Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00446

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PAGE 1

By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe word that won was constitutional.Ž With that correct spelling, “ fth grader Phoenix Jalbert of Medart Elementary School became the district spelling bee champion and quali“ ed to move on to the regional “ nal. The district spelling bee was held Friday, Jan. 11, at Wakulla Middle School, and 37 student contestants from both middle schools, three elementary schools, COAST Charter School and Wakulla Christian Academy competed to determine who would be spelling champion. In a rare turn of events, Jalberts brother Zayne is the runner up … the “ rst time theres been a brother-sister team in recent memory. Zayne Jalbert, a seventh grader at Wakulla Middle, misspelled stimulusŽ in the seventh round. That seventh round also cleared out challengers Ethan Brown, a Riversprings seventh grader, who fumbled on spelling the word untenable.Ž And Makenna Roddenberry, a “ fth grader at Riversink Elementary, sat down after trying and missing mitigate.Ž Continued on Page 5 Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 3rd Issue Thursday, January 17, 2012 O n e S e c t i o n One Section 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices ....................................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Church................................................................................Page 6 Obituaries ..........................................................................Page 7 Community ........................................................................Page 8 School ................................................................................Page 9 Sports ..............................................................................Page 10 Outdoors .........................................................................Page 11 Water Ways.................................................................... Page 12 Sheriffs Report ............................................................. Page 13 Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 14 Art & Entertainment ........................................................Page 15 Weekly Roundup...............................................................Page 16 Food..................................................................................Page 18 Thinking Outside the Book.............................................Page 19 Classi eds ....................................................................... Page 20 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 20 Comics .............................................................................Page 23 Natural Wakulla ...............................................................Page 24 INDEX OBITUARIES Shelley A. Mansfield Daniels Fletcher William Durrance Jimmy Fewell Clinton Mays Gray Jimmy James Damon Glenn Simmons Sr. Mary Alice Simmons Betty Ann Smith Bobby M. Wells g s pe ll in g b ee was h e ld d at Wa k u ll a Mi ddl e student con o th middle e lol s t e r k ul a d t o o n r ts is … Phoenix Jalbert is district spelling bee champion By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netA case against Wakulla County that looked like it was headed for the courtroom has been settled. The county commission agreed to the “ nal terms of a settlement in the case of Robert Roddeberry v. Wakulla County on Jan. 7. Roddenberry was “ red from his job as a paramedic with Wakulla County Emergency Medical Services on March 4, 2011. He claims he was terminated because he spoke up against a medical protocol for intubation set for the countys medical director. The county says he was let go because he failed to follow county protocols and did not complete a corrective action plan. In the settlement, Roddenberry was awarded $240,000 and is allowed to re-apply for his position with the county after a period of time has passed, according to his attorney Marie Mattox. Mr. Roddenberry is hopeful that he and the county will have a good relationship moving forward and is glad that this matter was resolved,Ž Mattox said. Roddenberry filed the lawsuit on May 6, 2011, against the county, EMS supervisor Scott McDermid, Dr. Michael Lusko, the county medical director, former Deputy County Administrator Tim Barden and former Director of EMS Fran Councill, claiming whistleblower retaliation, violation of his First Amendment rights and defamation. Attorney Brian Duffy, the counsel hired by the Florida Association of Counties to represent the county, declined to comment. The case was set to go to trial in Panama City on Nov. 26, but the county commission held an attorney-client executive session on Nov. 19 and approved the proposed settlement. There were a few adjustments and the “ nal agreement was approved at the recent commission meeting. Roddenberry had been a paramedic with the county since August 1997 when he started as a part-time employee and then became a fulltime employee in spring 1998. Roddenberry alleged that he was wrongfully terminated because of retaliation for his advocacy of best practices since 1997, for statements set forth in the run report of November 28, 2010, for the grievance and statement of duress set forth in his letter of December 15, 2010, and for the content of his letter of February 11, 2011.Ž The complaint states that retaliatory acts began after Roddenberry reported matters of public concern that werent within his job description. Prior to Roddenberrys termination, he was suspended for two shifts on Dec. 2, 2010. McDermid wrote in a letter to Roddenberry that This of“ ce has been advised by the County Medical Director that inappropriate comments were placed in a patients medical record regarding Wakulla Countys medical protocols for EMS/ Public Safety staff.Ž The comments mentioned referred to an incident that occurred on Nov. 28, 2010, when Roddenberry was treating a patient in respiratory distress and administered the countys protocol for intubation. According to the complaint, Roddenberry administered etomidate, per county protocol, and also administered Valium to avoid side effects of etomidate. The complaint states, the patient experienced the known Etomidate side-effects of trismus (involuntary clenching and locking of teeth) en route to the TMH emergency room.Ž In Roddenberrys report for that patient, he said, During OTI (Oral tracheal intubation), after giving Etomidate patient clenched down in trismus on laryngoscope blade, knocking her front teeth loose... perhaps our service needs to look at other means of facilitating airway management,Ž according to the complaint. Continued on Page 5 Lawsuit settledParamedic gets $240,000 settlement from Wakulla Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Christian Coalition will have a celebration of the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Hudson Park on Monday, Jan. 21, beginning at 9:30 a.m. Well have readings from the life of Dr. King, songs and a short speech followed by light refreshments,Ž said Jennie Jones, president of the coalition. We always take a break on this holiday to re” ect on the meaning and work of this man who gave his life for his cause. A short celebration of his life is important to everyone.Ž King, assassinated in 1968, was one of the key “ gures in the Civil Rights Movement and a winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. His effect on peoples lives led the county to rename Lower Bridge Road to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Road in 2009. The process was begun in 2003 and re” ected a lot of work for a number of people of both races,Ž said Jones. We wanted to honor a man whose work was so important and whose life was cut so short.Ž Shortly before Lower Bridge Road was re-named, a monument was erected and installed on the courthouse green with a walkway. We used the bricks in the walk to help raise money for the monument,Ž said Jones. A very signi“ cant donation was also made towards the monument by Suzanne and Bruce Smith, local residents. They really helped kick-start the monument fund with their donation,Ž said Jones. The program on Monday will include songs by youths from area churches, readings by Wakulla County Commissioner Howard Kessler and Herb Donaldson, president of Palaver Tree Theater Company, a Wakulla-based arts organization. We are looking forward to taking a few minutes of the holiday to re” ect on the life of Dr. King and invite everyone in the community to the Hudson Park celebration,Ž Jones said. In addition, the Christian coalition will be hosting a February Black History Month celebration on the weekend of Feb. 15 through Feb. 17. The coalitions annual Arthur Andrews Scholarship Banquet will be held Friday, Feb. 15, with proceeds going to the scholarship fund, which any Wakulla High senior can apply for. The banquet will be at the Wakulla County Senior Center with a dinner, speakers and music. Saturday, Feb. 16, will be the coalitions annual parade and celebration in Hudson Park. On Sunday, Feb. 17, will be the Read InŽ at the Wakulla County Public Library. For more information or tickets to the banquet, contact Jennie Jones, 926-7547, Ruth Francis, 926-5236 or Hugh Taylor, 926-6058.Celebration planned for Martin Luther King Jr. DayWILLIAM SNOWDENChampion Phoenix Jalbert with Superintendent Bobby Pearce. Longtime Superintendent of Schools David Miller was honored with a retirement party with hundreds of people at Wakulla High School on Saturday, Jan. 12. He was entertained by a video made by school staff wishing him well after nearly 40 years at the district as teacher, coach, principal and superintendent. With him were retired Sheriff David Harvey and wife Rhonda, Sen. Bill Montford, Millers wife Delores and granddaughter Danielle, and current Superintendent Bobby Pearce. Story and photos on Page 16.WILLIAM SNOWDEN David Miller is honored Retirement party is thrown for Miller • Community Center Plans are stalled, Page 2. • Plans for Wakulla Environmental Institute move forward, Page 3.More county news: Story of a little girl's best friend, named JulieRed Clay FootprintsPage 15

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWater and sewer customers of the City of St. Marks saw a slight increase on their bills effective Jan. 1. The 3-percent cost of living increase was unanimously approved by the city commission at its December meeting. This increase changes the inside city limits rates for residential to $22.46 per 3,000 gallons from $21.81. Commercial rates went up from $34.42 to $35.45. Outside city limits went from $39.29 to $40.47 for residential and $53.18 for commercial, up from $51.63. Sewer rates for residential went from $26.74 for the “ rst 3,000 gallons to $27.54. Commercial rates are now $56.81. In other matters before the city commission: € The citys streetscape improvements are nearly complete. The road paving, sidewalks are done and the period lighting, benches and trash cans have been installed. The city is just waiting for Progress Energy to “ nish underground wiring and to remove the old lighting. The city was awarded a $600,000 Community Redevelopment Block Grant for downtown revitalization. Some residents along Port Leon Drive chose to also participate in the beauti“ cation by paying to have their driveways paved, taking advantage of the construction company being in town for the city. € At its Jan. 10 meeting, the commission agreed to waive its vendor license fee for the upcoming Swap Meet on Feb. 14-16 on the site of St. Marks Innovation Park. John Jefferson and Rick Clevenger brought the idea to hold an antique automobile and motorcycle swap meet to bene“ t Vietnam Veterans of America and Wounded Warriors to the commission a couple months back. Theres nothing like this within 100 miles of here,Ž Clevenger said. In exchange for being able to hold the event at the old re“ nery site, they agreed to clean up the area. It looks great,Ž said Mayor Chuck Shields. The group has “ lled out an event permit and will get liability insurance for the event. The commission agreed to waive the fee that would be required for each vendor for the “ rst year of the event. It gives us and yall a chance to see how it goes,Ž Shields said. Page 2 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netIt could be back to the drawing board for the Wakulla County Commission regarding the Wakulla County Community Center. The idea was to turn the old New Life Church into a community center with one building being utilized by the YMCA, another serving as meeting rooms and a new gymnasium to be built on the 22-acre property. However, bids were returned for the renovation of the old sanctuary building into a YMCA and construction of the open ” oor gym and all were well over budget, said County Administrator David Edwards. Edwards said the county only has the funds to do either the renovation or the construction of the gymnasium. But not both. Now the county will need to speak with representatives from Capital Region YMCA to see if that will work with their plans for the center. The renovations to be done included a free weight and cardio room, “ tness classroom, kid zone and restrooms and showers. This building would be utilized by the YMCA. The county had entered into a memorandum of understanding with the YMCA for them to run the facility. Edwards has said in the past that the county parks and recreation department does not have the staff or funds to manage the community center. So the county sent out a request for proposals and the YMCA was the lone responder. However, now that plans are changing for the renovations, Edwards said he is unsure if the YMCA will continue with the agreement. He has reached out to them, but has yet to get a response. This could be because of a change in administration with the YMCA. The former President Ken Franklin has moved on and new president, Ray Purvis, was hired in late November. If the YMCA decides it does not want to proceed, Edwards said he will bring the item to the county commission and see what direction they would like to go. The county received a legislative appropriation for $392,000 to construct a community center. Not until after buying the current community center did they find out they couldnt use this funding to purchase an existing building. The money can only be used on new construction or renovations to a communal area. These funds must be spent by September 2013. Were running out of time,Ž Edwards said. Theres enough time, but if there is a change up, it will be a mad dash.Ž County Commissioner Ralph Thomas said the commission could look at using the funds to upgrade the countys recreation park. He suggested the county take advantage of the money and look at using it on something that will not have a recurring cost. Commissioner Randy Merritt said, Everybody wants a community center.Ž But he acknowledged the fact that the county just doesnt have the staff or funds to operate it. He suggested moving the library to the community center, like the Woodville Community Center where one side of the building serves as a library and the other side as a community center. Edwards said it all depends on what the YMCA says and then they will go from there. If they say no, then we need to “ gure out what to do,Ž Edwards said. Besides the delay in renovations, the county has run into several hiccups with the community center since it purchased the 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church on May 24, 2010. First, money had to be pulled from reserves to pay for it because it did not meet the criteria for the legislative appropriation. Then the county had to decide how it would operate the facility. After a year of discussion, the county entered into an MOU with the YMCA, but still doesnt have an operational plan worked out. The design for the community center has changed several times and the project “ nally went out to bid late last year. There have also been suggestions by those on the commission and in the community to sell the facility or use it as county of“ ces. However, those ideas have been shot down so far. In the meantime, it has yet to serve as a community center. It has been used for public meetings, a command center for Operation Santa and the building with several of“ ces and meeting rooms is being utilized by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Office Road Patrol and Criminal Investigation Divisions until their new facility is built. There have also been issues with the Community Center Advisory Committee. This group was intended to be made up of champions for the center who were tasked with coming up with fundraising and program ideas. After a couple meetings it became clear that some of those on the committee were not so supportive of the community center. The commission decided to change the make up of the group and will vote on the new members at the Jan. 22 meeting.COUNTY COMMISSION CITY OF ST. MARKSCommunity Center plans are stalledWater, sewer customers see rate increaseSt. Marks residents who wish to run for a seat on the city commission will have until Jan. 31 at 4:30 p.m. to qualify. Seats 5 is up for this election. This seat is currently held by Gail Gilman. Gilman has not yet led her paperwork to qualify for reelection, but did mention she had received it. To qualify, one must be a resident of St. Marks and sign up at city hall, 788 Port Leon Drive, between 9 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. If there is an election, it will be held Feb. 20 from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at city hall. For more information, call city hall at 925-6224.… JENNIFER JENSENQualifying open for city candidates WILLIAM SNOWDENThe Community Center was used by Operation Santa for its community outreach program during the holidays. ANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGIST *Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.FREE HEARING TESTINGOPEN TO ALL EVERY THURSDAY TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayToll Free 1-866-942-4007CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDINGCall for an appointment 850-942-4007• FREE Video Ear Inspection • 3 Year Warranty on ALL Models • Many Size OptionsDiscover How Much Better Your World Can Sound… NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL WORKERS AND RETIREES!? That’s Right… No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee!Miracle EarHearing Aid Center is NOW Offering Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 Submit your Special Event and we will include it in The Wakulla News Week in WakullaContact: jjensen@thewakullanews.net(850) 926-7102fax (850) 926-3815

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 3 PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netPlans are moving forward for Tallahassee Community Colleges future project, the Wakulla Environmental Institute. TCC has entered into a contract to purchase 158 acres on the north side of Riley Drive and northwest of Wakulla Middle School from the Gaby family to construct the site, which will include a 10,000-square foot Cracker style administration building. They are waiting for approval of a comprehensive plan amendment that would change the current locations future land use from agricultural to public facilities. The county commission agreed to send the application for the amendment to the state on Jan. 7 so they could review it. The institute will offer eight environmental degrees and certificate programs in the areas of water, wastewater, recycling, alternative energy, recreation and conservation. The “ rst phase of construction will include an entrance road from U.S. Highway 319, the administration building with classroom space and public meeting rooms, nature trials and boardwalks. Future plans include a maintenance building, conference center, 200room hotel, administration building, several classroom buildings, commercial vehicle drivers training building, practical training area and E.O. Wilson Biophilia Center Branch. One issue that was brought up with regards to the location was possible increase in traffic on U.S. Highway 319. Currently, only access to the property currently will be from U.S. Highway 319, but future phases of the project may allow for another access point off U.S. Highway 98. TCC also plans to create turn lanes and whatever is necessary to help traf“ c ” ow. County Commissioner Howard Kessler also pointed out the sites environmental factors, but said, Im sure TCC will be good stewards of the property.Ž The site features wetlands, a sinkhole, as well as a river rise which connects to the sinkhole by way of a natural bridge. There are also several low-lying areas. These can be used to interpret wetland wildlife, said WEI Executive Director Bob Ballard. The environmental features was one of the reasons the site is ideal for the institute. The county commission will now wait to see if the state has any issues or comments regarding the amendment, In other matters before the board: € The county commission voted four to vote, with Kessler opposing, to allow the planning department to approve certain types of variance requests to the wetlands ordinance for lots recorded prior to 1995 where there is less than 2,800 square feet of buildable area. This variance will allow development within the second 40-foot wetlands buffer. However, prior to applying for the variance to build within the buffer, the ordinance requires that applicants must “ rst fully utilize a 20 percent variance to the applicable building setbacks. Once they have utilized that variance, they can obtain the variance for development within the buffer zone. Prior to this ordinance, these types of variance requests came before the county commission for approval. County Commissioner Randy Merritt brought the change forward to speed up the process for the homeowner. There is still no development allowed within the 35-foot buffer closest to the wetlands. Kessler wondered how many people this change would affect. Since 2009, six variances have been submitted, he said. How much work are we really eliminating?Ž he asked. Merritt said it was more about the lengthy political process, rather than staff time. Planning Director Luis Serna said a lot of people inquire about the process, but many dont come forward because of the amount of time it takes to get approved. Kessler said this would also eliminate the publics input. I dont think its that much of a burden,Ž he said. Commissioner Ralph Thomas said this is a procedural issue and the description is very narrow. All were doing is allowing people to use their land,Ž he said. Kessler said, I think property rights is an important thing, but its not everything.Ž € The commission approved the Gulf Tourism and Seafood Promotional Grant agreement, accepted the $500,000 and approved to advertise for creative marketing and graphic design services and digital media advertising services. The Tourist Development Council applied for the $500,000 grant from the Gulf Tourism and Seafood Promotional Fund, which is a $57 million fund established to help those areas affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in April 2010, and it was awarded in November. The major component of the TDCs proposal was increasing the tourism name of Wakulla County and the brand awareness of its slogan The Natural Place to Be.Ž It also includes a marketing and advertising strategy that highlights Wakullas natural resources. There was also an idea to create a brand for Wakullas seafood industry, such as Fresh from Wakulla, a variation of the Fresh from Florida campaign. A majority of the funds will go towards print and digital media buys. Many of the print publications the TDC targeted are ones they have never been able to afford, according to TDC Director Pam Portwood. One area the county commission had some concern with was the work authorization for additional TDC director services in the amount of $15,000. Merritt said he would like Thomas, the commissions board member on the TDC, to look over Portwoods scope of work before it is approved. Thomas said, I wouldnt mind taking more time.Ž He added that TDC has been under fire before and he felt the commission needed to discuss its will, desire and wish of the TDC. Kessler agreed that there was some vagueness. Ive spent some time with this and I have major concerns.Ž The commission agreed to accept the grant, but would discuss the work authorization form for Portwood further before approving. The next commission meeting is Jan. 22 at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers.COUNTY COMMISSIONPlans for Wakulla Environmental Institute move forward JANUARY 17, 2013NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The Wakulla County Planning Commission and the Board of County Commissioners propose to adopt the following by ordinance. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, February 11, 2013, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, March 5, 2013 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any nonEnglish speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners' Of“ce at (850) 9260919 or TDD (850) 926-1201. JANUARY 17, 2013LEGAL NOTICE ROAD CLOSING NOTICE IS GIVEN that a public hearing will be held by the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Tuesday, February 19, 2013, beginning at 5:00 PM or as soon thereafter as time permits in the County Commission Chambers located west of the Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327 to consider a request to close that portion of platted but not constructed Beatrice Drive lying on the north side of Mashes Sands Road (State Road 372). Also located as shown on the “le in the of“ce of the Planning and Community Development Department, Wakulla County Commissioners Complex, 11 Bream Fountain Road and as further shown below as number 1. These administrative actions are in accordance with the provisions of Section 336.10, Florida Statutes. Any person desiring to appeal a decision of a County Board must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962. Advertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Wakulla County Tourist Development Council Creative Marketing and Graphic Design Services Request for Proposal No. 2013-06 Advertisement Begin Date: January 8, 2013 JANUARY 17, 2013 Advertisement Detail WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS Wakulla County Tourist Development Council Digital Media Advertising Campaign Services Request for Proposal No. 2013-07 Advertisement Begin Date: January 8, 2013 JANUARY 17, 2013 LEGAL NOTICEJANUARY 17, 2013

