Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
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30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00445

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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAfter Charlie Creel was sworn-in as the newly elected sheriff of Wakulla County on Jan. 8, he quoted Albert Einstein, The world is a dangerous place to live; not because of the people who are evil, but because of the people who dont do anything about it.Ž And he added, Well, were going to do something about it.Ž Creel placed his hand on the family Bible, his wife, Cheryl, and mother, Virginia, at his side, and recited the oath of of“ ce given by Judge Jill Walker in the Wakulla County Courthouse “ lled to capacity with citizens, supporters, deputies, city and county employees and city, county and state of“ cials. Following the oath, members of the audience gave Creel a standing ovation. One woman could be heard calling out loudly, Its been a long time coming, Charlie.Ž Creel then had his mother pin the sheriffs badge on him. Im overwhelmed with everybody thats come here today,Ž Creel said. Creel was elected this past November by 54 percent of the votes, beating out Maurice Langston for the position that was held by former Sheriff David Harvey for more than 30 years. Harvey retired in 2011 and Donnie Crum was appointed to serve the end of his term. Crum retired following his service. Judge Walker said, Today truly marks a new beginning for Wakulla County.Ž Creel ran for sheriff in 2008 against Harvey, but lost by fewer than 50 votes. This has been a long election cycle and in some ways it divided our community,Ž Creel said. Its time for us to heal.Ž Creel stressed the importance of the community coming together and moving forward. He urged citizens to speak to one another and be friendly with their neighbors. Thats what I ask from you,Ž he said. Creels second-in-command, Lt. Clarence TreyŽ Morrison, was also sworn into of“ ce. Creel said he chose Morrison because he wanted someone to mirror himself. The two, who have known each other for years, exchanged a hug following the swearing in. After the ceremony, Creel invited everyone to a reception at the livestock pavilion. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 118th Year, 2nd Issue Thursday, January 10, 2013 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 5A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 6A Community .....................................................................Page 7A School .............................................................................Page 8A Outdoors ........................................................................Page 9A Water Ways ...................................................................Page 10A Sheriffs Report .............................................................Page 11A Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Green Scene ....................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Classi eds ........................................................................Page 6B Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 6B Comics .............................................................................Page 9B INDEX OBITUARIES Gerald ‘Ray’ Anderson John Dempsey Crooke Edgar Crum David Lester Dunlap II Roy Milton Largent Melvin ‘Mel’ Goffinet Richard ‘Rick’ Roland Mills Jean Worth Owen William ‘Kent’ PearsonBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentWakulla High School earned an AŽ when high school grades for 2011-12 were recently released by the Florida Department of Education. I am excited about the opportunity for our students and employees to bene“ t from the extra recognition that comes with earning this A grade,Ž said Superintendent of Schools Bobby Pearce. All of our employees need to be appreciated for the part they play in a childs learning, from the classroom teachers to the parapros, bus drivers, lunchroom workers, custodial staffs and administrators who work towards the whole school system focusing on a quality educational experience for our children.Ž High school grades are released later than school grades for elementary and middle schools. Other factors, in addition to state test scores, such as graduation rate and college entrance exams scores are included in the high school grades, so it takes several months longer for this data to be gathered and checked by the Florida Department of Education. A new grading system for high schools was used for the third year in Florida since schools began earning letter grades in 1999. Florida high school scores now derive 50 percent of their school grade from Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT) and state End of Course Exams scores in Reading, Math, Science and Writing. The other 50 percent is now comprised of the following areas: graduation rate; graduation rate for at-risk students; participation and performance in Advanced Placement and college dual enrollment courses; industry certi“ cations earned in career/technical courses; and College ReadinessŽ in reading and math, as assessed on the American College Test (ACT), and the Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT).Continued on Page 3AWakulla High School earns an ‘A’ gradeBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen the idea to eliminate the Public Service Tax was presented at a previous Wakulla County Commission meeting, Chairman Randy Merritt said it didnt seem the motion would get a second, and he was right. Commissioner Howard Kessler made a motion to reduce the tax of 7 percent on the purchase of electricity, metered or bottle gas, fuel oils and water to 5 percent and was met with silence at the Jan. 7 meeting. After not receiving a second, the motion died and Kessler seemed surprised that the commission didnt want to at least discuss the option. This tax was imposed to primarily restore the reserve funds, Kessler said. And he agreed that the county needs to build up its reserves, but not at the current rate. The citizens need tax relief,Ž Kessler said. While the other four commissioners agreed that they wanted to lower taxes, they preferred looking at decreasing the ad valorem tax, rather than the PST because of its fairness. Everyone pays the PST and there is a 500-kilowatt exemption. Kessler felt the PST was unfair because it is a charge on necessities. Merrit said the average increase in a residents utility bill is $2 to $3 a month because of the tax. He asked Kessler if he really felt people could not handle this small amount. Kessler said the entire tax package … the increase in the Communications Services Tax and the solid waste assessment and PST … was too much. That three to “ ve dollars, that may seem like a little to us, is a lot to them,Ž Kessler said. Merritt said those in the county who live on the lowest income already receive some relief. There are exemptions for the “ re and solid waste assessments, grants for rental and utility assistance, free and reduced lunches for students, etc. I dont buy the argument that we are beating down low income families,Ž Merritt said. Kessler pointed out that most of that money comes from federal and state grants and he was talking about what the county government takes from its citizens. Merritt felt even grants should be factored in to show that those people are receiving some assistance. The reality on the ground is that weve got to pay to run this government,Ž Merrit said. Kessler felt the county be able to apply for these grants, them being rewarded and majority of students in the county being on free or reduced lunch shows the reality of how tough it is for many people “ nancially. We should appreciate that some people just cant do it,Ž Kessler said.Continued on Page 3AMotion to lower utility tax fails for lack of secondCharlie Creel is Wakulla's new sheriff PHOTOS BY WILLIAM SNOWDENWakulla County Judge Jill Walker administers the oath of of“ ce to Charlie Creel as his wife and daughter look on. Creel addresses the audience and calls for healing after the divisive election. Creel with his new undersheriff, Trey Morrison.Courtroom is packed for T uesdays swearing-in ceremony What’s in the garden now – Spinach W h a t ’ s i n t h e g a r d e n n o w – S p i n a c h What’s in the garden now – SpinachSee Page 1B

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBy BETH ODONNELLAssistant SuperintendentSuperintendent Bobby Pearce recently announced the 2013 School Level Teachers of the Year … surprising the teachers with ” owers, candy and balloons, Pearce received enthusiastic responses from students as he entered each classroom to present the honor to their teacher. The eight Teachers of the Year for 2013 are Miranda Bowen representing Crawfordville Elementary; Jodie Martin for Medart Elementary; Julia Parker for Riversink Elementary; Kay Reeves for Shadeville Elementary; Charlotte McCormick for Riversprings Middle; Josh Sandgren for Wakulla Middle; and Shari Evans for Wakulla High School. Mary Fort represents all of the district professionals who serve several schools. Nominations from each schools faculty began the process in November, and then nominees submitted professional and biographical information forms for their faculties to read. Faculties then voted for their schools Teacher of the Year. Selected teachers names were concealed until Pearce visited each school on Dec. 13. Seven school sites and the district professionals who serve several schools make up the eight teachers who will represent their areas for the next year. € Miranda Bowen of Crawfordville Elementary School has her bachelors degree in Elementary Education and a masters degree in Reading, plus has endorsements in ESOL (English Speakers of Other Languages) and Gifted Studies. Bowen has been teaching for eight years and currently teaches third grade. I believe that education is not only about teaching students ideas and standards,Ž Bowen says, but also about encouraging students to question and seek knowledge in a variety of areas both in school and out.Ž Bowen demonstrates her leadership skills in many ways, including as School Improvement Chair, Grade Level Team Leader, and as member of Delta Kappa Gamma Society International for women educators. She also serves on the Reading Leadership Committee, the Data Team, and provides technology support to fellow teachers. € Jodie Martin of Medart Elementary has a bachelors degree in Elementary Education and also is certified in elementary and secondary Exceptional Student Education (ESE). She has been teaching for nine years and currently teaches “ fth grade. An effective teacher looks at each individual child and then decides where the child is and what the child needs in order to be able to learn,Ž Martin says. Martin serves as a mentor to new teachers. In addition, she is the fifth Grade Team Leader, School Improvement Vice-Chair, and serves on the Reading Leadership Team and the Textbook Adoption Committee. She also coordinates the “ fth grade SAVE (Substance Abuse and Violence Education) program that is coordinated with the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce. € Julia Parker of Riversink Elementary earned her bachelors degree in Elementary Education from Flagler College where she was a recipient of the Academic Excellence Award. Teaching should be such that what is offered is perceived as a valuable gift,Ž Parker says. Every moment I touch a childs life is a gift that keeps on giving. Students need to know that they are cherished as an individual and they can learn from their mistakes and successes.Ž Some of her involvements include First Grade Team Leader, Reading Leadership Committee, member Delta Kappa Gamma and mentor teacher. She has training in Sustainable Forests through Project Learning Tree, plus was the recipient of the Seed Pearl of PromiseŽ award given by BLAST (Big Bend Leon Association of Science Teachers). € Kay Reeves is a 20year veteran of Shadeville Elementary. She has a bachelors degree in Elementary Education and is now teaching second grade after teaching fourth grade for 19 years. From the age of 8, I knew I wanted to become a teacher,Ž Reeves says. Even as methodologies and standards have changed over the years, it has never swayed my belief that all children can learn and achieve success in some capacity.Ž She was the Fourth Grade Team Leader for seven years in Leon County and was a school level Teacher of the Year there. In addition, she is on the School Advisory Council for School Improvement, plus is on the Project Learning Tree Committee. € Charlotte McCormick is the representative for Riversprings Middle School. She holds bachelors degrees in both Elementary Education and Accounting. In addition, she earned the ESOL Endorsement, the Reading Endorsement, and certifications in Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum and Exceptional Education. In her six years of teaching middle school, she has taught Language Arts, Science, Social Studies and Reading to students in grades six, seven and eight. Outlining what she believes to be effective teaching, she says, Many students with disabilities often feel they have no educational strengths that would empower them to learn or progress beyond their current capabilities. Creating a safe and secure learning environment for every student facilitates them in becoming more self-assured in their own abilities.Ž Her leadership is shown as RMS Lead Teacher for the ESE Department, AVID (Advancement via Individual Determination) Site team member, mentor teacher and as a member of the Professional Educators Network of Florida. McCormick is also involved with CROP (the College Reach-Out Program with Tallahassee Community College), plus she tutors three days a week after school. € Josh Sandgren is the representative from Wakulla Middle School. He holds a degree in Social Studies Education grades 6-12, certi“ cation in Middle Grades Integrated Curriculum, and is pursuing his masters degree in Educational Leadership. This is his ninth year in education, and currently he teaches Math and Civics to seventh graders. A very important aspect of effective teaching and coaching is instilling selfcon“ dence in your students or players,Ž he says. If you can get your students to believe in themselves, the sky is the limit for their chance of success. As hard as I work to go over the content and standards of my subjects, I spend an equal amount of time getting to know my students and building their self-con“ dence.Ž He has served on the School Advisory Council as the Math Department Chair, and is currently a Lead Teacher. Very involved with the athletic program at WMS, he has been an assistant football coach for eight years; head girls basketball coach for nine years; assistant softball coach for three years; and was the “ rst baseball coach in the schools history, serving as head coach for three years. € Shari Evans represents Wakulla High School as their Teacher of the Year. She holds a bachelors degree in English, is certi“ ed in English grades 6-12, has the Reading Endorsement, and is certified to teach AP (Advanced Placement) Literature and Composition. She is in her 11th year in education and she teaches English to students in grades 10 and 12. Effective teaching is an ongoing process that requires constant self-re” ec-tion, evaluation and revision,Ž she says. I believe managing your classroom with a “ rm but fair hand is the “ rst step toward effective teaching, followed by the recognition of each students needs.Ž Her involvements include School Advisory Council Chair for six years; Academic Team coach for 11 years; WHS Writing Coordinator for six years; and member of the Reading Leadership Team. € Mary Fort represents the district professionals who work with children at several schools. She is certi“ ed in Elementary Education, Early Childhood Education and Specific Learning Disabilities. In her 37 years in education she has taught second graders, plus students with varying exceptionalities in grades kindergarten through eight. Currently she is the Staf“ ng Specialist for children in grades K-8. Fort observes, Effective teachers know that every moment is a teaching moment, whether it is a curriculum based moment in the classroom or a random social skills training moment.Ž She serves as a trainer of the TEACH strategies for staff who work with students with disabilities, plus is a vital member of the District RtI (Response to Intervention) Leadership Team and all the elementary school RtI Leadership Teams. Fort has helped organize the Special Olympic Games, Focus on Ability Day, plus is the liaison to Gretchen Everhart School and district private schools. These eight are now in the running for Wakulla Countys 2013 District Teacher of the Year, which will be announced at the end of January. The 2013 Wakulla County Teacher of the Year will then compete with the other 66 districts Teachers of the Year for the Florida Teacher of the Year award in the spring. All Wakulla County teachers will be honored at the Teacher of the Year Breakfast on March 15. I am proud of all of our teachers and the tireless work they do every day to make sure that every child feels valued in our school system,Ž says Pearce. They truly understand what it means to educate the whole child. That these eight were chosen by their peers to represent their schools is a tribute to them.Ž School-level Teachers of the Year are announced SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe Teachers of the Year are Miranda Bowen, Jodie Martin, Julia Parker, Kay Reeves, Charlotte McCormick, Josh Sandgren, Shari Evans and Mary Fort. Sandwiches Soft Shell CrabsGrouper ShrimpOysters Mullet We Catch itCat shHot Dogs SPECIALS! Mullet Dinners $7.99 Grouper Burgers $6.99Fried, Blackened or GrilledWe have Soft Shell CrabsHwy. 98 next to fruit stand Open Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10-7 Closed Sun & WedHuttons Seafood & More 570-1004 Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304

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PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 3ABy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Jan. 4 … With the holidays over and the “ scal cliff problem put off for a few months, drivers of public policy are turning their attention toward the 2013 legislative session. As advocacy groups prepare for a legislative cycle that for all intents and purposes begins a week from now, a handful of hot button issues has already re-emerged that will provide fodder for part-time lawmakers who will spend most of their time in the capital for the next several months. Local pension bene“ ts, fast-track foreclosures, taxes and health care reform are again expected to play prominently when lawmakers return for the 2013 session. With committee hearings gearing up a week from now, much of the process will happen before the of“ cial March start of the regular session. Gov. Rick Scott was in the thick of working on his proposed budget this week. He must turn it in to lawmakers in a couple of weeks. While major growth in revenue isnt expected, neither is a big de“ cit. Hopefully, what were doing is were solving some problems,Ž Scott said this week in an interview. As we solve problems, hopefully we dont have to spend as much money in certain areas.Ž Scott said hell suggest more money anything that creates jobs, and look to save elsewhere. For example, more money for Enterprise Florida, which recruits companies to come to Florida … and at least a little new money for education, he said Friday. Anything that doesnt give the state a return, might not make it. While school funding may be safe, a number of education issues, from battles over charter schools and protecting schools from gunmen to the funding formula for early learning and how much tuition should be, will be on the table in the coming months. HEALTH CARE Advocates were also looking ahead this week to a health care debate in the coming year. Medicaid and the states response to the Affordable Care Act have already drawn the attention of both Scott and Republican leaders. The state has been pressing to move more Medicaid patients into managed care plans, an effort that has drawn opposition from Democratic lawmakers and some patient advocates. The state Agency for Health Care Administration has been seeking approval from the federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services for more than a year and also has started the contracting process for managed-care plans that want to take part in the long-term care system. The state also is seeking approval to require the broader Medicaid population, such as low-income women and children, to enroll in managed-care plans. Lawmakers must also respond to the Affordable Care Act … better known as Obamacare …which will remain the law of the land following the November elections. Both chambers have established committees to deal exclusively with the issue. VOTING Also as the new year has begun, state of“ cials have continued the look at what went wrong on Election Day and how the voting apparatus might need to be changed, if it does. Scott said on national TV recently that early voting days need to be re-examined … hinting that he and other Republicans may have made a mistake in cutting the number of days during which people can vote. He said this week that he does want lawmakers to look at that, though he isnt ready to say how many days, exactly, is a good idea. Scott also repeated this week the assertion that the ballot may be too long … something that should be looked at, he said, as a way of reducing voting wait times. PENSIONS, LOCAL REVENUE Cities and counties this week outlined legislative agendas that focus on protecting longstanding revenue streams while seeking more ” exibility in dealing with police and “ re“ ghter pensions. Both groups are wary of changes to the states communication services tax. Originally established in 2000 as a way to consolidate taxes on a growing list of communication services, the tax generated about $1.5 billion in revenue last year, according to Department of Revenue estimates. Of that, cities and countries receive about half. Changes made last year were determined to have a year negative impact on local governments, but state economists couldnt determine what the long term economic impact would be on local collections. For many cities, increasingly expensive pensions, especially for police and firefighters, are gobbling up larger portions of cash strapped budgets. The Florida League of Cities has made pension reform its top priority for the coming year. While many cities have adequately funded pensions, some municipalities have seen their ability to fund pension bene“ ts erode as the economy went south and tax collections dipped. A study by the LeRoy Collins Institute, a Tallahasseebased think tank housed at Florida State University, reported in September that pensions for police, fire“ ghters and other special category employees grew at a much steeper rate than that of other government workers. In seven years, contributions for public safety employees grew from 28 to 41 percent. OTHER ISSUES IN THE HOPPER A bill to speed up the foreclosure process was “ led this week in the House by Rep. Kathleen Passidomo, R-Naples. At “ rst blush, the bill is a more limited version of a bill (HB 213) that passed the House last year but stalled in the Senate. This time around, the proposal jettisons some of its more controversial items, including a provision dealing with abandoned property. The new bill (HB 87) Also maps out in more speci“ city the rights and obligations following a “ nal foreclosure judgment. A handful of House bills has also been “ led dealing with tuition for Florida high school students who are American citizens but the children of undocumented immigrants. STORY OF THE WEEK: With Congress barely averting a “ scal cliffŽ by passing a last-minute deal to extend a series of tax breaks while postponing planned spending cuts, Gov. Rick Scott was working on his proposed spending plan for the state … which is required to have a balanced budget. Scott dropped a few hints, but mostly hasnt said much about what hell suggest, other than additional tax relief for businesses and more money for education.WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of week in state government)New year marks return of some perennial issuesBy JO ANN PALMERRotary PresidentPlan to attend the 15th annual Valentine Celebration and Parade on Saturday, Feb. 9, in beautiful Hudson Park in downtown Crawfordville hosted by Rotary Club of Wakulla. This years grand marshall for the parade will be NFL player Nigel Bradham, former Wakulla High School War Eagle and Florida State University Seminole who is now playing for the Buffalo Bills. A new part of this years festival is the Cupid Dash 5K at 7:30 a.m. or one-mile walk. Register online at Raceit.com. Breakfast in the Park will follow the race, beginning at 8 a.m. The Sweetheart ParadeŽ will begin at 10 a.m. The Sweetheart Parade is the premier parade in Wakulla County and Rotary will be awarding prizes for the best-decorated Valentine-themed parade ” oats, with $100 for “ rst place, $75 for second and a $50 third place prize. Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will also award a $100 cash prize for the best ” oat decorated with all recyclable materials. Registration is required to participate in the Sweetheart Parade, and forms are available by emailing wakullavalentine@gmail. com. For more information on parade participation, contact Brian English, parade chairperson, at (850) number or email wakullavalentine@gmail.com. A variety of vendors … including arts and crafts, food and concessions, non-pro“ t organizations, churches and others … will be located in Hudson Park throughout the day in hopes of providing you with the perfect gift for Valentines Day, delicious food, or some helpful information. From 11 a.m. until 3 p.m., a variety of entertainment will be take place on the stage in the pavilion. At 3 p.m., one lucky person will win a cash prize of $1,000 at Hudson Park. (Do not have to be present to win.) Applications for booth space, or to enter the parade are available by contacting Niraj Patel at 926-3737 or by emailing wakullavalentine@gmail.com. The Valentine Celebration and Parade is the annual fundraiser for Rotary. The proceeds from the event are all put back into the community. Over the past 10 years, the club has been able to donate more than $150,000 to local organizations including the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center, Habitat for Humanity, Big Bend Hospice, Wakulla County Public Library, Wakulla Academic Boosters, Wakulla Special Olympics and many others. In addition, the club conducts a Dictionary Project every year, through which every third grade student in the county receives their very own dictionary. Rotary also sponsors an Interact Club at Wakulla High School and provides academic scholarships and sends high school students to a Rotary Youth Leadership Institute in the spring. The Rotary Club meets at noon every Thursday at the Wakulla Senior Citizens Center. There is guest speaker every week, except the “ rst Thursday of each month. For more information about Rotary please contact Jo Ann Palmer at 728-2072.Rotary gearing up for annual Valentines Celebration FILE PHOTOA parade ” oat in last years Rotary Valentine Parade. The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners will hold a Public Hearing on January 22, 2013 at 5:00 p.m. in the Commission Chambers, 29 Arran Rd., Crawfordville, FL 32327 to Consider: A copy of this ordinance shall be available for inspection by the public at 3093 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327. Interested parties may appear at the Public Hearing or submit comments and be heard with respect to the proposed ordinance. If a person decides to appeal any decision made by the board, agency, or commission with respect to any matter considered at such meeting or hearing, he or she will need a record of the proceedings, and that, for such purpose, he or she may need to ensure that a verbatim record of the proceedings is made, which record includes the testimony and evidence upon which the appeal is to be based. Any handicapped, visually or hearing impaired person or any non-English speaking person needing special assistance should contact the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners’ Office at (850) 926-0919 or TDD (850) 926-1201.JANUARY 10, 2013 Wakulla High School earns an A gradeMotion to lower utility tax fails for lack of secondContinued from Page 1A Improving for 2011-12 was the WHS participation rate in students taking Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment, and Career and Technical Education courses for college credit opportunities and industry certi“ cation. When more students sign up for harder classes, usually the passing rates go down. However, WHS increased both the number of students taking advantage of college credit and career/ technical courses, and also improved the passing success rates in these courses. WHS also improved the graduation rate of students at risk of not earning a diploma. In the previous school year 2010-2011, WHS had earned more than enough points for an A,Ž but the area of at-risk students graduation rates lowered the grade to a B for not improving “ ve points or more from the previous year. With an intense afterschool program, students at risk of not graduating brought up their test scores for 2011-2012 and met the at-risk standard. Wakulla High truly is an A school,Ž said WHS Principal Mike Crouch. Its good to get some tangible validation for all the hard work done at WHS by students and staff alike on a daily basis.Ž Overall, the Wakulla County School Districts total points for all schools made for an A district rating. Wakulla County has a string of seven consecutive years as an AŽ district. Continued from Page 1A There was also concern among commissioners about doing away with the tax and not having a solution to make up for the revenue shortfall it would create. The amount the tax is anticipated to generate for 2012-13 is $951,557. Kessler felt there was a need for relief now and said the county could slow down its build up of reserves. I think its irresponsible to just cut reserves,Ž Commissioner Ralph Thomas said. I want real cuts. We need to identify the cuts “ rst.Ž Commissioner Richard Harden agreed with taking a closer look at the county budget and identifying places to cut. But he felt the commission should wait until it begins its 2013-14 budget discussion to do so. Right now, this is a crutch our county is having to lean on until we can walk again,Ž Harden said. Commissioner Jerry Moore agreed that once the reserve fund is at the level it needs to be, the commission can start lowering the ad valorem tax. During the discussion, the debate became somewhat heated between commissioners. Moore said the reason the county was broke when he became a commissioner was because of bad leadership, pointing at Kesslers time as chairman of the commission. Kessler jabbed back that the chairman doesnt make the decisions and only has one vote. He added that he voted against the majority of the budgets during those years. The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Bibles & Bingo’ performs • Year in Review: A look back at 2012 • R.H. Carter announces retirement • Retirement ceremony is held for Crum • Speechless after school shooting, talking about electoral change • Looking back at 15 years at the center • Seniors give thanks in November • OUT TO PASTOR: ‘Tis the season to be brokethewakullanews.com Follow The Wakulla News on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. readers speak out The Opinion PageEditor, The News : The Wakulla County Christian Coalition will celebrate Black History Month with a banquet on Feb. 15 at the Wakulla County Senior Citizen Center, a parade in downtown Crawfordville on Feb. 16 at 11 a.m. and activities in Hudson Park shortly afterwards. Banquet tickets will go on sale at the end of January. You may reserve tickets by calling Ruth Francis at (850) 363-9193, Hugh Taylor at (850) 926-6058, Bossie Hawkins at (850) 656-2578, Jennie Jones at (850) 9267547, or George Green at (850) 926-5165. Please contact one of the above people to participate in the parade and/or to reserve a spot for a booth at the park. All correspondence to the Wakulla County Christian Coalition should be addressed to P.O. Box 456, Crawfordville FL 32326. Thank you, Jennie Jones President Editor, The News: At the start of this new calendar year, I wanted to write a brief note to thank you, the people of Wakulla, for allowing me the chance to serve you over the past four years. It has been an honor and a privilege … an experience that I will always treasure. Thank you. I especially want to thank Mike Stewart and Lynn Artz, who served beside me for the four years. I have a great deal of respect for both of them. They are statesmen, who always put people over politics. I have observed politicians who play games and manipulations to score cheap political points. This has never been the case with my peers; they always put the prosperity and people of Wakulla “ rst. Thank you. I want to thank the people who work for our county government. Being a public employee in Wakulla is not a job that is easy or pays a lot. Over the last few years the county has signi“ cantly reduced the staff. But our employees continue to ensure that the services that we expect, as the public, are met. Thank you. I want to thank the community leaders and citizens who make Wakulla strong. There is a core group of citizens who take the lead on every initiative. More than 30,000 people live in Wakulla, but the same faces organize all of our community groups and events. Thank you. We live in a great community and we are on the cusp of major change. Our population growth has slowed, but continues. With our great school system, the job growth potential from TCCs Environmental Institute and infrastructure improvements from RESTORE Act funding, Wakulla will continue to be a community that attracts families. These next few years are full of exciting potential. I wish our new board every success, and hope that they strive to work together for our communitys prosperity, avoid the pitfalls of political games, and make the most of the coming opportunities. I have truly enjoyed serving as one of your county commissioners. Thank you. Sincerely, Alan Brock Wakulla Station Editor, The News: Ed Brimner, politician and former County Commissioner, wrote a letter in our paper titled, Frustrated with lack of plan to cut taxesŽ (Dec. 27 issue). Brimner states that present commissioner, Dr. Howard Kessler, left the board in 2010 with our county in peril because of “ nancial ineptitude.Ž Politician Brimner has a selective memory. He fails to mention that during the four years he was on the board, our county experienced its greatest growth of government, more than any other four year period of time. He doesnt mention that it was his own yesŽ votes (along with other commissioners) that contributed seriously to this problem, not the noŽ votes of Kessler! Dr. Kessler was the one who kept warning about overspending and dwindling down the reserves. In fact, he was often the odd vote out, voting noŽ on this runaway spending that caused the dire straights we “ nd ourselves in. His conservatism was often dubbed as holding back community growth or not being a team player. Brimner puts the icing on the cake when he chides Kessler for not coming up with a plan as how to cut taxes and still provide needed services. Note, I say needed services. These are far different from wanted services. There will always be wantedŽ services. A clear distinction between need and want is the path to preserving our countys “ nances. It is every commissioners duty to “ nd this path and guide the county down it, until greater prosperity is available. Brimner acts as though this is not his problem. I encourage you, Mr. Brimner, to show up at BOCC meetings and lend your expertise by addressing this issue openly. You are too quick to criticize others. Both Jenny Brock and Howard Kessler campaigned against the Public Service Utility Tax. Walking door-to-door campaigning is a big eye opener. It affords you with an understanding of the peoples problems like no other. I accompanied Jenny many days and found myself becoming extremely sober about the disparity of our communitys blessings. I clearly learned that these taxes are an added burden to many folks that simply cant afford any more. Its time to admit that these taxes should be eliminated or seriously reduced. The million dollar plus revenue stream in our 2013 budget has way overshot its target to restore reserves over a period of 10 years. It is hurting those who need our help the most in this tight economy. This tax issue is once again on the BOCCs agenda, put there by Dr. Kessler. He seems to have a passion for addressing the hard issues that everyone else is willing to duck. This is our chance to review the excessive revenue being collected. This is our chance to talk about why the funds are going into the general fund instead of a separate account, so we can monitor them. This is the time to revisit the actual dollar “ gure that is to be the goal and it is the time to decide how long it will take us to get to that goal. This is the time, gentlemen, to stand up and do the right thing, and that doesnt mean taxing the people to death! Think about it when you are discussing this issue at the next meeting. Think about it and what you promised during your campaign that got you elected and, more importantly, think about who you promised it to. Gail Hickman Wakulla County citizen Editor, The News: Like most Americans, on Friday, Dec. 14, when I learned of the deadly attack on Sandy Hooks children and teachers, I felt overwhelmed by sadness. I became disgusted by the blindness of American citizens and our government. Government operates on the whims of its people. The latest victims of American culture are 20 of our most helpless. They were shot in classrooms. Once schools were our safest places. What do we hear over the news? Blame ownership of inanimate objects: guns. And/or blame mental illness. I agree that American seems to have become a cesspool for mental illness. This latest tragedy, like so many others, has its roots in the last century. In the 1960s, the question became, Is God dead?Ž Government policies became asinine. Give birth to illegitimate children and the U.S. Government will reward you. Never mind that you dont care to parent them in a constructive way. Married couples paid IRS a penalty tax for living in a moral way. Entertainment changed. Heartwarming stories were out. Forget emotional love. From the main character always being the point of a joke, helpless people became the target for laughter: speech of the cleftlipped and the walk of the elderly. Produce violence, blood and guts. Produce pornography. The more the better. Gadgets became the vogue. Cold plastic and metal in cell phones and all manner of objects were (are) a delight. Anything but eye-to-eye contact. Watch those around you. How many out for dinner are on phones while sharing a table? As a God-loving nation we prospered. Study the Bible and the U.S. Constitution, something few lawyers and judges appear to do. Our founding fathers were afraid of both documents being ignored and our leaders falling back on their personal opinions. No wonder the United States is in deep trouble and we, its citizens, race from socialism into a more frightening ism.Ž Guns are the center of the governments attention because without an armed people, government has ALL the power. The Second Amendment was rati“ ed in 1791. It states peopleŽ … that is, the people to keep and bear ArmsŽ rather than soldierŽ as is found in the Third Amendment. Evil individuals always “ nd weapons to use … box cutters, knives, fertilizer, dynamite, gasoline, to name a few. Simple minds seek simple answers. Admittedly, I am one. Find your Bible, assuming you still have one, blow off the dust and start reading it. There you will find much-needed solutions for the problems of today. Dont believe this? That is because you havent tried it. Some of you will ask, why did you write this letter? Because to paraphrase a very wise person, For evil to triumph, it is only necessary for good people to do nothing.Ž Patsy Jones Crawfordville Editor, The News: On Monday, Jan. 7, the Board of County Commissioners had an opportunity to eliminate the Public Service Tax paid by our citizens. I am not opposed to reducing or eliminating this tax, however, I made the decision that I would not support this action, at this time. I did not make this decision because I am now against reducing taxes. I am very much in favor of reducing taxes and I am certain that I was elected because the majority of our citizens expect me to do so. As a county commissioner, I believe I have an obligation to gather and consider all of the facts before making decisions to allow me to fully understand the impact of those decisions and the cost that will be placed on our citizens. I dont think I have ever met a single person who likes to pay taxes and Im certain that no one wants their hard earned tax dollars wasted. While none of us like paying taxes, almost everyone tells me they dont mind paying their fair share.Ž I have spent a lot of time analyzing county taxes in an attempt to understand the best way to determine how much money is required for a tax payer to pay their fair share. While each of us has different ideas of county services that are important to us, I think most of us can agree that the vast majority of taxpayers dollars are spent on basic services that we all use, or have access to, when we need them. The largest source of funds that pay for these services comes from the ad-valorem tax that is assessed against our properties. Since this is the largest source of local taxes, it only makes since to look there, if we want to “ nd ways to make cuts. This is what I discovered: In Wakulla County, there are currently 23,547 nongovernment parcels that are subject to taxation. Our previous Board of County Commissioners established a millage rate for the taxes on these parcels at 8.5 mills. That means, you and I are assessed a tax of $8.50 for every $1,000 of taxable value. This tax currently generates slightly more than $8 million to the tax roll. If we divide this amount by the 23,547 parcels, its easy to see that the average parcel is generating $343 per year in ad valorem property tax. This does not include the assessment for “ re services or for garbage services. This also does not include the taxes assessed against your property by the school board. Upon further investigation, I discovered that 1,047 parcels are exempt from paying ad valorem taxes and do not contribute any money toward basic county services. There are 16,436 parcels that contribute less than the average $343 a year toward basic county services. That leaves 7,111 parcels that are currently paying more than $343 a year. Many of these citizens are paying several times the average amount. We can see from the numbers that 30 percent of property owners in Wakulla County are paying the vast majority of taxes collected in our county. Seventy percent are paying less than the average amount. Please dont misunderstand me. Im not saying that those who are paying less than average are doing anything wrong. Their property value and any exemptions they are eligible for creates this situation, based on the current system established by the State of Florida. Even though it may be legal, the fact remains that everyone has access to the same basic services and 30 percent of the population are paying the majority of the cost. Lets go back to my statement that everyone tells me they are willing to pay their fair share. I believe this statement is true and I havent found anyone who says they expect their neighbors to foot the bill for them. Given the inherent disparity that exists in our current ad valorem system, I believe that I have an obligation to apply any available tax cuts toward this system “ rst. If we cut the Public Service Tax and ignore the property tax, we are making a decision to place an additional tax burden on the backs of citizens who are already paying more than their fair share. I understand that we can never completely eliminate this disparity, but we have an obligation to the citizens of Wakulla County to minimize this unfair system of taxation. After we reduce the ad valorem tax, the Public Service Tax would then become my number one target for additional reductions. I am fully aware that I will not make everyone happy with my decisions all of the time but I do hope everyone will agree that I will always make every effort to be fair all of the time and my decisions will always be based on facts. Ralph Thomas County Commissioner, District 1It was a pleasure to serve citizens oughts on the Public Service TaxChristian Coalition to host banquet America needs to seek answers Brimner has a selective memory

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By JAMES L. SNYDER It was just before New Years and the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage and I were relaxing after a busy week of toil and labor. I had immersed myself in a favorite book. As far as I am concerned, nothing compares to a favorite book when you are trying to relax and unwind. I turned the page and happened to notice on the other side of the room my wife was all a-twitchy. I have seen this behavior before and I knew she was anxious to say something. I pretended not to notice. Finally, it was as if she exploded. I cant wait for the New Year. Arent you excited?Ž I answered in the af“ rmative to try to keep the conversation as minimal as possible. No, I mean arent you really excited about the New Year?Ž I knew if I was going to get back to my book I would have to let her say what was on her mind. According to her, the approaching New Year was going to be spectacular. We have been in this New Year for a couple of weeks now and, I will not contradict my wife, at least aloud, but this New Year looks suspiciously like the Old Year. I am not quite sure what she thought would be different this year, but to me it is just the old year run through again. And that is good with me. I am not one of these people who needs the latest ” ash in the pan. I quite prefer the tried and true. It was about two weeks after the New Year and my wife said, Ill be back in an hour or two, Im going shopping.Ž It dawned on me about 10 minutes later that the reason my wife was so excited about the New Year was that she was going to go out and buy some new clothes. I smiled as I thought about her going to the store trying on dresses, seeking one that would “ t her both in size and in fancy. As for me, I am quite comfortable in my old clothes. They fit me just “ ne, thank you. Women have to look “ ne all the time. Men, on the other hand are not that particular about what they wear. My clothing does not make me feel any younger. I go along with the saying that says you are only as old as you feel. Of course, I do have some of those Methuselah moments. Everything old was once new and if new last very long it ends up being old. Therefore, whatever is old was once new and whatever is new will one day be old. This is where most people make their mistake. They fail to see the relationship between old and new. For example, as much as our culture pretends to be youth oriented, it does everything to get old while looking young. I am not old, I am just getting older and my plans are to get older and older and older. The great object in life is to get as old as you possibly can while looking and feeling new. Nothing to me is sillier than a 40-year-old trying to act 20. If people would put the money they spend to look young in a 401(k) their golden years would truly be golden. How much money is spent each year on plastic surgery? Right after the New Years celebration, I got up one morning feeling terri“ c. There was a bounce in my step, a giggle on my tongue; I was feeling like I was 20-something. I had not felt this good since I cannot remember how long. Then it happened. My mistake was going into the bathroom. There was this ghastly object called a mirror. When I looked into it, I was shocked to see I was not alone. There in the mirror was this old guy I hardly recognized. My “ rst reaction was to ask him to leave the bathroom and then I noticed something. That person in the mirror was me! All of those exhilarating feelings dissipated as reality grabbed hold of my soul and soundly shook me. In my Bible reading that morning, I read what the apostle Paul said. And be renewed in the spirit of your minds; and that she put on the new man, which after God is created in righteousness and true holinessŽ (Ephesians 4:2324 KJV). Only God, in His wisdom, can create in me something that is truly new.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 5A Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchSopchoppy Congregational Holiness Church would like to invite everyone to join them in revival with Brother B.B. Barwick scheduled for Jan. 24-26 beginning 7 p.m. nightly. The church is located at 83 Sheldon Street in Sopchoppy. Please come join them. They look forward to meeting and worshiping with everyone there! Church BriefsPHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEmmaus Road will perform at Christian Worship CenterRevival with B.B. Barwick set at Sopchoppy Congregational The Emmaus Road Quartet will perform at the Christian Worship Center on Saturday, Jan. 12, at 7 p.m. The Emmaus Road Quartet is a progressive Southern Gospel quartet based in Dalton, Ga. They have a sound all their own with original songs written by the group, new arrangements of old favorites, and a smooth, tight harmony. The purpose of their ministry is to change lives by being living testimony to the grace of Jesus Christ. Christian Worship Center is located at 3922 Coastal Highway. For more information, contact Kenneth at (850) 556-9230Family and friends honor Mother Doris MackeySo this is what new looks likeBy ETHEL SKIPPER Family and friends honored Mother Doris Mackey on Dec. 26. Family members visiting from Maryland, Georgia, west Florida and the surrounding area included Julie and Wayne Tanner, Joseph, Natalie, Kelly, Jordan, Summer, Virginia Campbell, Dawn and LaFrances Davis, Doris, Zachary, Lori McCann, Jacob, Paul, Leah, Joey, Mary Law, Catrina Miller, Joy Jerica and Darnell Ransom. Mother Doris is a happy mother for all her family she loves so much. This is a special time for her. She had a few of her cousins attend … Robert and Charlotte Rosier from Carrabelle, Dore Rosier, Alberta Hines, Merddie and Barbry Rosier, Eva Johnson, Mary Kelly, and Mary Green. Her niece Mildred Godbolt and Mrs. May France and Mrs. Lula Cooper and Mr. David Roddenberry. Speaker Elder Andrew Morris singing with the Skipper Temple Church Choir. Mother Mackey thanks everyone and wishes you a happy and blessed New Years. Happy birthday in January to Willie M. Stevens, Earnest Andrew on Jan. 7, Mother Josephine Allen, Robert Bo Rosier, Blondie Mills Jan. 6, Jerry Ornette Jan. 14, Mother Rossette Sanders on Jan. 8, Glenda Simmon Jan. 16, Colleen Mitchell Jan. 11, Elder Kenneth Rosier. Our prayer and concern goes out to all the sick and shut-in, those in hospitals, nursing homes, prison and all in need of prayer. Let us pray for each other. Save the date: Jan. 25 and Jan. 26 for the Skipper Temple Church of Christs “ fth annual Women of Excellence Conference. Pastor is Ethel M. Skipper. BUCKHORN NEWS OUT TO PASTOR The gospel quartet Emmaus Road.

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William KentŽ Pearson, 31 of Wakulla Station, passed away Dec. 31, 2012, after a lifelong battle with multiple medical conditions. He was the son of Shawn and Penny Pearson and the brother of Carrie Pearson Harris. Born April 17, 1981, he was a lifelong resident of Wakulla Station. He was a member of Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station, and was a member of the AnimalsŽ at Florida State Baseball. Kent was a proud 2000 graduate of Wakulla High School and attended all football games, home and away. He was also an avid fan of Florida State University in all sports. He loved WWE wrestling. As much as he was a sports fan, Kent also was a fan of politics. He was a past Ambassador for the March of Dimes and was instrumental in the successful lobby of Floridas Essential Electric law for the medically necessary, with Compassion for Children. Kent also did promotions for the Shriners during the years he was a patient. Kent was the center of attention wherever he went, with the love for life that he had. He not only enjoyed life more than anyone else, he also taught all those he came in contact with how to enjoy life. Kent was proud to call among his huge number of friends, then-Jacksonville Jaguars Coach Tom Coughlin, past FSU Coach Bobby Bowden, FSU Coach Mike Martin, Virginia Tech Coach Frank Beamer, past University of Virginia Coach George Welsh, Wakulla High School football coaches J.D. Jones and Scott Klees; and Florida Governors Bob Martinez and Jeb Bush. Kent was predeceased by his great-great maternal grandmother, Carrie Myers Eubank of Amherst, Va.; his maternal great-grandfather, Harry Tucker Eubank Sr. of Amherst, Va.; his grandfather, Lawrence M. Pearson of Tallahassee; his paternal great-grandmother, Mary Wilkinson Andrews of Tallahassee; his maternal grandmother, Anne Beth Beard Eubank of Amherst, Va.; his maternal great-grandmother, Anna Tweedy Beard of Amherst, Va.; his maternal grandfather, Harry Tucker Eubank Jr. of Amherst, Va.; his maternal great-grandmother, Sallie Myers Eubank of Amherst, Va. Survivors include his parents, Shawn and Penny Pearson of Wakulla Station; his sister and brother-inlaw, Carrie Pearson Harris and Wesley Harris of Lutz; his maternal great-greataunt, Evenly Eubank Jeter of Lynchburg, Va.; his great uncle, Winston Pearson of Cyrene, Ga.; his paternal grandmother, Mary Frances Andrews Pearson of Tallahassee; his uncle, Blane Pearson and wife Sandy of Crestview; his aunt, Lauren and husband Doug Owen of Chipley; his uncle, Dana Pearson and Rose Bruce of Tallahassee; his uncle, H.T. (Tuck) Eubank III and wife Betty of Quinton Va.; uncle John P. Eubank and wife Beth of Monroe, Va.; and a great host of cousins and friends. The family received friends Friday, Jan. 4, 2013, from 6 to 8 p.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, in Crawfordville. Services were held at Wakulla United Methodist Church in Wakulla Station on Saturday, Jan. 5, 2013, at 11 a.m. Burial followed in the church cemetery. The family will receive friends and family at other times at the home of Shawn and Penny Pearson. Memorial contributions may be made to the Marzuq Shrine Temple, P.O. Box 37120, Tallahassee FL or to the Spina Bi“ da Association of America, 4590 McArthur Blvd., Suite 250, Washington, D.C. 20007.Roy Milton Largent, 56, of Brooksville, died on Jan. 2, 2013, at home surrounded by family. Service to be held at a later date; please check back with the family. He was born in Orlando on Sept. 8, 1956, and lived in Sopchoppy for a good part of his life. Survivors include his parents, Frank and Fannie Largent; two daughters, Jenny Largent and Christina Beedy; three brothers, Gene Largent (of Crawfordville), Steve Largent and Carl Largent; three sisters, Patricia Johnson, Linda Largent and Sandra Stone; and three grandchildren. Brewer and Sons Funeral Home was in charge of the arrangements. Melvin Mel Gof“ net, 90, formerly of Crawfordville, died on Christmas Day 2012, surrounded by his family in Deland. He was born Jan. 5, 1922, in Rittman, Ohio. He served in the U.S. Air Force from 1941-1945 as an aircraft mechanic. He retired from Packaging Corporation of America in 1981. Survivors include his wife, Dee; two sons Gerry Gof“ net of Franklin, Tenn., Greg Gof“ net of Stillwater, Minn., and daughter Jill Cobb Gof“ net of Orlando; six grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren. In lieu of ” owers, donations in Mels memory can be made to the Alzheimers Association. Please send condolences to his daughter Jill Cobb at interstatefreight@ yahoo.com. A memorial service will be held in Rittman, Ohio, at a later date. Jean Worth Owen, 89, died on Jan. 2, 2013, at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital in Tallahassee. He served in the U.S. Marine Corps and at one time was the commander of the Tallahassee Marine Corps Tank Unit and retired with the rank of colonel. He was a member of the Florida Bar Association for 50 years and had a private law practice. He was a member of Holy Cross Anglican Church in Tallahassee. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Lourena Owen; his five children, Isabel Owen, John Owen (Linda) of Tallahassee, Thomas (Tommy) Owen of Sopchoppy, Ronald Owen (Amber) of Dallas and Linda Douglas (Bill) of Riverview; three step-children, Kathleen Cartledge (Phillip) of Tallahassee, Janet Outlaw (Cecil) of Murfreesboro, Tenn., and Watson Frawley (Rebecca) of Ashville, N.C.; a sister, Jayne Selby of Corpus Christi, Texas; and 11 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. He was predeceased by his parents, BJ Owen and Rachel Matheny Owen; and a brother, Theron Owen. Memorial Services will be held on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2013, at 11 a.m. at Holy Cross Anglican Church, 4859 Kerry Forest Parkway in Tallahassee. In keeping with his life of giving to his community, in lieu of ” owers, wishes are that donations be made to Grace Mission and Holy Cross Anglican Church. David Lester Dunlap II, 54, died Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013, in Sopchoppy. He was born in Atlanta, and was a lifelong resident of Wakulla County. He was a Trade Specialist for the Wakulla County School System. He was a member of the Southern Cruisers. He enjoyed ” oundering and was a supporter of the Wakulla High School War Eagles. Visitation was held Sunday, Jan. 6, 2013, fat the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church, 10 Faith Avenue, in Sopchoppy. Following visitation, services were held Sunday, Jan. 6, 2013, at the Sopchoppy United Methodist Church. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, P.O. Box 1000, Memphis TN 38148-0142. Survivors include his wife, Vicki L. Dunlap of Sopchoppy; parents, David and Jean Dunlap of Sopchoppy; a son, Zack Dunlap (Bobbi) of Tallahassee; a daughter: Cornelia Wiley (John) of Port St. Joe; a brother, Jeffrey Dunlap (Cindy) of Sopchoppy; and two grandchildren, Conner Wiley and Abraham Dunlap. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, assisted the family with arrangements. Edgar Crum, 88, of Sopchoppy, died on Dec. 29, 2012. He served in the U.S. Navy in the Paci“ c during World War II. He worked for 32 years for Buckeye Cellulose Company in Perry. He was a member of the Sopchoppy Church of Christ. Survivors include his wife of 64 years, Mary Emily Crum; children, Edgar A. Crum and Mary Susan Crum Lamb; brothers, Charles William Crum, Fred Angus Crum and George Harley Crum. He was preceeded in death by his parents, George Washington Crum and Ollie Ola Crum; sisters, Ester Crum, Helen Crum and Thelma Crum. A visitation was held at West Sopchoppy Cemetery on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2013, followed by a graveside service. In lieu of ” owers, donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd, Tallahassee FL 32308. Bevis Funeral HomeHarvey Young Chapel assisted the family. (850) 9263333 www.bevisfh.com. Gerald RayŽ Anderson, 59 of Freeport, formerly of Crawfordville, died on Jan. 6, 2013, after a battle with cancer. Private funeral services will be held. Survivors include two children, William GeraldŽ Anderson and April Elizabeth Anderson; two grandchildren, William ParkerŽ Anderson and Andrea Elizabeth Anderson of Crawfordville; one brother, Donnie Anderson of Alford; one sister, Patty Dula (Bob) of Blairsville, Ga.; numerous nieces and nephews, and family and friends. Also survived by caregiver and companion, Rachelle Chemotti, and mans best friend, Dixie. He was predeceased by his parents, Annette Strickland Sasser and J.R. Sasser; and brothers, Jimmy Anderson, Danny Anderson, Jamie Sasser. Clary-Glenn Funeral Home in Freeport was in charge of arrangements. Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comObituaries Gerald ‘Ray’ Anderson John Dempsey Crooke Edgar Crum David Lester Dunlap II Roy Milton Largent Melvin ‘Mel’ Goffinet Richard ‘Rick’ Roland Mills Jean Worth Owen William ‘Kent’ PearsonJohn Dempsey Crooke lost his battle with Parkinsons disease and Myasthenia Gravis on Dec. 28, 2012, in Tallahassee. A memorial service was held Thursday, Jan. 3, 2013, at Crawfordville United Methodist Church. In lieu of ” owers, memorial contributions can be made to the Parkinsons Foundation, 1401 Centerville Road Suite 504, Tallahassee FL 32308. He was born August 12, 1943, in Dundalk, Md., to Viola Demarlien and Jack Crooke. He served in Vietnam in 1964 with the U.S. Air Force, and then received his BA from the University of Miami. He worked in various phases of computers and programming in Miami, Boone, N.C., and Greenville, SC. He was retired from the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles as a computer analyst. He was a youth leader in Royal Ambassadors and with middle school Sunday school groups. He served as a deacon at Edwards Road Baptist Church in Greenville, S.C., and was a member of Crawfordville United Methodist Church. He loved the outdoors, especially hiking and camping. Survivors include his wife of 49 years, Patricia F. Crooke; a son, John Whit“ eld Crooke II (Kimberly); two brothers, Jack Crooke of East Point, S.C., and James Crooke of Deer“ eld Beach; a sister, Linda Casper of Cleveland, Tenn.; and a sister-in-law, Sallie Crooke of Candler, N.C.; two grandchildren, Carson and Caroline Crooke; and his loving nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his parents; a sister, Anita; and a brother, Albert. Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, (850) 926-3333, www.bevisfh.com, is in charge of the arrangements. Richard RickŽ Roland Mills, 58, of Crawfordville, passed away on Jan. 4, 2013. He served as a U.S. Marine and was owner and operator of Ricks Tractor Service. Donations may be made to the American Heart Association, 2851 Remington Green, Suite C, Tallahassee FL 32308 (850878-3885) Visitation was held Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2013, from 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville. Services followed at 11 a.m. at Bevis Funeral Home, Harvey-Young Chapel, Crawfordville, with burial to follow at Woodville Cemetery in Woodville. Survivors include his wife, Debbie S. Mills of Crawfordville; children, Sarah A. Mills of Anahuac, Texas, Jamie L. Mills and “ anc Daniel J. Grant of Tallahassee, Tabitha R. Mills of Crawfordville and Sierra Tara Nichole Mills of Crawfordville; mother, Christine L. Whitney and stepfather Bruce S. Whitney of Woodville; one sister, Betty L. Mills of Tallahassee; four brothers, Roy Mills of Bainbridge, Ga., Ronald L. Mills and wife Elaine M. Mills of Tallahassee, Randall L. Mills of Havana and Johnny W. Mills of Havana; one grandchild; and nine nieces and nephews.John Dempsey Crooke WIlliam ‘Kent’ Pearson Richard ‘Rick’ Roland Mills Gerald ‘Ray’ Anderson Edgar Crum David Lester Dunlap II Roy Milton Largent Melvin ‘Mel’ Gof net Jean Worth Owen LOG HOME KIT QUICK SALE A MUST!!! PERSONAL FINANCIAL PROBLEMS Purchased from American Log Homes (No! I am not a salesman) Model # 101 Carolina with Building Blueprints, Construction Manual & FREE DELIVERY (NO!! Windows, Doors & Roo“ng ARE NOT Incl) PAID $38,940 MUST HAVE $16,000 ** NO TIME LIMIT ON DELIVERY **view at www.thegreatamericanlogco.com **Ready Buyer Only Reply** Call Jim at 704-815-3717 Have RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS and tried everything? A local research study may offer free investigational rheumatoid arthritis medication. Compensation up to $1200 Call: 866-644-5462or visit www.RAtrial.com 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 7Ahappenings Community 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. 4-H Citrus Project distributes 500 bags of fruitBy SHERRI KRAEFTWakulla County 4-H AgentOn Saturday, Dec. 15, approximately 72 District III 4-H Council members, 4-H youth, friends, Wakulla Rotary members, club leaders and volunteers helped to clean, organize and bag 500 bags of citrus, apples and mints for the annual Wakulla County 4-H Community Citrus Project. After 4-H members and volunteers wiped and dried the fruit, they paired off and bagged each gift by including an apple, several mints and a personalized greeting card. Completed bags were then distributed around the room to “ ll the requests for donations to the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Meals-on-Wheels program, Wakulla County Coalition for Youths Operation Santa, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church, Big Bend Hospice of Wakulla and Franklin Counties, First Methodist Food Bank, Celebration Baptist Church and various Wakulla County food pantries. When all bags are distributed, approximately 400 families and 1,400 individuals will be potentially reached by this project. This is the seventh annual project and it is exciting that it continues to grow each year. One 4-H member of the Medart Green Team, Chase Thornton said that he liked being responsible and helping others through this project. Several other members indicated that this is one of their favorite 4-H activities and that they look forward to participating every year. As in previous years, the citrus was donated by the Mid-Florida Citrus Foundation. This year, they graciously agreed to double the amount of fruit from previous years to a total of 2,000 pounds. Apples were donated by the Crawfordville WinnDixie and mint candies were donated by the Crawfordville Sonic. In addition to in-kind donations, this year, the District III 4-H Council applied for a Community Pride Grant through the Florida 4-H Foundation to support this project with a $250 monetary grant. This grant is funded by the Chevron Corporation and is awarded every year to worthwhile projects. The Wakulla County 4-H program has received this grant for six of the last seven years to support and expand this project. Wakulla County 4-H and the District III 4-H Council would like to thank the following individuals and businesses for their generous contributions to this project: Chevron Corporation, the Florida 4-H Foundation, Winn Dixie, Sonic, the Mid-Florida Citrus Foundation managers Mickey Page and Bob Reaser, Jo Ann and Woody Palmer, Rotary of Wakulla and the Heller Brothers Packing Company. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSMember of 4-H and volunteers help bag and distribute fresh citrus to give out to various organizations around the county. ree generations of volunteering at the Salvation Army Special To The NewsThe Salvation Army was originally named The Volunteer Army.Ž That still holds true today. To be effective, they count on volunteers. The McMillan family has been one of their main supporters. Three generations help the ministry. Pictured: Tanya Jones, development coordinator for the Salvation Army, Finley McMillan, Captain Julio Da Silva, commanding officer, Captain Luci Da Silva, Diamond Teague, Stalena McMillan Teague and Jean McMillan. Special to The NewsThe riders at Ace High Stables ended the 2012 Southern Hunter Jumper Association show season with a bang. They brought home champion or reserve champion in 23 categories. Some of the most prestigious awards present at the annual banquet on Dec. 7, went to Kayla Rossetti, who not only won overall short stirrup, but was chosen to receive the Lawson May“ eld Memorial award for sportsmanship. Tory Russell rode AH Thief of Hearts to the high point pony of the year award, as well as childrens Pony Hunter Champion and also won the Hopeful Jumper and SHJA Mini Medal Championship on AH Confetti. Other 2012 winners include Kai Wagner, Chloe Wagner, Kennedy Davis, KarieJane Pearson, Tyler Vickers, Kourtnee Vickers, Destiny Stephens, Abby Jameson and of course apprentice instructor Bethany Haucke, who won Baby Green Hunter Champion with AH Little Red Ferrari. I am extremely proud of all my students and ponies, and am looking forward to 2013 show season,Ž said Gay Allen, riding instructor at Ace High Stables. We have new Wakulla riders joining our team, Faith Joiner, Hannah Mckenzie and Shyanne Brown. It will be a challenge to repeat this years accomplishments but I am blessed with a group of dedicated riders and wonderful ponies an horses. It should be fun.ŽRider have a successful year Carson Stanley III graduates Carson R. Stanley III (C.J.) graduated from the U.S. Navy boot camp on Dec. 12. He is a 2012 graduate from Wakulla High School. His parents are Carson and Charlotte Stanley of St. Marks. At left, Carson Stanley III Lecture at Gulf Specimen on Jan. 15Special to The NewsAnna White Hodges will be lecturing at Gulf Specimen Marine Laboratory at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 15. She is a talented entertainer and a passionate advocate for the rights of commercial “ shermen. Her talk will cover the history of aquaculture in Cedar Key, how it originally evolved from people trying to culture oysters into a full blown clam industry. While commercial “ shing with nets has been in their families for generations, she and her husband have made the transition from net “ shing to farming the sea and are part of the growing aquaculture industry that is coming to the Florida panhandle. She is the labs “ rst aquaculture entertainer, equipped with guitar, songs and stories. Start working out NOW! CALL TODAY! LET US MAKE YOURGena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 Fitness Resolutiona Reality 926-2200 Ross E. Tucker, CLURegistered Health UnderwriterTucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.Neither Tucker Life-Health nor Ross Tucker is connected with the Federal Medicare program. This is an advertisement for inuranc e. I understand by calling the number above I will be reaching a licensed insurance agent. Get a Better Medicare Plan Now!You may save money and/or gain benefits! Call today to see if you qualify.Use a Special Election Period to Hair Place That Full Service Hair Salon850-926-602027 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA!Cuts • Color • F acial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • F lat T ops F eather Locks • Color • P erms • Highlights MirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171&, ce Hair Salon e H lo Hai alo ir Sa c e ce a l o on o on on n y n Sa t 020 M a vi s s Ap pt On n l ly 962217 7 71 & F STYLES FOR MEN & WOMEN

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools School special holiday deadline: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Deadlines News: NOON TUE January 22th for all items faxed, mailed or delivered. Advertising: NOON THUR January 17th for all ads requiring proof. 4 p.m. THUR January 17th for all legal notices. 10 a.m. FRI January 18th for Classi“ed Ads. NOON FRI January 18th for all other advertising. Experts predict that within 100 years, natural lands and water resources will become scarce. Climate change will irreversibly alter the planet. And the habitats that support all life could be lost forever. Support our mission to protect the future of our natural world. To make a difference that lasts, join The Nature Conservancy. Log onto www.nature.org today or call (800) 842-8905.Little Tupper Lake in New Yorks Adirondack State Park. The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Gia Liberto wins Lions Club poster contest SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCrawfordville Lions Club Member Marc Dickieson presents students with certi“ cate of appreciation for participation in poster contest. Special to The NewsCrawfordville Lions Club and Riversprings Middle School collaborated in this years poster contest titled, Imagine Peace. Thirty-nine seventh graders created their rendition based on this theme. Lions Club Member Marc Dickieson presented each student a Certi“ cate of Appreciation for their participation. Students that placed received a monetary award and Certi“ cate of Achievement. First place and $50 went to Gia Liberto. Kallie Brand received second place and $35 and third place and $25 went to Alyssa Cacciatore. Sydney Colvin received fourth place and $15. Gias poster will continue to the district level of competition. The Crawfordville Lions Club and Riversprings Middle School look forward to working together next year.Special to The NewsKnowledge Tree Academy, 3240 Crawfordville Highway, has announced its participation in the U.S. Department of Agricultures Child Care Food Program, a federally funded program that reimburses child care providers for serving nutritious meals and snacks to enrolled, eligible children. Meals will be available at no separate charge to all participants. Parents and guardians of children eligible for free and reduced-price meals must complete an application. Eligibility information includes the names of all household members; income of each household member or household members Food Assistance Program case number or Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) case number; signature of an adult household member; and last four digits of the social security number of the adult household member signing the application or an indication that this adult does not have a SSN. Children who are members of households receiving Food Assistance Program or TANF bene“ ts, children enrolled in Head Start or Early Head Start, and foster children are automatically eligible to receive free meal bene“ ts with appropriate documentation. Children from families whose income is at or below certain levels are eligible for free or reduced-price meals.Special to The NewsThe Wakulla Middle School band had a busy fall semester. The program of 175 members performed at many places around the county and also for the middle school student body. The sixth grade band had their premier performance in November and showed that they have great talent and potential for their musical future. They played an evening concert for family and friends at the middle school and then entertained the residents at Eden Springs Nursing and Rehab Center on a “ eld trip performance. The seventh grade band performed with the eighth grade band for the school pep rally in October and also for the game against Riversprings Middle School. They had fun and showed great school spirit in their performance. Along with the eighth grade band and jazz band, they performed their winter concert for the student body during two daytime concerts and then an evening concert for their family members and friends. They also entertained the preschool children at the Sopchoppy Education Center in December with many holiday tunes. The eighth grade band played several patriotic selections for the school Veterans Day assembly in November. In addition to their performances already mentioned, the eighth grade band also performed with the high school band along with Riversprings band members at one of the high school games. They also played a concert of holiday music for the Wakulla County Senior Center. Several individuals of the Wakulla Middle School band program have received special honors this semester. Seventh graders, Zach Boone and Sam Picard and eighth graders Kayla Taff and Rafel Fortier were selected by audition to participate in District Middle School Honor Band which will be presenting their concert at Chilies High School on Jan. 26. Rafel Fortier was also selected to participate in the All-State Honor Band in Tampa on Jan. 12. Band Director, Laura Hudson would like to thank Florida A&M University intern, Jennifer Theisen, for helping to make the fall semester such a great success. The bands are looking forward to many exciting performances and “ eld trips during the spring semester. Special to The NewsEight Wakulla County High School senior football players will play in the Jan. 12 Florida-Georgia War of the Border All-Star game. Kickoff is scheduled for 2 p.m. at Tom White Field at Mack Tharpe Stadium at Colquitt County High in Moultrie, Ga. Admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children. Representing Wakulla will be Caleb Brown, John Chunn, Demetrius Lindsey, Kevin James, Fred Cummings, Dequon Simmons, Dalton Nichols and Brett Buckridge. Mike Coe of Madison County High will be the Florida coach. The Florida roster lists 72 players who come from the Tallahassee-North Florida area, including Jefferson County, Wakulla, East Gadsden, Madison County, Godby, Chiles, Rickards, Lincoln, North Florida Christian, Vernon, Liberty County, Florida, Taylor County, FAMU, Munroe, Aucilla Christian, Maclay, Leon and John Paul II high schools. Student artwork is on display at several locations around the county until May 2013. COURTHOUSE: Shadeville Elementary … Dean Daniels Wakulla High School … Keirsten Simmons, Loki Eikeland, Katherine Newell Wakulla Middle School … Kalliope Smid, Yazmin James, Shelby Weeks, Zac Boone Riversprings Middle School … Caleb Harper, Chase Grubbs COAST … Savannah Bishop, Erica Odom, Saydie Locatelli, Gabe Clewis, Savannah Kennedy Crawfordville Elementary School … Abbi Hoover, Aubrey Willis, Trey Teuten, Nailah Core, Gracie Osborne, Kaylee Graham, Diane Hale, Mackenzie Dunn, Travis, Clark, Aidan Tucker, Caleb Joiner, Sienna Guarino, Anna Pedler PUBLIC LIBRARY: COAST … Tony Wilkes WMS … Allyson Davis RMS … Shelby Smith, Lacie Blackburn, Sydney Colvin SES … Emily Hughes WHS … Olivia Simpson SENIOR CENTER: RMS … Ben Simpson COAST …Madison Fountain WHS … Brandy Yates CES …Halle Metcalf WMS … Taryn P“ ster CENTENNIAL/ST. MARKS: SES … Avery Duncan RMS … Lacie Blackburn CENTENNIAL/CRAWFORDVILLE WMS … Mason Johnston, Era Taff CES … Shae Cort, Matt Cason, Peyton Forbes, Colby Zinser, Spencer Carmichael COAST … Eric Levingston RMS …Josh Isman, John Coleman WHS … Ethan Byrd SES … Zoie Hill SCHOOL BOARD OFFICE: SES …Paige Ward WHS … Melanie Eskelund COAST … Patrick Allshouse WMS … Rian Diehl Wakulla Middle School band has great fall semesterFree and reduced lunch now o ered at Knowledge Tree War of the Border All-Star game is this Saturday Student artwork on display

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Well, 2012 has come and gone and we are in our second week of 2013. I hope you had a safe and Happy New Year and that 2013 is very prosperous. Hopefully youll get to “ sh more and catch more and bigger “ sh. I havent talked to a lot of folks who have been “ shing but those I have talked to have done fairly well. Capt. David Fife was back from Panama City between Christmas and New Years and had two very good days in Spring Creek. One morning when it was overcast they got their limit of nice trout using top water baits and then the next day the sun was out and the only thing they would hit was sinking MirrOLures but they did manage their limit. Mike Pearson, a neighbor from Shell Point, called me the other day and I told him I would either go to the Aucilla or the Econ“ na. Since he didnt know the Aucilla and had “ shed the Econ“ na quite a bit, he and a buddy went down there last Thursday and Friday. On Thursday they ended up with nine trout which they caught around the creek mouths and on Friday got their limit “ shing MirrOLures at the mouth of the river. He said they also caught quite a few small trout. Mike said the water was tannic stained which made the “ sh not so spooky. JR at the Aucilla said the river still has plenty of trout and reds and the creeks are still producing plenty of trout and reds. Use live bait, Gulp, Rattlin-Red“ n and chartreuse curly tails for the best results. Things change from day-to-day this time of year so I would give JR a call before I went all the way down there. I had a few charters right around Christmas and the only thing I could catch were rock bass, but they were the biggest rock bass I have ever caught. We used a 4-inch glow Gulp around rock piles in about 20 feet of water. It was non-stop action for 4 hours and on light tackle those guys pull pretty hard, especially the big ones. Besides that, there probably isnt a better tasting “ sh out there. On one of the trips Bill caught a 40inch red. Typically those big reds will come up to the top but this one stayed down. For 25 minutes we didnt know what we had on but I couldnt imagine anything else that it could have been. I asked if that was the biggest he had ever caught and he said it was on a light-spinning rod. He said he did have a citation for one he caught years ago in North Carolina that weighed 58 pounds. Now I dont believe the rods I use would land one that big. One of the “ sh that people dont know a whole lot about and havent done a bunch of studies on are Cynoscion nebulosus, or speckled sea trout. They are caught from Cape Cod, Mass., to southern Florida and throughout the entire Gulf of Mexico. The world record, which was caught in Florida, weighed 17.5 pounds. In our area they will typically spawn from April through September. Males reach maturity at approximately 2 years of age and between 7.9 and 9.4 inches, which is the standard length for that size “ sh. Females mature at 3 years of age at 8.3 to 9.8 inches. Spawning activity is controlled primarily by temperature and salinity. The expected life span is 8 to 10 years. I had always been told that trout dont travel far from where they are hatched but a study in Texas with tagged “ sh had proved one traveled 69 miles from the time it was caught and tagged and caught the second time. In 1990 a study was done in Texas which showed the survival rate of hooked and released “ sh to average 82.5 percent depending on what type of hook was used. In 1990, Georgia did a study and they showed a rate of 63.8 percent and Texas showed a survival rate of 73 percent on a study done in 1984. I believe water temperature has a lot to do with survival rate plus how they are hooked. My New Years hope is that the smallest “ sh you catch is 2013 will be bigger than the biggest “ sh you caught in 2012. Good luck and good “ shing! www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 9Aoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsFrom FWC NewsThis report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of Dec. 31 to Jan. 3. It does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. WAKULLA COUNTY: Officers Jason Carroll and Steven Cook were working duck hunters. The of“ cers located three subjects hunting wood ducks on a private pond. At the conclusion of the hunt, a resource inspection was conducted. The three hunters were found to be in possession of 15 wood ducks. The hunters were issued citations for possessing over the bag limit of wood ducks. LEON COUNTY: Officer Chris Jones received a complaint from dispatch that two individuals were hunting over bait in a management area. Of“ cer Jones responded and located two individuals leaving the area in question. Of“ cer Jones stopped and talked to the subjects briefly and was able to determine there was untagged deer meat in a cooler in the truck bed. Of“ cer Jones identi“ ed himself and issued a citation for the violation. OKALOOSA COUNTY: Of“ cer Philip Grif“ th checked two subjects in the Yellow River WMA after he heard a shot in a wooded area near where they were parked. One of the subjects stated he shot at a hog but missed. When the subjects exited the management area, Of“ cer Griffith searched where the subjects were hunting and located a small freshly killed antlerless deer. Lt. Mark Hollinhead responded to assist Officer Griffith in locating the subjects to question them about the deer. When one of the subjects learned he was being looked at for questioning, he contacted Of“ cer Grif“ th and admitted to shooting the deer. The subject was charged with taking an antlerless deer in a management area. € Lt. Keith Clark and NOAA Enforcement Of“ cer Grant Demesillo conducted a commercial “ sheries inspection on a local vessel in Destin Harbor. During the inspection, they observed two strips of red snapper “ llets being used as bait on “ sh hooks. With consent of the vessel operator, Lieutenant Clark inspected coolers along the deck of the vessel. The inspection revealed a plastic bag in a cooler buried under ice that contained 26 gray trigger“ sh “ llets. The commercial harvest of gray trigger“ sh is closed. Both violations were turned over to NOAA for law enforcement action. € Lt. Keith Clark and Investigator Ryan Nelson conducted a fisheries inspection on a local charter vessel in Destin Harbor. They observed the vessel landing at a local marina and of” oading eight greater amberjack. The officers made contact with the owner/operator of the vessel and con“ rmed the vessel was hired as a charter boat. An inspection of the charter vessel license revealed the license had expired August 2012. Investigator Nelson issued the owner/operator a citation for an expired charter vessel license. € Of“ cer Alan Kirchinger received a call after dark from a complainant who stated someone had just shot behind their house. The complainant then stated they saw a green truck leave the area. Of“ cer Kirchinger responded, located the vehicle and approached the suspects. Of“ cer Kirchinger observed a freshly killed doe in the back of the truck. After interviewing the subjects, they both admitted the doe was shot at least 30 minutes after legal shooting hours. They also said the only way they could see the deer was by the use of a pole light located on the neighboring property. The subject who admitted shooting the deer was cited, and his gun was seized. The deer was seized and donated to an approved charity. WALTON COUNTY: Officer Randall Brooks conducted surveillance along a roadway and “ eld after receiving complaints of night hunting in the area. After hours of watching the “ eld, Of“ cer Brooks observed a vehicle driving slowly while displaying a light in a manner capable of disclosing the presence of deer. When the vehicle was stopped, the driver attempted to conceal a loaded ri” e in the back seat. The driver admitted to looking for deer. The ri” e and spotlight were seized, and the driver was charged with attempting to take deer with a gun and light at night. € Of“ cer Randall Brooks was on patrol at night along the Holmes/Walton County line when he observed two subjects on an ATV parked on the shoulder of the road. Of“ cer Brooks observed a spotlight attached to the ATV and the subjects shuf” ing around in a manner as if they were trying to conceal something. Of“ cer Brooks made contact with the subjects and determined they were several miles from their residence. When Of“ cer Brooks asked if they had any “ rearms, one of them stated he was not supposed to be in possession of any firearms. A short time later, Of“ cer Brooks observed two “ rearms on the ground near the rear tires of the ATV. Both subjects admitted the firearms were theirs and that they tried concealing them. A records check determined one of the subjects was a convicted felon. Charges for possession of a “ rearm by a convicted felon will be direct filed with the State Attorneys Of“ ce. Both “ rearms were seized as evidence. € Lt. Mark Hollinhead responded to a dog running complaint after a landowner caught two dogs pursuing deer on his property. The dog collars revealed the owners information. Lieutenant Hollinhead took possession of the dogs and located the owner. An interview with the owner determined the dogs were permitted for an adjoining tract of property. The owner was issued a written warning for allowing dogs to pursue deer on private property where they were not permitted. BAY COUNTY: Officer Mike Nobles received information concerning bait in the Econ“ na WMA and the bait and stand were located. Of“ cers Nobles, Steve Wicker, Nick Price, and Lt. Jay Chesser began monitoring the area. After several days, a hunter was found in the stand and was cited for hunting over bait and no hunting license. He also was issued written warnings for no management area permit, no deer permit, no hunter orange, littering, and not having completed the hunter education course. € An FWC employee encountered a subject at a convenience store who tried to sell him a bag of untagged oysters. He reported the incident and watched as the subject bounced between two convenience stores attempting to sell oysters. Of“ cer Nick Price arrived and found the subject to be a commercial oysterman. Citations for no saltwater retail license and failure to deliver shell stock directly to a dealer were issued and the oysters were seized. Of“ cers Dennis Palmer and Nick Price encountered two subjects parked along the roadway acting suspicious. Inside the vehicle were a handheld spotlight and a high powered ri” e with a shell in the chamber. A dog could be heard trailing game in the woods adjacent to the area. The subjects said they werent night hunting, but just dumping a dogŽ because they didnt want it anymore. Both were charged with allowing a dog to pursue game on private property and were advised to catch their dog.Plenty of trout, reds in the Aucilla From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL FWC Law Enforcement ReportFrom FWC NewsRecreational and commercial blue crab harvesters in certain areas of the Panhandle must remove their blue crab traps from the water before Jan. 5, the “ rst day of a 10-day trap closure. This closure will give groups authorized by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission the opportunity to identify and retrieve lost and abandoned blue crab traps from the water. The January trap closure includes state waters from the Florida/Alabama state line through the Franklin/ Wakulla county line. Waters of the Ochlockonee River and Bay are not included in this closure. Traps can be placed back in the water Jan. 15. Until then, blue crabs may be harvested with other gear, such as dip nets and fold-up traps. Blue crab harvesters may also use standard blue crab traps during the closure if the traps are attached to a dock or other private property. Lost and abandoned blue crab traps are a problem in the blue crab “ shery, because they can continue to trap crabs and “ sh when left in the water. They can also be unsightly in the marine environment, damage sensitive habitats and pose navigational hazards to boaters on the water. The closure is one of three regional, 10-day blue crab trap closures that will occur in 2013 on the Gulf coast of Florida. Coastal waters from Broward through Pasco counties will close to traps July 10-19, and waters from Hernando through Wakulla counties, including all waters of the Ochlockonee River and Bay, will close to traps July 2029. There are six regional closures total: three in evennumbered years on the east coast and three in oddnumbered years on the west coastBlue crab trap closure underway in west Panhandle www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLCDAILY LUNCH SPECIALS $8.99 (INCLUDES TEA)850-925-STMK (7865)OPEN 11 AM 9 PM Tuesdays thru Saturdays CLOSED Sundays & Mondays785 Port Leon Drive (next to post of“ce)Seafood ~ Angus Steaks ~ Burgers ~ Chicken Oysters on the 1/2 shell (shucked to order) ASHLEY FEED STORE 8056 WAKULLA SPRINGS ROAD for more info call (850) 421-7703OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK FROM 9 A.M. 6 P.M.Professional Veterinary Services for Dogs and Horses offered by Dr. Wallace Randell, DVMVET DAY & RABIES CLINICRabies shots and other vaccinations available for Horses, Dogs and Cats plus other services all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comOn Saturday, members of Flotilla 12 came together for the “ rst meeting of 2013. We had a great turnout with more than 20 members and nine visitors. It was great to have such a packed room! We were lucky to have welcomed Lt. Krystyn Pecora as one of our visitors. Lt. Pecora is attending graduate school at Florida State University. A graduate of the Coast Guard Academy, she served at several stations before returning to school. It was very interesting when she discussed her working with the Auxiliary during her career as a very important asset to the Coast Guard. The Coast Guard is a smaller force than the New York Police Department and has an annual budget equal to the cost of one week of operations on an aircraft carrier without ” ights. She stressed that the Coast Guard could not do everything they do without the dedication and support of the Auxiliary. Past Flotilla commander Bob Asztalos discussed his appreciation for staff of“ cers and membership in making 2012 a great year for the Flotilla. As a thanks for his appreciation, he presented all staff of“ cers with a challenge coin from the Coast Guard Auxiliary. Terry Hoxworth discussed the signi“ cance of the coin. Before coins were used, it was tradition to have a button with insignia. There are several versions of the beginning of the tradition of a coin, however, the most accepted was that the coin originated during the First World War where a pilot presented his squadronmates with a small bronze coin with the units insignia. One of the pilots placed the coin in a pouch he wore around his neck. When this pilot was captured and mistaken as a saboteur, he had no identifying information, only the coin around his neck. After being set for execution, a Frenchman recognized the insignia and his life was spared. In modern times, coins are a very valued tradition in the military. Terry discussed that it is not uncommon for another service member to approach him and throw down the coin and issue a challenge. If the one being challenged does not show his coin, it is his responsibility to buy the challenger a drink. However, if the challenge is met, then the challenger has to buy the drinks. As he “ nished the explanation, Terry showed all of us his coin from the Marines. The incoming elected of“ cers, Flotilla Commander Duane Treadon and Flotilla Vice Commander Norma Hill, along with all the Staff Of“ cers for 2013, were administered the oath of of“ ce by Lt. Pecora. It was an honor to have someone from the active duty present! After all the business was complete, Bill Wannall, former Flotilla vice commander, presented the annual Gilbert Champion Award. This is traditionally done in December, however last year that was not possible. Gilbert Champion Award is an annual award established in 2005 by Flotilla 12 in remembrance of two founding members, Don Gilbert and John Champion. Both men were dedicated auxiliarists and exempli“ ed what it means to be a member of the United States Coast Guard Auxiliary. This annual award is presented to one member who meets the following criteria: The member must be in good standing and have been active in ” otilla activities throughout the year. The auxiliarists must also exemplify the four cornerstones of Member Service, Recreational Boating Safety, Operations and Marine Safety and Fellowship. These activities may include but are not limited to public education, public affairs, operations, personnel services, fellowship, division/district activities, vessel examinations, recreational boating safety, marine science and recruiting. Additionally, such a member promotes Auxiliary to the general public through recruitment, assisting when called upon by active duty and other community organizations and seeking opportunities to promote the missions of the U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary. Finally, this member also continuously pursues advancement in not only his/her personal skills and training, but also those of their fellow auxiliarists. Past recipients are Mark Rosen, Chuck Hickman, Carolyn Treadon, Tim Ashley, Bill Wannall and John Denmark. Following, Gary and Christy Owens were administered the oath of membership by Lt. Pecora. Welcome to the Flotilla, Gary and Christy! And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Sign up for our upcoming ABS Class on Jan. 26 to make sure you are not a part of the statistics. If you are interested in attending this class or one of our future classes please contact our public education staff officer at FSOPE@uscgaux.net or check out our website at www. uscgaux.net.a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water WaysCoast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies An Underwater Look Forward in Wakulla County Last week I attended the Beachwood 31st annual New Years Eve party at the Livingstons residence. There, amongst our friends and neighbors, we typically review what has happened during the last year. This year the continued increase in home foreclosures, loss of jobs and general economic strife was distressing. Some are solidifying their resources while others are just leaving town for greener pastures. One dive shop in Tallahassee went out of business a week ago, and the other has branched out away from diving into archery. Our efforts to open Wakulla Springs State Park to quali“ ed recreational diving was defeated. Indian Springs (next to Wakulla Springs), owned and operated by the YMCA, sold their property north of Route 267 to private developers, who are now proposing to rent the property surrounding the springs. Access to the basin and cave for diving has been closed while the new owners decide how they want to proceed. All of our December and January international attendance has canceled citing economic stress or disinterest in the county. The new cave dedicated store, Cave Connections, is busy identifying caves on private property that are only available through their facility, following in the footsteps of the out-of-town group that currently dives Wakulla Springs. None of this bodes well for Wakulla County economically. What then, can we see for underwater Wakulla in the crystal ball? Providing we survive the asteroid that is scheduled to pass between the earth and the moon on Feb. 15, there is a summer reprieve coming. The inshore (out 9 miles) spear “ shing season for Gag Grouper may open on April 1 through June 30, if the FWC draft proposal is implemented. That season will close inshore and open offshore in federal waters (9 miles to the shelf) July 1 through November or December. Red Grouper also opens April 1 through the end of January. Amberjack opens Aug. 1 and closes May 30. Red Snapper has not been determined at this time according to the FWC website. Our scalloping season in the shallow grass beds near shore now extends from July 1 through late September. And of course, for those who visit the Florida Keys for lobster, the mini season is in late July and opens otherwise Aug. 6, closing at the end of March. This summer could be a bumper year if inclement weather does not interfere. See http://myfwc.com/media/2455479/Gulf_Seasons_ AtAGlance_2013.pdf for more details. On shore, further cave exploration continues south of Route 98. The reported known 400-plus windows into the karst should be expanded with the renewed cave diving by several exploration groups. Deep exploration is hampered by the rise in the cost of helium, now at over $100 per 280 cubic feet (cf) cylinder. A diver who, say, breathes 1 cf per minute at the surface wants to dive to 200 feet in a cave or off shore, which may use a 50 percent helium mix, will pay $3 per minute at that depth. At that rate, his twin cylinder set will cost him $107, (not counting decompression gases) just for breathing gas. The dive will cost him/her in excess of $150, which encourages exploration divers to take up rebreathersƒ.. or some other pastime. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSADMINISTERING THE OATH: Clockwise from above, Lt. Keystyn Pecora administers the oath of of“ ce to Auxiliarists; Gary and Christy Owens are sworn-in by Lt. Pecora; Bob Asztalos, Bill Wannall and Duane Treadon. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Jan 10, 13 Fri Jan 11, 13 Sat Jan 12, 13 Sun Jan 13, 13 Mon Jan 14, 13 Tue Jan 15, 13 Wed Jan 16, 13 D ate 3.6 ft. 12:49 AM 3.6 ft. 1:38 AM 3.5 ft. 2:25 AM 3.3 ft. 3:11 AM 3.0 ft. 3:56 AM 2.7 ft. 4:42 AM Hi g h -1.3 ft. 7:07 AM -1.4 ft. 7:53 AM -1.2 ft. 8:36 AM -1.0 ft. 9:15 AM -0.6 ft. 9:50 AM -0.2 ft. 10:23 AM 0.3 ft. 10:52 AM L ow 3.1 ft. 1:41 PM 3.2 ft. 2:22 PM 3.2 ft. 2:59 PM 3.2 ft. 3:34 PM 3.1 ft. 4:05 PM 3.0 ft. 4:35 PM 2.9 ft. 5:04 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 6:53 PM 0.9 ft. 7:42 PM 0.7 ft. 8:28 PM 0.5 ft. 9:12 PM 0.4 ft. 9:57 PM 0.3 ft. 10:44 PM 0.4 ft. 11:35 PM L ow Thu Jan 10, 13 Fri Jan 11, 13 Sat Jan 12, 13 Sun Jan 13, 13 Mon Jan 14, 13 Tue Jan 15, 13 Wed Jan 16, 13 D ate 2.7 ft. 12:41 AM 2.7 ft. 1:30 AM 2.7 ft. 2:17 AM 2.5 ft. 3:03 AM 2.3 ft. 3:48 AM 2.0 ft. 4:34 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 7:18 AM -1.0 ft. 8:04 AM -0.9 ft. 8:47 AM -0.7 ft. 9:26 AM -0.4 ft. 10:01 AM -0.1 ft. 10:34 AM 0.2 ft. 11:03 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 1:33 PM 2.4 ft. 2:14 PM 2.4 ft. 2:51 PM 2.4 ft. 3:26 PM 2.3 ft. 3:57 PM 2.3 ft. 4:27 PM 2.2 ft. 4:56 PM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 7:04 PM 0.6 ft. 7:53 PM 0.5 ft. 8:39 PM 0.4 ft. 9:23 PM 0.3 ft. 10:08 PM 0.3 ft. 10:55 PM 0.3 ft. 11:46 PM L ow Thu Jan 10, 13 Fri Jan 11, 13 Sat Jan 12, 13 Sun Jan 13, 13 Mon Jan 14, 13 Tue Jan 15, 13 Wed Jan 16, 13 D ate 3.2 ft. 12:31 AM 3.3 ft. 1:25 AM 3.4 ft. 2:14 AM 3.3 ft. 3:01 AM 3.1 ft. 3:47 AM 2.8 ft. 4:32 AM 2.5 ft. 5:18 AM Hi g h -1.2 ft. 8:11 AM -1.3 ft. 8:57 AM -1.1 ft. 9:40 AM -0.9 ft. 10:19 AM -0.5 ft. 10:54 AM -0.2 ft. 11:27 AM 0.2 ft. 11:56 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 2:17 PM 3.0 ft. 2:58 PM 3.0 ft. 3:35 PM 2.9 ft. 4:10 PM 2.9 ft. 4:41 PM 2.8 ft. 5:11 PM 2.7 ft. 5:40 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 7:57 PM 0.8 ft. 8:46 PM 0.6 ft. 9:32 PM 0.5 ft. 10:16 PM 0.4 ft. 11:01 PM 0.3 ft. 11:48 PM L ow Thu Jan 10, 13 Fri Jan 11, 13 Sat Jan 12, 13 Sun Jan 13, 13 Mon Jan 14, 13 Tue Jan 15, 13 Wed Jan 16, 13 D ate 2.8 ft. 12:33 AM 2.8 ft. 1:22 AM 2.8 ft. 2:09 AM 2.6 ft. 2:55 AM 2.4 ft. 3:40 AM 2.1 ft. 4:26 AM Hi g h -1.3 ft. 6:46 AM -1.3 ft. 7:32 AM -1.2 ft. 8:15 AM -1.0 ft. 8:54 AM -0.6 ft. 9:29 AM -0.2 ft. 10:02 AM 0.3 ft. 10:31 AM L ow 2.4 ft. 1:25 PM 2.5 ft. 2:06 PM 2.5 ft. 2:43 PM 2.5 ft. 3:18 PM 2.4 ft. 3:49 PM 2.4 ft. 4:19 PM 2.3 ft. 4:48 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 6:32 PM 0.9 ft. 7:21 PM 0.7 ft. 8:07 PM 0.5 ft. 8:51 PM 0.4 ft. 9:36 PM 0.3 ft. 10:23 PM 0.4 ft. 11:14 PM L ow Thu Jan 10, 13 Fri Jan 11, 13 Sat Jan 12, 13 Sun Jan 13, 13 Mon Jan 14, 13 Tue Jan 15, 13 Wed Jan 16, 13 D ate 3.7 ft. 12:46 AM 3.7 ft. 1:35 AM 3.6 ft. 2:22 AM 3.4 ft. 3:08 AM 3.1 ft. 3:53 AM 2.7 ft. 4:39 AM Hi g h -1.5 ft. 7:04 AM -1.5 ft. 7:50 AM -1.3 ft. 8:33 AM -1.0 ft. 9:12 AM -0.6 ft. 9:47 AM -0.2 ft. 10:20 AM 0.3 ft. 10:49 AM L ow 3.2 ft. 1:38 PM 3.2 ft. 2:19 PM 3.3 ft. 2:56 PM 3.2 ft. 3:31 PM 3.2 ft. 4:02 PM 3.1 ft. 4:32 PM 3.0 ft. 5:01 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 6:50 PM 0.9 ft. 7:39 PM 0.7 ft. 8:25 PM 0.5 ft. 9:09 PM 0.4 ft. 9:54 PM 0.4 ft. 10:41 PM 0.4 ft. 11:32 PM L ow Thu Jan 10, 13 Fri Jan 11, 13 Sat Jan 12, 13 Sun Jan 13, 13 Mon Jan 14, 13 Tue Jan 15, 13 Wed Jan 16, 13 D ate 2.5 ft. 12:43 AM 2.4 ft. 1:40 AM 2.3 ft. 2:35 AM 2.0 ft. 3:31 AM 1.8 ft. 4:30 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 6:49 AM -1.0 ft. 7:34 AM -0.9 ft. 8:15 AM -0.7 ft. 8:52 AM -0.5 ft. 9:25 AM -0.2 ft. 9:54 AM 0.1 ft. 10:20 AM L ow 2.0 ft. 3:07 PM 1.9 ft. 3:35 PM 1.9 ft. 4:00 PM 1.9 ft. 4:21 PM 1.9 ft. 4:42 PM 1.9 ft. 5:02 PM 2.0 ft. 5:24 PM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 6:00 PM 1.2 ft. 6:53 PM 1.0 ft. 7:43 PM 0.8 ft. 8:32 PM 0.6 ft. 9:24 PM 0.5 ft. 10:20 PM 0.3 ft. 11:22 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 11:44 PM Hi g h Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacJan. 10 Jan 16First Jan. 18 Full Jan. 26 Last Feb. 3 New Jan. 11Major Times --:---:-11:36 AM 1:36 PM Minor Times 6:12 AM 7:12 AM 5:00 PM 6:00 PM Major Times 12:07 AM 2:07 AM 12:38 PM 2:38 PM Minor Times 7:09 AM 8:09 AM 6:08 PM 7:08 PM Major Times 1:07 AM 3:07 AM 1:36 PM 3:36 PM Minor Times 7:59 AM 8:59 AM 7:16 PM 8:16 PM Major Times 2:03 AM 4:03 AM 2:30 PM 4:30 PM Minor Times 8:43 AM 9:43 AM 8:21 PM 9:21 PM Major Times 2:56 AM 4:56 AM 3:21 PM 5:21 PM Minor Times 9:23 AM 10:23 AM 9:24 PM 10:24 PM Major Times 3:46 AM 5:46 AM 4:10 PM 6:10 PM Minor Times 10:00 AM 11:00 AM 10:23 PM 11:23 PM Major Times 4:33 AM 6:33 AM 4:51 PM 6:51 PM Minor Times 10:36 AM 11:36 AM 11:21 PM 12:21 AM Better Best Better Better Average Average Average7:34 am 5:55 pm 6:13 am 5:01 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:34 am 5:56 pm 7:09 am 6:09 pm 7:34 am 5:57 pm 8:00 am 7:17 pm 7:34 am 5:58 pm 8:44 am 8:22 pm 7:34 am 5:58 pm 9:24 am 9:24 pm 7:33 am 5:59 pm 10:01 am 10:24 pm 7:33 am 6:00 pm 10:37 am 11:22 pm12% 4% 4% 11% 19% 26% 33% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL Marine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.mikesmarine”orida.com MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 11Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportIn other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: DECEMBER 27 € A 45-year-old Crawfordville man was detained by Wal-Mart asset protection staff after he was allegedly observed taking hardware items and concealing them under items he purchased. The suspect took the hardware items beyond the last point of sale without paying for them. The items were valued at $101 and were recovered by store staff. Deputy Gibby Gibson charged the suspect with retail theft and transported him to the Wakulla County Jail. The suspect was also issued a trespass warning for Wal-Mart. € Annie White of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim used a bank card to make a purchase at a Crawfordville convenience store. Later the same day, three fraudulent attempts to use the bank card were made. Two $1 purchases were observed on the account but the bank caught a fraud attempt for $126 in Louisiana and it was not charged to the victim. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Charles Ball of Crawfordville reported a tax fraud. The victim attempted to file a tax return and discovered that someone had already “ led under his name. The fraudulent tax return was sent to Brandon, Fla. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Judy Parker of Crawfordville reported the theft of medications from her home. The missing medications are valued at $40. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. € Melissa M.J. Hagan, 22, of Crawfordville was arrested for battery and burglary with a person assaulted in connection with a confrontation at a Crawfordville residence. Hagan entered a residence without permission and entered into a physical altercation with a 26-year-old male victim. The victim was struck and choked by the suspect, his clothing was torn and some damage was also reported to the home. DECEMBER 28 € A 21-year-old Crawfordville female reported being the victim of a battery at a Wakulla County bar. As the victim left the bar, a verbal dispute turned physical. The victim received multiple abrasions and marks during the altercation. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Gary Ashburn of Crawfordville reported discovering a lost wrench but was unable to determine ownership. Deputy Elisee Colin determined a possible owner and the wrench was turned over to the Evidence Division. € Patricia Jackson of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of tools from her home. A chainsaw and air compressor, valued at $350, were taken. A suspect has been identified. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. DECEMBER 29 € Robert B. Fritz of Panacea reported “ nding checks and cash owned by Mahaley Watts of Panacea. The victim reported losing the property. It was discovered in a trash dumpster and may have thrown away by mistake. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Michael Wayne Adkins, 31, of Jacksonville was involved in a one vehicle crash. Atkins drove his 1997 Mercury through the intersection of Shadeville Highway and Highway 267. His vehicle went airborne through the trees, across the driveway of Savannahs and airborne again into the woods. The driver was not injured. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. DECEMBER 30 € Anna Witting of Crawfordville reported a disturbance at a county bar. The victim told Deputy Cole Wells that a suspect, who has been identi“ ed, punched her vehicle windshield and cracked the glass. A warrant has been requested for the suspect on a charge of criminal mischief. € Robert Manausa of Panacea reported a boat burglary. The victim reported the theft of a VHF radio from his boat. The radio is valued at $500 and a lock was also damaged. It was valued at $50. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € Michelle Marie Dawson, 25, of Tallahassee was involved in a one vehicle traf“ c crash at Shadeville Highway and Eagles Ridge Road. Dawson rolled her 1992 GMC Envoy when she struck the guide wires to a power pole. Dawson had an outstanding violation of probation warrant and was arrested. She was not seriously injured. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € Deputy Will Hudson was dispatched to Tallahassee Memorial Hospital after the hospital reported a possible gunshot wound to the face of a young victim. Deputy Hudson spoke to the 15-year-old Crawfordville male and determined that the teenager may have cut himself with a screwdriver or stick while carving wood. While gunshots were heard in the area where the teenager was working, no gunshots were reported at the time of his injury. Sgt. Andy Curles and Detective Josh Langston were contacted for potential followup investigation. DECEMBER 31 € David Eustis of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victim discovered pry marks on the door to his home. Damage to the door is estimated at $125. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Garrett Haire of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. Copper wire was stolen from the victims property. The wire is valued at $500. Deputy Vicki Mitchell investigated. € Ervin Goodwin of Crawfordville reported the theft of a wallet. The wallet was inside his clothing in his room. The wallet and contents were valued at $195. Deputy Clint Beam investigated. JANUARY 1 € Edward Spence of Crawfordville reported the theft of his mailbox. The box is valued at $20. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Justin Waltman of Crawfordville reported the theft of a vehicle light. The light was taken off his vehicle and is valued at $202. Deputy Scott Powell investigated. € Mary Wade of Sopchoppy reported the theft of medications from her home. The medication is valued at $50 and a suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. JANUARY 2 € Joshua Martin of Crawfordville reported a vehicle and trailer theft. The trailer contained lawn equipment from the victims business. The stolen items included two “ rearms. The value of the stolen property is approximately $40,000. The stolen property was entered into the FCIC/NCIC computer data base. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. € William Baxley of Crawfordville reported a residential burglary. A computer was stolen from the victims residence. It is valued at $800. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce received 820 calls for service during the past week including 13 business and residential alarms; 62 citizen contacts; 12 disturbances; 19 E-911 abandoned cell calls; 7 regular E-911 abandoned calls; 19 regular E-911 emergency calls; 33 investigations; 10 loud music/noise complaints; 53 medical emergencies; 309 residential and business security checks; 25 special details; 16 subpoena services; 16 suspicious people; 10 suspicious people; and 80 traf“ c stops. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will host a blood drive with the Southeastern Community Blood Center on Friday, Jan. 11 from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the WCSO parking lot. Donors will receive a Fandango voucher for a free movie ticket and will be entered for a chance to win a weekly drawing for a Samsung Blu-Ray 3-D home theatre along with an entry for the monthly grand prize of a Samsung 51 inch television. You must be at least 110 pounds to donate and you must provide identi“ cation to give blood. To give blood, contact Lt. Bruce Ashley at 745-7162, bashley@wcso.org or visit the bloodmobile on the southern end of the parking lot. For information about giving blood, visit the Southeastern Community Blood Center web site at scbcinfo. org. SopchoppyOpry.com S O P C H O P P Y O P R Y ENJOY ALL 12 SHOWSSEASON TICKETSONLY $100Call (850) 962-3711Come join us at the Sopchoppy Opry for the 2013 season! There are 12 great shows scheduled. Shows will feature SOUTHBOUND BANDwith individual guests along with a special group/band! Look whos coming to the 0PRY in 2013!January 26 Col. Wayne Martin & Country Gold February 23 Josh Noland & Friends w/Rick Knowles March 30 Charlie McCoy w/Purvis Brothers April 27 Stew Parsons & Spare Change May 25 The Thompson Trio June 29 Big Bend Bluegrass July 27 Lon & Liz Williamson w/Gatorbone Band August 31 Purvis Brothers September 28 Mollie Lynn & Band October 26 Southern Satisfaction November 23* South Bound Reunion December 14* Annual Christmas ShowIn historic Sopchoppy High School Auditorium *Please note that January through October shows will be on last Saturday night of the month with November & December shows on 23rd and 14th, respectively. All shows start at 7 pm. Individual tickets purchased at the door are $10 each except for the Charlie McCoy show which are $15 for individuals and $25 for couples.Thanks for your support of good family entertainment, the restoration effort & classic country, bluegrass & Gospel music! You can always “nd out whats coming up at the Opry at sopchoppyopry.com 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Blood drive set at sheri s o ce WILLIAM SNOWDENFormer Sheriff David Harvey with retiring Sheriff Donnie Crum and former Undersheriff Maurice Langston … after long careers in Wakulla, all three have left the sheriffs of“ ce.Crum given surprise retirement partyStaff reportSheriff Donnie Crum was given a surprise retirement party at 3Y ranch on Friday night, as former Sheriff David Harvey and longtime major Maurice Langston were among the hundreds of guests who celebrated Crums law career. Harvey retired as Wakulla sheriff in 2011 after more than 30 years. Crum, his undersheriff, was appointed to “ ll the interim term and stepped down on Monday, Jan. 7, for incoming sheriff Charlie Creel. Langston challenged Creel in the November election but lost. He has since been appointed as executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center. As stories were told about Crums career, one person at the event pointed at the stage where Harvey, Crum and Langston stood and noted there was close to 100 years of law enforcement among the three men.

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com Certainly, Sleeping Beautys narcoleptic respite was secured by this plant. It is the very image of a noxious bramble that would be conjured up by an imaginative and resolute wicked witch. The sinewy, winding tangle of vines studded with thorns resembling sharks teeth, only more of them and sharper, would easily deter all but the stout of heart in pursuit of a romantic ideal. The prince in the story had to have thick armor, a sharp sword and a real need to succeed to get through this thicket. While smilax may not be deliberately guarding any princesses in Wakulla County, it can still put up an intimidating barrier to man and beast. Also known as green briar, cat briar and other sometimes graphic terms, the native plant thrives in this area. In Greek mythology, Smilax was a wood nymph who was transformed into a bramble after the unful“ lled and tragic love of a mortal man. Her “ nal form in this fable was a re” ection of her character. Botanically, smilax is found in tropic to temperate zones. There are about 350 species worldwide and 20 domestically. The plant is very vigorous and is equipped with an enviable array of survival traits. It is ready to take every advantage to ” ourish and inhabit new territory even among the most hostile conditions. Individual plants can withstand harsh treatment and environments. If burned or mowed to the soils surface, they will regenerate from a segmented rhizome root system. Rhizome roots are the subterranean stems which spread roots and runners from its bulbous root nodes. If pulled up, the rhizome root system will separate at joints. Even the smallest piece of root left in the dirt will generate a new plant. Smilax has the additional resource of extrafloral nectaries, nectarproducing glands physically separate from the ” owers. These nectaries may function as an organ for the plant to rid itself of metabolic wastes and/or to attract bene“ cial insects for defense. Ants are especially attracted to the extra-” oral nectaries in smylax and may establish mounds close by. The ants defend the smilax from herbivores which eat the leaves, if they can bet past the thorns. In addition to spreading by its root system, smilax produces berries which contain a seed. The berries appear in late summer or early autumn and ripen to a blue-black color. The berries are usually consumed in winter after the smilax loses it leaves. Birds and animals will deposit the seed at a new site. Best chances for the seed to germinate occur after it is exposed to a freeze. Smilax vines will climb up trees, fence post, and any other stationary object to get better sun exposure. They have been known to reach over 30 feet in height, but do not tend to kill their host by shading out the sun. Ants commonly use the vines as a readily available pathway on foraging trips. The ants may establish colonies in elevated locations courtesy of smilax vines. To learn more about smilax in Wakulla County, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http:// wakulla.ifas.u” .edu.Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Smilax can put up an intimidating barrier Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSA tangle of Smilax, above, on a fence. Smilax roots, below. PARADE REGISTRATION FORMYour organization is invited to ParticipatePre-registration is required. CASH PRIZES will be awarded for the best Valentine’s Day theme decorated entry.The winner will be announced immediately following the parade by the MC and the cash award will be awarded to the CONTACT representative listed on this form. 1st Place $100 • 2nd Place $75 • 3rd Place $50 In addition, Keep Wakulla County Beautiful will offer a special cash prize of $100 for the best theme (Valentine’s Day) entry represented by recyclable materials!(i.e. cans, plastic bottles, and plastic bags, items that should end up in your recycle bin!)Name of Float/Organization: _________________________________ Entry type and brief description: _______________________________ (i.e. car, truck, trailer, tractor etc.) Contact Person: _________________________ Phone: ____________ Contact Address: ___________________________________________ Contact Email Address: ______________________________________(NOTE: Your only notice of line-up position will be emailed to this address.) 15th Annual 15th Annual Valentine Celebration & Parade Valentine Celebration & Parade SATURDAY, FEB. 9, 2013 HUDSON PARK 7:00 a.m. ........Race check-in 7:30 a.m. ........Fun Walk begins 8:00 a.m. ........5K Cupid Dash 8:00 a.m. ........Breakfast in the Park 9:00 a.m. ........Parade entries line-up and judging of entries 9:30 a.m. ........Arts & Crafts, food, games and rides open 10:00 a.m. .......Sweetheart ParadeSpecial Guest Grand Marshall Crawfordille NativeNIGEL BRADHAM Buffalo Bills Linebacker # 53 11:00 a.m. .......Entertainment begins and goes throughout the day 11:00 a.m. .......Presentation of parade entries awards 3:00 p.m. ........Ticket drawing for the $1,000 cash prize give awayTHANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS! • Anytime Fitness • Rainbow International • The Wakulla News • Regions Contractors, Inc. • Saved by Grace Jewelry • Rotary International • Wakulla Area Times • GWTC • Walgreens A F AMILY FRIENDLY DA Y OF FUN AND ENTERTAINMENT! A F AMI LY FRIENDLY DA Y OF FUN AND ENTERTAINMENT! & 5K CUPID DASH 1 MILE FIT FOR LOVE WALK1ST ANNUAL Register for the 5K Cupid Dash, go to RACEIT.COM (raceit.com/Register/?event=17619) Complete and mail your registration to: PARADE REGISTRATION, Rotary Club of Wakulla County at P.O. BOX 148, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32326. Valentine Parade Coordinator wakullavalentine@gmail.com

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Green Scene Health & Fitness Page 2B Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013As I drive the streets and roads of Wakulla County it thrills me to see the many “ lled recycling bins at the curb or road. People are really catching on. I know that we still have a long way to go since many are still trying to have their cardboard boxes taken without breaking them down and cutting them into smaller sizes and others are still leaving Styrofoam which WastePro does not take but we have made great strides in our efforts! Now we need to go a step further and try to eliminate the extra packaging and added waste during the initial point of sale. Do you ever think we will see cereal packaged without the extra cardboard outer wrapping? Do you think the drivethru industry will allow me to purchase a meal without an extra bag or box? Wouldnt it be nice to buy a childrens toy without the extra plastic and cardboard wrapping? Floridians throw away about 8 pounds of garbage per person each day which is double the national average (UF/IFAS Publication FCS3158). Remember that all this garbage is Here Todayƒ Here Tomorrow.Ž We need to feel responsible for not only of what we consume, but also for what we throw away. Not all packaging is frivolous. In many cases, it is an essential part of our marketing and distribution system. It performs several functions that include: € Protecting food from light, heat, oxygen, natural contamination and tampering. € Preserving food. € Protecting consumer goods from being crushed, soiled or shoplifted. € Protecting children from ingesting drugs and hazardous chemicals. € Informing consumers of proper use, storage feature and warranty. € Allowing for easier warehousing, transportation and distribution. Packaged products can be handled with large scale mechanical equipment. The packaging industry continues to refine and improve products. Some improvements allow for thinner, lighter weight materials that reduce the energy and materials costs, and reduce the amounts of garage going to the land“ ll. Continued on Page 2B By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Pre-cycling: A step to living sustainablyBy LES HARRISONWakulla Extension DirectorJanuary in not typically considered a gardening month in Wakulla County, but there are some vegetables which ” ourish in the “ rst months of 2013. Spinach is a prime example of a popular cool season leafy vegetable which grows well in Floridas Big Bend region. This native of western Asia handles the mild days and occasionally frosty nights with few problems. Propagating this plant is relatively simple, inexpensive and will reward the grower with an ample supply of tasty and nutritious greens. No more than 60 days is required from planting to picking. Insect problems are few this time of year, but will increase as the days lengthen and the temperatures rise. Disease and molds can be a problem if the plants remain damp and cool for too long a period. There are treatments for these conditions, but many times the expense outweighs the bene“ ts. The variety being grown in the UF/ IFAS Wakulla Extension Demonstration Garden is Regiment (Bejo 2561) and is offered by Bejo Seed Company. It was planted in early November 2013. Locally grown spinach can be used fresh in salads and in a variety of recipes. It is an exceptionally good source of vitamin A and iron. Preserving excess production is possible through several basic methods. Blanching and freezing is possible and requires few specialized tools. Canning in another preservation method, but requires more tools and attention to detail. To learn more about spinach production and preservation, contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla. ifas.u” .edu/. To get hands on gardening experience, sign up for the 2013 Master Gardener Class the UF/IFAS Wakulla Extension Of“ ce. Classes will begin in February.What’s in the garden now – Spinach LES HARRISON/SPECIAL TO THE NEWS • Be a 4-H Sustainability Star, story Page 2B. Complete Medical Care. Here in Wakulla. Now Accepting New Patients Our physicians have been providing comprehensive medical care for the families of Wakulla County for 15 years. Treating the entire family through all stages of life, we provide the medical care that your family needs.€ Infant, child, adult and geriatric care€ Womens healthcare€ Minor surgical procedures€ Diabetes education€ On site lab€ The support of TMH specialists and services SAME DAY Appointments Available Our medical team invites you to call to make your appointment today at (850) 926-7105. 15 Council Moore Road | Crawfordville, FL 32327 TMH Physician PartnersWAKULLA LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t

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Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comHEALTH & FITNESS New Years resolutions are often made out of the guilt of consumption; so why not start our resolutions now? If we remember preseason, we give ourselves a chance to set a grounded intention for mindful shopping, eating, drinking and staying up too late. But “ rstƒwhile it might seem next to impossible to say no to another chocolate covered shortbread cookie, some Baileys in your coffee (gasp!), or yet another darling gift for your sweetie, maybe its not a bad idea to allow yourself some concessions throughout the holidays. Whats the big deal … its everywhere. You might be more likely to be grumpy (or worse, binge!) if you deny yourself a little extra here and there. (Operative word here is a little). If you really think about it, New Years resolutions are often made from the feeling that we need to be better at not just what we do, but at who we are. I will stop shopping so much,Ž I will become a vegetarian,Ž or From now on I will be more patient.Ž Making a promise to ourselves that is steeped in a sense of not being good enough is like repeating empty af“ rmations that we dont really believe. It also stems from misguided thinking that quitting or achieving a thing will bring us that elusive happiness. As yogis we know that contentment is a practiced art, deeper than happiness and comes from within. Beyond the material and emotional planes, is the work of remembering. A sankalpa is like a spiritual resolution. It is more of a resolve that comes with energy, willpower, inner wisdom and heart. Starting a sankalpa begins with love. Think of this resolution as remembering your divinity. Kalpa means vow, and san is a derivative of the highest truth. A sankalpa then, is like a commitment in support of the deeper meaning of our life. We remember here that its not so much what we wish to change, but how we go about making that change. It begins with praise: I am always already whole and loved.Ž From there we set our goals and intentions with a feeling of peace and stability, and our actions to achieve the goals are consistent with our innermost desire. The beauty of this is that we can renew our sankalpa every time we hit the mat or meditation cushion, all year round. Unlike our New Years resolutions...which we mostly abandon in a few weeks, our sankalpa is an inspired intention that we revisit every time we practice, or even every time we have a moment of pause. We can state it prepractice or at the namaste moment. This season, I breathe in peace, and breathe out contentment. I am healthy and whole and my deepest desire is to remember this truth.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher at Studio 88 in Crawfordville. She can be reached at Focusyoga@yahoo.com or (228) 380-0140. YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Setting an intention for the new yearSlow and steady wins the raceWeight Loss is a big problem in the United States. Did you know that the percentage of adults 20 and older who are obese is 35.9 percent and the percent of adults age 20 and older who are overweight (and not obese) is 33.3 percent, according to the CDC. This means that approximately two-thirds of the United States is now either overweight or obese. This is now listed as an epidemic. People are tempted into trying to lose the unwanted weight quickly, taking short cuts, such as rapid shortterm diets, diet pills, weight loss pills, or shakes. This quick weight-loss is probably not helping you lose much fat, but instead you are losing water weight or lean muscle tissue, which you do not want to lose. When the diet fad stops, you will more than likely gain the weight back and sometimes even gain more weight than what you began with. The best method that almost everyone can agree on is slow and steady … as in the saying, SLOW AND STEADY WINS THE RACE.Ž The average person wanting to lose weight should lose no more than 1 to 2 pounds of weight loss a week. Here are some simple tips to help you lose the weight you want: FOOD TIPS € Avoid hunger pains. To keep food cravings down try to eat several small meals a day. In addition to this, just by eating, your body will burn approximately 10 percent more calories from digesting the foods. € Keep your body well hydrated (eight glasses of water daily). This is not only essential for your well-being, but also helps you feel less hungry. Try to avoid highcalorie coffees, sugary and carbonated drinks. € Mustard for mayo. One tablespoon of mayonnaise adds about 100 calories and 10 grams of fat, while one tablespoon of mustard has 10 to 20 calories. € Keep a journal or daily food log to help keep you aware and accountable for every morsel that you take in. This is not an easy task, but done consistently, will help keep track of calories and the overall quality of your diet. EXERCISE TIPS € Move more. Standing burns more calories than sitting, and sitting burns more calories than lying down. Instead of sitting, walk around while talking on the phone; stand while folding clothes; stretch during commercial and computer breaks. € Walk outside five or 10 minutes, gradually increasing a little each day, until you reach a 30-minute walk. € Buy a heart rate monitor which might help to motivate you when you actually notice how many calories you have burned and that your hard work is paying off. Numerous gym and cardio classes are available nowadays, there are trainers, DVDs, instructors, webinars, YouTube, and phone apps to help you start an exercise program that will “ t your needs and a lot of these are free. It will take time, it will take patience, and it will most de“ nitely take willpower. But if you take it slow and steadyŽ you will lose the weight and win the race within you! Good luck, be healthy, and have a great weight loss new year!Pamela Chichester, CFT is Body-Tek Gym Manager. She can be reached at (850) 926-BFIT. GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER The Waku l la News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com Be a 4-H Sustainability StarSpecial to The NewsWhat does sustainability mean? In 4-H a Sustainability Star will have fun being creative by upcyclingŽ to make everything old new again. ReCycle, ReFashion, ReMake, ReUse, ReDuce. This program will empower 4-Hers to make positive contributions to family and community by making inexpensive and environmental educational projects. Youth ages 5-18 can join this organized group and get the opportunity to: € Make new friends € Share and learn ideas € Develop a sense of pride € Learn how to go green by reducing what we throw away and make it into something new! Fun projects at the club meetings can include: € ReFashion old jeans and make purses or bags. € ReUse old T-shirts and creating a cozy pillow. € ReCycle magazines crafting beads for a necklace or bracelet. € ReMake an empty soda bottle for our feathered friends and construct a bird feeder. € ReDuce garbage by saving table scraps to make a nutrient-rich compost additive for your soil. They will meet the “ rst Sunday of every month from 3 to 5 p.m. at the 4-H Extension Of“ ce at 84 Cedar Avenue in Crawfordville. Contact Lori Gilbertson at my2thfairylori@aol.com or (850) 420-0132. Call the Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce for details as well. Visit the Wakulla County Facebook site and likeŽ us for updates and information. See how much fun 4-H can be! Working on a 4-H project. ANN HENNESSY, MA, CCC-A CERTIFIED & LICENSED AUDIOLOGIST *Hearing evaluation and video otoscope inspection are always free. Hearing evaluation is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only. These are not medical exams or diagnosis, nor are they intended to replace a physician's care. If you suspect a medical problem, please seek treatment from your doctor.FREE HEARING TESTINGOPEN TO ALL EVERY THURSDAY TALLAHASSEESEARS MIRACLE EAR GOVERNORS SQUARE MALL 1500 Apalachee ParkwayToll Free 1-866-942-4007CRAWFORDVILLE3295 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY THE LOG CABIN, BARRY BUILDINGCall for an appointment 850-942-4007• FREE Video Ear Inspection • 3 Year Warranty on ALL Models • Many Size OptionsDiscover How Much Better Your World Can Sound… NEED HEARING AIDS?HEARING AIDS AT NO COST TO FEDERAL WORKERS AND RETIREES!? That’s Right… No Co-Pay! No Exam Fee! No Adjustment Fee!Miracle EarHearing Aid Center is NOW Offering 1-866-742-1373 Get your business noticed One Call One Order One Payment Almost 4 million readers statewide are waiting to see your advertising message. Don’t make them wait any longer. Call us today! www.AdNetworksFlorida.com Colon cancer is the 2ndleading cause of cancer deaths in Florida. 7 out of 10cancer deaths can be prevented through screening and lifestyle changes. Colon cancer starts without symptoms so choose prevention and get screened.If youre 50or older, ask your doctor which colon cancer screening test is right for you. Colon Cancer Screening Saves LivescoloncancerFL.org Funded by CDC Cooperative Agreement #5U58DP002070-04

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Jan. 10  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Jan. 11  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Jan. 12  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  CAREGIVER SUPPORT GROUP offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla will be held at 9 a.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant in Crawfordville. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. Sunday, Jan. 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Jan. 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach.  RESPITE CARE is offered by The Alzheimer’s Project of Wakulla at Lake Ellen Baptist Church from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in the Fellowship Hall. Bring a loved one to be cared for. Lunch will be provided. There is no cost. The church is located at 4495 Crawfordville Highway. Call Pat Ashley for more information at (850) 984-5277. Tuesday, Jan. 15  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  SARRACENIA CHAPTER OF THE FLORIDA NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. Will Sheftall will present “Phenology: Clues for a Changing World.” This program concerns the seasonal cycles of living things – cycles that may be under the in uence of climate change – and the collection of citizen-observation data by the USA National Phenology Network. The public is invited to attend. Social time, with refreshments, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Jan. 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 2242321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Jan. 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will meet in the Education Center of the Crawfordville United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. This group meeting is for men and women, regardless of the type of cancer. For more information, call 926-6050. Special EventsThursday, Jan. 10  SOUP-ER BOWL PARTY will be held at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. This is a workshop which will include preparing, tasting and preserving soup. Several of the soups featured at the recent county-wide Empty Bowl event will be featured. Cost is $15 per person and no one will be turned away based on inability to pay the registration fee. Pre-registration is necessary. Do so by calling 926-3931. Friday, Jan. 11  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. Donors will receive a Fandango voucher for a free movie ticket and will be entered for a chance to win a weekly drawing for a Samsung Blu-Ray 3-D home theatre along with an entry for the monthly grand prize of a Samsung 51 inch television. Donors must be at least 110 pounds and provide identi cation to give blood. To give blood, contact Lt. Bruce Ashley at 850-745-7162, bashley@wcso.org or visit the bloodmobile. For information about giving blood, visit the Southeastern Community Blood Center web site at scbcinfo.org. Saturday, Jan. 12  RECEPTION for former Superintendent of Wakulla County Schools David Miller will be held from 4 to 6 p.m. at Wakulla High School’s cafeteria. Presentations will be made at 5 p.m. Light refreshments will be served. Tuesday, Jan. 15  LECTURE SERIES at at Gulf Specimen Marine Lab will feature Anna White Hodges at 7 p.m. Her talk will cover the history of aquaculture in Cedar Key, how it originally evolved from people trying to culture oysters into a full blown clam industry. While commercial shing with nets has been in their families for generations, she and her husband have made the transition from net shing to farming the sea and are part of the growing aquaculture industry that is coming to the Florida panhandle. She is the lab’s rst aquaculture entertainer, equipped with guitar, songs and stories. Gulf Specimen is located at 222 Clark Drive in Panacea. Thursday, Jan. 17  WAKULLA COUNTY TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP will meet at the library from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Call 850-926-0401 ext. 217 for more information.Upcoming Events Saturday, Jan. 19  SONS OF CONFEDERATE VETERANS “Wakulla Guards Camp” will meet a 5 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library. For more information, please call Lisa Morgan at (850) 926-1405.  ARBOR DAY FESTIVAL will be held from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hudson Park. Artisan and craft vendors are invited to display their wares. Nature art and outdoor items, such as gardening tools, plants, outdoor furniture, wind chimes and bird feeders will have appeal for festival goers. Green Guides, nurseries, tree and yard service companies, and other nature-based businesses are encouraged to publicize their services to this market. Vendors and exhibitors pay no fee. To participate as a vendor or exhibitor at this year’s festival, please request and return a vendor form to apiasecki@comcast or mail to Iris Garden Club, Attn.: Angret Piasecki, 137 Royster Dr. Crawfordville, FL 32327. For questions, send an e-mail or call 926-5049. Tuesday, Jan. 22  AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost for AARP members is $12, everyone else is $14. Those interested must register to attend a class. Call Ernie Conte at (850) 926-4605 for more information or to register. Thursday, Jan. 24  CLOSING THE GAP JOB FAIR AND EXPO will be held by Workforce Plus at the Leon County Civic Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Those interested in attending need to register by calling (850) 414-6085. RSVP by Jan. 3, 2013. Saturday, Jan. 26  GREEN CLEANING WORKSHOP will be held at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Jennifer Glaubius and Shelley Swenson will share information on the products Glaubius has researched and tested and those being encouraged through the extension of ce. They will discuss cleaning products that utilize natural ingredients that are safer for the person using them and for the environment. Recipes will be available. They will make an all-purpose cleaner for each participant to take home. Co-sponsored by Sustainable Big Bend. Cost is $10. Pre-Registration is necessary, call (850) 926-3931.  TALLAHASSEE FITNESS FESTIVAL will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Leon County Civic Center. National and local businesses will conduct exercise classes, offer free health screenings, workshops, personal training, product samples and more. There will be a tug-o-war competition to bene t Second Harvest. Door prizes will be provided every 30 minutes. College athletes will provide mini-sports drills and sign autographs in the Kids Korner. For more information, call 222-0200 and visit tally tnessfest.com. Saturday, Feb. 2  FOOD PRESERVATION PRESSURE CANNING WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. A class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be offered if participation merits a second session. The cost is $5. Call 926-3931 for more information or to register. Thursday, Feb. 7  FLORIDA SEAFOOD CLASS will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Seafood is quick and easy to prepare. Learn all about Florida Seafood health bene ts and risks, selecting, handling and preparing seafood. Join for a cooking demonstration and tasting. Pre-registration is required. The cost is $15. Call 926-3931 to register or for more information. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Jan. 10  WAKULLA COUNTY PARKS ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 5:30 p.m. at the Administration Conference Room, 3093 Crawfordville Highway.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Jan. 14  SOPCHOPPY CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall. By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorA reader lives a thousand lives before he dies. The man who never reads lives only one.Ž -George R.R. Martin Happy new year from the staff of the library! We have put a bow on a very successful 2012 and look forward to even more success in 2013. Planning actually begins this week for our Summer Program. In addition, we plan to continue to expand our collection (both physical and e-book), provide more programs which bene“ t the entire community and hope we will still provide the high level of services and service which youve come to expect. This month alone, we will have a sneak preview of plays from the Palaver Tree Theatre Company (more on that next week), our “ rst Friday Night Movie of the year (on Jan. 18), and the librarys “ rst family game day (on Jan. 26). Our goal, as always, is to continue to grow with the county. So please tell us about any ideas you may have to make 2013 the most successful year the library has had. Computer Classes for January We have a wide range of computer classes available to kick off the year. We have one class on Wednesday Jan. 16, Microsoft Word 2010 Level I at 2 p.m. The following Wednesday, Jan. 23, we have three classes, Craigslist at 9:30 a.m., Skype at noon, and Microsoft Excel 2010 Level 1 at 2:30 p.m. Lastly on Jan. 30, we have, Healthy PC: Maintaining your Computer at 9:30 a.m., Pinterest at noon, and Computer Basics: Using Windows 7 at 2:30 p.m. All of these classes are free but do require early registration so please give us a call or stop by! AARP Tax Service and Tax Forms We are still awaiting the arrival of this years tax forms from the IRS. While we placed our order months ago, the recent passage of the “ scal cliffŽ legislation, along with other issues, has delayed shipment. As soon as we receive them, we will make them available to the public, and advertise that we have them on hand. We ask for your patience as we await the arrival of the forms. The AARP will begin their annual free tax preparation for low to middle income “ lers on Saturday, Feb. 2. They will be on hand at the library each Saturday and Thursday mornings from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. during tax season to assist those who need their service. This is a “ rst come, “ rst served program so the earlier you arrive the better.Library News... Soup-er Bowl Party at 6 p.m. at the extension of ce. Blood drive from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the sheriff's of ce. Reception for David Miller from 4 to 6 p.m. at WHS cafeteria. Lecture series on history of aquaculture at 7 p.m. at Gulf Specimen.ThursdayFridaySaturdayTuesday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comDear EarthTalk: How is it that climate change is negatively affecting the health of rivers and, by extension, the quality and availability of fresh water? Robert Elman St. Louis, Mo. Global warming is no doubt going to cause many kinds of problems (and, indeed, already is), and rivers may well be some of the hardest hit geographical features, given the likelihood of increased droughts, ” oods and the associated spread of waterborne diseases. For one, rivers are already starting to lose the amount of water they channel. A 2009 study at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) found that water volume in the Columbia River in the Paci“ c Northwest declined by 14 percent since the 1950s. This trend is similar in major rivers all over the world. Many communities will see their water supplies shrink as temperatures rise and precipitation patterns shift,Ž reports the nonpro“ t American Rivers, adding that a rise in severe storms will degrade water quality and increase the risk of catastrophic ” oods. Changes in the timing and location of precipitation combined with rising levels of water pollution will strain ecosystems and threaten the survival of many “ sh and wildlife species.Ž These shifts will have dramatic impacts, threatening public health, weakening economies and decreasing the quality of life in many places. In the U.S., the number of storms with extreme precipitation has increased 24 percent since the late 1940s „ and the trend is expected to continue. Another certain impact on rivers is more pollution as more frequent and powerful storms increase runoff from urban and agricultural areas that contain fertilizers, pesticides, chemicals and motor oil. In older communities where storm water and sewage are transported together in one pipe, heavy storms can overwhelm the system and send raw sewage and polluted storm water into nearby streams and rivers,Ž says American Rivers. These combined sewer over” ows will grow more frequent as extreme storms increase.Ž Lower water ” ows and rising temperatures compound problems caused by more runoff. More frequent droughts and shifting precipitation patterns lower water levels in rivers, lakes and streams, leaving less water to dilute pollutants,Ž says the group. Higher temperatures cause more frequent algal blooms and reduce dissolved oxygen levels, both of which can cause “ sh kills and do signi“ cant harm to ecosystems.Ž American Rivers reports that the health of our rivers in the face of increasing warming will depend largely on community preparedness. Municipalities that fail to address aging infrastructure will experience greater increases in storm water runoff and sewer over” ows.Ž And communities that have damaged their wetlands, forests, streams and rivers will have fewer natural defenses to protect against the effects of climate change. There is much we can do to protect rivers besides reduce our carbon footprints. American Rivers is promoting green infrastructure „ an approach to water management that protects, restores or mimics the natural water cycle „ as the way to bolster the health of rivers. It means planting trees and restoring wetlands rather than building a new water treatment plant. It means choosing water ef“ ciency instead of building a new water supply dam. It means restoring ” oodplains instead of building taller levees.Ž Dear EarthTalk: What is the Living Building Challenge and how does it differ from the LEED certification program? Jason Marshall Richmond, Va. Both Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) and the Living Building Challenge (LBC) were created with the same goal in mind: to encourage more sustainability and resource conservation in architecture, design, construction and building operations. LEED, a program of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), is well known in architecture, building and design circles as the standard for certifying the green attributes of new and retrofitted structures (and even entire neighborhoods). Developers can reference LEEDs 110-point rating system to inform choices regarding design, technology, siting, landscaping and other elements of building or renovation processes. Structures using the greenest versions of each element would qualify for the highest LEED rating, Platinum (followed by Gold, Silver, and just plain Certified). In general, a project gets certi“ ed the day its ribbon is cut „ as long as developers followed through on implementing what they committed to on the LEED checklist. Upwards of 7,000 projects spanning some 1.5 billion square feet of development area across the U.S. and 30 other countries have quali“ ed for some kind of LEED certi“ cation so far. Meanwhile, LBC, created in 2006 by the Seattle-based non-pro“ t International Living Building Institute (ILBI), is a performance-based standard where a building only quali“ es if it achieves its energy, water and waste efficiency goals moving forward after the ribbon is cut. In fact, since LBC certi“ cation is based on actual, rather than modeled or anticipated performance, projects must be operational for at least 12 consecutive months prior to evaluation by the ILBI. Given the focus on performance, LBC does not provide as much detailed guidance, let alone a checklist of green attributes, instead letting the developers of each individual project decide for themselves how to best achieve their ef“ ciency and conservation goals via means appropriate to the project and to the region. That said, each project vying for LBC status must follow 20 general imperatives arranged under a system of seven general performance areas (or in the lingo of LBC: petalsŽ): Site, Water, Energy, Health, Materials, Equity and Beauty. Given that the imperatives are general, they can be applied to any conceivable project type, be it a building, infrastructure, landscape or community development. But whatever type of project, if it is to meet the exacting standards of LBC it must live up to each one. One of the imperatives under the Energy petal, for instance, is net zero energyŽ meaning the structure must harvest or generate as much power as it needs via alternative renewable sources. Within the Materials petal, another imperative is avoiding any of hundreds of building materials on ILBIs Red ListŽ of banned materials and substances. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com. EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). How does climate change a ect the health of rivers? Rivers may well be hard hit by climate change, given the likelihood of increased droughts, ” oods and the associated spread of waterborne diseases. The Columbia River in the Paci“ c Northwest, which has lost 14 percent of its water volume since the 1950s due to high temperatures and shifting precipitation patterns.iStockPhoto Seattles Bullitt Center (pictured here in progress) is a six-story solar-powered net zeroŽ building designed to make extensive reuse of rainwater, day lighting and other green amenities.JOE WOLF, courtesy FlickrBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Jan. 3 … Transocean Deepwater Inc., will plead guilty and pay $1.4 billion in civil and criminal penalties for its role in causing the nations largest oil spill in 2010, the U.S. government said Thursday. The Justice Department said in a statement that the company would plead guilty to violating the federal Clean Water Act, saying that it had filed the proposed settlement Thursday in U.S. District Court in Louisiana. The proposal is subject to court approval. Transocean, the worlds largest offshore drilling contractor, con“ rmed the proposed settlement in its own release sent to investors from its headquarters in Switzerland. The company said that as part of the agreement, the Justice Department wont pursue further action against it. The company admitted wrongdoing and will pay $400 million in criminal “ nes, and continue to help in a federal criminal investigation, DOJ said. Also, Transocean Ocean Holdings LLC, Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling Inc., Transocean Deepwater Inc. and Triton Asset Leasing GMBH agreed to pay an additional $1 billion to resolve federal Clean Water Act civil penalty claims for the three-month-long spill at the Macondo Well and the Transocean drilling rig Deepwater Horizon. The April 2010 spill shut down the northern Gulf of Mexico and, in addition to biological damage, caused a massive slowdown in the “ shing industry and tourism in Gulf economies, including along the Florida Panhandle. Eleven workers were killed and the spill was the largest in U.S. history. The spill also had an effect on oil drilling politics in Florida … effectively ending for the time discussions about opening more of the Gulf closer to Florida shores to new drilling. The settlement also requires the company and its subsidiaries to put in place measures to improve safety and emergency response ability at all drilling rigs in U.S. waters. This resolution of criminal allegations and civil claims against Transocean brings us one signi“ cant step closer to justice for the human, environmental and economic devastation wrought by the Deepwater Horizon disaster,Ž U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said in the statement. Transocean to pay $1.4B to settle claims Look us up online for News, Sports, & Special Events.www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 5B YOUR AD HERE Area Been Blend Bush Care Catch Cement Chip Claw Constructing Cook Dead Devils Disarm Door Drop Ease Eats Fame Final Fins Frog Gran Grin Gull Handkerchief Heal Kids Legend Limb Lots Melt Microphones Needs Next North Older Omit Pains Plug Post Racks Says This page sponsored in part by: Screw Send Shells Slid Snapped Sons Spiders Spite Sung Sweep Teas Thick Thorn Toad Tyre Unity Untying Water While Wine

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Rent or Own, use tax money as deposit, $550/month. 850-524-4090 (also have a 3/2 available) Mobile Homes For Sale SOPCHOPPY2 BR, 1 BA, Buy Owner w/ Screened Porch, on paved road, on 3 lots, lg covered shed for motor home or boat w/30amp electrical service. Psble owner finance $32,500 (850) 566-4124 Apartments Furnished SHELLPOINTPanoramic view from 3rd floor deck. Studio apartment has full size kitchen, huge bath, W/D, and king Murphy bed. Furnished. $650/month plus utilities, 6-month lease. 850-591-3306 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Cars MAZDA2006 Miata MX5 Grand Touring 40K Miles, Auto Transmission, Cloth Seats, MP-3 multi-Disk (6), $13,250 352-400-1551 Entertainment 460 COASTALHWY PANACEA, FL32346 850-713-0095 NOW OPEN HOURS M-TH 10AM -10PM F-SAT 10AM -12PM SUN 10AM -8PM Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com 5484-0110 TWN Vs. Austin, Hilda Case No. 12-348-CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO.: 12-348-CA THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON TRUSTCOMPANY, N.A. AS TRUSTEE FOR BCMSC SECURITIZATION TRUST2000-A, acting by and through GREEN TREE SERVICING LLC, as Servicing Agent, 7360 S. Kyrene Road, Tempe, AZ 85283 5492-0117 TWN Vs. Nelson, Delores Case No. 09-147-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO. 09-147-CA SPRINGLEAF HOME EQUITY, INC., formerly 5493-0117 TWN Vs. Reno, Richard Case #12-460-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE #12-460-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. RICHARD W. RENO and CHARLENE C. RENO, et al ; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:RICHARD W. RENO and CHARLENE C. RENO YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action on a promissory note and to foreclose a mortgage on the following property in Wakulla County, Florida See Exhibit A has been filed against you and all unknown parties claiming by, through, under, and against the herein named individual defendants who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said unknown parties may claim an interest as spouses, heirs, grantees or other claimants, and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Rick A. Savage, Esq., of the Savage Law Office, PLLC, plaintiffs attorney, whose address is Post Office Box 385, Tallahassee, Florida 32302 on or before 30 days from the date of the first publication of this notice and file the original with the clerk of this Court either before service on plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter, other a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint or petition. DATED on December 19, 2012. BRENT X THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D Willis, Deputy Clerk Exhibit AŽ Begin at the Southeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to J.H. Hudson by Davis Raker, et uxby Deed dated January 10, 1938 and recorded on Page 12 of Deed Book 23 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida and run East along the North boundary line of the right of way of the Crawfordville to St. Marks Public Road, also known as The Lower Bridge Road, for a distance of ninety-four (94) feet, thence run North one hundred fifty-five (155) feet, thence run West ninely-four (94) feet, thence run South one hundred fifty-five (155) feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Lying situate in Lot Seventy-seven (77) of Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida. Also described in that survey by Edwin G. Grown and Associates, Inc. Job #94-078 dated March 11, 1994 as follows: Begin at a concrete monument marking the Southeast corner of that certain tract of land conveyed to J.H. Hudson by Davis Raker, et ux by deed dated January 10, 1938 and recorded on Page 12 of Deed Book 23 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and thence run North 72 degrees 07 minutes 09 seconds East along the Northerly right-of-way boundary of State Road S-368 a distance of 93.67 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 14 degrees 06 minutes 56 seconds West 151.01 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 75 degrees 34 minutes 17 seconds West 35.99 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 78 degrees 33 minutes 19 seconds West 57.92 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 14 degrees 15 minutes 16 seconds East 159.66 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. January 10 & 17, 2013 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices AMERICAN GENERAL HOME EQUITY, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DELORES NELSON, etc, et vir, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to an order or a final judgment of foreclosure entered in the above-captioned action, I will sell the property situated in Wakulla County, Florida, described as: See Exhibit AŽ at public sale, to the highest and best bidder for cash, at the front lobbyof the Wakulla County Courthouse, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on the 14th day of February, 2013. That any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on December 12, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK,CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Sidney E. Lewis, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff 300 W. Adams Street, Suite 300 Jacksonville, Florida 32202 (904)-355-9003 #47361 Parcel I: All that certain land situate in Wakulla County,Florida: TRACT I: Commence at a point where the North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, intersects, the East right-of-way boundary of the Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee public road and thence run South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 209.00 feet for the Point of Beginning, from said Point of Beginning run South 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East 209.00 feet, thence run North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds East 209.00 feet, thence run South 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East 745.02 feet, thence run South 03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds West 361.08 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds West 1092.90 feet to the East right-of-way boundary of said public road, thence run North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds East along said right-of-way boundary177.87 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 7.55 acres, more or less. AND TRACT II: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West. Wakulla County, Florida with the Easterly right-of-way boundary of a graded county road (Old Tallahassee and Ochlockonee Public Road) and thence run South 84 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East along said North boundary 954.02 feet to the Point of Beginning, from said Point of Beginning continue South 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds East 174.92 feet to the Northeast corner of the South half of the Southeast quarter of said Section 12, thence run South 00 degrees 18 minutes 16 seconds East along the East boundary of said Section 12 a distance of 387.99 feet, thence run North 86 degrees 21minutes 50 seconds West 401.58 feet, thence run North 03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds East 387.07 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 3.45 acres, more or less. Parcel II: Tract I: Commence at a point where the North boundary line of the South half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida intersects the East right-of-way boundary of the Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee Public Road and thence run South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West along said right-of-way boundary 601.15 feet for the point of beginning. From said point of Beginning run North 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds East 214.28 feet, thence run South 86 degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds East 1,092.90 feet, thence run South 03 degrees 38 minutes 10 seconds West 200.00 feet, and thence run North 86 degrees 21 minutes 50 seconds West 1,169.82 feet, more or less, to the Point of Beginning. Less and Except that portion of the above described property lying within the following described parcel: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Townshlp 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, with the Easterly right of way boundary of a graded county road (Old Tallahassee and Ochlockonee Public Road) and thence run along said easterly right-of-way Boundary as follows: South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West 484.17 feet, South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West 60.72 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said. Point of Beginning continue South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West along said easterly right-of-way boundary 278.72 feet, thence leaving said easterly right-of-way boundary run South 72 degrees 56 minutes 50 seconds East 312.57 feet, thence run North 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds East 278.72 feet, thence run North 72 degrees 56 minutes 50 seconds West 312.57 feet to the Point of Beginning. Tract II: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast Quarter of Section 12,Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, with the easterly right-of-way boundary of a graded county road (Old Tallahassee and Ochlockonee Public Road) and thence run along said easterly right-of-way boundary as follows: South 24 degrees 40 minutes 26 seconds West 484.17 feet, South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West 578.85 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said point of Beginning continue South 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds West along said easterly right-ofway boundary 339.90 feet to the South boundary of said Section 12,Thence leaving said easterly rightof-way boundary run north 89 degrees 41minutes 52 seconds East along the South boundary of said section 12, a distance of 672.31 feet, thence leaving said south boundary run North 17 degrees 03 minutes 10 seconds East 339.90 feet thence run South 89 degrees 41 minutes 52 seconds West 672.31 feet to the point of beginning. Parcel III: Commence at the intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida, with the Easterly right-of-way boundary of a county graded road known as Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee Public Road, also known as Hill Green Road and thence run Southwesterly along said right-of-way boundary the following two (2) courses: South 24 degrees 39 minutes 53 seconds West 484.11 feet. South 16 degrees 59 minutes 53 seconds West 112.56 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 86 degrees 24 minutes 44 seconds East 1153.42 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) marking the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning run North 03 degrees 35 minutes 16 seconds East 174.01 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261),thence run South 86 degrees 14 minutes 02 seconds East 401.38 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the East boundary of said Section 12 (as monumented), thence run South 00 degrees 17 minutes 12 seconds East along said East boundary213.75 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said East boundary run North 86 degrees 14 minutes 02 seconds West 415.82 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence run North 03 degrees 35 minutes 16 seconds East 39.21 feet to the Point of Beginning, containing 2.00 acres, more or less. Together with a 30.00 foot wide access easement lying 15.00 feet each side of the following described line: Commence at the Intersection of the North boundary of the South half of the Southeast quarter of Section 12, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida with the Easterly right-of-way boundary of a county graded road known as Old Ochlockonee and Tallahassee Public Road, also known as Hill Green Road and thence run Southwesterly along said right-of-way boundary the following two (2) courses: South 24 degrees 39 minutes 53 seconds West 484.11feet, South 16 degrees 59 minutes 53 seconds West 97.14 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning and leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 86 degrees 24 minutes 44 seconds East 1149.84 feet to the point of beginning. Together with 1997 Skyline MH ID#s 46610857JB & 46610857JA January 10 & 17, 2013 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.com 4Br 2Ba House $850 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $1100 + Sec. Dep 2-3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850 + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650 + Sec. Dep. 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $750 + Sec. Dep 3Br 2Ba SWMH $550 + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $475 + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550 + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. 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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 7B Plaintiff, v. HILDAANN AUSTIN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HILDAANN AUSTIN, JO HARRIS, and STATE EMPLOYEES CREDITUNION, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO: HILDAANN AUSTIN, THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF HILDAANN AUSTIN, and JO HARRIS: YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Wakulla, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOT 56, GOLDEN GATE FOREST, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE 3 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA; TOGETHER WITH THAT CERTAIN 2000 FLEETWOOD 52 X 24 MOBILE HOME, SERIALNUMBER FLFLX70AB27540WC21. Commonly known as: 142 RUSSELLDRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327 You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 18th day of December, 2012. CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk January 3 & 10, 2013 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5476-0110 TWN vs. Jarvis, Marjorie Case No. 10000356CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE NO.10000356CA BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS SERVICING, LP, Plaintiff, v. MARJORIE S. JARVIS; RUSSELL A JARVIS; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 10000356CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 14th day of February, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the front Lobbyof the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 3, BLOCK A, GREAN LEA, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 2, PAGE(S) 66, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 66 GREANLEA DR. CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 (850) 577-4401 DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 12TH DAY OF DECEMBER, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk January 3 & 10, 2013 5477-0110 TWN Vs. Condrey, David 65-2012-CA-000011 Notice of Rescheduled Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION, CASE NO. 65-2012-CA-000011 PNC BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION Plaintiff, vs. DAVID P. CONDREY, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 10, 2012, and entered in Case No. 65-2012-CA-000011of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which PNC Bank, National Association, is the Plaintiff and David P. Condrey, Sheila A. Condrey, Silver Glen Homeowners Association, Inc., Silver Glen at Citrus Isles Homeowners Association, Inc., Silverglen Estates Homeowners Association, Inc., are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 14th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOT 20, OF SILVER GLEN, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF, AS RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK, PAGE 3, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 51 SIMMONS CT, PANACEA, FL 32346-2554 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens, must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 10th day of December, 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk January 3 & 10, 2013 5478-0110 TWN Vs. Garrett, Donna Case No. 65-2007-FC-000157 Notice of ReSched PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CASE No: 65-2007-FC-000157 WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR SECURITIZED ASSET BACKED RECEIVABLES LLC 2005-FR5 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-FR5, Plaintiff, vs. DONNA GARRETT, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF RESCHEDULED SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 10, 2012, and entered in Case No 65-2007-FC-000157 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida in which Wells Fargo Bank, National Association As Trustee For Securitized Asset Backed Receivasble LLC 2005-FR5 Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2005-FR5, is the Plaintiff and Donna Garrett, Calvary Portfolio Services, LLC as assignhee of Calvary Investments, LLC as assignee of Americredit, Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., Unknown Spouse of Donna Garrett, are defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in/on the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Wakulla County, Florida at 11:00 AM EST on the 14th day of Feburary, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment of Foreclosure: LOTS 50 AND 51, BLOCK 51, WAKULLA GARDENS, UNIT 5, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 56, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA A/K/A 46 BEELER RD, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated in Wakulla County, Florida this 10th day of December 2012. Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Albertelli Law, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 23028, Tampa, FL 33623 (813) 221-4743 In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, persons needing a special accomodation to participate in this proceeding should contact the ADA Coordinator not later than seven (7) days prior to the proceeding at the Office of the Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905; 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); 1-800 955-8770 (Voice), via Florida Relay Service. To file response please contact Wakulla County Clerk of Court, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327, Tel: (850) 926-0905l /faxL (850) 926-0901. Fax: (850) 926-0901. January 3 & 10, 2013 5479-0110 TWN Vs. Worrell, Kiersten Case #: 2011-CA-000137 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION, CASE #: 2011-CA-000137 Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage Plaintiff, -vs.Kiersten M. Worrell a/k/a Kiersten Worrell and David R. Worrell, Her Husband; Regions Bank; Villages of St. Marks Property OwnersAssociation, Inc.; Unknown Tenants in Possession #1; If living, and all Unknown Parties claiming by, through, under and against the above named Defendant(s) who are not known to be dead or alive, whether said Unknown Parties may claim an interest as Spouse, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees, or Other Claimants Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2011-CA-000137 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, Plaintiff and Kiersten M. Worrell a/k/a Kiersten Worrell and David R. Worrell, Her Husband are defendant(s), I, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDAAT11:00 A.M. on February 14, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 2, VILLAGES OF ST. MARKS, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 3, PAGES 70 THROUGH 74, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. 5480-0117 TWN Vs. Lehman, Nerissa Case #: 2012-CA-000030 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDACIVILDIVISION Case #: 2012-CA-000030 JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association Plaintiff, -vs.Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of foreclosure dated December 12, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2012-CA-000030 of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association, Plaintiff and Nerissa Paige Lehman a/k/a Nerissa P. Lehman are defendants(s), I, Clerk of Court, BRENTX. THURMOND, will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash ATTHE FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE LOCATED AT3056 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, HIGHWAY319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT11:00 A.M. on Feburary 21, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 38, BLOCK 7Ž, OF WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT TWO (2Ž), AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 42, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADACoordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850) 577-4430 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUITCOURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of Court ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 January 10 & 17, 2013 11-237156 FC01 CHE 5481-0117 TWN vs. Donham, Thomas Case No. 65-2008-FC-000263 Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 65-2008-FC-000263 US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FRE2, Plaintiff, vs. THOMAS T. DONHAM A/K/ATHOMAS E. DONHAM et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Judgment of Mortgage Foreclosure dated December 12, 2012 and entered in Case No. 65-2008-CA-000263 of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein US BANK NATIONALASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR SG MORTGAGE SECURITIES ASSET BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FRE2 is the Plaintiff and THOMAS T. DONHAM A/K/ATHOMAS E. DONHAM; SUSAN A. LUNDQUEST; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 21st day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: COMMENCE AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 33, TOWNSHIP5 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, AND RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 707.58 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 53 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 215.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING RUN SOUTH 68 DEGREES 58 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 107.05 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 15 SECONDS EAST 578.85 FEET TO THE NORTHERLYSHORE LINE OF THE OCHLOCKNEE RIVER, THENCE RUN NORTH 64 DEGREES 33 MINUTES 30 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID NORTHERLYSHORE LINE 110.64 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 15 SECONDS WEST 569.72 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A97 PAMELAPLACE, SOPCHOPPY, FL32358 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on December 12, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Ronald R Wolfe & Associates, P.L. P.O. Box 25018 Tampa, Florida 33622-5018 F08107224 WELLSLPS-CONV„-Team 6 -F08107224 **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850) 926-0905. January 10 & 17, 2013 5482-0117 TWN Vs. Kidwell, Joann 2012-CA-000185CANotice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDACASE NO. 2012-CA-000185CA NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE, LLC, PLAINTIFF, VS. JOANN KIDWELL, ETAL. DEFENDANT(S). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 13, 2012 in the above action, I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at Wakulla, Florida, on February 28, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Front lobby of courthouse -3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 for the following described property: Lots 30 and 31, of WAKULLAGARDENS, UNIT #3, as per Map or Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 43, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida ALSO TO INCLUDE: 1972 24X60 Baycrest Mobile Home ID #14171AAND #14171B Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. The Court, in its discretion, may enlarge the time of the sale. Notice of the changed time of sale shall be published as provided herein. 5483-0110 TWN Vs. DeCaprio, Alexis 65-2011-CA-000371 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO.:11-311-CA HARRY SPEAR, Plaintiff, v. ALEXIS J. DECAPRIO, a single woman; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGHT, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER GLAIMANTS, Defendants, NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 26, 2012, entered in Case No. 11-CA-000371 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein HARRY SPEAR, is the Plaintiff, and ALEXIS J. DECAPRIO, is the Defendant, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the front lobby of the Wakulla County Clerk of Courts Office, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m on January 31, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: See Exhibit AŽ Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after sale. DATED this 26th day of November, 2012. BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of the Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk EXHIBIT AŽ Parcel AŽ Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 17 minutes 50 seconds East 1356.32 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 00 degrees 17 minutes 33 seconds East 291.62 feet to a concrete monument lying on the approximate centerline of a 50 foot wide ingress/egress easement; thence run along said centerline South 89 degrees 28 minutes 41 seconds East 736.24 feet to a rod and cap; thence leaving said centerline run North 00 degrees 16 minutes 10 seconds East 590.80 feet to a rod and a cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 00 degrees 16 minutes 10 seconds East 588.95 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 27 minutes 32 seconds East 1225.47 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 40 minutes 55 seconds West 588.95 feet to a rod and cap; thence North 89 degrees 27 minutes 32 seconds West 1221.23 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 16.54 acres, more or less. Together with a 30 foot wide access and utility easement. Together with a 50 foot wide ingress/egress easement as recorded official Records Book 481, Page 69 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel BŽ Commence at a concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 17 minutes 50 seconds East 1356.32 feet to a concrete monument; thence North 00 degrees 17 minutes 33 seconds East 291.62 feet to a concrete monument lying on the approximate centerline of a 50 foot wide ingress/egress easement; thence run along said centerline South 89 degrees 28 minutes 41 seconds East 736.24 feet to a rod and cap for the POINT OF BEGINNING; thence from POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said centerline run North 00 degrees 16 minutes 10 seconds East 590.80 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 89 degrees 27 minutes 32 seconds East 1221.23 feet to a rod and cap; thence South 00 degrees 40 minutes 55 seconds West 590.39 feet to a rod and cap lying on the approximate centerline of said 50 foot wide ingress/egress easement; thence run along said centerline North 89 degrees 28 minutes 41 seconds West 1216.97 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 16.54 acres, more or less. Subject to a 30 foot wide access and utility easement lying over and across the Westerly 30 feet described thereof. Together with and subject to a 50 foot wide ingress/egress easement as recorded official Records Book 481, Page 69 of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Together with the following described 50 foot wide ingress and egress easement lying 25.00 feet each side of the following described centerline. Commence at a government concrete monument marking the Southwest corner of Section 11, Township 4 South, Range 2 West, Wakulla County, Florida; thence North 00 degrees 11 minutes 20 seconds East along the Westerly boundary of said Section 11 (as monument) a distance of 1355.66 feet to a government concrete monument, thence run North 00 degrees 13 minutes 51 seconds East along said Westerly boundary (as monument) a distance of 141.37 feet to the Northeasterly maintained right-of-way of Lawhon Mill Road, thence run South 43 degrees 11 minutes 52 seconds East along said maintained right-of-way 36.37 feet to the intersection with the centerline of aforesaid mentioned ingress and egress easement for the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING and leaving said maintained right-of-way run North 00 degrees 13 minutes 51 seconds East along said centerline 176.93 feet, thence run South 89 degrees 31 minutes 43 seconds East along the centerline 1929.29 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) thence continue South 89 degrees 31 minutes 43 seconds East along said centerline 704.30 feet to the Point of Terminus of said centerline. January 3 & 10, 2013 DATED: December 13, 2012. By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk of the Court (SEAL) Prepared by: Gladstone Law Group, P.A., 1499 W. Palmetto Park Rd., Suite 300, Boca Raton, FL33486 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson at 850-577-4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this motification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. January 10 & 17, 2013 12-000725-F\2012-CA-000185CA\Nationstar Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices BRENTX. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, DEPUTYCLERK OF COURT ATTORNEYFOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACHE, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, FL33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 January 3 & 10, 2013 10-211540 FC01 UPN Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!77 Strattonwood Road Off of Wakulla Springs Hwy. 5 minute commute to Tallahassee. Large 3BR/2BA home on 5 acres. Large workshop with outbuilding. $1100. mo No Pets, no smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 4 Bedroom or 3 Bedroom with Den, 2 Bath Home located on 1 acre with above ground pool. No smoking. $1100 per month with $1100 Deposit. Call Cristy 519-9039. • 2 Bedroom and 2 1/2 bath town home. (Two master suites upstairs) $800 per month with $800 deposit. No Smoking. Call Cristy 519-9039 • 51A Dispennette3BR/2BA $750 mo/$750 Security. Pets ok with $250 fee.• 29 Horseshoe Trail 3BR/2BA DWMH $650 Mo. $650 Security deposit. • 17 Cessna 3 BR/2BA TARPINE. Available end of December. $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security. No Smoking, No Pets. • 5 Susquehanna 2 BR/2BA $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets O.K. with prior approval and $250 fee. No Smoking. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit • 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! • 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit.

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 23 34 39 44 47 58 64 68 71 2 35 59 3 36 60 4 27 40 61 18 41 52 5 15 24 37 48 65 69 72 6 25 53 7 21 28 45 49 62 8 26 42 54 66 9 29 43 67 22 38 50 63 10 16 19 30 51 70 73 11 31 46 55 12 32 56 13 33 57 ACROSS 1. Cartoon collectibles 5. Be petty 10. Hold jacks or better 14. Cosmetics "caller" 15. Put up with 16. Curly veggie 17. Emaciated one 19. Diva's delivery 20. Staffordshire stink 21. Lamb, notably 23. Crammers, in short time 26. Anderson's "High __" 27. Scarecrow stuffing 29. Thumb through, as pages 34. Tooth care org. 37. Bar intro? 38. Great Lakes tribesmen 39. Life, in a "Forrest Gump" simile 44. High standard 45. Right-angle bend 46. B'way hit sign 47. Horseshoes throws 49. Nehi drinker on TV 52. Mini-album s, for short 54. Strikes out 58. Idaho's nickname 63. Amtrak's Northeast Corridor bullet train 64. Zillions 65. Source of unforeseen trouble 68. Four-star review 69. Destroy gradually 70. Roth, et al. 71. Bumped off 72. Darn again 73. Full of streaksDOWN1. Explorer John or Sebastian 2. Steer clear of 3. Bits of business card art 4. Pigs' rooting tools 5. Semi section 6. Blood-typing letters 7. Jungle transport 8. i.e., for long 9. Rent collector 10. "Sure, why not?" 11. __-mutuel 12. Dubya and classmates 13. Cl utter-free 18. Fingerboard ridge 22. Israel's Sharon 24. Grid great Dickerson 25. Obi, e.g. 28. Courter 30. Lobster __ Diavolo 31. Starts' partner 32. Lecher's look 33. Old US gas brand 34. "This won't hurt __!" 35. Bird clubbed to extinction 36. Gives walking papers to 40. Western Hemisphere gp. 41. Like a basestealing threat 42. Decked out 43. Word on shoppe signs 48. It keeps things apart 50. What "there oughta be" 51. Pistol's kickback 53. Rubberneck 55. "Girls Lie Too" country singer Clark 56. Violinist Mischa 57. Fresh-mouthed 58. Needle-nosed fishes 59. Carrier to BenGurion 60. Turn in chess 61. Hobo fare 62. Slaughter in baseball 66. Words of praise 67. Hardly any American Prole Hometown Content 1/6/2013 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 12 34 5 6 5178 51 6 31 56 429 9 8 5164 387126 200 9 HometownContent 812 3749 5 6 453619728 697285431 769 438512 235197684 148526397 926 843175 571962843 384751269 C A B O T A B I T G A R S E V A D E D O D O E L A L L O G O S A X E S M O V E S N O U T S O A S S T E W F R E T F L E E T C A B E R I C S P A C E R A B O S A S H S T A R E V I N E W O O E R E N O S I D E S T C L A D O D E L E S S O R O L D E F E W A R I E L A L A W O K A Y F R A R E C O I L P A R I F I T S T E R R I E L I S L E E R E L M A N N E A T E S S O S A S S Y 5485-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEEDTAX DEED FILE NO. 2012 TXD 015 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatTEFLA INVESTMENTSthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #2381 Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-078-013-11173-000MAGNOLIA GARDENS BLOCK L LOT 14 DB 59 P 30 OR 628 P 121 Name in which assessedANA GARCIAsaid property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5486-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 016 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #79 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #: 02-6S-03W-143-01308-B05OCHLOCKNEE RIVER ESTATES UNIT 1 BLOCK B LOT 5 OR 65 P 566 & OR 90 P 679 Name in which assessedWAYNE COOPER said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this4th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5487-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 017 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #700 5488-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 018 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #702 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #: 17-3S-01E-096-05326-000TOWN OF WANETA SQUARE 21 LOT 1 OR 62 P 880 & OR 46 P 923 Name in which assessedJ.W. CATES, JOHN C. WAGNER JR & FRANCES C. WOODWARD said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificate shall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be sold to the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M. Dated this5thday of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5489-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #846 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-016-006-06445-000WAKULLA RIVER ESTATES U1 BLOCK C LOT 54 OR 14 P 284 Name in which assessedMRS TEMPLE M BROWN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be 5490-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 020 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatLUCILE HAMLIN-CARTERthe holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #1184 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-043-010-09110-000WAKULLA GARDENS UNIT 3 BLOCK 30 LOT 8 OR 14 P 568 Name in which assessedMRS M.A. KENT, C/O MICHAEL BIACHETL said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 5491-0124 TWN NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR TAX DEED TAX DEED FILE NO.2012 TXD 021 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, thatED BRIMNER the holder of the following certificate has filed said certificate for a tax deed to be issued thereon. The certificate number and year of issuance, the description of the property, and the names in which it was assessed are as follows:Certificate #2468 Year of Issuance2010Description of Property: Parcel #: 00-00-092-000-11681-0003 ACRES LOCATED IN THE SW 1/4 OF HS LOT 92 DESC AS COM AT NE CORNER OF HS LOT 101 RUN WEST 30 CHAINS 8 LINKS TO POB THEN NORTHWARD 5 CHAINS Name in which assessedROBERT ALLEN said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices Tax Deed Notices redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 Year of Issuance2005Description of Property: Parcel #: 17-3S-01E-096-05296-000TOWN OF WANETA SQUARE 9 LOT 12 Name in which assessedHEIRS OF A C WILLIAMSON said property being in the County of Wakulla, State of Florida. Unless such certificateshall be redeemed according to law the property described in such certificate shall be soldto the highest bidder at the courthouse door on the 13th day of February, 2013 at 10:00 A.M.Dated this5th day of December2012 Signature: Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk By: Donna Richardson, Deputy Clerk Clerk of the Circuit Court, Wakulla County, Florida January 3, 10, 17 & 24, 2013 Submit your Special Event and we will include it in The Wakulla News Week in WakullaContact: jjensen@thewakullanews.net(850) 926-7102fax (850) 926-3815

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 – Page 9B 1. MUSIC: What is rap singer Eminems real name? 2. U.S. PRESIDENTS: Who was the first president to attend a baseball game? 3. ANATOMY: What is another name for the breastbone? 4. ARCHITECTURE: What is a colonnade? 5. ANIMAL KINGDOM: What is a kookaburra? 6. LITERATURE: Who wrote the novel The Last Picture ShowŽ? 7. HISTORY: What caused the Irish potato famine? 8. MOVIES: What horror film launched Johnny Depps film career? 9. GEOGRAPHY: What is the longest river in China? 10. MEDICINE: What is milk of magnesia used for? 2013 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Marshall Mathers 2. Benjamin Harrison, on June 6, 1892 3. Sternum 4. A sequence of columns 5. A type of kingfisher native to Australia and New Guinea 6. Larry McMurtry 7. A fungus called potato blight 8. A Nightmare on Elm StreetŽ 9. Yangtze River 10. As an antacid and a laxative YOUR AD HERE

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Continued from Page 1B We must recognize this industry for the improvement being made and keep encouraging additional improvements. I think we can all agree that some packaging, however, is excessive. It wastes energy and valuable materials, and contributes to waste disposal problems. Sometimes when improvements are made for convenience sake or to increase shelf life, the packages produced use more material, or are more difficult or impossible to re-use or recycle. Many products are available in a wide choice of packages options. Juice, for example, can be purchased in cans, bottles, jars, cartons, or single-serve juice boxes. Milk can be purchased that is shelf-stable, requiring refrigeration, or as frozen concentrate; you as a consumer have the choice. When you shop, choose the type of packaging that has the least environmental impact in terms of energy use, amount of materials used, or recyclability. The amount of packaging going into the waste stream can be reduced signi“ cantly. Here are some additional examples of the pre-cycling strategy: € Begin your Enviroshopping before you go to the store. Take shopping bags back to the store so you wont need to get new ones every time. I know you are tired of hearing this but sit outside a grocery store and watch the plastic bags being used. We still need to make progress in this area. € Look for packages that use the least amount of materials. Avoid those that use several layers when one would do. € Buy products in the largest quantity possible in one package. One large jug of cleaner uses less packaging material per ounce than several small bottles. Re“ ll a smaller spray bottle or dispenser from the large jug. Whenever they are available buy concentrated products then dilute them at home in a larger reusable container. € Look for products with re-usable dishes, rather than throw-away. € Fresh fruits and vegetables are available unpackaged or packed on trays with a plastic “ lm. Select just the pieces you want. Do you really need them bagged? € Consider the packaging materials in two quart containers and in a one halfgallon container. The two quart uses more packaging than the one half-gallon container. If 70 million Americas bought a half gallon container of milk a week instead of two quarts, they would reduce paper discards by 41.6 million pounds and plastic discards by 5.7 million pounds o year. Think carefully about the convenience of a product compared to its environmental impact. Although many of these suggested changes will need to be made at the corporate level, our discussion can lead to future changes that will impact our environment. You can improve the quality of life for yourself and our society by adopting environmentally appropriate behavior. You may think your part wont be enough to matter; your garbage by itself is not a problem. But when you add it to the garage of your neighbors, your towns, your countys, the whole state, then the problem has grown to huge proportions. Remember Little drops of water make a mighty ocean.Ž Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, January 10, 2013 www.thewakullanews.comSwenson: Pre-cycling is another step towards living sustainably -Janet By GREG and DOROTHY PATENTContributors, Relish magazineThe great island state of Hawaii is its own melting pot, with the foods of the native Hawaiians blending with those of immigrant workers. A favorite hodgepodge Hawaiian specialty is saimin, a delicious noodle soup. Saimin is said to have begun as a snack at ball games in Honolulu Stadium, where it became more popular than hot dogs and hamburgers. Today, it is eaten as a snack or sometimes for breakfast. Even McDonalds serves saimin in Hawaii. Hawaiians would add a serving of rice to make it a real meal. Saimin is basically a soup made with chicken or “ sh broth and egg noodles. After the noodles are cooked until just soft and ladled into bowls with hot broth, other ingredients are added on top. In Hawaii, typical toppings include cooked egg, sliced green onions, strips of Spam (Spam is a favorite food in the islands), pieces of Portuguese sausage, slices of Asian “ shcake, and/ or strips of Chinese roast pork called char sui. You can add colorful vegetables such as carrots, a few spinach leaves or bok choy. Serve saimin in large, deep bowls and eat it with a soup spoon and chopsticks. SAIMIN You can prep the “ rst 3 steps of the dish hours ahead. The “ nal cooking will only take a couple of minutes. 8 ounces dried Chinese egg noodles 1 tablespoon roasted sesame oil 1 to 2 cups broccoli ” owerets 4 cups reduced-sodium chicken broth 3 slices fresh ginger 8 ounces extra-“ rm tofu, well-drained and patted dry 2 tablespoons vegetable cooking oil, divided 2 large eggs, lightly beaten and seasoned with salt and pepper 1 teaspoon soy sauce 1/4 teaspoon salt Freshly ground black pepper 1/4 pound fresh snow peas, stringed 1 1/2 cups sliced bok choy or Napa cabbage 6 ounces cooked chicken or pork, chopped or shredded 1 cup fresh bean sprouts 2 green onions, thinly sliced on the bias Additional roasted sesame oil for drizzling on top 1. Cook noodles following package directions. Drain well, rinse in cold water, and combine with sesame oil in a large bowl. 2. Cook broccoli in 2 to 3 cups boiling water 2 to 3 minutes or until crisp-tender. Drain and rinse in cold water. Drain again and set aside. 3. Heat broth and ginger in a large saucepan over low heat about 30 minutes; do not allow it to boil. Remove ginger. 4. Cut tofu into 1/2-inch-thick squares and blot well with paper towels. Heat 1 tablespoon vegetable oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. When hot, add tofu and cook on both sides 5 to 6 minutes or until golden brown. Set aside on paper towels. Add remaining 1 tablespoon vegetable oil to pan; when hot, add egg and rotate pan to “ lm the bottom with a thin layer of egg. When egg has set on the bottom, carefully ” ip it over. Slide egg crepe onto a plate and cool. Roll up to form a tight cylinder and cut crosswise into thin strips. 5. When ready to serve, season broth with soy sauce, salt and pepper. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat; add snow peas and cabbage. Cook 1 minute. Add noodles, broccoli, pork or chicken, tofu, egg strips and bean sprouts; cook 30 seconds longer. Divide into bowls, scatter green onions on top and drizzle with sesame oil. Serve immediately. Serves 4. Per serving: 520 calories, 21g fat, 32g prot., 50g carbs., 5g “ ber, 1050mg sodium. For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. To download our new Relish digital editions and Relish Daily Dish phone app, go to relish.com/mobile. RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLETry Hawaiian saimin … a delicious noodle soupMARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY F ree Trees Saturday, January 1910:00 am 1:00 pm Hudson Park Rain or Shine Bring empty, black plant pots to enter a raf”e for a large tree.Organized by the Iris Garden Club with the support of Florida Division of Forestry, Sarracenia Chapter of the Florida Native Plant Society, Just Fruits & Exotics, Purple Martin Nursery, & Wakulla County Parks & RecreationCRAWFORDVILLEARBOR DAY2000 young trees will be given away!Redbud, Dogwood, Red Maple, Chickasaw Plum, Hophornbeam, Tulip Poplar, Shumard Oak, Longleaf Pines & more. IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARS OPEN Main Store: Mon. Sat. 8-6 Bait Shop: Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 Bait Shop (850) 926-1162 FULL Selection of Frozen Bait In Shore & Off Shore Tackle G E T READY FOR HUN T IN G Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator