Wakulla news

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Title:
Wakulla news
Physical Description:
Newspaper
Language:
English
Publisher:
George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication:
Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
weekly

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
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newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates:
30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Additional Physical Form:
Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note:
Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note:
Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note:
Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.

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University of Florida
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All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID:
UF00028313:00443

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Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 50th Issue Thursday, December 27, 2012 O n e S e c t i o n One Section 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k k l l l l P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe WakullaPublic Notices ....................................................................Page 3 The Opinion Page ..............................................................Page 4 Church................................................................................Page 5 Church................................................................................Page 5 Obituary .............................................................................Page 7 School ................................................................................Page 8 Water Ways.................................................................... Page 9 Senior Citizens ................................................................. Page 10 Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 11 Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 12 In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 13 Classi eds ....................................................................... Page 14 Legal Notices ...................................................................Page 14 Comics .............................................................................Page 17 Natural Wakulla ...............................................................Page 18 INDEX OBITUARY Robert Andrew Smith SPIRIT PAWSBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netR.H. Carter, the longtime executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens Center, publicly announced this week that he will step down from the post next month. In past interviews, Carter has indicated that during his time as Senior Center director he had often weighed retiring, but said there was always some project underway that he felt passionate about that kept him from leaving. Asked why now, Carter said his wife needs additional help nowadays. He also added that on Jan. 23 he will turn 70 and that everyone has to stop sometime. On Friday, Dec. 21, Carter said he will continue to be involved at the center, and pointed to ongoing plans to develop an Adult Daycare Center.Continued on Page 3R.H. Carter announces retirement Longtime Senior Center director to be replaced by Maurice LangstonLittle being done to help oystermen in Wakulla R.H. CarterR.H. Carter re ects on 15 years at the Senior Center in his column, Young at Heart, Page 10A. MELINDA WILDE/SPECIAL TO THE NEWSSpirit Paws members are Ally Smith, Demarcus Rowls, Taylor Marshall, Cheyenne Scott, Madison Loree, Michael Wilde, Destiny Green and Shawn Perry. (Not all pictured) Cheerleaders at Riversprings work with special needs students on cheers and dance routinesBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhat began as an idea has grown into a fullfledged, year-round program at Riversprings Middle School that is changing the way students view others who are different from themselves. Eight students who are in the Exceptional Student Education class at RMS are involved in this program, a cheer group called the Spirit Paws. They learn cheers and perform at parades, events and competitions. Members of this group are taught cheers and dance routines by the RMS cheerleaders, who also create the routines and cheers. Watching the RMS cheerleaders interact with the special needs kids is wonderful,Ž says Melinda Wilde. Her son, Michael, has cerebral palsy and is a member of the Spirit Paws. My son, along with the other kids, loves it,Ž she says. The group was started in October by Catherine Small, a guidance counselor at RMS and cheerleading coach, after she attended a committee meeting which discussed the upcoming Focus on Ability event which celebrates students in the ESE program in the district, as well as the teachers, staff and businesses who employ students and people with disabilities. She asked Tanya English about the possibility of performing at the event and told her of the idea to incorporate the students with special needs. Its something Ive wanted to do for a long time,Ž Small says. She then had nine days to prepare for the performance. The cheerleaders went into the ESE classroom and started working with and teaching the members of the Spirit Paws the cheers and dance routine. They just caught on so fast,Ž Small says. Once the girls started teaching the other students she knew she needed to come up with a name and so Spirit Paws was born. The Spirit Paws then needed a uniform and logo. Through donations from various people, she was able to get eight uniforms in time for their first performance.Continued on Page 7 Spirit Paws cheerleader Ally Smith performing at the Focus on Ability event.JENNIFER JENSENBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netFollowing an assessment of the oyster resources in Apalachicola Bay performed by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services which revealed the oyster population was severely depleted and severely stressed, Gov. Rick Scott requested a “ shery disaster declaration from Levy to Franklin counties from the U.S. Department of Commerce. That request was made in September and is still pending. Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission Executive Director Nick Wiley said in order for there to be a “ shery disaster declaration, they have to show economic loss. And we cant document it until its happened,Ž Wiley said at a Dec. 5 meeting of the FWC in Apalachicola. And its happening right now.Ž The prolonged drought and low level of fresh water coming from the Apalachicola River into the Bay caused oyster resource level that have not been this low since immediately after Hurricane Elena in 1985, according to the department of agriculture. Tropical Storm Debby, which was followed by Tropical Storm Isaac further impacted the resources. In Wakulla County, the problem was several years of drought combined with too much fresh water caused by Debby. Oysters require a delicate balance of fresh and salt water. If salinity levels are high for a prolonged period of time, they contribute to an increase in mortality rates, said David Heil of the Division of Marine Fisheries Management of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. Heil gave an update to members of the FWC Commission at the meeting in Apalachicola. Heil said, Its greater than Franklin County and Apalachicola Bay.Ž FWC Commissioner Ron Bergeron said, A lack of water or too much water is sudden death to an environment and to the economy of this community as well.Ž He added that this issue is about jobs, growth and a culture. This should take a very high priority,Ž he said. The governor also requested “ nancial assistance and earlier this month, the U.S. Department of Labor announced a $2.7 million national emergency grant to fund temporary jobs for eligible dislocated workers in the oyster and “ shery industries. However, that grant is only available to Franklin County. Wakulla County Administrator David Edwards said it is his understanding that the money will only be used to help those oystermen in Franklin County. The grant will provide temporary work to oystermen and will include reshelling the Bay with live and dead oyster material from unaffected areas of the Bay to those oyster bars damaged by the storm. The reshelling project will operate through June 30, 2013. Edwards said the oystermen in Franklin County came over to Wakulla County after getting all they could grab in Franklin. That doubled the amount of people getting up the oysters and now we dont have any,Ž Edwards said. Ronald Fred Crum, business owner and member of the Wakulla Fishermens Association, said a big problem with the oyster industry is over-harvesting. He said the oysters are starting to come back after suffering from the 30 inches of rain from Tropical Storm Debby. However, there is a need for stricter enforcement and to safeguard the nursery areas to protect the future of the industry. The areas that are closed need to be clearly marked. It is dif“ cult to tell the closed areas from the open ones, Crum said. We need jobs for these people,Ž Crum said. We have to look to the future.Ž Currently, Edwards said theres a lot of conversation happening about the problem, but nothing has been done so far to help those oystermen who are suffering in Wakulla. Edwards is hopeful that money received from the RESTORE Act will be able to fund projects to help oystermen with temporary work and financial assistance, but also fund a sustainable solution to the problem. Crum said there needs to be education and a plan to use that money to build the oyster industry, not provide short term solutions. We have a real opportunity here,Ž Crum said. It could be a while before the county sees any money from the RESTORE Act, so in the meantime it is looking to the department of agriculture for help. At the FWC meeting, Wiley said FWC is working with numerous agencies to address the cause of this problem, as well as look at ways to sustain the industry. This issue has really been elevated,Ž Wiley said.

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage? all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ HOLIDAY PHOTOSBy DAVID ROYSETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 21 … Policymakers react, and often over-react, to the most recent incomprehensible tragedy all the time. In fact, it seems that much of what legislators do is respond to the parade of terrible things that scroll across our TV screens, from terrorist attacks to children abused to death to anecdotes about the latest dangerous drug. Often, people wish theyd study a little longer, look a little more thoughtfully, rather than react sharply to what may be an isolated incident. But sometimes theres an incident so unspeakably terrible, or so frightening because of its randomness … the idea that there, but for the grace of God, go we all, that it seems ludicrous to study whether reacting is needed. The school shooting last week in Connecticut was one of those, where doing nothing … even if people cant agree on what to do … just seems so inadequate. But when policy makers start asking what should be done, theyre back at square one, with the realization that even in their shared grief and disbelief, people dont all agree on where to even start to address the most recent horror. Many times when theres a tragedy, theres an immediate retrenchment to often-heard, now clichd positions. This time was a bit different. Among those elected to think about public policy there was mostly stunned silence this week, a weariness delaying the usual bitterness that comes when emotionally charged issues must be debated. While 20 kids and 6 adults in Newtown, Conn., were on the minds of everyone this week, hardly anyone seemed able to start talking much about how to keep it from happening again. Too soon, many said. Just dont know the answer, others said. Few who fear or loathe restrictions on guns were willing to talk much at all. After initially saying the problem is that there arent enough guns in schools, Rep. Dennis Baxley, R-Ocala, said, when sought out for follow-up interviews, that he didnt really want to talk about the too-emotional issue anymore. Gov. Rick Scott also declined to get pulled into debating the answer to what must be done … saying that can come later after a proper period of mourning. Even when national TV host Soledad OBrien expressed frustration … saying she hopes the next school shooting doesnt happen before the governor and others are willing to do something … Scott said he wasnt ready to pronounce what the answer is. There will be plenty of time,Ž Scott said. I support the Second Amendment, I believe in the Second Amendment,Ž Scott said. What I want to focus on right now is the families, and to make sure our schools are safe.Ž In Florida, guns are pretty common … we learned that there are a million concealed carry permit holders in the state as of this past week. And policy makers already talk quite a bit about the role of guns in our lives, in part because its a state with a lot of gun violence. Weve just come off several months of examining the stand your ground law,Ž after the death of just one kid who was unlucky, in the wrong place at the wrong time. But this week there wasnt much. No one “ led gun control legislation. No one “ led legislation to strengthen gun owners rights. There was also little talk about mental health. There was a mention of school security by Gov. Scott, who asked school districts to review their safety and security plans. And late this week, Rep. Mike Fasano, R-New Port Richey, suggested there should be a police of“ cer in every school. But mostly, the nations biggest ongoing topic of discussion this week seemed so unbelievable that it apparently was hard to know how to react. ELECTION CORRECTION And so this week, the biggest story in Florida was about something that happened back in November. While Scott this week was unwilling to begin the conversation deeply on school safety, or gun safety, he did make news midweek when he seemed to implicitly acknowledge that Republicans may have made an error when they reduced the number of early voting days from 14 to 8. Scott, who signed legislation in 2011 which did exactly that, said on CNN this week that hes determined that the number of early voting days must be closely looked at to see if we need to addŽ more early voting days. He didnt commit to that, but clearly was acknowledging what critics have said, that it may be that if more people had voted early, fewer of them would have been there to get stuck in long lines on Election Day. In raising the possibility that the state could return to more early voting, Scott could be seen as laying the groundwork to help his Democratic opponent … more in a bit on that … because Democrats have claimed that their voters are most hurt by reduced early voting. It could also be moot … since Republican lawmakers reduced early voting and Democrats won the presidential race in Florida anyway. Scott also raised another very intriguing idea … that while obvious in some ways is also surprising when looked at through a political lens. Scott said what common sense has long said: that long, dif“ cult to understand ballot questions are a bad idea. Thats likely a big part of what slowed things down on Election Day, Scott said this week, and maybe the ballot length should be looked at. The political irony, of course, is that its his fellow Republicans in the Legislature who put those long constitutional amendment proposals onto the ballot. And they arent hamstrung by some of the limits that citizen movements are in putting proposals on the ballot. Scott also mentioned a third idea, giving local supervisors of election more flexibility on setting up polling places. Meanwhile, a MiamiDade grand jury this week also recommended more early voting as part of its look at elections. CHARLIE CRIST, SUPERSTAR The other news this week in state political circles also jumped out of the past. Charlie Crist is back in a big way, according to a poll released this week by Quinnipiac University. Crist, a former Republican governor, recently switched from independent to Democrat … further stoking the speculation that hes planning to run against Scott in 2014. This weeks poll might encourage him. The poll found that a lot of Florida voters still think that Scott isnt doing a very good job … despite months and months of job growth and the lowest unemployment rate people have seen since, well, the Crist administration. Turns out, a lot of people think the national economic improvement is carrying Florida along. Obviously, the governor has almost two years to go until the election and anything is possible, but he faces a herculean task in changing public opinion to his favor,Ž said Quinnipiac pollster Peter Brown. And the news was even better for Crist, who was governor as a Republican from 2007 to 2011, because it found he has a 47 percent favorable rating and just a 33 percent unfavorable mark among all voters. His favorability among Democrats is 65 percent and among independents is 48 percent, but only 28 percent of Republicans have a favorable view of Crist, compared to 56 percent who have an unfavorable view. The other most likely Democratic candidate, Alex Sink, who narrowly lost to Scott in 2010, overall is viewed favorably by just 27 percent of voters and unfavorably by 14 percent, but 57 percent of respondents didnt have an opinion. A PASSING OF NOTE: Doyle Conner, who was the states agriculture commissioner for an incredible 30 years, from 1961 to 1991, died last weekend. Conner, who was 83, also served a term as speaker of the Florida House at the age of 28, and remains the youngest to hold that post in the states history. STORY OF THE WEEK: Gov. Rick Scott raises the possibility of reversing course on election law changes made just a couple years ago, suggesting that early voting may need to be expanded again after he signed a law reducing it, and raising the idea of shortening the ballot. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: People are frustrated in our state. Weve got to restore con“ dence in our elections.Ž Gov. Rick Scott on why he thinks a new look at early voting and other elections procedures are needed. WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Speechless after school shooting, talking about electoral change Send us your holiday photosEmail pictures to editor@thewakullanews.net Layla Scott, 1. Andrew Nix, 7. Santa on the courthouse.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following application and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, January 14, 2013, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, February 4, 2013, beginning at 5:00 P.M., or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. The proposed amendment is included in a proposed ordinance entitled: Copies of applications, draft ordinances, and any related public record “les may be viewed at the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department located at 11 Bream Fountain Road, Crawfordville, FL 32327, 8 AM to 4:30 PM M/F; Phone (850) 926-3695. Any person desiring to appeal any decision made with regard to this matter must ensure a verbatim transcript or copy is made of the testimony and exhibits presented at said hearings. Persons needing special access considerations should call the Board Of“ce at least 48 hours before the date for scheduling purposes. The Board Of“ce may be contacted at (850) 9260919 or TDD 926-7962. NO FINAL ACTION ADOPTING THE PROPOSED AMENDMENT WILL BE TAKEN AT THESE MEETINGS. DECEMBER 27, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners proposes to consider the following applications and/or adopt the following by ordinance and has scheduled Public Hearings before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, January 14, 2013, beginning at 7:00 P.M. and before the Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners on Monday, February 4, 2013, beginning at 5:00 PM, or as soon thereafter as the matter can be heard. All public hearings will be held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. DECEMBER 27, 2012 The Wakulla County Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners propose to consider the following application. Public Hearings are scheduled regarding the following before the Wakulla County Planning Commission on Monday, January 14, 2013, beginning at 7:00 PM, and before the Board of County Commissioners on Monday, February 4, 2013 beginning at 5:00 PM, unless otherwise noted below or as time permits. All public hearings are held at the County Commission Chambers located west of the County Courthouse at 29 Arran Road, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. Interested parties are invited to attend and present testimony. DECEMBER 27, 2012 FAIR HOUSING / EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY DECEMBER 27, 2012 Continued from Page 1Maurice Langston, who recently lost the election for sheriff, was announced as Carters replacement. Langston has served on the Senior Center board of directors for years, and is the centers chaplain. Langston recalled a comment made on election night, after learning he lost the race to Charlie Creel, that when one door closes, God opens another door.Ž He said on Friday, I didnt realize the door would be grand.Ž Carter is set to step down Jan. 18, and Langston will take over of“ cially on Jan. 21. There will be some transition, though, with Langston coming on part-time after the “ rst of the year. Its a wonderful opportunity,Ž Langston said. Im so excited to serve the people of Wakullas Greatest Generation.Ž Carter said he had considered leaving in December, but wanted to stay through the hiring of a new chef to replace Mary Harrison, the beloved cook at the facility. Carter said the position wasnt advertised because the Board of Directors didnt want a pool of applicants who just wanted a job … but rather wanted to focus on those who are already involved and passionate about helping senior citizens. That group includes donors and the more than 150 volunteers who work at the Senior Center, Carter said. A search committee interviewed applicants, and the top three were interviewed by the board. Langston was the unanimous choice, Carter said. While the post of executive director is primarily about “ nancial management and personnel management, Carter said the most ful“ lling part of his job was dealing with the seniors themselves. We dont build widgets to make a pro“ t for a corporation … we provide personal services,Ž he said. Carter commended his staff for their commitment and dedication to the seniors, and said he was proud of his role in building the new Senior Center … which replaced the use of the building that currently houses the county building department … and the construction of new apartments on the land adjacent to the center. Our county was ready for something like this,Ž he said. I was just so lucky to be here during this period of time. I never had a project I didnt get full support of the board. He said he is still determined to see a Adult Daycare Center built, and says that is the current greatest need in the community. But its obvious that his connection to the individuals at the center has made the biggest impact on him. Tears clouded his eyes as he recalled some of the past seniors hes known during his tenure. It has blessed my soul,Ž he said of the experiences. And Im a better person for being here.Ž He recalled a senior citizen at the old facility who was there daily, when it was open Tuesday through Friday. Carter remembered the man sat apart from others, never got involved. He spoke to the man about the importance of the meals the center served … yes, the man acknowledged the only meals he got were the one served at the center, and he took three frozen meals home for the weekend. But he told Carter it was the other people he went to the center for. On Saturday, Sunday and Monday, he sat alone in his home waiting for Tuesday. The next week, Carter opened the facility for Monday through Friday. There was the woman who told him one Tuesday that the only thing she really wanted was coconut cake. Carter communicated that wish to Chef Mary. But the woman died within a couple of days. Chef Mary went ahead with the coconut cake and it was served on Tuesday … and Carter told the other seniors the story. They were all happy to be sharing the womans coconut cake. I truly believe that one day each of us will stand beside a measuring stick to measure what we have done for others,Ž Carter says. I feel good about what I have done.ŽR.H. Carter announces retirement; Maurice Langston to replace him R.H. Carter and Maurice LangstonWILLIAM SNOWDEN

