for detail terms, virtual tour: gt auctions.com, 205.326.0833, Granger, Thagard & Associates, Inc., G.W. Thagard, Business AB2100, Broker BK3009116, Auctioneer AU2846. I Love My RVSale 6 Days Only Feb 12-17 Motor Homes, Trailers, 5th Wheels, Van Campers. Bring your Trade, Title and Payment Book! $AVE BIG NOW R.V. World Inc. of Nokomis, 2110 U.S. 41, Nokomis, FL I-75 Exit 195 1-800-262-2182 www .rvworldinc.com 5530-0214 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS WATER SYSTEM RIVER SINK WATER TANK PAINTING & REPAIRS NUMBER: ITB 2013-09 Advertisement Begins: Friday, February 01, 2013 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed bids for ITB 2013-09, WAKULLA COUNTY WATER SYSTEM RIVER SINK WATER TANK PAINTING & REPAIRS will bereceived until 2:00 p.m. on Friday, February 22, 2013. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please dir ect all questions to : ADMINISTRA TIVE: Deborah DuBose, Wakulla County BOCC Phone: 850.926.9500 x 707FAX: 850.926.0940 E-Mail: ddubose@mywakulla.com TECHNICAL: Brent Pell, ESG Operations, Inc. 340 Trice Lane, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Office: 850.926.7616 E-Mail: bpell@esginc.net Bid documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on Friday, February 1, 2013. 5539-0214 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD INVITATION TO BID THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD INVITES YOU TO SUBMIT A BID ON THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED ITEMS: BID NUMBER: WCSB12/13-10 ITEM(S) TO PURCHASE: WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL -SCHOOL SIGN SEALED BIDS SHALL BE RECEIVED BY THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD UNTIL: FEBRUARY 26, 2013 @ 2:00 P.M. ALL BIDS RECEIVED SHALL BE OPENED AND READ ALOUD PUBLICLY, AT THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE, CRAWFORDVILLE FLORIDA ON: FEBRUARY 26, 2013 @ 2:00 P.M. THE BIDS SHALL BE CONSIDERED BY THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD DURING THEIR REGULAR SCHEDULED MEETING ON: MARCH 11, 2013.THE SCHOOL BOARD RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY AND ALL BIDS OR PORTIONS THEREOF. BID FORMS AND SPECIFICATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM: WILLIAM R. BRISTOL, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF FACILITIES WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD 69 ARRAN ROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 ALL BIDS SHOULD BE SEALED AND CLEARLY MARKED ON THE OUTSIDE OF THE ENVELOPE -SEALED BID, WAKULLA HIGH SCHOOL -SCHOOL SIGN, BID #12/13-10 ALL BIDS SHOULD BE MAILED TO: WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD 69 ARRAN ROAD CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327 ATTENTION: W. R. BRISTOL February14, 2013 Pelican Post Post your classi ed line ad in The Wakulla News and it will run on our website thewakullanews.com for FREE! Post it! Buy it! Sell it! Deadline Monday 11:00 A.M.CLASSIFIED ADS Starting at just $12.00 a week! Cars Real Estate Rentals Employment Services Yard Sales Announcements 877-676-1403 Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net Page 20 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comA-1PRESSURE CLEANING FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT F ALL ING LEAVES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help!Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l t h e e M M o o o o o o d d e e e e e r r n E q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t to He C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f f t t ! P A T GR EEN S L A WN S ER VICE Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED 4Br 2Ba House $825mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $1200mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $875mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 1.5Ba SWMH $570mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba Duplex $750mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2Ba SWMH $675mmo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba Duplex $625mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $450mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $500mo + Sec. Dep. RENTALS: Wakulla RealtySpecializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate BrokerWhite male 62, very active. Like to meet ladies to dine and dance. Lets meet. Nice home in Panacea. Wes 984-5733. No large women, please. ::: PERSONAL ::: --F&L AUCTION --FARM EQUIPMENT & ANTIQUE AUCTIONFEBRUARY 23 9AM EST Tractors, Mowers, Cultivators and all types of Farm Equipment AUCTIONS AuctionFDIC.com 866.509.4473AL-GA-FL-SCMonday,February25at1:00pmDoubletreeHotelTallahasseeNoBuyersPremium|5%DownPayment $2,500CashiersChecktoBid|BrokersProtected H&MCQ1035357,AB110;B.G.Hudson,Jr.,BK3006464,AU230HiddenPondLand&CoastalHighwayOchlockoneeBay 35NonContiguousLotsInThe RefugeAtPanaceaSubdivision The Wakulla NewsSelling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 21 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 57 Cloer Lane 3 BR/2BA. Available 3/1, $900./mo $900 Security Deposit. No Pets. 217 Horseshoe 4 BR/ 3 BA MH on 3 acres. $950 mo/ $950 Security Deposit. No Pets. 107 Wildwood 3BR/2BA with Den on one acre. No smoking, pets ok w/prior approval & $250 pet fee. $1100/mo $1100 security. 29C Old Courthouse Square2 Bedroom and 2 1/2 bath town home. (Two master suites upstairs) $800 per month with $800 deposit. No Smoking. Call Cristy 5199039. 51A Dispennette3BR/2BA $750 mo/$750 Security. Pets ok with $250 fee. 17 Cessna 3 BR/2BA TARPINE. Available end of December. $1,100 mo./$1,100 Security. No Smoking, No Pets. 5 Susquehanna 2BR/1BA $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets O.K. with prior approval and $250 fee. No Smoking. 