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Page 4 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• So this is what new looks like • Rotary gearing up for annual Valentines Celebration • Charlie Creel is Wakulla’s new sheriff • Sheriff’s Report for Jan. 10, 2012 • Year in Review: A look back at 2012 • School-level Teachers of the Year are announced • Motion to lower utility tax fails for lack of second • Week in Wakulla: Jan. 10-16 thewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Editor, The News: There has been a lot of talk and letters about the commission meeting where the public service tax was on the agenda but died for lack of a second. I would like to express my opinion of what happened that week. Dr. Howard Kessler had sent emails and put a letter in the paper urging citizens to come to the meeting and speak against the tax. This seems like a very reasonable thing on the surface but it is somewhat political. Let me stop here and say I support Dr. Kessler and like him but I am a realist. To the other commissioners this had to look like in-your-face politics, no matter what happened Kessler looked good. If the tax was repealed he won politically and if the tax stayed in effect he looked good politically and the others looked bad. We have an intelligent commission and nothing is going to be shoved down anyones throat and no one person is going to rule the others. The commissioners are intelligent with alpha type personalities but ego has no place on the commission. A famous politician said, Everything is political and all politics are local.Ž This is the worst of local politics because people are being attacked personally. I dont think our commissioners are wanting anything but what is best for the citizens, it is just that their opinions are different as to what is best. At the “ rst meeting of the new commission Kessler suggested a retreat with commissioners and Dave Edwards to discuss priorities and goals. The commission did not schedule a retreat and that was a mistake, in my opinion. Before people get more entrenched and more divided I would like to see the commission have that retreat and start over. A mulligan might be a good thing for the citizens sake. Bill Russell Ochlockonee BayEditor, The News : Back on Dec. 18, I wrote a letter to Rep. Steve Southerland urging him to vote to extend the Bush era tax cuts for those earning $250,000 per year or less, and urging him to raise tax rates on those 2 percent of Americans who earn more than $250,000 per year. To date, I have received NO reply from either Rep. Southerland or anyone on his staff. I do however, have an answer from him, impersonal though it may be … his vote on Jan. 1 of this year AGAINST the bill to extend the Bush era tax cuts for middleclass families. On his website, Rep. Southerland defends his vote against the compromise reached by the President and the Senate by stating in his Jan. 1 press release on the vote that the bill yields just $1 in spending cuts for every $41 in tax hikes.Ž And that  a deal like this ƒ would abandon our children and grandchildren on a cliff.Ž Whose children and grandchildren is he speaking of? Floridas 2nd Congressional District boasts a median annual income of only $34,718. That means half the working and retired people of this District earn less than $35,000 per year! In fact, median household income in Florida three years ago was $44,736, and statewide, only 3.1 percent of households earned more than $200,000. Rep. Southerland voted to deny tax relief to 97 percent of his constituents and their children. At what is considered the most generous time of year, it seems Mr. Southerland opted to make a statement of callous disregard for those whom he supposedly serves. The people of North Florida deserve better! A congressman who thinks about whats in their best interests, and votes accordingly. Someone whos fair on taxes. Someone whos willing to invest in education and infrastructure. Someone wholl help bring jobs and opportunity to this District. Someone like Al Lawson. Prokop V. Hruda TallahasseeEditor, The News: Your Jan. 10 newspaper ran a Letter to the Editor titled, Brimner has a selective memoryŽ that implied I could not remember that following my term as your county commissioner the county budget was larger than it was when I was elected. I fully understand (and remember) the budgets during my time of service. From 2002 through 2006, your Board of County Commissioners lowered taxes for all citizens. In 2002, the Wakulla County millage rate was 10 mills, the highest allowed by Florida Law. At the end of 2006, the Wakulla County millage rate was 8 mills, the lowest allowed by Florida if Wakulla County was to remain eligible for road paving assistance. As an example, if a citizen was paying taxes on $100,000 in 2002, they paid $1,000 in county taxes when I was elected. By 2006, taxes on $100,000 had dropped to $800 „ a 20 percent reduction in taxes. Im proud of that accomplishment. Despite the 20 percent cut in tax rates, it is true tax revenues to the county increased from 2002 through 2006. After all, we had new homes and businesses and more people paying taxes. Following 2006, property prices began to fall and as a result, tax revenues began to fall (and continues to fall). To address this problem, the past board neglected to cut non-essential programs and decided to increase taxes in the form of increased property taxes, new taxes on communications, new taxes on utilities and new mandatory fees (taxes by another name) on garbage. I encourage this board to work together to make hard, sometimes unpopular, decisions and cut county spending and taxes. As an individual, I might not like every cut but as a taxpaying citizen, I fully support cuts in spending. We are now at the point that every cut in taxes must be accompanied by cuts in spending. Our citizens cannot afford to pay for great programs used by very limited numbers of our family and friends. Ed Brimner Crawfordville By GOV. RICK SCOTT As we enter 2013, like a lot of folks Im re” ecting on the years past to “ nd ways that we can add to our previous successes in helping Florida families. We made a lot of progress in 2012, but a new year means we have another 365 days to improve education, grow jobs and make sure the cost of living for Florida families is low. To do so, Ive put together a list of my resolutions that will bene“ t Florida families: 1. Grow More Jobs Jobs are my absolute top priority. I ran on a platform of job creation, Ive promised to deliver 700,000 new private sector jobs in seven years and so far were well on our way with more than 200,000 jobs created by Florida businesses in two years. While weve had great successes, theres still more to do. To grow more jobs and provide each and every Florida family with the opportunity to pursue and live the American dream, we have to be the most business friendly place in the world because successful businesses hire people. To do so weve already cut 2,300 regulations, weve eliminated the business tax for 75 percent of Florida businesses … and for 2013 Im looking to cut it for 80 percent of businesses. Today, Texas is ranked number one for job creation, but Ive already told Gov. Perry that he should prepare for Florida to soon take the place of the national leader in job creation. 2. Improve Floridas Education System. The decisions we make today have tremendous effects on future generations, so for families to grow and prosper in Florida, we have to make sure were meeting the needs of future generations by providing a quality education. To do so Ive proposed my College and Career FIRST initiative, which will provide money for teachers to buy supplies they use in the classroom, cut the red tape and regulations that burden teachers, and put a hold on creating any new testing requirements that do not support our transition to Common Core. Ive also asked state colleges and universities to hold the line on tuition increases. Tuition at universities has gone up on families by more than 65 percent over the last “ ve years, and if we dont stop this dramatic climb we will make it impossible for most students to get a degree without leaving school with tremendous debt. We want our children to have the blessings of the American Dream, and to do so we have to support future generations by creating a world class education system that allows Florida families to compete and succeed. 3. Continue to Focus on Families. When I was in high school, my teacher gave us a test to tell us what career would suit us best. My test told me I should be a social worker because I love working with people and solving problems. Im excited about getting into communities in 2013 and having the opportunity to hear whats going on in the lives of Floridians to find more ways to help families get jobs, a great education and keep the cost of living low. Finally, I cant forget my job as a grandfather. Over the holidays, my 14month-old grandson Auguste took his “ rst steps. As he grows and learns his way through the world, Ann and I want to make sure were there to help guide and support him. Like every parent and grandparent, we want to make sure that our kids are safe and that they have access to a quality education, so that they can pursue the career of their dreams, and ultimately, start a family of their own. In 2013, we will continue to work every day to make Florida the best place in the world for families.Rick Scott is the governor of Florida.Gov. Scott’s resolutions for Florida in the New Year By SLIM RANDLES The problem was Billy, you see. Billys our town dog, ever since Sally passed away quietly on Docs porch, and Billys owner, Stewart Simpson, died two weeks later. The people who inherited Stews house didnt particularly enjoy having Billy around, and Billy appeared to feel the same way about them, so he became our dog. By which I mean everyones dog. People in town fed him whenever he came around, so there wasnt a problem that way. Matter of fact, hed gained a few extra pounds by riding the grub line. His job, as official town dog, was to be colorful, which he was, to greet tourists, which he did, and to escort the children to school, which he accomplished every weekday. On Saturdays hed show up at the school, look around, then go back downtown and see if there were any tourists who needed guidance. The problem was, it was now winter and cold, and Billy is a short-haired coonhound and shivers a lot. But hes our dog, and our responsibility, and thats why the high school boys in woodshop took over. First they held a design contest, to see who could lay out the best house possible for Billy. Two of the guys even measured him “ rst, because youd want the thing to be cozy, but not crowded. Then when the winning design was chosen, they set to work. In a weeks time, Billy had the best-insulated, classiest dog house in town. It could withstand zoning changes, hurricanes and atomic attack. They took it down to the crossing where the school kids were each weekday and leveled out a place for it under a shade tree. Then they threw some kibble in it to get Billy to go in. Billy ate the kibble and curled up and lay down in there and there were smiles all over town. The boys from woodshop received congratulations from the multitudes, and the project was declared a success. And when darkness fell and the wind began out of the east, Billy walked over to Mrs. Sandifords house and scratched on the door. She let him in and he jumped up on the couch with her two cats, Boots and Desdemona, and sighed. Love comes in all forms.Read free samples of Slims books at www. slimrandles.com. HOME COUNTRYREADERS WRITE:Disappointed in Southerlands vote Lets start over on public service tax Brimner remembers county budgetsBilly is the town dog

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Special to The NewsGulf Winds Federal Credit Union recently announced a merger with SCORE Federal Credit Union in Tallahassee. On Jan. 1, 2013, SCORE FCU officially became Gulf Winds, including the Crawfordville branch. The merger with SCORE FCU will add over 5,500 members and three branch locations in the Tallahassee area to Pensacola-based Gulf Winds. Once the merger is complete, Gulf Winds will have 12 branches, assets of $475 million, more than 56,000 plus members, and a “ eld of membership to include Escambia, Santa Rosa, Leon, Gadsden, Wakulla and Jefferson counties, and Escambia County in Alabama. Steps to fully merge the two credit unions have begun. SCORE FCU members will have access to more competitive savings and loan rates, enriched online banking capabilities, mobile banking, a convenient contact center and more. The Gulf Winds Team is excited and motivated to serve the SCORE FCU members and the Tallahassee area,Ž said Chris Rutledge, President and CEO of Gulf Winds. We are already working hard with the SCORE FCU team in preparation to offer our market leading savings and loan rates. As we plan for the future, our goal is to “ nd ways we can expand our footprint within the communities we serve and beyond.Ž www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 5Continued from Page 1 Phoenix Jalbert was the last speller standing … or, actually, sitting in a wooden chair on the stage. She had to correctly spell her word, and then spell another to win. Zayne Jalbert, Brown and Roddenberry all had to come back onstage for a spell-off to determine who would be runner up. In round 12, Zayne Jalbert won. Brown was defeated by the word inimitable.Ž Roddenberry by amateurish.Ž Last years champion, Danna Richardson, was eliminated in the sixth round with the word taciturn.Ž Phoenix Jalbert was presented with a trophy by Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce. William Snowden, editor of The Wakulla News, which was a sponsor of the district bee, presented Jalbert with a MerriamWebster Collegiate Dictionary. The three-judge panel was Snowden, Assistant Superintendent Beth ODonnell, and Sue Anderson of the district staff. Melanie Homan, head of the English department at Wakulla High School, was the pronouncer. Phoenix Jalbert is spelling bee championContinued from Page 1 This was not the “ rst time Roddenberry suggested the county look at using a different method of assisted intubation. The complaint states, Plantiff has communicated to all four listed defendants…along with the County Commissioners… that in his last six uses of Etomidate to combat compromised airways, four of six uses resulted in negative patient outcomes, including one fatality.Ž A corrective action plan was provided to Roddenberry on Dec. 8, 2010. In the complaint, Roddenberry contends that he followed the plan. However, the county contends that he did not. On Dec. 15, 2010, Roddenberry sent a letter to McDermid, of“ ce of Human Resources, Barden and County Attorney Heather Encinosa, stating that he accepted the plan under duress. Also on that day, Roddenberry sent a letter to the county commission and Barden stating he was asking for protection by the commission under the Whistleblower Protection Act. On Feb. 11, 2011, Roddenberry sent a rebuttal letter to Barden and Of“ ce of Management and Budget Coordinator Debbie Dubose, addressing the corrective action plan. In the letter he states, The protocols that are in question are antiquated and potentially dangerous to the outcome of our patients.Ž Roddenberry asked that the matter not be overlooked. After he was terminated he “ led an appeal, but it was denied. He then “ led a lawsuit. Mattox said, His interest from the beginning was making certain that the citizens of the county had the best emergency medical care possible.Ž Out of the $240,000, the county will pay $120,000 out of the general fund reserve and general fund disaster contingency reserve and the Florida Association of Counties Trust will pay the remaining $120,000.Lawsuit settled: Paramedic gets $240,000 settlement from Wakulla RHONDA STEVENS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSRunner-up Zayne Jalbert with champion (and sister) Phoenix Jalbert, with Wakulla Middle Principal Mike Barwick, Wakulla News Editor William Snowden, Superintendent Bobby Pearce and Medart Principal Sharon Kemp. By JO ANN PALMERKWCB DirectorEvery month people all over the world who are interested in the environment meet at informal sessions known as Green Drinks. These events are free and open to the public. People from all around the county, and surrounding areas come out to hear guest speakers share information on topics that are important to those who are looking for ways to improve their surroundings and sustain the environment, or just learn about something new and interesting. On Jan. 22, Steve Cushman, managing partner of Cave Connections and chairman of the Board of the Aquatic Science Association, will be giving a presentation on cave diving and its bene“ ts to conservation of natural resources. The presentation will include a short video clip of footage from Indian Springs Cave System, ways cave divers contribute to the science of conservation, research and our knowledge of just how fragile our water systems are. Cushman will follow with a brief on the efforts to revitalize the oyster industries here in Wakulla County. This is an informative presentation which will give the audience an awareness of the environment, as well as how each and every citizen can help do their part to get involved in the conservation and protection of natural resources. Conservation of the environment is paramount to maintaining a sustainable future in work, recreation and life for the community of Wakulla County. We hope you will join us Tuesday, Jan. 22, at 6:30 p.m., at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Green Drinks is held at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Tuesday of each month at the Lodge. Our next speaker will be Commissioner Richard Harden who will be talking about syrup making in Wakulla County. For more information about Keep Wakulla County Beautiful visit our website at KWCB.org or call the of“ ce at 745-7111. KWCB hosts International Green Drinks eventJan. 22 will feature presentation on cave divingBriefs Obama inauguration to be celebrated by Wakulla DemocratsWakulla Democratic Executive Committee welcomes all Democrats to join them celebrating the Inauguration of President Obama on Monday, Jan. 21, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at El Jalisco Mexican restaurant, 2481 Crawfordville Road. For more information about the Wakulla Democratic Party, visit the website at http://wakullademocrats. org No change in Waste Pro collection because of MLK holidayThere will be no change to solid waste collection for the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday on Monday, Jan. 21. All services will be completed on the normal scheduled day. Waste Pro would like to thank you everyone and wish them a happy and safe holiday. Chamber installation is set for Thursday, Jan. 17, at Senior CenterThe Wakulla Chamber of Commerce will hold its installation banquet for of cers on Thursday, Jan. 17 at the Senior Center beginning at 6:30 p.m. The cost is $20 per person, and the menu for the evening includes fresh green salad, pork tenderloin with walnut-cranberry stuf ng, rice pilaf, and dessert. There will be a cash bar. The speaker will be Bob Ballard, director of the TCC Wakulla Environmental Institute. – Staff reportsGulf Winds announces merger with Score Credit Union For us, it’s personal. “Each patient is our family, our friend, our neighbor.”2889 Crawfordville Hwy, Ste C Crawfordville, FL 32327 r Back row, left to right: Front row, left to right: A s k for B i g Be nd H o s pi c e by nam e r y. F ree Trees Saturday, January 1910:00 am 1:00 pm Hudson Park Rain or Shine Bring empty, black plant pots to enter a raf”e for a large tree.Organized by the Iris Garden Club with the support of Florida Division of Forestry, Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, Just Fruits & Exotics, Purple Martin Nursery, & Wakulla County Parks & RecreationCRAWFORDVILLEARBOR DAY2000 young trees will be given away!Redbud, Dogwood, Red Maple, Chickasaw Plum, Hophornbeam, Tulip Poplar, Shumard Oak, Longleaf Pines & more. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Monday Saturday from 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org

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Page 6 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchHonoring Your Loved One In Print Your church ad here! (850) 926-7102 By JAMES L. SNYDER I am not superstitious [knock on wood] but some things happen to me that leave me a little bit suspicious. I am not sure if there is a connection between superstitious and suspicious, but if there were, that would explain a lot in my life. I start every year with high hopes of making certain changes in my life. If I had a quarter for every change I wanted to make in my life but didnt, I would have all the change I need. This past week was one of those weeks. I was minding my own business, which for me is a full-time job without bene“ ts, and no matter what I did, I was either a day late or a dollar short. I had to go across town for a business meeting and as my luck would have it, I hit every red light. I am not sure but it seemed that there were 1,937 traf“ c lights in route to my destination. I had a gift card that I cannot remember when I got it, but I thought I would get a nice gift for myself. I selected my gift, went to the cash out counter and was informed that my gift card had expired yesterday.Ž I think I have just too many yesterdays in my life. I would like a card once that would expire tomorrow.Ž I have plenty of them. The bookstore that I do my business was having a special on a book that I really wanted. I got to the store, stood in line for well over an hour and, as my luck would have it, the person in front of me got the last one. Wheres my gun when I need it? I believe if there are 100 people playing a $10 million lottery I would be number 101. I come so close so many times, but you know what they say, an inch missed is like a mile missed. When my wife and I started our marital journey, we did not take a vow of poverty. It just has turned out that way. As soon as we have a little cash ahead, my wife begins to wonder what is going to break in the house. And, as luck would have it, she is usually right. All week long, my week went like this. All week long, I could not catch anything and then, as my luck would have it, I caught a cold. I did not set out at the beginning of the week to catch a cold. Whoever threw that cold at me I would like to find out right now. Of course, why I caught it in the “ rst place is to be questioned. I really did not see it coming. Why is it you cannot catch what you want but usually can catch what you do not want? A friend of mine always reminds me along this line that, Thats life.Ž I caught a cold and now I did not know what to do with it. I got up late in the morning, put on my bathrobe and went toward the kitchen wheezing and coughing as I shuffled down the hallway. When I got to the kitchen the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage looked at me with one of those looksŽ and said rather sternly, Dont you dare give that cold to me.Ž I was sick but I was not too sick to know a death threat when it came my way. When it comes right down to it, I am really a generous person. I would give you the shirt off my back if you needed it. However, when I have something like a cold,Ž I cannot give it to anyone. Nobody wants it! Believe me, the cold I have to give I would give freely. You turn around,Ž my wife said very sternly, and march yourself right back into bed.Ž Not only did I catch a cold, but also I am now catching the dickens. I must confess that I am an expert at catching the dickens, I have just never “ gured out what to do with it when I got it. If I was good at catching luck as I am with catching the dickens I would be the luckiest man in the world. If someone knows a pro“ table market for dickensŽ please contact me soon. Slowly I turned, step by step, I walked down the hallway, it seemed like of thousand miles, I “ nally threw myself into bed. Thankfully, the bed caught me. And so, as luck would have it, I have caught the cold, caught the dickens from my wife, and now I plan to catch up on some sleep. I am not sure if you starve a cold and feed a fever or if you feed a cold and starve a fever. So in my confusion, I fed myself. Resting on my bed, I thought of one of my favorite Bible verses. Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you restŽ (Matthew 11:28 KJV). Life is full of ups and downs. Just when you think you are up you “ nd yourself on the way down. The important thing in life is to have a safety net. For me, Jesus is my safety net and has never let me down. He will always catch me.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship, PO Box 831313, Ocala, FL 34483. He lives with his wife, Martha, in Silver Springs Shores. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. His web site is www.jamessnyderministries.com. OUT TO PASTORAs my luck would have it Sopchoppy Congregational Holiness Church would like to invite everyone to join them in revival with Brother B.B. Barwick scheduled for Jan. 24-26 beginning 7 p.m. nightly. The church is located at 83 Sheldon Street in Sopchoppy. Please come join them. They look forward to meeting and worshipping with everyone there!After taking a short break for the Christmas holiday the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church has resumed its weekly children’s ministry, Johnny Rogers. The Johnny Rogers Program is a Bible centered ministry that introduces children to the principles of the Christian faith and teaches them how to put that faith into action. This program celebrates the diversity of the body of Christ and embraces the unique and exciting ways in which God inspires his people to worship him. It uses videos, games and group participation to spark a child’s imagination and bring them into a closer relationship with the Father. The Johnny Rogers Program is held on Sunday evenings and is open to all children from kindergarten through the fth grade. Registration begins at 4:45 p.m. and activities run from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. A light dinner will be served. Sopchoppy United Methodist Church is located at 10 Faith Avenue in downtown Sopchoppy for more information call us at 962-2511 or visit the churches website at http://sopchoppyumc.org. Mount Olive Primitive Baptist Church No. 2 in Crawfordville will host a six-session video event, “The Art of Marriage” beginning in February. The class, with the subtitle of “Getting to the heart of God’s design,” will be held at the church on Friday, Feb. 22, at 6 p.m. and Saturday, Feb. 23, at 10 a.m. The cost of the class is $50 per couple. The registration deadline is Feb. 1. To register, contact Jocelyn Hayes at 980-2021 or email at joceylnbusiness@ gmail.com. The $50 registration fee includes the class manual, all meals, and an Art of Marriage bag.Church BriefsRevival with B.B. Barwick set at Sopchoppy Congregational Bible School will resume at Sopchoppy United Methodist Six-session class on ‘The Art of Marriage’ at Mount OliveA $1,000 grand prize is being offered in a special religious poetry contest sponsored by the Central Point Rainbow Poets, free to everyone. There are 50 prizes in all totaling almost $5,000. The deadline for entering is Feb. 23. To enter, send one poem only of 21 lines or less: Free Poetry Contest, PO Box 3336, Central Point, OR 97502. Or enter online www.rainbowpoets.com. We think great religious poems can inspire achievement,Ž said Fred Young, the organizations Contest Director. Our desire is to inspire amateur poets and we think this competition will accomplish that. Poets deserve opportunities to exhibit their work and get recognition. We hope our contest will encourage new poets to share their art.Ž Be sure your name and address appears on the page with your poem.Religious poetry contest is open