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Though hes the last person to seek personal credit for his accomplishments, R.H. Carter deserves a standing ovation from the citizens of this community. He took what was a well-intentioned but lackluster Senior Center and made it into something that is truly wonderful. Visit the Senior Center on any given weekday and look at the number of people there taking part in the activities. Theres also seniors aided by Meals on Wheels and other programs, not to mention the apartments next door. Carter is always quick to credit the staff and Board of Directors for their efforts in caring for seniors and raising money to keep the center going. Its true that staff is the front line and that the board has been involved in the decision-making. But the truth is, none of this would be happening without Carter. Because of his vision for what the Senior Center could be, and his determination to see it through … and make sure it continues … thats why it is what it is. May I make the modest suggestion that the Senior Center be named for him? I know the Board of Directors considered the idea before, when the new facility was built … but Carter said no to the idea back then. But there is no one more deserving of having a building named for them, especially the Senior Center, than R.H. Carter. No one has done more for seniors in this community, or been constantly battling to make sure theres money to keep the doors open and programs going. Grants arent enough to keep the Senior Center going … it takes constant fundraising. And the center has a great group on its fundraising committee who are constantly seeking new and interesting ways to raise money. But it goes back to Carter … and the people he draws to the center, and the loyalty he inspires because he truly cares about people. I think the R.H. Carter Senior Citizen Center has a nice ring to it.William Snowden is the editor of The News. Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• ‘A kiss under the mistletoe’ has long tradition • Wakulla’s share of RESTORE Act monies could be between $10 million and $41 million • TCC Wakulla gets approval from planning commission for new Environmental Institute • Sheriff’s Report for Dec. 20, 2012 • Community comes together in support of Operation Santa • Schools save $120,000 in energy costs • Firefighters quick response saves homethewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews.net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity. Frustrated with lack of plan to cut taxes Enjoyed recent visit to St. Marks READERS WRITE:Another one with an alter ego Judy Conlin Nurse Judy’s Nook William Snowdeneditor@thewakullanews.netR.H. Carter deserves credit for the Senior Center Editor, The News: The older I get the more discouraged I become with politicians. However, Im convinced politicians do act as demanded by those who elected them. Locally, there is a lot of talk about reducing taxesŽ but when an opportunity recently arose to actually reduce taxes, no action was taken. I commend Commissioner Howard Kessler for bringing forth a plan to reduce taxes. However, he did not suggest any way to pay for those tax reductions except to spend us to the very edge of bankruptcy with no reserve for unexpected emergencies. This was back-to-the-future for him „ when he left the board in 2010, our county was days away from the state taking over our county “ nances due to “ nancial ineptitude. This plan is irresponsible. On the ” ip side, there are three other Republicans on the board who also were elected on a platform of lower taxes. However, not a single one of these men could bring forth a speci“ c policy change or program to reduce. I have about lost hope. On the national level, the Republican-led House of Representatives has passed legislation replacing across-the-board cuts with speci“ c spending cuts to reduce taxes. The Senate refused to act. We are now facing tax increases as well as another debt-ceiling increase. Neither Republicans nor Democrats are really serious about reducing the size of the federal government. You now face a massive slate of tax hikes and defense cuts. The “ scal cliff will affect all American taxpayers, including you, with an average increase of more than $4,100 in taxes. These actions are unacceptable. I have contacted my commissioner and my Representative to express my concerns. Have you? What programs are you willing to do without so all our taxes can be reduced? It is only with spending cuts that we can have tax cuts. It is only by each of us assuming more responsibility in our own lives that the government can do less. I, for one, covet a smaller government so I can have more personal freedom combined with more personal responsibility. May the New Year bring smaller governments, more freedoms, and more personal responsibilities. Happy New Year! Ed Brimner Crawfordville Editor, The News: Spent last Saturday with my wife enjoying the natural and scenic beauty of the city of St. Marks. Recent improvements to the City Park, cemetery, boat ramp, paved city streets and downtown streetscape are exciting and remarkable. Homeowners and business owners are following the lead of the city and sprucing up store fronts and front yards. I cant wait to return and spend more time and money in St. Marks and Wakulla County. Jeff Caster Tallahassee Bee Bee Baloo is no longer a kitten. As I look at him sitting on the ” oor, I cant help thinking what a handsome aristocratic cat he has become. He wears his black tuxedo with its pure white shirt showing at the neck and chest, and his perfect little front feet shod in his wingtips. He looks like he is ready to greet the New Year at some feline ball only attended by the most socially prominent cats in the region. I imagine him dancing with the most beautiful girl cat at the ball, making all the other boy cats jealous, when he gets up, turns his back on me and walks away. This completely shatters my daydreaming, because the view from the rear does not “ t into the picture I have had in my mind. I watch him waddling down the hall, his fat tummy veering to the right and the left, his back legs wearing white knee socks. When viewed from this angle, Im afraid he would be a social outcast. No ball for him … maybe a sock hop. I dont mention any of this to Bee Bee. He is not lacking in self-con“ dence, and I dont want to start him down that path. He returns, having had a bite to eat. He sits down and begins delicately washing his face, an aristocrat once more. I walk over to pet him and he jumps on my bathrobe, climbs to the top and begins batting my hair. I pull him off and set him on the ” oor. He rolls onto his back kicking and clawing at my hand, more like a wrestler than my sweet kitty. Once I disentangle myself, he jumps up and begins speeding around the house like hes training for the Olympics. Maybe those are athletic socks hes wearing. I hear crashes from time to time as my inventory of knickknacks shrinks. I begin to despair of ever being able to tame this monster, when he jumps on my lap, curls up, purring like a motorboat and drifts off to sleep, looking like an angel. Im trapped there for a long time by the heavy furry bundle on my lap. I certainly dont want to disturb His Highness in his slumber. Im getting more rest than Ive had in years. In late afternoon, Im able to go get the mail, once disengaged from Bee Bee. We get a card addressed to Judy and BoBo. I know the sender is a poor speller so I chalk it up as a spelling error. Then I begin to think … always a dangerous occupation for me. I think of the difference in Bee Bees appearance coming and going. I think of the differences in his behavior. Suddenly it hits me. Oh no, Bee Bee has an alter ego named Bo Bo. Why didnt I see this before? How did this happen? What should I do? Of course, there is nothing I can do. In 2013, there will be four of us living in this house, a strange conglomerate. Please wish us luck. A very Happy New Year to you from Judy, Nurse Judy, Bee Bee, & Bo Bo.Judy Conlin is a nurse in Wakulla and Gadsden counties. She has a website, www.nursejudyinfo. com. Annette George, owner of the Soup R Market, picked up the list of her New Years resolutions: 1. Replace cracked glass on the meat cooler. 2. Walk two miles each morning before work. 3. Lose 15 pounds by summer. 4. Take a class in Spanish. She thought about the kind of person shed be at this time next year with all those things done, and it made her smile. Then she looked out the window at the snow and crossed off number two. Each morningŽ was just too ƒ too, in” exible. Its always best, she thought to make promises you can keep. Annette tapped her teeth with the pencil. The Spanish class was in the city, and with gas prices being what they are ƒ well, she could always pick up a Spanish grammar book at the Read Me Now bookstore. Number 4 reluctantly had a line drawn through it. You know, that glass has been cracked on the meat cooler for six years now, and it has never caused any kind of health threat. So the line up the glass causes a slight distortion as a shopper looks at a pork chop. So what? And have you seen what they get to replace that glass? The pencil drew again, slowly but deliberately. This left number three: lose 15 pounds by summer. This is one she will not scratch off. She remembers sitting by the swimming hole on Lewis Creek last summer watching the kids swimming. Next summer, shell swim with them. She will lose those 15 pounds. How? Well, by ƒ eating better. Sure. Maybe one of those chocolate milkshake supplements each morning. Well, better not say each morning, but ƒ whenever, you know. And walking. How much? Who knows? But walking. Yes. Walking. Losing 15 pounds. By summer. She smiled and decided to celebrate with a candy bar. Only one, of course. Life is good.Read free samples of Slims books at www. slimrandles.com.Home Country by Slim Randles It was nothing, dear … just the sound of another resolution breaking.ŽA repeat of a cartoon from last year about this same time.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 5A Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Bibles & Bingo performs Parish Family at Friendship Church on Dec. 30The Parish Family, a gospel singing group, will perform a concert at Friendship Primitive Baptist Church on Sunday, Dec. 30, at 6 p.m. The church is located at 165 Friendship Road in Medart. The concert is free and everyone is welcome. Mass schedule at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton The schedule for Mass at St. Elizabeth Church in Medart:  Sunday, Dec. 30, at 9 a.m.  Tuesday, Jan.1, at 9:30 a.m. Sacred Heart in Lanark has services on: Saturday, Dec. 29, at 5 p.m.  Sunday, Dec. 30, at 7:30 a.m. 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) religious views and events ChurchBy REV. JAMES L. SNYDER For the last several hours, I have been slouching in my easy chair basking in the soothing aura of the season. I have not moved in several hours, and it probably will be several more hours before I even think of moving. Just a few days ago, we were in the middle of our Christmas holiday celebration with family and friends. The only thing I enjoy more is the peace and quiet that follows upon the heels of all that festivity. Do not get me wrong, I love my family and friends but boy do I love peace and quiet. Isnt one of the sayings of the season, Peace on earth, goodwill toward menŽ? I am not sure of all the rami“ cations of that phrase, but I do enjoy the peace that comes following an exuberant time of celebration with family and friends. About this time, the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage came in and saw me in the same position she saw me several hours previous. Are you,Ž she said after staring at me for a few moments, going to stay in that chair all day?Ž All I could do was smile graciously in her direction. Then she became concerned, and prodded me a little, Are you all right?Ž She said it with a deep sense of genuine concern. I knew I owed her an explanation for the collapse of my bodily activities. Nothing wrong with me,Ž I explained, Im just broke.Ž With that, I smiled a rather infectious smile. She broke out laughing and said, What did you say?Ž I think at the time she thought I was just exercising the spirit of merriment. I said, Im broke.Ž Then she had a look of concern on her face. What do you mean youre broke?Ž I knew she was concerned at that point and I had to explain to her what I meant by being broke. By being broke, I do not mean like the government broke into my bank account and con“ scated my money. For all Americans that is quite a taxing situation. Also, by being broke I do not mean I dropped my wifes favorite porcelain teapot and broke it all over the floor. Once something is broke, there just is no way of “ xing it. Im broke,Ž I repeated to my wife with a whimsical smile, and its a real good feeling this time of the year.Ž She looked at me, shook her head and then went back to her business. I thought some more on that subject and reaf“ rmed my idea that being broke this time of the year was a marvelous feeling. If it were April, tax time, being broke would not feel so good. Or, if it were before Christmas, being broke would not be a very good idea. Being broke after Christmas means several things. First, it means that I did my best to bless my family and friends around me with tokens of appreciation. That is all a gift really is. I am not a very good gift buyer, just ask my wife. I am the kind of person who thinks it is the thought that counts. I also know, behind every thought must be some emblem of tangibility. I have done my best this year to select gifts that would be appreciated, at least for a moment. It would be a terrible thing at the end of the Christmas season to have a ton of money left over realizing that maybe you did not do your best this year at Christmas time. Do not get me wrong. I am a Pennsylvania Dutchman through and through and we do not believe in wasting money. We do believe in investing our resources in family and friends. I am not extravagant in my giving. I do not have it to be extravagant. What I do have, I want to use to bless and encourage the people that have meant so much to me during the year. Yes, being broke is a good feeling. Being broke also means I have no room for regrets. Would I have liked to give more gifts? Sure, but when you run out of money, you cannot go any further. By being broke at the end of Christmas means, I have done everything I possibly could within my resources to thank the people I love for being a part of my life. You cannot buy friendship. Unless of course you are in Washington DC or Hollywood California. Among normal folk, friendship is not for sale. It is not even for rent. At this time of the year, it sure is a wonderful feeling to tell your friends and family you are glad they are a part of your life. Being broke is a lot more than having no money. Being broke means that I have done everything within my power to bless those people around me. I have given all I had to give and there is a good warm fuzzy feeling about that. God is the one who set the standard along this line. For the wages of sin is death; but the gift of God is eternal life through Jesus Christ our LordŽ (Romans 6:23 KJV). God looked at the world, it broke His heart and therefore He sent His Son to remedy our situation. Thank God for that broken heart. He gave His all for those He loved.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTOR‘Tis the season to be broke PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe gospel group the Parish Family will perform at Friendship Church. The Apalachee Bay Volunteer Fire Department invited the Bibles & BingoŽ youth group to be the featured program for this years annual Christmas meeting. Bibles & BingoŽ started as a Vacation Bible School this past summer and has continued at the request of the kids who participated. The group meets every Saturday from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in Shell Point at the “ re station. Young people from 5 up are invited. Several teens have also volunteered and are there each Saturday to help run the programs. PHOTO SPECIAL TO THE NEWS

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comObituaries Robert Andrew Smith, 80, of Tallahassee and formerly of Jacksonville, died on Thursday, Dec. 20, at the Margaret Z. Dozier Hospice House at Big Bend Hospice in Tallahassee. The funeral service will be held at 2 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 27, at Killearn United Methodist Church in Tallahassee. The family will receive friends at the church one hour prior to service time, as well as following the service. A graveside service will follow at 2 p.m. on Friday, Dec. 28, at Arlington Park Cemetery in Jacksonville. Memorial donations may be made to Big Bend Hospice, 1723 Mahan Center Blvd., Tallahassee,FL 32308; or to Killearn United Methodist Church, 2800 South Shamrock, Tallahassee FL 32309. He was a native of Jefferson County, Ala., and retired as section head for the Consolidated Jacksonville motor pool. He was an active member of Killearn United Methodist Church in Tallahassee. Survivors include his daughter, Mary Thomas (DJ) of Crawfordville; three grandchildren; and four greatgrandchildren. He was predeceased by his wife, Dollie Todd Smith in 2005. Bevis Funeral Home of Tallahassee (www.bevisfh. com) is assisting the Smith family.Robert Andrew SmithBy ANDRE WHITEMens Fraternity of WakullaHow do we Love God as described in Matthew 22. Matthew 22:36-40: 36 Teacher, which is the great commandment in the law?Ž 37 Jesus said to him, You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your mind. [d] 38 This is the “ rst and great commandment. 39 And the second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. [e] 40 On these two commandments hang all the Law and the Prophets.Ž We must have a genuine encounter with God. The following people had genuine God encounters, Adam, Moses, Enoch, Abraham, David, the 3 Hebrew boys. And hopefully you. What is not a genuine encounter? Attending church because your parents made you. Going to the altar because you were afraid of Hell. Accepting Jesus because everyone else did it. Accepting Jesus because your parents told you God can “ x all your problems. How do we start loving God John 6:44 44 No man can come to me, except the Father which hath sent me draw him: and I will raise him up at the last day. The word of God touches your heart and causes a desire, a hunger and thirst for more of Him. The knowledge of Jesus, what He did for us and Gods love for us should have a profound impact. After the initial encounter, whats next? We should have a desire to be in His presence. We should desire to know God. Study His word. Listen to preaching. We should have a desire to Live for God … repent from sins. We should have a desire to resist sin and temptation. We should have a desire to love God and others. Desire to obey His commandments. Parable of the sower (Matthew 13) On the same day Jesus went out of the house and sat by the sea. 2 And great multitudes were gathered together to Him, so that He got into a boat and sat; and the whole multitude stood on the shore. 3 Then He spoke many things to them in parables, saying: Behold, a sower went out to sow. 4 And as he sowed, some seed fell by the wayside; and the birds came and devoured them. 5 Some fell on stony places, where they did not have much earth; and they immediately sprang up because they had no depth of earth. 6 But when the sun was up they were scorched, and because they had no root they withered away. 7 And some fell among thorns, and the thorns sprang up and choked them. 8 But others fell on good ground and yielded a crop: some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty. 9 He who has ears to hear, let him hear!Ž The Parable of the Sower Explained 18 Therefore hear the parable of the sower: 19 When anyone hears the word of the kingdom, and does not understand it, then the wicked one comes and snatches away what was sown in his heart. This is he who received seed by the wayside. 20 But he who received the seed on stony places, this is he who hears the word and immediately receives it with joy; 21 yet he has no root in himself, but endures only for a while. For when tribulation or persecution arises because of the word, immediately he stumbles. 22 Now he who received seed among the thorns is he who hears the word, and the cares of this world and the deceitfulness of riches choke the word, and he becomes unfruitful. 23 But he who received seed on the good ground is he who hears the word and understands it, who indeed bears fruit and produces: some a hundredfold, some sixty, some thirty.Ž Acts 1:8 But ye shall receive power, after that the Holy Ghost is come upon you: and ye shall be witnesses unto me both in Jerusalem, and in all Judaea, and in Samaria, and unto the uttermost part of the earth. Do you remember when you had a life changing encounter with God? Do you remember feeling His presence and how it impacted your life? If its been a while since you had that kind of God experience, then How do we Love God with all your heart, soul, and mind? The fist step is to choose. Once we have had a genuine encounter with God and the Holy Spirit is tugging on our heart we must choose to accept the gift of salvation. Some struggle with saying yes, and yet some say no. But for those that says yes, they will begin the amazing transformation from darkness to light, from death to light, from living by the ” esh to living in the spirit. Why do some struggle to say yes? Sin … Lust of the eyes, lust of the ” esh and the pride of life. Refuse to give up sinful living. Sex outside of marriage, shacking up, lying, cheating, drugs, alcohol, love of money, ungodly pleasure and desires, etc. Deceived … Bad information about God, church, life. I will get saved after I get my life in order.Ž We cant do it thats why we need a savior who has the power to change us. I cant believe in a god I cant touch, see, or hear.Ž I tried God once and my life had more trouble than ever before.Ž We now have an enemy / The lie … You wont have any more problems once you get saved.Ž I dont want to lose my friends.Ž (Non-Christian friends) My family wont accept me as a Christian.Ž Those who say yes and receive the gift of salvation by faith will receive the following: Your sins are forgiven. Forever erased from your record. Your name is written into the Lambs book of life. You are now member of the family of God. You now have brothers and sisters in Christ. (And a heavenly party takes place in your honor.) You receive the power of the Holy Spirit and one or more Spiritual gifts. God then begins the clean up process. You receive the Love of God, and you now have the Spirit of God dwelling inside you. You have the power to say no to sin. The 10 changes of a Christian life 1. We must stay connected to the spiritual source, the vine. (prayer, church attendance, bible study, serving, being with other Christians.) 2. We must grow spiritually. As a child grows into an adult. Study God and His word. Unfortunately, falling and failing is part of the growing process. Repent and turn away from sin if you fall. 3. We must submit to obeying Gods word and the daily leading of His Holy Spirit. (Resist sin. There is always a way of escape) 4. To defend ourselves from the enemy, we need the full armor of God. Continue to reject the influences of Satan. 5. We live by the spirit not after the ” esh. God will lead us in everything, but we must keep him “ rst in our lives. 6. We choose to Love God and one another, even strangers and enemies. 1 Corinthians 13. 7. Lifestyle changes. We are no longer of this world and must stop living a sinful lifestyle. Stop sinful activities. Do not dress as the world. Do not go to ungodly places. Do not watch, listen to, or play ungodly movies, music, websites or video games. Our bodies are temples of God and His holy spirit dwells within us. 8. As we mature, we minister to others. We witness to others both in word and lifestyle. Go tell the world. Lead others to Christ. 9. Continue to seek God daily. Renew your mind and commitment to God daily. 10. We now live with an eternal mind set. We live by faith (in God) not by sight. We are now able to Love God with all our heart, soul, and mind, because His love and Spirit now dwells within us and has changed us.The full study can be found at The Mens Fraternity of Wakulla website, www.byhisgrace.cc/ MensFraternityofWakulla/ news.htm.How do you love God with all your heart, soul and mind? Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS The Wakulla County Board of County Commissioners is seeking “ ve members to volunteer to serve on the Community Center Advisory Committee. The purpose of the committee is to advise the board on the development of the Community Center. These functions primarily include assisting in seeking grant funding, obtaining community input and involvement, and assisting the Board in developing a long term plan for the Community Center to ensure the Centers stability and continuity. The five committee members must be citizens of Wakulla County and interested in providing input for the implementation of long term plans and programs for the Community Center. Interested persons should submit a Community Center Advisory Committee application no later than Monday, Jan. 3. Applications can be obtained from Katie Taff at ktaff@ mywakulla.com.Members needed for advisory committee PLEASE RECYCLE

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 7Ahappenings Community Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308 DEALS FAMOUS OYSTER HOUSE IN ST. MARKSLLCDAILY LUNCH SPECIALS $8.99 (INCLUDES TEA)850-925-STMK (7865)OPEN 11 AM 9 PM Tuesdays thru Saturdays CLOSED Sundays & Mondays785 Port Leon Drive (next to post of“ce)Seafood ~ Angus Steaks ~ Burgers ~ Chicken Oysters on the 1/2 shell (shucked to order) •Flooring •Carpentry •Painting •Tile Work FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 Cell (850) 570–1968 24 High Drive – Crawfordville926-1110Thurs-Fri 10AM-4PM • Sat 10AM-2PMThe Wakulla County Historical Society is offering 10% off All Old Jail Gift Shop items. 850.224.4960www.fsucu.org GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 Special to The NewsTITUS Sports Academy is excited to announce that they will be offering a Speed and Agility Camp over the break. Day one will be held on Dec. 29 for ages 5-11, from 10 a.m. to noon. Day two will be Dec. 30 for ages 12-18, from 12:30 p.m to 2:30 p.m. Both days will be held at Riversprings Middle School, 800 Spring Creek Highway. Camp Objectives: 1. Increase Sprint Speed (20yd, 40yd, and 60yd Dash) 2. Increase Total Body Power Capability (Vertical, Standing Long Jump, and Total Body Strength) 3. Increase Lateral Movement (Foot quickness and Agility Movement, and Speed) Focus of Training CampTarget the Five Physical Qualities of Sport Mobility/ Flexibility-Movement Ef“ ciency Strength/ Power--Force of Movement Speed/ Acceleration-Joint Velocity Agility/ Coordination-Motoe Efficiency Endurance/ Fatigue Resistance TITUS Performance Team has trained of been a part of: The National Football League, National Champion Football Teams, Heisman Trophy & Butkus Award Winners, Major League Baseball, The Olympics, National Champion Ski Teams and numerous All-American Athletes. Be sure to bring athletic clothing and shoes. The cost is $30 per person-cash or check accepted on location. Make checks payable to: Riversprings Middle School. For additional information, contact Titus Sports Academy at 850-671-3278 or info@ titussports.com.Special to The NewsDue to Christmas falling on Tuesday, Dec. 25 and New Years on Tuesday, Jan. 1, the solid waste pickup for Waste Pro customers in Wakulla County will be one day behind. If the current day of service is Tuesday, it will be on Wednesday. If it was on Wednesday normally, it will be picked up on Thursday. If it is normally picked up on Thursday, it will now be Friday. And if it was picked up on Friday, it will now be picked up on Saturday. This only applies to the two upcoming holidays. Regular service will resume following New Years Day. Waste Pro would like to thank its customers and wish them a happy and safe holiday.Special to The NewsJudge Jimmy Joanos of Tallahassee has agreed to speak to the Wakulla County Historical Society at its meeting on Jan. 8 from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Wakulla County Library. He will speak on the subject of the history of Florida State football. Judge Joanos has been a part of the FSU scene all his life and has written extensive articles pertaining to FSU sports and in particular, football. Those of who have spent their lives in the shadow of FSU football games, players and coaches enjoy many memories that will be stirred in this anticipated meeting. Everyone is invited. Spirit Paws: RMS cheer squad and special needs students Continued from Page 1 The Spirit Paws performed on the stage at the Focus on Ability event and received only a little bit of coaching from a few cheerleaders who stood off the stage in front of them. It was a showstopper,Ž Small says. A real tear jerker moment.Ž After that performance, the Spirit Paws went to competitions with the RMS squad and also performed in front of large crowds. At a cheerleading competition at Florida State University, they performed in front of about 400 people. They performed by themselves and just blew the top off that place,Ž Small says. These are the kids who have never really been in the spotlight and to perform in front of 400 people is hard for any kid, she said. They like it,Ž Small says. Wilde adds, The looks on the Spirit Paws faces when they perform is priceless. They get so excited that theyre able to do something like this.Ž In addition to the competitions, event and parade the Spirit Paws have participated in, they were also invited to the cheerleading banquet by the cheerleaders. The Spirit Paws went free of charge to the event. Thanks to the generosity of several businesses and one person, the students didnt have to pay to get their hair done, formal attire or corsages and boutonnieres. They were also presented with trophies and several cheerleaders read speeches at the event that talked about their relationship with the Spirit Paws. It was amazing,Ž Small says. The program isnt just about helping students with special needs develop social skills and con“ dence, but to also change how students think about students who are different from them, she says. To see something like this kind of reaf“ rms the humanity out there,Ž Small adds. Wilde agrees and says Hopefully their peers will watch and learn from their actions.Ž Middle Schoolers are compassionate and caring individuals and if given one chance, they will show that they truly are, Small says. This will affect them for the rest of their lives,Ž Small says. And maybe it will help create an army of people interested in helping other people. Small wants the program will continue to grow. She plans to speak with Wakulla Middle School about offering a similar program. Her hope is that every school in the district will have a program like the Spirit Paws. Wilde too hopes the program stays around for many years to come. It can de“ nitely change the life of a child,Ž she says. Small was thankful to businesses and people who felt the program was bene“ cial and wanted to support it, Wakulla Florists, Dazzles Hair Salon, Junior League of Tallahassee, Mens Warehouse, Ace Hardware Trophies, Hibbett Sports and Dorothy. Its affected so many people,Ž she says. JENNIFER JENSENSpirit Paws and RMS cheerleaders at Focus on Ability.Special to The NewsChipley … The Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) District Three of“ ce is suspending highway construction projects on major roadways across Northwest Florida. There will be no work on state roads requiring lane restrictions from Monday, Dec. 24 through Wednesday, Jan. 2. All major roads will be open to normal traf“ c. Although no construction closures are scheduled over the holiday weekend, existing state highway work zones will remain in effect. Motorists are reminded to use caution while traveling through work zones around barricades and equipment. FDOT is encouraging drivers to allow extra travel time and to use extra caution in existing work zones along state highways. Drivers are urged to make sure they buckle up, along with their passengers. FDOT and other safety agencies also ask drivers to obey speed limits, get adequate rest before traveling, avoid distractions and never drink and drive. Drivers also are urged to be prepared for unscheduled highway closures due to accidents, disabled vehicles or other events. Motorists should be alert to changing weather conditions while traveling. Travelers can access Floridas 511 service from cell phones, landlines, and the Internet at www.FL511.com to receive updates on travel in the area. For more Florida Department of Transportation District Three information follow us on twitter @ myfdot_nw” .Special to The NewsThe Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce will host a blood drive with the Southeastern Community Blood Center on Friday, Jan. 11 from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the WCSO parking lot. Donors will receive a Fandango voucher for a free movie ticket and will be entered for a chance to win a weekly drawing for a Samsung Blu-Ray 3D home theatre along with an entry for the monthly grand prize of a Samsung 51 inch television. Donors must be at least 110 pounds to donate and you must provide identi“ cation to give blood. To give blood, contact Lt. Bruce Ashley at 7457162, bashley@wcso.org or visit the bloodmobile on the southern end of the parking lot. For information about giving blood, visit the Southeastern Community Blood Center web site at scbcinfo.org.Blood drive will be Jan. 11 at WCSOJudge Joanos will talk about FSU football Garbage will be picked up one day later Highway projects are suspended for holidays Agility Camp held at RMS over winter break St. Marks photo contest entries due by Jan. 6The St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge Photo Contest is underway. All entries must be received by Jan. 6, 2013. Judges will pick winners in the following categories: Wildlife, landscape, butter” ies and small wonders. Each photo submitted must have been taken on or of the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in the past year by the person who enters it in the contest. There will be a $10 entry fee for up to three photos Make checks payable to St. Marks Refuge Association. FORMAT: Prints only. All entries must be prints 8Ž x 10Ž or 8Ž x 12Ž. Prints must be mounted on black or white 11Ž x 14Ž foam board or mat board with the entry form attached to the back. Photographers who are 17 years old and younger, must have entries accompanied by a release from a parent or legal guardian. All prints submitted will be considered donations to the Association and be sold to help support the Association and Refuge activities. Mail entries to: 2013 Photo Contest, St. Marks NWR Photo Contest, PO Box 368, St. Marks, FL 32355, or deliver photos to the Visitor Center at the Refuge. Do not send photos by e-mail. Community announcements: Email community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available.

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comeducation news from local schools School Re“nance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a ”oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Of“ce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Of“ce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Of“ce: 850.926.1960 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com 000CV38 Employee and teachers of the month are announced for December Special to The NewsDecember Teachers of the Month are Riversink Elementary Schools Lauren Baker and Wakulla Pre-Ks Nancy Lewis. Curriculum and Professional Development Departments Lou Ann Crum was named employee of the month. Superintendent Robert Pearce and the Wakulla County School Board applaud the enthusiasm these employees bring to the district, as well as the optimistic spirit they display on behalf of the students, schools, the profession of education and communities they serve. Baker, December Teacher of the Month, began her teaching career as a substitute teacher in 2006. She was soon hired in a regular position at Medart Elementary School to teach third grade and transferred to Riversink Elementary when the new school opened in 2008. Baker credits the wonderful teachers she had throughout her formative years for setting her on the track to success. She said, I am proud to be able to continue the legacy of those who inspired me.Ž Baker graduated from Flagler College with a BA in Elementary Education and ESE. She is currently attending Saint Leo University where she is on track to complete her masters degree in education leadership by August 2013. Re” ecting on her teaching, she said, Although I strive to lead my students toward academic achievement, I am most successful when my students demonstrate an eagerness to learn and the con“ dence to try new things.Ž Principal Jackie High said, Lauren Baker is a champion in the background, consistently working hard to make sure each of her students reaches their full potential. She has earned a reputation for her abilities to work challenging students because she integrates a variety of techniques. Her dedication is appreciated.Ž Lewis, Wakulla Education pre-kindergarten teacher, has been teaching since August 1999 in Sopchoppy. Lewis is also a December Teacher of the Month. Her teaching career began in Tampa as an elementary ESE teacher. When her husband relocated to Tallahassee, her research led her to the high performing School district of Wakulla County. Lewis grew up in Gulf Breeze and later graduated with degrees from the University of Florida, the University of South Florida and Florida State University. According to Lewis, preschool is educations best kept secret. She said, I love the handson curriculum and latitude of teacher-creativity. Children are such eager learners at this age. I am fortunate to be able to lead children on a learning expedition.Ž Incorporating developmentally appropriate experiences that nurture a love of learning is the focus for Lewis lessons. Lewis serves the community above and beyond in other capacities including Sunday school teacher, outreach volunteer, TEACH I and II instructor, School Advisory Council Committee member, and volunteer with Boy Scouts of America, Sopchoppy Fourth of July, Wakulla Community Feast, Wakulla High Band and Jesus River Festival. Principal Kim Dutton said, Ms. Lewis is truly a part of the Sopchoppy community. She sometimes rides her bike to school. She has a true love for teaching and has not lost sight of those things that are truly important in the eyes of a pre-K student, such as blowing bubbles with a bubble wand, stomping in mud puddles, “ nding a beautiful birds feather, or climbing in Santas lap to talk about the list.Ž The December Employee of the Month is the Curriculum and Professional Development Departments secretary, Lou Ann Crum. Crum has been working with the District since 2006. Crum spent her formative years attending school in Lancaster, S.C., and relocated to Walker, La., where she graduated from Walker High School. She attended Clover Park Vocational School in Tacoma, Wash., and Tallahassee Community College. When asked what she enjoys most about her job, Crum said, The people I work with. Whenever asked, they are right there to lend a hand with whatever the task may be. It is nice to have people who can make you smile with a kind word or gesture and who will take your mind of the chaos and stress that surrounds us.Ž Crum sites the annual District Spelling Bee as one of her favorite aspects of the job. She said, Seeing the excitement and anticipation in the students is a reminder that all of the work is worth the effort.Ž Contributing in other community activities such as Relay for Life and Vacation Bible School keep Crum busy when not at work. Executive Director of Curriculum, Beth Mims, said, Lou Ann is one of those special people who nurtures those around her. She is a great worker who has all of the computer and clerical skills necessary to make an of“ ce run smoothly, but her strength and her gift is in how she treats and responds to people daily. She is always looking ahead to assure that packets are prepared for meetings. She goes ahead of me and sets up equipment and refreshments and makes the training and meeting rooms nice places to be. Lou Ann excels at taking responsibility. Once we have worked through processes, I can trust her to follow through and complete the task. For example, she is the one who goes through the thousands of volunteer applications each year and assures that volunteers are approved in time for parties and “ eld trips. She works with the various schools and is large part of why the approval process is a success. Needless to say, I am blessed to work with her in the Curriculum Of“ ce.Ž Lauren BakerNancy LewisLou Ann CrumScott urges districts to enhance security measures at schools Special to The NewsTALLAHASSEE … On Dec. 17, Gov. Rick Scott called on school districts to review emergency procedures and devise methods for enhancing security in Florida schools. The Governor also encouraged school leaders to communicate with families the current safety procedures and the additional actions schools are taking in enhancing safety and protection for students. Governor Scott said, Following the tragedy in Connecticut, I join parents everywhere who want to make sure our students are safe. To better protect Floridas children, Im asking Florida school districts to review their emergency procedures and work alongside the Dept. of Education, FDLE and local law enforcement to review and enhance on-campus emergency plans to ensure the safety and well-being of our students. School should be a sanctuary for learning and creativity where students, teachers and parents feel safe … and a review of these procedures will enhance safety for Florida schools.Ž In 2001, the Florida Legislature passed the Safe Passage Act requiring every district to have a clearly directed safety and security program that includes comprehensive plans with input from parents, community representatives, local emergency agencies, teachers, staff, and students. Each year, districts must assess and update their emergency plans using a comprehensive assessment tool. In 2003, the Florida Department of Education adopted a statewide policy detailing school preparation and response to emergencies and threats of violence. The departments Of“ ce of Safe Schools works with districts to implement safety objectives; including: Limiting school entry points Inspecting school grounds daily for suspicious persons Establishing communication procedures for alerting parents Enhancing police patrol of campus during peak times of traf“ c and activity. School leaders throughout the state have begun enhancing security measures: On Sunday, Hillsborough County School Superintendent MaryEllen Elia deployed phone messages to school staff and parents about safety precautions occurring in schools this week. We have been in contact with local police … who will work together with our school security staff to arrange for deputies and of“ cers to play a more visible role on and around our campuses … especially our elementary schools,Ž said Superintendent Elia. Were working with law enforcement and doing everything we can to keep our campuses safe and secure.Ž Superintendent of Orange County Schools Dr. Barbara Jenkins said, We take all perceived threats to student safety seriously, and deal with them swiftly by activating safe school plans and calling on our school resource officers assigned by our excellent law enforcement partners. Child safety is in the minds of our leadership team and we appreciate additional law enforcement presence in and around our schools this week.Ž Bennett is next education commissioner By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 12, 2012...The State Board of Education chose a rising star in the school-choice movement to be Floridas next education commissioner Wednesday, sparking a blistering condemnation from the states main teachers union. Tony Bennett, the superintendent of public instruction in Indiana, was unanimously tapped by the board at its December meeting. The position has been “ lled by interim Commissioner Pam Stewart since Gerard Robinson resigned last summer amid controversies surrounding Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test scores and the botched rollout of school grades. Bennett had been mentioned for the job in 2011, when Robinson got it, but didnt apply. The Indiana supervisor of public instruction is an elected position, and Bennett was defeated in his bid for re-election last month. I think we have a great opportunity to capture Floridas moment,Ž Bennett told the board in brief remarks after he was selected. In the resume he submitted to the board, Bennett boasted of spearheading the most comprehensive education reform effort in 25 yearsŽ while in Indiana. The initiative introduced a voucher program and limited collective bargaining to pay and bene“ ts. Bennett also highlighted an increase of more than four percentage points in Indianas graduation rate and his decision to change the states school grading scale to a system using letter grades. Board members pointed to Bennetts experience and work on some of the same reform efforts that Florida is pushing, including a nationwide guideline for curriculum known as the common core standards, as an asset. Gov. Rick Scott also praised Bennett in a statement issued by his of“ ce. Tony has a great record of achievement in Indiana and I am con“ dent he will be a tireless advocate for Floridas students,Ž Scott said. But the Florida Education Association blasted Bennett, saying he had an antagonistic relationship with teachers in Indiana. He is a champion of the testing mania, unchecked expansion of charter schools and voucher programs and has proven to advance the Jeb Bush education agenda that has drawn “ re from teachers, parents and experts in the “ eld,Ž FEA President Andy Ford said in a statement. Thats the same approach that has led to a ” awed and chaotic system in Florida that has frustrated parents and teachers alike.Ž Democrats, many of whom have opposed elements of Floridas education agenda in recent years, largely held their “ re. I hope the choice the board made is the right one for Florida,Ž said House Minority Leader Perry Thurston, D-Plantation. Florida deserves an education commissioner who puts public schools and public school students “ rst.Ž School news and announcements: Email school news to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. News is edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space is available. Find us on

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 9A Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD a peek into life on and under the water W a t e r W a y s Water Ways Water Ways UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton As the year draws to a close, it is a time to re” ect back on the years accomplishments and look with anticipation to next year! Flotilla Staff Of“ cer for Information Services Duane Treadon has been working hard to get all of our “ nal paperwork entered into the AuxData system to ensure that our efforts have been accounted for. While some members do not turn in all their hours and others may forget as life becomes more hectic, for 2012 we have completed more than 8,700 hours total for the Apalachee Bay area. For an organization that is about 30 members large, that is almost 300 hours of volunteer time per member this year. There are some members who are able to give more, and some who do less, but everyone does their best! These hours break down into several program areas. Members provided 25 hours for public education. Out About Boating Safely class is taught by quali“ ed instructors, as well as several other supportive members. The 8-hour class is taught by at least six different instructors. We have completed 16 safety patrols and spent more than 90 hours on the water. Each patrol has at least four individuals on board, leading to a total of over 265 person hours. Public Affairs are another big focus area for the Auxiliary. These affairs include, but are not limited to, events such as the North Florida Fair, the FSU ” yover and this weekly column. Events that allow us to make our presence known and talk about boating safety is critical to our ability to remain strong and active in this area. This year, we had over 475 hours of public affairs. In addition, vessel exams and marine dealer visits are a great way to talk to individuals interested in safe boating and the auxiliary! There were 92 boats in our area inspected to determine if they met the minimum requirements for safety. The inspections look for required safety equipment and to ensure that boaters have emergency resources if needed such as a bucket to bail water and ” ares. Many of you may have seen the displays we maintain in local stores for safe boating resources. These displays require maintenance and restocking. More than 300 visits were made to marine dealers in 2012. The Auxiliary has been called a force multiplier for the Coast Guard. For our area, we are often the eyes and ears for Station Panama City. A conservative estimate for the value provided to the Station is roughly $20 per volunteer hour. In total, that would add up to over $150,000 that the Auxiliary saved the Coast Guard by having auxiliarists provide these services in the Apalachee Bay area. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. If you would like to be a part of the Auxiliary, please contact us at fso-hr@ uscgaux.net for more information or check us out on our FaceBook page and at www.uscgaux.net. Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Dec 27, 12 Fri Dec 28, 12 Sat Dec 29, 12 Sun Dec 30, 12 Mon Dec 31, 12 Tue Jan 1, 13 Wed Jan 2, 13 D ate 3.1 ft. 12:35 AM 3.2 ft. 1:10 AM 3.2 ft. 1:43 AM 3.3 ft. 2:17 AM 3.2 ft. 2:53 AM 3.2 ft. 3:33 AM 3.0 ft. 4:17 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 7:47 AM -0.6 ft. 8:17 AM -0.7 ft. 8:45 AM -0.6 ft. 9:12 AM -0.6 ft. 9:40 AM -0.4 ft. 10:10 AM -0.2 ft. 10:44 AM L ow 2.9 ft. 2:13 PM 3.0 ft. 2:44 PM 3.1 ft. 3:14 PM 3.1 ft. 3:44 PM 3.2 ft. 4:13 PM 3.1 ft. 4:42 PM 3.1 ft. 5:15 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 7:23 PM 1.0 ft. 8:00 PM 0.9 ft. 8:37 PM 0.8 ft. 9:14 PM 0.7 ft. 9:53 PM 0.6 ft. 10:34 PM 0.5 ft. 11:24 PM L ow Thu Dec 27, 12 Fri Dec 28, 12 Sat Dec 29, 12 Sun Dec 30, 12 Mon Dec 31, 12 Tue Jan 1, 13 Wed Jan 2, 13 D ate 2.3 ft. 12:27 AM 2.4 ft. 1:02 AM 2.4 ft. 1:35 AM 2.4 ft. 2:09 AM 2.4 ft. 2:45 AM 2.4 ft. 3:25 AM 2.3 ft. 4:09 AM Hi g h -0.4 ft. 7:58 AM -0.5 ft. 8:28 AM -0.5 ft. 8:56 AM -0.5 ft. 9:23 AM -0.4 ft. 9:51 AM -0.3 ft. 10:21 AM -0.1 ft. 10:55 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 2:05 PM 2.3 ft. 2:36 PM 2.3 ft. 3:06 PM 2.4 ft. 3:36 PM 2.4 ft. 4:05 PM 2.3 ft. 4:34 PM 2.3 ft. 5:07 PM Hi g h 0.8 ft. 7:34 PM 0.7 ft. 8:11 PM 0.6 ft. 8:48 PM 0.6 ft. 9:25 PM 0.5 ft. 10:04 PM 0.4 ft. 10:45 PM 0.4 ft. 11:35 PM L ow Thu Dec 27, 12 Fri Dec 28, 12 Sat Dec 29, 12 Sun Dec 30, 12 Mon Dec 31, 12 Tue Jan 1, 13 Wed Jan 2, 13 D ate 2.9 ft. 1:11 AM 3.0 ft. 1:46 AM 3.0 ft. 2:19 AM 3.0 ft. 2:53 AM 3.0 ft. 3:29 AM 3.0 ft. 4:09 AM 2.8 ft. 4:53 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 8:51 AM -0.6 ft. 9:21 AM -0.6 ft. 9:49 AM -0.6 ft. 10:16 AM -0.5 ft. 10:44 AM -0.4 ft. 11:14 AM -0.1 ft. 11:48 AM L ow 2.7 ft. 2:49 PM 2.8 ft. 3:20 PM 2.9 ft. 3:50 PM 2.9 ft. 4:20 PM 2.9 ft. 4:49 PM 2.9 ft. 5:18 PM 2.9 ft. 5:51 PM Hi g h 1.0 ft. 8:27 PM 0.9 ft. 9:04 PM 0.8 ft. 9:41 PM 0.7 ft. 10:18 PM 0.6 ft. 10:57 PM 0.5 ft. 11:38 PM L ow Thu Dec 27, 12 Fri Dec 28, 12 Sat Dec 29, 12 Sun Dec 30, 12 Mon Dec 31, 12 Tue Jan 1, 13 Wed Jan 2, 13 D ate 2.4 ft. 12:19 AM 2.5 ft. 12:54 AM 2.5 ft. 1:27 AM 2.5 ft. 2:01 AM 2.5 ft. 2:37 AM 2.5 ft. 3:17 AM 2.3 ft. 4:01 AM Hi g h -0.6 ft. 7:26 AM -0.6 ft. 7:56 AM -0.6 ft. 8:24 AM -0.6 ft. 8:51 AM -0.5 ft. 9:19 AM -0.4 ft. 9:49 AM -0.2 ft. 10:23 AM L ow 2.3 ft. 1:57 PM 2.4 ft. 2:28 PM 2.4 ft. 2:58 PM 2.5 ft. 3:28 PM 2.5 ft. 3:57 PM 2.4 ft. 4:26 PM 2.4 ft. 4:59 PM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 7:02 PM 1.0 ft. 7:39 PM 0.9 ft. 8:16 PM 0.8 ft. 8:53 PM 0.7 ft. 9:32 PM 0.6 ft. 10:13 PM 0.5 ft. 11:03 PM L ow Thu Dec 27, 12 Fri Dec 28, 12 Sat Dec 29, 12 Sun Dec 30, 12 Mon Dec 31, 12 Tue Jan 1, 13 Wed Jan 2, 13 D ate 3.2 ft. 12:32 AM 3.3 ft. 1:07 AM 3.3 ft. 1:40 AM 3.3 ft. 2:14 AM 3.3 ft. 2:50 AM 3.2 ft. 3:30 AM 3.1 ft. 4:14 AM Hi g h -0.7 ft. 7:44 AM -0.7 ft. 8:14 AM -0.7 ft. 8:42 AM -0.7 ft. 9:09 AM -0.6 ft. 9:37 AM -0.4 ft. 10:07 AM -0.2 ft. 10:41 AM L ow 3.0 ft. 2:10 PM 3.1 ft. 2:41 PM 3.2 ft. 3:11 PM 3.2 ft. 3:41 PM 3.2 ft. 4:10 PM 3.2 ft. 4:39 PM 3.1 ft. 5:12 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 7:20 PM 1.1 ft. 7:57 PM 1.0 ft. 8:34 PM 0.8 ft. 9:11 PM 0.7 ft. 9:50 PM 0.6 ft. 10:31 PM 0.5 ft. 11:21 PM L ow Thu Dec 27, 12 Fri Dec 28, 12 Sat Dec 29, 12 Sun Dec 30, 12 Mon Dec 31, 12 Tue Jan 1, 13 Wed Jan 2, 13 D ate 2.4 ft. 12:04 AM 2.3 ft. 12:48 AM 2.3 ft. 1:32 AM 2.2 ft. 2:18 AM 2.1 ft. 3:08 AM 1.9 ft. 4:02 AM Hi g h -0.8 ft. 7:23 AM -0.7 ft. 7:54 AM -0.7 ft. 8:21 AM -0.6 ft. 8:45 AM -0.5 ft. 9:08 AM -0.3 ft. 9:31 AM -0.2 ft. 9:59 AM L ow 2.0 ft. 3:35 PM 2.0 ft. 3:57 PM 2.0 ft. 4:18 PM 2.0 ft. 4:37 PM 2.0 ft. 4:57 PM 2.0 ft. 5:15 PM 2.1 ft. 5:40 PM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 6:43 PM 1.3 ft. 7:20 PM 1.2 ft. 7:57 PM 1.1 ft. 8:36 PM 0.9 ft. 9:18 PM 0.8 ft. 10:05 PM 0.6 ft. 11:02 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 27 Jan 2First Jan. 20 Full Jan. 29 Last Jan. 7 New Jan. 13Major Times --:---:-12:04 PM 2:04 PM Minor Times 6:43 AM 7:43 AM 5:25 PM 6:25 PM Major Times 12:29 AM 2:29 AM 12:53 PM 2:53 PM Minor Times 7:29 AM 8:29 AM 6:17 PM 7:17 PM Major Times 1:17 AM 3:17 AM 1:40 PM 3:40 PM Minor Times 8:11 AM 9:11 AM 7:11 PM 8:11 PM Major Times 2:04 AM 4:04 AM 2:27 PM 4:27 PM Minor Times 8:50 AM 9:50 AM 8:06 PM 9:06 PM Major Times 2:50 AM 4:50 AM 3:13 PM 5:13 PM Minor Times 9:28 AM 10:28 AM 9:01 PM 10:01 PM Major Times 3:36 AM 5:36 AM 3:58 PM 5:58 PM Minor Times 10:03 AM 11:03 AM 9:58 PM 10:58 PM Major Times 4:21 AM 6:21 AM 4:44 PM 6:44 PM Minor Times 10:37 AM 11:37 AM 10:54 PM 11:54 PM Best SEASONS BEST Better++ Better Average Average Average7:31 am 5:45 pm 5:26 pm 6:44 amMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:32 am 5:45 pm 6:18 pm 7:30 am 7:32 am 5:46 pm 7:12 pm 8:12 am 7:32 am 5:47 pm 8:07 pm 8:52 am 7:33 am 5:47 pm 9:02 pm 9:29 am 7:33 am 5:48 pm 9:58 pm 10:04 am 7:33 am 5:49 pm 10:55 pm 10:38 am93% 99% 95% 88% 82% 76% 70% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL Marine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698 www.mikesmarine”orida.com MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. Paintball! With everyone on holiday, and the weather turning colder, we see an increase frequency of very small steel and aluminum cylinders showing up for recharging. These cylinders were “ rst developed decades ago driving the gas for soda making machines. Today they drive a thriving sport called paintball. The cylinders are DOT-monitored just like our scuba cylinders, but apart from their size, differ most often in that they are “ lled with low pressure liquid Carbon Dioxide or CO2. A year ago, folks at Air Gas begged me to set up a CO2 recharge station in Wakulla based upon the number of requests they got in Tallahassee. But there is so much more to this sport than “ lling CO2 cylinders. Last year a group from FSU asked if they could use our cleared 5 acres to set up a playing “ eld. Boy, did I get an education! The sport involves shooting a plastic ball “ lled with different color paints from a special gun. Whether you shoot at targets or each other de“ nes the protective clothing (and face shield) you wear. The cooler weather makes donning the protective equipment more comfortable. The FSU crowd brought in” atable targets and structures that “ lled the “ eld. Teams were selected and scores were kept based upon the number of successful (kept by color) strikes that were made. When the day was over, the “ eld looked very colorful, but the “ rst rain washed it all away. It appears the balls and the paint are quickly biodegradable. After the next rain storm, I found no vestige of the games played! The guns used are available from many sources locally and on the internet. They are driven by CO2 or high pressure air. These guns can be very sophisticated and expensive, but most are very affordable. A local dad was in yesterday discussing his recent acquisition of paintball supplies and said his children were joining up with several other families to get into this sport. He was a bit frustrated since many of the cylinders he had purchased were out of the DOT required hydrostatic testing dates and were cheaper to replace than retest. But we sorted it all out in the end. We currently only “ ll the drive gas cylinders. We offered the backlot. In fact, we offer to work with folks if they would like to set up a course back there. Here is a great opportunity to take unused space and make something fun out of it. Obviously we want to work with parents and their children to “ nd a safe recreational activity this holiday season. The winter ocean is rough and cold, the warm local springs are off limits to recreational diving, so why not expand the compressed-gas horizons.From FWC News This report represents some events the FWC handled over the week of Dec. 7 through Dec. 13. FRANKLIN COUNTY: FWC Of“ cers worked tirelessly to prevent the illegal harvest of oysters from closed waters in the Apalachicola Bay. Of“ cers John Allen and Matt Gore, along with assistance from FWCs aviation wing, issued nine misdemeanor citations for the harvest of oysters from conditionally restricted waters, unshaded oysters, and untagged bags of oysters. The 11 bags of oysters seized during these efforts were returned to the restricted waters alive, thus keeping them from the consumer shellfish market and preventing the health-related issues that can arise from ingesting tainted shell“ sh. € Officer John Allen conducted a “ sheries inspection on a few anglers on the St. George Island Fishing Pier. His inspection revealed an undersized sea bass and an oversized red drum. The of“ cer issued a misdemeanor citation for the red drum and a warning for the sea bass. € Of“ cers continue to monitor shell“ sh harvesting in Apalachicola and Apalachee Bay. During the past seven days, Of“ cers Jason Carroll and Steven Cook observed two subjects harvesting oysters in conditionally closed waters. Of“ cers set up surveillance, and after gathering enough evidence conducted a vessel stop on the oyster boat. The subjects were charged for oystering in conditionally closed waters, and the oysters were seized and returned back to the bay. LEON COUNTY: Of“ cers have been working night-fishing complaints on Lake Talquin. The complaints involved individuals keeping over the bag limit and undersized crappie and striped bass. Lt. Kent Harvey and Of“ cers Chris Jones, Blake Hoelscher, Jason Carroll, and Steven Cook were able to set up surveillance at key “ shing areas on the lake. The hours they worked were sporadic and were when the fish seemed to be biting the best. The officers made nine arrests for possession of undersized crappie and striped bass, along with a size limit arrest for crappie and black bass. In addition, the of“ cers arrested some subjects at the lake on outstanding warrants. € Lt. Kent Harvey responded to a boating accident on Lake Talquin. The Gadsden County Sheriffs Department received a 911 call about a man in a small boat that overturned just out from Ingrams Fish Camp. Harvey was in the area and responded. Upon arrival, a Good Samaritan had retrieved the individual and his boat from the water. The subject was showing signs of hypothermia. EMS responded, but the subject refused to be transported. The boat appeared to have been swamped by waves over the stern due to rough water. FWC Law Enforcement operations

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com W a k u l l a C o u n t y S e n i o r C i t i z e n s C e l e b r a t e L i f e Wakulla County Senior Citizens Celebrate Life This is the last article I will publish as executive director of the Wakulla County Senior Citizens. I became executive director in April 1997. Life is a journey that some enjoy more than others. But the last 15 years has been a journey that has given me more pleasure and satisfaction than anyone should expect from their employment. This article will include people and events that Ive enjoyed during this part of my life. First, the joy of watching our employees work so hard to please our clients was more than anyone should expect. One Christmas day, just as I was seated at the table to over-indulge in our Holiday Feast, a lady called me and said she was at home alone with nothing to eat. I told her to wait and I would bring her lunch in a few minutes. I immediately “ xed too much for one person and drove to her home. The “ rst thing I noticed was that she had plenty of food including frozen meals in her freezer. I then realized that food wasnt what she needed … it was someone to talk with on Christmas day. I stayed much longer than I planned and my family understood. Later at work, I told our staff about this and one staff member spoke up and stated that this same lady called her with the same problem on Thanksgiving Day. Seeing this “ rsthand helped me better understand the depression and other health problems that our older population experience who live alone face every holiday. This event showed me how much our staff cared. There was a lady held captive for years and was shared by a group of men including her former husband. There were some children born during this time and some did not survive and she never saw the others. When discovered, the men were imprisoned and she soon came to the Senior Center but did not speak. We were advised to avoid her being in the presence of loud noises and never let a man touch her including handshakes. Soon, she was having conversations with other seniors. Noises did not bother her as much so I asked if I could interview her for an article. She agreed, so we met and she told me all she could remember for the article. As we ended the interview, I told her that I could not write a story about our conversation. I expressed appreciation for her openness and she left happy. A few weeks later, she brought a pair of praying hands she had made in a craft activity and said she made them as a gift for me. Before she left, she said she wanted to give me one more gift. Then she asked could she hug my neck, and she did as I cried. I havent told this story many times because I become emotional every time I mention it. Im sure I was the “ rst man she willingly touched after her captivity. I made a list of individuals and events that I could discuss that exceed 20 possibilities and the article is getting too long already. One gentleman was so excited that we were building a new Senior Center. Every day he would talk about it. He did not live long enough to see it. He had no family. The Senior Center paid for his cremation. This was the “ rst funeral I conducted. A board member sang. I saved his ashes for the new center and he remained in my of“ ce for two years before I spread his ashes in the Gulf of Mexico. A lady from Europe hid in the woods to avoid the German invasion. She ate tree bark and grass to make milk for her baby. This was a long story but she did not want it published. Her babies are almost my age and she is still going strong. This is only a sample of senior center experiences. All of our staff could tell similar stories. It seems impossible to have a group of employees that have such a passion for serving our older population. Every one of them just as myself, believe we are so blessed for all we experience by serving. A group of employees who are rarely recognized because they are out of sight are the champions of service. They serve the homebound seniors in our county. The in-home service workers are those that call the sheriffs department when they are unable to enter a home. They “ nd seniors lying on the ” oor or in a bathtub and they dont know how long they have been there. They have saved so many lives. Sometimes they are too late and the client has expired. These employees are faced with protective dogs. They “ nd homes unsafe or too unclean for human use. These events and conditions do not keep them from serving these seniors. They are the champions of senior services for all they do. Senior services cost much more than our grants provide. The search for additional funds is a requirement of every employee and board member. Recently Century Link sent us a check for sponsorship of our countywide Thanksgiving Dinner. Every check we receive creates opportunities to serve seniors. Our older population is growing and so are their needs. My tenure here will end in January 2013. At the time this was written the Executive Director Selection Committee had completed interviews and their recommendation will go the Board of Directors at their next meeting. If they reject the recommendation, the selection committee will continue their efforts. The Board of Directors are to be commended for their support of every effort weve recommended to improve senior services. You, the citizens of Wakulla County have provided the “ nancial resources to make these services possible. I ask you to send a contribution to the Wakulla County Senior Center at 33 Michael Drive, Crawfordville FL 32327. Hurry and it can be deducted from your 2012 taxable income. I ask you to continue making contributions for our older population who need and deserve so much.R.H. Carter is executive director of the Senior Center. R.H. Carter Looking back at 15 years at the centerBy MICHELLE HUNTER Giving thanks was the message for November this year. The weather was seasonally warm with a few days of cold and some frost. The dining room was “ lled with the warm colors of fall; burgundy, pumpkin, nutmeg, golden yellow and green. A large wreath hung in the front of the room, decorated with natural items from the outdoors and bright colored butter” ies. A large banner hung above it with the words Giving ThanksŽ to remind us of the season of harvest, and the many things we have to be thankful for. Tamaras Tuesday craft classes included decorating leaf-shaped boxes, and antiqued picture frames that looked like they came from an art gallery! One of our seniors from the Silver BellsŽ group, Marilyn Firehammer donated beautiful crocheted hats for our craft classes. Seniors made fabric ” owers which they applied to the hats so everyone ended up with their own creations. These hats came in handy on those cold days. Haydee Jackley of Ribits Ceramic Studio, brought in bisque ware for the seniors to paint. These items will be used as decorations for their homes, or given as Christmas gifts for family and friends. The Senior Center is so blessed to have these wonderful programs brought to us by the Healing Arts of Wakulla County (HAWC). Shelley Swenson of the extension of“ ce taught her monthly nutrition class on breakfast cereals. She gave each participant a cereal box to read the ingredient list and nutrition chart. Most of the seniors were very surprised at the lack of nutrition and the high calorie count the cereals contained. This was a great class on how to read food labels. They also received handouts on the guidelines they should follow when buying breakfast foods. A traditional Thanksgiving meal, with all the “ xins, including Chef Marys homemade cranberry sauce, was served for our free countywide Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 20 and a superb brunch the next morning sent everyone home very full just before the holiday. We would like to say thank you to everyone who volunteers their time and energy to make this center a wonderful loving place to be. We also want to thank the community for all their donations throughout the year. As the month came to an end the dining room was converted to Christmas with lovely decorations and a very large Christmas tree. Buddy Smith played Christmas songs on the piano, as the seniors entered the dining room. Christmas is coming and Santa Claus will be here on Dec. 21 at our Christmas Brunch. If you have any questions or need additional information, please call (850) 926-7145 PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSAt this years community Thanksgiving Dinner offered by the Senior Center on Nov. 20.Seniors give thanks in November Volunteers dancing at the community dinner to the tunes of the Pickin n Grinnin Band. One of the crocheted hats donated for craft classes, with a fabric ” ower applied. The Senior Center decorated for the Christmas season after Thanksgiving.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 11Areports Law Enforcement and CourtsClayton G. Rodgers of Crawfordville reported a structure “ re and WCSO and Wakulla County Fire Rescue responded to a house “ re at 11:17 a.m. The “ re was reported at 21 Satinwood Drive in Crawfordville. WCSO Deputy Sean Wheeler arrived “ rst and reported to responding “ re“ ghters that the house was heavily involved and all occupants were out of the house. When the “ rst “ re unit arrived they found ” ames coming from several windows of the stilt home. Fire crews were able to make entry into the home and contain the “ re to the master bedroom and bathroom. The rest of the home was heavily “ lled with smoke and heat. Wakulla County “ re“ ghters were able to bring the “ re under control in less than 10 minutes. In addition to county “ re“ ghters, volunteers from the Crawfordville and Apalachee Bay VFDS responded to assist. WCEMS also responded to assist. Units were on the scene for more than two hours assuring the heavily damaged home was completely out. Rodgers, the owner, stated he had gone to the store to make a quick purchase and when he returned he found smoke coming from the house. He had to travel to a nearby relatives home to call for the “ re department as his cell phone was in the house. Fire Chief Mike Morgan said he felt the cause was accidental and possibly due to a discarded cigarette. He added that the quick response from all of the agencies involved helped to keep the “ re from consuming the entire structure. The Florida Fire Marshals Of“ ce was noti“ ed of the blaze. Christopher L. Rodgers, the son of the owner, was also at the scene. Deputy Sean Wheeler pulled the two men back to safety as they attempted to enter the residence which was already on fire. The home was a total loss and the Red Cross was noti“ ed. In other activity reported by the sheriffs of“ ce this week: DECEMBER 14 € David Howard King, 37, of Panacea was issued a notice to appear in court after discharging a “ rearm at his residence at Apocalyptic Tattoo Studio. King and two other men got into a verbal dispute and King retrieved a .357 caliber pistol. The suspect admitted to “ ring his weapon in the air near Coastal Highway. He was issued the court notice for discharging a firearm in public. Deputy Clint Beam and Deputy Marshall Taylor investigated. € Donetta Sterling of Crawfordville reported a theft at her home. A ladder, “ rewood and an appliance were reported missing. The missing property is valued at $500. Suspects have been identified. Deputy Randy Phillips and Detective Derek Lawhon investigated. € A 16-year-old male juvenile was arrested for possession of narcotics with intent to sell within 1,000 feet of a school facility. Wakulla High School administrators received information that the student was in possession of narcotics. Numerous pills were discovered in the students book bag. The pills were packaged in different ways. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € A 15-year-old Wakulla High School student was discovered to be in possession of a homemade marijuana smoking pipe following a search by WHS administrators. The male student was issued a notice to appear in court for possession of drug paraphernalia. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € Jessica Strickland of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim observed an unauthorized charge of $499 on her bank card. The fraud was committed in Panama. Deputy Sean Wheeler investigated. DECEMBER 15 € Jodee Bodiford of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. A heavy gauge extension cord and an outside air conditioning unit were stolen from her home. The stolen property is valued at $600. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Julie Edmondson of Panacea reported a grand theft of an air conditioning unit. The unit was removed from the victims porch. It is valued at $600. On Dec. 16, the victim identi“ ed a suspect in the case and the unit was returned to her. Deputy Will Hudson investigated. DECEMBER 16 € Colleen Rojas of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim noticed an unauthorized charge of $445 on her bank account which was generated in North Carolina. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Vanessa Stokes-Monroe of Metairie, La., reported the loss of a handgun which was placed on her vehicle before she left Crawfordville. The “ rearm fell off the vehicle as she drove away. The lost property was estimated at $285 and an effort to locate the “ rearm along the road was unsuccessful. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. DECEMBER 17 €A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student reported his wallet as lost or stolen. The wallet was missing from the band room. The property and contents are valued at $81. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € Shawn Raker of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. Four unauthorized charges were observed for a total of $655 including airport parking and home shopping purchases. Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Keith Alan Henderson, 38, of Crawfordville was issued a notice to appear in court for assault and a trespass warning was also issued. Henderson was involved in a confrontation at Bellamys Outdoor Sports with business owner Owen Bellamy, allegedly verbally threatening him with bodily harm. Deputy Vicki Mitchell and Deputy Ward Kromer investigated. € Louise Fedorak of Panacea reported a residential burglary. A restaurant cooker, cart and table saw were stolen from the victims storage trailer. The property is valued at $735. Individuals of interest were identified. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Valerie Bradford of Panacea reported the theft of medications from her home. The medications are valued at $60. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. DECEMBER 18 € Ronald Strickland of Woodville reported a residential burglary at his Sopchoppy property. A boat and motor, chainsaw, gas tank, gas can and gas hose, valued at $2,720 were removed from the property. Evidence was collected at the scene. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. € Oral Nolan of Tallahassee and Comcast Cable was involved in a traf“ c crash at the 1700 block of U.S. Highway 319. The victim struck a bear with his work truck. The bear ran off into the woods and the vehicle suffered minor damage. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. DECEMBER 19 € Dianna Porter of Sopchoppy reported a traffic crash on Sopchoppy Highway just south of Sopchoppy involving a bear. The bear could not be located and there were no injuries reported. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 903 calls for service during the past week including 12 residential and business alarms; 69 citizen contacts; 19 disturbances; 15; E-911 abandoned cell calls; 16 regular E-911 abandoned cell calls; 19 regular E-911 calls; 48 investigations; 11 loud music/noise complaints; 55 medical emergencies; 270 residential and business security checks; 57 special details; 20 subpoena services; 10 suspicious vehicles; 20 traf“ c enforcements; 73 traf“ c stops; and 11 wanted people.Sheri s ReportSpecial to The NewsThe Florida Sheriffs Association, to preserve years of historical knowledge and share best practices, founded the New Sheriffs Institute and has concluded its 2012 training of the newly-elected Sheriffs across the state. The program is held every four years following elections and provides critical resources and training for the newly elected sheriffs and their command staff. This program allows sheriffs-elect to learn about the varied and robust operations of a Sheriffs Of“ ce. Wakullas sheriff-elect Charlie Creel participated in the training. This years class also consisted of: € Brevard … Sheriff-Elect Wayne Ivey. € Broward Sheriff-Elect Scott Israel. € Calhoun Sheriff-Elect Glenn Kimbrel. € Charlotte Sheriff-Elect William Prummell. € Flagler Sheriff-Elect Jim Manfre. € Franklin Sheriff-Elect Mike Mock. € Gilchrist Sheriff-Elect Robert BobbyŽ Schultz. € Gulf Sheriff-Elect Mike Harrison. € Levy Sheriff-Elect Bobby McCallum. € Liberty Sheriff-Elect Nick Finch. € Marion Sheriff-Elect Chris Blair. € Martin Sheriff-Elect William Snyder. € Monroe Sheriff-Elect Rick Ramsay. € Nassau Sheriff-Elect Bill Leeper. The New Sheriffs Institute is one of the greatest resources for our sheriffs,Ž said FSA Executive Director Steve Casey. We have put together an exceptional program to bring years of historical knowledge that captures the responsibility and essence of what it means to be a sheriff,Ž Casey said. The six-day program was held Dec. 2 to Dec. 7 and was kicked off with a Remembering Our Roots Ceremony held at the FSA Law Enforcement Memorial Wall. The sheriffs-elect then spent the rest of the week learning about a variety of topics from industry professionals. Topics ranged from maintaining the integrity of the badge and dealing with personnel issues to their role in the legislative process and providing county jail services. The New Sheriffs Institute is also where they receive their Florida Sheriffs Manual, a 345-page reference tool that many Sheriffs use on a daily basis. The week was capped off with a trip to the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches main campus in Suwannee County. This institute provides a new sheriff with the essentials, from operational issues to administrative demands, legal mandates to liability management,Ž said FSA President and Highlands County Sheriff Susan Benton. This training is a great way to become familiar with all the responsibilities and authority that come with being a new Sheriff. Its essentially managing a business that is accountable for the welfare and safety of its citizens.Ž There were also several re-elected sheriffs who used the New Sheriffs Institute as an opportunity to get refreshed on different aspects, be proactive and take advantage of the educational opportunities offered at the event. Staying up to date with the latest trends and best practices within law enforcement is an important part of being sheriff. The New Sheriffs Institute provides sheriffs with all the skills needed to continue to lead, protect and unite their citizens. The Florida Sheriffs Association is a not-for-pro“ t 501(c)3 corporation made up of the Sheriffs of Florida, approximately 3,500 business leaders and 70,000 citizens throughout the state. Founded in 1893, FSA has quietly served the citizens of Florida by supporting the needs of the states law enforcement community. FSA also provides Sheriffs Of“ ces much-needed programs such as affordable training, special task forces and legislative and legal services. FSA has established and funded the Florida Sheriffs Youth Ranches with facilities throughout the state to help restore hope, fulfill dreams, and prepare boys and girls for the future. For more information on the Florida Sheriffs Association, visit www.” sheriffs.org.Sheri -elect Charlie Creel attends new sheri s trainingFlorida Sheri s Association wraps up successful New Sheriffs Institute Training for Floridas newest top cops Sheriff-Elect Charlie Creel We will close at 1 pm Christmas Eve and re-open Jan. 2, 2013 (850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSBAIT SHOPwill remain OPEN reg. hours(850) 926-1162Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart• Oyster Knives • Gloves • Hand Held VHF Radios • Rubber Boots • Cast Nets • Gift Certi cates• Create A Basket or Bucket for ALL Your Outdoor Fun! HUNTING H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N T T T I I N N G G G BOOTS Field Blazer Muck Boots www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA Open 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. -----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org Promise Land THRIFT STORE y 926-3281 HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH

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Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Dec. 27  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Dec. 28  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Dec. 29  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer fire department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@gmail. com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Dec. 30  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Dec. 31  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Tuesday, Jan. 1  New Year’s Day Wednesday, Jan. 2  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Jan. 3  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.Special EventsSaturday, Dec. 29  BLOOD DRIVE will be held from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Wal-Mart in Crawfordville. No appointment is necessary. Donors will receive their choice of a Fandango voucher for a free movie ticket or a $10 Wal-Mart gift card. Must have photo ID and must weight at least 110 pounds. No appointment necessary. For more information, call 877-7181 or visit www.scbcinfo.org.Upcoming EventsSunday, Jan. 6  FIRST SUNDAY AT THE REFUGE presentation series will “Ask the Staff” at 2 p.m. at the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge. Learn the routines and unforeseen challenges they face in keeping equipment moving, budgets balanced and wildlife protected while providing superior recreational opportunities. First Sunday presentations are in the Environmental Education Center, “Nature’s Classroom” at St. Marks Refuge, 1255 Lighthouse Road. Seating is limited so come early. Refuge entrance fees apply. Call (850)925-6121 for more information. Tuesday, Jan. 8  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY will hold its monthly program at the library from 7 to 9 p.m. Judge Jimmy Joanos of Tallahassee will speak on the history of FSU football. Judge Joanos has been a part of the FSU scene all his life and has written extensive articles pertaining to FSU sports and in particular, football.  PANHANDLE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY MEETING will feature Julia Byrd, Senior Archaeologist, Bureau of Archaeological Research as she presents “Florida Prehistoric and Historic Canoes.” They will explore the diversity of prehistoric and historic canoes and discuss patterns in the ways people made and used canoes throughout Florida’s history. PAST meetings are at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Gov. Martin House, 1001 De Soto Park Dr., Tallahassee. De Soto Park Dr. is off Lafayette St. between Seminole Dr. and Myers Park Dr. Thursday, Jan. 10  SOUP-ER BOWL PARTY will be held at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. This is a workshop which will include preparing, tasting and preserving soup. Several of the soups featured at the recent county-wide Empty Bowl event will be featured. Cost is $15 per person and no one will be turned away based on inability to pay the registration fee. Pre-registration is necessary. Do so by calling 926-3931. Friday, Jan. 11  BLOOD DRIVE will be held at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. Donors will receive a Fandango voucher for a free movie ticket and will be entered for a chance to win a weekly drawing for a Samsung Blu-Ray 3-D home theatre along with an entry for the monthly grand prize of a Samsung 51 inch television. Donors must be at least 110 pounds and provide identi cation to give blood. To give blood, contact Lt. Bruce Ashley at 850-745-7162, bashley@ wcso.org or visit the bloodmobile on the southern end of the parking lot. For information about giving blood, visit the Southeastern Community Blood Center web site at scbcinfo.org. Thursday, Jan. 17  WAKULLA COUNTY TOBACCO FREE PARTNERSHIP will meet at the library from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. Call 850-926-0401 ext. 217 for more information. Tuesday, Jan. 22  AARP DRIVER SAFETY CLASS will be held at the Wakulla County Public Library from 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Cost for AARP members is $12, everyone else is $14. Those interested must register to attend a class. Call Ernie Conte at (850) 926-4605 for more information or to register. Thursday, Jan. 24  CLOSING THE GAP JOB FAIR AND EXPO will be held by Workforce Plus at the Leon County Civic Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Those interested in attending need to register by calling (850) 414-6085. RSVP by Jan. 3, 2013. Saturday, Jan. 26  GREEN CLEANING WORKSHOP will be held at 9:30 a.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Jennifer Glaubius and Shelley Swenson will share information on the products Glaubius has researched and tested and those being encouraged through the extension of ce. They will discuss cleaning products that utilize natural ingredients that are safer for the person using them and for the environment. Recipes will be available. They will make an all-purpose cleaner for each participant to take home. Co-sponsored by Sustainable Big Bend. Cost is $10. Pre-Registration is necessary, call (850) 926-3931.  TALLAHASSEE FITNESS FESTIVAL will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Leon County Civic Center. The one-stop “Fitness Shop” is dedicated to health, tness, nutrition, and beauty. National and local businesses will conduct exercise classes, offer free health screenings, conduct workshops, provide free personal training, product samples and more. There will be a tugo-war competition to bene t Second Harvest of the Big Bend. Door prizes will be provided every 30 minutes. Local college athletes will provide mini-sports drills and sign autographs in the Kids Korner. Learn to to grow a small garden and cook healthy food during various demonstrations. For more information, call 222-0200 and visit tally tnessfest.com. Saturday, Feb. 2  FOOD PRESERVATION PRESSURE CANNING WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. A class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be offered if participation merits a second session. The cost is $5. Call 926-3931 for more information or to register. Thursday, Feb. 7  FLORIDA SEAFOOD CLASS will be held from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Seafood is quick and easy to prepare. Learn all about Florida Seafood health bene ts and risks, selecting, handling and preparing seafood. Join for a cooking demonstration and tasting. Pre-registration is required. The cost is $15. Call 926-3931 to register or for more information. Saturday, Feb. 9  FOOD PRESERVATION WATER BATH CANNING WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. A class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be offered if participation merits a second session. The cost is $5. Call 926-3931 for more information or to register. Saturday, Feb. 16  JAMS AND JELLIES FOOD PRESERVATION WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the Wakulla County Extension Of ce. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. A class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be offered if participation merits a second session. The cost is $5. Call 926-3931 for more information or to register. Saturday, Feb. 23  WALK TO DEFEAT ALS will be held at Tom Brown Park in Tallahassee. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. and the walk starts at 10 a.m. The purpose is to raise funds and awareness for ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, a progressive, fatal neurodegenerative disease. There is no known cause or cure for ALS. Proceeds raised will support patient care and comfort, as well as research for treatments and a cure. For more information go to www.WalktoDefeatALS.org, or call 888-257-1717, ext. 115.  SALSA PARTY WORKSHOP will be held from 9 a.m. to noon. Hands-on preservation workshops where participants will practice food safety techniques and leave with a nished product. A class from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. will be offered if participation merits a second session. The cost is $5. Blood Drive at Wal-Mart from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. New Year’s EveNew Year’s Day Historical Society Museum and Archives open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday Monday TuesdayThursday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Government Meetings Monday, Jan. 7  WAKULLA COUNTY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 5 p.m. in the commission chambers. An item of interest is the TCC Wakulla Environmental Institute. Tuesday, Jan. 8  WAKULLA COUNTY RESTORE ACT ADVISORY COMMITTEE will hold a public meeting at 6 p.m. at the TCC Wakulla Center. Computer Class Schedule at the libraryThursday, Jan. 10 € Facebook II will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. This class is for students who already have a Facebook account who would like to learn more features, tips and tricks. Such as categorizing their friends, use FB email, upload pics, videos, and add apps. Wednesday, Jan. 16 € Microsoft Word 2010, Level I, will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. In this class you will learn to create, edit, save and print documents in Microsoft Word. Discover features such as: Spelling and Grammar, Auto Correct/Text, Find/ Replace, etc. Wednesday, Jan. 23 € Craigslist will be held from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Do you have some larger items to sell such as appliances, electronics, computers, furniture, or household items? Do you want to use the Internet but still sell locally and not worry about shipping any goods? If so, join us and learn how to use Craigslist. € Skype will be held from noon to 2 p.m. Make free calls with Skype. download, set up an account, create your pro“ le, create contacts, make a call, chat and more. € Microsoft Excel 2010, Level I, will be held from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Create a custom worksheet, use features such as: Auto Correct/Auto Fill, Custom List and Keyboard Shortcuts. Learn basic formulas and functions. Wednesday, Jan. 30 €Healthy PC: Maintaining your Computer will be held from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Review of computer maintenance such as how to Defrag, Scan for Viruses and Spy Ware, and more. € Pinterest will be held from noon to 2 p.m. Discover how to browse pinboards and get inspiration from people who share your interests. Pin what you love from around the web, Discover content by browsing interest categories, Explore pins and boards curated by pinners you follow, repin, like and comment on your favorite pins. € Computer Basics using Windows 7 will be held from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Learn to navigate Windows 7 and use programs provided; including saving and printing. Class is intended for new computer users. For certain classes, students must know computer basics including how to use a mouse and some familiarity with using the internet. All classes are free and are open to Wakulla County residents. The classes are held at the Wakulla County Public Library located at 4330 Crawfordville Highway. Registration is required. To register call (850) 926-7415.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 13A F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL #3 Florida vs. #21 Louisvilleat Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans, LA Wednesday, Jan. 2 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. DISCOVER ORANGE BOWL #13 Florida State vs. #15 Northern Illinois at Sun Life Stadium, Miami Gardens, FL Tuesday, Jan. 1 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excitedtoo! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! FSU’s Manuel closing in on school historyBy BOB FERRANTEof the OSCEOLAErik Manuel had mentioned to his son that he was close to accomplishing something special, a feat that no other Florida State quarterback had ever done. EJ Manuel is already 3-0 in bowl games. And while he didnt start the 2010 Chick“ l-A Bowl win over South Carolina, he relieved the injured Christian Ponder after halftime and led FSU to a win. Manuel would be the “ rst FSU quarterback to play a signi“ cant amount of time in four bowl victories if the Seminoles defeat Northern Illinois on Jan. 1 in the Orange Bowl. He would also be the “ rst FSU quarterback to start and win three bowl games. My dad mentioned that to me when I was home a few weeks ago,Ž Manuel said. Im looking forward to it. If you can have a 4-0 record that says a lot. That says enough in itself. Just got to keep the streak going.Ž Manuel hasnt had the best numbers in bowl games, but he has delivered clutch performances … and victories. Last year, on a broken leg, he led FSU back from a 14-3 fourth-quarter de“ cit to beat Notre Dame 18-14. Manuel completed 20 of 31 passes for 249 yards and a pair of touchdown passes to Bert Reed and Rashad Greene. In the 26-17 win over South Carolina, FSU led 13-3 at the half. But Manuel led FSU to three scoring drives in the second half, “ nishing with a 7-yard pass to Taiwan Easterling, to secure the win. And as a freshman in 2009, Manuel helped coach Bobby Bowden retire with a 33-21 win over West Virginia. Manuel had a touchdown run and completed 17 of 24 passes against the Mountaineers. Manuel is a combined 48 of 70 (68.5 percent) for 522 yards in the three bowl games. West Virginias Pat White, from 200508, is thought to be the only quarterback to start in four bowl wins. Oklahomas Landry Jones is going for his fourth bowl win … all starts … when the Sooners play Texas A&M in the Cotton Bowl on Jan. 4.EJ Manuel may be “ rst quarterback to win four bowl games. Long season zooms by quicklyBy MARTY COHENGATOR BAIT STAFF WRITERIts funny how fast the college football season seems to fly by, yet thinking back to the opening few games makes it feel like years ago. I was reminded of this sentiment while watching Texas A&M wunderkind quarterback Johnny Manziel deservedly accept the Heisman Trophy. Stretching the memory bank all the way back to Sept. 8, when Manziel made his debut against Florida in an eventual 20-17 Gator triumph, he was certainly not the quarterback who would morph into the nations most electrifying player. The Gators got a dose of good fortune when A&M had its scheduled opener at Louisiana Tech postponed because of hurricane conditions in the Bayou, meaning Manziel and his mates would not have a chance to knock out the opening-day rust while implementing a new offensive system. I remember leaving College Station thinking that Manziel was a nice-looking player and over time, could be a force in the SEC. Little did we know that his inaugural game would be the springboard for a record-breaking season. The Gators held Manziel to his least productive day all season, just 233 yards of offense. His longest run of the day was 16 yards, on his “ rst attempt, a scramble on thirdand-17. His passing numbers were decent … 23 of 30 for 173 yards … but wound up being his lowest total in 12 games. Manziel was sharp early when the Aggies scored a pair of touchdowns and a “ eld goal on their “ rst three possessions to assume a 17-7 lead after 23 minutes. The Aggies ran 38 plays and gobbled up 226 yards on those three drives, and looked like they would breeze up and down the “ eld on the Gator defense like it was some ordinary Big 12 out“ t. But things changed dramatically from that point, as the Gators adjusted and subsequently shut down the high-” ying Aggies, who would score under 30 points only one time the rest of the season, in a dramatic 29-24 win at Alabama. The Gators completely sti” ed the Aggies in the second half, limiting the hosts to a mere three “ rst downs, 49 yards of offense and 9:55 of possessions time. And in what would become a season-long trend, the Gator defense surrendered only two plays longer than 20 yards, one on a trick play reverse pass from a wide receiver. It was a Florida comeback, highlighted by the brilliant second-half defensive performance, that would become the trademark of this team, setting up an even-keeled blueprint that would yield a number of terri“ c second-half, particularly fourth-quarter, outings. We stated way back in mid-September that the second-half shutdown in College Station may be looked at in years down the road as the turning point in head coach Will Muschamps tenure, much like Steve Spurrier credited the 1990 road win over Alabama in the second game of his inaugural season as the springboard for future championship greatness. After the desultory opener against Bowling Green, Floridas playmakers began to emerge in the Texas heat, and when the dust settled three months later, a dozen players earned some sort of postseason recognition (All-SEC or All-American), not bad for a team that did not have a single player named to the medias preseason All-SEC “ rst team back in late July. Yup, seven Gators were included on the preseason All-SEC squad, with just two on the second team (safety Matt Elam and kicker Caleb Sturgis) and “ ve on the third team (defensive linemen Sharrif Floyd and Dominique Easley, linebacker Jon Bostic, offensive tackle Xavier Nixon and return specialist Andre Debose). Thats it. Well guess what, six Gators made either the AP or Coaches “ rst-team All-SEC squads … Elam, Floyd, Sturgis, running back Mike Gillislee, tight end Jordan Reed and punter Kyle Christy … while two others (Bostic and cornerback Marcus Roberson) earned second-team honors and four were selected to the leagues All-Freshman team (defensive ends Jonathan Bullard and Dante Fowler, offensive tackle D.J. Humphries and linebacker Antonio Morrison). For good measure, four Gators earned All-American honors, with Elam, Floyd and Sturgis receiving “ rst-team All-American status from some national organization and Christy getting a secondteam nod.The Gators triumph over Texas A&M in its “ rst SEC game of this season after joining the conference. Photo by COLIN HACKLEY GATOR BAIT

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Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com Self Storage Notices 5465-1227 TWN Sale-Crawfordville Self Storage 1/5/13 PUBLIC NOTICE Notice is given pursuant to Florida Self-Storage Facility Act, Florida Statues, Chapter 83, Part IV that Crawfordville Self Storage will hold a sale by sealed bid on Saturday, January 5, 2013, at 10:00 a.m. at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. of the contents of Mini-Warehouse containing personal property of: Latrese Webster Marilyn Mitchell Before the sale date of Saturday, January 5, 2013, the owners may redeem their property by a payment of the outstanding balance and cost by paying in person at 3291 Crawfordville Hwy. December 20 & 27, 2012 5462-1227 TWN vs. Stewart, Anthony Case No. 2007-40-FC Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVILACTION, CASE NO.: 2007-40-FC HSBC BANK USA, N.A., Plaintiff, vs. ANTHONYSTEWART, et al, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order Rescheduling Foreclosure Sale dated December 4, 2012 and entered in Case No. 2007-40-FC of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACounty, Florida wherein HSBC BANK USA, N.A., is the Plaintiff and ANTHONYSTEWART; JEANNIE STEWART; ACCREDITED HOME LENDERS, INC. SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO AAMEES FUNDING CORPORATION; are the Defendants, The Clerk of the Court will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at FRONTLOBBYOF THE WAKULLACOUNTYCOURTHOUSE at 11:00AM, on the 7th day of February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment: LOT 30 OF EASTGATE SUBDIVISION (UNRECORDED) AND BEING MORE PARTICULARLYDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCE AT ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 59 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEYOF LANDS IN WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA AND RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 30 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID LOT 59 ADISTANCE OF 2365.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE SOUTH 17 DEGREES 52 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 1050.52 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION; THENCE ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARYOF SAID EASTGATE SUBDIVISION RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 1000.00 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE EASTERLYRIGHT OF WAY BOUNDARYOF ACOUNTYROAD (GRIFFIN ROAD); THENCE ALONG SAID RIGHT OF WAYBOUNDARYSOUTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 466.75 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE A50 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT (MIDWAYCOURT); THENCE ALONG SAID CENTERLINE NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 300.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE NORTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS EAST 155.59 FEET; THENCE RUN SOUTH 72 DEGREES 40 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 100.00 FEET; THENCE RUN NORTH 17 DEGREES 51 MINUTES 45 SECONDS WEST 155.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A5 FOOT ROADWAYEASEMENT ALONG THE NORTHERN PORTION OF SAID PROPERTY. A/K/A24 MIDWAYCOURT, CRAWFORDVIL, FL32327 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within sixty (60) days after the sale. WITNESS MYHAND and the seal of this Court on December 5, 2012. Brent X. Thurmond, Clerk of the Circuit Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. WillisDeputy Clerk **See Americans with Disabilities Act Any persons with a disability requiring reasonable accommodations should call Clerk of Circuit Court at (850)926-0905. December 20 & 27, 2012 F07006995 5467-0103 TWN vs. Weilacher Dale L. Case No. 65 2012 CA 000136 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIRCUIT CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO.: 65 2012 CA 000136 BANK OF AMERICA, N.A.; Plaintiff, DALE L. WEILACHER, JR., et al., Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION TO: ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES, CLAIMING B Y, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, BENEFICIARIES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS OF DALE L. WEILACHER, JR. DECEASED, ET AL., 214 MAIN STREET, TIDIOUTE, PA 16351; 1234 TOWER HILL RD., NORTHERN CAMBRIA, PA 15714 AND TO: All persons claiming an interest by, through, under, or against the aforesaid Defendant(s). YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose a mortgage on the following described property: Lot 13, Block A, Hammock Woods, according to the map or plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 3, page 6, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on the attorney for the Plaintiff, Morales Law Group. P.A., whose address is 14650 NW 77th Court, Suite 303, Miami Lakes, FL 33016, and the file the original with the Clerk within 30 days after the first publication of this notice, or on or before January 25, 2013. If you fail to do so, a default my be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Foreclosure Complaint. Dated December 11, 2012 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk December 27, 2012 & January 3, 2013 12-000714-1 5469-1227 TWN vs. Yore, Frank Case No. 12-73-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, STATE OF FLORIDA, CASE NO.: 12-73-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, successor in interest to WAKULLA BANK, Plaintiff, vs. FRANK J. YORE and KAREN HOPE YORE, husband and wife; CRE VENTURE 2011-1, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company; UNKNOWN TENANT #1; UNKNOWN TENANT #2; UNKNOWN TENANT #3; UNKNOWN TENANT #4; UNKNOWN TENANT #5, and UNKNOWN TENANT #6, who may be in possession, Defendants. AMENDED CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO F.S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 1, 2012, in Case No.: 12-73-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse in Crawfordville, Florida at 11:00 a.m. EST on January 31, 2013 the following described property: Lot 3 of PETRIK PARK, according to the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat Book 4, Page(s) 1, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. December 20 & 27, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. 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Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker LOCAL NEWS The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews.com  Just $31 per year in Wakulla County  $42 per year in Florida  $44 per year out of state Please Go To www.thewakullanews.com and click on subscribeorCall877-401-6408 C a n ’ t Can’t a c c e s s access T h e The W a k u l l a Wakulla n e w s ews o n l i n e online c o n t e n t ? content? S u b s c r i b e Subscribe t o d a y a n d today and g e t f u l l get full a c c e s s access! WAKULLA COUNTY BUILDING OFFICIAL ANTICIPATED VACANCY December 20, 26, 2012

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 15A 5463-1227 TWN vs. Hyatt-Kight, Brenda Case No. 10-328-CA Notice of Foreclosure PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO.: 10-328-CA CITIMORTGAGE, INC, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC Plaintiff, vs. BRENDA D. HYATT-KIGHT, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated November 21, 2012, and entered in Case No. 10-328-CA of the Circuit Court 5468-1227 TWN Vs. Chrisco, Chad Case No. 652009CA000391CAXXX Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE THIRD JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION, CASE NO.: 652009CA000391CAXXXX CITIMORTGAGE, INC, SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC. Plaintiff, vs. CHAD CONROYCHRISCO A/K/ACHAD CHRISCO, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated November 21, 2012, and entered in Case No. 652009CA000391CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLACOUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC. SUCCESSOR BYMERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC., is Plaintiff, and CHAD CONROYCHRISCO A/K/ACHAD CHRISCO, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLACounty Courthouse, the FRONTlobby of the courthouse, at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 31 day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: North Half of Lot 50 of Rainbow Acres, as per the map or plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Book Page 66 Aof the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, being more particularly described as follows: Commence at an iron pipe marking the Southwest corner of Lot 50 of Rainbow Acres, as per the map or plat recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 66Aof the public Records of Wakulla County, Florida, and proceed North 00 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds East along the West boundary of said Lot 50 a distance of 316.93 feet to the Point of Beginning. From said Point of Beginning thence continue North 00 degrees 12 minutes 35 seconds East 316.93 feet to an iron pipe marking the North corner of said Lot 50, thence run South 89 degrees 54 minutes 50 seconds East 330.47 feet to an iron pipe marking the Northeast corner of said Lot 50, thence run South 00 degrees 15 minutes 33 seconds West along the East boundary of said Lot 50 a distance of 317.07 feet, thence run North 89 degrees 53 minutes 23 seconds West 330.20 feet to the Point of Beginning. Together with an Easement for ingress and egress over and across the West 30.00 feet of the South one-half of Lot 50 of Rainbow Acres, a subdivision as per map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 1, Page 66Aof the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, WAKULLACOUNTY, Florida, this 13th day of December, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL33309 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By: Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Attorney for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, Office of Court Administration 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL32303, 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 20 & 27, 2012 5471-0103 TWN Vs. Morgan, William F. Case No.: 2008-000123-FC Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY. FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION Case #: 2008-000123-FC BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. Plaintiff, -vs.William F. Morgan, III a/k/a William F. Morgan 3rd; Donna L. Morgan; Any and All Unknown Parties Claiming By, Through, Under, and Against the Herein Named Defendant(s) Who Are Not Known To Be Dead Or Alive, Whether Said Unknown Parties May Claim An Interest As Spouses, Heirs, Devisees, Grantees Or Other Claimants; Primus Automotive Financial Services, Inc.; John Doe And Jane Doe as Unknown Tenants In Possession Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVENpursuant to an Order of Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 10, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 2008-000123-FC of the Circuit Court of the 2nd Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P., Plaintiff and William F. Morgan, III. a/k/a William F. Morgan, 3rd. and Donna L. Morgan, Husband and Wife are defendant(s), I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash AT THE FRONT LOBBY OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY COURTHOUSE LOCATED AT CHURCH STREET, HIGHWAY 319, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA AT 11:00 A.M. on February 7, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 46, BLOCK 7, WAKULLA GARDENS, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 39, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THIS LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the ADA Coordinator; 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, Florida 32301; (850)577-4430at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification of the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days. If you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT Wakulla County, Florida (SEAL) By: /s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF: SHAPIRO, FISHMAN & GACH, LLP 2424 North Federal Highway, Suite 360, Boca Raton, Florida 33431 (561) 998-6700 (561) 998-6707 December 27, 2012 and January 3, 2013 10-212854 FC01 5473-0103 TWN Vs. Atkinson, Dessera Case #12-34-CA Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CASE # 12-34-CA CENTENNIAL BANK, a foreign, banking corporation, Plaintiff, v. Dessera Atkinson, et al; Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, pursuant to a Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 12, 2012, entered in Case No. 12-34-CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CENTENNIAL BANK is the Plaintiff, and DESSERA ATKINSON; HERBERT H. TRICE, JR., AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANTS WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES OR OTHER CLAIMANTS are the Defendants, the undersigned will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at Lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida, 32327 at 11:00 oclock a.m. on February 21, 2013 the following described property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure to-wit: SEE EXHIBIT A Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days of the sale. DATED this 12th day of December, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, Clerk of Court (seal) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC, is Plaintiff, and BRENDA D. HYATT-KIGHT, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, the FRONT lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 31 day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 13, Block A of SAVANNAH ACRES UNIT 1, according to the map or plat thereof recorded in Plat Book 2, Page 17, Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, this 11th day of December, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By: /s/ Drew T. Melville, Esq., Florida Bar No. 34986 Attorney for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 20 & 27, 2012 EXHIBIT A BETTYWOOD II, TRACT 8 Commencing at the Northwest corner of Lot No. 58, Hartsfield Survey, Wakulla County, Florida (marked by a concrete monument set by St. Joe Paper Company), thence run North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds east along the South right-of-way of a sixty foot county road, 1,311.15 feet to an iron pipe and the POINT OF BEGINNING of tract described herein. From the POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East along South right-of-way of aforesaid county road 350.0 feet to a point on centerline of a sixty foot roadway running North and South, thence run South 17 degrees 11 minutes 33 seconds East along centerline of aforesaid North and South roadway 300.0 feet, thence run South 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds West 350.0 feet to an iron pipe, thence run North 17 degrees 11 minutes 33 seconds West, 300.0 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Situate, lying and being in Land Lot No. 58, Hartsfield Survey, Wakulla County, Florida and containing 2.41 acres. ALSO,TRACT 10 Commencing at the Northwest corner of Lot No. 58 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands of Wakulla County, Florida (marked by a concrete monument set by St. Joe Paper Paper Company) thence run North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East along the South right-of-way of a 60 foot county road 1,179.37 feet to a concrete monument and the POINT OF BEGINNING of the tract described herein. From the POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East along South right-of-way of county road 131.29 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 17 degrees 11 minutes 33 seconds East 331.8 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds West 131.29 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 17 degrees 11 minutes 33 seconds West 331.8 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Situate, lying and being in Land Lot No. 58, Hartsfield Survey, Wakulla County, Florida and containing One (1.0) acres. ALSO, Tract 11 Commencing at the Northwest corner of Lot NO. 58 Hartsfield Survey of Lands of Wakulla County, Florida (marked by a concrete monument set by St. Joe Paper Company), thence run North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East along the South right-of-way of a 60 foot county road 1.048.58 feet to a concrete monument and the POINT OF BEGINNING of the tract described herein. From the POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East along South right-of-way of county road 131.29 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 17 degrees 11 minutes 33 seconds East 331.8 feet to a concrete monument, thence run South 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds West 131.29 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 17 degrees 11 minutes 33 seconds West 331.8 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING. Situate, lying and being in Land Lot No. 58, Hartsfield Survey, Wakulla County, Florida and containing One (1.0) acres. AND MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED IN RECENT SURVEY dated June 5, 1997 by James ThurmanŽ Roddenberry Surveyor, Job #97-244 as follows: Commence at a St. Joe Paper Company concrete monument marking the Northwest corner of Lot No. 58 of the Hartsfield Survey of Lands in Wakulla County, Florida and run North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East along the Southerly right-of-way boundary of Wakulla/Arran Road 1048.17 feet to a concrete monument (marked #679) marking the POINT OF BEGINNING. From said POINT OF BEGINNING continue North 72 degrees 23 minutes 10 seconds East along said Southerly right-of-way boundary 612.56 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261) lying on the intersection with the centerline of Penny Road thence leaving said right-of-way boundary run South 17 degrees 09 minutes 28 seconds East along said centerline 300.00 feet to a re-rod (marked #4261), thence leaving said centerline run South 72 degrees 23 minutes 29 seconds West 349.92 feet to a concrete monument (marked #679), thence run South 17 degrees 43 minutes 42 seconds East 31.77 feet to a concrete monument (marked #679), thence run South 72 degrees 23 minutes 52 seconds West 262.80 feet to a concrete monument, thence run North 17 degrees 11 minutes 01 seconds West 331.69 feet to the POINT OF BEGINNING containing 4.41 acres, more or less. Together with 84 PIED, MH ID#5348912602A, ID 35348912602B, Title #40468562, #22882011 December 27, 2012 & January 3, 2013 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 29 Horseshoe Trail 3BR/2BA DWMH $650 Mo. $650 Security deposit. • 27 Amy Lane 3 BR/2 BA in Linzy Mill. $1,000 Mo/$1,000 Security. No pets or smoking. • 17 Cessna 3 BR/2BA TARPINE. Available end of December. $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security. No Smoking, No Pets. • 5 Susquehanna 2 BR/2BA $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets O.K. with prior approval and $250. fee. No Smoking. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit • 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! • 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!77 Strattonwood Road Off of Wakulla Springs Hwy. 5 minute commute to Tallahassee. Large 3BR/2BA home on 5 acres. Large workshop with outbuilding. $1100. mo No Pets, no smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking The Wakulla Newswww.thewakullanews. com F o r l o c a l For local n e w s news a n d and p h o t o s photos v i s i t u s visit us o n l i n e online w w w T h e W a k u l l a N e w s c o m www.TheWakullaNews.com MINUTES OF THE WAKULLA COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD MEETING HELD ON DECEMBER 17, 2012DECEMBER 27, 2012

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com 5464-1227 TWN vs. Poore, James, II Case No. 652012CA000087CAXXXX Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO.: 652012CA000087CAXXXX CITIMORTGAGE, INC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC Plaintiff, vs. JAMES M. POORE, II, et al Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated November 21, 2012, and entered in Case No. 652012CA000087CAXXXX of the Circuit Court of the SECOND Judicial Circuit in and for WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, wherein CITIMORTGAGE, INC SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO ABN AMRO MORTGAGE GROUP, INC, is Plaintiff, and JAMES M. POORE, II, et al are Defendants, the clerk will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash, beginning at 11:00 AM at the WAKULLA County Courthouse, the FRONT lobby of the courthouse at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327 in accordance with Chapter 45, Florida Statutes, on the 31 day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Summary Final Judgment, to wit: Lot 16, Block D, Songbird Subdivision, according to the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat Book 3, Page 88, of the Public Records of Wakulla County, Florida. Parcel Identification Number: 00-00-074-272-10223-D16 Any person claiming an interest in the surplus funds from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the lis pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. Dated at Crawfordville, WAKULLA COUNTY, Florida, this 11th day of December, 2012. PHELAN HALLINAN PLC 2727 West Cypress Creek Road Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33309 T: 954-462-7000 F: 954-462-7001 By:/s/ Drew T. Melville, Esq, Florida Bar No. 34986 Attorney for Plaintiff If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office Office of Court Administration, 301 S Monroe St, Rm 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303 850.577.4401 at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 day; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 20 & 27, 2012 5470-0103 TWN vs. Gibson, Lanette Case No. 2011-CA-000081 Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO. 2011-CA-000081 DEUTSCHE BANK NATIONAL TRUST COMPANY, AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE, FOR NEW CENTURY HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2005-4, Plaintiff, vs. LANETTE GRIGGS GIBSON III A/K/A L.G. GIBSON, ET AL. Defendants NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): UNKNOWN HEIRS OF L.G. GIBSON, JR. A/K/A LANETTE GRIGGS GIBSON JR. (CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) Last Known Address: 8 PINEWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE,FL 32327 YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: BEGIN AT AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF SECTION 29, TOWNSHIP 2 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF STATE ROAD NO. 369 AND THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID NORTH BOUNDARY 567.97 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 26 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 184.45 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF PINE WOOD STREET, THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 50 MINUTES 00 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 520.12 FEET TO AN OLD CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE INTERSECTION WITH THE WESTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF SAID STATE ROAD NO. 369, THENCE RUN NORTH 14 DEGREES 03 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY 190.95 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING A/K/A 8 PINEWOOD STREET, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to Lauren E. Barbati, Esq. at VAN NESS LAW FIRM, P.A., Attorney for the Plaintiff, whose address is 1239 E. NEWPORT CENTER DRIVE, SUITE #110, DEERFIELD BEACH, FL 33442 on or before January 25, 2013 a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the WAKULA TIMES and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided to Administrative Order No. 2065 If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 10th day of December, 2012 BRENT THURMOND, CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By:/s/Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk December 27, 2012 & January 3, 2013 5472-0103 TWN Vs. Partnow, Elaine Case No. 65 2012 CA000186 Notice of Foreclosure Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDACIVILDIVISION, CASE NO.: 65-2012-CA-000186 DIVISION: ONEWESTBANK, F.S.B. Plaintiff, vs. ELAINE T. PARTNOW; TURNER BROWNE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICAACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARYOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2; ALLOTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS 5474-0103 TWN v. Poka, Tim Case No. 2011-000069-CA Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO: 2011„000069-CA SCORE FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff, v. TIM POKA A/K/A TIMOTHY POKA; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF TIM POKA (IF ANY); CAPITAL ONE BANK USA, N.A.; WALKERS CROSSING HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC.; TENANTS OR UNKNOWN PARTIES IN POSSESSION; AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY THROUGH OR UNDER ANY DEFENDANTS NAMED HEREIN, Defendants. CLERKS NOTICE OF SALE UNDER F .S. CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS GIVEN that, in accordance with the Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated December 3, 2012, in the above-styled cause, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at the Wakulla County Courthouse, at 11:00 a.m. oclock on February 14, 2013, the following described property: LOT 23, WALKERS CROSSING (UNRECORDED): COMMENCE AT A CONCRETE MONUMENT MARKING THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 8, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 89 DEGREES 54 MINUTES 47 SECONDS WEST ALONG THE NORTH BOUNDARY OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 8 A DISTANCE OF 1,697.41 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTTES 22 SECONDS WEST 690.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING THENCE RUN NORTH 75 DEGREES 41 MINUTES 50 SECONDS EAST 229.82 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY EASEMENT, SAID POINT LYING ON A CURVE CONCA VE TO THE NORTHEASTERLY, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 231.49 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 45 DEGREES 06 MINUTES 29 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 182.25 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 41 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 32 SECONDS EAST 177.58 FEET TO A POINT OF REVERSE CURVE, THENCE RUN SOUTHEASTERLY ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ALONG SAID REVERSE CURVE WITH A RADIUS OF 290.00 FEET THRU A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 10 DEGREES 30 MINUTES 22 SECONDS FOR AN ARC DISTANCE OF 53.08 FEET, THE CHORD OF SAID ARC BEING SOUTH 58 DEGREES 29 MINUTES 36 SECONDS EAST 53.10 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 17 DEGREES 59 MINUTES 04 SECONDS WEST 73.81 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 61 DEGREES 42 MINUTES 13 SECONDS WEST 412.18 FEET THENCE RUN NORTH 00 DEGREES 07 MINUTES 22 SECONDS EAST 370.19 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. SUBJECT TO A ROADWAY EASEMENT OVER AND ACROSS THE EASTERLY 30.00 FEET Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5475-0103 TWN Estate of Hunley, David File No. 12-108-CP Notice to Creditors PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA PROBATE DIVISION, FILE NO: 12-108-CP IN RE: ESTATE OF DAVID GERSON HUNLEY Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS The administration of the estate of David Gerson Hunley, deceased, whose date of death was September 7, 2012, and whose social security number is xxxx-xx-4779, is pending in the Circuit Court for WAKULLA County, Florida, Probate Division, the address of which is 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327. The names and addresses of the personal representative and the personal representatives attorney are set forth below. All creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate on whom a copy of this notice is required to be served must file their claims with this court WITHIN THE LATER OF 3 MONTHS AFTER THE TIME OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE OR 30 DAYS AFTER THE DATE OF SERVICE OF A COPY OF THIS NOTICE ON THEM. All other creditors of the decedent and other persons having claims or demands against decedents estate must file their claims with this court WITHIN 3 MONTHS AFTER THE DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE. ALL CLAIMS NOT FILED WITHIN THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH IN SECTION 733.702 OF THE FLORIDA PROBATE CODE WILL BE FOREVER BARRED. NOTWITHSTANDING THE TIME PERIODS SET FORTH ABOVE, ANY CLAIM FILED TWO (2) YEARS OR MORE AFTER THE DECEDENTS DATE OF DEATH IS BARRED. The date of first publication of this notice is December 27, 2012. Personal Representative: Sandra Corlazzoli 204 Atlantic Blvd., Key Largo, Florida 33037 Attorney for Personal Representative: Patricia Gessel, P.L., Attorney At Law Florida Bar No. 084328 99530 Overseas Hwy. #2, Key Largo, FL 33037 Telephone: 305-453-5277 Email: pgessel@aol.com December 27, 2012 & January 3, 2013 Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration Notices to Creditors/ Administration THEREOF. TOGETHER WITH 1996 DOUBLEWIDE PALM MOBILE HOME, VIN #PH09871AFL AND PH098701BFL, ID#0071388796 & 0071388795 ANY PERSON CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTY OWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE A CLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. Dated: December 11, 2012 By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk (Court Seal) December 27, 2012 & January 3, 2013 Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to a Final Summary Judgment dated December 10, 2012, entered in Civil Case No.: 65-2012-CA-000186, of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein ONEWESTBANK, F.S.B.is Plaintiff, and ELAINE T. PARTNOW; TURNER BROWNE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARYOF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; UNKNOWN TENANT#1; UNKNOWN TENANT#2; ALLOTHER UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOTKNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAME UNKNOWN PARTIES MAYCLAIM AN INTERESTAS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS, are Defendants. I will sell to the highest bidder for cash at 11:00 a.m., at front lobby of the Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Hwy, Crawfordville, FL32327 on the 7 day of February, 2013 the following described real property as set forth in said Final Summary Judgment, to wit: LOTS 4 AND 5, BLOCK B, WEST POINT ASUBDIVISION OF LIVE OAK ISLAND, ASUBDIVISION, AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, AT PAGE 19, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. This property is located at the Street address of: 32 WEST POINT DRIVE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL32327. If you are a person claiming a right to funds remaining after the sale, you must file a claim with the clerk no later than 60 days after the sale. If you fail to file a claim you will not be entitled to any remaining funds. After 60 days, only the owner of record as of the date of the lis pendens may claim the surplus. WITNESS my hand and the seal of the court on December 10, 2012.BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE COURT (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk Attorney for Plaintiff:Elizabeth R. Wellborn, P.A.1701 West Hillsboro Blvd, Suite 307Deerfield Beach, FL33442Telephone: (954) 354-3544, Facsimile: (954) 354-3545 IN ACORDANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 27, 2012 & January 3, 2013 Brain Teaser 1 14 17 20 24 32 37 40 43 51 56 60 63 2 33 52 3 34 53 4 25 27 46 5 21 44 18 38 41 57 61 64 6 15 35 58 7 28 54 8 26 47 9 22 45 23 42 62 65 10 16 19 36 39 59 11 29 48 55 12 30 49 13 31 50 ACROSS 1. Face protectors 6. Ness or Lomond 10. Uses a bookie 14. Bandleader Shaw 15. Mezzo's offering 16. Like hens' teeth, proverbially 17. Satellite spifferupper? 19. Atlas stat 20. McKellen or Holm 21. Trident prong 22. Happy hour buys 24. Solitary one 26. Caught in the act 27. Org. dealing with aliens 28. Famous 32. Classic toothpaste 35. Wealthy one 36. High point 37. Ancient letter 38. Prepared like shepherd's pie 39. Spanker, e.g. 40. Travel guide list 41. Mideast's Gulf of __ 42. Mid way alternative 43. Like shish kebab 45. Caesar's salutation 46. Millennia upon millennia 47. Breastbone 51. Solidarity leader in Poland 54. Carson's TV predecessor 55. "How was __ know?" 56. Basketballer's target 57. Harvest spifferupper? 60. "Bus Stop" playwright 61. Roller coaster feature 62. Cubic meter 63. Use a spyglass 64. Hard to hold on to 65. Cash in much of the ContinentDOWN1. First Lady after Bess 2. Loud, like a crowd 3. Brit's weight 4. Flesh and blood 5. Troubador's verse form 6. Cleo or Frank ie of song 7. Author Sarah __ Jewett 8. Ltd., across the Channel 9. Made tougher 10. Genius spifferupper? 11. Take home 12. Long march 13. Salty seven 18. Web page visits 23. Stutz Bearcat contemporary 25. Excavation spifferupper? 26. Mantle's number 28. Collected clippings 29. March Madness org. 30. Kuwaiti bigwig 31. Editor's excision 32. Pupil's place 33. Music to slamdance to 34. Green Gables girl 35. Hell of a place? 38. Boat hanger-on 42. Beat to death, so to speak 44. Dawn goddess 45. Just __ (not much) 47. Too sentimental 48. Fertiliz er ingredient 49. In __ (unborn) 50. Social customs 51. Tamer's handful 52. Top-flight 53. Theater area 54. Fast Eddie's game 58. Beluga delicacy 59. Erwin of early TV American Prole Hometown Content 12/23/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 123 43516 278 8 426 75 4659 2 96 65174 913 200 9 HometownContent 597 1862 4 3 438952167 216734895 859 427631 673891452 124365789 782 549316 365218974 941673528 M A M I E I R I S W H I P A R O A R P U N K A O N E S T O N E A N N E L O G E K I N M I N E S W E E P E R S E S T I N A E O S H I T S B A R N A C L E L A I N E H A D E S R O E O R N E R A K E D P O O L C I E S E V E N S A P P Y H A R D E N E D A T A D R E O O V E R U S E B R A I N W A S H E R S T U E A R N N C A A N I T E R T R E K E M I R U T E R O S E A S D E L E M O R E S The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 – Page 17A 1. MOVIES: What was the name of the planet where Luke Skywalker (Star WarsŽ) grew up? 2. LITERATURE: Who wrote the childrens book The Wind in the WillowsŽ? 3. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What is a common name for the dog breed Borzoi? 4. MYTHOLOGY: What was the name of the sun god in Greek mythology? 5. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the island of Curacao located? 6. HISTORY: In what U.S. state did the Battle of Bunker Hill take place? 7. GEOMETRY: How many sides does a quadrilateral have? 8. PSYCHOLOGY: What type of fear is represented by hedonophobia? 9. TELEVISION: What was the name of the lead character on Miami Vice,Ž and who played the role? 10. MILITARY: What is the highest decoration awarded for heroism in the U.S. military? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Tatooine 2. Kenneth Grahame 3. Russian Wolfhound 4. Helios 5. Caribbean 6. Massachusetts 7. Four 8. Fear of pleasure 9. Sonny Crockett (played by Don Johnson) 10. Medal of Honor YOUR AD HERE

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Page 18A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 27, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comThe recent cold snap and return to temperatures normal for December in Wakulla County has brought the insect and bug population to a standstill. The mosquito activity is all in South Florida where a fresh batch of northern tourist is available daily for feasting. It is safe to stroll outside, in most area locations, without fear of needing a blood transfusion. Though at a momentary standstill, the signs for next springs insect outbreak are evident now. Eastern Tent Caterpillar nests are dropping from trees and being distributed by wind, animals and people. These native caterpillars build large, thick nests in the forks and crotches of many kinds of trees, especially cherry. The silky tent shaped nests are easy to identity on the upper branches of host trees. The caterpillars which emerge in the spring of 2013 were laid in the spring of 2012. The adult moth lays her eggs in a single batch in May to July in Wakulla County. There are 200 to 300 eggs laid in the group. The mass of eggs are shiny, reddish-brown and look like dried foam. They are ordinarily about six inches back from the tip of a thin twig in host tree. In approximately three weeks the eggs contain fully formed caterpillars, but the small caterpillars remain in the eggs until the following spring. In late-February to midMarch they chew their way through their egg shells ready to eat as their host tree is in spring bud. The voracious larvae immediately infest and, if in suf“ cient numbers, defoliate oak, plum and poplar. Normally the trees recover after a few weeks, but weakened or diseased trees may die. When not eating the newly hatched caterpillars construct their silk tent. The caterpillars use a pheromone trail to guide them back home when feeding is done. A social insect, the eastern tent caterpillars congregate at their speci“ c tent during the night and in rainy weather, expanding it to accommodate their growing size. These caterpillars do not feed within their nests, keeping it clean and neat. The caterpillars disperse and colonize new areas when maturity is reached. They construct cocoons in protected places once they have suf“ ciently scattered. Birds are not attracted to these hairy caterpillars. If they have a heavy concentration of black cherry leaves in their diet, the caterpillars will have a bitter acrid taste. Parasitic wasp and weather are the two most common causes of caterpillar death. These caterpillars are especially susceptible to cold weather once they have emerged from their eggs. About two weeks later an adult moth emerges to begin the process again. Mating and egg laying commonly occur within 24 hours of the moths emerging from their cocoons. The moths are nocturnal and are encountered in” ight only at night. The females die soon after the eggs are deposited. Contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Of“ ce at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.ufl. edu/ to learn more about Wakulla Countys Eastern Tent Caterpillars. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” .edu or at (850) 926-3931.Signs of next spring visible with tent caterpillars Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTOS BY LES HARRISONNests of tent caterpillars visible in the bare treetops, above. The remains of a tent, below. Tent caterpillars in the spring. Complete Medical Care. Here in Wakulla. Now Accepting New Patients Our physicians have been providing comprehensive medical care for the families of Wakulla County for 15 years. Treating the entire family through all stages of life, we provide the medical care that your family needs.€ Infant, child, adult and geriatric care€ Womens healthcare€ Minor surgical procedures€ Diabetes education€ On site lab€ The support of TMH specialists and services SAME DAY Appointments Available Our medical team invites you to call to make your appointment today at (850) 926-7105. 15 Council Moore Road | Crawfordville, FL 32327 TMH Physician PartnersWAKULLA Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator 27 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certi“cates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDo’sColor • P erms • HighlightsFacial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • Flat TopsMirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 NOW OPENHALFTIMEFINE WINE & LIQUORSWe will Match our Local Competition850745-8267 2615 Crawfordville Hwy. Great Selection and Price on GIFT BOXESWE HAVE KEGSDrive Through Available! WE BRING TALLAHASSEE PRICES TO YOU