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Randy Merritt, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Director, Employee Support Svcs. February 7 & 14, 2013 5533-0221 TWN Vs. Delpasand, Arman Case No. 10-349-FC Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 10 FC, UCN: 652010CA000349XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ARMAN DELPASAND; et al., Defendants. RE-NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated 06/20/2012 and an Order Resetting Sale dated 1/7/13 and entered in Case No. 10 349 FC, UCN: 652010CA000349XXXXXX of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. is Plaintiff and ARMAN DELPASAND; LAURACHURCHMAN; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 County, Florida, at 11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of March, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: TRACT 23 OF DEER RUN COMMENCE AT AGOVERNMENT CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 35, TOWNSHIP4SOUTH, RANGE 3WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 21 MINUTES 41 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID SECTION 35 ADISTANCE OF 1243.04 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 1510.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 00 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 349.26 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 05 SECONDS EAST 624.70 FEET TO THE WESTERLYRIGHT AWAYBOUNDARYCOUNTY GRADED ROAD, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARY349.25 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DE5534-0221 TWN vs. Rudd, Malcolm Case No. 65-2009-CA-000232 Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-0002362 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MALCOLM H. RUDD et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 16, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2009-CA-000232 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC, is the Plaintiff and MALCOLM H. RUDD; TENANT#1 N/K/AKRISTYHOLLINGSWORTH are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 52, BLOCK A, AMELIAWOOD, UNRECORDED; COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF LOT NUMBER 73 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF THE LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN THENCE NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE SOUTH BOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 73 ADISTANCE OF 33.0 FEET TO THE EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYOF A66 FOOT COUNTYROAD, RUN THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYADISTANCE OF 928.91 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE THENCE NORTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYADISTANCE OF 100.0 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID EASTERLYRIGHT-OF-WAYBOUNDARYRUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS EAST 217.80 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 16 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 14 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 72 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 17 SECONDS WEST 217.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A275 TRICE LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL323270000 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on January 16, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09056787 CHASEDIRECT-CONV-Team 3 -F09056787 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. February 14 & 21, 2013 5535-0221 TWN vs. Smith, Jeff Case No. 65-2010-CA-000233 Notice of Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2010-CA-000233 CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE MANHATTAN MORTGAGE CORPORATION, Plaintiff, vs. JEFF L. SMITH JR, et al, Defendant(s). 5536-0221 TWN Vs. The Marshes Case No. 2012-000208-CANotice of Sale Pursuant to Chapter 45 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2012-000208-CA CADENCE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. THE MARSHES AT EVANS CREEK, LLC; SIDNEYE. GRAY; RICHARD G. SUBER; and UNKNOWN TENANT(S), Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE is given pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 7, 2013, in Case No. 2012-000208-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in which Cadence Bank, N.A. is the Plaintiff and The Marshes at Evans Creek, LLC; Sidney E. Gray; Richard G. Suber; and Unknown Tenant(s) are the Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, in Crawfordville, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 a.m. on March 7, 2013, the property set forth in the Final Judgment of Foreclosure and more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a point where the West boundary of Section 1, Township 6 South, Range 2 West intersects the Westerly right-of-way of U.S. 98 and run thence South 45 degrees 39 minutes 39 seconds East along the Westerly boundary of said right-of-way 615.05 feet, then run North 48 degrees 02 minutes 21 seconds East 200.4 feet to a concrete monument on the Easterly right-of-way boundary of U.S. 98 for the Point of Beginning; from said Point of Beginning run South 45 degrees 39 minutes 39 seconds East along Easterly right-of-way boundary 420.0 feet, thence run North 48 degrees 02 minutes 21 seconds East 136.8 feet, thence run North 82 degrees 34 minutes 21 seconds East 816.3 feet to the center of Evans Creek, then run a meandering course along center of said Evans Creek for a chord bearing of North 22 degrees 25 minutes 21 seconds East a distance of 483.44 feet, then leave said creek and run South 82 degrees 34 minutes 21 seconds West 1187.0 feet, then South 48 degrees 02 minutes 21 seconds West 294.45 feet to the Point of Beginning in the Northwest Quarter of Section 1, Township 6 South, Range 2 West, in Wakulla County, Florida. Being more particularly described by a recent field survey by James Thurman Roddenberry, Job #97-034 as follows: Commence at a 3 inch round government concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Section 1, Township 6 South, Range 2 West Wakulla County, Florida and run South 27 degrees 43 minutes 52 seconds East 1336.66 feet to a concrete monument lying on the Northeasterly right-of-way boundary of U.S. Highway No. 98 for the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run South 45 degrees 39 minutes 39 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary 420.01 feet to a 4 inch by 4 inch concrete monument (marked #799), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run North 48 degrees 02 minutes 21 seconds East 136.80 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run North 82 degrees 34 minutes 21 seconds East 797.03 feet to the centerline of Evans Creek, thence run Northeasterly and Northwesterly along the centerline of said Creek the following courses: North 19 degrees 54 minutes 07 seconds East 34.14 feet; North 00 degrees 42 minutes 27 seconds East 107.20 feet; North 02 degrees 29 minutes 27 seconds West 29.41 feet; North 56 degrees 21 minutes 19 seconds West 123.74 feet; North 00 degrees 59 minutes 43 seconds East 94.62 feet; North 51 degrees 34 minutes 56 seconds East 109.97 feet; North 77 degrees 40 minutes 59 seconds East 82.58 feet; North 74 degrees 48 minutes 58 seconds East 111.02 feet; thence leaving said centerline run South 82 degrees 34 minutes 53 seconds West 1167.52 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 48 degrees 01 minutes 02 seconds West 294.61 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 10.40 acres more or less Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. DATED: January 7, 2013 BRENTTHURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Michael P. Bist Gardner, Bist, Wiener, Wadsworth, Bowden, Bush, Dee, LaVia & Wright, P.A. 1300 Thomaswood Drive Tallahassee, Florida 32308 February 14 & 21, 2013 5537-0221 TWN Vs. Porter, Melody Case No. 65-2010-CA-000358 Notice of ReSched Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 65-2010-CA-000358 HSBC MORTGAGE SERVICES INC., Plaintiff, vs. MELODY M. PORTER, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 9, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000358 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which HSBC Mortgage Services Inc., is the Plaintiff and Melody M. Porter, Michael C. Porter, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00AM EST on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: ALL THAT PARCEL OF LAND IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 7, A DISTANCE OF 249.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 218.56 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 198.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 40.00 FOOT ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 18 5538-0221 TWN Vs. Phillips, James 65-2010-CA-000252 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO. 65-2010-CA-000252 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR J.P. MORGAN MORTGAGE ACQUISITION TRUST 2006-HE2, ASSET BACKED PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-HE2. Plaintiff, vs. JAMES W. PHILLIPS, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 9, 2013, and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000252 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for J.P. Morgan Mortgage Aquisition Trust 2006-HE2, Asset Backed Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2006-HE2, is the Plaintiff and James W. Phillips, Rebekah Taylor, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Ownit Mortgage Solutions, Inc., a California Corporation, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 15 & 16, BLOCK 18, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A 161 RENEGADE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 9th day of January, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800 955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905l /faxL (850) 926-0901. Fax: (850) 926-0901. February 14 & 21, 2013 10-39092 5591-0221 TWN vs. Hicks, Joshua Case No.12-199-CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDAGENERALJURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 12-199-CA FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, Plaintiff, vs. JOSHUAL. HICKS A/K/AJOSHUAHICKS AND HEATHER S. BURNSED A/K/A HEATHER BURNSHED, et al. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated January 17, 2013, and entered in 12-199-CAof the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein FLAGSTAR BANK, FSB, is the Plaintiff and JOSHUAL. HICKS A/K/AJOSHUAHICKS; HEATHER S. BURNSED A/K/AHEATHER BURNSHED are the Defendant(s). Brent Thurmond as the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., the Front Door, Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, FL32327, at 11:00 AM on March 21, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 18, BLOCK A, HAMMOCK WOODS SUBDIVISION, ACCORDING TO THE MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 26, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated this 17th day of January, 2013. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Tamika Peterson, Deputy Clerk IMPORTANT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADACoordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. February 14 & 21, 2013 12-06087 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 218.56 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 199.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY 20 FEET OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 7, A DISTANCE OF 249.23 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, CONTINUE NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 218.56 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 198.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 40.00 FOOT ACCESS EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 54 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE 218.56 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS EAST 199.80 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ALSO AN ACCESS EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE SOUTHERLY 20 FEET AND THE WESTERLY 20 FEET OF THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED PROPERTY: COMMENCE AT AN OLD LIGHTWOOD HUB MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 7, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 23 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 7, A DISTANCE OF 467.79 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 198.82 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 18 MINUTES 54 SECONDS WEST 241.20 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 12 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 28 SECONDS EAST 202.56 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 7, A DISTANCE OF 198.08 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. A/K/A 87 FAMILY CIR., SOPCHOPPY, FL 32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 9th day of January, 2013. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law,Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327; Telephone: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800-955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; Fax: (850) 926-0901. February 14 & 21, 2013 10-50150 NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 16, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2010-CA-000233 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONALASSOCIATION, SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO CHASE HOME FINANCE LLC1, is the Plaintiff and JEFF L. SMITH JR; RHONDAC. SMITH; BENEFICIAL FLORIDA, INC.; PLANTATION ACRES ROAD MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION, INC.; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: BEGIN AT AST. JOE PAPER COMPANYCONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 18 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 5 ADISTANCE OF 389.22 FEET THENCE RUN SOUTH 21 DEGREES 00 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 683.86 FEET TO APOINT LYING ON THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE A DISTANCE OF 108.47 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 23 MINUTES 53 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE ADISTANCE OF 108.80 FEET, THENCE LEAVING SAID CENTERLINE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 19 SECONDS WEST 645.44 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT (MARKED NO. 4261), THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 05 MINUTES 57 SECONDS EAST ALONG THE WEST BOUNDARYOF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 5 ADISTANCE OF 587.01 FEET TO ARE-ROD (MARKED NO. 7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 50 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 16 SECONDS EAST 383.11 FEET TO ARE-ROD (MARKED NO.7160), THENCE RUN SOUTH 55 DEGREES 19 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 414.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH A1994 MERR ID NOS FLHML2F56011955A, FLHML2F56011955B AND FLHML2F56011955C AND TITLE NOS 66731558, 66731559 AND 66731560 A/K/A336 MARYANN DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on January 16, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Glenda Porter, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018, Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F10029878 CHASEDIRECT-SPECFHLMC-Team 3 -F10029878 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. February 14 & 21, 2013

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Page 22 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comGREES 52 MINUTES 05 SECONDS WEST 622.53 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on January 7, 2013 BRENTX THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff, PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339 1438 Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Service Email: answers@shdlegalgroup.com February 14 & 21, 2013 5523-0214 TWN Vs.Nichols, Elizabeth Case No. 12-364-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO.: 12-364-CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTCOMPANY, N.A. AS TRUSTEE GREENPOINTMANUFACTURED HOUSING CONTRACTTRUST, PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATE SERIES 1999-3, acting by and through GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, in its capacity as Servicer, 7360 S. Kyrene Road, Tempe, AZ 85283 Plaintiff, v. ELIZABETH A. NICHOLS, et al. Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ELIZABETH A. NICHOLS and THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF ELIZABETH A. NICHOLS YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Wakulla, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOT 4, OF SHADEVILLE SOUTH, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGE 19 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 1999 GENERALMANUFACTURED D6648, 24 X 52 MOBILE HOME SERIALNUMBER: GMHGA4109923361A/B Commonly known as: 76 SOUTHERN DRIVE, CRAWFORVILLE, FLORIDA32327 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 3rd day of December, 2012. CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 7 &14, 2013 5524-02147 TWN vs. Carnivale, Kenneth Case No. 652012CA000350CAXXXX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 652012CA000350CAXXXX JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. KENNETH CARNIVALE A/K/A KENNETH C. CARNIVALE A/K/A KENNY CARNIVALE; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF KENNETH CARNIVALE A/K/A KENNETH C. CARNIVALE A/K/A KENNY CARNIVALE; UNKNOWN TENANT I; UNKNOWN TENANT II; KELLY CARNIVALE A/K/A KELLY M. CARNIVALE Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:KELLY CARNIVALE A/K/A KELLY M. CARNIVALE, 59 RIDGEWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 OR 22 SIOUX TRAIL, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN And any unknown heirs, devisees, grantees, creditors and other unknown persons or unknown spouses claiming by, through and under the above-named Defendants(s), if deceased or whose last known addresses are unknown. YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to wit: Lot 6, Block 5, of WAKULLA GARDENS, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 39 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Mark W. Hernandez, Butler & Hosch, P.A., 3185 South Conway Road, Suite E, Orlando 32812 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Witness my hand and seal of said Court on the 17th day of January, 2013. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street; Tallahassee, FL 32301; 850-577-4401; at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 7 & 14, 2013 5525-0214 TWN vs. Bergholz, Raydi Case No. 2012-CA-000154 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2012-CA-000154 CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION 21ST MORTGAGE CORPORATION, a Delaware corporation authorized to transact business in Florida, Plaintiff, vs. RAYDI BERGHOLZ, a/k/a RAYDI PIAGET and YANNICK BERGHOLZ, a/k/a YANNICK Y. BERGHOLZ, husband and wife; BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Plaintiffs Final Judgment of Foreclosure entered on December 12, 2012 in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash on February 21, 2013 at 11:00 A.M. (EST), at the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, the following described property: Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Lot 72 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run North 69 degrees 32 minutes 00 seconds East along the Southerly boundary of said Lot 72 a distance of 560.03 feet to a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument, thence run North 21 5527-0214 TWN vs.Greene, James Case No. 65-2012-CA-000046 Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000046 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA Plaintiff, vs. JAMES N. GREENE, III A/K/AJAMES GREENE, III A/K/AJIM GREENE A/K/AJAMES GREENE A/K/AJAMES N. GREENE, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated January 16, 2013 and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000046 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NAis the Plaintiff and JAMES N. GREENE, III A/K/AJAMES GREENE, III A/K/AJIM GREENE A/K/AJAMES GREENE A/K/AJAMES N. GREENE; KIMBERLYGREENE A/K/A KIMBERLYS. KUHNHIEN A/K/AKIMBERLYS. GREENE; HANACOCK BANK AS SUCCESSOR OF HANCOCK BANK OF FLORIDA; CAPITALCITYBANK; BANC OF AMERICA LEASING & CAPITAL, LLC are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 14th day of March, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: THE EAST HALF OF THE EAST HALF OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER (E 1/2 OF E 1/2 OF NE 1/4 OF SE 1/4) OF SECTION 12, TOWNSHIPTHREE SOUTH, RANGE TWO WEST, WAKULLACOUNTYFLORIDA A/K/A488 WHIDDON LAKE ROAD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327-0021 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on January 16, 2013. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F11042038 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. February 7 & 14, 2013, 2013 5532-0221 TWN vs. Browne, John Case No. 12-419-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO.: 12-419-CA CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. JOHN E. BROWNE, JR, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:SAMANTHA WATERS LAST KNOWN ADDRESS: 1314 PAWNEE POINTE CT, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32312 CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE WEST HALF OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 34, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SAID SECTION 34 A DISTANCE OF 404.76 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 30.00 FOOT ROADWAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 18 WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY A DISTANCE OF 122.60 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 10 WEST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 505.23 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 WEST 314.25 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE CONTINUE NORTH 84 WEST 10.00 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 84 WEST 100.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 05 WEST 149.95 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 84 EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY BOUNDARY 110.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 05 EAST 149.93 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Marshall C. Watson, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 1800 NW 49TH STREET, SUITE 120, FT. LAUDERDALE FL 33309 on or before March 14, 2013, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in THE WAKULLA NEWS and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301, 850.577.4401, at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 23rd day of January, 2013.BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk February 14 & 21, 2013 12-05498 5531-0221 TWN The Estate of Wilsey Lamar Stevens Case No. 2013-08-CP Notice To Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION CASE NO. 2013-08-CP In Re: The Estate of: Wilsey Lamar Stevens Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of Wilsey Lamar Stevens, deceased, whose date of death was November 4, 2012, File Number 2013-08-CP, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this Court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. 5540-0221 TWN Sale Date 03/02 Crawfordville Self Storage PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Craw5514-0221 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 024 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatJOHN J RYAN & SHARON W RYANthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #432Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 23-5S-02W-123-02816-018TWIN LAKES ESTATES U1 BLOCK A LOT 18 OR 46 P 601 Name in which assessedJER BE LOU DEV CORP said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of March, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this5thday of December 2012Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 31 and February 7, 14 & 21, 2013 5515-0221 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 025 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatJOHN J RYAN & SHARON W RYANthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #534Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel #: 01-6S-02W-147-03576-C02TARPINE BLK C LOT 2 OR 59 P 50 & OR 67 P 480-492 Name in which assessedPANACEA COASTAL PROP INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of March, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this5thday of December 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 31 and February 7, 14 & 21, 2013 5516-0221 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 026 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatJOHN J RYAN & SHARON W RYANthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #491Year of Issuance2009 Description of Property: Parcel #: 26-5S-02W-000-03550-00026-5S-2W P -2-M-54 LYING IN E 1/2 OF SEC 26 OR 185 P 782 & OR 485 P 756 Name in which assessedPANACEA COASTAL PROP INC said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of March, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this5thday of December 2012Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, ClerkBy: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 31 and February 7, 14 & 21, 2013 5519-0221 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 029 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatJOHN J RYAN AND SHARON W RYANthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows: Certificate #192Year of Issuance2010 Description of Property: Parcel #: 23-4S-02W-064-02020-016ELLENWOOD SUB M-50C LOT 16 OR 183 P 780 & OR 216 P 265 Name in which assessedWALTER B DICKSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of March, 2013at 10:00 A.M. Dated this5thday of December 2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 31 and February 7, 14 & 21, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices fordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, March 2, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: David Moss Marilyn Mitchell Before the sale date of Saturday, March 2, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. February 14 & 21, 2013 The date of first publication of this notice is February 14, 2013. Personal Representative: Mary R. Stevens 56 Terrace Lane, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 Attorney For Personal Representative: T. Whitney Strickland, Jr. Florida Bar No. : 0287350 3360 Capital Circle NE, Tallahassee, Florida 32308 Telephone No. (850) 222-2888 February 14 & 21, 2013 degrees 21 minutes 53 seconds West 381.28 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run North 69 degrees 57 minutes 19 seconds East 255.25 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the Northeasterly maintained right-of-way of Barber Road for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING run North 57 degrees 24 minutes 04 seconds West along said maintained right-of-way 176.39 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said maintained right-of way run North 72 degrees 29 minutes 44 seconds East 195.74 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run South 29 degrees 34 minutes 20 seconds East 132.78 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run South 69 degrees 17 minutes 46 seconds West 50.57 feet to a concrete monument (marked #2919), thence run South 69 degrees 57 minutes 19 seconds West 59.93 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. TOGETHER WITH that certain 1998 FLEETWOOD Chadwick Mobile Home 28 x 76 with Serial Numbers GAFLV05A27358CW22 and GAFLV05B27358CW22. Property Address: 113 Barber Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTERST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: December 12, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK WAKULLA COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk February 7 & 14, 2013 1 14 17 20 25 31 36 39 45 48 55 58 61 2 26 46 3 27 42 4 28 43 5 23 40 56 59 62 18 37 57 6 15 32 49 7 29 50 8 30 47 9 24 44 10 21 41 60 63 22 38 51 11 16 19 33 52 12 34 53 13 35 54 ACROSS 1. Boozehound 6. Resort island off Venezuela 11. Shooting marble 14. Shake off 15. Emphatic denial 16. Wish undone 17. DASH 19. Summer cooler 20. Cable TV worker 21. Spanish hero 23. Suffix with project 24. Charmer's basketful 25. Fancy duds 29. Take turns 31. Closes in on 32. Word before basin or bore 33. Vintner's vessel 36. Fairy tale start 37. A natural, in craps 38. Move, in Realtor lingo 39. To the __ degree 40. Transparent 41. Alternative to a coop 42. Temporarily inactive 44. Fired on 4 5. On disk 47. Moo __ pork 48. St. __ (West Indies nation) 49. They're struck out 55. Go out __ limb 56. DASH 58. Sitcom diner owner 59. Beethoven dedicatee 60. __ voce (softly) 61. Keats composition 62. Supply base 63. Boy Scout unitDOWN1. Hatcher or Garr 2. Appliance for Emeril 3. Pols' providers: Abbr. 4. Trim to fit, perhaps 5. Patches up 6. Go for fish 7. Lecherous sort 8. Exploitative type 9. Twice, in music 10. Weapons supply 11. DASH 12. Bemedaled Murphy 13. Garden intruders 18. Model Macp herson 22. Long. crosser 24. Cooperstown's Musial 25. Bard's "soon" 26. Jamboree enclosure 27. DASH 28. Ill humor 29. Rosie's fastener 30. Baltic Sea feeder 32. MTV viewer, most likely 34. Pierce player 35. Tugboat blast 37. Mower's home 38. Aussie bounder 40. One way to serve clams 41. Aerial show figure 43. "Exodus" hero 44. Tom Jones's "__ a Lady" 45. Replay technique, for short 46. In pitch 47. Winter woe 49. Faucet problem 50. Sinclair rival, once 51. Sikorsky of aviation 52. Not fooled by 53. Brussels-based gp. 54. Farm fare 57. Bullring "Bully!"American Prole Hometown Content 2/10/2013Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 00 9 HometownContent 1 2 23415 5678 5 81 3924 739 51 46 97532 89 00 9 HometownContent 478 1956 2 3 263748195 159623478 695 487231 831962547 724531986 512 374869 947856312 386219754 T E R I A N O N S L O M O O V E N T E N T T U N E D P A C S T A C H L O C A L E E D I T I R E A R I R E P A I R S S T E A M E D E L L E S H E D O L E A N G L E T E E N D R I P R O U E R I V E T E S S O U S E R O D E R S L E E T B I S S T A N S H E S A R S E N A L C H U T I S T L A T R O O I G O R T R A C K E V E N T O N T O A U D I E A L D A N A T O W E E D S T O O T S L O P

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 23 1. GEOGRAPHY: What country lie s northwest of Colombia? 2. FOOD & DRINK: What kind of foo d is fusilli? 3. POLITICS: How many popular vote s separated Richard Nixon and John F. Ken nedy in the 1960 presidential election? 4. LITERATURE: What 19th-centur y novel starts with the line, There was n o possibility of taking a walk that day? 5. TELEVISION: On Bonanza, wha t was the name of the character played b y Michael Landon? 6. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: Wha t was the popular name of the Scottish out law Robert MacGregor? 7. MEDICINE: What is the function o f the chemical substance called heparin? 8. PERSONALITIES: Who is the che f on the Barefoot Contessa cookin g show? 9. BUSINESS: Which merchant use d the five-and-dime-store concept to cre ate one of the largest retail chains in th e world? 10. GAMES: What is the standar d weight of a shot put used by men in com petition? Answers 1. Panama 2. Pasta 3. Just more than 100,000 4. Jane Eyre, by Charlotte Bronte 5. Little Joe 6. Rob Roy 7. Prevents blood clotting 8. Ina Garten 9. F.W. Woolworth 10. 16 pounds8. Clamp used in surKeep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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Page 24 THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comFamily connections are curious. There are those which are reputedly good and those not so good. Every teenager has endured a warning about associating with someone from a bad family. The discussion usually includes a lot of justi cation on the part of the parent and rationalization on the part of the child. When it comes to the insect world, the rationalization usually wins out. A case in point is the bloodsucking conenose or kissing bug. This native insect, Triatoma sanguisuga, is a member of the Triatoma family, a genus of assassin bug. This insect is commonly called a kissing bug because it targets the soft tissues around the mouth of mammals as a feeding site. As if being in the assassin bug family is not bad enough for its reputation, this pests South American cousin is responsible for inoculating victims with Chagas disease. Chagas disease, a protozoan, fortunately does not occur in these latitudes. The bloodsucking conenose found in Wakulla County is a brown, winged bug, 3/4-inch long, with the edges of its abdomen alternating in light and dark colors. They have a slender, straight beak with piercing-sucking mouthparts. The antennae are inserted on the side of the head between the eyes and the end of the beak. They are rarely seen during the day, instead hiding in leaf litter and other debris near their intended host. Birds apparently consider them quite tasty and they are easy targets for avian predators. Kissing bugs primarily feeds at night on the blood of sleeping animals, such as raccoons and opossums which burrow in the vicinity. The life cycle of the conenose can vary considerably depending on temperature, humidity, and availability of hosts. Females lay one egg at a time, up to ve eggs each day. A total of 200 to 300 eggs can be produced each year by one female. The females scatter the eggs in inconspicuous places out of the view of potential predators. The broad distribution gives the young kissing bugs a better chance of survival. The eggs are very small, 1.5 mm long, white, and hatch in approximately 13 to 35 days. There are eight nymphal stages before the conenose reaches maturity. The adults can live from six months to three years. Problems arise when these insects encounter humans. If this creature enters a home or dwelling, its nocturnal habits make humans easy prey. The bloodsucking conenose will enter into a home by crawling through cracks in the foundation, torn window screens, or other structural aws or inadequacies. Many times they enter by simply clinging to a domestic pet or to the clothing of an unaware person. Once indoors, they are found in bedding, cracks in the floors and walls, or under furniture. Most bites from conenose bugs are rarely felt. However, some can be quite painful and infection can occur if the bite wounds are scratched and contaminated. To learn more about the bloodsucking conenose or the kissing bug, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of ce at 850-9263931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u .eduLes Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u .edu or at (850) 926-3931.The bloodsucking conenose or kissing bug Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe bloodsucking conenose is also known as a kissing bug because it targets the soft tissues around the mouths of mammals as a feeding site. Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Please accept my new 1 Year subscription at the price of $25 Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ __________ __________ __________ Exp. Send Payment to:Savings apply to NEW Wakulla County subscriptions only.P.O Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 1-877-401-6408The Wakulla News Is On Vlbtnns Day!$2 5 $ 2 5 Just Just FOR FOR Get local Wakulla news, features, photos, sports, national coupons and more!fs Law Oce Est. 1998 Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator WAKULLA COUNTY SENIOR CENTER33 Michael Dr. Crawfordville, FL (850) 926-7145 Ext.221$30 per personIncludes: Dinner, Beer / Wine, & Entertainment$10 per studentIncludes: Dinner, Soft Drinks & Entertainment(Students and those underage will receive wrist bands) Mystery Dinner TheaterPerformed by: Wakulla High Dramatis Personae Department Directed by: Susan SolburgProceeds benet Senior Citizen Services Doors open at 7pm Entertainment & Dinner begins at 7:30pm Friday February 22, 2013 Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351

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Our 118th Year, 7th Issue Thursday, February 14, 2013 One Section One Section 75 Cents 75 Cents news The Wakulla15th annual Rotary Club of WakullasVALENTINES FESTIVAL Coast Charter School won rst place and $100 from both Rotary and Keep Wakulla County Beautiful in the parade oat contest. Faces along the parade route from Azalea Park to Hudson Park. Wakulla Middle Schools Marching Band.

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Page 2V THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comROTARY VALENTINES FESTIVAL A big grin and a bag for all the candy. Madden Metcalf, 7, a rst grader at Shadeville, along the parade route still wearing his number from the Fit for Love 1-mile walk, in which he was the rst nisher in 10:20. The Covenant Hospice parade oat won second place in the contest, and took home $75. Mount Beasor Primitive Baptists parade oat won third place in the contest, and $50. Grand Marshall Nigel Bradham, former Wakulla War Eagle and FSU Seminole now playing for the Buffalo Bills, takes time to pose with fans in Hudson Park after the parade. Fire ghter waves to the crowd. A festival-goer at Hudson Park after the parade. The retruck siren was very loud.More photos online at thewakullanews.comPhotos by William Snowden

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 Page 3VROTARY VALENTINES FESTIVAL Tiger Rock Martial Arts had a parade oat and gave a demonstration of forms and skills in the pavilion after the parade. Wakulla Dance Academys parade oat. More faces of some young people along the parade route. Some faces in the crowd along the parade route. The parade oat for the Swine Show. Wakulla Christian School marches in the parade. The Wakulla County Schools parade oat. This dog barked along in time with the WMS Marching Band. Looking for candy. Wakulla Sheriff Charlie Creel and Undersheriff Trey Morrison wave to the crowd during the parade.

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Page 4V THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, February 14, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comROTARY VALENTINE CUPID 5K Runners at the start of the Cupid 5K. There were more than 85 who registered for the run and the 1 mile Fit for Love walk. Winner Dwayne Evans, who nished in 19:42. Womens rst place nisher Nicki Beam, who came in at 24:55. A couple of young runners dressed in tutus for the race. Race registration for the Cupid 5K. Valentine Celebration & Parade Valentine Celebration & Parade Thank You To Our Sponsors! Air-Con Ms. Alice Veasman Talquin Electric Buddy Wells Habitat for Humanity Wakulla Insurance Agency Keep Wakulla County Beautiful Best Western PLUS Wakulla Inn & Suites Bridlewood Apartments Brick Launchers. LLC Friends of the Wakulla County Public Library Refreshment Services PEPSI Regions Contractors, Inc. Preble-Rish Inc Rotary International Capital City Bank Saved by Grace Jewelry The Wakulla News Anytime Fitness Wakulla Area Times Big Bend Hospice Wakulla County 4-HJam 4 Camp Brian C. English, CHFC CLTC Senior Partner William F. Versiga, Financial Rep Joseph E. Morgan Electrical Contractor Inspired Technologies Inc. Auto Trim Design & Signs Homestead Imprinted Sportsware GWTC Road ID Walgreens Wakulla Realty Frances Casey Lowe, P.A. Bevis Funeral Home Harvey-Young Chapel Ray s Kayaks & Excursions, LLC Rainbow International 5K CUPID DASH 1 MILE FIT FOR LOVE WALK1ST ANNUAL 15th Annual 15th Annual SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 2013 HUDSON PARK