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 7Shelley A. Mans“ eld Daniels, 57, of Plant City, died Sunday, Jan. 6, 2013. Graveside services will be held at the St. Marks Cemetery on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at 2 p.m. Survivors include her daughter, Mitchelle Selman (Tim); her father, Edward V. Mans“ eld (Zoe A.); her mother, Jackie Repka (Gary); a sister, Michelle Mans“ eld Thompson (Will); a brother, Michael E. Mans“ eld; and grandson Chase Thornton (Amanda). Florida Direct Crematory in St. Petersburg was assisting the family with the arrangements.Obituaries Shelley A. Mansfield Daniels Fletcher William Durrance Jimmy Fewell Clinton Mays Gray Jimmy James Damon Glenn Simmons Sr. Mary Alice Simmons Betty Ann Smith Bobby M. WellsFletcher William Durrance, 94, of Tallahassee, died on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013. He was born Dec. 9, 1918, in Wakulla County, the son of William Galveston Durrance and Nannie Pigott Durrance. He served in World War II in the U.S. Navy. Funeral services will be at Abbey Funeral Home, 4037 N. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013, at 11 a.m. Visitation will also be at Abbey Funeral Home from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. In lieu of ” owers, memorial contributions may be made to Covenant Hospice, 1545 Raymond Diehl Road, Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include his daughters, Wanda Siders (Bill), and Nancy Mistry of Tallahassee; two grandsons; and numerous nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his wife of 71 years, Opal Posey Durrance; his parents; a brother, Clark Durrance; and sisters, Mary Love Moore, Nannie Ruth Bowen and Louise Langston. Online condolences may be made at www.abbeyfh.com. Jimmy James, Captain J.J.,Ž 90, of Apalachicola, died on Dec. 30, 2012, at home with his family. He was born Feb. 27, 1922, in Apalachicola to Imanuel and Annie James. He moved from Apalachicola in 1951 to Port St. Joe where he lived the remainder of his life. He was a shrimper and was known to many as J.J. or Captain J.J. A memorial service was held Monday, Jan. 7, 2013, at at Oak Grove Church in Port St. Joe. In lieu of ” owers, memorial donations may be made to Oak Grove Church. Survivors include three daughters, Dianne Brogdon, Margo Marion (Raymond) and Vickie Whitehead; five grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren; and two sisters, Elaine Fitzgerald of Georgetown, S.C., and Ann Estes of Crawfordville. He was predeceased by his parents; wife of 60 years, Iris Lovett James; and his two grandsons, Brandon James Brogdon and Benjamin Ferrell Whit“ eld Jr. Services were provided by Comforter Funeral Home. Clinton Mays Gray, 53, died on Jan. 13, 2013, after a battle with cancer. He was born Nov. 5, 1959, in Tallahassee to parents Mays Leroy Gray and Nelda Gray Staccone. He was a graduate of North Florida Christian School and attended TCC and Lively Tech. He was employed for the past 14 years by the Tallahassee Housing Authority. Funeral services will be held Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at Calvary Chapel in Tallahassee, 8614 Mahan Drive, at 3 p.m. Burial will follow at New Hope Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at Calvary Chapel. In lieu of ” owers, memorials may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee FL 32308. Survivors include his wife, Catherine; two sons, Seth Gray (Amy) and Adam Gray (Melissa); a daughter, Shelby Gray; two step-daughters, Kanisha Jones (Jantale) and Kelsey James; and four granddaughters. He is also survived by his two brothers, Scott Gray (Julie) and Cole Gray (Sheri); and a sister, Deborah Gray Maddox (Warren). Beggs Funeral Homes, 3322 Apalachee Parkway, in Tallahassee, (850)942-2929 is in charge of arrangements. Damon Glenn Simmons Sr., 53, of Tallahassee, died on Friday, Jan. 4, 2013. Wake services were held on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Strong & Jones Funeral Home Chapel. Funeral services were held on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, at 11 a.m. at the River of Life Church in Crawfordville, with burial at Buckhorn Cemetery. Survivors include his wife, Lurea Thurman Simmons; “ ve brothers, Herman Simmons Jr. (Julia), Archie B. Simmons Sr. (Glenda), Frank A. Simmons (Cynthia), Ronnie Simmons (Gwen) and James DavidŽ Simmons Sr. (Evelyn); “ ve sisters, Martha McBride (Theophalas), Frances Simmons (Peter), Phyllis Simmons, Julia Simmons Skipper and Vertia Freeman (Fred); two daughters, Belynda Thomas of St. Petersburg and Joscelyn Simmons; and a son, Damon Glenn Simmons Jr. of Punta Gorda. He was predeceased by his parents, Herman Sr. and Willie Mae Simmons; and a sister, Mary Alice Simmons. Betty Ann Smith, 69, of Medart, passed away on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013. She was born in Georgia and had lived in this area for 10 years coming from Plantation. She was a Baptist. Visitation was held Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2013, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville. Graveside services will be held at 3 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 17, 2013, at West Sopchoppy Cemetery in Sopchoppy. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Dept 142, Memphis TN 38148-0142. Survivors include two sons, Kenneth Wayne Smith and James Lanier Smith; a daughter, Lisa Rene Hoyt; a sister, Evelyn Faye Andrews; and four grandchildren, Jennifer Lynn Smith, Samantha Marie Rogue, Robert Lanier Smith and Stephanie Rene Stiker. She was predeceased by her husband, James Smith. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, FL is in charge of arrangements. (850-925-3333 or www. bevisfh.com).Bobby M. Wells, 77, of Cordele, Ga., died Tuesday morning, Jan. 8, 2013 at his residence following a short illness. He was born April 25, 1935 in Wakulla County to the late Henry Franklin Wells and Barbara Hall Crum Wells. He was the former manager of a seafood plant. He was a member of Lake Blackshear Baptist Church in Cordele, Ga. Funeral services were held Thursday, Jan. 10, 2013, at 2 p.m. at Lake Blackshear Baptist Church in Crisp County, Ga. Burial followed in the Warwick Methodist Church Cemetery in Warwick, Ga. Visitation was from 12:30 p.m. until the funeral hour at Lake Blackshear Baptist Church. Memorial donations may be made to United Hospice, 708 E. 16th Ave. Cordele GA 31015. Survivors include his wife, Grace V. Wells of Cordele, Ga.; two sons, Buddy Wells (Letha) and George Brent Wells (Sheryl) both of Crawfordville; four daughters, Elizabeth L. Smith (Joey) of Sylvester, Va., McHugh (Jim) of Stockbridge, Ga., Lina L. Powell (Chuck) of Douglas, Ga., and Bobbie Rebecca Duggan (Leonard) of Cordele, Ga.; 11 grandchildren and 11 greatgrandchildren. Friends may sign the online guestbook and share their memories with the family by visiting Kimbrell-Sterns website at www.kimbrellstern.com. Mary Alice Simmons, 61, of Crawfordville, died on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013. She worked as a medical disability specialist for the Florida Department of Health Division of Disability Determination Services. Wake services were held on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, from 6 to 7 p.m. at Strong & Jones Funeral Home Chapel. Funeral services will be held on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, at 11 a.m. at the River of Life Church in Crawfordville, with burial at Buckhorn Cemetery. Survivors include a loving companion, Calvin Nelson; five brothers, Herman Simmons, Jr. (Julia), Archie B. Simmons Sr. (Glenda), Frank A. Simmons (Cynthia), Ronnie Simmons (Gwen) and James DavidŽ Simmons Sr. (Evelyn); “ ve sisters, Martha McBride (Theophalas), Frances Simmons (Peter), Phyllis Simmons, Julia Simmons Skipper and Vertia Freeman (Fred); and a sister-in-law, Lurea Thurman Simmons and a host of other relatives and friends. She was predeceased by her parents, Herman Sr. and Willie Mae Simmons.Jimmy Fewell, 51, died Jan. 7, 2013, at the Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice House in Tallahassee. His “ nal days were spent surrounded by his family and close friends. Visitation with the family was held from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. and the memorial service followed at 6 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at Crawfordville First Baptist Church. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Big Bend Hospice House of Tallahassee, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd. Tallahassee FL 32308 or Angie Deeb Cancer Unit c/o Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare Foundation Inc., 1331 East Sixth Avenue, Tallahassee FL 32303. He was born Dec. 31, 1961, in Tallahassee to Raleigh and Beverly (Grif“ n) Fewell. He was owner and operator of Elite Drywall Contracting Inc. and partners with Neil Autry in North Florida Spray Foam Inc. He was an avid hunter, die-hard NASCAR fan, loving father and, according to his great nephews, the strongest man in the world. Survivors include his wife, Laura Fewell; two daughters, Maegen and Taylor Fewell; parents, Raleigh and Beverly Fewell; sisters, JoLea Fewell Conibear and Melinda FewellCrum (Kendall); a niece, Niki Lawhon (Josh); a nephew, Tyler Crum; two great nephews, Brayden and Parker Lawhon; and a great niece, Kinley Lawhon; two aunts, Sara Herring of Leesburg and Diane Landers (Curt) of Mount Juliet, Tenn.; close friends, Neil, Shelia, Travis and Brandon Autry, Stacey, Terry, Kate and Sarah Small, Amanda and Jeff Fillingim, Gail, Herman, Blair, and Carry Mathers, and many, many more. He was predeceased by his grandparents, Bennie and Freida Rhodes Grif“ n, Dick Hardy and Minnie Lee Dalton Fewell. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel in Crawfordville assisted the family with arrangements. (850-926-3333 or www.bevisfh.com)Fletcher William Durrance Jimmy James ‘Captain J.J.’ Clinton Mays Gray Damon Glenn Simmons Sr. Mary Alice Simmons Betty Ann Smith Bobby M. Wells Jimmy Fewell Shelley A. Mans eld Daniels Special to The NewsThirty years ago a handful of people from this community had a dream of bringing hospice care to the Big Bend area. Following the initiation of the “ rst modern hospice care in the United States in 1974, these community leaders secured a Certi“ cate of Need from the State of Florida to provide hospice care in Leon, Franklin, Gadsden, Jefferson, Liberty, Madison, Taylor and Wakulla counties. It took much foresight and determination to lay the groundwork for a communitybased hospice in Tallahassee, but Dr. and Mrs. Al McCully and Dr. Jim Beck, among others, were up for the task. They saw a need in the community, then proved that need and met the conditions of the law for Big Bend Hospice to become incorporated in February 1983 and to receive its license on April 1, 1983 to provide hospice care in eight counties. Sue Gallagher, pastor of the United Church of Christ of Tallahassee, was one of the “ rst to respond when approached by community leaders Richard Lee, Loretta Armour and Lee Nahass. These leaders asked for assistance in establishing an organization which would enable the terminally ill person who wanted to focus on life and living, no matter the duration, to be in his or her home, with comfort as the goal of treatment. The first BBH office was donated space in the United Church of Tallahassee. As Big Bend Hospice grew, so did the need for more space to house their committed staff and volunteers. In 1987 BBH moved to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital Home Health Building. There were several other moves before settling at their present of“ ce on Mahan Center Boulevard in 1996. In 2000, BBH began and completed the construction of the Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice House, a 12-bed inpatient facility built by the community through a capital campaign, and located directly behind the current administration building. This facility is available when skilled level of care is necessary and the patient cannot remain in their own home. The word hospiceŽ is derived from a medieval word meaning a place of shelter for travelers on a dif“ cult journey. Although Big Bend Hospice cannot change the outcome, they can change the experience of the journey. Dr. R. James Mabry Jr. was named the “ rst BBH Medical Director in 1983 and served for 20 years before retiring. BBH Medical Directors lead hospice care teams,Ž made up of the patients own doctor, hospice nurses, home health aides, social workers, chaplains, music therapists, and specially-trained volunteers, to encourage and assist each patient to live as fully as possible with the time he or she has left. BBH bereavement services are available for people dealing with issues relating to the diagnosis of a life-threatening illness. In 1989, BBH added an additional component hosting the “ rst Bereavement Support Groups to provide education, comfort, and encouragement after the death of a loved one. The next year the Childrens Hospice Care program (later renamed The Caring TreeŽ) was established thanks to a grant from the Junior League. The Caring TreeŽ services are designed to meet the unique needs of grieving children and teens. For over 25 years, BBH has had a tree as the centerpiece of their logo. Sue Hestor, who served on the original Board of Directors, was the creator of this logo. Sue would often “ nd her children under the shelter of their big oak tree, a favorite spot in her backyard. When her son, Bucky, passed away in 1992, Sue felt the tree, with its strong roots and branches, was the ideal symbol to provide strength and shelter for those in need.Ž Big Bend Hospice belongs to this community. In 1996 the Big Bend Hospice Foundation was granted approval by the IRS as a 501(c)3 organization for the purpose of supporting the mission and services of BBH. In 2000, BBH established their internationally renowned Music Therapy Program. BBH has won many awards over the years, including the 1997 Nonprofit of the YearŽ by the Tallahassee Chamber of Commerce, the 2004 Nonpro“ t of the YearŽ by the Tallahassee Democrat and the 2005 Nonprofit Best of TallyŽ award by the Tallahassee Magazine. In 2006, BBH Senior Companions were recognized as the Volunteer Group of the YearŽ at the Tallahassee Democrats Volunteer Luncheon. Elaine Bartelt became the Executive Director of BBH in 1987, providing caring and compassionate leadership until her retirement in 2003. We had six employees when I started with Big Bend Hospice and over 200 when I retired … and in addition to that we had more than 300 volunteers!Ž Bartelt said. Now, 30 years later, Big Bend Hospice continues to provide patients with emotional and physical support during the “ nal phases of their life. The Mission of Big Bend Hospice is and always has been to provide compassionate care to individuals with a lifelimiting illness, comfort to their families and emotional support to anyone who has lost a loved one,Ž said Cathy Adkison, current President and CEO of Big Bend Hospice.Big Bend Hospice celebrates 30 years of service

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Page 8 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings CommunityFormer Wakullan saves life with marrow donationBy Chase CarterThe Azle NewsRon Porter had his mouth swabbed in 1994 to see if his marrow could help a young child at his church. Though he did not match, the DNA information collected from that foursecond swab was stored in the National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) to cross-reference for future matches. Fast-forward to 2009, when Paul Boccaccio, a resident of Hartford, Conn., visited his physician for an annual check-up. His blood cell counts came back low enough for concern, and further tests diagnosed him with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), which sprouts up in the bone marrow and quickly replaces healthy white blood cells in the body. We were immediately referred a T-cell bone marrow transplant,Ž said wife Micki Boccaccio. Even though it wasnt severe yet, the cancer had popped up in spots all throughout his body.Ž The treatment would consist of grafting the bone marrow stem cells from a donor into Boccaccios bloodstream. In order for it to be accepted properly, a very speci“ c match was needed. Thus, the hospital turned to the NMDP and Be The Match … a partner organization that volunteers in the collection and processing of samples … to “ nd Paul a match. His doctors were frank with the odds. They said finding a match for me was a one in ten million chance. Thats a big, big number. Scary big,Ž said Paul Boccaccio. That is when Rob Porter received a call in his home informing him that his DNA had found a match. He immediately jumped at another chance to help. After a series of tests to verify the pairing, he was injected twice a day to stimulate T-cell growth. After the injections, he returned to allow the doctors to harvest the excess marrow. Porter was thanked for his donation, and was told nothing more other than a 49-year-old male from the U.S. would be receiving the cells. The “ rst application of the graft, on July 29, 2009, failed, much to the vexation of the medical staff overseeing Paul Boccaccios treatment. They hooked the cells up to tube already in me. The whole thing took less than four minutes, and it was supposed to save my life,Ž he said. But after waiting three months, it was clear I was not improving.Ž The team decided to try once more, but informed the Boccaccios that there would be no third try. After the second injection in December 2009, the doctors put him on a 100-day watch period, checking for improvement constantly. After a year of relative health and improvement, the medical team assured him of a bright future. And two years later Paul Boccaccio was placed on the survivors list. Then, he was given the name and information on the man who had saved his life. Ron Porter and his wife, Kim, received an email earlier this year, thanking him for his donation that saved the life of a 49 year-old male from the U.S. In gratitude, this couple expressed their wishes to travel down to Texas in order to personally thank him. The Porters happily agreed. Planned days before the holiday season, Paul and Micki Boccaccio touched down on Nov. 15 and were greeted to hugs and handshakes. The two couples spent the day at the Fort Worth Stockyards. The next day, the Porters took their guests to Dealey Plaza and many other famous North Texas sites, but they also reserved time to sit and chat, connecting the two threads of a shared experience. It was emotional, but I had to meet the man who gave me my life back,Ž said Paul Boccaccio. Their hospitality was “ rst rate, but they never mentioned they lived right by a golf course!Ž As both are avid golfers, the men took time to walk the greens of Cross Timbers Golf Course, swapping stories and getting to know each other. The Boccaccios also brought with them a Connecticut BoxŽ full of local wines, candies, sundries, a cutting board made of native wood and Legos (which are produced in the state). After heartfelt goodbyes and the promise to bring both of their full families together in the future, the Boccaccios returned home. Im living large, now,Ž said Paul Boccaccio. I cant thank enough the dedicated team that looked after me and Ron for his miracle donation. They gave me life again.Ž His wife expressed the same wondrous appreciation. Its truly a miracle that a match was found. His family and relative were all tested, but none came close to matching a total stranger in Azle, Texas. Remarkable!Ž Though Ron Porters sleep apnea keeps him from donating marrow again, both he and the Boccaccios urge everyone to donate, or at least enter themselves in the registry. It took thirty seconds and a single swab for me, and even the extraction is mostly painless. If that is all it takes to save a mans life, Id do it again and again,Ž said Ran Porter. For more information about donating or registering in the National Bone Marrow Registry, visit www.marrow.org or www. nmdp.org. Porter was born and raised in Spring Creek in Wakulla County. He graduated from Wakulla High School in 1979. He is retired from the U.S. Army and lives in Azle, Texas.Story and photo courtesy of The Azle News AZLE NEWSRon Porter (left) and Paul Boccaccio (right) met for the “ rst time on Nov. 17. Simmons will wed Moore Gary Simmons Jr. and Rebecca Moore Gary Angelo Simmons Jr. of Crawfordville and Rebecca Jolene Moore of Quincy announce their upcoming wedding. She is the daughter of Tracy Moore and Mary Finuff. He is the son of Gary and Regena Simmons. The ceremony will be held on Feb. 28 in Sopchoppy. Ledfords celebrate 50 years Betty Ann and Thomas TomŽ L. Ledford, Sr. celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary at Angelos in Ochlockonee Bay on Saturday, December 29. They were married on Saturday, Dec. 29, 1962, at the First Baptist Church in Tallahassee. She is the daughter of the late Vera Shef“ eld Otto and Robert Loys Robertson of Perry. The Ledfords have four children, Terri Gross of Tallahassee, Dr. Tammi Ledford of Texas, Teddi Creamer of Tallahassee and Thomas L. Ledford, Jr. of Glen St. Marys. The couple also has nine grandchildren and seven great-grand children. He came to Tallahassee from Mount Dora as a beverage agent with the State of Florida in 1962. He spent most of his career in law enforcement and as an electrician with the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW). She was employed with the City of Tallahassee and the majority of her work experience was in the legal “ eld and self employed as owner of her own personnel consulting “ rm. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Ledford Sr. Arbor Day Festival is this Saturday January 19 marks the ninth annual Crawfordville Arbor Day celebration … and tree giveaway … at Hudson Park. Starting at 10 a.m., more than 2,000 trees will be given away for free. The young trees are all pot-grown and several feet tall (except for the pines). Festival goers may choose from red bud, dogwood, Chickasaw plum, red maple, tulip poplar, shumard oak, myrtle oak, eastern hophornbeam, mockernut hickory and winged elm. Smaller quantities of Ogeechee tupelo, southern red oak, turkey oak, basket oak, sugarberry and bald cypress will be found as well. In addition, the Florida Division of Forestry will give away longleaf pine and slash pine seedlings. Every person may take home one free tree plus several bareroot pines. After noon, the remaining trees will be sold for $4 per tree. Volunteers are all experienced gardeners or Master Gardeners and will be able to answer questions. Bring an empty, blackplastic plant pot to trade for chances to win one of three beautiful Chinquapin trees in 5-gallon pots from Just Fruits & Exotics Nursery. There will also be music, food, exhibits and arts and craft vendors. The Iris Garden Club will sell baked goods to raise scholarship funds. Arbor Day is a nationally celebrated observance that encourages tree planting and care. The Iris Garden Club of Wakulla organizes this annual event. For more information, contact Lynn Artz at 320-2158 or lynn_artz@ hotmail.com ASHLEY FEED STORE 8056 WAKULLA SPRINGS ROAD for more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY & RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services Michelle Snow School of Music Singing, dancing, playing rhythm instruments, and more.Weekly class Fridays 5:15 p.m.Hwy. 98 Medart Call 926-7627Toddlers and Pre-School Children Introduction to Music Class for Wee Sing n PlayMommy & Me Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171&, c e H a i r S a l o e H l o H a i a l o i r S a c e c e a l o o n o o n o n n y n Sa t 020 M a vi s s Ap pt On n l ly 962-217 7 71 & F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 wakulla.ifas.u.edu (850) 926-3931 Email 4-H Agent at sjkraeft@u.edu and more!

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 9education news from local schools SchoolAnn Scott kicks o Celebrate Literacy Week Special to The NewsTallahassee, January 14 …Today Florida students committed to participate in a literacy campaign across the state themed Take the Lead and Read.Ž First Lady Ann Scott joined author Susan Snyder and students at The Villages Intermediate Center to kick off Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida!. The initiative brings together education leaders and volunteers to promote the importance of literacy. As part of the week, thousands of volunteers read to children in classrooms throughout the state. Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida! supports partnerships between state and local agencies, community organizations, and schools while encouraging students to read each day. I truly believe reading and literacy are the driving forces for student success in education,Ž said Florida First Lady Ann Scott. I want to encourage parents and children this week to find time to get excited about reading together, knowing that spending just a few minutes a day reading any book is time well spent.Ž Reading is the gateway skill for success in learning and life,Ž said Commissioner of Education Dr. Tony Bennett. Our students are best served when the greater community is engaged in education. I thank the partners of Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida! and our educators for their efforts in promoting the critical skill of reading in and outside our classrooms.Ž This year, Florida students were again challenged to participate in the Million Minute Marathon. The marathon is a special program that encourages students from across the state to read for an additional 20 minutes during the school day in celebration of literacy. The goal for 2013 is 30 million minutes, up from the 2012 goal of 20 million minutes. The results will be tallied and submitted by the district reading contact to the Department of Educations Just Read, Florida! of“ ce. Schools, teachers, and volunteers may choose to read the of“ cial book of the 2013 marathon, Grandmas Crazy Chickens by Susan Snyder, or make a selection of their own. Additionally, through a partnership with Daytona International Speedway and the Florida Department of Lottery, the Just Read, Florida! of“ ce will rev upŽ the challenge to read by visiting schools across the state with the of“ cial Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida! Race Car. The race car made a special appearance at the kickoff event where students had a chance to tour the vehicle and take photos with Scholastics Clifford the Big Red Dog. The Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida! Race Car will continue to tour the state through February Local school districts and community partners are also encouraged to create fun and exciting literacy events that reinforce the importance of reading. Celebrate Literacy Week, Florida! is a weeklong celebration from Jan. 14-18, geared toward raising awareness for literacy programs and projects offered by the Department of Educations Just Read, Florida! of“ ce and its partner agencies and organizations. For more information about the Just Read, Florida! of“ ce, visit www.justread” orida.com.Keiser University collects $15,000 worth of toysSpecial to The NewsIn a two-week long toy drive ending Dec. 21, Keiser Universitys 15 Florida campuses collected countless toys valued at nearly $15,000 making the holiday season a little brighter for the children of military families served by Keisers partner, Operation Homefront. Each campus held a kickoff event in remembrance of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7 with special guests including members of the United States military, representatives of Operation Homefront, elected of“ cials such as United States Congressman Alcee Hastings, Florida Senator Lizbeth Benacquisto, Florida Representatives Greg Steube and Michelle Rehwinkel-Vasilinda, members of the local communities and Santa Claus. In the nearly four decades of Keiser Universitys service to the community and our State, the outpouring of support for this event which directly bene“ ts Floridas military children has been one of the most rewarding charitable projects we have ever undertaken,Ž said Belinda Keiser, vice chancellor of Community Relations and Student Advancement at Keiser University. On behalf of our 18,000 students and 3,500 employees we extend our heartfelt thanks and warmest holiday wishes to Operation Homefront and all of the American military heroes and their families for their service, honor and sacri“ ce,Ž she added. Just this past Friday alone we are shipping out collections to families that are part of the Army Wounded Warrior Transition (AW2) command in Florida,Ž said Simone Hoover, executive director for Operation Homefront Florida. Hoover also said that for service members with kids, especially in the lower ranks, holiday shopping is a major expense that can put further strain on an already tight budget. Operation Homefront: A 501(c)(3) nonpro“ t organization, Operation Homefront was formed in February 2002. It was developed to support the families of deployed service members immediately following 9/11. Operation Homefront is headquartered in San Antonio, Texas, and has evolved into a major nonpro“ t. The target population is American military personnel and their families who have unmet needs due to “ nancial hardship, death, injury, or physical or mental detriment as a result of service in Iraq or Afghanistan. Special to The NewsFlu activity is being reported widespread across 47 states as of Jan. 5. This is an increase from 41 states in the previous weeks report. The CDC is recommending a 3-step approach this year to “ ghting in” uenza. 1. Get a ” u vaccination. This recommendation extends to everyone 6 months of age and older. While there are may different ” u viruses, a ” u vaccine protects against the three viruses that research suggest will be the most common. 2. Take the usual everyday precautions which include: € Try to avoid close contact with sick people and if you are sick with ” u-like illness. The CDC recommends that you stay at home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone, except to get medical care or to obtain necessities if there is nobody to get them for you. € Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash and be sure to wash your hands after youve thrown it away. If a tissue is not available and you are wearing long sleeves you can cough into your bent elbow or if long sleeves are not being worn, tuck your nose and mouth down into the neck of your shirt to avoid spreading illness to those around you. € Wash your hands often with soap and running water, if available, otherwise, use an alcoholbased hand rub. € Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. € Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may be contaminated with germs like the ” u, for example, keyboards, telephones and doorknobs. 3. If you get the ” u, antiviral drugs can treat your illness. Antiviral drugs are different from antibiotics. They are prescription medicines and are not available over the counter. They can make the illness milder and shorten the time you are sick. They may also prevent serious ” u complications. Follow your doctors instructions for taking this drug. Flu-like symptoms include the following: FEVER… People may be infected with the ” u and have respiratory symptoms without a fever. COUGH SORE THROAT RUNNY or STUFFY NOSE BODY ACHES HEADACHE CHILLS & FATIGUE Some people may also experience vomiting and diarrhea with the ” u. The CDCs website is helpful and informative. Visit it at www.cdc.gov/” u.Tips to “ ght the ” u Special to The NewsThroughout the busy school year, many high school students across the country are already taking steps to explore college and other post-graduation opportunities. In fact, in todays challenging economic climate and competitive job market, it has become increasingly important to begin planning for future career options at an early stage. One area that is particularly ripe for opportunity is in the STEM “ elds (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). In August, U.S. News & World Report reported that there will be a need to “ ll over 1.2 million STEM jobs in the U.S. by 2018. Despite the promise these career paths offer, less than one-third of eighth graders in this country are pro“ cient in mathematics and science and fewer than 15 percent of U.S. undergraduates receive science or engineering degrees. This academic lag has resulted in the countrys STEM workforce hovering under 3 percent of the total working population. It is important to close these gaps because STEM “ elds have an enormous impact on our countrys growth and also provide rich opportunities for our youth,Ž says John Jones, R.Ph., J.D., who is a senior vice president at OptumRx and the chair of the Pharmacy is Right for Me educational initiative. We should reach students early in their education to get them thinking about the opportunities the sector has to offer, and begin taking those “ rst steps toward building careers in the diverse STEM arena.Ž So how can parents and caretakers help kids embark upon successful professional journeys in STEM and related “ elds? Jones recommends taking the following steps: 1. Engage young students early on and provide them with an educational roadmap. Students may not consider careers in STEM “ elds because they simply do not know about what those pathways can offer. Help expose kids as early as elementary and middle school to the types of unique and exciting options found through STEM. Work with your children to build a strong foundation in math and science skills, which are essential to pursuing STEM opportunities at every level … from technical positions to those requiring advanced degrees. 2. Encourage hands-on learning. Gaining real-world STEM experience through internships, summer jobs, or even participation in student innovation competitions can help kids get excited about future possibilities and apply their science and math education in creative ways. Shadowing STEM professionals in the local community can also provide a deeper understanding of what STEM professions involve on a day-to-day basis. 3. Seek out additional support both in your local community and online. Preparing for post-high school and post-college life can be extremely challenging, even with parental support. Encourage children to seek additional help at school by speaking with their guidance counselors. Find mentors at school or in the local community to provide professional guidance. Use credible Web-based resources for educational and “ nancial information. Online resources, such as those offered through Pharmacy is Right for Mes website, Facebook and Twitter channels, can help young students navigate through the challenges of reaching their long-term goals. Despite the challenging job forecast, there is a wide range of prospects open to students in the thriving STEM industries. Engaging the next generation of STEM leaders by getting kids excited about these careers can help secure successful futures for youth.Steps to give children a head start in mathematics, science and beyond 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inurance. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! 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Staff reportThree Lady War Eagle golfers were recently named to the All-Big Bend Team. Michalyn Jeziorski, a sophomore, was named to the First Team. She placed fifth at the City Championship and sixth at the District 3-1A tournament. Kenzie Lee, a sophomore, was named to the Second Team. Casey Lowe, a senior, was given an honorable mention. Six players from area schools were named to the team, selected by the Tallahassee Democrat.Special to The NewsKelbi Davis, a senior at Wakulla High School, will sign a full scholarship with Gulf Coast State College on Friday, Jan.18, at 2:30 p.m. to play fastpitch softball. The scholarship signing will be held at Wakulla High Schools culinary arts classroom. Davis will move to Panama City in August to start classes and begin practice with her new team, but for now, shes gearing up for the high school season. Davis family have said they are extremely proud of her as this has been her dream since she was 12 years old. No matter the obstacles (and there were many), she just kept proving what she could do until she got what she wanted, said her mom, Audra Davis. Page 10 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comsports news and team views Sports WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENZach Nordlof leads the War Eagles in transition against Lincoln Trojans last week. Wakulla fell to the Trojans in overtime.BASKETBALLWar Eagles fall to Lincoln in overtime, 54-52By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe War Eagles lost a heartbreaker in overtime to the Lincoln Trojans on Thursday, Jan. 10, in Tallahassee. The game was tight and hard-fought, with Wakulla down 26-22 at the half. With 4 minutes left in the game, the score was knotted at 40 all … and down to 3 minutes, the teams had traded a couple of goals to make it even at 42. Briceton Beverly made a hook shot under the bucket that rolled in to put Wakulla up 44-42 at the 2-minute mark, but Lincoln responded with a 2-pointer to tie it with 1:22 left. With a minute left, Beverly sunk two foul shots to take back the lead, but Lincoln drove back down the court to tie it back up. With 42 seconds, Wakulla shot a 3-pointer from the corner that wouldnt go, and the game was tied at the end of regulation. In the 4-minute overtime period, Lincoln scored “ rst on two foul shots to take the lead, and scored again to go up 50-46. Zach Nordlof nailed two free throws, and Beverly made one of two when he was fouled to bring the score to 50-49. With 1:10 remaining, a Lincoln shooter was fouled and went to the charity stripe where he sank two free throws to put the Trojans up 52-49. But Wakullas Clay Greene hit a 3-pointer from the corner to tie it at 52 all with 30 seconds left. Lincoln, though, drove down the court and shot, made a rebound and scored a put-back with two seconds left to win. Wakulla fell to 4-12 on the season. JV: The War Eagle junior varsity team beat Lincoln 46-34.GOLF SOFTBALL3 girls named to All-Big BendPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMichalyn Jeziorski on the putting green. Kelbi Davis gets a hit in a recent tournament.Sports shorts Lady War Eagles lose one, win oneThe Lady War Eagles lost to Taylor County 43-37 on Thursday, Jan. 10, but won the following day over North Bay Haven by a score of 49-43. Top scorer for Wakulla was Mya Williams with 13 against Taylor and 12 points against North Bay Haven. Two War Eagles named to All-stateLineman Chris Grif n, a commitment to Georgia Tech, and linebacker Kevin James were both named to the First Team, Class 5A All-State team. The two were selected by state newspaper editors and sports reporters for the honor. Caleb Fell faces a Trojan defender. Kelbi Davis to sign with Gulf State 000DLQI

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From FWC NewsThis report represents some events the FWC handled in the Northwest Region over the week of Jan. 4-10, but does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. FRANKLIN COUNTY: Of“ cers Jason Carroll and Matt Gore were working Apalachicola Bay when they encountered two suspects who were commercial mullet fishing. After conducting surveillance, the of“ cers stopped the subjects when they observed them hide a net. Subsequent investigation revealed the net was not marked, was of an illegal mesh size, and was greater than 500 square feet. The two subjects were repeat offenders of resource violations. Both subjects were cited for the violations and the net was seized. Three hundred pounds of mullet were also seized. GADSDEN COUNTY: Of“ cer Chris Jones concluded a felony trespass case. After interviewing witnesses and the suspect, he presented the case to the State Attorneys Office. The State Attorney agreed on the findings of the investigation and issued a warrant for the arrest of the offender. The subject was picked up and booked into the Gadsden County Jail. JACKSON COUNTY: Of“ cers Hank Forehand, Scott Cassels, and Lt. Mark Clements worked a detail in the Graceville area after receiving information of night hunting occurring in the area. The of“ cers utilized the replica deer in several locations known to be frequented by poachers. After several nights, their efforts paid off and shortly before midnight, a subject and his girlfriend stopped in the middle of the county road and “ red “ ve shots at the replica using a .22 caliber ri” e. The subject was stopped and charged with shooting from the roadway and attempting to take deer at night. € Officer Hank Forehand was on patrol in the Graceville area when he heard what he believed to be a duck shoot in a nearby pond. After making his way into the property on foot, he set up surveillance on two subjects engaged in hunting. The end of legal shooting hours for migratory birds came and the two continued shooting at ducks for 30 more minutes. Once the two subjects finally stopped shooting, Of“ cer Forehand exited from his concealed position and made contact with the two shooters. Both subjects were cited for attempting to take ducks after legal hours. € Of“ cer Jason Hutchinson and K-9 Of“ cer Mike Guy were working the Dellwood area after receiving a complaint of shots being “ red from the roadway just after dark. After several hours of surveillance on the area, the two of“ cers observed a vehicle enter a “ eld and begin shining a spotlight. After several minutes, a single rifle shot was heard coming from the location of the vehicle. The of“ cers stopped the vehicle as it tried to exit the “ eld. After interviews were conducted of the two adults in the vehicle, it was discovered that the male subject driving the vehicle had held the spotlight on a deer and allowed his juvenile son to shoot at it. The adult male subject was cited for attempting to take deer at night and for providing false statements to law enforcement. ESCAMBIA COUNTY: Of“ cer Christopher Pettey received a complaint from a hunting club member regarding trespass and illegal hunting activity on his clubs land. Earlier in the week, one of the members was hunting on a food plot when two unidenti“ ed individuals walked onto the plot carrying a gun and started to approach the shooting house. When the individuals noticed the hunter, they ran but dropped a hat. Members of the club tracked the two to a nearby neighborhood. One of the club members thought he might know one of the subjects and assisted Officer Pettey with identification. An inquiry on Facebook revealed a video of the subjects shooting a doe deer out of the same shooting house on the private hunt club. Of“ cer Pettey interviewed the two subjects and quickly obtained a confession after revealing the video evidence. One of the subjects in the video was wearing the same hat he dropped when he was confronted by the hunter. Officer Pettey obtained warrants on the subjects for trespass and for taking an antlerless deer out of season. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 11outdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsSpecial to The News The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission will host a series of public meetings in late January to help shape the future of deer management in the Florida Panhandle. We are working on an exciting project to establish deer management units (DMUs) throughout Florida,Ž said Cory Morea, FWCs Deer Management Program coordinator. He added, We are looking at the Panhandle “ rst, but we are moving to a new model of deer management in the state in which hunters and other stakeholders will have a greater impact on deer management decisions.Ž DMUs will divide the state into smaller geographic areas where deer population characteristics are similar. Right now, the state is divided into four management zones that are used to set hunting season dates based on deer breeding chronology. As proposed, DMUs will be smaller units within zones and allow the FWC to manage deer on a more local level based on the preferences of hunters, farmers and other interested stakeholders. Two DMUs are proposed for Zone D, which encompasses much of the Florida Panhandle region (western portions of Gadsden, Leon and Wakulla counties and all counties west of them). One unit would cover the area south of Interstate 10 and the other north of I-10. Times and locations: € Jan. 29, 6:30 … 8:30 p.m. CST at the Jackson County Agricultural Conference Center, 2741 Pennsylvania Ave. in Marianna; € Jan. 30, 6:30 … 8:30 p.m. EST at the Burns Building Auditorium, Florida Department of Transportation, 605 Suwannee St. ,in Tallahassee; € Jan. 31, 6:30 … 8:30 p.m. CST at the University of West Florida, Commons Auditorium, 11000 University Parkway, in Pensacola. For more information, contact Cory Morea at 850-617-9487. For people who cannot attend any of the meetings, there will be other opportunities to learn about this project and provide input.By MARJ LAW Im used to seeing the spur-like protrusion on the back of a handgun. This thing is called a hammer.Ž In old western movies, a really cool cowboy shot his handgun by taking the outside palm edge of his left hand and fannedŽ this hammer towards his body. Then, hed pull the trigger with his right index “ nger. Bang! Fan! Bang! Fan! Bang! Such high drama! Back when, handguns were made with these hammers. Now, some guns have ” at backs where the protrusions once were located. Look Mom, no hammer! These are called striker“ red guns. Glocks dont have hammers. The Spring“ eld XDM doesnt either, although most Spring“ elds do. Very basically, in the striker-“ red gun, the “ ring pin (the striker) is tensioned by a spring inside the slide. When you pull the trigger, safeties disengage and the trigger bar pulls the striker back and then releases it. The spring that was tensioning it pushes the striker forward to make contact with the primer and then the gun “ res. Bang! So, if you dont see the hammer on the back of a gun youre looking at, its striker-“ red. I do like the striker-“ red Spring“ eld XDM because it shoots sweetly and hits the target, but I miss the romance of that hammer. Back in the 1950s, Mattel made the Fanner 50Ž cap gun. My buddies and I would fan it just like a real gun and caps inside went pop pop pop. We could be Roy Rodgers, Dale Evans, the Lone Ranger, Gene Autry or John Wayne. We wore holsters and chaps. We peeked around shrubbery, frantically fanning the hammers of our guns. Bang! Bang! Bang!Ž wed call. Youre dead!Ž No, Im not! You missed!Ž our victim would reply. Bang! Bang! Got you that time!Ž wed insist. And our pal would grab his chest, fall to the ground, and kick his feet in the air. High drama! You cant do that with a striker-“ red gun.Marj Law is the former director of Keep Wakulla County Beautiful who has become an avid gunner in her retirement. HOME ON THE RANGEIf I had a hammer Selecting a handgun with or without a hammerPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSHAMMER NO HAMMER: A hammerless Glock, left, has a striker, while a hammer is visible in the pistol on the right.Public input sought on deer management FWC Law Enforcement operations ASHLEY FEED STORE 8056 WAKULLA SPRINGS ROAD for more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M. WE REALLY APPRECIATE YOU and look forward to serving you in 2013!!Wonderful Customers Thanks for a Great 2012!to all of our IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service

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Page 12 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comWith the unseasonably warm weather, it can be misleading to many who venture out on the water. This past Saturday, the air temperature reached into the upper 70s, but the water remained cooler in the low to mid-60s, depending where you were on the coast. At this water temperature, a person can remain in the water two to seven hours before exhaustion or unconsciousness sets in. The expected time of survival is from two to 40 hours. Water between 50 and 60 degrees only offers one or two hours before exhaustion or unconsciousness sets in and one to six hours for survival. (Taken from www.seagrant.umn. edu/coastal_communities/hypothermia#time). Many factors affect an individuals ability to survive, including wearing a lifejacket that is “ t properly, and having proper equipment for assisting others in locating you. When you fall into cold water, there are many physical reactions that occur. The first is that you cant breathe. Your heart rate and blood pressure increase. You may have uncontrolled gasping for air. Your movements may also be uncontrolled. This phase is called cold water response. It can last from 30 seconds to several minutes. This phase will pass and you will need to stay calm and get your breathing under control. The second is called cold incapacitation. As the warmth of your body is lowered by the water surrounding you, your body will work to keep your core temperature high. Blood ” ow to your arms and legs will be lowered. You will lose the ability to swim. Without some sort of ” otation device, 50 percent of those who die in cold water die of drowning due to cold incapacitation. The “ nal phase is hypothermia. You can survive in cold water much longer than many believe, as long as you are wearing a lifejacket. The body is very effective at keeping the core warm. It could take an hour or much longer to lose consciousness. So what can you do to lessen the dangers of cold water boating? First, always wear your lifejacket. If you fall into the water, your lifejacket will keep your head above water while you catch your breath and get your breathing under control. It will keep you floating when your arms and legs are too cold to work. It will keep you ” oating even if you are unconscious. You should attach a whistle, a re” ective mirror, and an emergency strobe light to your lifejacket. If you have an Emergency Position-indicating Radio Beacon (EPIRB), make sure it is in working order and with you. EPIRBs can be purchased and some companies rent them. File a ” oat plan with somebody. If the unforeseen happens, this may trigger a search that saves your life. Wear cold water gear. When the water temperature drops to 60 degrees or less, USCG regulations require the Auxiliary to wear mustang suits. Keep a change of dry clothes on board. If you do get wet, you can put on dry clothing. If you “ nd yourself in the water, try to get out as quickly as possible. Follow the 1-10-1Ž rule. Take one minute to calm yourself and get your breathing in control. Use the next 10 minutes to get yourself out of the water while your arms and legs are fully functioning. You should have one hour before hypothermia begins to set in. Conserve your body heat as best you can. Limit your movement and assume the heat-emitting lessening position (HELP). Cross your arms and place your hands under your armpits. Cross your legs and try to pull up into a ball. This will help to protect your core temperature. Finally, your battle with the cold is not over even if help arrives. There is the possibility of post-rescue collapse or after-drop. Hypothermia weakens the body and can bring it to the edge of collapse. The rescue itself is stressful to the victim. Get the person out of the wet clothes. This is not a time for modesty. Wet clothes are hard to remove, so do not waste too much time with their removal. Cover the victim with a blanket. Keep them horizontal on their back or side. If you have hot water bottles or hot packs, apply them to the head, neck, chest and groin. You can also lie next to or on top of the victim to warm them with your own body heat. Do not apply heat directly to the arms or legs. You can kill a person by causing cold blood to ” ow to the heart and brain. Let the extremities warm on their own. If the victim is conscious, you can give them warm liquids sweetened with sugar for energy. Do not give alcohol and avoid caffeine if possible. Keep the person horizontal even if the victim begins to feel better. Their body is in a fragile state. The heart can quit pumping correctly. Let the local ER determine if the person is ready to stand. If you are in a situation where you or someone else falls into the cold water and hypothermia is setting in, use your VHS radio to call for help on channel 16 and head for shore. EMS can meet you dockside if they know you are coming. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Sign up for our upcoming ABS Class on Jan. 26 to learn more about being safe out on the water! If you are interested in attending this class, contact our Public Education staff officer at FSO-PE@ uscgaux.net or check out our website at www.uscgaux.net.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Time to get ready. The weather may be uncharacteristicly warm, but few are currently diving. The ocean is still on the cool side. I do see many boats on trailers pass by us preparing for the upcoming season. And we are no different. A good friend donated a nice boat to our efforts to move more diving offshore. Folks are tuning up engines, testing electronics and charging or replacing batteries. April arrives soon enough. The excitement is epidemic with this warm weather. Your diving equipment is as important a life support technology as is your boat. Your cylinder may need a visual inspection, a hydro test or valve cleaning having sat idle since last summer. Your regulator needs an annual tune up to perform at its best. And just like the PFDs required by the Coast Guard, so too should you inspect and test you Buoyancy Compensator. Every year our attendance at national conferences makes us aware of diving improvements. Our evaluation of diving incidents has taught us two lessons: 1. Life support equipment not routinely serviced and maintained leads to needless emergencies. 2. The majority of emergencies underwater are the result of poor or rustyŽ training. Both have a basis in attitude. Refreshment training is always a good idea. This can be done by what is called continuing education: upgrade to Nitrox breathing gas, or Oxygen Delivery for management of decompression, surface-supply hose diving, spear“ shing, or even rebreather diving. Better diving technology and techniques abound. Every one of these topics are new and exciting, enabling divers more and safer bottom time. Training is not hard to “ nd and timely with four months until April. Yesterday, a boater told me he “ ne tunes his engine, and streamlines his boat and his boating skills to be faster every year. He said he wants to avoid ocean emergencies by having the ability to return to shore rapidly should a storm threaten. We divers need to proactively engage in similar improvements to avoid the underwater emergencies we can avoid. Safe diving, like safe boating, is no accident! UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton ILLUSTRATION SPECIAL TO THE NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews. F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL Marine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.mikesmarine”orida.com MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jan 17, 13 Fri Jan 18, 13 Sat Jan 19, 13 Sun Jan 20, 13 Mon Jan 21, 13 Tue Jan 22, 13 Wed Jan 23, 13 D ate 2.3 ft. 5:36 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 11:21 AM 0.4 ft. 12:37 AM 0.4 ft. 1:58 AM 0.3 ft. 3:29 AM 0.1 ft. 4:44 AM -0.1 ft. 5:39 AM -0.3 ft. 6:22 AM L ow 2.8 ft. 5:34 PM 1.9 ft. 6:46 AM 1.8 ft. 8:32 AM 1.8 ft. 10:24 AM 2.0 ft. 11:33 AM 2.3 ft. 12:16 PM 2.5 ft. 12:50 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 11:53 AM 1.4 ft. 12:38 PM 1.6 ft. 1:52 PM 1.6 ft. 3:30 PM 1.5 ft. 4:51 PM 1.3 ft. 5:48 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 6:08 PM 2.6 ft. 6:56 PM 2.5 ft. 8:14 PM 2.5 ft. 9:48 PM 2.7 ft. 10:57 PM 2.8 ft. 11:46 PM Hi g h Thu Jan 17, 13 Fri Jan 18, 13 Sat Jan 19, 13 Sun Jan 20, 13 Mon Jan 21, 13 Tue Jan 22, 13 Wed Jan 23, 13 D ate 1.7 ft. 5:28 AM Hi g h 0.5 ft. 11:32 AM 0.3 ft. 12:48 AM 0.3 ft. 2:09 AM 0.2 ft. 3:40 AM 0.1 ft. 4:55 AM -0.1 ft. 5:50 AM -0.2 ft. 6:33 AM L ow 2.1 ft. 5:26 PM 1.5 ft. 6:38 AM 1.3 ft. 8:24 AM 1.4 ft. 10:16 AM 1.5 ft. 11:25 AM 1.7 ft. 12:08 PM 1.9 ft. 12:42 PM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 12:04 PM 1.0 ft. 12:49 PM 1.2 ft. 2:03 PM 1.2 ft. 3:41 PM 1.1 ft. 5:02 PM 1.0 ft. 5:59 PM L ow 2.0 ft. 6:00 PM 1.9 ft. 6:48 PM 1.9 ft. 8:06 PM 1.9 ft. 9:40 PM 2.0 ft. 10:49 PM 2.1 ft. 11:38 PM Hi g h Thu Jan 17, 13 Fri Jan 18, 13 Sat Jan 19, 13 Sun Jan 20, 13 Mon Jan 21, 13 Tue Jan 22, 13 Wed Jan 23, 13 D ate Hi g h 0.3 ft. 12:39 AM 0.4 ft. 1:41 AM 0.4 ft. 3:02 AM 0.3 ft. 4:33 AM 0.1 ft. 5:48 AM -0.1 ft. 6:43 AM -0.3 ft. 7:26 AM L ow 2.1 ft. 6:12 AM 1.8 ft. 7:22 AM 1.6 ft. 9:08 AM 1.7 ft. 11:00 AM 1.9 ft. 12:09 PM 2.1 ft. 12:52 PM 2.3 ft. 1:26 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 12:25 PM 1.0 ft. 12:57 PM 1.2 ft. 1:42 PM 1.4 ft. 2:56 PM 1.5 ft. 4:34 PM 1.4 ft. 5:55 PM 1.2 ft. 6:52 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 6:10 PM 2.5 ft. 6:44 PM 2.4 ft. 7:32 PM 2.3 ft. 8:50 PM 2.4 ft. 10:24 PM 2.5 ft. 11:33 PM Hi g h Thu Jan 17, 13 Fri Jan 18, 13 Sat Jan 19, 13 Sun Jan 20, 13 Mon Jan 21, 13 Tue Jan 22, 13 Wed Jan 23, 13 D ate 1.8 ft. 5:20 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 11:00 AM 0.4 ft. 12:16 AM 0.4 ft. 1:37 AM 0.3 ft. 3:08 AM 0.1 ft. 4:23 AM -0.1 ft. 5:18 AM -0.3 ft. 6:01 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 5:18 PM 1.5 ft. 6:30 AM 1.4 ft. 8:16 AM 1.4 ft. 10:08 AM 1.6 ft. 11:17 AM 1.8 ft. 12:00 PM 1.9 ft. 12:34 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 11:32 AM 1.3 ft. 12:17 PM 1.6 ft. 1:31 PM 1.6 ft. 3:09 PM 1.5 ft. 4:30 PM 1.3 ft. 5:27 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 5:52 PM 2.0 ft. 6:40 PM 2.0 ft. 7:58 PM 2.0 ft. 9:32 PM 2.1 ft. 10:41 PM 2.2 ft. 11:30 PM Hi g h Thu Jan 17, 13 Fri Jan 18, 13 Sat Jan 19, 13 Sun Jan 20, 13 Mon Jan 21, 13 Tue Jan 22, 13 Wed Jan 23, 13 D ate 2.3 ft. 5:33 AM Hi g h 0.7 ft. 11:18 AM 0.4 ft. 12:34 AM 0.5 ft. 1:55 AM 0.3 ft. 3:26 AM 0.1 ft. 4:41 AM -0.1 ft. 5:36 AM -0.4 ft. 6:19 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 5:31 PM 2.0 ft. 6:43 AM 1.8 ft. 8:29 AM 1.9 ft. 10:21 AM 2.1 ft. 11:30 AM 2.3 ft. 12:13 PM 2.5 ft. 12:47 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 11:50 AM 1.5 ft. 12:35 PM 1.7 ft. 1:49 PM 1.8 ft. 3:27 PM 1.6 ft. 4:48 PM 1.4 ft. 5:45 PM L ow 2.8 ft. 6:05 PM 2.6 ft. 6:53 PM 2.6 ft. 8:11 PM 2.6 ft. 9:45 PM 2.7 ft. 10:54 PM 2.9 ft. 11:43 PM Hi g h Thu Jan 17, 13 Fri Jan 18, 13 Sat Jan 19, 13 Sun Jan 20, 13 Mon Jan 21, 13 Tue Jan 22, 13 Wed Jan 23, 13 D ate 1.5 ft. 5:37 AM Hi g h 0.3 ft. 10:44 AM 0.1 ft. 12:32 AM -0.0 ft. 1:47 AM -0.2 ft. 3:00 AM -0.4 ft. 4:04 AM -0.5 ft. 4:58 AM -0.6 ft. 5:45 AM L ow 2.1 ft. 5:49 PM 1.3 ft. 7:01 AM 1.2 ft. 8:54 AM 2.2 ft. 7:36 PM 2.2 ft. 8:28 PM 1.6 ft. 1:31 PM 1.7 ft. 1:58 PM Hi g h 0.6 ft. 11:09 AM 0.8 ft. 11:34 AM 1.2 ft. 3:41 PM 1.2 ft. 4:51 PM L ow 2.1 ft. 6:18 PM 2.2 ft. 6:54 PM 2.1 ft. 9:25 PM 2.2 ft. 10:24 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJan. 17 Jan 23First Jan. 18 Full Jan. 26 Last Feb. 3 New Feb. 9Major Times 5:19 AM 7:19 AM 5:42 PM 7:42 PM Minor Times --:---:-11:11 AM 12:11 PM Major Times 6:05 AM 8:05 AM 6:28 PM 8:28 PM Minor Times 12:17 AM 1:17 AM 11:46 AM 12:46 PM Major Times 6:50 AM 8:50 AM 7:13 PM 9:13 PM Minor Times 1:12 AM 2:12 AM 12:23 PM 1:23 PM Major Times 7:36 AM 9:36 AM 8:00 PM 10:00 PM Minor Times 2:05 AM 3:05 AM 1:03 PM 2:03 PM Major Times 8:23 AM 10:23 AM 8:47 PM 10:47 PM Minor Times 2:58 AM 3:58 AM 1:45 PM 2:45 PM Major Times 9:11 AM 11:11 AM 9:35 PM 11:35 PM Minor Times 3:49 AM 4:49 AM 2:30 PM 3:30 PM Major Times 9:59 AM 11:59 AM 10:24 PM 12:24 AM Minor Times 4:38 AM 5:38 AM 3:19 PM 4:19 PM Average Average Average Average Average+ Average Average7:33 am 6:01 pm 11:12 am --:--Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:33 am 6:02 pm 11:47 am 12:18 am 7:33 am 6:03 pm 12:24 pm 1:13 am 7:32 am 6:04 pm 1:04 pm 2:07 am 7:32 am 6:05 pm 1:46 pm 2:59 am 7:32 am 6:05 pm 2:31 pm 3:50 am 7:31 am 6:06 pm 3:20 pm 4:39 am39% 46% 52% 58% 64% 70% 76% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring Creek St. Marks River EntranceTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 13reports Law Enforcement and CourtsOn Jan. 4, Ricky P. Leger, 23, was arrested by federal law enforcement of“ cials in Louisiana in connection with Wakulla County burglaries and thefts that occurred in August 2012 in Panacea. WCSO investigators interviewed witnesses that helped place Leger at the scene of several crimes. Leger was charged with burglary of a structure in connection with the theft of a water hose from A&P Seafood. On Aug. 2, Leger was charged with burglary of a structure/conveyance and petit theft in connection with the theft of $150 worth of property from Brooks Concrete. Later, Leger allegedly returned to A&P Seafood and created $1,100 worth of damage to an air conditioning unit on a seafood freezer. A seafood vehicle was also damaged. The charges in the incident included burglary to a structure, burglary to a structure/conveyance with more than $1,000 damage and felony criminal mischief. Leger allegedly drove a vehicle to the Bottoms Road boat landing money box which was snatched out of the ground by using a vehicle and chain. Leger also is alleged to have driven to the Levy Bay boat ramp money box and snatched that box out of the ground. Damage to the boxes totaled $1,810 and charges included felony criminal mischief and petit theft. Leger allegedly fled Wakulla County after the crimes were committed. After his arrest, he was taken to the Wakulla County Jail and was released after posting a $14,000 bond. Detective Lorne Whaley investigated along with Deputy Stephen Simmons. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: JANUARY 3 € Wal-Mart Asset Protection staff reported a retail theft. Evidence at the store indicated that an associate placed merchandise in a shopping bag for a customer without scanning it. Ten recovered store items were valued at $57. The store associate, Rachel Elaine Lopez, 32, of Crawfordville was charged with retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Danielle Alvarez of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim noted that a rifle was stolen from her property at an undetermined time. The weapon is valued at $600. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Shawn Osborne of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Medications and clothing, valued at $90, were reported missing. The victim is unsure if the vehicle was locked at the time of the incident. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. JANUARY 4 € Michael Eaton of Tallahassee reported the theft of his wallet. The wallet and contents are valued at $745. The victim is unsure where the wallet was located when it became lost and stolen. Someone attempted to use the victims bank cards to make purchases in Carrabelle, Calloway and Alabama. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Scarlett Lovell of Crawfordville reported damage to her fence. Someone clearing timber near her fence damaged it and attempted to put it back together. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € A 40-year-old Tallahassee woman reported being the victim of a carjacking where a black male jumped into her vehicle at an intersection in Tallahassee. The victim told the WCSO that the suspect pointed a gun at her and demanded money. The suspect told the victim to drive to Wakulla County where he reportedly ” ed the scene on foot and got into an unknown vehicle. The Leon County Sheriffs Office was contacted to initiate an investigation. Deputy Scott Powell and Lt. Brent Sanders investigated. JANUARY 5 € Marsha Crisler of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims mailbox and others along Rehwinkel Road were damaged. The victims mailbox was valued at $300. Vehicle parts were collected at the scene. A total of seven mailboxes were reported as damaged on Rehwinkel Road, Evelyn Road and Bodiford Lane. The boxes were valued at $160. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Tabitha Pearce of Crawfordville reported a vehicle burglary. Stereo accessories were stolen from the victims vehicle. The vehicle was left unlocked and the equipment was valued at $1,200. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. JANUARY 6 € Deputy Billy Metcalf assisted the Franklin County Sheriffs Of“ ce in locating an individual wanted for theft in Franklin. The 18-year-old Crawfordville suspect was turned over to Franklin County of“ cials in Medart after Deputy Metcalf observed the stolen items in the back of the suspects truck. € Raymond Gloss of Tallahassee reported a criminal mischief in Crawfordville. The victim was at a county bar when someone slashed his tires. The tires were valued at $400 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Natasha Irene Monroe, 29, of Crawfordville was involved in a one vehicle traffic crash on Spring Creek Highway near Steele Court. The vehicle rolled over during the crash, however, the driver and two young passengers were not injured. The vehicle was a total loss. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. JANUARY 7 € Catherine Youells of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim accepted a friend request on Facebook from an organization claiming that she won $10 million. The victim was contacted by someone asking her to put money on a Money Pak card. Once she followed the instructions she was told an individual would come to her home with her winnings. However, nobody followed through by giving her a check with her winnings. She lost $100 in the scam. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € Michael Greene of Talquin Electric Cooperative reported two unruly customers cursing staff and making threats toward Talquin of“ cials over an electrical bill. The couple ” ed the scene before law enforcement arrived. Deputy Elisee Colin arrived at the home of the Crawfordville couple and served a trespass warning for the Talquin of“ ce in Crawfordville. No charges were filed against the couple. € Stanley West of Crawfordville reported a business burglary at his Shell Point area business. The victim arrived at the closed business and observed damage to the door. Glass display cases were damaged inside the structure and the building was ransacked. Plastic cups were stolen. The cups are valued at $400 and damage to the building was estimated at $1,000. Detective Ryan Muse and Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Christine Knowles of Crawfordville reported the theft of utility services. The victim learned that her water was being stolen by another resident who was also involved in the theft of electricity from a second victim. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Marcilla Dyke of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. Someone entered the victims home and removed a “ rearm. The “ rearm was valued at $100. The home was ransacked and a shed on the property was also entered. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. JANUARY 8 € Judith Rutledge of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim observed four unauthorized transactions on her bank account. Three of the transactions were created through a book company and the fourth vendor was undetermined. The fraud was valued at $211. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. € Jeffrey Taff of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of tools from his property. The total value of stolen wrenches was estimated at $1,000. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Jesse J. Jalbert, 35, of Crawfordville and a threeyear-old were involved in a traf“ c crash at 2120 Crawfordville Highway. Only non-life threatening injuries were reported. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Deborah Green of Crawfordville reported the grand theft of two motorcycles from an area business. The dirt bikes were located at a Crawfordville business that had closed. The victim has not been able to locate the missing dirt bikes. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. JANUARY 9 € Arthur Junge of Panacea reported a theft at an Ochlockonee Bay campground. The victim left his camper for a short period of time and returned to discover that his gas grill and propane tank were missing. The property was on a picnic table and is valued at $80. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Judith Smith of Panacea reported a residential burglary. A forced entry was observed as a door was kicked in. Damage to the home was estimated at $100. Approximately $11 in change was also taken during the burglary. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Clarence Cline of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. The victim reported the theft of $450 worth of coins. Deputy Rachel Wheeler investigated. € Stephanie Larson of Crawfordville reported the theft of an animal cage and no trespassing signs from her property. The value of the missing property is $70. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 928 calls for service during the past week including 12 residential and business alarms; 61 citizen contacts; 14 disturbances; 18 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 6 abandoned E-911 calls; 13 regular E-911 calls; 40 investigations; 49 medical emergencies; 343 business and residential security checks; 35 special details; 11 suspicious people; 29 traffic enforcements; 97 traf“ c stops; and 13 wanted people.Sheri s ReportDEPUTIES SWORN-IN: Wakulla County Sheriff Charlie Creel swore in and provided credentials to WCSO deputies, detention deputies, Public Service Of“ cers and reserve deputies Wednesday, Jan. 9 at River of Life Church in Crawfordville. Sheriff Creels message to the community was one of unity and trust in staff to provide the very best law enforcement to the citizens of the county. He added that everyone within the agency has shown great professionalism and plays a role in making Wakulla County a great place to work and live. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordvillewww.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA TAMPA€ Local physicians at a new medical clinic in Tampaare so sure their medication will help men with erectile dysfunction, they are offering the first 37 callers a free inoffice medication dose. Erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation have long been a problem for millions of men, in spite of the popularity of Viagra, Cialis and Levitra. Many men arent helped by these pills or cannot take them due to adverse side effects. Florida Mens Medical Clinic custom blends over 180 combinations of medications for each patient. ŒThats why our success rate is so high,‹ says Dr. Kevin Hornsby, M.D. ŒWe help men as old as ninety-four, with diabetes, prostate surgery and heart conditions. Regardless of their age or medical history our results everyday are amazing.‹ All medications are FDA approved, and no surgery isinvolved.ŒWe adjust the prescriptionforaman's performance to 45-minutes, an hour, 90-minutes or longer,‹ according to Dr.Hornsby,‹ andpatients see results right in our office. After climax the patient stays erect the entire period of time. This allows them to achieve a second climax and adequately satisfytheirpartner.Noothermedication can do this. We offer a simple guarantee: If you dont respond to the medication on the first visit the office visit is free.‹ With that guarantee, local patients have nothing to lose. Openings are filling quickly for the free in-office medication dose, after that the normal feeswillbe charged. Patients areassuredofutmost privacy and professionalism with private waiting rooms and an allmale staff. Further information is available by calling (813) 440-3622.Florida Mens Medical Clinic, 2203 N. Lois Ave., Suite 705, Tampa, FL. Just off I-275 by International Mall. For patients more than 60 miles away the doctor will pay your gas.www.FloridaMensClinic.comA d v e r t o r i a lFREEMEDICATIONDOSE BY STEVE MUELLERMens Health Consultant Erectile DysfunctionClinic Opens in Florida Florida (800) 264-9510. Florida Mens Clinic 3 Locations: Jacksonville, Tampa, Ft. Lauderdale FLORIDA LUNCH PARTNER… R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. nt Monday Saturday from 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE The Wakulla News

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Page 14 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Jan. 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Friday, Jan. 18  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 5451853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Jan. 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Jan. 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Jan. 21  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. Tuesday, Jan. 22  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant. Wednesday, Jan. 23  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Jan. 24  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Special EventsThursday, Jan. 17  WAKULLA COUNTY TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP will meet at the library from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Call 850-926-0401 ext. 217 for more information. Saturday, Jan. 19  SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS “Wakulla Guards Camp” will meet a 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. For more information, please call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405.  ARBOR DAY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hudson Park. Starting at 10 a.m., more than 2,000 trees will be given away for free. The young trees are all pot-grown and several feet tall (except for the pines). Every person who attends may take home one free tree in a pot plus several bareroot pines. After 12 noon, any number of the remaining trees may be obtained for a requested donation of $4 per tree. Families will nd delightful music, food, and exhibits. The Iris Garden Club will sell baked goods to raise scholarship funds. Artisans, craftsmen, and other vendors will be selling their wares. Bring a canvas bag to hold everything you will acquire. For more information, please contact Lynn Artz at (850)320-2158 or lynn_artz@hotmail.com.  FARM SHARE will be at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. to provide food to those in need. The church is located at 2780 Surf Road, Panacea. Monday, Jan. 21  MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DAY CELEBRATIONS will be held at 9:30 a.m. at Hudson Park by the Wakulla County Christian Coalition. There will be readings from the life of Dr. King, songs and a short speech followed by light refreshments.  CELEBRATION OF THE INAUGURATION OF PRESIDENT OBAMA will be held by the Wakulla Democratic Executive Committee from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at El Jalisco Mexican restaurant at 2481 Crawfordville Road. For more information about the Wakulla Democratic Party, visit the website at http://wakullademocrats.org/. Tuesday, Jan. 22  AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost for AARP members is $12, everyone else is $14. Those interested must register to attend a class. Call Ernie Conte at (850) 926-4605 for more information or to register.  INTERNATIONAL GREEN DRINKS will be held by Keep Wakulla County Beautiful at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. Steve Cushman, managing partner of Cave Connections and Chairman of the Board of the Aquatic Science Association, will be giving a presentation of cave diving and its bene ts to conservation of natural resources. The presentation will include a 5-minute video clip of footage from Indian Springs Cave System. He will follow with a brief on the efforts to revitalize the oyster industries here in Wakulla County. Thursday, Jan. 24  CLOSING THE GAP JOB FAIR AND EXPO will be held by Workforce Plus at the Leon County Civic Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Those interested in attending need to register by calling (850) 414-6085. RSVP by Jan. 3, 2013. Upcoming EventsFriday, Jan. 25  SNEAK PEEK by Palaver Tree Theater will be held at 7 p.m. at the library. The public is invited to learn more about their upcoming readings and performances including: “The Left Hand Singing,” written by Barbara Lebow; “WakullaStory: Mania for Speculation” (Wakulla and the Forbes Purchase) written by Madeleine Carr and Brent Thurmond; “The Wakulla Volcano,” based on Rodney Letchworth’s essay, and the SCENE in Wakulla Playwrights and Film Festival, in June. Saturday, Jan. 26  GREEN CLEANING WORKSHOP will be held at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Jennifer Glaubius and Shelley Swenson will share information on cleaning products that utilize natural ingredients that are safer for the person using them and for the environment. Recipes will be available. They will make an all-purpose cleaner for each participant to take home. Co-sponsored by Sustainable Big Bend. Cost is $10. Pre-Registration is necessary, call (850) 926-3931.  TALLAHASSEE FITNESS FESTIVAL will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Leon County Civic Center. National and local businesses will conduct exercise classes, offer free health screenings, conduct workshops, provide free personal training, product samples and more. There will be a tug-o-war competition to bene t Second Harvest of the Big Bend. Door prizes will be provided. For more information, call 222-0200 and visit tally tnessfest.com.  FARM SHARE will be at Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. to provide food to those in need. The church is located at 2780 Surf Road, Panacea. Saturday, Feb. 2  FOOD PRESERVATION PRESSURE CANNING WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. A class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be offered if participation merits a second session. The cost is $5. Call 926-3931 for more information or to register. Sunday, Feb. 3  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE PRESENTATION SERIES will feature Peter Cowdrey, educator in residence at the Museum of Florida History, as he shows how Apalachee Bay and the St. Marks area were depicted on the earliest maps of Florida at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. He will appear in the persona of an 18th century ship’s navigator and describe some of the early mapping tools used. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited, so please come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call 925-6121 for more information. Government Meetings Tuesday, Jan. 22  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. Wednesday, Jan. 23  RESTORE ACT Advisory Committee wild hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center, located at the north entrance of Centennial Bank, Crawfordville. Monday, Jan. 28  WAKULLA COUNTY RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 7 p.m. at the library.By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorWhatever the cost of our libraries, the cost is cheap compared to that of an ignorant nation.Ž Walter Cronkite Friday Night Movie Our “ rst Friday Night Movie for 2013 is this Friday night at 7 p.m. Were proud to show an acclaimed family/baseball drama starring Clint Eastwood, Amy Adams and Justin Timberlake. When an old school scout (Eastwood) for the Atlanta Braves is assigned to check out a potential 1st round pick, he realizes that his eyesight is going. In addition to this the new schoolŽ assistant general manager is looking for a way to force him out. The scouts estranged daughter (Adams) joins him for a few weeks, putting her career as an attorney on hold, to be his eyes and make an attempt to rekindle the relationship they had when she was a child. Meanwhile, a scout for the Red Sox (Timberlake) who Eastwoods character signed years ago before an injury ended his career, tries to attract Clints daughter. This PG-13 rated “ lm has something for everyone; sports, family drama, a love story and a few laughs. Please come out and enjoy what very well may be Eastwoods last acting role. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. Family Game Day On Saturday, Jan. 26, from 9 a.m. to noon well be having our “ rst Family Game Day at the library. Come join in on all the fun as well have all sorts of board and card games set up in our Main Meeting Room. Wed love to expand this into a regular event so please come out and help us kick it off right. More details will follow in next weeks article. AARP Tax Service and Tax Forms We are still awaiting the arrival of this years tax forms from the IRS. While we placed our order months ago, the recent passage of the “ scal cliffŽ legislation along with other issues has delayed shipment. As soon as we receive them we will make them available to the public, and advertise that we have them on hand. We ask for your patience as we await the arrival of the forms. The AARP will begin their annual free tax preparation for low to middle income “ lers on Saturday, Feb. 2. They will be on hand at the library each Saturday and Thursday mornings from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. during tax season to assist those who need their service. This is a “ rst come, “ rst served program so the earlier you arrive the better.Library News... Arbor Day Festival from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hudson Park. MLK Jr. Day Celebration at 9:30 a.m. at Hudson Park. AARP Driver Safety class 9:30 am. to 4 p.m. at the library. KWCB Green Drinks program at 6:30 p.m. at Wakulla Springs Lodge. SaturdayMondayTuesdayTuesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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By HERB DONALDSONSpecial to The NewsEver wonder how theft, murder, volcanos, and the ultimate forgiveness are connected? If so, you may want to attend Palaver Tree Theaters sneak peek event on Friday, Jan. 25, in order to “ nd out. The sneak peek is designed to offer the community a chance to learn more about the upcoming readings and productions being produced by Palaver Tree for its 2013 season. Expect interviews with writers and others involved in productions, such as The Left Hand Singing.Ž The play, written by Barbara Lebow, will be presented as a stylized read in February at the Old Wakulla Courthouse, during Black History Month, in association with the Wakulla County Christian Coalition. The story revolves around three college students (one black, two white) who have decided to participate in registering blacks to vote during the Freedom Summer of 1964. It is loosely based on the murders that occurred in Philadelphia, Miss., of Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman (both from New York, white), and James Chaney (from Meridian, Miss., black). All three were helping organize civil rights efforts on behalf of the Congress for Racial Equality (CORE), when they disappeared, and were later found in an earthen dam. The disappearance led to an FBI investigation code-named MIBURN or Mississippi BurningŽ from which the popular Hollywood movie got its name. Brent Thurmond, Madeleine Carr and Cathy Frank will be on hand to discuss this years WakullaStory. As in past years, WakullaStory is presented in association with the Wakulla County Historical Society, of which Frank is president. WakullaStory: A Mania for Speculation (Wakulla and the Forbes Purchase)Ž takes place in March, and centers around the somewhat dubious land swap that involved approximately 1.5 million acres of land, including what is now known as Wakulla County. The Wakulla VolcanoŽ was originally an essay by Rodney Letchworth, a “ fth generation native of Leon County. As a naval aviator, he ” ew 289 combat missions in Vietnam, providing close air support for Marines on the ground. He had an uncle who revealed to him a few of the strange happenings that occurred many years ago on an island, up a river, near a volcano.Ž Letchworth will discuss his uncles story that led to his personal fascination with the Wakulla Volcano. The play will be performed in April, during the annual Wild About Wakulla Week. SCENE in Wakulla: New Plays/New Films Fest, is a “ rst-time effort for Palaver Tree. Best Western Inn & Suites has graciously offered to sponsor this threeday affair that explores the works of emerging writers and “ lmmakers. One of the plays to be presented during SCENE, is based on the book, Wildflowers in the MedianŽ by Agnes Furey, who tells a personal story of restorative justice.Ž Fureys daughter and grandson were killed by a man her daughter was attempting to help. In an effort to heal, Agnes reached out to the former English teacher and college graduate who murdered her daughter and grandchild. He is currently serving time for his crimes. Furey will be on hand to discuss all of this, and her collaboration with Palaver Tree to bring this book to life as a play. & My maternal grandfather, John Y. Gresham, entered the U.S. Lighthouse Service sometime around 1916 with his assignment as assistant keeper at the Cape San Blas Lighthouse. Before leaving that lighthouse, he was promoted to keeper and transferred to the St. Marks Lighthouse about 1918. The Cape San Blas Lighthouse is located in Gulf County, not far from Port St. Joe and Apalachicola. It juts out into the Gulf of Mexico in the Florida Panhandle, southwest of Tallahassee. My mother used to tell me her very “ rst memories were as a child at the Cape San Blas light. Mother was born in 1913, so was very young at the time. She said that vivid in her memories were the large waves which pounded the beach at the cape and were terrifying to her. The gulf always seemed angry and rough at the cape, and the sand dunes were like mountains to her … she was so small, and they so large. She said another of her memories involved watching as her father left to volunteer for duty in World War I. She said the family was so sad as they watched him leave, wondering if they would ever see him again. And then, the joy she recalled as he returned home, having been rejected for service because of his vital occupation as a lighthouse keeper. Mother used to tell me, though, that throughout her life, she never forgot her best friend Julie. She mentioned Julie often enough that I was vaguely aware of the story involving her, but never gave it much thought. Not much thought, that is, until near the end of mothers life. I recall sitting next to her bed at the nursing home where she would spend her last days. Mothers words were something like this: Oh son, Ill always remember my little friend, Julie, from the days when I was a little 3or 4-year-old girl at Cape San Blas.Ž In the dim light of the nursing home room, I could detect tears in my mothers eyes as she recalled her little friend, and the tragedy that stayed with mother, a tragedy which occurred 80 years before on that treacherous beach at Cape San Blas. I can tell you the story easily because it is very brief. One day at Cape San Blas, mother took her little friend, Julie, to play on the beach near the lighthouse. She took Julie across some of the large dunes and they were playing and having so much fun, not too far from the waters edge. Their play was interrupted by my grandmother calling out to my mother, summoning her home. Mother did not recall why she was called home, but believed it was either for supper or possibly because she and Julie were behind the dunes and out of sight of the keepers quarters. Because of the urgency of the calls, mother ran home, leaving Julie behind, next to the sand dune. That night after mother was put to bed, she could hear an unusually strong storm with high winds blowing ashore from the southeast. Never had mother heard the breakers pound the beach with such fury or the wind howl as that night. In her little girls mind, she worried and could not sleep thinking of her little friend Julie out there in that storm. She knew she was too small and it would be dangerous for her, so she remained in her bed. At “ rst light the next morning, with the storm having abated somewhat, mother ran down to the beach and over the dunes where she and Julie had been playing the day before. For days afterward, mother would look for Julie but never “ nd her. Mother couldnt get over the vision of Julie being battered by the storm and probably washed far out to sea by those terrible waves. Heartbroken, she cried. Although Julie was just a childs doll, she was mothers best friend at that time, and the loss remained with her for the rest of her life. Mother described Julie to me as a beautiful doll made of porcelain, with dark curly hair and blue eyes... I loved her so much.Ž Mothers was a childs love. Nothing is as pure, innocent or true as the love of a child. In her mind, Julie was not just an inanimate doll, but a thing of joy, a treasure. Mother passed away in the summer of 1999. No doubt she is in heaven now, and I would like to think that there with her, cradled in her arms, is her doll, her friend, Julie.Story of a little girl's best friend, Julie Red Clay Footprints By John Roberts www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 15 JOHN ROBERTS/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSJohn Roberts mother, Vera Gresham, whose father was lighthouse keeper at Cape San Blas and later at St. Marks. Palaver Tree to hold a sneak peek on Jan. 25WHAT: Palaver Tree Theater Sneak Peek WHEN: Friday, January 25th at 7pm WHERE: Wakulla County Public Library Free and open to the public •Flooring •Carpentry •Painting •Tile Work FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 Cell (850) 570–1968 all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ Commercial Residential & Mobile Homes Repairs Sales Service All Makes and Models(850) 926-3546LIC. #RA0062516 r r s Locally Owned and Operated Since 1991 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Start working out NOW! CALL TODAY! 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Page 16 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comDavid Miller retires as superintendent By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netHundreds of people turned out for a retirement party honoring David Miller for his nearly 40 years of service to the county as teacher, coach, principal and superintendent. The party was held Saturday, Jan. 12, at the Wakulla High School cafeteria. Miller retired in November, and handed over the reins to newly elected Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce. Staff and students at local schools put together a humorous video wishing Miller well in his retirement. Longtime friend and colleague, Sen. Bill Montford, who was formerly superintendent of Leon County schools, presented Miller with a proclamation noting his numerous achievements … including Millers selection in 2004 as Superintendent of the Year by the state association of superintendents. Montford noted Millers philosophy of making decisions as superintendent was to whats best for the kids. One of the more emotional tributes was the presentation of a ” ag to Miller by the school resource officers. Lt. Billy Jones noted that Miller is the “ rst civilian to be given the honor of receiving a ” ag which has ” own over the sheriffs of“ ce. Miller could be seen blinking back tears as Jones added in his comments the highest compliment of law enforcement: that he would go through a door with Miller anytime, explaining that it means he knows the person has his back. Retired Sheriff David Harvey, who pitched on the 1968 Wakulla baseball team that went to the state championship but lost, and on which Miller was catcher, noted that Miller had presented him with a Wakulla baseball cap at his own retirement party in October 2011. So he presented Miller with a Harvey campaign hat. Pearce and school board members Becky Cook and Greg Thomas presented Miller with a commemorative plaque honoring his years of service. In his comments to close the evening, Miller attributed the success of the district to the teamwork of everyone working together for the common goal. Retired Sheriff David Harvey with the Wakulla baseball cap Miller gave him at his retirement, presented Miller with a Harvey hat. Harvey was the pitcher and Miller the catcher on the 1968 Wakulla baseball team that challenged for a state championship. Sen. Bill Montford, Millers wife Delores and Miller with a Senate proclamation honoring Miller for his service to Wakulla and the state. Former Superintendent David Miller at his retirement party talking with longtime friend Sen. Bill Montford, who served as superintendent of Leon schools. Miller addresses the audience at his retirement party. School resource of“ cers present Miller with a ” ag in a shadow box in an emotional tribute. Miller is the “ rst civilan to be so honored. School board member Becky Cook, Superintendent Bobby Pearce and school board member Greg Thomas make a presentation. Miller recounts his years serving Wakulla as teacher, coach, principal and superintendent of schools. The success of the district has been due to teamwork,Ž he told the crowd. More photos online at thewakullanews.com PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDEN

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 17By MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Jan. 11 … Florida Gov. Rick Scott and state health of“ cials spent much of the week on their heels while the estimated price of the Affordable Care Act dropped faster than tree ornaments the day after Christmas. What began Monday as a $26 billion millstone around the neck of Florida taxpayers was reduced eight-fold to a more manageable $3 billion expense after Agency for Health Care Administration of“ cials “ ne-tuned their 10year estimates for what expanding Medicaid would cost the state. Beginning Monday with comments on a chilly street corner in Washington, D.C., Scott, … a vocal critic of Obamacare … took heat for citing “ gures that key legislative analysts questioned and the governors opponents said were downright in” ated. In contrast, groups eyeing election reforms came up with surprisingly similar remedies this week. Separate groups called on lawmakers to be a little more laconic on proposed constitutional amendments, saying the length of the 2012 general election ballot contributed to long lines at the polls. The governor spent the remainder of the week traveling the state and touting a proposed tax break for manufacturing machinery while calling for performance pay for public employees. AHCA ESTIMATES TUMBLE AMID SKEPTICISM Following a meeting with U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Scott lamented to a small cadre of Washington reporters that the costs to Florida of the unfolding health care plan would be catastrophic … $26 billion over a decade. Growing government, its never free, Scott said. It always costs money.Ž Scotts lament did not go unnoticed and soon became the grist for critics who said the governors “ gures were in” ated and inaccurate. Even the Agency for Health Care Administration, an agency under the governors eye, blinked. Days after Scotts initial estimates, which were based on earlier AHCA “ gures, the agency reduced its estimates to a lowball $3 billion over 10 years. The revisions came after state budget analysts, including the top staff member on the House Health Care Appropriations Subcommittee, raised questions about the assumptions that AHCA had used in the earlier report. Scotts of“ ce continued to defend the higher estimate, which took into account the federal governments historic “ nancial support for Medicaid of about 58 percent. The Affordable Care Act calls for the federal government to fund a minimum of 90 percent of the costs for people who take advantage of expanded Medicaid eligibility. Unless the federal law changes, House Appropriations Chairman Seth McKeel, R-Lakeland, said lawmakers must base their calculations on what the law says. We must follow our process which requires estimates based on current law and practice, McKeel said. This is critical to the integrity of our budgeting process.Ž ELECTION REFORMS EMERGE Following a 2012 election cycle remembered for images of weary voters standing in late-night lines, a series of proposed election reforms appeared to coalesce this week as various stakeholders, from election supervisors to Scott, weighed in. Among the top suggestions: Limit the length of ballot initiatives and allow local supervisors to offer more days of early voting in more locations. Local elections supervisors say theyd like more ” exibility in future elections to accommodate the growing number of voters who choose to cast ballots before Election Day. Scott also appears more amenable to extending early voting hours. The Florida State Association of Supervisors of Election said it would request that the Legislature give county supervisors the option to allow up to 14 days of early voting. Lawmakers reduced the number of early voting days to eight as part of a controversial elections bill approved in 2011. Sen. Jeff Clemens, DLake Worth, “ led a proposed constitutional amendment this week seeking to limit to three the number of proposed amendments the Legislature could put on the ballot in any one election. Clemens has “ led another proposal to automatically register voting-age motorists who apply for Florida drivers licenses. The ballot limitation, if not the sponsor, may have some traction this year. Senate President Don Gaetz has said lengthy amendments may have played a role in long lines and said the Senate would have a high bar for considering proposed amendments while he is president. But in a state where the public and lawmakers have long used the constitution to get things done when the Legislature wont, and in a famously decentralized state where locals have a lot of power, could officials really shorten the ballot? And would it actually make a difference? SCOTT NAMES FIVE TO BOG Gov. Rick Scott appointed “ ve new members of the Board of Governors on Thursday, bringing him close to having named a majority of the 17-member panel responsible for overseeing Floridas 12 state universities. Scotts of“ ce announced the appointments of Wayne Huizenga Jr., Ned Lautenbach, Alan Levine, Wendy Link and Edward Morton in a brief news release late Thursday. The “ ve will join three other members of the board that Scott has appointed. The “ ve were named to seats that were either vacant or where the terms of current board members had expired and those members had not applied to be reappointed. Scotts office has yet to announce what will happen with the seat currently held by Norman Tripp, who has asked for another term. BILLS FILED With the New Year behind them, lawmakers did what they do best, they “ led bills. Among a handful of proposals this week is a measure by Sen. Eleanor Sobel, D-Hollywood, to allow same-sex partners to receive some of the bene“ ts … heathcare, pension benefits, custodial rights … that are afforded married couples. The legislation speci“ cally states it is not an attempt to do an end-run around a provision in the Florida Constitution de“ ning marriage as the union of one man and one woman, but it would allow gay Floridians to get some rights approaching marriage. MANUFACTURING TAX BREAK PROPOSED Scott on Wednesday proposed eliminating the sales tax paid by manufacturers when they purchase equipment, part of his ongoing effort to cajole companies to move to Florida and get those already here to add workers. There already is a sales tax exemption for new equipment but to qualify companies must prove theyve increased their productive outputŽ by 5 percent after buying the equipment. Until Jan. 1, they had to show theyd increased output by 10 percent, but lawmakers reduced the requirement during last years legislative session at the urging of Scott. The proposed break would save companies an estimated $45 million a year. STORY OF THE WEEK: The Agency for Health Care Administration slashes the states estimated cost of Obamacare from $26 billion to $3 billion. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: In Miami-Dade County, the ballot read like the book of Leviticus … though not as interesting,Ž Senate President Don Gaetz in reference to the 12-page ballot that greeted voters in the South Florida county.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Healthcare: But wait, there’s more…. By JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Jan. 14 … As lawmakers decide how … or whether … to move forward with parts of the federal Affordable Care Act, House and Senate select committees plunged Monday into issues such as a potential expansion of the Medicaid program and the laws effects on Florida businesses. In back-to-back meetings, lawmakers heard testimony from people with far-different perspectives about the controversial health overhaul, which Florida Republican leaders resisted for more than two years. Backers, including two physicians, urged the committees to carry out important parts of the law, including expanding Medicaid eligibility to hundreds of thousands of additional people. Trying to put a face on the states uninsured population, Palm Beach Gardens resident Arie Strobel told lawmakers that she and her daughter have been unable to get coverage since her husband died suddenly in 2009, creating worries and causing her to forgo doctors visits. Theres that fear in the middle of the night, what am I going to do when I have something or when she has something? How are we going to handle this? And I kind of just close my eyes, Strobel, 53, said. But the Senate select committee also heard concerns from employers about how coverage requirements and penalties in the law could drive up costs for businesses. The concerns center, at least in part, on small businesses that have struggled in recent years with increasing health-insurance premiums. Ive got to tell you that Im thoroughly confused, said Kim Williams, president of Marpan Supply Co., a Tallahassee recycling business that has 74 employees. I dont know what its going to cost me next year.Ž The meetings came as lawmakers prepare to make decisions during the upcoming legislative session about a series of major issues stemming from the law, better known as Obamacare. Unlike a boisterous Senate meeting last month that drew tea-party activists and other Obamacare opponents, Mondays discussions were relatively low key. It appears clear, however, that lawmakers are focusing on a few big Obamacare-related issues heading into the session, which starts in March. They include whether to expand Medicaid eligibility, whether to take part in operating a healthinsurance exchange and how to deal with changes in insurance regulations. Gov. Rick Scott, a longtime critic of the health law, became embroiled in a controversy last week after he repeatedly said expanding Medicaid eligibility would cost the state an estimated $26 billion over 10 years. After it became public that state budget analysts had questioned the validity of that estimate, the Agency for Health Care Administration revised it to as low as $3 billion. Sen. Joe Negron, a Stuart Republican who chairs the Senate select committee, said the range of estimates is too expansiveŽ and that it needs to be narrowed. He said the state will work to have the best estimates it can. During a presentation about various elements of Obamacare, House staff director Christa Calamas said part of the complexity of the law is that it depends on hard-to-predict human behavior. Its very difficult to anticipate what the effects will be, Calamas said at one point. Florida has already missed a deadline to begin running a health-insurance exchange in January 2014, which means the federal government will at least initially operate it. Despite the missed deadline, Negron said the state could enter a partnership with the federal government to run an exchange or could operate its own exchange in later years. The potential Medicaid expansion also is drawing heavy attention, as backers say it would provide coverage to more people and reduce the amount of uncompensated care provided by hospitals and health professionals. The expansion would allow people with higher income levels to qualify for Medicaid and also would allow childless adults … a group now largely excluded from the program … to sign up. Safety Harbor physician Owen Linder and Tarpon Springs physician Lawrence Floriani told lawmakers that the expansion would lead to health coverage for more working Floridians. But Rep. Matt Hudson, a Naples Republican who is vice-chairman of the House select committee, expressed frustration with the federal government. For example, he said Washington will not allow the state to only partially expand Medicaid and still qualify for increased federal funding that has been included in the law. That was an all-ornothing offer that was presented to the state, said Hudson, who also is chairman of the House Health Care Appropriations Subcommittee.Medicaid, businesses at issue in Obamacare debate D D U D L E Y S ’ A U C T I O N 4000 S. Florida Ave., Inverness, FL (1/2 mile S. of the Fairgrounds) BE SURE TO WATCH THE WEBSITE. Absentee and phone bids always accepted. 352-637-9588. Photos on web. Personal Property sold Dudley’s Auction Ab1667. Maine-ly Real Estate BK#381384. 12% bp, 2% ca/chk discount. Announcements from the block take precedent. AUCTIONS Every Thursday: Estate Adventure auction. 800+ lots! Furniture, estate vehicles, collectibles... JAN. 15: Lien held storage units. You never know what’s inside! Lock cutting starts at 10am…(Inverness Mini Storage) JAN. 19: Signed memorabilia. Jerseys, posters, bats, SIGNED JIMI HENDRIX ALBUM. Live & Online 400+ lots! JAN. 25: Coin auction. Uncirculated, graded gold, key date morgans, proofs, MORE… Live & Online 400 lots! JAN. 26: Antique store liquidation. Florida Porch Antiques (700 block Main St. Leesburg) Great Quantity!JAN. 28: Real estate restaurant auction. 19 restaurant properties, owner retiring (4135 S. Suncoast Blvd [US 19] Homosassa)FEB. 3: Antique & Collectibles 500+ Lots!Fresh estate items, hand-picked for our monthly antique auction www.dudleysauction.com Estate Online Specialty Real Estate au2246 ab1667 One Click. Job Resources. Real Results. The Employ Florida network helped me to improve my professional skills and connected me with a training opportunity.Ž THE RESULT: Elizabeth Matthews was trained and hired by Regional Medical Center Bayonet Point. Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. T HE RE SU LT: Eliz abe th M a tth e w s w as trained and hired by Re g iona l Medical Center Ba y onet Point.ELIZABETH MATTHEWS Monitor Technician and Unit Secretary Hudson, FL R R R e e e a a a a l l l l R R R R e e e e e s s s s s u u u u l l l l l t t t t s s s s . HIRED EmployFlorida.com1-866-FLA-2345 Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Florida Department of Health € Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04 Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com ESTATE Estate of Dr. J.H. HarrisonŽ5,300 Acres … Offered DividedJefferson, Johnson, Tattnall & Washington Counties, Georgia RowellAuctions.com R c o m ,, g Thursday -:January 31st -:10:00 a.m.All Properties Selling from 3700 Baldee Rd., Bartow, GA Also Selling Late Model John Deere Equipment Sat. -:February 2nd -:10:00 a.m.In Cooperation with Weeks Farm Machinery Auction, Inc. For Complete Inventory List visit RowellAuctions.com| 800-323-8388 | 800-323-8388 Rowell Auctions, Inc. Rowell Auctions, Inc. | 800-323-8388 Rowell Auctions, Inc.10% Buyers Premium GAL AU-C002594 3,100 Acres of Cropland 1,500 Acres Irrigated2,000 Acres in Plantation Pines Timber Cruise Available3 Homes in Jefferson County Farm Headquarters which include Office, Grain Facility, Equipment Shelters & Barns Located at 3700 Baldee Rd., Bartow, GA 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING

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Page 18 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com -Janet By DAVID WHITE Ask a wine enthusiast to name his favorite value wines, and hell likely to steer you towards bottles that cost between $15 and $25 each. This makes sense … many oenophiles think nothing of dropping $25 or more on each bottle of wine. But this ignores market realities. The average bottle of wine in the United States sells for just $6.22, according to Nielsen. A full 90 percent of all wines sold cost less than $12 per bottle. Americans like to drink cheap. So a wine enthusiasts valueŽ wine is a regular wine consumers splurgeŽ wine. In 2013, resolve to splurge more often. Even if this means drinking less wine to keep your budget balanced, your palate will thank you. This isnt to say that wines costing less than, say, $10 per bottle are inevitably bad. There are plenty of satisfactory options at that price point. The shelves at stores like Trader Joes are full of such wines. But spending so little generally relegates one to mass-market brands that bene“ t from economies of scale. Spending $15-25 per bottle dramatically increases the possibility of “ nding a wine thats exciting … a wine thats both delicious and intellectually captivating. One could compare it to the difference between Olive Garden and the local Italian joint. The former is predictably adequate, offering heaping piles of salad, breadsticks, and focus-group-tested entrees. The latter is hit-or-miss, but investigating such restaurants is always exciting. And exploration -with food, wine, and so much else … is the only way to discover underappreciated gems. A few years ago, I interviewed David Denton, a well-known wine educator and sommelier in Washington, D.C. In explaining how he developed his passion for wine, Denton eloquently summarized the cerebral appeal of wine. Wine is like travel in a bottle,Ž he explained. For the cost of a bottle of wine, you can escape to somewhere exotic. You can get lost in the label, thinking about where the wine came from and who made it.Ž That sense of place … where a wine came from and who made it … is the primary reason wine is so engaging. While its possible to “ nd wines that inspire and pique curiosity for $10, its much, much easier if youre willing to spend a bit more. Once youre at the $15 to $25 price point, the number of options is virtually endless. Sure, even at $25, its nearly impossible to “ nd Champagne, Napa Valley Cabernet Sauvignon, or high-quality Pinot Noir. But if youre willing to drink bravely … to explore the unfamiliar by trying unusual grapes from unusual regions … you can sample some of the greatest wines in the world. Last weekend, for example, I enjoyed a remarkable Blaufrankisch … the signature red wine of Austria … from Anton Iby, one of the nations best producers. It was fruity, spicy, distinctive, and absolutely delicious. The cost? Just $16. Some of the best reds from Spain, Portugal, Italy, and even France can be found at similar prices. On New Years Eve, I enjoyed two sparkling wines from France … a Cremant dAlsace from Joseph P“ ster and a Cremant du Jura from Hubert Clavelin … that wowed my friends. Both bottles were purchased for just $15 per bottle. Sparkling wines from Alsace and the Jura have long offered exceptional value. With whites, the options are similarly expansive. In recent months, Ive become obsessed with a Kerner, an extremely aromatic variety that was bred in 1929 by crossing Trollinger and Riesling. One of my favorites, which retails for $17, comes from Abazzia di Novacella, a winery that was founded a whopping 850 years ago by the Augustinian order of monks. Talk about history in a bottle! So long as youre willing to spend $15-25, you can easily explore some of the most renowned whites from South Africa, France, Italy, Austria, and Germany. Early January is the perfect time to re” ect on the previous year and make resolutions for the new one. For those of us who take wine seriously … or at least want to … its smart to include wine in our New Years resolutions. The world of wine offers endless possibilities. So in 2013, make sure to explore those possibilities … and drink better! David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine (PalatePress. com). WHITES WINESDrink better in 2013 The following schools have requested newspapers for their classrooms and are in need of sponsors. This one time cost covers an entire school year. Crawfordville Elementary ..........36 classrooms/newspapers .........$576/yr Medart Elementary ...................33 classrooms/newspapers .........$528/yr Riversink Elementary ................20 classrooms/newspapers .........$320/yr Shadeville Elementary ..............40 classrooms/newspapers .........$640/yr C.O.A.S.T. Charter School ........10 classrooms/newspapers .........$160/yr Sopchoppy Education Center........................20newspapers ..........$320/yr Attention Teachers … if you are a teacher in a Wakulla County school that is not currently listed and would like The Wakulla News delivered to your classroom, please contact us today!Just $16 puts a newspaper in a classroom every week for an entire school year. To sponsor or partially sponsor a classroom in a Wakulla County school, call Tammie Bar“eld or Sherry Balchuck at (850) 926-7102, or mail your contribution to The Wakulla News Newspaper in Education Program, P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville, Florida 32326. ! Name _________________________________ Address _______________________________ City _______________________State ____Zip _________ Phone ______________Email _______________________ Your donation of $16 will sponsor a classroom for an entire school year. YES! I want to help sponsor NIE program. Enclosed is my check for _____________ to help support as many children as I can. All donations to the NIE program are tax deductible. For sponsoring The Wakulla News Newspapers in Education program. Get on the bus and help bring the most up-to-date textbook to our local classrooms by becoming a sponsor ofƒ 35% 35%A SAVINGS OF $14.00/YR $25$ 2 5 Just Just FOR FOR Marriages Anniversaries Obituaries Births School Religion Sports Classifieds Legal NoticesSubscribe Today & Stay Informed About Local:Please accept my new 1 Year subscription at the price of $25 Name Address City State Zip Phone # ( ) Email Address Credit Card __________ … __________ … __________ … __________ Exp. Send Payment to:Savings apply to NEW Wakulla County subscriptions only.P.O Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326 1-877-401-6408The Wakulla NewsExp: 01/31/2013

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 19A Aloud Apron Arrow Beams Began Breaking Carrot Curls Demand Dozen Drums Earned Entries February Fossils Later Lends Length Mends Mistakes Moods Naval Noisy Organ Pains Papered Plurals Potted Press Provide Pulled Purely Ranks Record Rented Scales This page sponsored in part by: YOUR AD HERE Scheme Shocked Solid Stray Strips Three Tornado Urban Videos Votes Years Yo-yos

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SAR002071 CLASSIFIEDADSStartingatjust$12.00aweek! Cars€RealEstate€Rentals€Employment€Services€YardSales€Announcements Todays New Ads CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 Medical Careersbegin here Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-203-3179 www .CenturaOnline.com AIRLINE CAREERSBecome an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 AIRLINES ARE HIRING -Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAAapproved program. Financial aid if qualified -Housing available CALLAviation Institute of Maintenance (866)314-3769 Nursing CareersBEGIN HERE -GET TRAINED IN MONTHS, NOT YEARS. FINANCIAL AID IF QUALIFIED. HOUSING AVAILABLE. JOB PLACEMENT ASSISTANCE. CALLCENTURAINSTITUTE (877) 206-6559 Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed Top 5% Pay & Late Model Equip Plus Benefits, New Equip & 401K Need CDLClass A Driving Exp 877-258-8782 www .ad drivers.com Driver -$0.03 Quarterly Bonus, plus $0.01 increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. Daily or weekly pay. CDL-A, 3 months current exp. (800)414-9569 www .driveknight.com DRIVER TRAINEES NEEDED NOW! Learn to drive for Schneider National! Earn $700 per week! No experience needed! Local CDLTraining. Job Ready in 15 days! (888)368-1964 DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERY WEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl TIRED OFLIVING PAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 Can Your Dig It?Ž Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-203-3179 www .Centura Online.com KENMORE WASHER $150 delivered,warranty I Buy Used Appliances I Repair All Appliances 850-745-1189 LEATHER LIVING ROOM SET, NEW, neverused„$975. CHERRY, BEDROOM SETsolid wood, new in factory boxes„$895 Original price $6500, Can Deliver. Bill (813)298-0221. Happy Jack LiquivicRecognized safe & effecitive against hook & roundworms by US Center for Ventinary Medicine.PET STOP(850) 926-7949 www.happy jackinc.com NEAR WOODVILLE3BD/2BA, SW, MH In the woods, Mobile Home, $650 mo.+ sec. Available Immediately (850) 745-8526. North Wa kulla2BR, 2BA, Central Heat & Air, City water included. No Pets$525. mo., $250 Dep. (850) 926-5326 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $475/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 Wakulla GardensSmall but nice 2/1on nice lot. Owner will carry with down payment. Rent or Own, use tax money as deposit, $575/month. + Dep. 850-524-409 0 SOPCHOPPY2 BR, 1 BA, By Owner w/ Screened Porch, on paved road, on 3 lots, lg covered shed for motor home or boat w/30amp electrical service. Psble owner finance $32,500 Owner/Broker (850) 566-4124 SHELLPOINTPanoramic view from 3rd floor deck. Studio apartment has full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6-month lease. 850-591-3306 PANACEACottage, for Rent 2/1 Close to Dickson Bay, Recently Rennovated Hardwood floors, ceiling fans throughout, W/D hook-up, covered front proch & open back deck, Small pets considered Excellent fishing! $585/month 850-926-4217 CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 NORTH WAKULLA2 BEDROOM Large porch CHA, 2 fenced acres with oak trees $650 mo + Sec. Dep.Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com 5503-0117 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Fictitious Name NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the Undersigned, Doing business as: Hungry Howies Pizza #3046 at 2000 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite D, Crawfordville, FL 32327 with a mailing address of 2000 Crawfordville Hwy, Suite D, Crawfordville, FL 32327 desiring to engage in business under a fictitious name intends to register said name with Florida Department of State, Division of Corporations, Tallahassee, Florida. DATED this 9th day of January, 2013 /s/ Ziad Kazbour January 17, 2013 5500-0117 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE WAKULLA COUNTY BOARD OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS RELOCATION OF SMITH CREEK SCHOOL HOUSE NUMBER: ITB 2013-04 Advertisement Begins: Friday, January 11, 2012 @ 8:00 a.m. Board Decisions will be available at: 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Sealed bids for ITB 2013-04, RELOCATION OF SMITH CREEK SCHOOL HOUSE will be received until 10:00 a.m. on January 25, 2013. Bids should be addressed to the Wakulla County Purchasing Office, at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, at which time all bids will be publicly opened. Bids received after the time and date specified will not be accepted and shall be returned unopened to the Bidder. Please dir ect all questions to : ADMINISTRA TIVE: Deborah DuBose, Wakulla County BOCC Phone: 850.926.9500 x 707FAX: 850.926.0940 EMail: ddubose@mywakulla.com TECHNICAL: Scott Nelson, Director, Emergency Operations Wakulla Co. Sheriffs Office, 515 Oak Street, Crawfordville, FL 32327 Office: 850.745.7200 E-Mail: snelson@WCSO.org ITB documents will be available at www.mywakulla.com or can be picked up at Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners Administrative Office at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 after 8:00 a.m. on Friday, January 11, 2013. The owner reserves the right to waive any informality or to reject any or all bids. Wakulla County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Any person with a qualified disability requiring special accommodations at the bid opening shall contact purchasing at the phone number listed above at least 5 business days prior to the event. If you are hearing or speech impaired, please contact this office by using the Florida Relay Services which can be reached at 1.800.955.8771 (TDD). The Board of County Commissioners reserves the right to reject any and all bids or accept minor irregularities in the best interest of Wakulla County. Randy Merritt, Chairman Deborah DuBose, Director, Employee Support Svcs. January 17, 2013 Page 20 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 3br 2.5ba Twnhs $850.00 mo. 3br 2.5ba Twnhs $1100.00 mo. 4br 2ba Hs. $850.00 mo. 3br 2ba DWMH $650.00 mo. 2br 1ba SWMH $475.00 mo. 1br 1ba Cottage $550.00 mo. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker WINTER 2013 GOVERNMENTAUCTION Trucks, vehicles & equipment from (10) area counties, several cities, Utilities, banks & area Sheriff Depts. SATURDAY JANUARY 19: 9AMTALLAHASSEE, FL: North Florida Fairgrounds ITEMS INCLUDE: MUCH MORE!PREVIEW: 9AM-4PM on Fri., Jan. 18 Live Online bidding with proxibidMIDWAY MACHINERY & AUCTION VICTORIAN CURVED SOFA $600 FIRM. 850-926-7060 1/2 Acre Corner in Sopchoppy. 4/2 Pool, 2 car gar. Great Condition! Reduced to $124,900 CALL LIONEL DAZEVEDO (850) 284-6961 RE-ADVERTISEMENT OF ANTICIPATED VACANCY Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net A-1PRESSURE CLEANING FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE. CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 OFFICE SPACE LEASEFOR THE BARRY BUILDING ATTHE LOG CABINCrawfordville 850-508-5471$25000/MO Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 GOT FALLIN G L E A VES? We have All the Modern Equipment to Help! Call for free quote! (850) 528-2371 or (850) 926-7461Locally Owned and Operated/Licensed and Insured e h h h h h h h h a a a a v e e A A A A A A A A A l l l l l l l l l l l th e e M M o o o o d d e e e e r r n E q q q q q q ui p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p p m m m m m m m m e n n t t to He C C C ll ll ll ll ll f f f f f f f f f f t t ! PAT GR EE N ’ S L AWN S E R V IC E Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED Selling Something? Advertise with a Classified Ad in For As Little As $12 A Week 877676-1403 Monday Saturday from 10-5 1616 Crawfordville Hwy., Suite B(850)926-6241SALE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 21 5494-0117 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE: Tuesday, January 22 3013 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 January 17, 2013 5502-0117 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE OF PUBLIC SALE Vehicle will be sold for towing and storage. Charges pursuant to F.S. 713.78 Date of Sale: 2/11/13 Time 9:00 AM Vehicle: 1994 Cadillac VIN#1G6EL12Y3RU62127 7 All sales by Hobbys Towing & Recovery 1498 Shadeville Rd Crawfordville, FL32327 850-926-7698 5498-0117 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE Towersource, on behalf of the Florida Department of Management Services Division of Telecommunications, proposes to construct a 300-foot self-supporting lattice (310-foot overall height with appurtenances) telecommunications structure. The tower would be located at 2984 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy, Wakulla County, FL 32358, Tax Parcel ID 29-3S-04W-000-00181-000. The tower is anticipated to have FAA Style E (L-864/L-865/L-810) lighting. Towersource invites comments from any interested party on the impact the proposed undertaking may have on any districts, sites, buildings, structures or objects significant in American history, archaeology, engineering, or culture that are listed or determined eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. Comments pertaining specifically to historic resources may be sent to Environmental Corporation of America, ATTN: Dina Bazzill, 1375 Union Hill Industrial Court, Suite A, Alpharetta, Georgia 30004. Ms. Bazzill can be reached at (770) 667-2040 ext. 111. Comments must be received within 30 days of the date of this notice. In addition, any interested party may also request further environmental review of the proposed action by notifying the FCC of the specific reasons that the action may have a significant impact on the quality of the human environment pursuant to 47 CFR Section 1,1307. This request must only raise environmental concerns and can be filed online using the FCC pleadings system or mailed to FCC Requests for Environmental Review, Attn: Ramon Williams, 445 12th Street SW, Washington, DC 20554 within 30 days of the date that this notice is published. Instruction for filing an online Request for Environmental Review can be found at www.fcc.gov/asr/environmentalrequest. Refer to File No. A0802051 when submitting the request and to view the specific information about the proposed action. January 17, 2013 5499-0117 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE REGISTRATION AND NOTICE TO SHOW CAUSE Pursuant to Section 98.075(2), Florida statutes, notice is given to the following person(s) to show cause why they should not be disqualified as a registered voter: David J. Gay Last known address of: 49 Sioux Trail Crawfordville, FL32327 Malaika S. Barnes Last known address of: 39 Nelson Rd. Crawfordville, FL32327 The above individual(s) is/are notified to show cause why his/her name should not be removed from the voter registration rolls. Failure to respond within 30 days of this published notice will result in a determination of ineligibility by the Supervisor of Elections and removal of your name from the statewide voter registration system. For further information and instructions, contact the Supervisor of Elections at (850) 926-7575. Henry F. Wells, Wakulla County Supervisor of Elections P. O. Box 305 Crawfordville, Florida, 32326 January 17, 2013 5492-0117 TWN Vs. Nelson, Delores Case No. 09-147-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-147-CA SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY, INC., formerly AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DELORES NELSON, etc, et vir, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an order or a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: See Exhibit AŽ at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front lobbyof the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on the 14th day of February, 2013. That any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on December 12, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK,CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Sidney E. Lewis, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 300 W. Adams Street, Suite 300 Jacksonville, Florida 32202 (904)-355-9003 #47361 Parcel I: All that certain land situate in Wakulla County,Florida: TRACT I: Commence at a point where the North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, intersects, the East right-of-way boundary of the Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee public road and thence run South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 209.00 feet for the Point of Beginning, from said Point of Beginning run South 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East 209.00 feet, thence run North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds East 209.00 feet, thence run South 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East 745.02 feet, thence run South 03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds West 361.08 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds West 1092.90 feet to the East right-of-way boundary of said public road, thence run North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary177.87 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 7.55 acres, more or less. AND TRACT II: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West. Wakulla County, Florida with the Easterly right-of-way boundary of a graded county road (Old Tallahassee and Ochlockonee Public Road) and thence run South 84 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East along said North boundary 954.02 feet to the Point of Beginning, from said Point of Beginning continue South 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East 174.92 feet to the Northeast corner of the South half of the Southeast quarter of said Section 12, thence run South 00 degrees 18 minutes 16 seconds East along the East boundary of said Section 12 a distance of 387.99 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds West 401.58 feet, thence run North 03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds East 387.07 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 3.45 acres, more or less. Parcel II: Tract I: Commence at a point where the North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida intersects the East right-of-way boundary of the Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee Public Road and thence run South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 601.15 feet for the point of beginning. From said point of Beginning run North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds East 214.28 feet, thence run South 86 degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds East 1,092.90 feet, thence run South 03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds West 200.00 feet, and thence run North 86 degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds West 1,169.82 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except that portion of the above described property lying within the following described parcel: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Townshlp 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, with the Easterly right of way boundary of a graded county road (Old Tallahassee and Ochlockonee Public Road) and thence run along said easterly right-of-way Boundary as follows: South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West 484.17 feet, South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West 60.72 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said. Point of Beginning continue South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West along said easterly right-of-way boundary 278.72 feet, thence leaving said easterly right-of-way boundary run South 72 degrees 56 minutes 50 seconds East 312.57 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds East 278.72 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 56 minutes 50 seconds West 312.57 feet to the Point of Beginning. Tract II: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 12,Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, with the easterly right-of-way boundary of a graded county road (Old Tallahassee and Ochlockonee Public Road) and thence run along said easterly right-of-way boundary as follows: South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West 484.17 feet, South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West 578.85 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said point of Beginning continue South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West along said easterly right-ofway boundary 339.90 feet to the South boundary of said Section 12,Thence leaving said easterly rightof-way boundary run north 89 degrees 41minutes 52 seconds East along the South boundary of said section 12, a distance of 672.31 feet, thence leaving said south boundary run North 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds East 339.90 feet thence run South 89 degrees 41 minutes 52 seconds West 672.31 feet to the point of beginning. Parcel III: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, with the Easterly right-of-way boundary of a county graded road known as Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee Public Road, also known as Hill Green Road and thence 5493-0117 TWN Vs. Reno, Richard Case #12-460-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #12-460-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. RICHARD W. RENO and CHARLENE C. RENO, et al ; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:RICHARD W. RENO and CHARLENE C. RENO YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action on a promissory note and to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida 5495-0124 TWN vs. Shaifer, Billy R. Case No. 65-2011-CA-000341 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION CASE NO. 65-2011-CA-000341 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, vs. BILLY R. SHAIFER, JR ET. AL.; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated December 13, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2011-CA-000341, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for CountyŽ County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP F/K/A COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, is Plaintiff, and BILLY R. SHAIFER, JR.; DEBRA L. SHAIFER; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; ALL OTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST A NAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at front lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL 32327 on the 28th day of February, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN EAST ALONG, THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER A DISTANCE OF 1548.50 FEET TO THE WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF A GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 01 DEGREES 25 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID WESTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 1540.00 FEET, THENCE RUN EAST 42.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID GRADED COUNTY ROAD WITH THE CENTERLINE OF A BRANCH FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN THENCE SOUTH 01 DEGREES 25 MINUTES EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 459.72 FEET TO A POINT OF CURVE TO THE LEFT, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 7.25 FEET, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 80 DEGREES 37 MINUTES 04 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 10.20 FEET (THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 42 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST 9.37 FEET) TO THE NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY OF ANOTHER GRADED COUNTY ROAD, THENCE RUN SOUTH 82 DEGREES 02 MINUTES 04 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY 428.27 FEET TO AN OLD IRON PIPE, THENCE LEAVING SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARY RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 27 MINUTES 28 SECONDS WEST ALONG A FENCE LINE AND AN EXTENSION THEREOF 600.45 FEET TO AN OLD IRON PIPEIN THE CENTER OF A BRANCH, THENCE RUN ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF SAID BRANCH AS FOLLOWS: SOUTH 40 DEGREES 36 MINUTES 34 SECONDS WEST 105.62 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 75 DEGREES 01 MINUTES 48 SECONDS WEST 47.80 FEET, THENCE NORTH 51 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 06 SECONDS WEST 102.59 FEET, THENCE NORTH 82 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 25 SECONDS WEST 213.32 FEET, THENCE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 39 MINUTES 18 SECONDS WEST 75.98 FEET, THENCE WEST 13.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. CONTAINING 5.25 ACRES MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH: A SINGLE WIDE MOBILE HOME ID#TW1FLH52614 AND TITLE #20975014. This property is located at the Street address of: 90 NAMON SPEARS ROAD, CROWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on December 13, 2013. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (COURT SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff:Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A. 1701 West Hillsboro Blvd, Suite 307, Deerfield Beach, FL 33442Telephone: (954) 354-3544, Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 17 & 24, 2013 5496-0124 TWN vs. Mixon, Shelby Case No. 652012CA000436CAXXXX Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 652012CA000436CAXXXX GMAC MORTGAGE, LLC Plaintiff, vs. SHELBY D. MIXON, et al Defendant(s). 5497-0124 TWN vs. LeVaughn, Tamara Case No: 65-2009-CA-000285 Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, FILE NO: F09068548 WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, vs. TAMARAL. LEVAUGHN et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated January 01, 2013 and entered in Case NO. 65-2009-CA-000285 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, is the Plaintiff and TAMARAL. LEVAUGHN; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTFOYER OF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 28th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 43 AND 44, BLOCK 4, OF LAKE ELLEN ESTATES UNIT ONE, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 44 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. A/K/A37 MONTGOMERYDRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on January 3, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F09068548 WELLSLPS-SPECFHLMC„-Team 1 -F09068548 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. January 17 & 24, 2013 NOTICE OF ACTION TO:UNKNOWN SPOUSE, HEIRS, BENEFICIARIES, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, ASSIGNEES, CREDITORS, TRUSTEES AND ALL OTHER PARTIES CLAIMING AN INTEREST BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINST THE ESTATE OF WILLIE F. MIXON, JR., DECEASED RESIDENT:Unknown LAST KNOWN ADDRESS:151 EDGEWOOD DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property located in WAKULLA County, Florida: LOT 16, EDGEWOOD, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 83 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA has been filed against you, and you are required to serve a copy to your written defenses, if any, to this action on Phelan Hallinan PLC, attorneys for plaintiff, whose address is 2727 West Cypress Creek Road, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309, and file the original with the Clerk of the Court, within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, either before February 16 or immediately thereafter, otherwise a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. This notice shall be published once a week for two consecutive weeks in The Wakulla News. DATED:December 26, 2012 Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Michelle Christensen, Deputy Clerk of the CourtCopies furnished to: Phelan Hallinan PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 Movant counsel certifies that a bona fide effort to resolve this matter on the motion noticed has been made or that, because of time consideration, such effort has not yet been made but will be made prior to the scheduled hearing. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 At least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 17 & 24, 2013 PH #33738 See Exhibit A has been filed against you and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, grantees or other claimants, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Rick A. Savage, Esq., of the Savage Law Office, PLLC, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 385, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, other a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on December 19, 2012. BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk Exhibit AŽ Begin at the Southeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to J.H. Hudson by Davis Raker, et uxby Deed dated January 10, 1938 and recorded on Page 12 of Deed Book 23 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and run East along the North boundary line of the right of way of the Crawfordville to St. Marks Public Road, also known as The Lower Bridge Road, for a distance of ninety-four (94) feet, thence run North one hundred fifty-five (155) feet, thence run West ninely-four (94) feet, thence run South one hundred fifty-five (155) feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Lying situate in Lot Seventy-seven (77) of Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida. Also described in that survey by Edwin G. Grown and Associates, Inc. Job #94-078 dated March 11, 1994 as follows: Begin at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to J.H. Hudson by Davis Raker, et ux by deed dated January 10, 1938 and recorded on Page 12 of Deed Book 23 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 72 degrees 07 minutes 09 seconds East along the Northerly right-of-way boundary of State Road S-368 a distance of 93.67 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 14 degrees 06 minutes 56 seconds West 151.01 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 75 degrees 34 minutes 17 seconds West 35.99 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 78 degrees 33 minutes 19 seconds West 57.92 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 14 degrees 15 minutes 16 seconds East 159.66 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. January 10 & 17, 2013 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 107 Wildwood 3BR/2BA with Den on one acre. Above ground pool. No smoking, pets ok w/prior approval & $250 pet fee. $1100/mo $1100 security. • 2BR/2.5 BA (2 Masters upstairs) No smoking, available March 1st. $800 mo/ $800 Security Deposit. • 26C Guinevere in Camelot. 3BR/2BA townhome, no smoking or pets. $800 mo/ $800 Security Deposit. • 4 Bedroom or 3 Bedroom with Den, 2 Bath Home located on 1 acre with above ground pool. No smoking. $1100 per month with $1100 Deposit. Call Cristy 519-9039. • 2 Bedroom and 2 1/2 bath town home. (Two master suites upstairs) $800 per month with $800 deposit. No Smoking. Call Cristy 519-9039. • 51A Dispennette3BR/2BA $750 mo/$750 Security. Pets ok with $250 fee. • 17 Cessna 3 BR/2BA TARPINE. Available end of December. $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security. No Smoking, No Pets. • 5 Susquehanna 2 BR/2BA $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets O.K. with prior approval and $250 fee. No Smoking. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit. • 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking

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Page 22A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com run Southwesterly along said right-of-way boundary the following two (2) courses: South 24 degrees 39 minutes 53 seconds West 484.11 feet. South 16 degrees 59 minutes 53 seconds West 112.56 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 86 degrees 24 minutes 44 seconds East 1153.42 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run North 03 degrees 35 minutes 16 seconds East 174.01 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261),thence run South 86 degrees 14 minutes 02 seconds East 401.38 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the East boundary of said Section 12 (as monumented), thence run South 00 degrees 17 minutes 12 seconds East along said East boundary213.75 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said East boundary run North 86 degrees 14 minutes 02 seconds West 415.82 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run North 03 degrees 35 minutes 16 seconds East 39.21 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 2.00 acres, more or less. Together with a 30.00 foot wide access easement lying 15.00 feet each side of the following described line: Commence at the Intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida with the Easterly right-of-way boundary of a county graded road known as Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee Public Road, also known as Hill Green Road and thence run Southwesterly along said right-of-way boundary the following two (2) courses: South 24 degrees 39 minutes 53 seconds West 484.11feet, South 16 degrees 59 minutes 53 seconds West 97.14 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 86 degrees 24 minutes 44 seconds East 1149.84 feet to the point of beginning. Together with 1997 Skyline MH ID#s 46610857JB & 46610857JA January 10 & 17, 2013 5480-0117 TWN Vs. Lehman, Nerissa Case #: 2012-CA-000030 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000030 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of foreclosure dated December 12, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000030 of the Circuit Court of 5481-0117 TWN vs. Donham, Thomas Case No. 65-2008-FC-000263 Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2008-FC-000263 US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FRE2, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS T. DONHAM A/K/ATHOMAS E. DONHAM et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated December 12, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000263 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FRE2 is the Plaintiff and THOMAS T. DONHAM A/K/ATHOMAS E. DONHAM; SUSAN A. LUNDQUEST; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 707.58 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 215.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 68 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 107.05 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 578.85 FEET TO THE NORTHERLYSHORE LINE OF THE OCHLOCKNEE RIVER, THENCE RUN NORTH 64 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLYSHORE LINE 110.64 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 569.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A97 PAMELAPLACE, SOPCHOPPY, FL32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on December 12, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08107224 WELLSLPS-CONV„-Team 6 -F08107224 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. January 10 & 17, 2013 5482-0117 TWN Vs. Kidwell, Joann 2012-CA-000185CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2012-CA-000185CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS. JOANN KIDWELL, ETAL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 13, 2012 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on February 28, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 for the following described property: Lots 30 and 31, of WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT #3, as per Map or Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida ALSO TO INCLUDE: 1972 24X60 Baycrest Mobile Home ID #14171AAND #14171B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. DATED: December 13, 2012. By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of the Court (SEAL) Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A., 1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this motification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 10 & 17, 2013 12-000725-F\2012-CA-000185CA\Nationstar 5501-0124 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 2/2/13 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, February 2, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Timothy White Before the sale date of Saturday, February 2, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. January 17 & 24, 2013 the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman are defendants(s), I, Clerk of Court, BRENTX. THURMOND, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT11:00 A.M. on Feburary 21, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 38, BLOCK 7Ž, OF WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT TWO (2Ž), AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of Court ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 January 10 & 17, 2013 11-237156 FC01 CHE 5485-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDTAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 015 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTEFLA INVESTMENTSthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate # 2381Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-078-013-11173-000MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK L LOT 14 DB 59 P 30 OR 628 P 121 Name in which assessedANA GARCIAsaid property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5486-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 016 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #79 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #:02-6S-03W-143-01308-B05OCHLOCKNEE RIVER ESTATES UNIT 1 BLOCK B LOT 5 OR 65 P 566 & OR 90 P 679 Name in which assessedWAYNE COOPER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this4th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5487-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 017 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #700 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #:17-3S-01E-096-05296-000TOWN OF WANETA SQUARE 9 LOT 12 Name in which assessedHEIRS OF A C WILLIAMSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5488-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 018 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #702 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #:17-3S-01E-096-05326-000TOWN OF WANETA SQUARE 21 LOT 1 OR 62 P 880 & OR 46 P 923 Name in which assessedJ.W. CATES, JOHN C. WAGNER JR & FRANCES C. WOODWARD said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this5thday of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5489-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #846 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-016-006-06445-000WAKULLA RIVER ESTATES U1 BLOCK C LOT 54 OR 14 P 284 Name in which assessedMRS TEMPLE M BROWN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th 5490-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 020 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate # 1184Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-043-010-09110-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 30 LOT 8 OR 14 P 568 Name in which assessedMRS M.A. KENT, C/O MICHAEL BIACHETL said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5491-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatED BRIMNER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate # 2468Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #:00-00-092-000-11681-0003 ACRES LOCATED IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS LOT 92 DESC AS COM AT NE CORNER OF HS LOT 101 RUN WEST 30 CHAINS 8 LINKS TO POB THEN NORTHWARD 5 CHAINS Name in which assessedROBERT ALLEN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 day of February at 10:00 A.M. Dated this5thday of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 1 14 17 20 28 33 38 44 55 64 68 71 2 29 56 3 30 49 57 4 24 39 53 21 34 45 65 5 15 18 40 50 58 6 25 51 69 72 7 22 31 46 59 8 26 41 54 66 19 42 60 9 16 27 35 47 10 23 43 52 67 70 73 11 32 48 61 12 36 62 13 37 63 ACROSS 1. Wade through mud 5. El __ (weather phenomenon) 9. Comedian Rock 14. Ballerina's garb 15. Words of confidence 16. Half of Hispaniola 17. "Topaz" author Leon 18. Once-common electronics shop gadget 20. "Iliad" sage 22. Musical talent 23. Like a broken bronc 24. Qatari, e.g. 26. Partner of red beans 28. Rarely seen brass instrument 33. Prefix with center 34. Bit of foliage 35. Casaba or Crenshaw 38. Business abbr. followed by a year 40. Winter neckwear 43. In __ straits 44. Port on the Seine 46. Narc's incurs ion 48. Front end of a bray 49. Cause to get inebriated 53. Canyon comeback 54. Pack away 55. When doubled, a penitentiary 58. MS. reviewers 60. Puts up 64. Neither sink nor swim 67. Cheer for your team 68. Get melodramatic 69. Sticky strip 70. Where Paris took Helen 71. "What's My Line?" crew 72. "Zounds!" 73. One of the IviesDOWN1. Phaser setting 2. Tackle box item 3. Mayberry tippler 4. Composer Mahler 5. Fertilizer compounds 6. Post-OR place 7. Local theater, slangily 8. Slot machine attrib ute 9. Fidel's associate 10. Sped up 11. Actress Moreno 12. Bit of news 13. Farm father 19. Chicago paper, familiarly 21. Sportscaster Hershiser 25. Bric-a-__ 27. Dot follower 28. Zig or zag 29. Lhasa __ (small dog) 30. Grinned from ear to ear 31. "It's a work __!" 32. Statesman Root 36. Creme-filled snack 37. __-do-well 39. Convention attendee 41. Cheerleaders' syllables 42. Rid of impurities 45. Big Apple inits. 47. Christian in fashion 50. "That was close!" 51. Compound of element #53 52. Of a standard keyboard layout 55. Choreography bi t 56. "__ La Douce" 57. Marquee gas 59. Dateless 61. Mrs. Dithers 62. Hammer or sickle 63. Lid malady 65. Costa __ Sol 66. Emissionswatching org. American Prole Hometown Content 1/13/2013 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 3 4532 13678 376 89 394 76 934 2795 183 200 9 HometownContent 678 1425 3 9 495738261 123569748 549 387126 287615493 361924857 756 291384 832476915 914853672 S T U N V E E R S T E P L U R E A P S O I R M A O T I S L I T U P N E O N G U S T A V D E L E G A T E O R E L N Y C D E L N I T R A T E S W H E W I C U B R A C I O D A T E N A B E O F A R T S T A G O N E A R M R A H S E P A T R I B F I L T E R E D C H E C O M D I O R H A S T E N E D Q W E R T Y R I T A E L I H U C O R A I T E M O R E O T O O L S I R E N E E R S T Y E

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 – Page 23A 1. PERSONALITIES: Who wrote the 1960s book Unsafe at Any Speed,Ž which detailed safety shortcomings in the auto industry? 2. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What color is lapis lazuli? 3. GEOGRAPHY: The Falkland Islands lie off the coast of which continent? 4. HOBBIES: What does a spelunker do? 5. U.S. STATES: What is the official nickname of the state of Illinois? 6. LANGUAGE: What does the Latin term ipso factoŽ mean? 7. ART: What is chiaroscuro? 8. CARTOONS: What is the name of Porky Pigs girlfriend? 9. SCIENCE: What kind of gases are neon and helium? 10. MOVIES: Which three comedians starred in the film comedy ¡Three Amigos!Ž Answers 1. Ralph Nader 2. Blue 3. South America 4. Explore caves 5. Land of Lincoln 6. By the fact itself 7. Use of light and shadow in artwork 8. Petunia 9. Noble gases 10. Steve Martin, Chevy Chase and Martin Short YOUR AD HERE Keep Wakulla County BeautifulLeave Nothing But Your Footprints

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January, recent warm weather in Wakulla County notwithstanding, is a month many associate with snow. News reports supply graphic details of noreasters and blizzards causing airport closures and traf“ c hazards in many cities to the north. Joyfully, snow is rare in panhandle Florida. All but the most reckless of drivers stay put when the landscape and traf“ c lines lose their features to the frosty covering. Any accumulation of the ” uffy white anomaly is a universal cause for celebration by every school child. Snow days provide a breather from the drudgery of math and grammar. Snow, however, is not the only white layer to cover portions of Wakulla County. Some residents have recently discovered bleached patches of matter with all the appearance of snow, but none of the negative or positive side effects. Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EcM) suddenly appear in clumps reminiscent of a snowfalls last remains as it melt into oblivion. Weather conditions heavily in” uence the appearance of these sometimes large fungi. This EcM fungi is quite common in disturbed soils which are near trees, especially oaks and pecans. Spores left long ago are exposed to growing conditions which promote its occasional return. Its family members include the haute cuisine morel mushrooms and truffles which are so highly prized by gourmets everywhere. It has been estimated this plants family has 20,000 to 25,000 members worldwide. It is extremely challenging for a specialist to identify these plants individually by their form and shape. Proper identi“ cation requires rigorous testing. EcM fungi play an important role for common plants containing chlorophyll, the chemical which keeps them green. This fungus is credited with improving nutrient availability by hosting bacteria which processes unavailable compounds into usable plant food. They are also thought to mediate drought effects and enhancing seedling establishment by symbiotic bacterial activity. Some EcM fungi have an affinity for mineral soils or alkaline soils, those with a pH over seven. Some soils in southern Wakulla County are alkaline and excellent candidates for growth of EcM fungi. This fungi family uses a variety of techniques to become established in new areas. The fruiting structures may appear in several locations on the plant, each having a unique advantage for distributing the spores. Some spores are distributed from above ground structures which may utilize the wind or animals as a means of spreading. Below ground structures require animals to disturb and distribute the spores on their fur or feathers. Research on this plant family is ongoing and much is yet to be learned. Genetic analysis holds the potential for many useful applications. To learn more about EcM fungi in Wakulla County, contact your UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas. u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931. Page 24 – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 17, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comEctomycorrhizal fungi can look like snowfall Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSplotches of fungi in a tilled “ eld, above. A closer look at the fungi spores, below. Thank You To Our Sponsors! 15th Annual 15th Annual Valentine Celebration & Parade Valentine Celebration & Parade SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 2013 HUDSON PARK 7:00 a.m. ........Race check-in 7:30 a.m. ........Fun Walk begins 8:00 a.m. ........5K Cupid Dash 8:00 a.m. ........Breakfast in the Park Arts & Crafts, food, games and rides open 9:00 a.m. ........Parade entries line-up and judging of entries 10:00 a.m. .......Sweetheart ParadeSpecial Guest Grand Marshall Crawfordville Native NIGEL BRADHAM Buffalo Bills Linebacker # 53 11:00 a.m. .......Entertainment begins and goes throughout the day 11:00 a.m. .......Presentation of parade entries awards 3:00 p.m. ........Ticket drawing for the $1,000 cash prize give away• Anytime Fitness • Rainbow International • Regions Contractors, Inc. • Rotary International • Saved by Grace Jewelry • Wakulla Area Times • The Wakulla News • Keep Wakulla County Beautiful • Wakulla County 4-HJam 4 Camp • Homestead Imprinted Sportsware • Big Bend Hospice • GWTC • Road ID• Walgreens 5K CUPID DASH 1 MILE FIT FOR LOVE WALK1ST ANNUAL Register for the 5K Cupid Dash, go to RACEIT.COM (raceit.com/Register/?event=17619) A FAMIL Y FRI ENDL Y DAY OF F UN AND ENT ERTAINME NT! A FAMIL Y FRI ENDL Y DAY OF F UN AND ENT ERTAINME NT! For more information email WakullaValentine@gmail.com • Ray s Kayaks & Excursions, LLC Grand Marshal Nigel Bradham Grand Marshal Nigel Bradham Law Oce Est. 1998 Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator