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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00028313/00439
 Material Information
Title: Wakulla news
Physical Description: Newspaper
Language: English
Publisher: George R. Langford-Ben Watkins
Place of Publication: Crawfordville Fla
Publication Date: 12-13-2012
Frequency: weekly
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Newspapers -- Crawfordville (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Panacea (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Wakulla County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre: newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage: United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Crawfordville
United States -- Florida -- Wakulla -- Panacea
Coordinates: 30.176111 x -84.375278 ( Place of Publication )
 Notes
Additional Physical Form: Also available on microfilm from the University of Florida.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 74, no. 1 (Jan. 2, 1969)-
General Note: Published at: Panacea, Fla., Sept. 2, 1976-Sept. 4, 1980.
General Note: Editor: William M. Phillips, <1978>.
General Note: Publisher: Marjorie Phillips, <1978>.
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Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: aleph - 000401960
oclc - 33429964
notis - ACE7818
lccn - sn 95047268
System ID: UF00028313:00439
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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe county presented its case against certain aspects of the updated ” ood maps to representatives with the Federal Emergency Management Agency last week but was unable to change their minds. They came back and said, thanks, but not thanks,Ž said County Administrator David Edwards. Some of the concerns that were raised were the elevated ” ood zones which could have a large “ nancial impact on area businesses and residents. The base ” ood elevation for the City of St. Marks was raised 10 feet, and the ” ood zone goes well upriver. Most of the changes are in the coastal area and along the rivers, but also shows expanded ” ooding areas in places such as Wakulla Gardens. The maps will affect homeowner insurance rates and building in those areas. FEMA said their model is correct, Edwards said. Were back to square one,Ž he added. Edwards said he argued that FEMA is basing the new ” ood zones based on a storm that has never hit the coast, a hypothetical storm, which may end up costing residents a lot of money. However, FEMA argued that New Jersey had never seen a storm like Hurricane Sandy.Continued on Page 3A Other county news: • RESTORE Act could mean $40 million to Wakulla, Page 2A. • 4 of 5 commissioners support Airport Master Plan, Page 3A. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 48th Issue Thursday, December 13, 2012 T w o S e c t i o n s Two Sections 7 5 C e n t s 75 Cents k h h h k l l h P u b l i s h e d W e e k l y R e a d D a i l y Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe Wakulla Green Scene Page 12B GreenScen e Tips for a green holiday seasonPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways.................................................................... Page 11A Green Sceene ................................................................. Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Holiday Guide ..................................................................Page 7B Classi eds ..................................................................... Page 10B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13B INDEX OBITUARIES Charles Sanford Cocroft Delores D. ‘Dee’ McCrainie Gerrell James Monroe Sanders Thomas Charles Sanders A t t h e Q u e e n ’ s At the Queen’s d i a m o n d j u b i l e e diamond jubilee To county’s dismay, ood maps are nalOperation Santa families will get dinner Staff reportThose who are being assisted through Operation Santa and have no plans for Christmas dinner are invited to Promise Land Ministries for a free meal. Were trying to extend a hand,Ž said Glenn Hamel, pastor of Promise Land Ministries. This is the “ rst year his ministry is offering the dinner. He attended a meeting of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, which is the group behind Operation Santa, and heard about those families who were in need of food. I said, We can do something about that,Ž Hamel said. So he decided to try and offer a free meal to those who otherwise would have nothing to eat on Christmas. At last count, there were 211 families being helped through Operation Santa and 23 families who applied after the deadline and are on a waiting list. Hamel said the invitation is open to anyone who is without food on Christmas. However, he is asking that anyone who plans to attend to try and RSVP by Dec. 20 by calling 251-4302. There will also be activities for children. Promise Land Ministries is located at 20 Church Road, Crawfordville. Christmas in Sopchoppy WILLIAM SNOWDENSanta Claus was in Sopchoppy on Saturday morning, Dec. 8, hanging out at the historic railroad depot to listen to Christmas wishes from local kids. Isabel Brown, 5, was a little shy as Santa tried to pry out what she wants for Christmas. More photos of Christmas in Sopchoppy on Page 12B. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe experience of a lifetime. This was the sentence echoed by Becton Roddenberry and his grandmother Majesty MajŽ Strickland to describe their trip to England to celebrate a momentous milestone for the monarchy, 60 years of Queen Elizabeth IIs reign.Roddenberry and Strickland attended the celebration of the Diamond Jubilee held June 1-11 in London, England. The Diamond Jubilee gave me a chance to express my deep respect for a monarch whose like we shall never see again, let 60 cheers ring long and loud,Ž Roddenberry says. Roddenberry has always loved English history and is a big fan of the British monarchy and the queen. He traveled to Europe in high school and ever since then, he has been fascinated with English history, his grandmother says. He probably knows more British history than most British people,Ž Strickland says. Roddenberry decided he wanted to attend the Diamond Jubilee and decided to ask his grandmother if she wanted to go. Mamaw had never traveled overseas before, so I thought what better occasion for her to get to see the queen too,Ž he says. Strickland says, Im glad I took him up on it.Ž The start of their trip began with the Epsom Derby Investec Day. Roddenberry was able to book two seats in the queens stand for the derby, which Strickland says they pronounce darby.Ž I booked a year in advance, and was shocked to “ nd out that anyone can book in the queens stand at the derby,Ž Roddenberry says.Continued on Page 5AA Sopchoppy pair … Becton Roddenberry and his grandmother, Maj Strickland … go to London and manage to sit near Queen Elizabeth. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBecton Roddenberry and Maj Strickland on their way to the Epsom Derby where they saw the queen. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSQueen Elizabeth, in blue, at the derby.

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Page 2A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe new formula for how the eight counties in Florida that were affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill will split their portion of some of the penalties that will be paid directly to the states has been decided and will leave Wakulla County with the potential of receiving even more money. Under the current formula, if the settlement or “ nes levied on the parties responsible for the oil spill is $20 billion, Wakulla will see at least $41.5 million. If the amount is the minimum of $5 billion, the county will receive $10.4 million. The Committee of Eight Disproportionately Affected Counties met last week at the request of Rep. Steve Southerland who felt the original formula did not give enough to the smaller counties … Franklin, Gulf and Wakulla. The formula didnt take into account how the “ shing and seafood industries were affected by the oil spill in those counties, said County Administrator David Edwards. He thought that needed to be a factor,Ž Edwards said. Representatives of the eight counties agreed to the new formula. However, the formula will have to be presented to each commission for their approval. Edwards said the county commission will vote on the agreement at its Jan. 7 meeting. This formula is for one of the pots of money that has been designated to flow directly to each of the “ ve Gulf states, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Florida, under the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States Act. This act established a Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund in the U.S. Treasury in which 80 percent of the Clean Water Act penalties from the Deep Horizon Oil Spill will be distributed to impacted areas for recovery. Of that 80 percent, 35 percent will be divided among the “ ve states. In Florida, those funds will be distributed directly to the 23 Gulf Coast counties. The eight affected counties will receive 75 percent and the other 15 Gulf counties will receive 25 percent. Of the 75 percent, 20 percent of that money will be divided evenly among the eight counties and the remaining money will be given out based on shoreline oiled, sales tax, average population and distance from the oil rig. The money can be used on restoration and protection of natural resources; mitigation of natural resources; implementation of a federally approved marine, coastal, or conservation management plan; workforce development and job creation; state parks; infrastructure projects benefitting the economy or ecological resources (ports); coastal ” ood protection; planning assistance; administrative costs; promotion of tourism, including recreational “ shing; and promotion of seafood consumption. The remaining portion of the 80 percent of penalties will go to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council at 30 percent and the Impact/Allocation Consortium will receive 30 percent. The remaining 5 percent will be dedicated to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration and Science, Observation, Monitoring and Technology Program administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and centers of excellence. In order to be prepared for the potential massive amount of money coming to Wakulla County, the county commission established the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee which will bring potential projects the money can be used on to the commission. This has the potential to be one of the biggest things to happen to Wakulla County and the region in a long time,Ž Edwards said. The committee met for the first time on Dec. 4 to get an overview of the RESTORE Act. We need everyone to understand what the RESTORE Act does,Ž Edwards said. The majority of the meeting was spent going over the goal of the committee, which will take applications for potential projects, rank them and present them to the commission. There will be a large need for community input, Edwards said. During the meeting, the committee selected Bob Ballard, executive director of TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, as chairman and Mark Mitchell of Panacea Waterfronts Florida, as vice chair. The meeting on Dec. 11 also focused on laying down the groundwork for the group. Once the U.S. Department of the Treasury works out the rules and regulations for this process, the committee can begin to focus on projects. We need the rules,Ž Edwards said. Once we have the rules then we will know how to play the game.Ž He anticipates the department of the treasury coming out with those rules between mid-December and mid-January. Some potential areas this funding could be used is for the TCC Environmental Institute, wasterwater treatment plant, beach restoration, park development, park improvement, canal dredging, “ sheries, oyster relay, etc.Wakulla’s share of RESTORE Act monies could be between $10 million and $41 millionSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Health Department is expanding dental services to women in the Healthy Start program, thanks to a block grant from the Florida Department of Health Infant, Maternal and Reproductive Health Program. The $9,000 grant will allow the Wakulla County Health Department to provide dental services to uninsured and underinsured pregnant women in Healthy Start. Women will continue to receive care for up to six months after their babies are born. This grant will enable us to help more mothers and their babies in a very important way,Ž said Padraic Juarez, MS, REHS, CPM, Wakulla County Health Department administrator. Some studies have linked gum disease to preterm births, so we are excited to be able to expand dental services to the women who need them.Ž To take advantage of the dental program, women must be pregnant and referred by the Healthy Start program. Mothers who are uninsured or underinsured and at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level are eligible. This includes Medicaid-eligible women who do not qualify for coverage of needed dental treatment otherwise. Eligible mothers will receive preventive care, restorative care and surgical treatment as needed at the Health Departments dental clinic at 48 Oak Street in Crawfordville. The Wakulla County Health Departments dental clinic also provides exams, X-rays, cleanings, fluoride treatments, extractions, fillings, root canals and dentures for children through age 20. The clinic has partnered with the College of Central Florida to provide services to the countys children, and education to students enrolled in the colleges dental assisting programs. Healthy Start is a comprehensive program promoting optimal prenatal health and developmental outcomes for all pregnant women and babies in Florida. The fundamental goals of the Healthy Start program are to reduce infant mortality, reduce the number of low birth weight babies and improve health and developmental outcomes. For information on how to qualify for the program, call the Wakulla County Health Department Healthy Start Program at 850-926-0400.Christmas in the Park is held Friday night at Azalea ParkSpecial to The NewsMore than 400 people jammed into Azalea Park in Crawfordville Friday, Dec. 7 for the 12th Annual Christmas in the Park celebration featuring Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus and their helper elves. Santa and the entourage arrived at the park just after dark escorted by a Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce patrol vehicle as they arrived in an electric car. Many visitors to the park were festively dressed and children were excited for an opportunity to speak to Santa Claus about their Christmas wishes. The event was sponsored by the, WCSO WCSO volunteers, the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department and Centennial Bank. The event featured a kiddie train, games, food, prizes, Christmas decorations and a chance to speak to Santa and Mrs. Claus. The event had an outstanding turnout on a beautiful night. Dozens of children and parents lined up in the cool and dry weather to create a long line to visit with Santa Claus. Lt. Bruce Ashley helped organize the event for former organizer and now retired Captain Larry Massa who organized the event for many years. This event is a way for the sheriffs of“ ce to give back to the community,Ž said retiring Sheriff Donnie Crum. It provides an opportunity to say thank you to everyone in our community. We hope that all of the children had a wonderful time and look forward to Christmas Day in a little more than two weeks.Ž Two of Wakulla Countys favorite animals, McGruff the Crime Dog and Sparky the Fire Dog, visited with children throughout the night. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCounty health department expands dental services to cover women in needWakulla women in Healthy Start program can get preventive and restorative dental care Santa and Mrs. Claus arrive at Christmas in Park on Friday night. At right, Santa listens to the Christmas wishes of children at the Christmas in the Park on Friday, Dec. 7. Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage?

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers’ convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the Dec. 5 Wakulla County Commission meeting it became clear that four out of the “ ve commissioners were in support of the Wakulla County Airport. At that meeting, the commission voted four to one, with only Commissioner Jerry Moore opposing, to update the Airport Master Plan. Moore said he looks at the airport as a business and it will be years before it turns a pro“ t. Before this thing makes any pro“ t, I will probably have less hair,Ž Moore said. The last year or so the airport was at the center of a large controversy. The controversy started after a portion of private property on Surf Road that is next to the airport was cleared and a sign stating that it was the future site of the airport expansion was placed on the site. Many residents in the area became concerned about a possible expansion and their properties being impacted. The airport is out of compliance with the Florida Department of Transportation because of safety concerns. A building and hangar encroach the safety zone of the airport. The building that now houses La Cantina Grille is 50 feet within the primary surface area, which is the area surrounding the landing area and there is also a 13-acre hangar parcel that has one hangar that was constructed in 2006 too close to the primary surface area. In order to have the airports license extended, the runway must be moved over about 35 feet to the west and widened. The runway length would be extended from 2,800 feet to 2,972 feet. In order to move the runway, the county will have to acquire property to the west. Originally included in the Airport Layout Plan was some property south of Surf Road. Some of the land that was included in the plan belongs to people who do not want to sell their property. The county has said they will remove those properties from the plan. The county received a grant for $75,000, that does not require a match, and was intended to be used originally on runway lighting, however, the county was looking to get FDOT to approve them using it for removal of trees obstructing ” ight path, appraisals and surveys of adjacent airport property, updating the Airport Layout Plan and planning services and airport management plan. Edwards said the county was originally informed by DOT that it didnt need to update the master plan, but since then DOT has changed its mind. The county will now be using the funds to update the master plan, layout plan and appraisal and planning services. If the county does not do the updates needed to put the airport back into compliance, it could lose its ability to operate. Commissioners Randy Merritt, Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas were in agreement that they didnt want to see the county lose the airport. Once you close them, you dont get them back,Ž Kessler said of small airports. The countys consultant Kimley-Horne will provide the services. In other news: € The commission voted unanimously to change the composition of the Wakulla County Community Center Advisory Committee from 11 members to “ ve. The committee met only a few times, but had issues with not having enough members present and some who were clearly not in favor of the community center. There will be an application process for citizens who would like to serve on the committee. The commission will then vote on the new members at a future meeting. The purpose of the committee is to advise the commission on development of the Community Center site and programs, assist in seeking grant funding, obtain community input and involvement and assist the commission in developing a long-term plan for the Community Center. The county purchased the community center which is a 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church, on May 24, 2010. The current plan for the community center site is to use a legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include a free weight and cardio room, “ tness classroom, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of“ ces. Also included in the plans is the addition of an open ” oor gymnasium, which would would have a high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. The approval of the bid for renovations will come before for the commission at its Jan. 7 meeting. € Since this was the “ rst real meeting of the newly formed county commission, the commission needed to decide which commissioner would serve on the various committees representing the county. Merritt will serve on the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, Community Traf“ c Safety Team, Capital Regional Transportation Planning Agency, Canvassing Board, Big Bend Regional Partnership and Wakulla County Audit Committee. Moore will serve on the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee, Big Bend Scenic Byway, alternate on the Value Adjustment Board, Our Region Tomorrow Advisory Board, Transportation Disadvantaged Local Coordinating Board, Small County Coalition and alternate on ARPC. Harden will serve on the District Health Care Council, Wilderness Coast Library Advisory Board, and as alternate on the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and CRTPA. Thomas received the most appointments, including the North Florida Broadband Authority, coalition for youth, Value Adjustment Board, Wakulla State Forest liaison, Tourist Development Council, Small County Coalition, Public Safety Coordinating Council and alternate on the Gulf Consortium. Kessler was not appointed to any committees. He asked for zero because of several projects he is currently working on. The next county commission meeting is scheduled for Jan. 7 at 5 p.m.COUNTY COMMISSION 4 of 5 commissioners support Airport Master PlanBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen County Commissioner Richard Harden ran for his current position, he had to resign from his post on the Sopchoppy City Commission before taking of“ ce. He resigned on Nov. 19 and left a vacant seat. At the previous Sopchoppy City Commission meeting, the commissioners decided to leave it empty for now. The city will hold elections in June to fill the open spot and current Commissioners Colleen Skipper Mitchell and Anginita Rosier will be up for reelection. They just decided to wait,Ž said City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. The current commission consists of Skipper Mitchell, Rosier, Commissioner Lara Edwards and Commissioner Martha Evans. The commission only needs three commissioners in attendance at a meeting to have a quorum and be able to hold a meeting. In other news: € The commission approved allowing a boy scout to construct a park bench and arbor at Sopchoppy City Park for his Eagle Scout project. Lawhon said the scout used to live in Sopchoppy, and now lives in Tallahassee. He decided he wanted to do his project in Sopchoppy. The project will take three to four days. This isnt the “ rst time the city has been the recipient of an Eagle Scout project. The Sopchoppy Veterans Memorial that stands in front of Sopchoppy City Hall was the vision of boy scout Zackary Dunaway. The memorial includes a wall of honor, made out of brick, adorned with a plaque and a ” ag pole in front of the wall with four small statues depicting the armed forces standing in salute surrounding it, Dunaway designed the memorial and found the people with the skills to do the work. The commission voted unanimously to allow the scout to construct the arbor and bench at city park. € The commission also voted to again support the efforts of Operation Santa with a donation of $500. Last year, the commission also approved spending $500 and used that to buy bicycles for the children in the program. The next meeting will be held on Jan. 14 at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.CITY OF SOPCHOPPYSeat will be left vacant on city commission CITY of ST. MARKS PUBLIC HEARING NOTICEThe City of St. Marks is in the process of carrying out a Small Cities Community Development Block Grant in the Commercial Revitalization category, grant number 11DB-C5-02-75-02-C02, in the amount of $600,000.00. The grant is being funded thru the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO). The project consists of the construction of streetscape improvements along portions of Port Leon Drive and Terminal Drive in downtown St. Marks. The City is considering expanding the scope of the project to include the undergrounding of the utilities along the portions of Port Leon Drive and Terminal Drive where the streetscape improvements are being constructed. A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the proposed expansion of the project to include the undergrounding of utilities will be held on Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 11:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as possible at the City of St. Marks City Hall located at 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, Florida. A draft copy of the amendment package will be available for review at that time. A final copy of the amendment package will be made available at the City of St. Marks, Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. no more than five (5) working days after the December 20, 2012 meeting. The amendment will be submitted to DEO after the December 20, 2012 Public Hearing. To obtain additional information concerning the amendment and the public hearing, contact Ms. Zoe Mansfield, City Manager, 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, Florida 32355, (850) 925-6224. The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Ms. Mansfield at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Ms. Mansfield at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact Ms. Mansfield at least five calendar days prior to the meeting.DECEMBER 13, 2012 Special to The NewsSARASOTA … Commissioner Ralph Thomas joined with newly elected commissioners from across the state in an orientation hosted by the Florida Association of Counties recently. The orientation, held on Nov. 28, provided a summary of the roles and responsibilities of counties and commissioners in Florida. The program is sponsored by the University of Florida/IFAS Extension, and held in conjunction with the Associations 2013 Legislative Conference. The following topics were covered: History of Floridas Counties, Powers, Duties and responsibilities of County Commissioners, Constitutional Of“ cers, Legislative Session, Budget revenue and expenditures, Annual Fiscal Year Decisions, Human Resources, Ballot Issues, Policy Decisions, Sunshine laws: An Introduction to Ethics, Public Records, and Open Meetings Requirements. New commissioners face many challenges and road blocks,Ž said FAC Executive Director Chris Holley. By participating in this program Commissioner Thomas is one step ahead in better serving his constituents and county.Ž Im glad I decided to attend the orientation,Ž Thomas said. The FAC instructors included attorneys and seasoned commissioners who shared their knowledge allowing me to bene“ t from their combined experiences. The training was excellent,Ž Thomas said, and Im con“ dent it will help me better serve the citizens of Wakulla County.Ž Commissioner Thomas personally paid all of his own travel expenses without taxpayers dollars. For 80 years, the Florida Association of Counties (FAC) has represented the diverse interests of Floridas counties, emphasizing the importance of protecting home rule … the concept that government closest to the people governs best. The Florida Association of Counties helps counties effectively serve and represent Floridians by strengthening and preserving county home rule through advocacy, education and collaboration.Commissioner Ralph omas attends new commissioner orientationFlorida Association of Counties hosts program for Floridas 98 new commissioners Continued from Page 1A The county was hoping to get FEMA on a technicality, that the agency didnt follow its own procedures during this process, but Edwards said it appears FEMA did everything right. Its a tough thing,Ž Edwards said. Edwards said the county could “ ght the maps, but it would cost a large amount of money and they could come back with the same answer. The new Flood Insurance Rate Maps are here to stay and the 90-day appeal process for property owners who believe there has been an error started on Dec. 6. The county will be working with FEMA and the Northwest Florida Water Management District to identify those parcels that are affected and notify the property owners of the appeals process, as well as recommend they contact their insurance provider. There will be another meeting with FEMA in January to give citizens another opportunity to ask questions about the maps. Under the current schedule, the new maps will take effect in December 2013. Once this happens, some ” ood insurance policy holders may see changes in their policies. The proposed flood maps may be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmd” oodmaps.com. Residents who believe the flood maps contain errors have until March 6, 2013, to make an appeal by submitting scienti“ c or technical information to the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department. For questions or additional information, contact the Planning and Community Development Department at 926-3695.To countys dismay, ” ood maps are “ nal Ralph Thomas at commissioner orientationOnce you close them, you dont get them back, one commissioner says of small airports.

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Page 4A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online:• Wakulla student dies • Fatal car crash on Surf Road near Sopchoppy • 1 death attributed to the flu; health department holds flu shot clinics • School flu shot clinics set • Performing Messiah • Commission has discussion on Public Service Tax • New Board of County Commissioners is swornin • Chamber Chatter: New members, upcoming ribbon cuttingsthewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of“ ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors “ rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri“ cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News: In a recent edition of The Wakulla News there was an excellent article about Noah Posey that covered a good bit of his life and Wakulla history (Noah Posey: Fisherman, crab house processor, businessman, restauranteur,Ž Nov. 29). I enjoyed reading about Noah and the history of “ shing and crabbing in our waters but something was missing. The missing part was what a great asset to our county the Posey family is. Noah and Mildred help many organizations and individuals that no one ever knows about. The Poseys have also raised their family to be community-minded people who help people when they can and do positive things for our community. Their daughter Sherrie Miller works for the good of the community just as hard as she works at the restaurant. Sherrie serves on volunteer committees that are working to make the county a better place to visit and do business. No one promotes Wakulla harder than Sherrie does and it is all for free. Their son John lends his cooking skills to help out charities just like his dad does. The Posey family is not making money every time you see those Poseys Catering trailers at events. John has a son (Justin) who is a Wakulla County “ re“ ghter and he occasionally cooks and helps out at charitable and community functions. Justin has cooked for three years in the “ re“ ghter barbecue contest and fundraiser. Noah and his staff prepare all of the side dishes for that particular charity event and they do not pro“ t a dime from it. There is no way to estimate how many individuals or families the Posey family has helped and the only people who know are the ones being helped. If just 10 percent of the people in Wakulla were as involved in the community as Noah, Mildred and their family this would be an even greater place to live. The Wakulla News article about Noey Posey was good but the part that was missing is the great family tradition of serving and helping their community. Go down to Poseys Up the Creek to eat and there will always be at least one family member there that should be thanked for all they do. Bill Russell Ochlockonee Bay Editor, The News: In a world where economic times are hard, this is a thank you letter to small businesses that helped sponsor a bene“ t for a neighbor. These small businesses are the backbone of a community. When local people are in trouble or need help it is small local businesses that step up and give back to the community. We should all be mindful of that when we are choosing where to shop. I hope that you, our neighbors, will patronize local business when possible. Now Wakulla Free Riders would like to thank the following businesses: Lindys Chicken, That Place on 319, El Jalisco, Modern Communications Inc., Wakulla Pawn & Curio Shop Inc., Thread Tree, Body-Tek, Crawfordville Auto & Tire, Beef O Bradys, Anytime Fitness, Rhodeside Market, La Parrillada Mexican Grille, The Sights & Sounds Co., Ace Hardware-Crawfordville, Snack Shack, Upholstery Unlimited, Stephanie Mathews, Another Mans Treasure, BWs Grill, That Hair Place, New China Buffett, Carries Cove, Gulf Coast Lumber & SupplyCrawfordville, Hamaknockers BBQ, Ming Tree Garden, Evolution Day Spa, Capt. Seaniles, Myra Jeans, Custom Floors & More, Lees Liquors & Fine Wine, Skybox, Stevens Seafood & Chicken, Apocalyptic Tattoo Studio, Big Top 2 Supermarket, Mikes Marine Supply, Huttons, Dux Liquors, Outzs Too, Iron Ravens, Southern Spirits, Black Bean Restaurant, Wakulla Motorcycle Works, Ace Hardware-Woodville, Coastal Corner, Gulf Coast Lumber-Woodville, Market Liquors, Sunshack Dry Cleaners, B & L Automotive Parts, Turn Key Automotive, Money & Daughters Auto Repair, Panhandle PizzaWoodville, Wild“ re Grill, The Kast Net, Orions Motorsports. Sincerey, Wakulla Free Riders Editor, The News: I think that many Wakullans are experiencing what I experienced today and am hoping that at some point we all will be able to slow down, get away from the commercial environments created by television and tabloid and learn how to assess what is actually real to our families and our futures. On Sunday I did two very different things that illustrate both the quandary and the beauty of the Christmas season: I went to church and I went to the mall. One I wanted to do and the other I needed to do. Below is a brief description of each experience. As I walked into my church I heard the music. Christmas was in the air. There was warmth that does not come from either weather or temperature setting. People were smiling, children were laughing, every one was dressed in red and green and wore pins and rings and necklaces that looked like wreaths, angels, candy canes and mini trees. Sincere greetings of happiness and good tidings were wrapped around handshakes and hugs. Talk of love, good food and gift-giving dotted conversations wherever one turned and joy was aglowŽ on the faces of both the young and the old. There were breathtaking seasonal decorations with lights and poinsettias placed to highlight the beauty of the season and all were speaking about the birth of Jesus. There was peace and calm that surrounded the moment and everyone just knew their presence was wanted … that they belonged. A sense of being uplifted was prevalent in peoples hearts. In contrast, as I walked in to the mall I heard the semiharshness of words spoken in the way one might when pressured to hurry and get throughŽ a task. There was no music, only the swish, swish of the hustle and bustle. People were complaining and feeling that the season cost too much in terms of personal toil and dollars alike. There were long lines and a little pushing at the cashiers desk. Although there was talk between the participants, it was casual and for the most part was little more than common courtesy. Everything sparkled but longterm worth often minimal. Oh, yes there was excitement and expectation and a longing to “ nd the perfect gift. The desire to make someone happy and to give to a loved one was everywhere but the frustration, the worry, the costly dazzle and ultimately the realization that the perfect gift could not be found was also present. At the end of the day excitement and exhilaration too often turned to exhaustion and a sense of missed opportunity. There are many more churches in Wakulla County than sizeable malls in Tallahassee. Every one of them is beautiful, especially at this time of year, and the true blessing is that not one of them will close their doors to anyone who wants to worship on a Sunday morning. If you do not attend a church regularly give your self and your family a wonderful gift. Choose a church and visit it next Wednesday or Sunday. There is no cost but the value is priceless. Cynthia Webster Crawfordville My name is Bentlee and I was born in Panama City. Unfortunately, I ended up in an animal shelter over that way (a kill shelter) and my time was running out. Fortunately for me, the folks over at CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment) in Wakulla County rescued me and gave me a little more time to “ nd suitable parents. As luck would have it, one day after church in January 2009 a family came by looking for a new pet and thank God for me (and them, I am sure) they chose me. I have lived in my forever homeŽ ever since. My heart will always go out to the folks at CHAT who made all of this possible. Because my human parents love me so much and support the organization that brought me into their lives we stirred up a bit of fun. My daddy, in the spirit of Christmas and giving, recently started a Facebook page for me and issued a Friends Equals Dividends for CHAT Challenge. My family offered a $500 donation to CHAT if I reached 500 friend requests by a set deadline. Well, with a little push I snagged my 500 friends just before time was up. This seemed to get the ball rolling and the excitement level up as several of my new friends were already supporters of CHAT and issued their own challenge on top of challenge. They pledged additional funds for even more friend requests. I feel so special and I am so excited that my so far over 700 Facebook friends are participating in this challenge to raise funds for CHAT. You can help, too by befriending me on facebook, www.facebook.com/ bentlee.boo.5. I was really happy when my family took me to visit CHAT on Saturday, Dec. 8, so I could paw deliver our $570 donation check in person (thats how many friends I had by the deadline), but l didnt know that CHAT also had a surprise in store for me. I was OFFICIALLY appointed spokesdog for CHAT, and have my certi“ cate to prove it. This was so awesome, I, a former death row candidate, was saved, found my loving forever home, and am now the of“ cial spokesdog for the organization that helped me! Woof, woof. CHAT of Wakulla thanks the Russell family for their support and donation to our organization, and also thanks Weston Howland, Faith Hughes DVM, Janice Eakin, Kristy Pursell and Jake and Barbara Hines for the additional bonus cash offered. And remember, spay or neuter your pets.Find out more about CHAT at www.chatofwakulla.org or find CHAT of Wakulla on Facebook. If you have a Facebook account, please befriend Bentlee Boo so no bones are left in the hole!Editor, The News: Another Mule Day in Calvary, Ga., has come and gone and I remembered a few years ago, in 2010, when my dad, Hoppy Strickland, rode in the Mule Day Parade. He won the trophy for Best Jack, all with the help of his stunning four-legged friend Mule Train.Ž After seeing the photos of dad and Mule Train, I thought it would be nice to give thanks and to recognize Mule Trains owners, John and Beth Kirkland from Jackson County. I would also like to apologize for this acknowledgement taking so long, but a friend of my father said he was going to publish the story and photos two years ago but has yet to follow through with his word. So this year, a very good friend of my dad, Billy Hart from the Quincy-Lake Talquin area, rode his jackass, Donkey DonkŽ in the 2012 Mule Day parade. They won the Special Award trophy, “ rst place trophy for Best Jackass and a cash prize. After taking a look at Mr. Billys photos he sent my dad, I felt it only “ tting to ask The Wakulla News to publish Mr. Billys recent accomplishment as well as the accomplishment of my dad from 2010. Congratulations to Mr. Billy and Donkey Donk! Hey dad, you had better get your jackass ready for 2013. I love you and cant wait to see you ride again. Thank you and Merry Christmas, Dana Wilson Crawfordville READERS WRITE:Prize winning mules at Mule DayBentlee raises more than $500 for CHATTwo versions of the season: church and mall Noah Posey helps a lot in Wakulla ank you for support of bene“ t Billy Hart and Donkey Donk won “ rst place this year. Wakullas Hoppy Strickland and Mule Train won at Mule Day in 2010.

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Continued from Page 1A He was told that it is “ rst reserved for the Royal Family, the Royal Household, lords and ladies, and knights and dames. They were lucky enough to reserve the last two seats. With Strickland in formal day dress and hat and Roddenberry in morning dress and top hat, they took their seats at the derby only a few feet from the queen and within touching distance of Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenia, the daughters of the Duke of York Prince Andrew. The Royal Family sat two rows above Strickland and Roddenberry. When the jockey won the race, the queen came down the stairs to greet him. We could even see the wrinkles in her face, which were very few,Ž Strickland says. Roddenberry also ended up in the receiving line when the queen and Prince Philip went to their seats. He bowed as the queen walked past him. It was an exhilarating experience, a moment my entire body was consumed with butter” ies,Ž he says. The two also attended a tea party on the River Thames, watching The Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant, which is a ” otilla of up to 1,000 boats assembled from across the commonwealth. I had no idea they owned so many commonwealths,Ž Strickland says. The queen, Prince Philip and the Royal Family were on the Royal Barge during the ” otilla. You could see them pretty good with a binoculars,Ž Strickland says. The pair also watched the BBC Concert at Buckingham Palace. Following the concert, the queen lit the National Beacon. The evening ended with a “ reworks display. On Tuesday, June 5, the Diamond Jubilee weekend culminated with a day of celebrations in central London, including a service of thanksgiving at St. Pauls Cathedral followed by two receptions, a lunch at Westminster Hall, a carriage procession to Buckingham Palace and “ nally a balcony appearance, ” ypast and Feu de Joie. Following the celebrations, the pair was able to tour the London area, including visiting Windsor Castle, the Tower of London, the Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abby. For Strickland, one of the other major highlights of the trip was visiting the home and chapel of John Wesley, the founder of Methodism. Its amazing to see that chapel that he preached in,Ž Strickland says. It was great.Ž They also became friends with their chauffeur. He and his wife invited them to dinner one night on their trip. They still keep in touch with him. Not only was it an awesome trip, but we made a life-long friend,Ž Roddenberry says. Strickland and Roddenberry also made friends at the hotel where they were staying for the trip. Once the employees there found out Stricklands “ rst name was Majesty, they bought her a cape and bowed to her. They all just went ape,Ž Strickland says. It was the funniest thing.Ž Not only do the two describe being in London for the Diamond Jubilee as an incredibly amazing experience, they both said being able to be there together made it even better. The trip was a lifetime experience with my Grandson, one I will always cherish,Ž Strickland says. Roddenberry adds, It was a lifetime experience, one that I will always treasure, and being with my grandmother made it even more special.Ž Queen Elizabeth II came to the throne on Feb. 6, 1952, after the death of her father, King George VI. The Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II is a multinational celebration throughout 2012 marking the 60th anniversary of the accession of Queen Elizabeth II to the thrones of seven countries and 16 sovereign states. Queen Victoria is the only other monarch in history to have celebrated a Diamond Jubilee, which she did in 1897. If still reigning on Sept. 10, 2015, Queen Elizabeth II will surpass Queen Victoria as the longest reigning monarch in British history. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 5ASpecial to The NewsFAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, Wakulla County Extension, and local small farmers have worked together to provide a capacity building workshop and farm tour examining concepts of hydroponics as a sustainable farming strategy for farmers and urban gardeners in our region. The workshop will take place at Sopchoppy Farms, a local small farm that features heirloom hydroponic tomatoes. This is the second workshop in the integrated agricultural systems series examining successful alternative small farm strategies. The focus areas are: How to build a hydroponic system, How to build an affordable greenhouse or high tunnel and Organic integrated pest management strategies for high tunnels and greenhouses. Facilitators for this session include Tim Carroll of Sopchoppy Farms, Jody Bedgood and Derek Helms of Tallahassees Evershine Hydroponics, Trevor Hylton of FAMU/ Wakulla County Extension, and Neal Miller of FAMU/ USDA-ARS. The hands-on learning session and farm tour will start at 1:30 p.m. and last until 5 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 16. The cost is $15 per person. The Integrated Agricultural Systems Workshop will highlight several local small farmers and their organically grown and sustainably grown produce for purchasegreens, lettuce, onions, purslane, sugar cane stalks, sugar cane syrup, fresh baked bread and honey. Delicious local heirloom Cherokee Purple, Brandywine, and German Johnson tomatoes from Sopchoppy Farms will also be available for purchase. For additional information contact: Jennifer Taylor/ FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, famu.register@ gmail.com Location: Sopchoppy Farms 7953 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy FL 32358 Directions: Take U.S. Hwy 319 South to Sopchoppy. Continue through the town of Sopchoppy. Follow road signs to farm. WILLIAM SNOWDENScouts Brady, Julian, Justin, Dayton and Chance.Tiger Cub Scouts visit e Wakulla NewsDugout canoes to be discussed at meetingStaff ReportA group of Tiger Cub Scouts and their parents visited The Wakulla News this week, part of the scouts work on communications. Editor William Snowden talked to the scouts on Monday, Dec. 10, about newspapers and the different jobs involved in getting a paper out. The scouts are part of Tiger Cubs Pack 8 that meet at Medart Elementary. Their cubmaster is Blake Barnidge.Farm tour set Dec. 16 on hydroponicsEmily Winston is new manager of Inn at WildwoodSpecial to The NewsThe Inn at Wildwood Resort would like to congratulate, and introduce to the community, our new Hotel Manager Emily Winston. Winston moved to Wakulla County from Augusta, Ga., in 2009, to be closer to family and give her children an opportunity at a better education from our counties top rated schools. It was during this move, she got acquainted with the area, and found a diamond in the rough … the Inn at Wildwood Resort. She got a job as a front desk clerk, and through hard work, determination and a stellar personality, she pursued her career with force. In less than a year, in 2010, she made the supervisor position as has been the face for the Inn for the past two years. We, with great excitement, promoted her to hotel manager on Nov. 28. With all she has proven and her passion for the job she performs, we expect great things for our property, and a wonderful experience for all the guests that stay at the Inn. This mother of three truly has the ITŽ factor most companies dream of having. She has put together a great team and we anticipate a great change for the future. So if you want to “ nd a local place to stay or have friends visit, or want to book an event or party, chances are youll be greeted by Emily with a big smile and even bigger personality! Congratulations to you, Emily Winston, and welcome to our community! TALLAHASSEE … Tallahassee Community College has selected Kimberly Moore as the Colleges new vice president of workforce development. Moore is one of the Tallahassee areas most wellknown and respected workforce development leaders, and brings over a decade of expertise to TCC. Moore comes to TCC from Workforce Plus„ where she joined in 2001 and has served as CEO since 2005. Workforce Plus provides comprehensive employment and workforce services and has helped connect thousands of jobseekers with employers. Before Workforce Plus, Moore served as a senior workforce development specialist at TCC. Moores experience has also been shaped by serving on the boards of numerous community organizations, including the Leon County Economic Development Council, the United Way of the Big Bend, the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce and the FAMU Small Business Advisory Council. Moores community-oriented service has earned her many awards and recognitions, including the Bethel Empowerment Foundations Phenomenal Women Making a DifferenceŽ award in 2010, the National Hook-ups Gadsden County Woman of the Year in 2012 and Wakulla Chamber Member of the Year finalist recognition in 2012. Kimberlys name is synonymous with workforce development and community leadership in Tallahassee,Ž said Dr. Jim Murdaugh, president of TCC. TCC has had a great relationship with Kimberly and WORKFORCE plus over the years, and we are thrilled that she is bringing her experience and leadership skills to the College.Ž As vice president of workforce development at TCC, Moore will provide leadership for the Colleges career-focused training, professional development, adult education and business consulting programs. TCCs Center for Workforce Development offers training across a wide variety of fields, including manufacturing, construction and trades, information technology, green energy and ecotourism, with an emphasis on matching students skills with employers needs. For more information on the Center for Workforce Developments offerings, visit www.tcc.” .edu/workforce. Kimberly Moores “ rst day at TCC will be March 1, 2013. Emily WinstonKimberly Moore joins TCC as new VP of Workforce DevelopmentKimberly Moore Join us on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, at 7 p.m., as Julia Byrd, Senior Archaeologist, Bureau of Archaeological Research presents Florida Prehistoric and Historic Canoes.Ž Florida is home to an unusually large concentration of dugout canoes, or boats made from tree trunks. The earliest of these canoes is over 6,000 years old, and people continued making and using log boats through the historic period. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Gov. Martin House, 1001 De Soto Park Drive in Tallahassee. Look for signs on Lafayette Street on the evening of the meeting. Call (850) 245-6444 for further information. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. € CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law Of“ceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 •Flooring •Carpentry •Painting •Tile Work FREE Estimates • Licensed & Insured • Lic. #7827(850) 745–8771 Cell (850) 570–1968 (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926…8116 At the Queens Diamond Jubilee Please Recycle

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Page 6A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Santa will visit Ochlockonee Bay UMC Santa Claus will be visiting Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church at 2780 Surf Road on Saturday, Dec. 15, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. with refreshments and giving out gifts.  Upcoming events at Wakulla UMCWakulla United Methodist Church announced these upcoming events at the church: “Living Nativity” will be held Friday and Saturday, Dec. 14 and 15, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Drive through at 918 Woodville Highway with refreshments at the church fellowship hall at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Christmas Eve candlelight Service will be held Dec. 24 at 7 p.m. Wakulla Station Community Dinner will be held Christmas Day, Dec. 25, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event is sponsored by the Kast Net and will be held at the Alford Building. Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at1584 Old Woodville Highway. For more information on these events, call (850) 421-5741 for more information. Quilt raffled off by Christ Church AnglicanAgain this year the nimblengered quilters of Christ Church Anglican made a beautiful quilt for raf e. Members sold tickets at $1 each or 6 for $5 all over the county. After the service on Sunday, Dec. 9, the winner was drawn from the hundreds of entrants – Julie Martin of Sopchoppy was the winner. Christ Church thanks everyone who sold and bought tickets. And the quilters are already planning next year’s prize. 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday… Nursery available … Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 • Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With UsŽ www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road • Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" — Romans 16:16You’ve Got Bible Questions? We’ve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses availableƒ please call for details, 962…2213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org We’re Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel Cooksey“Come & Worship With Us”926-IVAN(4826) By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER The Christmas holiday season is always ablaze with beautiful colors. I “ nd it hard to be gloomy or grumpy this time of the year. I must confess, not everybody belongs to this Holiday Cheer Club.Ž It is an exclusive club but open to anybody who is tired of being grumpy. Colors abound throughout the season and the Christmas songs highlight this. Im dreaming of a white Christmas.Ž Ill have a blue Christmas without you.Ž Rudolph the red nose reindeer.Ž One of the most obvious colors of Christmas is green. Right at the center of this Christmas holiday is the Christmas tree decked from top to bottom in beautiful colors and lights. Nothing says Christmas quite like an old-fashioned Christmas tree. My thoughts along this line are, let the grumps and grouches complain about the Christmas tree. For myself, I will look with admiring wonder at the beauty of the Christmas tree. Then of course, who could forget good old Santa Claus dressed in his red suit. I never could “ gure out why Santas suit was always red. Throughout the years, I never gave it too much thought and assumed it was a fashion statement from the North Pole. For the most part, we only celebrate Christmas once a year. I think Charles Dickens had it right with old Mr. Scrooge, after his conversion, celebrating Christmas every day of the year. If I were president of the United States, I would enact a law that would set aside one year to be a year of celebrating Christmas all 365 days. I think I would only have to do it once and nobody would want to go back to the old grumpy times of celebrating it only one time out of the year. I was thinking about this the other night when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage jarred me back to reality. Have you,Ž she queried most seriously, finished with your Christmas shopping?Ž Christmas shopping! I had forgotten about it. I know we celebrate Christmas every year but I sometimes get so caught up with celebrating Christmas I forget about buying Christmas presents. After all, that Christmas tree would be somewhat naked if there were not Christmas presents to litter around the bottom. I had to look at my wife and say, No, I havent even started. How many Christmas presents do I have to buy?Ž Silly boy,Ž she said with a chuckle that could compete with good old Santa Claus any day of the week, you got to buy Christmas presents for everybody in our family.Ž Santas red suit has nothing to do with a North Pole fashion statement; it has everything to do with my “ nancial statement. I got a piece of paper and together my wife and I jotted down all of the members in our family. By the time we were done, I would have to purchase Christmas presents for hundreds and hundreds of family members. At the beginning of the month of December, my checkbook is in the black, but each day of the month the black begins to fade into expanding shades of red. By the time the 24th of the month comes around my checkbook is a solid, brilliant, scarlet red. I sighed quite deeply as I closed my checkbook. I almost said to my wife, Remember the day...?Ž I stopped short of vocalizing that thought. I thought back when we “ rst were married, which seems like hundreds of years ago, we only got presents for each other. I bought one present for her and she bought one present for me. What a Merry Christmas we had back in the day.Ž A few days later as we were wrapping those presents I began thinking of another color. I looked at my wife and said, This must be what they mean when they talked about the golden days.Ž She laughed, and I thought some more. My thoughts centered on the fact of what a wonderful family we have. After all those years, we have accumulated a marvelous family. Thinking about all the ones in my family, I began to retract those thoughts of veto. You know,Ž I said to my wife quite thoughtfully, red becomes my checkbook.Ž All that red means all that family. The Christmas holiday season means family. There is no family more glorious than the family of God. The Bible says, For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting lifeŽ (John 3:16 KJV). The whole spirit of Christmas has to do with giving, and God started it all. I do not mind a redŽ Christmas because everyone in my family is worth it. As Tiny Tim said, God bless us all, everyone.ŽRev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORI’ll have a ‘red’ Christmas, thank youreligious views and events ChurchThe students of Michelle Snow School of Music will present their Christmas recital on Friday, Dec. 14, and Saturday, Dec. 15, at Christ Church Anglican on Coastal Highway 98 in Medart. Fridays performance will begin at 7 p.m., and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Youth of all ages will be playing a variety of musical styles and instruments, including guitar, violin, piano, drums, and voice. The recital will feature performances by the following young musicians: Sydney Colvin, Brianna Peacock, Danyelle Dias, Nicholas Cotes, Victor Palumbo, Tanner Pafford, Joey Rickards, Summer Padgett, Jason Paris, Steven Kinsey, Shea Harrington, Zoie Hill, Ariel Ganey, Yese Reyes, Jacob Rardin, Marina & Jonah Harvey, Lindley Kendrick Jack and Maxwell Mispel, Desmond Maxwell, Rhiannon Beattie, Ryan Crawford, Allison Gordon, Sabashtian Jalbert, Ashlee Maddi, Riley Blankenship, Annabell Chancy, Loranda Hutton, Wesley Kyle, Jason Westmark, Precision Rudd, Derisha & Deshea Jones, Ella Wren Moody, Ryvan Heys, Oliver Robinson, Skyler Crawford, Chloe Choquette, and Abbott Gauger. The recitals are free-of-charge, open to the public and will be followed by receptions. For more information, please call 9267627. Students from the music studios of Mary Updegraff and Kristin Dow will be performing in Sounds of the SeasonŽ on Monday, Dec. 17, at 7 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. The recital will feature holiday favorites to lift the Christmas Spirit. Family and friends are invited to attend. Updegraffs students are Kristin Bodie, Rena Carter, Nathan Cushard, Mia Frick, Travis Harvey-Henderson, Ali Pearson, Emma Vaughn and Jessica Wise. The choirs of the United Methodist and First Baptist churches of Crawfordville are joinging together to present the Christmas cantata, Silent NightŽ by Russell Mauldin and and Sue C. Smith, Sunday, Dec. 16, at 3 p.m. at the Methodist Church and 6 p.m. at First Baptist, Becky Cook and Kirstin Dow, directors. The musical features a wonderful blend of traditional, contemporary and original Christmas songs to celebrate the season.Christmas recitals setMichelle Snow students will perform Dec. 14 and Dec. 15 Mary Updegra s students will perform on Dec. 17 Choirs to perform songs of the season at churches on Dec. 16

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 7AJames Monroe Sanders, 64, of Sopchoppy, died on Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. A lifelong Wakulla County resident, he was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who enjoyed “ shing and having a good time with family and friends. Survivors include a brother, William M. (Matilda) Sanders of Sopchoppy; sisters, Peggy Porter of Tallahassee, Dorothy (David) Kelly, Viola Henderson and Perlie Revells, all of Sopchoppy; and numerous nieces and nephews also survive. A Celebration of Life service was held by his family at his Syfrette Creek Road residence on Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, Macclenny, 850-559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net/.Obituaries Charles Sanford Cocroft Deloris Devota ‘Dee’ McCranie Gerrell James Monroe Sanders Thomas Charles SandersCharles Sanford Cocroft Jr., 77, passed away on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2012, in Madison, Ga. He was born in Miami on Feb. 28, 1935, to Malcolm Cocroft and Clara Cocroft. He was a farmer all of his life and a commercial “ sherman for 35 years. He thoroughly enjoyed “ shing and hunting and sharing his bounty. He was a very generous man. He also enjoyed playing the steel guitar. He had a high appreciation of the land and saw the value in it. He enjoyed riding his Harley Davidson motorcycle. In 1972 his family was nominated as Farm Family of the YearŽ for Jefferson County. He is survived by his wife of “ ve years, Wylene Cocroft of Wacissa; his children, William BillyŽ Cocroft and wife Eva of Longwood, Janine Taylor and husband Bubba of Tallahassee, Carl Cocroft of Wakulla Station, and Shane Cocroft and wife Nikki of North Carolina; three grandchildren, Brandi Cocroft of Kissimmee, Lexi Cocroft of Longwood and Kevin Odom of Longwood; a nephew, Gary Estes of Monticello; three stepchildren, James McMullen, Tom McMullen and Janice Clarke; eight step-grandchildren; “ ve great-grandchildren; as well as his lifetime friend Mike Corley; and his rat terrier Jack. Funeral Services were held at Wacissa United Methodist Church on Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 at 3 p.m. with Pastor Jim Gamble of“ ciating. Interment was held in Beth Page Cemetery. The family received friends on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Wacissa United Methodist Church. In lieu of ” owers, memorial donations may be made to the Wacissa United Methodist Church Building Fund, P.O. Box 411, Wacissa FL 32341. All arrangements are under the care of Joe P. Burns Funeral Home. Sign the guestbook at www.joepburnsfuneralhomes.com.Charles Sanford Cocroft James Monroe SandersThomas Charles Sanders, 71, of Waycross, Ga., formerly of Bloomsburg, Penn., died Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, at the Hospice Satilla Hospice House after an extended illness. He was born in Youngwood, Penn., to Thomas D. Sanders and Florence Cressler Sanders. At the age of 2, he and his family moved to Bloomsburg, Penn., where he lived and worked until moving to Waycross, Ga., in 1996. He graduated from Bloomsburg High School in 1959, and then began working for the Textron Corporation where he worked as a hydraulic mechanic building blades for military aircraft. After the closing of the Textron plant he moved to Waycross where he worked for Carlton Caterpillar until his retirement in 2004. Sanders also owned and operated T.C. Leasing Company. In Bloomsburg, he was active in the Bloomsburg Town Park, the Elks Lodge, Moose Lodge, American Legion and the VFW. He served as a volunteer “ re“ ghter and worked part time at the Bloomsburg Airport. He, along with “ ve others, founded the Demolition DerbyŽ held every year at the Bloomsburg Fair. Growing up with NASCAR driver Jimmy Spencer, he loved NASCAR racing and collected NASCAR diecast cars. He was a member of St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Bloomsburg. Survivors include his wife, Gail Sanders of Waycross; a daughter, Tara C. Sanders of Tallahassee; a grandson, Kayden Thomas Carraway-Sanders of Tallahassee; three sisters-in-law, Cookie Sanders of Orangeville, Penn., Carol McCloskey and her husband Mike of Waycross, and Sherrell Fruit and her husband Bob of Bloomsburg, Penn.; and numerous nieces, nephews and other relatives. Along with his parents, he was predeceased by two daughters, Tammy C. Sanders and Tonya C. Sanders; and two brothers, Edward Sanders and Calvin BudŽ Sanders. A service celebrating the life of Thomas Charles Sanders will be held at a later date in Bloomsburg, Penn. In lieu of ” owers the family requests memorial contributions be sent to the Hospice Satilla Hospice House, 808 Evergreen Way, Waycross, GA 31501. The Miles-Odum Funeral Home in Waycross is in charge of arrangements. Sympathy may be expressed by signing online at www.milesodumfuneralhome.com. Deloris Devota DeeŽ McCranie Gerrell, daughter of John A. and Sarah Kate McCranie, lived 76 inspirational years, spending 60 wonderful years married to Walter Dale Gerrell. She was one of eight children of which three survived, Iola, Kathlene and RitaSue. She raised three children, Jim (Brenda), Melanie (Clay) and Mark (Deborah) and spoiled six grandchildren, Tony, Jarrett, Tammie, Michael, Mindy and Leah. She lived to enjoy the birth of 14 greatgrandchildren, Morgan, Brody, Dalton, Cole, Madyson, Colby, Conner, Cole, Carly, Macy, Claire, Grayson, Haley and Leaston. She was also loved by her many nieces and nephews. Dee was a loving and active member of the Woodville First Baptist Church where she enjoyed worshipping, singing in the choir for the last 50 years and faithfully serving as the church secretary for many years. She worked with the Department of Agriculture and served as the State of Floridas Rural Mail carriers auxiliary president. She also volunteered as a Pink Lady working at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and at local elementary schools. She enjoyed traveling, cooking and ensured that her family was provided for. She always had a smile on her face, looked for the positive in any situation and most of all loved God, her Lord and Savior. Funeral Services were held on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012, at 11 a.m. at Woodville First Baptist Church with burial at Woodville Cemetery. A visitation was held from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, at the church. In lieu of ” owers, memorial contributions may be made to Woodville First Baptist Church, 9500 Woodville Highway, Tallahassee FL 32305. Beggs Funeral Home, 3322 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, FL 32311, (850) 9422929 was in charge of arrangements.Deloris Devota ‘Dee’ McCrainie Gerrell Thomas Charles SandersSpecial to The NewsBishop Gregory Parks is visiting every parish in the diocese to meet the people and see what we provide to our parish. Before mass he was humored as one of the second graders came in the front door to the church and the bishop was in the foyer. The youngster looked up and could only say, wow! You see, the bishop is 6-feet, 8-inches in stocking feet. During Mass, the bishop commented on his height as being the tallest bishop in the United States. He had an opportunity to speak with many of St. Elizabeth parishioners and to visit with the youth. It happened that they were learning the Rosary that day. While in the area, the bishop also attended Sacred Heart Parish in Lanark, which is also pastored by Father Eddie. That mass was Saturday evening. From Crawfordville, the bishop went to the Tallahassee airport where he ” ew on to Washington, D.C., to meet with all of the U.S. bishops. This was a great day for St. Elizabeth Ann Seton parishioners. The good Lord willing, Bishop Parks will return in person for our young folks con“ rmation. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBishop Gregory Parks of Pensacola celebrates Mass with Father Eddie and Father Paul at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Medart.Bishop visits, celebrates Mass at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church Special to The NewsHolidays are about the memories, so how can you make yours merry and bright? Here are some tips to get you started from Deanna Brann, PhD, weddings blogger with The Huffington Post and author of the new book, Reluctantly Related: Secrets To Getting Along With Your Mother-inLaw or Daughter-in-Law.Ž € Talk with the parents about the gift-giving rules for the grandchildren. Know what they want and dont want for their children in the way of gifts, money spent, number of gifts, etc. If it isnt clear, ask. € Explore the holiday plans in advance so you know what is happening when and by whom … dont assume anything. Get clarity so you know in advance how the holidays will be and where you “ t into them. € Dont take things personally … holidays are stressful. Parents are trying to please everyone, plus they want to create their own holiday traditions. € Think of some things you can do with your grandchildren that dont include monetary gifts. Create the memories by doing, not necessarily by buying. The grandkids will remember what you did long after the holidays, but they wont remember what you bought them. € Create a family tradition of your own with your grandchildren. Create something that your grandchildren will not only remember, but also look forward to year after year.Tips to make holiday memories merry and bright 000CV38 Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville Phone 926-8245 926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority.Ž Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. • Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts• Probate and Heir Land Resolution • Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) • Title Insurance • Business Planning and Incorporations • General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926–7685 or 510–2326 Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926–7685 or 510–2326 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH Open 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. -----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org Promise Land THRIFT STORE y 926-3281

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Page 8A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityTeen asks for presents for others on birthday Special to The NewsMakayla Payne, an 11th grader at Wakulla High School, just celebrated her 17th birthday. At her party, instead of gifts, she asked everyone to bring a new unwrapped toy to be donated to Toys For Tots. She is the daughter of Scott and Shelli Payne of Medart and the granddaughter of Lessie and Terry Crum of Medart and Deborah and Mike McFadden of Woodville. Not many 17-year-olds would give up gifts to help others,Ž said her mother. She has a big heart.ŽPHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe toys the party goers gave for Toys for Tots, above. Makayla Payne and her friends at her birthday party, at left. Applications sought for “ rst ” ight of Honor FlightSpecial to The NewsMore than 60 years ago, Americas Greatest Generation fought oppression around the world, and in 2004, the World War II Memorial was dedicated on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. in their honor. The veterans who lived to see that day were in their eighties or older. Even now, most of these veterans have never visited the monument that honors their sacri“ ce. Recently, Honor Flight Tallahassee, part of the national Honor Flight Network, hosted its official kick-off event to introduce the newly-formed Honor Flight hub to the Big Bend region. Honor Flight Tallahassee exists for one reason … to send North Floridas U.S. military veterans to Washington, D.C. to re” ect at the memorials built to honor their sacri“ ces, at no cost to the veteran. We are running out of time to honor our veterans with this special mission,Ž said Mac Kemp, Chair of Honor Flight Tallahassee. The United States is losing its World War II veterans at the rate of approximately 900 per day, and we cannot miss the opportunity to thank our local members of the Greatest Generation for their service and sacri“ ce.Ž The inaugural Tallahassee Honor Flight is scheduled for spring 2013. While the ” ight is free to veterans, each ” ight costs between $85,000 and $100,000 and is entirely funded by local fundraisers and community support. The Leon County Board of County Commissioners was among the “ rst to recognize the importance of this community program and unanimously approved a $10,000 donation during the Oct. 9 commission meeting. The Board commends the work that has been completed in establishing our local Honor Flight hub and we are proud to be engaged as a community partner in this initiative,Ž said Nick Maddox, Leon County Commissioner and 2011-2012 Vice Chairman. This program is consistent with Leon Countys on-going efforts to support our local community of veterans, and we hope this “ nancial contribution provides a catalyst for other community partners to contribute to this important endeavor.Ž Honor Flight Tallahassee is currently accepting applications from World War II veterans from all service branches for the inaugural ” ight. Additional information and application are available at www.HonorFlightTallahassee.org. During each ” ight, volunteer guardians support the veterans … pushing wheelchairs, carrying belongings, or simply joining in a full day of celebration and re” ection. Guardians are critical to the success of each Honor Flight and applications are currently being accepted for the inaugural ” ight. Healthcare professionals and active military are especially encouraged to apply. Donations are critical to ensure Honor Flight Tallahassee can honor veterans with a trip to Washington, D.C. Donations can be made by visiting HonorFlightTallahassee.org and clicking Donate.Ž Checks may be made payable to Honor Flight Tallahassee and mailed to: P.O. Box 12033, Tallahassee, FL 32317. Honor Flight Tallahassee is a 501(c)(3) organization and all contributions are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. Honor Flight Tallahassee was established in 2012 as a local hub of the national Honor Flight Network. Honor Flight Tallahassees mission is to transport U.S. military veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit the memorials dedicated to honor their service and sacri“ ces, at no cost to the veteran. The inaugural ” ight is scheduled for spring 2013. For more, visitwww. HonorFlightTallahassee.org. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLeon County Commission gives donation to Honor Flight which sends military veterans to Washington, D.C. Special to The NewsCHAT of Wakulla, Inc. recently announced that “ nancial assistance to spay or neuter unaltered dogs is now available again through a second grant obtained by the organization this year. It is impossible to adopt outŽ of the pet overpopulation crisis, and CHAT is committed to help families on limited income. Millions of animals get euthanized across the U.S. each year because there are just not enough homes. They are making “ nancial assistance available to families with unaltered companion dogs, to reduce the number of litters entering the local shelter. CHAT wants to prevent the senseless death of unwanted animals. They are grateful to the local veterinarians for agreeing to a reduced fee for procedures to be eligible for this grant. To accommodate the schedule of local veterinarian clinics, only a certain number of vouchers will be available each month. The vouchers must be used within 30 days of issuance. Spay/Neuter vouchers can be obtained at the CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville on Thursdays from 3 to 7 p.m. only. Applicants may then schedule appointments with Crawfordville Animal Hospital, Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital or VAC Wakulla Animal Hospital. They currently have a waiting list, so call (850) 926-0890 during the hours mentioned above for more information and requirements.Special to The NewsFAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, Wakulla County Extension and local small farmers have worked together to provide a capacity building workshop and farm tour examining concepts of hydroponics as a sustainable farming strategy for farmers and urban gardeners in the region. This workshop will take place at Sopchoppy Farms, a local small farm that features heirloom hydroponic tomatoes, on Dec. 16. This is the second workshop in the integrated agricultural systems series examining successful alternative small farm strategies. The focus areas are: How to build a hydroponic system, How to build an affordable greenhouse or high tunnel and Organic integrated pest management strategies for high tunnels and greenhouses. Facilitators for this session include Tim Carroll of Sopchoppy Farms, Jody Bedgood and Derek Helms of Tallahassees Evershine Hydroponics, Trevor Hylton of FAMU/Wakulla County Extension, and Neal Miller of FAMU/USDA-ARS. The hands-on learning session and farm tour will be held from 1:30 to 5 p.m. on Dec. 16. The Integrated Agricultural Systems Workshop will highlight several local small farmers and their organically grown and sustainably grown produce for purchase, including greens, lettuce, onions, purslane, sugar cane stalks, sugar cane syrup, fresh baked bread and honey. Delicious local heirloom Cherokee Purple, Brandywine, and German Johnson tomatoes from Sopchoppy Farms will also be available for purchase. Cost of the workshop is $15 per person. For additional information contact: Jennifer Taylor, of FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, at famu. register@gmail.com.Small farms workshop and tour is this Sunday Help available at CHAT for spay/neuterSpecial to The NewsThere are three upcoming Tools to Quit classes that will be held in January. These tobacco cessation classes will be held on Jan. 8, Jan. 15 and Jan. 29. There is no cost to attend. Free nicotine patches and nicotine gum are provided to participants who complete each one timeŽ class, while supplies last. All classes begin at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library (Conference Room), 4330 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. There will be additional classes offered throughout 2013. For additional information, please Calandra Portalatin by telephone at 850-224-1177 or by e-mail at cportalatin@bigbendahec.org.Tobacco quit classes o ered Find us on Community News: Email your community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. Announcements are edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space becomes available. News: Advertising: Christmas (Dec. 27 edition)HOLIDAYAdvertising Deadlines

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 9Aeducation news SchoolBruce, Saulter win spelling bee at CESSpecial to The NewsOn Friday, Nov. 16, Crawfordville Elementary School held its annual fourth and “ fth grade Spelling Bee. Twenty-four students from eight homeroom classes were selected to participate and battled their counterparts for two first and second place positions from each grade level. First place winner from “ fth grade was second year participant, Wilson Bruce, representing Mrs. Kellys class and second place winner was Lynne Carnes from Mrs. Adkison and Mrs. Strickland class. Fourth grade winners included Tyler Saulter, “ rst place, and Cameron Lee, second place, both from Mrs. Hat“ elds class. Cougar Media Specialist, Cindy Burse was the moderator. Mary Fort, District Elementary Staf“ ng Specialist and Tracy Dempsey, former Crawfordville Elementary ESE teacher and current District Secondary Staf“ ng Specialist, and Tammy Peltier, Cougar administrative secretary, served as panel judges. Other contestants from the fifth grade classes included Morgan Carter, Crystal Jedziniak, Jason Rogers, Lilly Simons, Bryan Smith and Emily Thomas. Danielle Beaulieu, Elizabeth Dubois, Katarina Gunnarsson and Ally Harden were absent and did not compete. Fourth grade contestants included Hannah Babcock, Aden Barksdale, Kaitlin Campbell, Kyle Campbell, Keira Cushard, Rachel Freeman, Dawson Hooker, Caleb Tillman and Melody White. Zachary Neel was absent and did not compete. Advancing on to the District Spelling Bee on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at Wakulla Middle School will be Bruce, Carnes, Saulter and Lee. Barbara Mingledorff, “ fth grade teacher served as the Spelling Bee Sponsor. Other “ fth and fourth grade teachers include Alisa Adkison, Renee Kelly, Brandi Panzarino, Trish Strickland, Holly Harden, Frankie Harvey, Heather Hatfield, Louann Hames and Sherry Parks. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFifth grade contestants in the spelling bee Fourth grade spelling bee contestants By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 6...A day after the Florida Department of Education issued and then pulled back information on teacher evaluations across the state, interim Commissioner Pam Stewart told lawmakers that the “ rst year of a new attempt to pay teachers according to performance was painful.Ž Stewarts appearance Thursday followed the agencys decision to pull down information about teacher evaluations for the 2011-12 school year, saying a relatively small number of teachers had mistakenly been counted multiple times in certain categories in the states overall numbers. I think this is a painful year,Ž Stewart said at a meeting of the Senate Education Appropriations Subcommittee. I think any time you implement something this large for the “ rst time, there are growing pains. I think that the 12-13 year will be much more telling, and how we do as we move forward.Ž By late Thursday afternoon, a corrected version of the information originally released by the department was available. And the agency pointed out that the percentages of teachers rated in each category changed only slightly. But Stewart and lawmakers also discussed a looming change for the 201415 year, when local school districts are supposed to develop ways to assess the growth in student performance -the basis of teacher pay under the new regime -in courses that dont currently have state-backed tests available. Currently, many teachers for those courses are being evaluated based on other numbers; kindergarten teachers, for example, are sometimes evaluated based on an entire schools performance on state tests, despite the fact that kindergarten students do not take state tests. Thats one of the things that we are facing that is problematic for us, that is one of the biggest concerns that we hear and will be corrected each year as we move forward through this system, as those assessments are developed and used in districts,Ž Stewart said. But some lawmakers sounded skeptical, noting that a curriculum based on a national model, tests matching that curriculum and other changes are also slated to take effect at the same time. Senate Education Committee Chairman John Legg, R-New Port Richey, said he supported each change on its own. But when you add them all together, it looks like we have one runway in 2014 coming up. ... Should we maybe look at the ” ight path of all these different planes that are coming and maybe adjust some of the timetables for some of these ” ight paths to land correctly on that year?Ž he asked. Stewart didnt directly answer. I think that as we move forward, time is going to tell us whether or not we did this in the right sequence or not, and we need to be looking along the way incrementally to determine whether or not we need to make shifts,Ž she said. Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, said after the meeting that he was less concerned with the correction of the evaluation numbers than with the deadline for the local tests -and that the state should delay some of the changes. Im of the opinion now that we cannot get done in a year and a half what needs to be done to implement the programs and changes the way we should do them,Ž said Montford, a former Leon County superintendent of schools. We should not do them halfway.ŽStewart: First year of teacher evaluations painfulEarly learning formula under review By MARGIE MENZEL THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAResponding to the unanimous request of Floridas 31 early learning coalitions, Gov. Rick Scott Friday announced that recent controversial changes to the funding formula for the states subsidized school readiness programs would be frozen and reviewed. In a letter to Roseann Fricks, chair of the Association of Early Learning Coalitions, Scott said he had asked the state Of“ ce of Early Learning to establish a work group of lawmakers, coalitions, child care providers and local governments to gather input and re“ ne a funding formulaŽ by January 1, 2014. A quality early learning system is critical to providing Florida children the tools they need to succeed,Ž Scott wrote. OEL Director Mel Jurado resigned the day before Scotts announcement, but OEL Director of Governmental Relations Allen Mortham said he was unaware of a connection between the two events. The governor was responding to an uproar that ensued when, in late June, OEL noti“ ed the coalitions that their funding would change on July 1, less than a week later. Some coalitions would get more money, others less. The changes blind-sided not only the coalitions but their local legislative delegations. Its a win for the families. Its a win for the providers,Ž said a jubilant Evelio Torres, director of the Early Learning Coalition of Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties, on Friday. That coalition lost $3.7 million this year and stood to lose $22.3 million more over the next “ ve years. That is the right way to do thisƒto ensure that we end up with a formula that takes into consideration everyone at the table.Ž Early learning guru David Lawrence, who was copied on Scotts letter, agreed. I think the governor is right on target … in promising a fair process as well as underscoring how critical high-quality early learning is to the future of children and of Florida. The wisest course Florida could possibly take is to help parents help their children have the best possible chance to succeed in school and in life.Ž The Early Learning Coalition of the Big Bend lost more $650,000 this year. Its board chair, Bryan Desloge, president of the Florida Association of Counties, also applauded the governors move. This is an important issue and a purposeful conversation needs to occur between all the stakeholders before additional changes occur,Ž Desloge said. The early learning system connects lowincome working families with subsidized child care that, in turn, promotes school readiness. Florida has 68,000 children waiting for services. Early learning issues roiled the 2012 legislative session, which saw a clash between those who wanted to loosen the standards for providers and those who argued for higher quality child care. After a scathing report by the Auditor Generals Of“ ce, four lawmakers proposed early learning measures and a compromise bill was hammered out and passed. Scott vetoed the measure, saying the state could implement the changes by rule. Among them was an equity funding formula.Character building tips for parents with teens Special to The NewsParents today contend not only with yesterdays worries … drug abuse, bullying, teenage sex and delinquency … but new challenges. The digital age has introduced adult predators and other online hazards, and body-altering decorating such as tattoos and piercings are popular temptations, said James G. Wellborn, a clinical psychologist with 18 years of experience working with parents and teens. The teenage years are unlike any other in a persons life … its a unique in-between period from childhood to adulthood, and its helpful to remember that problems during this time are actually normal,Ž says Wellborn, author of the new book Raising Teens in the 21st Century: A Practical Guide to Effective Parenting,Ž A universally admired trait, spanning all cultures, religion and philosophy, is compassion. A truly compassionate teen will inevitably have a host of other positive qualities, Wellborn said. Parents can encourage compassion in the following ways: € Model it: Compassion is largely learned, so be aware of how you act around your children. How did you respond to the request for money from that panhandler on the street? What comment did you make behind his back, in the presence of your kid? Your teens are watching and listening. € Notice it: Point out examples of compassion that occur around you. It comes in many forms. Relevant to our daily lives are the people who quietly, and without recognition, help others in need, including volunteers of all types. € Teach it: Compassion has to be taught, so be prepared to provide direct instruction on how your teen needs to think and act in order to develop that quality. One important component empathy. If your teens cant see things from anothers perspective, it is dif“ cult for them to appreciate what that person is going through. € Anticipate it: Character can be fostered by projecting moral strength into their future. Say things like: By the time youre an adult, you will be such a person of strong character.Ž € Guilt it: A personal value system serves as a means of accountability to oneself (and your family and community). If they ful“ ll the promise of personal values it is a source of justi“ able pride. Violating personal values should result in guilt for not doing whats right and shame for letting other people down. € Repeat it: Once is not enough when it comes to character. Find every opportunity to work it into the conversation. News: Advertising: New Years (Jan. 3 edition)HOLIDAYAdvertising Deadlines all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialists our ome own ealtor ŽŽ

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Page 10A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, so much for winter. Folks are starting to put away their ” annel shirts and breaking out the shortsleeve shirts and shorts. I was “ shing on Thursday and there was a guy out “ shing with a pair of shorts and no shirt. Its almost the middle of December and youre supposed to be wearing coats and sock caps or at least longsleeve shirts and sweatshirts. The water temperature when I was out yesterday was in the high 60s. Right now Im sure the “ sh are confused and keep moving. I just talked with JR at the Aucilla and he said “ shing was still good but the patterns have changed. Most of the “ sh moved from deep in the creeks in the holes to the mouth of the creeks and out onto the ” ats. He did say you could still catch trout in the river. He said once the trout move into the river those “ sh are gonna stay until we get a lot of rain and the salinity of the river changes drastically. There are plenty of reds in the river and are biting on everything. Live shimp, cut bait, Gulp and top water baits. There are still plenty of pinfish around so youre gonna loose a lot of shrimp to them. Jimmy Bevis at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks said “ shing continues to be good. He went way up East River yesterday and said there were plenty of trout there. Kenny Davis who guides for Jimmy took his family about a week ago and limited on trout and caught some real nice reds. They “ shed the mouth of the St. Marks for the trout and East River for the reds. Bucky and one of the other employees there went the other day and went east of the lighthouse. They were “ shing the creeks and came back with their limit of trout and reds. He said they threw back a lot of legal trout because they forgot a tape and if they werent at least 17 or 18 inches long they didnt keep them. Jimmy said hes still seeing some sheepshead but not like a couple of weeks ago and plenty of ” ounder are being caught. Capt. Randy Peart said he just got back from “ shing down around Pine Island. They were strictly ” y-“ shing and he said “ shing was fair. They caught trout, jacks, lady“ sh, mangrove snapper and 7 or 8 snook. He took his 23-year-old son Wes who is getting ready to go in the army. On Jan. 23 he will report to Ft. Benning for basic and after that hes going to Ranger school. We wish him all the best. Randy said last week he took Harold Fulford and Bruce Johnson to the Econ“ na for two days and he said they had incredible “ shing. They caught their limit of 19 to 20 inch trout both days but only had one red. He said trout “ shing was fantastic but just didnt know where the reds were. Two weeks ago Randy and his son were at the Econ“ na and had trailer trouble. Wes pulled the trailer to Perry to have it welded and while he was gone R andy said he eased down the river fishing. Using a ” y he caught 10 nice tr out. When Wes got back they continued catching and releasing trout and then went out to 8 feet of water and caught big sea bass on a ” y. According to Capt. Pat McGriff fishing down around the Keaton Beach area is fantastic. Everyone is getting their limit of trout and the “ sh are back on the ” ats in 2 and a half to 3 and a half feet of water. Live shrimp, pin“ sh, Gulp and topwater baits are all producing. Last Wednesday and Thursday I “ shed with Dalbert and Lonnie Fitch from Kennesaw, Ga. We “ shed up in the creeks and in Spring Creek. They had 10 trout on Wednesday and probably threw back 50 or 60 that were shorts. On Thursday they also had 10 trout, one nice flounder and a 26-inch red which is the “ rst nice red I have seen in a while. Dalbert is 85 and has been “ shing down in this area for a long time. I asked about when he “ rst started coming down here and he said they “ shed with a Mr. Crum but he couldnt remember his “ rst name. He said they “ shed with him quite a few times and then came down one week and Mr. Crum wasnt going to be able to take them. Dalbert asked if he could “ nd them someone else and he told them that his son was a good “ sherman and could take them. His sons name was Harley Crum and was 16 years old at the time. He kept his son out of school those two days and Harley took them and continued taking them when they came down until he got married and moved away. He said they always caught a lot of “ sh with them. I asked Dalbert late in the afternoon of the “ rst day we “ shed if he was getting tired. He said he was but would never tell me he was. He stood up and “ shed all day casting a rod and I told him I hoped I could do t hat at 85. He said he hopes he can do it at 86. Sunday afternoon Dwayne Broadway and I went for a couple of hours because someone had told me where they had caught several nice trout. It was a spot I “ sh quite often and have caught a lot of “ sh from and wanted to see if they were still there. We caught and released at least 50 trout and probably half of them were over 15 inches. We used strictly the pearl white grub and caught “ sh non-stop for two hours. We also caught and released two reds and two ” ounder. Its supposed to cool off a little this week but I dont think it will do anything except maybe move some “ sh off the ” ats to the mouth of the creeks again. Good luck and good “ shing!Warm weather has moved the sh to the mouth of creek and onto the ats From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Dylan Raker, son of April Zanco, is pictured with his “ rst 4-point buck shot while hunting with his grandfather, Bo Zanco, and step-brother Ethan Vonier in Sumatra on Thanksgiving weekend. Brag BookSPECIAL TO THE NEWSDylan Raker bags his “ rst buck, a four-pointerFor the week of Nov. 30 Dec. 6. This report represents some events the FWC handled over the past week, but does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. SANTA ROSA COUNTY: Officer Kenneth Manning and Lt. Dan Hahr were on foot patrol within the Blackwater WMA when they heard a ri” e shot west of their location. The of“ cers knew of a tree stand in that area and walked to its location. When they got close to the location, they heard a person dragging something through the brush. A man walked up to them carrying a muzzleloader with blood on his hands and pants. He admitted that he had shot a deer and that it was a doe. He then told them that he had seen a cow-horn buck walking the same trail the past weekend, so he assumed it was the same deer even though he could not see antlers. The of“ cers followed the man back down the trail to a freshly killed doe deer. They issued the man a notice to appear for taking an antlerless deer out of season and seized the ri” e and deer. € Of“ cer Kenneth Manning “ led charges of possession of a “ rearm by a convicted felon on a subject who was hunting with a modern muzzleloader over the Thanksgiving weekend. The man was hunting over bait within Blackwater WMA with a muzzleloader that was not an antique or a replica. The man was also charged with hunting over bait within a WMA. OKALOOSA COUNTY: Of“ cer Alan Kirchinger was working on the Yellow River within the Yellow River WMA when he observed a vessel pull up at an area where he knew some corn had been scattered. After a short while, he approached the area and observed a man hunting over a baited area. Of“ cer Kirchinger issued him a notice to appear for hunting over bait within a WMA.FWC Law Enforcement Bevis at S h e ll Is l an d Fis h S t. Mar k s sai d “ s h in g conb e g ood. He went w ay R iver yestera id e w h o r Jimmy too k y about a week ag o and n trout an d cau gh t some rea l t h e rive r fis h in g Ui ” h h t10 but would never tell me he s too d up an d “ s h e d a ll i n g a ro d an d I to ld h i m I c o uld d o t h H h Dwa y ne B a nd I went f o r a h o urs because s o me o ne me w h ere t h e y h a d cau g Spotted sea trout St. MarksRIVER CANTINA “We Have The Best Hamburgers Around”Prize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 6th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 14 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish… If you can’t… Join us Anyway! Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!* 2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Family owned and operated boarding facility with over 10 years experience and a veterinary technician on-site. Indoor and outdoor boarding facilities for dogs small and large, cats and birds. Large and secure play areas with hands-on attention daily and friendly service we are sure to accommodate your needs. Whether you and your family are going on vacation, an extended stay or just away for the day, we are here for you. No duration is too long or short and our rates can’t be beat! Livestock care at your farm or home is available!Personal care is given to each and every animal every day. Play time is our favorite time!(We do not make breed restrictions)Proud supporter of local rescues! Stefan Pedler, Owner1886 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 www.BloxhamBoardingKennel.com (850) 597-1739 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarine”orida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 11AAs the year draws to a close we are tying up loose ends and preparing to look ahead to the coming year. Flotilla Commander Elect Duane Treadon and Flotilla Vice Commander Elect Norma Hill have been working hard to make the transition from our current elected leadership seamless. Our Flotilla has done well with Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos and Vice Commander Bill Wannall at the helm. We are very lucky to have such dedicated members who are willing to take on such important positions. It has been said you are only as strong as your weakest link. Flotilla 12 has been fortunate to have a host of dedicated individuals who are willing to come together and make a lot happen each and every year. Given that the Auxiliary is a volunteer organization, it is amazing how invested everyone is along with the support provided from the community! With the slow down, Flotilla 12 was not on the water this past weekend, but we will be out this coming weekend! Bringing back navigation rules, we are up to Rule 15: Crossing Situation. When two power-driven vessels are crossing so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has the other on her starboard side shall keep out of the way and shall, if the circumstances of the case admit, avoid crossing ahead of the other vessel. A good interpretation of this rule is that if you are coming into a crossing situation and you see the red portside navigation light of the other boat, you should make adjustments to avoid hitting them. Many thanks to Flotilla 13-06 for the informative graphic. However, even if you are the boat that has the right of way, and you see that the other boat is not adjusting to avoid the risk of hitting you, you must make corrections. Rule 7: Risk of Collision addresses this in greater detail. This rule, and all of the Navigation Rules are available at: www.uscg.mil/directives/cim/16000-16999/ cim_16672_2d.pdf. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Knowing the rules of the waterways can make the difference in making it home safely! Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD a peek into life on and under the water W a t e r W a y s Water Ways Water Ways The Road Trip. Winter training continues now that we are back from a 7,500 mile, month long road trip. We set out at the beginning of November to attend the Diving Equipment Manufacturers Association (DEMA) in Las Vegas, Nev. I hate ” ying, encourage staff to join me on the road, and visit collaborating facilities along the way. So I drive whenever I can. Not surprisingly, I drive a diesel Jetta, which has wonderful mileage and plenty of room. Two years ago I drove our diesel Sprinter because I needed to get all our DOT banks hydrostatically tested at one of the oldest stations in the country, in Oklahoma City, at City Carbonics, half way to Las Vegas. I picked them up on the way back. This year we expanded our hydrotestatic test facility to service these larger cylinders ourselves. Joerg Hess and I took our technician, Travis, to DEMA this year and then ” ew him back to Wakulla. After test diving a new rebreather in Lake Meade, we continued west to spend Thanksgiving with my brother in Oregon. By Monday, we were at Innerspace Systems Corporation in Washington State, the folks who make the most successful rebreather in this country, the Megalodon. We were visiting to become quali“ ed to repair their newest rebreather, one half the size, cost and still as capable a rig as the Megalodon. Rebreathers have changed the way we dive the caves. This new platform will change the way we dive the ocean from Wakulla County. Mechanical repairs to the Jetta held us in Oregon for a few extra days, forcing us to work outside in dreary weather. But rain in the Siuslaw Valley means mushrooms spring forth from their forests. During a brief break in the weather, I found a huge Boletus mushroom that tasted delicious! Eating eggs from range-fed chickens and organic vegetables during our stay made up for the layover. My brother is a back-to-the-basics farmer now. He even heats his house with used vegetable oil. A road trip is a time for imaginering. Days and miles on end between visits to manufacturer facilities, Dr. Hess and I brainstormed topics that will shape where Wakulla Diving will go in the coming years. We visited American Underwater Products (second largest dive manufacturer in the world) near San Francisco for a day of training on their new rebreather, the Prism2. We stayed with Mike Menduno, legendary Tech diver, visionary and editor of Aquacore Magazine. Then we drove over the Donavan Pass to Reno and eastbound to Salt Lake to visit our Russian colleague, Konstatine Kovalenko. Theres a chance he may join us, dramatically adding new dimensions to diving support in Wakulla. In Boulder, Colo., we visited Spark Fun. Three newly graduated engineers from the local university loved to play with electronics, and shared their enthusiasm. They still do, but now employ 130 employees to help them do it. We toured their facility, and were amazed at how they pulled it off (lessons learned there). We have returned with new plans, toys and renewed enthusiasm, to re-engage with the Madison County Police Dive Team for another two weeks of training. We introduced an inexpensive remotely operated vehicle (ROV), that they loved (almost as much as we do!). It will be an exciting new year underwater in Wakulla County. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton A huge Boletus mushroom that tasted delicious! Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.8 ft. 12:50 AM 3.9 ft. 1:37 AM 3.8 ft. 2:24 AM 3.6 ft. 3:11 AM 3.3 ft. 4:00 AM 2.9 ft. 4:55 AM Hi g h -1.4 ft. 8:05 AM -1.3 ft. 8:51 AM -1.0 ft. 9:35 AM -0.6 ft. 10:18 AM -0.2 ft. 10:58 AM 0.3 ft. 11:38 AM 0.8 ft. 12:01 AM L ow 3.3 ft. 2:38 PM 3.2 ft. 3:21 PM 3.1 ft. 4:01 PM 3.0 ft. 4:39 PM 2.9 ft. 5:16 PM 2.8 ft. 5:54 PM 2.5 ft. 6:02 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 7:43 PM 1.2 ft. 8:29 PM 1.1 ft. 9:15 PM 1.0 ft. 10:04 PM 0.9 ft. 10:58 PM 0.8 ft. 12:19 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 6:35 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:42 AM 2.9 ft. 1:29 AM 2.8 ft. 2:16 AM 2.7 ft. 3:03 AM 2.5 ft. 3:52 AM 2.2 ft. 4:47 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 8:16 AM -0.9 ft. 9:02 AM -0.7 ft. 9:46 AM -0.5 ft. 10:29 AM -0.1 ft. 11:09 AM 0.2 ft. 11:49 AM 0.6 ft. 12:12 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 2:30 PM 2.4 ft. 3:13 PM 2.3 ft. 3:53 PM 2.2 ft. 4:31 PM 2.2 ft. 5:08 PM 2.1 ft. 5:46 PM 1.8 ft. 5:54 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 7:54 PM 0.8 ft. 8:40 PM 0.8 ft. 9:26 PM 0.7 ft. 10:15 PM 0.7 ft. 11:09 PM 0.6 ft. 12:30 PM L ow 2.0 ft. 6:27 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.6 ft. 1:26 AM 3.6 ft. 2:13 AM 3.5 ft. 3:00 AM 3.3 ft. 3:47 AM 3.0 ft. 4:36 AM Hi g h -1.2 ft. 9:09 AM -1.2 ft. 9:55 AM -0.9 ft. 10:39 AM -0.6 ft. 11:22 AM -0.2 ft. 12:02 PM 0.8 ft. 12:02 AM 0.8 ft. 1:05 AM L ow 3.1 ft. 3:14 PM 3.0 ft. 3:57 PM 2.9 ft. 4:37 PM 2.8 ft. 5:15 PM 2.7 ft. 5:52 PM 2.7 ft. 5:31 AM 2.3 ft. 6:38 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 8:47 PM 1.0 ft. 9:33 PM 1.0 ft. 10:19 PM 0.9 ft. 11:08 PM 0.3 ft. 12:42 PM 0.7 ft. 1:23 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 6:30 PM 2.5 ft. 7:11 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.0 ft. 12:34 AM 3.0 ft. 1:21 AM 3.0 ft. 2:08 AM 2.8 ft. 2:55 AM 2.6 ft. 3:44 AM 2.2 ft. 4:39 AM 1.9 ft. 5:46 AM Hi g h -1.3 ft. 7:44 AM -1.3 ft. 8:30 AM -1.0 ft. 9:14 AM -0.6 ft. 9:57 AM -0.2 ft. 10:37 AM 0.3 ft. 11:17 AM 0.8 ft. 11:58 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 2:22 PM 2.5 ft. 3:05 PM 2.4 ft. 3:45 PM 2.3 ft. 4:23 PM 2.2 ft. 5:00 PM 2.2 ft. 5:38 PM 2.1 ft. 6:19 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 7:22 PM 1.1 ft. 8:08 PM 1.0 ft. 8:54 PM 0.9 ft. 9:43 PM 0.9 ft. 10:37 PM 0.8 ft. 11:40 PM L ow Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.9 ft. 12:47 AM 4.0 ft. 1:34 AM 3.9 ft. 2:21 AM 3.7 ft. 3:08 AM 3.3 ft. 3:57 AM 2.9 ft. 4:52 AM 2.5 ft. 5:59 AM Hi g h -1.5 ft. 8:02 AM -1.4 ft. 8:48 AM -1.1 ft. 9:32 AM -0.7 ft. 10:15 AM -0.2 ft. 10:55 AM 0.3 ft. 11:35 AM 0.8 ft. 12:16 PM L ow 3.4 ft. 2:35 PM 3.3 ft. 3:18 PM 3.2 ft. 3:58 PM 3.0 ft. 4:36 PM 2.9 ft. 5:13 PM 2.8 ft. 5:51 PM 2.8 ft. 6:32 PM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 7:40 PM 1.2 ft. 8:26 PM 1.1 ft. 9:12 PM 1.0 ft. 10:01 PM 1.0 ft. 10:55 PM 0.9 ft. 11:58 PM L ow Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:36 AM 2.8 ft. 1:31 AM 2.6 ft. 2:27 AM 2.3 ft. 3:26 AM 2.0 ft. 4:31 AM 1.7 ft. 5:47 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 7:40 AM -0.9 ft. 8:26 AM -0.8 ft. 9:11 AM -0.6 ft. 9:53 AM -0.3 ft. 10:32 AM 0.0 ft. 11:09 AM 0.3 ft. 11:44 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 4:01 PM 2.2 ft. 4:37 PM 2.1 ft. 5:09 PM 2.0 ft. 5:37 PM 2.0 ft. 6:03 PM 2.0 ft. 6:28 PM 2.1 ft. 6:54 PM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 6:52 PM 1.4 ft. 7:41 PM 1.3 ft. 8:34 PM 1.1 ft. 9:34 PM 0.9 ft. 10:41 PM 0.7 ft. 11:57 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 6 Dec. 12First Dec. 19 Full Dec. 28 Last Jan. 7 New Jan. 13Major Times 12:24 AM 2:24 AM 12:56 PM 2:56 PM Minor Times 7:33 AM 8:33 AM 6:18 PM 7:18 PM Major Times 1:27 AM 3:27 AM 1:58 PM 3:58 PM Minor Times 8:32 AM 9:32 AM 7:26 PM 8:26 PM Major Times 2:28 AM 4:28 AM 2:58 PM 4:58 PM Minor Times 9:25 AM 10:25 AM 8:33 PM 9:33 PM Major Times 3:26 AM 5:26 AM 3:53 PM 5:53 PM Minor Times 10:10 AM 11:10 AM 9:38 PM 10:38 PM Major Times 4:19 AM 6:19 AM 4:44 PM 6:44 PM Minor Times 10:51 AM 11:51 AM 10:40 PM 11:40 PM Major Times 5:08 AM 7:08 AM 5:32 PM 7:32 PM Minor Times 11:29 AM 12:29 PM 11:40 PM 12:40 AM Major Times 5:55 AM 7:55 AM 6:18 PM 8:18 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:03 PM 1:03 PM SEASONS BEST Better Good Average Average Average Average+7:24 am 5:38 pm 7:34 am 6:19 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Brightness– Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:25 am 5:38 pm 8:33 am 7:26 pm 7:26 am 5:39 pm 9:26 am 8:34 pm 7:26 am 5:39 pm 10:12 am 9:39 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 10:52 am 10:41 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 11:30 am 11:40 pm 7:28 am 5:40 pm 12:04 pm --:--1% 7% 15% 23% 30% 37% 44% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centersSTOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com“2-Night Free Vacation!”or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE

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Green Scene Page 12A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Sustainability practices focus on finding ways to reduce consumption in addition to reusing, repurposing, and repairing items. These values also fit with holiday celebrations, making it a time of sustaining traditions as well as helping the environment. According to the Green American magazine, a periodical that embraces small, easily implemented sustainability ideas, The United States landfills see a 24 percent increase in their garbage intake during the holiday season.Ž There have to be ways to change this statistic. Here are some ideas for greening your holiday season. If you have already made all of your preparations for this holiday season, look around your home, yard and purchased gifts to decide if you can make some improvements for the next year. Perhaps the after-holiday sales will allow you to make some good, sustainable choices at a reasonable price in preparation for the holidays, 2013. DECORATIONS € Use LED lights. They use up to 80 percent less energy than incandescent lights and they last longer, so they are worth the splurge. Consider solar holiday lights; they only use the energy they soak up from the sun. €If you have old incandescent lights lurking in your attic or basement, recycle them at one of the large box stores during the months they are collecting and properly disposing of them. Inquire about the details of their program the next time you are in the store; dont make a special trip. € Reduce the amount of lights or strands used for decorating and use a timer on your lights to save electricity. € Make table centerpieces and other decorations out of collected natural objects such as acorns, holy or oak trimmings, berries, or other harvested fruits and vegetables. GIFTS € Wrap gifts with brown paper bags, newspaper, or reused wrapping paper. Create personal wrapping paper with stamps, collages, or drawing on the remaining paper bags from your grocery shopping stash. I know you have no use for them now that you started carrying your own fabric, reusable bags to the store. € Avoid wrapping altogether and tie a large bow around the item instead. Alternatively, make the wrapping a part of the gift such a using reusable tins, planting pots or new towels. € Give presents or gift certificate from local businesses. € Focus on homemade or non-traditional gifts such as baked goods, plants, fishing licenses, dance classes, travel mugs, local art, or battery chargers. € If you are giving appliances or electronics, make sure they are Energy Star certified. This is your guarantee that they have been evaluated for energy efficiency. € Make a donation in someones name to charities or conservation organizations. I attended an alternative holiday giving event last weekend and purchasedŽ charitable donations for 15 of my friends who I want to remember but who need nothing in tangible items. € Give time.Ž Help older relative with difficult chores, take children to a park for a mother or dad who live in the neighborhood, or teach someone a skill or talent you have. It is like receiving a stocking stuffed with sentiment. FOOD € Check stores for special sauces, jams, cider or meat. € Use cloth napkins in your table settings. € Buy in bulk to reduce grocery trips and packaging. € Compost your food waste. TREES € Instead of a traditional tree, use locally grown, live trees that can be planted outside after the holiday. Consider an out-of-the-ordinary tree like a palm or citrus. € Be aware that even through artificial trees can be reused each year, they may contain materials such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and are made overseas. Again buy local and be aware of potentially toxic chemicals. € Wouldnt it be wonderful if Wakulla County could start a tree recycling program that will turn used trees into chip mulch? MISCELLANEOUS € I have to accept that I am beginning to receive emailed holiday cards. I know it is a sign of the times but for me, I will continue to send cards but will always utilize cards made from recycled paper. € Carpool with friends or family for shopping trips. € Encourage recycling for bottles and cans at holiday parties and events by having containers visible and clearly marked. € For those parties you host, use cloth napkins, biodegradable, disposable dishes or your pottery or china. Having a greenŽ holiday benefits us much more than just through the environment. Creating homemade gifts and decorations or reusing items from previous years also means spending less money than buying new items. Investing time and creativity in the holiday can help make it more fulfilling and meaningful for you, your family and your friends. Shelley Swenson is FCS/EFNEP Agent II with the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office. She can be reached at 926-3931. By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Tips for a green holiday seasonWant your holidays wrapped in more meaning „ and less stuff? The holiday season is meant to be a time of peace, re” ection, and celebration, but too often exhaust rather than uplift us. If you sometimes feel trapped by the shopping, spending, crass displays, and frenzied preparations, you arent alone. Our national surveys consistently show that Americans feel put upon by the commercialization of the season and want more of what mattersƒ not just more stuff. This year, you dont have to rack up credit card debt or get swept up in the seasons commercialism. Instead, consider creating holidays that instill more meaning into the season and encourage more sharing, laughter, creativity, and personal renewal. With our Simplify the Holidays campaign, New Dream is here to help you get started. We hope the tips and activities outlined here will help you reduce stress and increase personal ful“ llment during this holiday season. TAKE THE PLEDGE! The holiday season is arguably our greatest cultural paradox. Tradition, family, and faith are obscured by the pressures to spend. We all want to show our loved ones that we care about them, but we dont want to go broke in the process. And isnt it possible to celebrate without leaving a trail of trash that will stay in the land“ lls long after the season has passed? Heres a list of ideas to help you celebrate the holidays with more joy and less stuff. Pledge to 5 actions „ or more! „ that you will adopt this year: GIVE THE GIFT OF TIME by creating your own gift card for a service (e.g., babysitting, carwashing, petsitting, chores, making dinner, organizing an outing). GIVE A HANDMADE GIFT like a memoir of cherished memories with that person, a book of family recipes, a collage of pictures and mementos, or a calendar “ lled with the birthdays and anniversaries of friends and family. OFFER TO TEACH A SKILL YOU POSSESS (e.g., knitting, photography, computer skills, “ nancial planning, a foreign language, music lessons, canning tomatoes, cooking a favorite recipe). CONSIDER LESS GIMMICKY, LESS COMMERCIAL GIFTS for children, such as arts/crafts supplies, books, a magnifying glass, or building blocks. CREATE A PAPERLESS HOLIDAY LETTER on the computer and email it to friends and family. HAVE A WHITE ELEPHANT PARTY at the of“ ce instead of a traditional gift exchange, where each person brings a wrapped secondhand item in good condition. DRAW NAMES IN YOUR FAMILY FOR GIFT-GIVING (for extra fun and surprise, make it Secret SantasŽ), so that you can put more time and thought into one gift instead of having to give to several people. SHOP FOR USED ITEMS for all or most of your holiday gifts (e.g., local thrift store, Craigslist, Freecycle, used products on Amazon or eBay). SHARE THE GIFT OF MUSIC by caroling, and include visits to elderly neighbors or a nursing home. Or, gather friends and family for an in-home holiday sing-a-long. GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY by preparing care packages for the homeless, or volunteering at an organization to help those in need during the holiday season. ADOPT A LESS IS MOREŽ ATTITUDE toward holiday decorating. Opt for natural trimmings such as clippings from local evergreens and holly bushes. SAVE PAPER by wrapping gifts in newspaper comics, junk mail, paper bags decorated with markers, old maps, phone books, or other reused paper. PREPARE YOUR HOLIDAY MEALS with as many seasonal, locally grown, and/or organic foods as possible. REDUCE JUNK MAIL by removing your name from mailing lists of unwanted holiday catalogs. PHOTO BY BRANDPOINT(BPT) With homes adorned in holiday hues of silver, gold and red, these are colorful times. This year, why not greenŽ your holiday by adopting some eco-friendly traditions? From making holiday meals with organic ingredients to wrapping gifts in recycled paper, its easy to “ nd ways to celebrate the season and be kind to Mother Nature at the same time. EARTH-FRIENDLY FEASTING Americans are embracing organic foods for many reasons, from better taste on their plates and improved health in their homes, to the gentler impact on the environment associated with the production of organic produce and meats. If youve never tried organic dining before, give your family … and the earth … the gift of going organic this holiday season. And if you prefer organic foods throughout the year, theres no need to set the habit aside just because of the holidays. From main dishes of responsibly raised poultry and line-caught “ sh, to side dishes of sustainably grown vegetables and grains, its easy to serve a holiday meal thats good for your family and the environment. Companies like Simply Organic offer options for every aspect of holiday feasting, including mixes for gravies, dips and dressings, organic spices, ” avorings, extracts and sauces. You can “ nd holidayappropriate organic products and recipes at www.simplyorganic.com. Decorating with heart Some traditional holiday decorations can be less than friendly for the environment, but a cut tree is not necessarily one of them. Consider that the production of arti“ cial trees consumes large quantities of resources and creates wasted by-product. Also, keep in mind most tree lots sell trees raised on farms, so natural forests are not impacted by the tree you buy off the lot. When it comes time to dispose of your tree, consider mulching it yourself, rather than just setting it out on the curb. What would the holidays be without bright lights? But those little bulbs can consume lots of energy. Switching to LED lights will reduce the amount of power it takes to keep your home twinkling brightly this holiday season. And a bonus of LED lights: they last longer, so you wont have to buy new strands every season. GUILT-FREE GIVING Gift-giving and the goodwill it brings are at the heart of the holidays, but that good feeling often also comes with ripped wrapping paper, pounds of packaging materials and a lot of energy consumed in shopping. It is possible, however, to give gifts with minimal impact on the environment and your conscience. Handmade gifts are not only more ecofriendly, they show the recipient that you cared enough to invest time and effort in creating something unique. But if youre not handy, look for gifts that are energy-ef“ cient (like solar-powered items or gadgets that use rechargeable batteries), come with minimal packaging, are made of sustainably harvested natural materials, or that are locally produced. Intangible gifts can also be green.Ž Instead of gifting the cooking enthusiast in your life with a new set of pots and pans, sign him up for a cooking class and attend together. Give your gardening fan a gift certi“ cateŽ redeemable for your help when spring planting season arrives. Greening your holiday season will take some thought and time, but giving yourself and your loved ones a more environmentally responsible holiday season will be something you can celebrate throughout the year.More ways to green your season Simplify the holidays with less stu

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 13ADear EarthTalk: What is perchlorateŽ in our drinking water supply and why is it controversial? David Sparrow Chico, Calif. Perchlorate is both a naturally occurring and man-made chemical used in the production of rocket fuel, missiles, “ reworks, ” ares and explosives. It is also sometimes present in bleach and in some fertilizers. Its widespread release into the environment is primarily associated with defense contracting, military operations and aerospace programs. Perchlorate can be widespread in ground water, soils and plants, and makes its way up the food chain accordingly … even into organically grown foods. To wit, a 2005 Journal of Environmental Science and Technology study using ion chromatography to “ nd contaminants in agricultural products found quantifiable levels of perchlorate in 16 percent of conventionally produced lettuces and other leafy greens and in 32 percent of otherwise similar but organically produced samples. Today, traces of perchlorate are found in the bloodstreams of just about every human on the planet. Perchlorate in the environment is a health concern because it can disrupt the thyroids ability to produce hormones needed for normal growth and development. Besides its potential to cause endocrine system and reproductive problems, perchlorate is considered a likely human carcinogenŽ by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some 11 million Americans live in areas where concentrations of perchlorate in public drinking water supplies are signi“ cantly higher than what is considered safe. Per the mandate of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the EPA is currently working on setting national standards for how much perchlorate can be allowed in drinking water without putting people at risk. As part of the process, the agency is studying the available science on the health effects of perchlorate exposure and evaluating laboratory methods for measuring, treating and removing perchlorate in drinking water. The EPA will publish a proposed rule on the matter for public review at some point in 2013. We are happy that the EPA is moving ahead with a drinking water standard...but we are concerned that it wont be strict enough,Ž reports Renee Sharp of the nonprofit Environmental Working Group (EWG). The group would like to see the U.S. adopt a truly health-protective drinking water standard lower than 1 ppb [parts per billion]Ž for perchlorate. Insiders dont believe federal policymakers will go that low, however, since the EPA says it cannot detect perchlorate below 2 ppb. But EWG point out that Massachusetts is already testing for it with a 1 ppb cut-off, per the mandate of its statewide standard set back in 2006. The only other state to have a drinking water standard for perchlorate is California, which set 6 ppb or less as an allowable concentration back in 2004. But that states Of“ ce of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment recently proposed lowering the standard to 1 ppb based on new data regarding environmental exposure, possible effects of perchlorate and consideration of infants as a susceptible population. If the EPA develops a tough new standard, almost every state will need to readjust its water monitoring systems to take into account how much perchlorate is making its way to our taps and into the foods we eat„a no doubt costly process but one that will greatly bene“ t both current and future generations. Dear EarthTalk: I heard about a group called the Womens Earth Alliance that works on environmental projects in many parts of the world. What kinds of projects? Judy Stack Barre, Vt. The Womens Earth Alliance (WEA) supports community groups around the world that work at the intersection of womens rights and the environment. A project of the Berkeley, Calif.-based David Brower Center, WEA partners with local women-led community groups engaged in “ nding solutions to vexing environmental problems. WEA helps women secure their rights and safety and remove barriers to full participation in society by supporting them in addressing the environmental issues impacting their lives. By bringing womens leadership to these critical environmental issues, WEA helps bring vital voices, perspectives and participation to addressing the greatest and most basic challenges of our time. The idea for WEA emerged from a 2006 meeting in Mexico City where 30 women leaders from 26 countries gathered to address how women can do more to address todays environmental challenges. WEA offers training and resources around issues of water, land, food and climate change, operating on the guiding principle that when women thrive, communities, the environment and future generations thrive.Ž Of utmost importance to WEA is securing womens access to basic resources (food, land and water) so they can enjoy economic, social and political security. Since women in many societies are responsible for the management of food and water, the group reports, they can experience both the unequal burden of work to secure and prepare the familys food and water as well as the vulnerability which results from traditional gender roles at home and gender discrimination in society.Ž Women also tend to be particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, says WEA: Women in underserved communities “ nd themselves on the front lines of climate impacts, often witnessing their water sources and traditional land bases shift or disappear because of a dangerous mix of changing temperatures and structural inequalities.Ž Currently WEA focuses on three geographic areas: India, North America and Africa. Its India Program supports small and emerging womens groups that are promoting food sovereignty, traditional knowledge and advocating for the rights of women farmers. The groups trainings, advocacy and movement building have enabled thousands of poor Indian women to become environmental leaders in their communities. In North America, WEA links pro bono legal, policy and business advocates across the continent with Indigenous women leading environmental campaigns. Through rapid response advocacy, longterm policy working groups, trainings and delegations, WEAs innovative advocacy partnerships protect sacred sites, promote energy justice, and ensure environmental health on Indigenous lands,Ž the group reports. And in Africa, WEA partnered with Crabgrass, a California-based human rights group, to create the Global Womens Water Initiative (GWWI) that provides training to help people implement water related strategies to improve their communities health, self reliance and resilience to climate change. With GWWI, WEA and Crabgrass are building a cadre of advanced female trainers skilled in applying holistic solutions with appropriate technology to environmental problems regarding water, sanitation and hygiene. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www. emagazine.com). Subscribe www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue www.emagazine.com/trial. e danger of perchlorate in drinking water Eleven million Americans live in areas where concentrations of perchlorate … a chemical used in the production of rocket fuel, missiles, “ reworks, ” ares and explosives … are signi“ cantly higher in public drinking water supplies than what is considered safe.PHOTO BY COMSTOCK/THINKSTOCKThe Womens Earth Alliance helps women around the world secure their rights and safety and remove barriers to full participation in society by supporting them in addressing the environmental issues impacting their lives. Pictured: A female farmer in India.ISTOCKPHOTO/THINKSTOCK Re“nance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a ”oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Of“ce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Of“ce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Of“ce: 850.926.1960 EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me “nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED.RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc.

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Page 14A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Dec. 5, Phillip Vause of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping. The victim met Deputy Randy Phillips at his hunting property and discovered a “ berglass boat dumped in the wood line 30 feet from Old Plank Road. The boat was missing a motor. The vessel was registered to a man in Archer but the registration expired in 2001. The litter control crew was noti“ ed to remove the vessel from the Vause property. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce this week: NOVEMBER 27 € Debra Range of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported the unauthorized use of her bank card at several retail establishments in the Miami area. The charges totaled $1,510. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. NOVEMBER 29 € Thomas Askins of the Sopchoppy Education Center reported a narcotics violation. A plastic bag with suspected marijuana inside was taken from a student. The 15-year-old male student had the plastic bag in his pants pocket. The juvenile was issued a notice to appear in court and turned over to his mother. The marijuana weighed 4.7 grams. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. € Kimberly Ruiz of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported receiving mail from a reemployment assistance program in Orlando. The letter contained unemployment information despite the fact that the victim is fully employed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. € Lt. Mike Kemp and Deputy Gibby Gibson were contacted about two male subjects looking into parked vehicles at the Bridlewood Apartments in Crawfordville. Two juveniles were observed walking in the area with a bag “ lled with boxing equipment. One of the juveniles admitted stealing the property. The victim, Martin Valencia, was able to recover the bag and equipment as well as several other personal items that were discarded in a wooded area. More stolen property was recovered on the second suspect. The two juveniles were charged with burglary and grand theft in the case. They were booked into the Wakulla County Jail and released to the custody of their parents. NOVEMBER 30 € Gene Darby of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of“ ce Maintenance Department reported a criminal mischief to WCSO property. Someone slashed the tires of a digital warning sign trailer while it was posted at FH 13 and FH 365. Damage to the tires was estimated at $200. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € Rebecca Holton of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Pry marks were observed on multiple doors at the victims home. Evidence was collected at the scene. Damage to the home was estimated at less than $250. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Judith Smith of Panacea reported the theft of an aluminum wheelchair ramp, valued at $100. The property was taken from the victims carport. The next day the victim reported that the ramp reappeared on her property and the case was closed. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. DECEMBER 1 € A vehicle was observed on Whiddon Lake Road that was an obstruction hazard. The property owner was located and asked to remove the vehicle from the scene. When WCSO Dispatch received another complaint about the vehicle two hours later, a wrecker was contacted to remove the vehicle. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. € Norman Jones of Crawfordville reported a hitand-run traf“ c crash with a mailbox. Jones mailbox and boxes owned by three neighbors were damaged by a vehicle. Damage was estimated at $50. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. DECEMBER 2 € Garland Landers of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported that a laptop computer and charger were taken from his home. The missing property is valued at $220 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Jacqueline Butler of Crawfordville reported locating a mens bicycle on a wooded lot near High Drive and Audubon Forest in Crawfordville. The bike had not been reported stolen and it was taken to the WCSO Impound Yard. It is valued at $150. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. € Jonathan Stalvey of Winn-Dixie reported a business burglary. The outdoor propane tank case was damaged and seven propane tanks were stolen. The missing propane tanks and padlock are valued at $449. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. € Linda Miller of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a lawn mower and tin from her home. A suspect has been identified. The missing property is valued at $545. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. DECEMBER 3 € Deputy Ian Dohme investigated a report of a false child abuse claim being “ led against a Crawfordville victim. Three reports were “ led against the victim over a seven year period. An investigator from the Florida Department of Children and Families investigated the complaints and found them to be unfounded. The false claims investigation was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. € Wal-Mart Loss Prevention staff reported a retail theft involving a male and two females operating a golf cart which was parked in front of the store. While in the store, the male allegedly stole two jackets and a laptop computer. One of the females allegedly also took a jacket. The trio stopped to pay for some food items before leaving. The value of the stolen items was estimated at $658. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. € Detective Derek Lawhon recovered stolen property from a 16-year-old Crawfordville male who admitted breaking into vehicles in The Farm subdivision. Heather Mercer of Crawfordville was contacted by Detective Lawhon through her stolen GPS unit. The GPS and a phone charger were recovered from the juvenile. They are valued at $130. The victim decided not to press charges against the juvenile since he cooperated with Detective Lawhons investigation. € Stuart Korte of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his residence. Jewelry, “ rearms, coins, electronics and other miscellaneous property, valued at $6,500, was reported missing. A suspect has been identi“ ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. DECEMBER 4 € William Gene McDowell, 72, of Crawfordville was arrested for failure to register as a sex offender as required by Florida Statute. A search of law enforcement data bases determined that the suspect missed four required registrations over two years. Deputy Ian Dohme, Detective Josh Langston and Criminal Investigations Analyst Angie Gardner investigated. € Brenda Sanders of Sopchoppy reported the possible theft of a vehicle tag. The tag was entered into the FCIC/NCIC data base as lost or stolen. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. € Gregory Marr of Crawfordville reported the theft of $30 cash from Winn-Dixie. The victim paid for groceries in the self checkout line and also requested an additional $30. He left the store without removing the cash from the machine. He returned a short time later and the cash was missing. Evidence was collected at the scene and a female suspect was observed putting the money into her purse. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. €Detective Nick Boutwell served a search warrant at a Crawfordville home in connection with a felony retail theft that occurred at WalMart the day before. Benjamin Delaney Millership, 43, of Brattleboro, Vt., was contacted by individuals at the home and requested to return to the residence. Millership was arrested for felony retail theft when Detective Boutwell discovered two of the stolen items at the home. Detective Josh Langston, Captain Randall Taylor, Detective Ryan Muse, Sgt. Andy Curles and Deputy Ian Dohme also took part in the execution of the search warrant. DECEMBER 5 € Alphonso Andrew Williams, 45, of Crawfordville was arrested for failure to register as a sex offender. Williams was required to register during the month of November, but failed to do so. Deputy Stephen Simmons, Detective Josh Langston and Criminal Investigations Analyst Angie Gardner investigated. € Stacy Cody of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of $5,000 worth of jewelry from her home. A suspect has been identi“ ed in the case. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Matthew Jalbert of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered four unauthorized charges which were made to his bank account. The charges were created at Wal-Mart stores and a Whataburger in three different Texas locations. The charges totaled $217. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. € A 17-year-old male was issued a civil citation after Wakulla High School officials discovered that the male student was in possession of marijuana on campus. The marijuana weighed .3 of a gram and the civil citation was issued for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student was issued a notice to appear for possession of marijuana on the school campus. Two baggies of marijuana were discovered on the male student. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. € Marian Smith of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered that someone in Yuma, Ariz., used her bank card without authorization. The transactions were made at a truck stop and totaled $450. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. € Tamara Ingram of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims home and property was shot with a paint ball gun. No damage was reported to the home. A 14-year-old suspect was identi“ ed, but no charges were “ led. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated.DECEMBER 6 € Wal-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Martin Quinn Fretterd, 27, of Crawfordville was reportedly observed taking an electronics item from the store without paying for it. The suspect left the scene without stopping for store of“ cials but was contacted by Lt. Dale Evans at his home. The value of the stolen item is $64. The suspect was also issued a trespass warning for the store. He was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Elisee Colin also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 776 calls for service during the past week including16 residential and business alarms; 58 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 13 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 20 regular E-911 telephone calls; 55 investigations; 36 medical emergencies; 196 residential and business security checks; 15 reports of shots “ red; 27 special details; 42 subpoena services; 13 thefts; 12 traf“ c enforcements; 54 traf“ c stops; 11 reckless vehicles and 14 watch orders.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized three members of the St. Marks Powder (SMP) crew as local heroes Thursday, Nov. 29 after their fast action saved the life of a vendor who was servicing machines at the powder plant. Sheriff Crum presented the two men and one woman plaques thanking them for being heroes in their workplace. The three St. Marks Powder employees were not aware they were going to be recognized until they gathered in one of their buildings in front of their peers who applauded their efforts. On Oct. 30, a vendor was at the plant replenishing goodies in machines when he lost consciousness. Hearing commotion in a break room, Terri Neal, Zan Henry and Stan Harrison investigated and discovered the vendor unresponsive. The team assisted the victim by placing him ” at on the ” oor before administering CPR. The plants emergency alert was activated to report a CPR in progress. Stan and Zan knelt close to the vendors body and began giving chest compressions. Although they had not had a CPR class in many years, they remembered the basic techniques of pushing straight down on the chest using great pressure and repeated motion. CPR was continued until the St. Marks Powder First Responders arrived at the scene and an Automated External De“ brillator (AED) was also used. The vendor regained consciousness prior to being transported to a Tallahassee hospital by Emergency Medical Services for continued medical management. His doctor informed us that not only did CPR/AED save this persons life, but due to the timely response this person did not suffer any heart damage,Ž said Patrick Hutto, Human Resources for St. Marks Powder. We appreciate their efforts and want to recognize these Wakulla County heroes who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to help their fellow man,Ž said Crum. In saving a human life, they have gone well above their regular duties. Thank you for what you did.Ž SMP of“ cials said they have several AED units available around the company property with plans to add more in the future. We had two choices,Ž said Harrison of hearing the commotion in the break room. We could do something or we could do nothing.Ž Harrison, Henry and Neal chose to do something. Heroes recognized at St. Marks PowderSPECIAL TO THE NEWSZan Henry, Stan Harrison, Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum and Terri Neal. YARD SALEFRI & SAT DEC 14 & 15 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!CHRISTMAS HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Send us your holiday photosSend by Dec. 20 to be included in the Christmas issue Email pictures to editor@thewakullanews.net or bring them to e Wakulla News o ce www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 15AWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized Assistant State Attorney Eddie D. Evans with a Distinguished Service Award for contributing to the Florida Sheriffs Association for 25 years. Sheriff Crum made his presentation on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Evans received a certi“ cate for contributing to better law enforcement.Ž Evans is a resident of Sopchoppy and works for State Attorney Willie Meggs in the Tallahassee of“ ce. We appreciate the regular contributions from people like Eddie who care deeply about outstanding law enforcement,Ž said Sheriff Crum. I knew it was a long time but I didnt realize it had been 25 years,Ž said Evans. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEddie Evans and Sheriff Donnie Crum.Prosecutor Eddie Evans receives Distinguished Service AwardBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 5 … With a fierce drought sparking wild“ res across the state, then-Gov. Lawton Chiles took the extraordinary step in 1998 of banning the sale and use of fireworks around the Fourth of July holiday. And Wednesday, Dec. 5, more than 14 years after the smoke cleared, an appeals court snuffed out a “ reworks companys arguments that it should receive more than $1 million from the state because of the ban. The 2nd District Court of Appeal overturned a Hillsborough County circuit court ruling that found Galaxy Fireworks, Inc., should be compensated because the ban amounted to a government takingŽ of property. A three-judge panel said both sides in the case agreed that an executive order issued by Chiles was a valid exercise of the states police power.Ž But in rejecting the arguments of Galaxy and siding with the state, it said the ban did not eliminate the value of the companys property. Appellees (Galaxy) maintained their ownership of their fireworks inventories, had the right to transfer their inventories to an out-of-state location where sales were permitted, and in fact did sell the same inventories after the expiration of the two-week ban on sales, the ruling said. Appellees were not denied the value of their property, only the profits that might have been earned in the state of Florida during that speci“ c time period --pro“ ts that ultimately were realized by the subsequent sale of the assets.Ž In the case, Galaxy argued that it makes about 70 percent of its annual pro“ ts during the Fourth of July holiday season, which follows about two months of preparation. The ruling said Galaxy argued that the ban deprived them of the economic bene“ t of their inventories. This, they argue, was a compensable taking in violation of the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution.Ž The ruling, which came after years of litigation, overturned a circuit-court decision that would have led to Galaxy receiving about $1.1 million. Of that amount, the company would have recouped $1 million in damages, along with interest. Chiless executive order banned the sale and use of “ reworks and sparklers from June 25 through July 9, 1998, amid wildfires that burned hundreds of thousands of acres across Florida and caused evacuations of areas such as Palm Coast in Flagler County. Crews spent weeks trying to corral the “ res, while shielding homes and residents from damage. In the ruling Wednesday, appeals-court judges Charles Davis, Nelly Khouzam and Marva Crenshaw pointed to the dangerous conditions at the time Chiles issued the order. The need for the limitation was the dangerous conditions that temporarily existed in the state at that particular time, they said in the seven-page ruling, written by Davis. Such a temporary limitation on the right to sell required by the widespread dangerous conditions mitigates against this being considered a compensable taking.Ž Also, regardless of the executive order, it said the “ reworks industry is heavily regulated because of potential dangers. Appellees voluntarily invested in their inventories knowing that the regulation of the sale and use of such was subject to change from time to time and from locality to locality, the ruling said. The temporary limitation on the sale of the “ reworks under these facts does not rise to such an interference with investment-backed expectations as to constitute a compensable taking.ŽCourt stamps out reworks rm's case from 98 wild res DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H.BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICE ELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.comCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDSWE NOW ACCEPT We are an approved Medically Supervised Weight Loss ProgramFAMILY PRIMARY CARE URGENT CARE/WALK INS Pulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study DEXA Bone Density Testing Worker’s Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug Screening School/Bus/DOT/Sports PhysicalsCapital HealthPLAN By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 11 … The tough housing market is expected to continue to be a drag on the states tax collections even after the economy begins to pick up in future years, according to forecasters. There were few changes Tuesday in what state economists believe will happen with property values for the coming “ scal year, which begins July 1. Forecasters met and moved the expected growth rate for taxable property values up to 0.83 percent. Thats a few ticks up from 0.75 percent -and both are negligible changes that arent expected to produce much revenue. That number will be used to “ gure out how much counties are likely to pay the state in the required local effortŽ that is distributed as part of the main formula for public school funding. And forecasters also anticipate slow growth in property values over the next two or three years, with things picking up to somewhere around 3 percent a year. The lag is caused by a surge in foreclosure “ lings that have swamped the courts; properties that go into foreclosure now take as much as two and a half years to go from “ ling to the market. Many of the foreclosures that happened as the housing crisis was roiling Florida still arent showing up in the numbers. The worst years are really ahead of us in terms of hitting the marketplace,Ž said Amy Baker, coordinator for the Legislature‘s Of“ ce of Economic and Demographic Research. She suggested during the meeting that foreclosures could still be putting pressure on property tax revenues as late as the 2016-17 budget year. After the meeting, Baker told reporters that more homeowners could also use short sales to try to get rid of homes instead of going through foreclosure. At some point we think short-sales in Florida are going to pick up,Ž she said. They havent yet.Ž Short sales can sometimes drive down the assessed values of homes. But the forecasters also took into account factors that could offset the increase in foreclosures, including new residents moving into the state and the so-far slow recovery. Migration is going to be picking up,Ž said Don Langston, an economist with the House, during the meeting. The demand side is going to be ... notably stronger.ŽForeclosures still a ecting state budget

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Page 16A – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comRecent temperatures notwithstanding, winter is of“ cially eight days away. Dec. 21 is the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in the northern hemisphere which heralds the start of winter. On the winter solstice, the Suns path has reached its southernmost position in the sky. This is a celestial event often missed by 21st century inhabitants who are otherwise occupied with modern distractions. The native flora and fauna do not, for the most part, have these same distractions. Most indigenous plants gradually react to the waning hours of light and the moderating temperatures by sheading leaves and shifting to a dormant state. However, some plants react to this seasonal transference by getting a jumpstart on their competition. Wakulla Countys thistles are one such plant. This is prime time for thistles to start growing and become established for the upcoming spring days. The head start gives the thistles a major advantage for colonizing new ground and pushing out other plants. The lush green leaves are an enticing target for livestock and wildlife which seek every grazing opportunity during winter. Unfortunately, at least for the herbivores, the leaves are covered with sharp, stiff spines which make consumption painful. There are at least nine different species of thistle in Florida which include tall thistle, Lecontes thistle, swamp thistle, Nutalls thistle, purple or yellow thistle, bull thistle, Virginia thistle. They are distinguished by their ” owers color and the general shape of the plant, but several are rare to encounter. All Florida thistles are biennials, with the exception of Lecontes thistle which is a perennial. Biennial plants are those growing from seed in the “ rst year and which produce seeds the second year. There are three distinct life stages pertaining to all native thistles. During the “ rst year the plant will grow as a rosette, a taproot with a cluster of leaves on or near the soil surface. The rosette growth stage occurs primarily during the winter months in Wakulla County. During the second year, a stalk with a bloom bud will elongate from the rosette, which is referred to as bolting. Bolting frequently begins in late January and goes through July, depending on the species and environmental conditions. Once the biennial plant ” owers, it can produce up to 4,000 seeds per plant. The tiny seed are dispersed by wind with the aid of thistledown, a soft feathery material easily transported on the breeze. As the seed are scattered the biennial thistles are dying. Throughout history thistles have used in folk medicine. Roman naturalist, philosopher and military commander Pliny the Elder believed thistle to be a cure for baldness. Other early herbalists considered it a treatment for the plague, vertigo and headaches. The most likely verifiable and legitimate use for thistle in antiquity was as an early warning system. An invading Viking force was attempting a surprise attack on Scotsmen, when one of the barefoot Norsemen stepped on a thistle. The reaction to the sharp spines alerted the Scots who were able to then successfully defend themselves. The appreciative Scots incorporated the thistle in their national crest, where it remains to this day. Contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u” .edu/ to learn more about the areas thistles. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u” edu or at (850) 926-3931.Thistles use winter to push out other plants Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON PHOTOS BY LES HARRISONA thistle bloom. A thistle early bolt. By FEATUREHUB For gardeners, the winter months are made for dreaming … a time for planning, paging through seed catalogs and envisioning the wonders theyll see in the gardening season to come. For them, here are holiday gift ideas to help while away the winter months: € Plant a terrarium: When gardening outdoors isnt an option, give the gift of a tabletop garden. These mini greenhouses offer the perfect glimpse into nature in the middle of winter. Best yet … theyre easy to make; you neednt be a gardener to assemble. Get creative with a large glass container (keep your eyes peeled for them at craft stores and flea markets). Fill with stones, planting medium and plants. Look to the internet for various how-to guides on planting terrariums. € Stuff a stocking: Tis the season to stock up on gardening gifts to make life in the garden even more pleasant. Help keep pesky insects away from busy gardeners with BugBand natural insect repellent wristbands. The colorful plastic DEET-free wristbands contain Geraniol; these vapors form a protective shield around the immediate area, keeping insects a safe distance away. The wristband keeps working, up to 120 hours. Starting at $4.95. Order at www.bugband.net. € Create a backyard focal point: Whether in bloom or dormant, a backyard garden offers the best place to linger and watch the changing landscape of each season. Extend the use of your favorite gardeners favorite place with the Walden Ring Convertible Firepit. Simply stack your own stones in a circle and insert a Walden Ring. Additional inserts are available to transform the ring from “ repit to fountain to garden planter to heated birdbath to table to barbecue. Base ring available online for $595, inserts from $150. Go to www.waldenbackyards. com. € Give a public garden visit. When cabin fever sets in, give your gardener the perfect getaway: a gift certi“ cate, day pass or membership to the nearest public garden, many of which have events and offerings year-round. More than 500 botanic gardens, arboreta, educational gardens, farm gardens, historical landscapes, zoos, museum gardens and other gardens are members of the American Public Gardens Association. To locate one near you, go to www.garden.org/public_gardens/.Gardening gift ideas Ace tools make the perfect gift for the do-it-yourselfer. Theyve been engineered to the highest standards of durability and performance and theyre guaranteed to equal or exceed the quality of the big national brands. So stock their workshop with the tools they can always count on … Ace. Store Hours: Mon-Fri 8-7, Sat 8-6, Sun 10-5 Apply Today! Visit www.acerewardsvisa.com/ar93110 or see your local participating Ace Rewards retailer for more details.The creditor and issuer of the Ace Rewards Platinum Visa Card is U.S. Bank National Association ND.The best tools for saving money. SM FIND US ON: Visit acehardware.com for store services, hours, directions and more... SATURDAY ONLY!20% oLimit 1 per household.Power tools and small appliances qualify for 10% off. Offer valid at Crawfordville Ace Hardware store. See details on right.all regular-priced items December 15,2012 only. Must present coupon to receive offer. Cant be combined with other offers. LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLE! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Ace Home Center / NAPA2709 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 323272158 (850) 926-3141 www.acehardware.com

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012sports news and team views Sports WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENLady War Eagles pass the ball against Rickards last week. War Eagle Markell Rawls prepares to shoot a free throw against Rickards.Lady War Eagles fall to RickardsBASKETBALLWar Eagles fall to Rickards, Florida HighBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Lady War Eagles were outgunned by the Rickards Lady Raiders last week, 59-14. The Lady War Eagles did score “ rst in the game, held Thursday, Dec. 6 in Tallahassee, but the girls trailed at halftime 37-11. A freethrow with 10 seconds left accounted for Wakullas 1 point in the third quarter and the score was 52-12. Top scorers for Wakulla were Ashley Carr with 4 points, including a 3-point shot; and J. Webster with 4 points and 7 rebounds. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles got into a battle on Thursday, Dec. 6, against the Rickards Raiders in Tallahassee, falling by a score of 64-32 in a hard-fought game. The next night, the War Eagles were battling Florida High and fell by a score of 73-66. At Rickards, Wakulla was leading at the end of the “ rst quarter 14-11. But the game started getting away in the second period, with some Wakulla fans questioning some calls. At the half, Rickards was leading 35-23. In the third, Wakulla Coach Sean Crowe was called for a technical after a referee heard him telling his players to use their elbows when making rebounds. At the end of the third, Wakulla trailed 51-28. Top scorers for Wakulla were Zach Nordlof with 15 points, Corion Knight 8, and Malik Thomas, Sheldon Johnson, Caleb Fell, Vonte Ervin and Patrick Harvey each had 2. Continued on Page 3B It’s the holidays and time to wear elastic-waisted pantsPam Chichester, GET FIT Page 2B Staring at the scal cliff, looking back at the electionWEEKLY ROUNDUP Page 2B TH E Complete Medical Care. Here in Wakulla. Now Accepting New Patients Our physicians have been providing comprehensive medical care for the families of Wakulla County for 15 years. Treating the entire family through all stages of life, we provide the medical care that your family needs.€ Infant, child, adult and geriatric care€ Womens healthcare€ Minor surgical procedures€ Diabetes education€ On site lab€ The support of TMH specialists and services SAME DAY Appointments Available Our medical team invites you to call to make your appointment today at (850) 926-7105. 15 Council Moore Road | Crawfordville, FL 32327 TMH Physician PartnersWAKULLA 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t LUNCH PARTNER… R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 • Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive… Deli Deliof the week at FRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS • SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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We all try to be our very best throughout the year … then Halloween rolls around with all that trick-or-treat candy, and from there on it goes on and on through December. It is a constant battle, throughout the holiday season and out comes the elastic-wasted sweats as we can no longer button those skinny jeans. The number one thing that people hate about their body is their bellies. We want the ” at belly or chiseled six-pack absŽ by bikini season. In the United States alone, approximately 60 percent of adults are carrying more belly fat than we want. So what is the best strategy for banishing belly fat? There are an unimaginable number of books and websites to tell you how to do it. Just understand that thousands and thousands of sit ups will not do you any good unless … you drop the weight! Again and again, I see people getting on one of the ab machines to lose their belly, or they are taking a speci“ c shake, or even some weird pill, that guarantees abs. Its just simply not true. There are no magic pills, super-duper ab exercises or special foods that target belly fat. The good news is that with weight loss many people notice they are losing weight in their abdominal region. But be warned, there are numerous factors that affect weight loss such as exercise, genetics, age, metabolism and where your body prefers to deposit fat. You might be one of those individuals who tend to pack it on the belly. People who drink daily, smoke cigarettes, older adult males or postmenopausal woman are at even higher risk. But dont be discouraged; try starting by changing your diet. Eat whole grains and fresh fruit. Stay away from re“ ned foods (white breads). Add exercise and you will actually begin to see your body take shape. We all want beautiful abdominals, but what we really need is a strong core foundation. A strong core will help us to actually do the powerful movements that are needed in abdominal exercises. Here are a few effective exercises for strengthening and “ rming your abdominal muscles and building core stability. These are excellent to incorporate into your daily workout routine: € REVERSE CRUNCH: The reverse crunch works well as a toning, strengthening exercise because you isolate the abdominal muscles. Lie back on the ” oor. Flex your knees. Raise your knees against your head by crunching your abs. Remember to push your lower back against the ” oor on each rep. Keep your knees ” exed, close to your glutes. Knees move towards your head, head doesnt move towards your knees. Keep your head on the ” oor. € OBLIQUE CRUNCH: This is an exercise use to strengthen the oblique muscles of the body to help the individual keep “ t and remain healthy. Lie on your back and cross the left foot over the right knee, hands behind your head. Keeping lower back pressed into the ” oor, lift your shoulder blades off the floor and then curl your upper body diagonally across your body towards your left knee. Switch knees and repeat for 12 to 16 reps on each side. € PLANK EXERCISE: The plank exercise helps strengthen midsection, upper-body and lowerbody muscles along the front of your body. Planks also strengthen inner core muscles that support your joints. Start by lying on the ” oor and rest your body on your forearms with your palms flat on the floor. Shoulders are aligned directly over your elbows and legs are straight behind you with your ankles, knees and thighs touching. In push-up motion, raise your body off the ” oor, supporting your weight on your forearms and your toes. You can rotate your elbows to a 45 degree angle and clasp your palms together in the center. Make sure that your back is ” at and your head, neck and spine are in a straight line. Abdominal muscles engaged, stomach does not drop or hips to rise up. Take slow inhales and exhale steadily. Try to begin with 20 seconds at a time till you get proficient enough to complete a 60 second plank 3 to 5 sets. Start with several (3-5) abdominal exercises 3-5 times a week and repetitions that are comfortable for your “ tness level. As you improve, increase the number of repetitions and variation of exercises. You do not need to do all the exercises. Remember you are more likely to keep up an exercise program if it works well with you. So select exercises that you like and can perform for several weeks and if they do not feel comfortable then try another. Just dont give up. Keep trying and you will find something that will “ t with your lifestyle and needs. MERRY CHRISTMAS and hope your holidays will be full of health and “ tness!Pamela Chichester, CFT is Body-Tek Gym Manager. She can be reached at (850) 926-BFIT. Page 2B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWHS sports schedule:TUESDAY, Dec. 11 € Boys basketball at Godby at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. € Girls basketball at West Gadsden at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. WEDNESDY, Dec. 12 € Girls basketball at Lincoln High School at at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. THURSDAY, Dec. 13 € Boys basketball at East Gadsden High School at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. FRIDAY, Dec. 14 €Girls & Boys basketball in Bainbridge Tournament in Bainbridge, Ga., Boys play at 8 p.m. Girls TBD. € Wrestling at OdoBan Lethal Wrestling Invitation in Perry, Ga., with weigh-in at 2 p.m. SATURDAY, Dec. 14 € Boys basketball in Bainbridge Tournament in Bainbridge, Ga., at 5 p.m. Continued from Page 1B On Friday, the War Eagles hung tough with Florida High but lost. At the end of the “ rst period, Wakulla trailed 22-13. At halftime, the War Eagles went into the locker room down 40-25. In the third, Wakulla dominated on a 20-10 run to close the score to 5 points, 50-45. But the Seminoles outscored Wakulla in the fourth, 23-21 to take the win. Scorers for Wakulla included Sheldon Thomas with 14 points, Zach Nordlof with 12, Corion Knight with 10, Caleb Fell with 8, Bryson Beverly with 5, Markell Rawls with 2 and Malik Thomas with 1. With the two losses, the War Eagles record falls to 2-5 for the season. They were set to play Godby on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at Godby.HEALTH & FITNESSWar Eagles fall to Rickards, Florida High It’s the holidays and time to wear elastic-waisted pants GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER PHOTO BY METRO GRAPHICSOne of the most common requests heard in a yoga class is hip openers today please.Ž This request is usually followed by the other half of the class groaning. We love to hate hip openers yet our bodies crave them and often feel lighter and more open after „ for good reason. The majority of us sit for most of our days, shortening the hip ” exors at the front of the hip (psoas, rectus femoris, sartorius) and tightening the hip rotators (piriformis, obturator internus, gamellus, to name a few). The hip joint itself is a ball-and-socket type joint with the head of the femur (thigh bone) sitting in the acetabulum or socket of the pelvis. A variety of muscles attach into the femur starting from the pelvis itself, the lumbar spine, the sacrum, or other parts of the femur. In general when we stretch or open a muscle we are lengthening its position, moving the two attachment points away from each other. This is easy to assess with linear muscles like the psoas which attaches from the front of the lumbar spine, crosses through the pelvis and attaches to the head of the femur. If we flex the hip forward we are shortening the psoas, bringing the two attachments of the muscle closer together. If we extend the hip backwards (such as in the back leg of Pigeon pose) we are opening and lengthening the psoas. The effect becomes greater in King Pigeon pose if we assume an upright posture with our spine so that we lengthen the upper attachment more. In this example we can also rethink our de“ nition of hip openers. Suddenly, poses with a bent knee where we rotate the hip are not the only way to open our hips. If the psoas attaches into the femur, and a shortened psoas tightens our hip (not to mention the affect it has on our low back) then poses like Warrior / Virabhadrasana or Half Moon / Ardha Chandrasana become hip openers too. The rule of how to open a muscle becomes less clear with the hip rotators where the angle of the joint actually affects the action of the muscle. For example, the piriformis muscle attaches from the front of the sacrum to the back of the femur. It acts as an external or outward rotator of the hip. Except if the hip is ” exed, then it assists in abduction or sideways movement of the hip. So to follow the rule of opening we would want to internally rotate the femur, flex the hip and adduct or bring the femur towards midline. This can be achieved with the top leg in Marichyasana (sit with your left leg extended, bend your right knee and step the foot across your left thigh so that the femur is ” exed, adducted toward midline, and gently internally rotated.) Other hip openers dont seem to follow the rule of opening. We often externally rotate the hip to stretch the external rotators of the hip. Huh? The reason this works is because we typically ” ex the hip at the same time. To understand how hip openers work we have to picture the position of the muscle. Lets picture the obturator internus muscle, a close friend of piriformis. It attaches from our sitting bone or ischial tuberosity to the greater trochanter of the femur, a bony outcropping on the side of the hip. Our ischial tuberosities can be felt when sitting, they are the bony bits under the flesh of our buttocks. Our greater trochanter can be felt by “ rst “ nding the top of our pelvis by placing our hands at our waist, “ rmly pressing in and down until we feel a ledge. This is our iliac crest. Slide your hands down and with your thumb you will feel a bony prominence that is the femur. You can feel it move by slowing rotating the hip in and out. So now we can feel the attachment points for the obturator internus, between the ischial tuberosity or sitting bone, and our femur. From this observation we can see that in a neutral position the muscle wraps around the hip. So if were to flex the hip, the ischial tuberosity scoops under thus increasing the space between the two attachment points and increasing the wrapping distance of the muscle … hence lengthening the muscle. This is why a simple squat (using the term simple lightly) can stretch our hip rotators and can be one of the reasons Westerners “ nd it so challenging to achieve. Since there are many muscles in the hip with many functions depending on the demands we place on our body, keeping these muscles supple can help us in ways that may not seem obvious at “ rst. Traditional yogic thought attributes many healing properties to hip openers from organ issues to sexual dysfunction. So if you are one of the groaners when hip openers are suggested, perhaps pause to wonder if they could be helping you in ways you werent even aware.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher who teaches at Studio 88 in Crawfordville. She can be reached at 228-380-0140 or Focusyoga@yahoo.com.Hip openers – what really happens YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Become a volunteer with Florida’s Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. The Ombudsman Program is a statewide advocacy organiza on seeking to ensure the health, safety, welfare and rights of Florida’s elders who reside in nursing homes, assisted living facili es and adult family care homes. Bene ts of volunteering with us include: Meet and interact with others who share a passion for volunteering, personal ful llment and growth. Give back to the community and seek to make a posi ve di erence in the lives of long-term care facility residents. Receive mileage reimbursement as well as support from state and local sta Apply today! To learn more call 1-888-831-0404 or visit ombudsman.m orida.com online. CLIP & CALL! 866-938-5968 www.StudyForArthritis.comCompensation up to $50.00 per visit No-cost study-related care and study medications for up to 42 months. No health insurance or referrals are required.Local doctors need volunteers for a research study comparing FDA-approved arthritis medications. DO YOU SUFFER FROM ARTHRITIS? Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Dec. 13  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Dec. 14  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.  GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresa’s Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.  PICKIN’ ‘N’ GRINNIN’ JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays)  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Dec. 15  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321.  SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 9621010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Dec. 16  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Dec. 17  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m.  YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Dec. 18  ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BUNCH meets in the children’s room at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness.  VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m.  CRAWFORDVILLE LION’S CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jean’s Restaurant.  SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. This month’s feature will be the Chapter’s traditional wreathmaking party. Grapevine wreath blanks and a variety of other native-plant materials will be provided for all attending. Participants who have their own hobby glue guns should bring them. The public is cordially invited. Social time, with holiday refreshments for all, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Dec. 19  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m.  BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m.  KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684.  LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m.  NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information.  BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials.  KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Dec. 20  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Women’s Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103.  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information.  COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Posey’s Steam Room in Panacea.  FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce.  ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon.  WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville.  NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge.  WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will be having their annual Christmas dinner at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. This event is open to men and women, regardless of the type of cancer, bring spouses, caregivers and friends. Call 926-6050 for details.Special EventsThursday, Dec. 13  WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 6 p.m. at Angelo’s. All Democrats are invited for a festive look back at 2012. A cocktail “hour” will precede the dinner program. The menu will be a la carte ordering with no ticket required. The dinner program will start at 7 p.m. The executive committee elections are scheduled at 6 p.m. Only those precinct representatives elected are eligible to vote. For more information, visit www.wakullademocrats.org/. Friday, Dec. 14  CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Smokin Vapor Wakulla will be held at 11:30 a.m. at 1626 D Crawfordville Highway.  CELTIC CHRISTMAS CONCERT will be held at Posh Java at 8 p.m. The string trio, Terra, will perform Celtic and traditional Christmas music. Terra is made up of award-winning ddle player, Aisha Ivey, Alex Shor on cello, and Steve Hodges on mandolin, bouzouki, and guitar. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Saturday, Dec. 15  HOLIDAY SILENT AUCTION AND BOOK SIGNING will be held by the Florida Wild Mammal Association and Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Tallahassee Elks Lodge located at 276 N. Magnolia Drive. Nature writer and photographer John B. Spohrer, Jr. will sign copies of his book, “The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay,” with part of the proceeds going to Goosecreek and FWMA. There will also be a cash bar and raf e. For more information, go to www.wakullawildlife.org or www.goosecreekwildlifesanctuary.org.  PERSONAL PROTECTION AND FIREARMS SAFETY COURSE will be held from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriff’s Of ce Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676.  COMMUNITY FUN DAY will be held by the Wakulla Moose Lodge to celebrate their Founders Day. The public is invited. There will be children’s activities. The Ochlockonee Volunteer Fire Department will be on site to give re truck demonstrations, the sheriff’s of ce will provide child identi cation kits, a guest speaker will talk about safe internet sur ng and the Southeastern Blood Bank will have a mobile on site for blood donations. Adults making a donation will receive a free hot dog lunch. Children eat for free. Santa will also be there. There will be a large indoor yard sale. The Lodge is located at 44 Jer-Be-Lou Boulevard in Panacea. For questions, call 984-2510.  CHRISTMAS BOAT PARADE will be held by the St. Mark’s Yacht Club between 6 and 6:30 p.m. It can be viewed from Riverside Cafe and near the Old Fort.  CIVIL WAR ERA CHRISTMAS will be held at the Tallahassee Museum from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Ladies Soldier’s Friend Sewing Society of Tallahassee will present the celebrations and traditions of Christmas in the South in the1860s. Food and decorations of the season will be featured by ladies and gentlemen attired in clothing representing that period of history at Bellevue. For more information, call Karen Kugell, 860-562-9985. Tuesday, Dec. 18  WAKULLA COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will hold its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. for dinner and conversation, 7 p.m. for the executive committee meeting, at Deal’s Oyster House in St. Marks. This month, the meeting will be centered around organizing and electing of cers for the executive board for the coming term. Only those precinct Committeemen and Committeewomen who led a candidacy form and turned in a loyalty oath will be eligible to vote or be elected to of ce. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Dec. 13  WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway.  ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Dec. 17  WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorThe only thing you absolutely have to know is the location of the library.Ž -Albert Einstein Each year as part of our State Aid to Libraries application process, I have to submit a statistical report by Dec. 1 to the State Library. This report shows in black and white, veri“ able facts, how the library is used by the community. Some numbers, which may interest you, are the fact that we have nearly 12,000 card holders from every section of the county, who over the past year have checked out more than 83,000 items during their more than 50,000 visits to the library. Thats an average of more than 250 people coming through our doors a day when were open! We had over 750 meetings and children/family programs here with a total attendance of over 15,000 people. Nearly half of that was due to our year round programs for infants and pre-schoolers, and our Summer Program for all children in the community. Showing that were so much more than a place where people can read magazines and books for free is the fact that there were nearly 16,000 uses of our 12 public computers over the past year. Weve also been proud to provide more than 700 hours of free computer classes which 3,200 people took advantage of. In addition to all this, over the past year we were able to assist the students of Wakulla County with their summer reading by providing multiple copies of the required books, as well as meeting their needs year around with a childrens and young adult collection that we consider second to none, and which accounted for more than 21,000 checkouts. We are also happy to be able to assist our hard working colleagues at the school libraries in the county by providing access to materials after school hours, on Saturdays and during the summer to the youth of the community. This year we also began offering e-book checkout services to those with mobile devices, and partnered with Rotary of Wakulla County to provide dictionaries to every third grader in the county. We are very proud to offer a wide range of needed services to the great citizens of Wakulla County and fully realize that we cant do all this without your support. Your generous support raised more than $14,000 for the Friends of the Library this year, a group who continues to lessen the burden on Wakulla taxpayers by funding our Summer Program for Children, as well as other library expenses. Not everyone can afford to drive to Barnes & Noble in Tallahassee or has the capability to order books, movies, etc. online or has a computer period to apply for jobs, government assistance or to do research for school in this rapidly technologically oriented world. We provide a safe place for the entire family to come to learn and to be entertained and for citizens to stay involved in their community and will do our level best to continue to do so. Please feel free to not take my word for it and come by to see all that we have to offer. In closing, the library staff and I wish everyone a safe and happy holiday season and hope to see many of you come in over the next year!! Ringling Brothers comes to the library! Mark your calendars for the afternoon of Friday, Dec. 14, as a laughter ambassador from the Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus will be at the library at 4:30 p.m. for a fun-“ lled reading of Dr. Suess If I Ran the Circus.Ž Please come out and kick off the weekend by welcoming the world wide famous circus to the library. The show begins at 4:30 p.m., so please bring out the whole family! Holiday Hours The library will be closed on Tuesday, Dec. 25 for Christmas Day and Tuesday, Jan. 1 for New Years Day. Materials may be turned into the Book Drop in the front parking lot.Library News... Holiday Silent Auction and book signing at Tallahassee Elk Lodge from 1 to 5 p.m. Community Fun Day at Wakulla Moose Lodge. Christmas Boat Parade in St. Marks between 6 and 6:30 p.m. Firearms Safety Course at Sheriff’s Of ce Range from 8 a.m to 4 p.m. SaturdaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday W e e k Week i n inW a k u l l a akulla W a k u l l a akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Join the string trio, Terra, for a Celtic Christmas Concert at Posh Java in Sopchoppy on Friday at 8 p.m.

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Page 4B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com F L O R I D A S T A T E S E M I N O L E S FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators F L O R I D A g a t o r s FLORIDA gators T h e W e e k e n d S l a t e The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL #3 Florida vs. #21 Louisvilleat Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans, LA Wednesday, Jan. 2 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. DISCOVER ORANGE BOWL #13 Florida State vs. #15 Northern Illinois at Sun Life Stadium, Miami Gardens, FL Tuesday, Jan. 1 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excitedtoo! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! FSU’s Fisher: NIU belongs in Orange BowlBy TIM LINAFELTOSCEOLAJimbo Fisher isnt buying any of the talk that Northern Illinois doesnt deserve its spot in the Orange Bowl. As far as Fisher is concerned, NIU is a worthy opponent that deserves to be precisely where it is … paired with Florida State Seminoles in a contest to be played Jan. 1 at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens. By virtue of “ nishing 15th in the “ nal Bowl Championship Series standings … ahead of Big East champ Louisville … the Huskies automatically qualified for a berth in a BCS game. But that didnt stop a panel of ESPN analysts from debating whether NIU, which “ nished 11-1 and champion of the Mid-American Conference, belonged on college footballs premier stage. Fisher, though, didnt have any such questions. You dont get in this game unless youre a good football team,Ž said Fisher, just a day removed from winning his “ rst conference title at FSU. Its easy for talking heads to say that (NIU doesnt belong). Theyve earned the right to be here, theyve earned the right to have this opportunity.Ž Florida State will have some proving of its own to do, too. The Seminoles (11-2) claimed their “ rst Atlantic Coast Conference title since 2005 on Saturday, but struggled to put away a middling Georgia Tech team that “ nished 6-7 and is only in a bowl thanks to an NCAA waiver. The Seminoles can follow up that title by winning their “ rst BCS bowl and achieving their “ rst 12-win season since beating Virginia Tech in the 2000 Sugar Bowl for their second national championship. To do that, FSU will have to slow down an NIU offense that ranks ninth in the country in rushing, 15th in total offense and scores more than 40 points per game. Huskies QB Jordan Lynch has accounted for 43 touchdowns (24 passing, 19 rushing) and has amassed 2,962 passing yards to go along with an additional 1,771 yards on the ground. We know were going to get an inspired opponent, an opponent thats going to be ready to prove something,Ž Fisher said. But more importantly, were going to play a very good opponent.Ž Both schools will have new-look coaching staffs come New Years Day … NIU just promoted offensive line coach Rod Carey to head coach following Dave Doerens departure to North Carolina State. FSU, meanwhile, still has yet to determine who will coach its defense after coordinator Mark Stoops accepted Kentuckys head coaching position. A reporter asked Carey what hed have thought had he been told at the beginning of the year that hed make his head coaching debut in the Orange Bowl. I wouldnt have believed you,Ž Carey said. Its been crazy, but things happen for a reason.Ž Jimbo Fisher says Northern Illinois is a worthy opponent. Huskies quarterback Jordan Lynch leads an offense ranked ninth in rushing.Expecting coaching continuity for GatorsTHOMAS GOLDKAMPGATOR BAIT STAFF WRITERIf Floridas defense this year is any indication, continuity on the coaching staff might be one of the single most important factors in a teams growth. The Gators have had more than their share of coaching changes over the past “ ve years, particularly on offense. Four different offensive coordinators have rolled through Gainesville, with only Steve Addazio holding the post for more than a year since 2008. Even now, theres the possibility Florida could lose offensive coordinator Brent Pease, should a handful of job opportunities pop up. Pease is on the head coaching short list for a few jobs, though he seems content in Gainesville at the moment. In any case, second-year coach Will Muschamp has contingency plans in place if any of his staff members are approached about an opportunity to move up. I always tell our staff this: If you have an opportunity for a promotion, if youre a position coach and you can go be a coordinator, if youre a coordinator and you can go be a head coach, Ill support you 1,000 percent,Ž he said. That says what kind of job were doing here at Florida.Ž Floridas coaches are up for a few awards, led by defensive coordinator Dan Quinn. Quinn was named one of “ ve “ nalists for the Broyles Award, given annually to the nations top coordinator. Muschamp said he would support any moves up the coaching ladder by his staff. Lateral moves? Not so much. Guys that want to make parallel moves and theyre always looking for the next job, they dont need to be here anyway,Ž he said. Well go “ nd a good coach. Theres a bunch of people that want to coach here. Theres a long list at my desk.Ž While the next few weeks could be little tense for Florida fans hoping to hold on to what seems to be a pretty solid core of assistants, Muschamp is con“ dent the Gators can reload with quality assistants if necessary. This is a great place to work and weve got a good, young football team,Ž he said, and were going to be good for a long time, OK?Ž Muschamp does not expect any other staff changes other than receivers coach, a position he is looking to “ ll after Aubrey Hill resigned before the 2012 season began and graduate assistant Bush Hamdan was elevated to the job on an interim basis. Injury Updates Linebacker Jelani Jenkins suffered a broken bone in his right foot and will miss the bowl game after undergoing surgery on Monday morning. True freshman linebacker Antonio Morrison is expected to replace him in the starting lineup. Backup offensive lineman Ian Silberman (shoulder) and safety DeAnte Saunders (knee) will both miss the bowl game due to injuries. Linebacker Neiron Ball, who has missed the past two games after suffering an ankle injury on the opening kickoff against Louisiana, is expected back for the bowl game. Quarterback Jeff Driskel and center Jon Harrison are both nursing ankle injuries and are currently wearing walking boots, but both are expected to play in the bowl game. Saban Silliness On an SEC Championship Game teleconference call, Alabama coach Nick Saban made it clear hes not thrilled about the possibility of the Gators going to a BCS bowl despite not winning the East Division. Florida, at 11-1, is almost certain to play in the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans ahead of the loser of Saturdays SEC title game between Alabama and Georgia, and Saban wasnt happy about it. Its not really a great scenario,Ž he said. You play your way into the championship game, which means youre the best team in your division. It doesnt seem quite right. I dont feel good about it for our football team or their football team.Ž Of course, Sabans memory is short, matching his stature, since Alabama did virtually the same thing just last season by “ nishing runner-up to SEC champ LSU in the SEC West and then playing in the national title game. In typical Muschamp fashion, Floridas coach responded with a funny line when asked about Sabans comments Monday. Well, I can switch and go to Atlanta if he doesnt want to go to Atlanta and play the Dawgs,Ž he chimed. Be careful what you ask for, Nick.Ž Freshman linebacker Antonio Morrison delivers this crushing hit on FSU quarterback EJ Manuel that turned the game.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 5B YOUR AD HERE Ally Begin Blown Bought Break Chores Courts Cowboys Cubs Dads Departments Drop Ease Equated Erase Eyes Fans Fried Gain Germ Glory Glow Gone Grew Grin Hour Idea Into Ironed Lame Learn Near Neighborhood Nice This page sponsored in part by: Pace Pass Pebbles Port Rate Removed Sang Seize Shift Snack Sweater Text Thus Tide Tied Urge Wash

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Page 6B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 7, … Gov. Rick Scott bid hasta la vista to Colombia and to the head of the Department of Economic Opportunity this week as state lawmakers held a meet and greet of their own in preparation for the 2013 legislative session. During a series of introductory committee sessions, lawmakers heard from a host of state agencies and a rabble of Tea Partiers who shouted down lawmakers in what was later characterized as a overzealous, and ill-mannered, exhibition of patriotic exuberance. Meanwhile, state education of“ cials described as painfulŽ the “ rst statewide teacher assessment, the rollout of which was marred by some math errors. When corrected, the evaluation found 96.5 percent of teachers were rated ef“ cient or higher, harking back to the mythical Minnesota hamlet of Lake Wobegon, where all the children are above average. SESSION GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER CYCLE Lawmakers officially rolled up their sleeves this week as they returned to Tallahassee to begin work for the 2013 session. Though much of the work was introductory, some committees made it clear what their priorities will be between now and May. Property insurance issues and tort reform will be among the hotly contested issues in the coming months, with Citizens Property Insurance Corp. officials expected to be under the microscope as lawmakers look for ways to depopulate the state-backed insurer. Floridas top insurance of“ cial Kevin McCarty was given a January deadline to come up with a series of proposals to reduce the size of Citizens and to further reduce costs in the states auto-insurance market. On the health care front, lawmakers will begin looking at how the state will implement the sweeping federal health care program, commonly known as ObamaCare, following November elections that determined that overturning the controversial initiative isnt in the cards for at least the next four years. ELECTION REVISITED Of“ cials have been wondering … again … since the early morning hours of Nov. 7 just why Florida cant ever seem to fully run a problemfree election. This time, it was particularly long lines at Election Day voting sites in a few South Florida counties … and difficulty determining the final results, an embarrassment that left Florida in the uncountedŽ column long after President Obamas re-election was reassured by the count in the rest of the nation. Some again brought out the jokes … why did Florida move its primary election so early? So it would have a winner by the general election. But mostly of“ cials this week just wanted to know how to make the states voting process work like it seems to most everywhere else. State elections of“ cials went before a couple legislative committees this week and began explaining how it all works … or doesnt. State elections of“ cials said theyll visit several counties next week to talk to local supervisors as the fact-“ nding truly gets under way. WHO IS FISCAL CLIFF? WHATS HIS PROBLEM? The “ rst positive indications about Floridas budget in many years now might be in trouble. After years of cuts, the coming “ scal year had been shaping up to look pretty good … with it appearing that lawmakers would at least start the year in the black. Wait a minute, though. Legislators heard this week that the good news could be overtaken by events if the Florida Supreme Court strikes down changes to the state pension, or the nation plunges over the “ scal cliff. Speaking to the first meeting of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Amy Baker -coordinator of the Legislatures Of“ ce of Economic and Demographic Research … said the “ scal cliff talks loom large. If Republicans and Democrats in Washington cant hash out a deal to avoid major automatic budget cuts, the resulting economic damage could wipe out Floridas good news budget plans. Also at issue is a looming decision in the challenge to a 2011 law that required employees to contribute 3 percent of their income to their retirement funds, along with other changes. It could cost the state around $2 billion if the Supreme Court strikes down the law. DEO CHIEF STEPS DOWN, SCOTT APPOINTS SUCCESSOR Hunting Deutsch, who until Tuesday was the head of Scotts job creating engine, the Department of Economic Opportunity, is again on the job hunt after resigning the post amid growing scrutiny of his own unemployment history. Because he resigned, the former bank manager wont be eligible to collect unemployment bene“ ts, which he received for nearly two years between 2009 and 2011 after he was downsized as part of a bank merger. Deutsch, who also received an undisclosed severance package from his former employer, collected 91 weeks of unemployment compensation during a period of joblessness that included a stint of European travel. First reported by the Florida Current, Deutsch said the experience of not having a job made him more empathetic of the hundreds of thousands of Floridians who were also looking for work as the states jobless rate languished in double digits. Hunt did the right thing by resigning from DEO,Ž Scott said in a statement issued by his of“ ce. It is important that nothing interfere with our mission to create more jobs and opportunities for Florida families.Ž Two days later, Scott appointed his General Counsel, Jesse Panuccio, to take over the agency that has seen three executive directors in 14 months. COURTS: TAJ MAHALŽ AND PRIVATE PRISONS ADDRESSED The courts again supplied news for the week, with a handful of cases that have been closely watched in the capital city. State agencies battling with local businesses agreed to a $500,000 settlement for artwork sold for the First District Court of Appeal building in Tallahassee. The out-of-court settlement included about $190,000 in attorney fees to be paid by the state. The opulent structure has brought about the downfall of at least one appellate judge, who resigned after a series of disclosures over lavish furnishings, expensive artwork and other accoutrements Meanwhile, a circuit judge in Tallahassee ruled that the Legislative Budget Commission could not on its own privatize health care services in most of the states correctional institutions. The ruling by Circuit Judge John Cooper allows the Department of Corrections to privatize health-care services in a region covering roughly the bottom third of the state; that contract was speci“ cally included in the “ ne print of the budget for the spending year that ends June 30. But Cooper said that the other three regions of the state couldnt be privatized by the LBC, which voted in September to approve the broader initiative, that only the full Legislature could make such broad policy decisions. GENTING SAYS NO TO PUBLIC VOTE, WILL WAIT ON GAMBLING Florida voters will not be asked to weigh in on a statewide gambling initiative after the primary backer of the proposed constitutional amendment decided to see what lawmakers come up with instead. Genting executives this week disclosed that they will await action by the Legislature before determining their next step in efforts to develop resort gambling megaprojects in the state. Legislative leaders have said they dont expect an extensive gambling battle this year. Instead, lawmakers are expected to conduct an extended study of the issue, a review that could include public hearings around the state and other fact-“ nding activities. Earlier this year, the Malaysia-based Genting Group created a group that hired petition gatherers and attorneys with expertise in getting constitutional amendments onto the ballot … essentially signaling a possible intent to circumvent the Legislature on the issue. But Genting of“ cials let legislative leaders know this week that the company will hold its cards for now. TEACHER EVALUATIONS PAINFULŽ The Florida Department of Educations interim commissioner this week told lawmakers its been a painful year as the state initiates a new teacher evaluation system that appears to have its share of problems. On Tuesday, the department posted teacher evaluations from across the state only to withdraw them shortly afterward due to errors in the data. DOE Interim Commissioner Pam Stewart appeared Thursday before lawmakers following the release of the corrected data for the 2011-12 school year, which showed that only3.5 percent of Florida teachers were not satisfactorily doing their jobs. I think this is a painful year,Ž Stewart said at a meeting of the Senate Education Appropriations Subcommittee. I think any time you implement something this large for the “ rst time, there are growing pains. I think that the 12-13 year will be much more telling, and how we do as we move forward.Ž BILLS BEING FILED With lawmakers back in town, a number of bills were “ led in both chambers as lawmakers gear up for the 2013 session now less than four months away. Measures to provide instate tuition to the resident children of undocumented immigrants (HB 11) and create a no-drone-zone (SB 92) in Florida … banning unmanned aerial aircraft ” own by police … were among the bills “ led this week. STORY OF THE WEEK: Lawmakers return to begin gearing up for 2013 session. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Well, they probably didnt want someone on there who was going to speak up and bang their “ st on the table when they see something wrong thats not in the best interest of the consumer, the ratepayer.Ž Rep. Mike Fasano, speculating this week on why he may have been left off the House Insurance CommitteeSTATE GOVERNMENT WEEKLY ROUNDUP … (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Staring at the scal cliff, looking back at the electionTALLAHASSEE … Sen. William J. BillŽ Montford, D-Tallahassee, has been tapped for key leadership roles for the 2013 Legislative Session. This move by Senate President Don Gaetz clearly demonstrates his commitment to bipartisanship in the Florida Senate. I am very pleased with, and appreciative of, the committee assignments that Senator Gaetz has entrusted to me,Ž said Sen.Montford. I am particularly proud to have been tapped as Chairman of the Agriculture Committee and Vice Chairman of two K-20 Committees, and I am humbled by Senator Gaetz con“ dence in me.Ž Montford was also selected by the Senate Democratic Leader as Policy Chair for the Senate Democratic Caucus and was appointed to the following committees for the 2013 Legislative Session: Agriculture, Chair K-20 Appropriations, Vice Chair K-20 Substitute, Vice Chair Appropriations Banking & Insurance Gaming Government Operations Health & Human Services Appropriations and Rules. Many of the counties I represent are rural and farming counties, so my appointment as Agriculture Chairman is of great importance to me due to the direct impact this industry has on so many of my constituents, as well as our state,Ž said Montford. And as a former school superintendent, principal and math teacher, I am very excited to be serving on two key K-20 committees that signi“ cantly impact the education of our youth, which is pivotal to the economic vitality of our state.Ž Montford was recently reelected to his second term in November representing District 3 which includes 11 north Florida counties. Besides Wakulla, Montford also represents Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, and Taylor counties. Montford currently serves as the Chief Executive Of“ cer for the Florida Association of District School Superintendents. WASHINGTON, D.C. … Congressman Steve Southerland applauded Gov. Rick Scotts announcement that the State of Florida has received approval for a $2.7 million National Emergency Grant (NEG) through the U.S. Department of Labor providing temporary employment for the Franklin County oystermen and “ shermen devastated by the impact of Tropical Storm Debby. North Floridas oyster harvesters have experienced incredible economic hardship due to natural conditions that are far beyond their control,Ž Southerland said. Apalachicola Bays oystermen and fishermen are a rich part of our Florida heritage, and this desperately-needed disaster aid will go a long way in restoring our coastal economies and keeping these hardworking families on the water and in business,Ž Southerland said. National Emergency Grants provide funding for a temporary expansion of training and employment programs at the state and local level in response to unforeseen economic events and natural disasters. Southerland joined Florida Sens. Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson and Florida Reps. Jeff Miller and Richard Nugent last September in authoring a letter to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce requesting a “ shery disaster declaration for Apalachicola Bays oyster harvesters.By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 4 … A judge struck down a decision by the Legislative Budget Commission to privatize health-care at prisons across most of the state, one of the “ rst times a court has weighed in on the power of the 14-member panel. The ruling, issued Tuesday, allows the Department of Corrections to privatize health-care services in a region covering roughly the bottom third of the state; that contract was speci“ cally included in the “ ne print of the budget for the spending year that ends June 30. But Leon County Circuit Court Judge John Cooper said that the other three regions couldnt be privatized by the LBC, which voted in September to approve the broader initiative. Whether to privatize some or all of this states prison operations is a signi“ cant policy decision,Ž Cooper wrote. Under existing law, the Legislature weighs in on this policy decision through its appropriations power. ... Authorizing and funding privatizing health services in Floridas prisons is the prerogative of the full Legislature and not that of the Legislative Budget Commission.Ž Coopers opinion marks a victory for two unions -the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Florida Nurses Association -that challenged the LBCs decision and the privatization initiative more broadly. Though Cooper sided with the state on the authority to hand over health-care services to private companies, his ruling on the LBC action would require new legislative action unless his decision is overturned on appeal. We believe that this decision will bring that issue back into the sunshine where it belongs,Ž said Alma Gonzalez, special counsel for AFSCME Council 79. But because of the relative lack of case law in the area, a ruling from an appeals court or the Supreme Court could have broad rami“ cations on just how far the authority of the LBC extends. This is a precedent-setting decision,Ž Gonzalez said. She said the union was still advising employees to keep their options open in case the services are eventually awarded to Corizon, Inc. The union expects the state to appeal. Requests for comments from the Department of Corrections were not immediately returned. UPDATE: The Florida Department of Corrections has moved forward quickly with an appeal of a circuit judges ruling last week that blocked a plan to privatize prison health services in the central and northern parts of the state. The 1st District Court of Appeal received the departments notice of appeal Thursday, two days after Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper ruled that the Legislative Budget Commission overstepped its authority by approving the privatization plan, according to an online court docket. The appeal is not a surprise … the department said it would challenge Coopers ruling. Judge: LBC can’t privatize all prison health careMontford gets leadership roles Southerland applauds disaster assistance for local oystermenProsecutors will appeal a Leon County judge’s decision rejecting an attempt to subpoena a Florida TimesUnion reporter in a criminal case against one of Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll’s aides, the Times-Union reported Tuesday. Circuit Court Judge Frank Sheffield quashed the subpoena last month, saying prosecutors hadn’t proven that the information they want from Matt Dixon, the paper’s Tallahassee reporter, can’t be obtained from other sources. Under a limited privilege granted to journalists, prosecutors are supposed to show that there are no other avenues for gathering evidence before they subpoena reporters. Carletha Cole has been charged with illegally sharing with Dixon a recording of a conversation with Carroll’s chief of staff.State appealing decision on reporter’s testimony

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 7B Did you know?When you shop with local merchants more of your money stays closer to home; suppor ng your local parks, recrea on centers, libraries and other things that make this community a great place to live. Shopping local can s mulate and help restore a poor economy!Local ownership means that important decisions are made locally by people who live in the community and who will feel the impacts of those decisions. Your dollars spent in locally owned businesses have three times the impact on your community as dollars spent at national chains. When shopping locally, you simultaneously create jobs, fund more services through sales tax, invest in neighborhood improvement and promote community development.Locally owned businesses create more jobs locally and, in some sectors, provide better wages and bene ts Locally owned businesses build strong neighborhoods by giving back to the community, linking neighbors, and by contributing more to local causes.Shop local and keep your local dollars circulating in your home town! P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC L P A ALL Y P N.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re Re R R R R R s s si sid id ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youŽMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIE’S C OVEC ARRIE’S C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS AT Toys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Vera Bradley ~ ~ Dot’s Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 • Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subway 27 EŽ AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certi“cates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDo’sColor • Perms • HighlightsFacial Waxings • Specialty Cuts • Flat TopsMirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce T H 1616-D North Pointe Center Crawfordville C hristmas D ress SALE 15-40% OFFChristmas HoursMon-Sat 10-7 850926-4222

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Page 8B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce OPEN Mon.Sat. 8-6(850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 IF WE DON’T HAVE IT… WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSBAIT SHOP(850) 926-1162Mon. Sat. 6-6 • Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart• Oyster Knives • Gloves • Hand Held VHF Radios • Rubber Boots • Cast Nets • Gift Certi cates• Create A Basket or Bucket for ALL Your Outdoor Fun! HUNTING H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N T T T I I N N G G G G BOOTS Field Blazer Muck Boots 850745-8414 850 745-8414 HAIR SALON Merry Christmas, Happy New Year& Thank You for Another Great Year!DOREEN AND NIKKI AT 3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) Holiday Craft Bazaar Saturday, December 8 at the CRAWFORDVILLE WOMAN’S CLUBSecond annual holiday bazaar hosted by the Crawfordville Womans Club at the clubhouse located at 64 Ochlockonee Street behind Hudson Park.Numerous vendors will display their wares in indoor comfort. Friday night, December 7 Sneak Preview Tickets are being sold to take a sneak preview to Saturdays event and enjoy delicious hors doeuvres and a wine tasting.9 a.m. 3 p.m. FREE and open to the publicA portion of the proceeds from the bazaar will go to the Crawfordville Womans Club scholarship fund and other civic projects. 294-6482 Tickets to the Friday night preview are $10 each for more info please call 850-274-8000 Modern Communications Modern Communications NEXT TO EL JALISCOS2481 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.CRAWFORDVILLE UNLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PER MO.DATA CHARGES MAY APPLY NATIONWIDE PRE-PAID UNLIMITED TALK UNLIMITED TEXT Over 3000 rods & reels in stock Drawings for Prizes to be held weeklyƒ stop in and register. (NO PURCHASE NECESSARY) 850-984-5501 1321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida full line of & GIFT CARD GIFT CARD850-984-55011321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida Mens CALCUTTA Neoprene Stocking Foot/Chest Waders $6995Sale Reg. 89.99 $4995Sale Reg. 74.99 12 1/2Ž x 7Ž x 21Ž 14Ž x 9 1/2Ž x 27Ž / / 2 2 2 x x 2 2 7 7 7 7 7 7 14 14 x x 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 1/ 1/ / / / / 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 $5995Sale Reg. 89.99 16Ž x 10 1/2Ž x 30Ž $6795Sale Reg. 99.99 CALCUTTA Dry Bags Razor Sharp Stainless Steel Knife Kit $29995Sale Reg. 319.99 Bayou Classic 4 gal. Fryer Stainless Steel $1995 Sale SAVE $40 Reg. 59.99 We have the Best Prices on Live and Frozen Bait Around! LYs (menhaden) 5lb box $3.95 Everyday. We stock Coolers! While supplies last receive a Free 125 yard spool of 15 or 20lb test Spider Wire Invisi-braid ( $21.00 value ) with purchase of a Penn reel or Penn combo. Also enter to win a FREE 125 yard spool of 15 or 20lb Spider Wire Invisi-braid. There will be one name drawn every day. As always free spooling with purchase of any line. YETI COOLERS & “Re-Store”Shadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat.  9 a.m. 5 p.m. Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 9BFOOD & ENTERTAINING -Janet By JO MARSHALL Contributor, Relish magazineFrom la braise, a French term for glowing coals heaped around a closed cooking vessel, braise is a slow, moist cooking method used primarily for meats and vegetables. English cooks focused on the cooking vessel itself and came up with the less romantic term pot roast.Ž In simple terms, braising takes the following steps: 1) Brown meat in a little oil. 2) Moisten with liquid, often stock and an acidic element such as wine. 3) Cover tightly and cook at low heat „ often 325F or less „ until meat is fork tender. Roasting was for the wealthy who could afford to fatten the calf.Ž Braising was the peasants way to coax succulence from older, muscular animals, which were tough but very tasty. A good braise is more than the sum of its parts: Meat absorbs ” avor from the liquid, the liquid takes body from collagens in the meat, and a ” avorful sauce is an automatic byproduct. Classic braises include the coq au vin (chicken in wine) and the dish made with veal shanks, osso buco (literally, pierced boneŽ). Some tips: Brown meat on all sides to develop flavor. Dont drown your meat in liquid. In general, add liquid no more than half way up the side of the roast. For especially fatty cuts, cool the braised dish until fat is easily skimmed, then reheat and adjust seasonings. Flavorful braising liquids produce a more ” avorful dish, and recipes may call for reducing a bottle of wine to a single cup. Good candidates for braising include chuck roasts, shanks and short ribs. Braising is also a great technique for cooking vegetables ranging from cabbage to fennel. Braised Chicken and Vegetables This recipe is based on a French peasant dish. It uses inexpensive ” avorful chicken thighs and other pantry staples. 1 tablespoon olive oil 6 bone-in chicken thighs 1 potato, peeled and chopped 1 yellow onion, “ nely chopped (1 cup) 2 carrots, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 3/4 cup white wine (such as Chardonnay) 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth 3 sprigs fresh thyme Juice of 1 lemon 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 tomato, chopped 1/2 lemon, thinly sliced (optional) 1. Heat oil in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Add chicken, and brown on both sides, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from pan. Add potato, onion and carrots; cook 5 minutes. 2. Return chicken to pan (with any juices). Add garlic, wine, broth, thyme, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes. Add chopped tomato and serve. Garnish with lemon slices, if desired. Serves 4. Per serving: 320 calories, 12g fat, 75mg chol., 24g prot., 21g carbs., 3g “ ber, 540mg sodium. For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. To download our new Relish digital editions and Relish Daily Dish phone app, go to relish.com/mobile. RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLE WHITEŽS WINESBraising is a slow, moist cooking methodHoliday wine gift ideasTips to enhance holiday mealsMARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY By DAVID WHITETime is running out to “ nish up your Christmas shopping. For those looking to impress a wine enthusiast, these “ nal days are daunting. Malls and department stores offer little that would please an oenophile, and the staff at Best Buy doesnt know a thing about wine. The internet, of course, can be overwhelming! Relax. Wine lovers are easy to please, regardless of your budget. Here are my top picks. First, consider a wine club. Whether youre shopping for a complete novice or the next Iron Sommelier, everyone appreciates trying new wines. TastingRoom.com is worth checking out, as it literally brings the tasting room to your living room. Launched three years ago by a tech entrepreneur, the company transfers wine into miniature bottles, allowing consumers to sample a host of wines without having to purchase an entire bottle. Wine club memberships start at $30 per shipment. If youre shopping for someone who enjoys wines from Napa Valley, consider the Bordello Wine ClubŽ from Vintners Collective, a multi-winery tasting room in downtown Napa. While the club is expensive … the average shipment runs $165 … the collective is home to some of Napas most celebrated, small-production winemakers. If youre shopping for a fan of Oregon Pinot Noir, theres a similar collective in the Willamette Valley called Carlton Winemakers Studio. For novice wine drinkers, newspaper wine clubs are fun. These have proliferated in recent years, and the New York Times selections tend to get the highest marks. That said, many local retailers have their own clubs that offer a better value. Books also make good gifts. If youre shopping for a budding oenophile, pick up a copy of Kevin Zralys Windows on the World Complete Wine Course.Ž For good reason, its been in print for nearly 30 years. If youre shopping for a wine enthusiast who already has a stocked bookcase, pick her up a copy of Wine Grapes,Ž the justreleased guide to 1,368 grape varieties by Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding, and Jos Vouillamoz. The book is hefty … it clocks in at more than seven pounds … and has a price tag to match, retailing for $175. But its a reference book that every wine geek is desperate to own. A more affordable choice is How to Love Wine,Ž by New York Times chief wine critic Eric Asimov. Part memoir and part manifesto, the book thoroughly combats the poison of wine snobbery through an honest and personal evaluation of Americas wine culture. It was my favorite book this year. Actual wine also works. To make an impression, youll want something thats recognizable but isnt easily found at the supermarket. Champagne is always memorable, and in recent years, wine enthusiasts have gone gaga over Grower Champagne,Ž or wines made by the farmers who grow the grapes. Just as we understand why an apple grown in Virginia tastes different from an apple grown in Massachusetts, we understand why a Sonoma Chardonnay tastes different from one produced in Napa. Champagne is no different. And Grower Champagne conveys that sense of place. Egly-Ouriet, Pierre Peters, and Vilmart are three top Growers. Their wines are pricey but delicious. Of course, if you go this route, dont hesitate to ask the knowledgeable staffer at your local wine shop for advice. She might steer you toward something else thats equally impressive, like a wellknown Bordeaux or Super Tuscan. Stemware and decanters also make for great gifts. Look for brands like Riedel, Spiegelau, and Schott Zwiesel. Whatever you do, dont waste money. Ive never seen the point of a wine stopper, and no wine enthusiast wants a kitschy, hand-painted wine glass. The latest gadgets, too, are typically a waste … cordless rechargeable wine bottle openers always seem more dif“ cult to use than traditional waiters tools.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine (PalatePress. com).(BPT) Thanksgiving and Christmas meals often incorporate a lot of traditional foods and ” avors, which as a host, may become a bit boring. But when you have friends and family visiting for several days, there are plenty of opportunities to shine with new ” avors and interesting meals. As a host, embrace all of the meals youll be serving, which provides you with an excellent chance to show off your culinary skills. To help you plan the menus and entertain your guests during their entire visit, Gaby Dalkin of Whats Gaby Cooking and Lindsay and Taylor Landis of Love and Olive Oil have recipes and tips to make everything much easier. I think like most people, Im not just entertaining on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, but am making meals for my family on the days surrounding the holiday,Ž Dalkin says. These are times when I feel like can stray from the ordinary holiday tradition and experiment with my recipes.Ž Here are some tips to make your holidays a memorable time: € Assess your ingredients including your spice cabinet to ensure all holiday essentials like cinnamon, cloves, vanilla bean, nutmeg, ” our and sugar are available for all recipes. € Choose recipes ahead of time so you know that you have all ingredients available. Purchase the dry goods you need at least a week ahead to help reduce stress. Then purchase perishable items like meat and dairy products a day or two before guests arrive so you have everything ready to go. € Make non-perishable snacks ahead of time and store them in containers to bring out when needed. Try this recipe from Dalkin to keep your guests happy: Sweet and Spice Roasted Nuts Ingredients: 1 cup raw whole cashews 1 cup raw whole walnuts 1 cup raw whole almonds 1 cup raw pepitas 1 egg white 1 teaspoon water 1/2 cup white sugar 1/4 teaspoon Spice Islands Sea Salt 1/2 teaspoon Spice Islands Cayenne Pepper 1/2 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Saigon Cinnamon Directions: Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the cashews, walnuts, almonds and pepitas in a large bowl and toss to combine. Whisk together the egg white, water, sugar, salt, cayenne pepper and cinnamon. Drizzle the wet mixture over the nuts and toss to combine, making sure they are evenly coated. Transfer the nuts to the baking sheet and spread in an even layer. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the nuts from the oven and separate the nuts as they cool. Store in an airtight container and serve as needed. Classic Pumpkin Pie Chocolate Chip Pancakes Ingredients: 1 1/4 cup all-purpose ” our 1 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Saigon Cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Ginger 1/8 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Cloves 3 tablespoons white sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon Spice Islands Sea Salt 1 cup 2 percent milk 1/2 cup pumpkin puree 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 egg 1/2 cup chocolate chips butter or baking spray for skillet Directions: In a large bowl, combine the ” our, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, sugar, baking powder and salt and set aside. In another large bowl, whisk together the milk, pumpkin, vegetable oil and egg. Add the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and stir until everything is just combined, being careful not to over mix. Fold the chocolate chips into the mixture. Heat a griddle or large pan to medium-low heat. Coat the pan with cooking spray. Drop 1/4 cup of batter onto heated skillet. Cook on the “ rst side until the edges begin to bubble, about 2 minutes. Carefully flip pancake over and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes or until golden brown. Continue this process to make the rest of the pancakes, making sure to lightly spray the pan between each pancake to ensure they do not stick. Serve the pancakes immediately with maple syrup and butter, if desired.

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(888)368-1964 DRIVERSClass AFlatbed. HOME EVERYWEEKEND! Pay 37/mi, Both ways, FULLBENEFITS, Requires 1 year OTR Flatbed experience, (800)572-5489 x227, SunBelt Transport, Jacksonville, Fl Experienced OTR Flatbed DriversEarn 50 up to 55 cpm loaded. $1000 sign on to qualified drivers. Home most weekends. Call: (843)266-3731 / www .bulldoghiway .com EOE TIRED OFLIVINGPAYCHECK TO PAYCHECK? Theres great earning potential as a Professional Truck Driver! The average Professional Truck Driver earns over $700/wk*! 16-Day CDLTraining @ NFCC/Roadmaster! Approved forVeterans Training. CALLTODAY! (866)467-0060 *DOL/BLS 20 12 General Help DRIVERS:All Miles PAID (Loaded & Empty)! Home on the weekends! Running Class-A CDL Flatbed. Lease to Own-No Money DownCALL: 888-880-5911 Employment Info Apply Now, 12 Drivers Needed. Top 5% Pay & Late Model Equipment. Guaranteed Home for Xmas. Need CDLClass ADriving Exp (877)258-8782 www .ad drivers.com Schools/ Instruction Can Your Dig It?Ž Heavy Equipment School. 3wk Training Program. Backhoes, Bulldozers, Excavators. Local Job Placement Asst. VA Benefits Approved. 2 National Certifications. (866)362-6497 ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical *Business *Criminal Justice *Hospitality Job placement assistance.Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call www .Centura Online.com 888-203-3179 Appliances GE DRYER $125 I Buy Used Appliances I Sell Used Appliances I Repair All Appliances 850-745-1189 Furniture SHABBY CHIC white distressed dble bed frame, $35, White chest of drawers, w/ black poles $30, 2 sml white, drop-leaf tables, $25 & $20, very low distressed, round coffee table $25, distressed round dining rm table w/2 chairs $35. 850-926-1016 Garage/ Yard Sales CRAWFORDVILLE INDOOR SALE Sat, Dec 15th 8am to 2pm Golf equip, Xmas stuff & lots more CASH ONLY 13 Harry Morrison Rd General 12 x 20 PORTABLE BUILDING Fully insulated & paneled 5ft dr, 2 windows, light & outlet. $3000 YOU MOVE 850-926-5456 or 850-694-0005 Wanted to Buy $100 each for FLORIDA LICENSE PLATES FROM WAKULLA COUNTY THAT BEGIN WITH THE NUMBER 65 for years 1943, 1949, 1950, 1951,1954,1955. Up to $2000 for any Florida Wakulla porcelain license plate dated 1911-1917 Any condition accepted, so long as they are readable. Jeff Francis 727 424 1576 email gobucs13@aol.com Pets BALLPYTHON MORPHS FOR SALE Distinctive Christmas Gifts for the Reptile Enthusiast Normal color juvenile Ball Pythons available for only $25! 2012 Ball Python designer morphs available at reduced prices. Piebald, Blue-eye Leucistic, Albino, Ivory, Enchi, Fire, Pastel and Super Pastel. Special Christmas offer, available through December 31st only. 850-421-1894 Mobile Homes For Rent CRAWFORDVILLE3/2 Doublewide MH For Lease or Lease Purchase Lake Ellen $695 + deposit. fenced yard 850-524-4090 PANACEAClean SW 3/1 in quiet neighborhood. Paved St., near bay. Free garbage pk-up. No Smoking. References required. $475/mo., $300/Security (352) 493-2232 SOPCHOPPY2 BR, 1 BA, w/ Screened Porch, on paved road, on 3 lots, possible sale with owner finance to qualified buyer $475. Mo. + Dep. (850) 566-4124 Rental Houses SOPCHOPPY AREAwaterfront cottage 1br/1ba, exc. cond. cath. ceiling, sep storage/laundry, Clear filtered water $590. month. 84 Mt. Beasor Rd. off Persimmon850-524-1026 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE 2br 2ba Very Clean! $750mo. No pets, No indoor smoking. (850) 926-8795 Rent: Houses Unfurnished CRAWFORDVILLE3 or 4Bedroom / 2 Bath, W/D hook-up, CHA, huge fenced yard. $850/mo plus dep. (850) 228-0422 North WakullaCty, 3 bdrms, on 3 wooded acres, c/h/a large front porch, $675 plus security Brenda Hicks Realty (850) 251-1253 Real Estate For Sale 20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0 Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful Views, West Texas. (800)843-7537 www .sunsetranches.com Citrus County Homes PINE RIDGE-THIS IS THE PROPERTY YOUVE BEEN LOOKING FOR! Bring your boat, horses, in-laws; there is room for everything! 4/3.5 w/7 car garage/workshop & in-law suite on 5.83 acres. Mostly wooded with large back yard. Beautiful & serene. High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community. www .centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352.249.9164 Boats Sundance 02 16ft 25hp Evinrude w/power trim, center console, trolling motor saltwater 54lb thrust, trailer w/new tires, ready to fish, can be seen at ABC storage Crawfordville, $3,150 (850) 926-9986 (850) 566-5207 Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com 5452-1213 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, December 17 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 December 13, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5459-1220 TWN vs. Collins, Delma Case No. 11000310CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 11000310CA CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff, vs. Delma O. Collins; Unknown Spouse of Delma O. Collins; Wakulla County, Florida; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 19, 2012, entered in Case No. 11000310CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Delma O. Collins; Unknown Spouse of Delma O. Collins; Wakulla County, Florida; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front lobbyof the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 31st day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4 AND THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 3, BLOCK 29, OF GREINERS ADDITION TO CRAW5460-1220 TWN Vs. Isman, Timothy Case No. 11-274-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-274-CA, UCN: 652011CA000274XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST2006 4CB, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006 4CB, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHYW. ISMAN A/K/ATIMOTHYWADE ISMAN; PATRICIAELIZABETH BERNETT F/K/APATRICIAE. ISMAN; FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT T O CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated December 3, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11 274 FC UCN: 652011CA000274XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST2006 4CB, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006 4CB is Plaintiff and TIMOTHYW. ISMAN A/K/ATIMOTHYWADE ISMAN; PATRICIAELIZABETH BERNETT F/K/APATRICIAE. ISMAN; FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 2234Ž EAST 1323.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE NORTH 89 5033Ž WEST ALONG THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SUMMERWOOD UNIT TWO (AN UNRECORDED PLAT), 331.56 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE RUN NORTH 00 4435Ž EAST 658.66 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASEMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 4502Ž EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ITS EXTENSION 331.27 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 4307Ž WEST 658.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASEMENT. TOGETHER WITH APERPETUALEASEMENT AND RIGHT OF WAYIN COMMON WITH OTHERS FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND REGRESS IN THE SUMMERWOOD SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 127, PAGE 840, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THE BENEFITS AND BURDENS OF ALLROAD EASMENTS AND RIGHTS OF WAYSUBJECT TO ARIGHT OF WAYIN FAVOR OF FLORIDAPOWER COMPANY, AND THE SUMMERWOOD ROAD OWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION AS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 100, PAGE 598 AND OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 127, PAGE 840, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on December 3, 2012. BRENTX THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339 1438 Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com December 13 & 20, 2012 5461-1220 TWN Vs. Frink, Mary Case No. 11-CA-344 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-CA-344, UCN: 652011CA000344XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. MARYK. FRINK; CARLISREAL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARYK. FRINK; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARLISREAL; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices foreclosure dated December 3, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-CA-344 UCN: 652011CA000344XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.Ais Plaintiff and MARYK. FRINK; CARLISREAL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARYK. FRINK; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARLISREAL; UNKNOWN TENANTNO.1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 County Florida, 11:00 a.m on the 7th dayof February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 24, CARMEN ROCIO, ASUBDIVISON AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on December 3, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 December 13 & 20, 2012 1183-114402 Page 10B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Denise’s ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2-2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $750mo + Sec. Dep 2Br 1Ba House $595mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $550mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $425mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.Ž850926…5084Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16Ž .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE. CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold Burse STUMP GRINDING 926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munge’s Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates! 24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICE Mike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065“pray like it’s up to God, Work like it’s up to you” LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer 850-926-BOAT

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 11B FORDVILLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 19th day of November, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5454-1220 TWN vs. Darnell, Kristine Case No. 65 2009 CA 000487 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000487 HSBC BANK USA, NA, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE LMT 2006-7 TRUST FUND Plaintiff, v. KRISTINE ANNE DARNELL A/K/A KRISTINE DARNELL; MICHAEL CHATWOOD; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL CHATWOOD NKA ASHLEY MARIE DAVIS; THE HAMMOCKS SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 26, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 65-2009-CA-000487 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 7th day of Feburary, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, THE HAMMOCKS PLASE I, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 44-45 OF PUBLIC RECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, Phone (850) 577-4401 DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 26TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) 5455-1220 TWN vs. Kidwell, Jerry Case No. 12-000400-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO. 12-000400-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JERRY L. KIDWELL A/K/A JERRY KIDWELL; STACI D. KIDWELL A/K/A STACI KIDWELL; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): JERRY L. KIDWELL A/K/A JERRY KIDWELL (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 205 LONGLEAF Dr., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 STACI D. KIDWELL A/K/A STACI KIDWELL (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 205 LONGLEAF Dr., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON THE WEST BOUNDARY OF LOT 75 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WEST BOUNDARY 612.04 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 444.17 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT COUNTY ROADWAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY ROADWAY BOUNDARY 438.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 350.60 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 331.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 374.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 319.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LONGLEAF DRIVE, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 77 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 322.91 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 97.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 15 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 9.98 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 293.05 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 335.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 2.65 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH THAT 1991 SKYLINE CORPORTATION TRIPLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN # H93575GK, TITLE # 61774637, VIN # H93575GL, TITLE # 61774632, VIN # H93575GR, TITLE # 61774646. a/k/a 205 LONGLEAF DR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before January 14, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the THE WAKULLA NEWS and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 28th day of November, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk December 13 & 20, 2012 5457-1220 TWN Vs. Maxwell, Nathaniel Case No. 2012 303 CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE 5458-1220 TWN vs. Rudegeair, Clarence Case No. 2011 309 CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTYGENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-309-CA DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE RALI 2005-QS14, Plaintiff, vs. CLARENCE W RUDEGEAIR, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: SUMMER S. KNIGHT, 167 MASHES SAND RD, PANACEA, FL 32346; 426 N RIDE, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 and 1613 N. M.L. KING JR. BLVD., TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUMMER S KNIGHT 167 MASHES SAND ROAD, PANACEA, FL 32346; 426 N RIDE, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 and 1613 N. M.L. KING JR. BLVD., TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: LOT 1, PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 1, AS PER PLAT OR MAP RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THAT PART OF THE WESTERLY OF ABANDONED ALETHA DRIVE LYING ADJACENT TO LOT 1, PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT OR MAP THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND LYING SOUTH OF STATE ROAD NO. S-372. has been filed against you and you are required to a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Nicholas J. Vanhook, McCalla Raymer, LLC, 225 E. Robinson St, Suite 660, Orlando, FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 24th day of January, 2012. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk December 13 & 20 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO.: 2012 303 CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida 32256 Plaintiff, v. NATHANIELMAXWELL, JR., TAWANNAMAXWELL, PROBUILD COMPANY, LLC, SEMINOLE TRUSSES, INC., GENESIS CONSTRUCTION GROUP, INC., CARMEN ROCIO HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and THE UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION OF 20 CARMEN ROCIO LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:NATHANIELMAXWELL, JR. and TAWANNAMAXWELL: YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Wakulla, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOT 2, CARMEN ROCIO, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 28th day of November, 2012. CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk December 13 & 20, 2012 By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk FL-97002643-09 December 13 & 20, 2012 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results! A New Level of Service!!!Ž 850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate• 17 Cessna 3 BR/2BA TARPINE. Available end of December. $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security. No Smoking, No Pets. • 5 Susquehanna 2 BR/2BA $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets O.K. with prior approval and $250. fee. No Smoking. • 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo, includes all utilities • 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit • 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1,400 mo. $1,400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval • 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! • 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties! 850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!77 Strattonwood Road Off of Wakulla Springs Hwy. 5 minute commute to Tallahassee. Large 3BR/2BA home on 5 acres. Large workshop with outbuilding. $1100. mo No Pets, no smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking 5 Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1 Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2 Go to http://www. TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign upŽ as shown below. 3 Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click ContinueŽ. 4 Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click ContinueŽ. Register your online account today!

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Page 12B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 29 36 39 44 49 52 63 68 71 2 30 64 3 31 65 4 22 40 66 18 37 45 55 5 15 23 41 53 6 21 32 46 50 56 69 72 7 33 57 8 34 58 19 24 42 54 67 9 16 35 38 47 59 10 25 43 51 70 73 11 26 48 60 12 27 61 13 28 62 ACROSS 1. "No __, no gain" 5. Prefix with physics 9. Rattails, e.g. 14. Patron saint of sailors 15. Like the Sabin vaccine 16. Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood, for two 17. Lucky Lindy's plane 20. In great shape 21. Operation Desert __ 22. __ Blo fuse 24. Is mad for 29. Popular charity 35. "Pagliacci," e.g. 36. Several reps, in the gym 37. '54-to-'77 alliance 38. "Glengarry Glen Ross" playwright David 39. "My stars!" 41. Rudely sarcastic 43. Unescorted 44. "Gesundheit!" 46. Make corrections to 48. Sturgeon delicacy 49. Ci ty on the Mohawk 50. Helen Reddy chart topper 52. It makes jelly jell 54. Source of iron 55. Actor Max von __ 59. Butler's word 63. High school subject 68. Bacall mate, familiarly 69. Beehive State natives 70. Quaker State city 71. Fowl buildings 72. Orange or Rose 73. Thieves' hauntsDOWN1. Roach or rat 2. Bowlful for Bowser 3. Chip-tosser's utterance 4. "__ for the weary" 5. Witty remark 6. Libidinous god 7. Our last mustachioed president 8. "Not to mention ..." 9. Movieland 10. Altar assent 11. Bud's comedy pal 12. Brother of Peyton 13. Draft letters 18. Runs while standing 19. La-la lead-in 23. Keats offerings 25. Australian mine find 26. Shark sucker 27. Heretofore 28. Glossy fabric 29. Exhausts 30. Make invalid 31. Right-leaning? 32. Tapered off 33. Grisham's "__ to Kill" 34. Alpine air 40. Tear carrier 42. Prefix meaning "within" 45. Oxeye and others 47. Has the guts 51. In need of body work 53. UN locale 56. Apply crudely 57. Not fooled by 58. "That's a relief!" 60. Barreled along 61. Ms. Brockovich 62. Bar selections 63. Pie equivalent? 64. Guernsey's greeting 65. Freudian topic 66. Saw with the grain 67. Christmas or Easter: Abbr. American Prole Hometown Content 12/9/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that you’ve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 200 9 HometownContent 1 2 1345 3678 3 26 289714 413 4 517 6189 39 200 9 HometownContent 175 4829 3 6 892163457 436957281 317 248695 289635714 654791823 943 526178 561879342 728314569 P E S T U S E S U P A B C A L P O N E G A T E M O O I M I N I T A L I C E G O N O R E S T D U C T R I P I D L E S D A I S I E S M O T O D E S N Y C E R O S W A N E D D A U B T A F T A T I M E O N T O A L S O Y O D E L W H E W T R A E N T O I S L F I L M D O M D A R E S I D O O P A L D E N T E D L O U R E M O R A T O R E E L I E R E N O W E R I N S S S S A T E E N R Y E S

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 – Page 13B 1. PSYCHOLOGY: If you had choreophobia, what would you be afraid of? 2. COMICS: What comic hero has a nemesis named Ming the Merciless? 3. TELEVISION: Where were the characters of Laverne and ShirleyŽ employed in Milwaukee? 4. ARCHITECTURE: Who invented the geodesic dome? 5. LITERATURE: What were the names of The Three MusketeersŽ by Alexandre Dumas? 6. MOVIES: What male actor starred in the 1981 film Arthur,Ž and who was his leading lady? 7. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the island country of Sri Lanka located? 8. CHEMISTRY: What is the Periodic Table symbol for zinc? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What nickname did author Tom Wolfe give the 1970s? 10. LANGUAGE: What are corsairs? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Dancing 2. Flash Gordon 3. Shotz Brewery 4. Richard Buckminster Fuller 5. Aramis, Athos and Porthos 6. Dudley Moore and Liza Minelli 7. Off the coast of India 8. Zn 9. The MeŽ Decade 10. Privately owned warships YOUR AD HERE

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Page 14B – THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Christmas in Sopchoppy CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: Visitors stroll along Rose Avenue to look at the vendors booths; Santa was visiting the railroad depot and heard the wishes of Bailee Shef“ eld, 5, and Isabel Brown, 5; newly elected county commissioner from Sopchoppy Richard Harden talks with members of the committee selling gift bricks to support the ongoing efforts to improve the historic depot. Evan Haddock, 2, investigates the bearskin at the FWC tent manned by Keilina Castro and Victoria Gilley, interns with the agencys bear management program. Arts and crafts vendor Sherry Balchuck helps a customer browsing her selection of jewelry. Andy Kasey with Alli Riley, 2, who just got her face painted, and Donna Riley. Members of the Sopchoppy Homemakers Association with baked goods for sale. The Wak u lla News F o r l o c a l n e w s a n d p h o t o s For local news and photos w w w t h e w a k u l l a n e w s c o m www.thewakullanews.com PHOTOS BY WILLIM SNOWDEN More photos online at thewaullanews.com



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By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe county presented its case against certain aspects of the updated ood maps to representatives with the Federal Emergency Management Agency last week but was unable to change their minds. They came back and said, thanks, but not thanks, said County Administrator David Edwards. Some of the concerns that were raised were the elevated ood zones which could have a large nancial impact on area businesses and residents. The base ood elevation for the City of St. Marks was raised 10 feet, and the ood zone goes well upriver. Most of the changes are in the coastal area and along the rivers, but also shows expanded ooding areas in places such as Wakulla Gardens. The maps will affect homeowner insurance rates and building in those areas. FEMA said their model is correct, Edwards said. Were back to square one, he added. Edwards said he argued that FEMA is basing the new ood zones based on a storm that has never hit the coast, a hypothetical storm, which may end up costing residents a lot of money. However, FEMA argued that New Jersey had never seen a storm like Hurricane Sandy.Continued on Page 3A Other county news: RESTORE Act could mean $40 million to Wakulla, Page 2A. 4 of 5 commissioners support Airport Master Plan, Page 3A. Serving Wakulla County For More Than A Century Our 117th Year, 48th Issue Thursday, December 13, 2012 Two Sections Two Sections75 Cents 75 Cents k h h h k l l h Published Weekly, Read Daily Published Weekly, Read DailynewsThe Wakulla Green Scene Page 12B GreenScen e Tips for a green holiday seasonPublic Notices .................................................................Page 3A The Opinion Page ...........................................................Page 4A Church.............................................................................Page 6A Obituaries .......................................................................Page 7A Community .....................................................................Page 8A School .............................................................................Page 9A Outdoors ......................................................................Page 10A Water Ways.................................................................... Page 11A Green Sceene ................................................................. Page 12A Sheriffs Report................................................................Page 14A Sports ..............................................................................Page 1B Week in Wakulla ..............................................................Page 3B In the Huddle ...................................................................Page 4B Thinking Outside the Book ..............................................Page 5B Holiday Guide ..................................................................Page 7B Classi eds ..................................................................... Page 10B Legal Notices .................................................................Page 10B Comics ...........................................................................Page 13BINDEX OBITUARIES Charles Sanford Cocroft Delores D. Dee McCrainie Gerrell James Monroe Sanders Thomas Charles SandersAt the Queens At the Queens diamond jubilee diamond jubileeTo countys dismay, ood maps are nalOperation Santa families will get dinner Staff reportThose who are being assisted through Operation Santa and have no plans for Christmas dinner are invited to Promise Land Ministries for a free meal. Were trying to extend a hand, said Glenn Hamel, pastor of Promise Land Ministries. This is the rst year his ministry is offering the dinner. He attended a meeting of the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth, which is the group behind Operation Santa, and heard about those families who were in need of food. I said, We can do something about that, Hamel said. So he decided to try and offer a free meal to those who otherwise would have nothing to eat on Christmas. At last count, there were 211 families being helped through Operation Santa and 23 families who applied after the deadline and are on a waiting list. Hamel said the invitation is open to anyone who is without food on Christmas. However, he is asking that anyone who plans to attend to try and RSVP by Dec. 20 by calling 251-4302. There will also be activities for children. Promise Land Ministries is located at 20 Church Road, Crawfordville.Christmas in SopchoppyWILLIAM SNOWDENSanta Claus was in Sopchoppy on Saturday morning, Dec. 8, hanging out at the historic railroad depot to listen to Christmas wishes from local kids. Isabel Brown, 5, was a little shy as Santa tried to pry out what she wants for Christmas. More photos of Christmas in Sopchoppy on Page 12B. By JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe experience of a lifetime. This was the sentence echoed by Becton Roddenberry and his grandmother Majesty Maj Strickland to describe their trip to England to celebrate a momentous milestone for the monarchy, 60 years of Queen Elizabeth IIs reign.Roddenberry and Strickland attended the celebration of the Diamond Jubilee held June 1-11 in London, England. The Diamond Jubilee gave me a chance to express my deep respect for a monarch whose like we shall never see again, let 60 cheers ring long and loud, Roddenberry says. Roddenberry has always loved English history and is a big fan of the British monarchy and the queen. He traveled to Europe in high school and ever since then, he has been fascinated with English history, his grandmother says. He probably knows more British history than most British people, Strickland says. Roddenberry decided he wanted to attend the Diamond Jubilee and decided to ask his grandmother if she wanted to go. Mamaw had never traveled overseas before, so I thought what better occasion for her to get to see the queen too, he says. Strickland says, Im glad I took him up on it. The start of their trip began with the Epsom Derby Investec Day. Roddenberry was able to book two seats in the queens stand for the derby, which Strickland says they pronounce darby. I booked a year in advance, and was shocked to nd out that anyone can book in the queens stand at the derby, Roddenberry says.Continued on Page 5AA Sopchoppy pair Becton Roddenberry and his grandmother, Maj Strickland go to London and manage to sit near Queen Elizabeth. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBecton Roddenberry and Maj Strickland on their way to the Epsom Derby where they saw the queen. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSQueen Elizabeth, in blue, at the derby.

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Page 2A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netThe new formula for how the eight counties in Florida that were affected by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill will split their portion of some of the penalties that will be paid directly to the states has been decided and will leave Wakulla County with the potential of receiving even more money. Under the current formula, if the settlement or nes levied on the parties responsible for the oil spill is $20 billion, Wakulla will see at least $41.5 million. If the amount is the minimum of $5 billion, the county will receive $10.4 million. The Committee of Eight Disproportionately Affected Counties met last week at the request of Rep. Steve Southerland who felt the original formula did not give enough to the smaller counties Franklin, Gulf and Wakulla. The formula didnt take into account how the shing and seafood industries were affected by the oil spill in those counties, said County Administrator David Edwards. He thought that needed to be a factor, Edwards said. Representatives of the eight counties agreed to the new formula. However, the formula will have to be presented to each commission for their approval. Edwards said the county commission will vote on the agreement at its Jan. 7 meeting. This formula is for one of the pots of money that has been designated to flow directly to each of the ve Gulf states, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas and Florida, under the Resources and Ecosystems Sustainability, Tourist Opportunities and Revived Economies of the Gulf Coast States Act. This act established a Gulf Coast Restoration Trust Fund in the U.S. Treasury in which 80 percent of the Clean Water Act penalties from the Deep Horizon Oil Spill will be distributed to impacted areas for recovery. Of that 80 percent, 35 percent will be divided among the ve states. In Florida, those funds will be distributed directly to the 23 Gulf Coast counties. The eight affected counties will receive 75 percent and the other 15 Gulf counties will receive 25 percent. Of the 75 percent, 20 percent of that money will be divided evenly among the eight counties and the remaining money will be given out based on shoreline oiled, sales tax, average population and distance from the oil rig. The money can be used on restoration and protection of natural resources; mitigation of natural resources; implementation of a federally approved marine, coastal, or conservation management plan; workforce development and job creation; state parks; infrastructure projects benefitting the economy or ecological resources (ports); coastal ood protection; planning assistance; administrative costs; promotion of tourism, including recreational shing; and promotion of seafood consumption. The remaining portion of the 80 percent of penalties will go to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council at 30 percent and the Impact/Allocation Consortium will receive 30 percent. The remaining 5 percent will be dedicated to the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration and Science, Observation, Monitoring and Technology Program administered by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and centers of excellence. In order to be prepared for the potential massive amount of money coming to Wakulla County, the county commission established the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee which will bring potential projects the money can be used on to the commission. This has the potential to be one of the biggest things to happen to Wakulla County and the region in a long time, Edwards said. The committee met for the first time on Dec. 4 to get an overview of the RESTORE Act. We need everyone to understand what the RESTORE Act does, Edwards said. The majority of the meeting was spent going over the goal of the committee, which will take applications for potential projects, rank them and present them to the commission. There will be a large need for community input, Edwards said. During the meeting, the committee selected Bob Ballard, executive director of TCCs Wakulla Environmental Institute, as chairman and Mark Mitchell of Panacea Waterfronts Florida, as vice chair. The meeting on Dec. 11 also focused on laying down the groundwork for the group. Once the U.S. Department of the Treasury works out the rules and regulations for this process, the committee can begin to focus on projects. We need the rules, Edwards said. Once we have the rules then we will know how to play the game. He anticipates the department of the treasury coming out with those rules between mid-December and mid-January. Some potential areas this funding could be used is for the TCC Environmental Institute, wasterwater treatment plant, beach restoration, park development, park improvement, canal dredging, sheries, oyster relay, etc.Wakullas share of RESTORE Act monies could be between $10 million and $41 millionSpecial to The NewsThe Wakulla County Health Department is expanding dental services to women in the Healthy Start program, thanks to a block grant from the Florida Department of Health Infant, Maternal and Reproductive Health Program. The $9,000 grant will allow the Wakulla County Health Department to provide dental services to uninsured and underinsured pregnant women in Healthy Start. Women will continue to receive care for up to six months after their babies are born. This grant will enable us to help more mothers and their babies in a very important way, said Padraic Juarez, MS, REHS, CPM, Wakulla County Health Department administrator. Some studies have linked gum disease to preterm births, so we are excited to be able to expand dental services to the women who need them. To take advantage of the dental program, women must be pregnant and referred by the Healthy Start program. Mothers who are uninsured or underinsured and at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty level are eligible. This includes Medicaid-eligible women who do not qualify for coverage of needed dental treatment otherwise. Eligible mothers will receive preventive care, restorative care and surgical treatment as needed at the Health Departments dental clinic at 48 Oak Street in Crawfordville. The Wakulla County Health Departments dental clinic also provides exams, X-rays, cleanings, fluoride treatments, extractions, fillings, root canals and dentures for children through age 20. The clinic has partnered with the College of Central Florida to provide services to the countys children, and education to students enrolled in the colleges dental assisting programs. Healthy Start is a comprehensive program promoting optimal prenatal health and developmental outcomes for all pregnant women and babies in Florida. The fundamental goals of the Healthy Start program are to reduce infant mortality, reduce the number of low birth weight babies and improve health and developmental outcomes. For information on how to qualify for the program, call the Wakulla County Health Department Healthy Start Program at 850-926-0400.Christmas in the Park is held Friday night at Azalea ParkSpecial to The NewsMore than 400 people jammed into Azalea Park in Crawfordville Friday, Dec. 7 for the 12th Annual Christmas in the Park celebration featuring Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus and their helper elves. Santa and the entourage arrived at the park just after dark escorted by a Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce patrol vehicle as they arrived in an electric car. Many visitors to the park were festively dressed and children were excited for an opportunity to speak to Santa Claus about their Christmas wishes. The event was sponsored by the, WCSO WCSO volunteers, the Wakulla County Parks and Recreation Department and Centennial Bank. The event featured a kiddie train, games, food, prizes, Christmas decorations and a chance to speak to Santa and Mrs. Claus. The event had an outstanding turnout on a beautiful night. Dozens of children and parents lined up in the cool and dry weather to create a long line to visit with Santa Claus. Lt. Bruce Ashley helped organize the event for former organizer and now retired Captain Larry Massa who organized the event for many years. This event is a way for the sheriffs of- ce to give back to the community, said retiring Sheriff Donnie Crum. It provides an opportunity to say thank you to everyone in our community. We hope that all of the children had a wonderful time and look forward to Christmas Day in a little more than two weeks. Two of Wakulla Countys favorite animals, McGruff the Crime Dog and Sparky the Fire Dog, visited with children throughout the night. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSCounty health department expands dental services to cover women in needWakulla women in Healthy Start program can get preventive and restorative dental care Santa and Mrs. Claus arrive at Christmas in Park on Friday night. At right, Santa listens to the Christmas wishes of children at the Christmas in the Park on Friday, Dec. 7. Use Ebiz, place a classified ad thru our self service program. 1. Easy 2. Quick 3. ConvenientPlace your ad TODAY! 000D3KM www.thewakullanews.comCleaning out your garage?

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 3A PUBLIC NOTICESFor our readers convenience, The Wakulla News will provide this Public Notice Section in our A-section for all Public Notices not published in the Legal Notice section of the newspaper. JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netAt the Dec. 5 Wakulla County Commission meeting it became clear that four out of the ve commissioners were in support of the Wakulla County Airport. At that meeting, the commission voted four to one, with only Commissioner Jerry Moore opposing, to update the Airport Master Plan. Moore said he looks at the airport as a business and it will be years before it turns a pro t. Before this thing makes any pro t, I will probably have less hair, Moore said. The last year or so the airport was at the center of a large controversy. The controversy started after a portion of private property on Surf Road that is next to the airport was cleared and a sign stating that it was the future site of the airport expansion was placed on the site. Many residents in the area became concerned about a possible expansion and their properties being impacted. The airport is out of compliance with the Florida Department of Transportation because of safety concerns. A building and hangar encroach the safety zone of the airport. The building that now houses La Cantina Grille is 50 feet within the primary surface area, which is the area surrounding the landing area and there is also a 13-acre hangar parcel that has one hangar that was constructed in 2006 too close to the primary surface area. In order to have the airports license extended, the runway must be moved over about 35 feet to the west and widened. The runway length would be extended from 2,800 feet to 2,972 feet. In order to move the runway, the county will have to acquire property to the west. Originally included in the Airport Layout Plan was some property south of Surf Road. Some of the land that was included in the plan belongs to people who do not want to sell their property. The county has said they will remove those properties from the plan. The county received a grant for $75,000, that does not require a match, and was intended to be used originally on runway lighting, however, the county was looking to get FDOT to approve them using it for removal of trees obstructing ight path, appraisals and surveys of adjacent airport property, updating the Airport Layout Plan and planning services and airport management plan. Edwards said the county was originally informed by DOT that it didnt need to update the master plan, but since then DOT has changed its mind. The county will now be using the funds to update the master plan, layout plan and appraisal and planning services. If the county does not do the updates needed to put the airport back into compliance, it could lose its ability to operate. Commissioners Randy Merritt, Richard Harden, Howard Kessler and Ralph Thomas were in agreement that they didnt want to see the county lose the airport. Once you close them, you dont get them back, Kessler said of small airports. The countys consultant Kimley-Horne will provide the services. In other news: The commission voted unanimously to change the composition of the Wakulla County Community Center Advisory Committee from 11 members to ve. The committee met only a few times, but had issues with not having enough members present and some who were clearly not in favor of the community center. There will be an application process for citizens who would like to serve on the committee. The commission will then vote on the new members at a future meeting. The purpose of the committee is to advise the commission on development of the Community Center site and programs, assist in seeking grant funding, obtain community input and involvement and assist the commission in developing a long-term plan for the Community Center. The county purchased the community center which is a 22-acre property that was previously home to New Life Church, on May 24, 2010. The current plan for the community center site is to use a legislative appropriation to renovate the former sanctuary building to include a free weight and cardio room, tness classroom, kid zone and restrooms and showers. The other building would remain as it is, with several of ces. Also included in the plans is the addition of an open oor gymnasium, which would would have a high school and college regulation size basketball court. The former sanctuary building would be utilized by the YMCA, which has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the county to manage the community center. The approval of the bid for renovations will come before for the commission at its Jan. 7 meeting. Since this was the rst real meeting of the newly formed county commission, the commission needed to decide which commissioner would serve on the various committees representing the county. Merritt will serve on the Apalachee Regional Planning Council, Community Traf c Safety Team, Capital Regional Transportation Planning Agency, Canvassing Board, Big Bend Regional Partnership and Wakulla County Audit Committee. Moore will serve on the RESTORE Act Advisory Committee, Big Bend Scenic Byway, alternate on the Value Adjustment Board, Our Region Tomorrow Advisory Board, Transportation Disadvantaged Local Coordinating Board, Small County Coalition and alternate on ARPC. Harden will serve on the District Health Care Council, Wilderness Coast Library Advisory Board, and as alternate on the Wakulla County Coalition for Youth and CRTPA. Thomas received the most appointments, including the North Florida Broadband Authority, coalition for youth, Value Adjustment Board, Wakulla State Forest liaison, Tourist Development Council, Small County Coalition, Public Safety Coordinating Council and alternate on the Gulf Consortium. Kessler was not appointed to any committees. He asked for zero because of several projects he is currently working on. The next county commission meeting is scheduled for Jan. 7 at 5 p.m.COUNTY COMMISSION 4 of 5 commissioners support Airport Master PlanBy JENNIFER JENSENjjensen@thewakullanews.netWhen County Commissioner Richard Harden ran for his current position, he had to resign from his post on the Sopchoppy City Commission before taking of ce. He resigned on Nov. 19 and left a vacant seat. At the previous Sopchoppy City Commission meeting, the commissioners decided to leave it empty for now. The city will hold elections in June to fill the open spot and current Commissioners Colleen Skipper Mitchell and Anginita Rosier will be up for reelection. They just decided to wait, said City Clerk Jackie Lawhon. The current commission consists of Skipper Mitchell, Rosier, Commissioner Lara Edwards and Commissioner Martha Evans. The commission only needs three commissioners in attendance at a meeting to have a quorum and be able to hold a meeting. In other news: The commission approved allowing a boy scout to construct a park bench and arbor at Sopchoppy City Park for his Eagle Scout project. Lawhon said the scout used to live in Sopchoppy, and now lives in Tallahassee. He decided he wanted to do his project in Sopchoppy. The project will take three to four days. This isnt the rst time the city has been the recipient of an Eagle Scout project. The Sopchoppy Veterans Memorial that stands in front of Sopchoppy City Hall was the vision of boy scout Zackary Dunaway. The memorial includes a wall of honor, made out of brick, adorned with a plaque and a ag pole in front of the wall with four small statues depicting the armed forces standing in salute surrounding it, Dunaway designed the memorial and found the people with the skills to do the work. The commission voted unanimously to allow the scout to construct the arbor and bench at city park. The commission also voted to again support the efforts of Operation Santa with a donation of $500. Last year, the commission also approved spending $500 and used that to buy bicycles for the children in the program. The next meeting will be held on Jan. 14 at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.CITY OF SOPCHOPPYSeat will be left vacant on city commission CITY of ST. MARKS PUBLIC HEARING NOTICEThe City of St. Marks is in the process of carrying out a Small Cities Community Development Block Grant in the Commercial Revitalization category, grant number 11DB-C5-02-75-02-C02, in the amount of $600,000.00. The grant is being funded thru the Florida Department of Economic Opportunity (DEO). The project consists of the construction of streetscape improvements along portions of Port Leon Drive and Terminal Drive in downtown St. Marks. The City is considering expanding the scope of the project to include the undergrounding of the utilities along the portions of Port Leon Drive and Terminal Drive where the streetscape improvements are being constructed. A public hearing to provide citizens an opportunity to comment on the proposed expansion of the project to include the undergrounding of utilities will be held on Thursday, December 20, 2012 at 11:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as possible at the City of St. Marks City Hall located at 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, Florida. A draft copy of the amendment package will be available for review at that time. A final copy of the amendment package will be made available at the City of St. Marks, Monday through Friday between the hours of 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. and 1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. no more than five (5) working days after the December 20, 2012 meeting. The amendment will be submitted to DEO after the December 20, 2012 Public Hearing. To obtain additional information concerning the amendment and the public hearing, contact Ms. Zoe Mansfield, City Manager, 788 Port Leon Drive, St. Marks, Florida 32355, (850) 925-6224. The public hearing is being conducted in a handicapped accessible location. Any handicapped person requiring an interpreter for the hearing impaired or the visually impaired should contact Ms. Mansfield at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and an interpreter will be provided. Any non-English speaking person wishing to attend the public hearing should contact Ms. Mansfield at least five calendar days prior to the meeting and a language interpreter will be provided. Any handicapped person requiring special accommodation at this meeting should contact Ms. Mansfield at least five calendar days prior to the meeting.DECEMBER 13, 2012 Special to The NewsSARASOTA Commissioner Ralph Thomas joined with newly elected commissioners from across the state in an orientation hosted by the Florida Association of Counties recently. The orientation, held on Nov. 28, provided a summary of the roles and responsibilities of counties and commissioners in Florida. The program is sponsored by the University of Florida/IFAS Extension, and held in conjunction with the Associations 2013 Legislative Conference. The following topics were covered: History of Floridas Counties, Powers, Duties and responsibilities of County Commissioners, Constitutional Of cers, Legislative Session, Budget revenue and expenditures, Annual Fiscal Year Decisions, Human Resources, Ballot Issues, Policy Decisions, Sunshine laws: An Introduction to Ethics, Public Records, and Open Meetings Requirements. New commissioners face many challenges and road blocks, said FAC Executive Director Chris Holley. By participating in this program Commissioner Thomas is one step ahead in better serving his constituents and county. Im glad I decided to attend the orientation, Thomas said. The FAC instructors included attorneys and seasoned commissioners who shared their knowledge allowing me to bene t from their combined experiences. The training was excellent, Thomas said, and Im con dent it will help me better serve the citizens of Wakulla County. Commissioner Thomas personally paid all of his own travel expenses without taxpayers dollars. For 80 years, the Florida Association of Counties (FAC) has represented the diverse interests of Floridas counties, emphasizing the importance of protecting home rule the concept that government closest to the people governs best. The Florida Association of Counties helps counties effectively serve and represent Floridians by strengthening and preserving county home rule through advocacy, education and collaboration.Commissioner Ralph omas attends new commissioner orientationFlorida Association of Counties hosts program for Floridas 98 new commissioners Continued from Page 1A The county was hoping to get FEMA on a technicality, that the agency didnt follow its own procedures during this process, but Edwards said it appears FEMA did everything right. Its a tough thing, Edwards said. Edwards said the county could ght the maps, but it would cost a large amount of money and they could come back with the same answer. The new Flood Insurance Rate Maps are here to stay and the 90-day appeal process for property owners who believe there has been an error started on Dec. 6. The county will be working with FEMA and the Northwest Florida Water Management District to identify those parcels that are affected and notify the property owners of the appeals process, as well as recommend they contact their insurance provider. There will be another meeting with FEMA in January to give citizens another opportunity to ask questions about the maps. Under the current schedule, the new maps will take effect in December 2013. Once this happens, some ood insurance policy holders may see changes in their policies. The proposed flood maps may be viewed at http://portal.nwfwmd- oodmaps.com. Residents who believe the flood maps contain errors have until March 6, 2013, to make an appeal by submitting scienti c or technical information to the Wakulla County Planning and Community Development Department. For questions or additional information, contact the Planning and Community Development Department at 926-3695.To countys dismay, ood maps are nal Ralph Thomas at commissioner orientationOnce you close them, you dont get them back, one commissioner says of small airports.

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Page 4A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreaders speak out The Opinion Page The Wakulla News (USPS 664-640) is published weekly at 3119-A Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327. Periodicals postage paid at P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307. Phone: (850) 926-7102. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Wakulla News, P.O. Box 307, Crawfordville, FL 32326-0307.The Wakulla NewsPublisher Emeritus: William M. Phillips Family (1976-2006)All subscriptions to The Wakulla News become due and payable one year from the time the subscription is purchased.In County $31/yr. $17.50/6 mo. Out of County $42/yr. $24/6 mo. Out of State $44/yr. $26/6 mo.Editor: William Snowden ............................................editor@thewakullanews.net Reporter: Jennifer Jensen ..........................................jjensen@thewakullanews.net Advertising: Lynda Kinsey .......................................lkinsey@thewakullanews.net Advertising/reception: Denise Folh ...........................denise@thewakullanews.net Production Coordinator/IT: Eric Stanton ............advertising@thewakullanews.net NATIONAL NEWSPAPERFOUNDATION NATIONAL NEWSPAPERBlue Ribbon AWARD WINNINGNEWSPAPER MEMBER Most popular stories online: Wakulla student dies Fatal car crash on Surf Road near Sopchoppy 1 death attributed to the flu; health department holds flu shot clinics School flu shot clinics set Performing Messiah Commission has discussion on Public Service Tax New Board of County Commissioners is swornin Chamber Chatter: New members, upcoming ribbon cuttingsthewakullanews.com Follow us on Letters to the editor The Wakulla News welcomes your letters. You can email it to editor@thewakullanews. net, mail it to P. O. Box 307, Crawfordville FL 32326 or drop it off at The News of ce, 3119-A Crawfordville Highway. Letters are published as space becomes available and must include the authors rst and last name, mailing address and telephone number for veri cation purposes. Only the name and town will be published. One submission per person per month. Letters are edited for style, length and clarity.Editor, The News: In a recent edition of The Wakulla News there was an excellent article about Noah Posey that covered a good bit of his life and Wakulla history (Noah Posey: Fisherman, crab house processor, businessman, restauranteur, Nov. 29). I enjoyed reading about Noah and the history of shing and crabbing in our waters but something was missing. The missing part was what a great asset to our county the Posey family is. Noah and Mildred help many organizations and individuals that no one ever knows about. The Poseys have also raised their family to be community-minded people who help people when they can and do positive things for our community. Their daughter Sherrie Miller works for the good of the community just as hard as she works at the restaurant. Sherrie serves on volunteer committees that are working to make the county a better place to visit and do business. No one promotes Wakulla harder than Sherrie does and it is all for free. Their son John lends his cooking skills to help out charities just like his dad does. The Posey family is not making money every time you see those Poseys Catering trailers at events. John has a son (Justin) who is a Wakulla County re ghter and he occasionally cooks and helps out at charitable and community functions. Justin has cooked for three years in the re ghter barbecue contest and fundraiser. Noah and his staff prepare all of the side dishes for that particular charity event and they do not pro t a dime from it. There is no way to estimate how many individuals or families the Posey family has helped and the only people who know are the ones being helped. If just 10 percent of the people in Wakulla were as involved in the community as Noah, Mildred and their family this would be an even greater place to live. The Wakulla News article about Noey Posey was good but the part that was missing is the great family tradition of serving and helping their community. Go down to Poseys Up the Creek to eat and there will always be at least one family member there that should be thanked for all they do. Bill Russell Ochlockonee Bay Editor, The News: In a world where economic times are hard, this is a thank you letter to small businesses that helped sponsor a bene t for a neighbor. These small businesses are the backbone of a community. When local people are in trouble or need help it is small local businesses that step up and give back to the community. We should all be mindful of that when we are choosing where to shop. I hope that you, our neighbors, will patronize local business when possible. Now Wakulla Free Riders would like to thank the following businesses: Lindys Chicken, That Place on 319, El Jalisco, Modern Communications Inc., Wakulla Pawn & Curio Shop Inc., Thread Tree, Body-Tek, Crawfordville Auto & Tire, Beef O Bradys, Anytime Fitness, Rhodeside Market, La Parrillada Mexican Grille, The Sights & Sounds Co., Ace Hardware-Crawfordville, Snack Shack, Upholstery Unlimited, Stephanie Mathews, Another Mans Treasure, BWs Grill, That Hair Place, New China Buffett, Carries Cove, Gulf Coast Lumber & SupplyCrawfordville, Hamaknockers BBQ, Ming Tree Garden, Evolution Day Spa, Capt. Seaniles, Myra Jeans, Custom Floors & More, Lees Liquors & Fine Wine, Skybox, Stevens Seafood & Chicken, Apocalyptic Tattoo Studio, Big Top 2 Supermarket, Mikes Marine Supply, Huttons, Dux Liquors, Outzs Too, Iron Ravens, Southern Spirits, Black Bean Restaurant, Wakulla Motorcycle Works, Ace Hardware-Woodville, Coastal Corner, Gulf Coast Lumber-Woodville, Market Liquors, Sunshack Dry Cleaners, B & L Automotive Parts, Turn Key Automotive, Money & Daughters Auto Repair, Panhandle PizzaWoodville, Wild re Grill, The Kast Net, Orions Motorsports. Sincerey, Wakulla Free Riders Editor, The News: I think that many Wakullans are experiencing what I experienced today and am hoping that at some point we all will be able to slow down, get away from the commercial environments created by television and tabloid and learn how to assess what is actually real to our families and our futures. On Sunday I did two very different things that illustrate both the quandary and the beauty of the Christmas season: I went to church and I went to the mall. One I wanted to do and the other I needed to do. Below is a brief description of each experience. As I walked into my church I heard the music. Christmas was in the air. There was warmth that does not come from either weather or temperature setting. People were smiling, children were laughing, every one was dressed in red and green and wore pins and rings and necklaces that looked like wreaths, angels, candy canes and mini trees. Sincere greetings of happiness and good tidings were wrapped around handshakes and hugs. Talk of love, good food and gift-giving dotted conversations wherever one turned and joy was aglow on the faces of both the young and the old. There were breathtaking seasonal decorations with lights and poinsettias placed to highlight the beauty of the season and all were speaking about the birth of Jesus. There was peace and calm that surrounded the moment and everyone just knew their presence was wanted that they belonged. A sense of being uplifted was prevalent in peoples hearts. In contrast, as I walked in to the mall I heard the semiharshness of words spoken in the way one might when pressured to hurry and get through a task. There was no music, only the swish, swish of the hustle and bustle. People were complaining and feeling that the season cost too much in terms of personal toil and dollars alike. There were long lines and a little pushing at the cashiers desk. Although there was talk between the participants, it was casual and for the most part was little more than common courtesy. Everything sparkled but longterm worth often minimal. Oh, yes there was excitement and expectation and a longing to nd the perfect gift. The desire to make someone happy and to give to a loved one was everywhere but the frustration, the worry, the costly dazzle and ultimately the realization that the perfect gift could not be found was also present. At the end of the day excitement and exhilaration too often turned to exhaustion and a sense of missed opportunity. There are many more churches in Wakulla County than sizeable malls in Tallahassee. Every one of them is beautiful, especially at this time of year, and the true blessing is that not one of them will close their doors to anyone who wants to worship on a Sunday morning. If you do not attend a church regularly give your self and your family a wonderful gift. Choose a church and visit it next Wednesday or Sunday. There is no cost but the value is priceless. Cynthia Webster Crawfordville My name is Bentlee and I was born in Panama City. Unfortunately, I ended up in an animal shelter over that way (a kill shelter) and my time was running out. Fortunately for me, the folks over at CHAT (Citizens for Humane Animal Treatment) in Wakulla County rescued me and gave me a little more time to nd suitable parents. As luck would have it, one day after church in January 2009 a family came by looking for a new pet and thank God for me (and them, I am sure) they chose me. I have lived in my forever home ever since. My heart will always go out to the folks at CHAT who made all of this possible. Because my human parents love me so much and support the organization that brought me into their lives we stirred up a bit of fun. My daddy, in the spirit of Christmas and giving, recently started a Facebook page for me and issued a Friends Equals Dividends for CHAT Challenge. My family offered a $500 donation to CHAT if I reached 500 friend requests by a set deadline. Well, with a little push I snagged my 500 friends just before time was up. This seemed to get the ball rolling and the excitement level up as several of my new friends were already supporters of CHAT and issued their own challenge on top of challenge. They pledged additional funds for even more friend requests. I feel so special and I am so excited that my so far over 700 Facebook friends are participating in this challenge to raise funds for CHAT. You can help, too by befriending me on facebook, www.facebook.com/ bentlee.boo.5. I was really happy when my family took me to visit CHAT on Saturday, Dec. 8, so I could paw deliver our $570 donation check in person (thats how many friends I had by the deadline), but l didnt know that CHAT also had a surprise in store for me. I was OFFICIALLY appointed spokesdog for CHAT, and have my certi cate to prove it. This was so awesome, I, a former death row candidate, was saved, found my loving forever home, and am now the of cial spokesdog for the organization that helped me! Woof, woof. CHAT of Wakulla thanks the Russell family for their support and donation to our or ganization, and also thanks Weston Howland, Faith Hughes DVM, Janice Eakin, Kristy Pursell and Jake and Barbara Hines for the additional bonus cash offered. And remember, spay or neuter your pets.Find out more about CHAT at www.chatofwakulla.org or find CHAT of Wakulla on Facebook. If you have a Facebook account, please befriend Bentlee Boo so no bones are left in the hole!Editor, The News: Another Mule Day in Calvary, Ga., has come and gone and I remembered a few years ago, in 2010, when my dad, Hoppy Strickland, rode in the Mule Day Parade. He won the trophy for Best Jack, all with the help of his stunning four-legged friend Mule Train. After seeing the photos of dad and Mule Train, I thought it would be nice to give thanks and to recognize Mule Trains owners, John and Beth Kirkland from Jackson County. I would also like to apologize for this acknowledgement taking so long, but a friend of my father said he was going to publish the story and photos two years ago but has yet to follow through with his word. So this year, a very good friend of my dad, Billy Hart from the Quincy-Lake Talquin area, rode his jackass, Donkey Donk in the 2012 Mule Day parade. They won the Special Award trophy, rst place trophy for Best Jackass and a cash prize. After taking a look at Mr. Billys photos he sent my dad, I felt it only tting to ask The Wakulla News to publish Mr. Billys recent accomplishment as well as the accomplishment of my dad from 2010. Congratulations to Mr. Billy and Donkey Donk! Hey dad, you had better get your jackass ready for 2013. I love you and cant wait to see you ride again. Thank you and Merry Christmas, Dana Wilson Crawfordville READERS WRITE:Prize winning mules at Mule DayBentlee raises more than $500 for CHATTwo versions of the season: church and mall Noah Posey helps a lot in Wakulla ank you for support of bene t Billy Hart and Donkey Donk won rst place this year. Wakullas Hoppy Strickland and Mule Train won at Mule Day in 2010.

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Continued from Page 1A He was told that it is rst reserved for the Royal Family, the Royal Household, lords and ladies, and knights and dames. They were lucky enough to reserve the last two seats. With Strickland in formal day dress and hat and Roddenberry in morning dress and top hat, they took their seats at the derby only a few feet from the queen and within touching distance of Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenia, the daughters of the Duke of York Prince Andrew. The Royal Family sat two rows above Strickland and Roddenberry. When the jockey won the race, the queen came down the stairs to greet him. We could even see the wrinkles in her face, which were very few, Strickland says. Roddenberry also ended up in the receiving line when the queen and Prince Philip went to their seats. He bowed as the queen walked past him. It was an exhilarating experience, a moment my entire body was consumed with butter ies, he says. The two also attended a tea party on the River Thames, watching The Thames Diamond Jubilee Pageant, which is a otilla of up to 1,000 boats assembled from across the commonwealth. I had no idea they owned so many commonwealths, Strickland says. The queen, Prince Philip and the Royal Family were on the Royal Barge during the otilla. You could see them pretty good with a binoculars, Strickland says. The pair also watched the BBC Concert at Buckingham Palace. Following the concert, the queen lit the National Beacon. The evening ended with a reworks display. On Tuesday, June 5, the Diamond Jubilee weekend culminated with a day of celebrations in central London, including a service of thanksgiving at St. Pauls Cathedral followed by two receptions, a lunch at Westminster Hall, a carriage procession to Buckingham Palace and nally a balcony appearance, ypast and Feu de Joie. Following the celebrations, the pair was able to tour the London area, including visiting Windsor Castle, the Tower of London, the Palace of Westminster and Westminster Abby. For Strickland, one of the other major highlights of the trip was visiting the home and chapel of John Wesley, the founder of Methodism. Its amazing to see that chapel that he preached in, Strickland says. It was great. They also became friends with their chauffeur. He and his wife invited them to dinner one night on their trip. They still keep in touch with him. Not only was it an awesome trip, but we made a life-long friend, Roddenberry says. Strickland and Roddenberry also made friends at the hotel where they were staying for the trip. Once the employees there found out Stricklands rst name was Majesty, they bought her a cape and bowed to her. They all just went ape, Strickland says. It was the funniest thing. Not only do the two describe being in London for the Diamond Jubilee as an incredibly amazing experience, they both said being able to be there together made it even better. The trip was a lifetime experience with my Grandson, one I will always cherish, Strickland says. Roddenberry adds, It was a lifetime experience, one that I will always treasure, and being with my grandmother made it even more special. Queen Elizabeth II came to the throne on Feb. 6, 1952, after the death of her father, King George VI. The Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II is a multinational celebration throughout 2012 marking the 60th anniversary of the accession of Queen Elizabeth II to the thrones of seven countries and 16 sovereign states. Queen Victoria is the only other monarch in history to have celebrated a Diamond Jubilee, which she did in 1897. If still reigning on Sept. 10, 2015, Queen Elizabeth II will surpass Queen Victoria as the longest reigning monarch in British history. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 5ASpecial to The NewsFAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, Wakulla County Extension, and local small farmers have worked together to provide a capacity building workshop and farm tour examining concepts of hydroponics as a sustainable farming strategy for farmers and urban gardeners in our region. The workshop will take place at Sopchoppy Farms, a local small farm that features heirloom hydroponic tomatoes. This is the second workshop in the integrated agricultural systems series examining successful alternative small farm strategies. The focus areas are: How to build a hydroponic system, How to build an affordable greenhouse or high tunnel and Organic integrated pest management strategies for high tunnels and greenhouses. Facilitators for this session include Tim Carroll of Sopchoppy Farms, Jody Bedgood and Derek Helms of Tallahassees Evershine Hydroponics, Trevor Hylton of FAMU/ Wakulla County Extension, and Neal Miller of FAMU/ USDA-ARS. The hands-on learning session and farm tour will start at 1:30 p.m. and last until 5 p.m. on Sunday, Dec. 16. The cost is $15 per person. The Integrated Agricultural Systems Workshop will highlight several local small farmers and their organically grown and sustainably grown produce for purchasegreens, lettuce, onions, purslane, sugar cane stalks, sugar cane syrup, fresh baked bread and honey. Delicious local heirloom Cherokee Purple, Brandywine, and German Johnson tomatoes from Sopchoppy Farms will also be available for purchase. For additional information contact: Jennifer Taylor/ FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, famu.register@ gmail.com Location: Sopchoppy Farms 7953 Smith Creek Road, Sopchoppy FL 32358 Directions: Take U.S. Hwy 319 South to Sopchoppy. Continue through the town of Sopchoppy. Follow road signs to farm. WILLIAM SNOWDENScouts Brady, Julian, Justin, Dayton and Chance.Tiger Cub Scouts visit e Wakulla NewsDugout canoes to be discussed at meetingStaff ReportA group of Tiger Cub Scouts and their parents visited The Wakulla News this week, part of the scouts work on communications. Editor William Snowden talked to the scouts on Monday, Dec. 10, about newspapers and the different jobs involved in getting a paper out. The scouts are part of Tiger Cubs Pack 8 that meet at Medart Elementary. Their cubmaster is Blake Barnidge.Farm tour set Dec. 16 on hydroponicsEmily Winston is new manager of Inn at WildwoodSpecial to The NewsThe Inn at Wildwood Resort would like to congratulate, and introduce to the community, our new Hotel Manager Emily Winston. Winston moved to Wakulla County from Augusta, Ga., in 2009, to be closer to family and give her children an opportunity at a better education from our counties top rated schools. It was during this move, she got acquainted with the area, and found a diamond in the rough the Inn at Wildwood Resort. She got a job as a front desk clerk, and through hard work, determination and a stellar personality, she pursued her career with force. In less than a year, in 2010, she made the supervisor position as has been the face for the Inn for the past two years. We, with great excitement, promoted her to hotel manager on Nov. 28. With all she has proven and her passion for the job she performs, we expect great things for our property, and a wonderful experience for all the guests that stay at the Inn. This mother of three truly has the IT factor most companies dream of having. She has put together a great team and we anticipate a great change for the future. So if you want to nd a local place to stay or have friends visit, or want to book an event or party, chances are youll be greeted by Emily with a big smile and even bigger personality! Congratulations to you, Emily Winston, and welcome to our community! TALLAHASSEE Tallahassee Community College has selected Kimberly Moore as the Colleges new vice president of workforce development. Moore is one of the Tallahassee areas most wellknown and respected workforce development leaders, and brings over a decade of expertise to TCC. Moore comes to TCC from Workforce Plus where she joined in 2001 and has served as CEO since 2005. Workforce Plus provides comprehensive employment and workforce services and has helped connect thousands of jobseekers with employers. Before Workforce Plus, Moore served as a senior workforce development specialist at TCC. Moores experience has also been shaped by serving on the boards of numerous community organizations, including the Leon County Economic Development Council, the United Way of the Big Bend, the Wakulla Chamber of Commerce and the FAMU Small Business Advisory Council. Moores community-oriented service has earned her many awards and recognitions, including the Bethel Empowerment Foundations Phenomenal Women Making a Difference award in 2010, the National Hook-ups Gadsden County Woman of the Year in 2012 and Wakulla Chamber Member of the Year finalist recognition in 2012. Kimberlys name is synonymous with workforce development and community leadership in Tallahassee, said Dr. Jim Murdaugh, president of TCC. TCC has had a great relationship with Kimberly and WORKFORCE plus over the years, and we are thrilled that she is bringing her experience and leadership skills to the College. As vice president of workforce development at TCC, Moore will provide leadership for the Colleges career-focused training, professional development, adult education and business consulting programs. TCCs Center for Workforce Development offers training across a wide variety of fields, including manufacturing, construction and trades, information technology, green energy and ecotourism, with an emphasis on matching students skills with employers needs. For more information on the Center for Workforce Developments offerings, visit www.tcc. .edu/workforce. Kimberly Moores rst day at TCC will be March 1, 2013. Emily WinstonKimberly Moore joins TCC as new VP of Workforce DevelopmentKimberly Moore Join us on Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2013, at 7 p.m., as Julia Byrd, Senior Archaeologist, Bureau of Archaeological Research presents Florida Prehistoric and Historic Canoes. Florida is home to an unusually large concentration of dugout canoes, or boats made from tree trunks. The earliest of these canoes is over 6,000 years old, and people continued making and using log boats through the historic period. The meeting will be held at the B. Calvin Jones Center for Archaeology at the Gov. Martin House, 1001 De Soto Park Drive in Tallahassee. Look for signs on Lafayette Street on the evening of the meeting. Call (850) 245-6444 for further information. Of WakullaHeating & AirServing Wakulla & Franklin Counties850-926-5592Sales & Service All Makes & Models3232 Crawfordville Hwy. CrawfordvilleOwned & Operated by Gary Limbaugh Lic. # CAC1814304 Farrington Law OfceDeirdre A. Farrington, Esq. Lic. FLA & VA Bankruptcy | Divorce | Custody | Wills | Probate Crawfordville and Tallahassee 850-926-2700 Flooring Carpentry Painting Tile Work FREE Estimates Licensed & Insured Lic. #7827(850) 745 Cell (850) 570 (850) 421-3012 24-Hour ServiceSpecializing In Repair & Service Residential & Commercial Homes & Mobile Homes ER0015233Call Mark or Cole Oliver for all your electrical needs. GEO-ENERGY Since 1985 CERTIFIED DEALER FOR: MacCLEAN WATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 926 At the Queens Diamond Jubilee Please Recycle

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Page 6A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Wakulla Worship Centers Medart Area Crawfordville Area Sopchoppy Coastal Wakulla Station Church Briefs Santa will visit Ochlockonee Bay UMC Santa Claus will be visiting Ochlockonee Bay United Methodist Church at 2780 Surf Road on Saturday, Dec. 15, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. with refreshments and giving out gifts. Upcoming events at Wakulla UMCWakulla United Methodist Church announced these upcoming events at the church: Living Nativity will be held Friday and Saturday, Dec. 14 and 15, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. Drive through at 918 Woodville Highway with refreshments at the church fellowship hall at 1584 Old Woodville Highway. Christmas Eve candlelight Service will be held Dec. 24 at 7 p.m. Wakulla Station Community Dinner will be held Christmas Day, Dec. 25, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. The event is sponsored by the Kast Net and will be held at the Alford Building. Wakulla United Methodist Church is located at1584 Old Woodville Highway. For more information on these events, call (850) 421-5741 for more information. Quilt raffled off by Christ Church AnglicanAgain this year the nimblengered quilters of Christ Church Anglican made a beautiful quilt for raf e. Members sold tickets at $1 each or 6 for $5 all over the county. After the service on Sunday, Dec. 9, the winner was drawn from the hundreds of entrants Julie Martin of Sopchoppy was the winner. Christ Church thanks everyone who sold and bought tickets. And the quilters are already planning next years prize. 8:30am Service9:30am Sunday School for Adults10:30am Worship Service Childrens Sunday School850-745-8412 3383 Coastal HighwayChrist Church AnglicanWednesday 6:00 pm Supper and Children, Youth and Adult Bible ClassesThursday 10:00 am Adult Bible StudyThe Rev. John Spicer, RectorSunday Nursery available Pastor Vicar Bert MatlockChurch 926-7808 Pre-School 926-5557Bible Class 9:00 a.m. Worship 10:00 a.m. Pre-School M-F (3-5 Years)Trinity Lutheran Church of Wakulla County Hwy. 98, Across from WHS Web site: Lutheransonline.com/trinityofwakulla Ochlockonee BayUnited Methodist ChurchSunday Worship 9 a.m. Adult Sunday School 10:30 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall(850) 984-0127 Sopchoppy United Methodist ChurchSunday School 9:45 a.m. Worship 11 a.m.Pastor Kevin Hall850-962-2511 Wakulla United Methodist ChurchSunday Contemporary Service 8:30 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 11 a.m.1584 Old Woodville Rd. Wakulla Station 421-5741 Pastor Susie Horner 1st Crawfordville United Methodist ChurchPastor Mike Shockley 926-7209 Ochlockonee & Arran Road Come Grow With Us www.crawfordville-umc.orgSunday School 10:00 a.m. Worship 11:00 a.m. Let the Bible Speakwww.OysterBayChurchofChrist.orgFind the Peace and Hope and Answers in these Troubling Times.1044 Shadeville Road Crawfordville, Florida 32327 "the churches of Christ salute you" Romans 16:16Youve Got Bible Questions? Weve Got Bible Answers Sopchoppy Church Of ChristCorner of Winthrop & Byrd St.Sunday: Bible Study ...9:30 a.m. Worship ...................10:30 a.m. Evening Worship .............5 p.m. Wednesday: Bible Study ...7 p.m. Visitors are welcome! Home Bible Courses available please call for details, 96213 Schedule of Services SUNDAY: Refreshments Sunday School Worship Prayer WEDNESDAY: Supper Pioneer Club: Youth and Adult Classes 9:30am 10:00am 11:00am 6:00pm 6:00pm 6:30pm Pastor John S. Dunning (From Rhema Bible Training Center) www.ochcc.org Blood Bought Word Taught Spirit WroughtSpirit Life ChurchPentecostal 962-9000 2889C Crawfordville Hwy 850.926.9308 bigbendhospice.org Were Here to Share the Journey... Sunday School........................10 a.m. Sunday Worship ......................11 a.m. Evening Worship .......................6 p.m. Wednesday Service ..................7 p.m. & Youth Service ........................7 p.m. Royal Rangers ...........................7 p.m. Missionettes ..............................7 p.m. Ivan Assembly of God202 Ivan Church Road Crawfordville Pastor, Daniel CookseyCome & Worship With Us926-IVAN(4826) By REV. JAMES L. SNYDER The Christmas holiday season is always ablaze with beautiful colors. I nd it hard to be gloomy or grumpy this time of the year. I must confess, not everybody belongs to this Holiday Cheer Club. It is an exclusive club but open to anybody who is tired of being grumpy. Colors abound throughout the season and the Christmas songs highlight this. Im dreaming of a white Christmas. Ill have a blue Christmas without you. Rudolph the red nose reindeer. One of the most obvious colors of Christmas is green. Right at the center of this Christmas holiday is the Christmas tree decked from top to bottom in beautiful colors and lights. Nothing says Christmas quite like an old-fashioned Christmas tree. My thoughts along this line are, let the grumps and grouches complain about the Christmas tree. For myself, I will look with admiring wonder at the beauty of the Christmas tree. Then of course, who could forget good old Santa Claus dressed in his red suit. I never could gure out why Santas suit was always red. Throughout the years, I never gave it too much thought and assumed it was a fashion statement from the North Pole. For the most part, we only celebrate Christmas once a year. I think Charles Dickens had it right with old Mr. Scrooge, after his conversion, celebrating Christmas every day of the year. If I were president of the United States, I would enact a law that would set aside one year to be a year of celebrating Christmas all 365 days. I think I would only have to do it once and nobody would want to go back to the old grumpy times of celebrating it only one time out of the year. I was thinking about this the other night when the Gracious Mistress of the Parsonage jarred me back to reality. Have you, she queried most seriously, finished with your Christmas shopping? Christmas shopping! I had forgotten about it. I know we celebrate Christmas every year but I sometimes get so caught up with celebrating Christmas I forget about buying Christmas presents. After all, that Christmas tree would be somewhat naked if there were not Christmas presents to litter around the bottom. I had to look at my wife and say, No, I havent even started. How many Christmas presents do I have to buy? Silly boy, she said with a chuckle that could compete with good old Santa Claus any day of the week, you got to buy Christmas presents for everybody in our family. Santas red suit has nothing to do with a North Pole fashion statement; it has everything to do with my nancial statement. I got a piece of paper and together my wife and I jotted down all of the members in our family. By the time we were done, I would have to purchase Christmas presents for hundreds and hundreds of family members. At the beginning of the month of December, my checkbook is in the black, but each day of the month the black begins to fade into expanding shades of red. By the time the 24th of the month comes around my checkbook is a solid, brilliant, scarlet red. I sighed quite deeply as I closed my checkbook. I almost said to my wife, Remember the day...? I stopped short of vocalizing that thought. I thought back when we rst were married, which seems like hundreds of years ago, we only got presents for each other. I bought one present for her and she bought one present for me. What a Merry Christmas we had back in the day. A few days later as we were wrapping those presents I began thinking of another color. I looked at my wife and said, This must be what they mean when they talked about the golden days. She laughed, and I thought some more. My thoughts centered on the fact of what a wonderful family we have. After all those years, we have accumulated a marvelous family. Thinking about all the ones in my family, I began to retract those thoughts of veto. You know, I said to my wife quite thoughtfully, red becomes my checkbook. All that red means all that family. The Christmas holiday season means family. There is no family more glorious than the family of God. The Bible says, For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life (John 3:16 KJV). The whole spirit of Christmas has to do with giving, and God started it all. I do not mind a red Christmas because everyone in my family is worth it. As Tiny Tim said, God bless us all, everyone.Rev. James L. Snyder is pastor of the Family of God Fellowship in Ocala. Call him at (866) 552-2543 or e-mail jamessnyder2@ att.net. OUT TO PASTORIll have a red Christmas, thank youreligious views and events ChurchThe students of Michelle Snow School of Music will present their Christmas recital on Friday, Dec. 14, and Saturday, Dec. 15, at Christ Church Anglican on Coastal Highway 98 in Medart. Fridays performance will begin at 7 p.m., and Saturdays at 11 a.m. Youth of all ages will be playing a variety of musical styles and instruments, including guitar, violin, piano, drums, and voice. The recital will feature performances by the following young musicians: Sydney Colvin, Brianna Peacock, Danyelle Dias, Nicholas Cotes, Victor Palumbo, Tanner Pafford, Joey Rickards, Summer Padgett, Jason Paris, Steven Kinsey, Shea Harrington, Zoie Hill, Ariel Ganey, Yese Reyes, Jacob Rardin, Marina & Jonah Harvey, Lindley Kendrick Jack and Maxwell Mispel, Desmond Maxwell, Rhiannon Beattie, Ryan Crawford, Allison Gordon, Sabashtian Jalbert, Ashlee Maddi, Riley Blankenship, Annabell Chancy, Loranda Hutton, Wesley Kyle, Jason Westmark, Precision Rudd, Derisha & Deshea Jones, Ella Wren Moody, Ryvan Heys, Oliver Robinson, Skyler Crawford, Chloe Choquette, and Abbott Gauger. The recitals are free-of-charge, open to the public and will be followed by receptions. For more information, please call 9267627. Students from the music studios of Mary Updegraff and Kristin Dow will be performing in Sounds of the Season on Monday, Dec. 17, at 7 p.m. at the Crawfordville United Methodist Church. The recital will feature holiday favorites to lift the Christmas Spirit. Family and friends are invited to attend. Updegraffs students are Kristin Bodie, Rena Carter, Nathan Cushard, Mia Frick, Travis Harvey-Henderson, Ali Pearson, Emma Vaughn and Jessica Wise. The choirs of the United Methodist and First Baptist churches of Crawfordville are joinging together to present the Christmas cantata, Silent Night by Russell Mauldin and and Sue C. Smith, Sunday, Dec. 16, at 3 p.m. at the Methodist Church and 6 p.m. at First Baptist, Becky Cook and Kirstin Dow, directors. The musical features a wonderful blend of traditional, contemporary and original Christmas songs to celebrate the season.Christmas recitals setMichelle Snow students will perform Dec. 14 and Dec. 15 Mary Updegra s students will perform on Dec. 17 Choirs to perform songs of the season at churches on Dec. 16

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 7AJames Monroe Sanders, 64, of Sopchoppy, died on Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. A lifelong Wakulla County resident, he was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran who enjoyed shing and having a good time with family and friends. Survivors include a brother, William M. (Matilda) Sanders of Sopchoppy; sisters, Peggy Porter of Tallahassee, Dorothy (David) Kelly, Viola Henderson and Perlie Revells, all of Sopchoppy; and numerous nieces and nephews also survive. A Celebration of Life service was held by his family at his Syfrette Creek Road residence on Saturday, Dec. 8, 2012. Arrangements are under the care and direction of Forbes Funeral Home, Macclenny, 850-559-3380. Please sign the online guestbook at www.forbesfuneralhome.net/.Obituaries Charles Sanford Cocroft Deloris Devota Dee McCranie Gerrell James Monroe Sanders Thomas Charles SandersCharles Sanford Cocroft Jr., 77, passed away on Saturday, Dec. 1, 2012, in Madison, Ga. He was born in Miami on Feb. 28, 1935, to Malcolm Cocroft and Clara Cocroft. He was a farmer all of his life and a commercial sherman for 35 years. He thoroughly enjoyed shing and hunting and sharing his bounty. He was a very generous man. He also enjoyed playing the steel guitar. He had a high appreciation of the land and saw the value in it. He enjoyed riding his Harley Davidson motorcycle. In 1972 his family was nominated as Farm Family of the Year for Jefferson County. He is survived by his wife of ve years, Wylene Cocroft of Wacissa; his children, William Billy Cocroft and wife Eva of Longwood, Janine Taylor and husband Bubba of Tallahassee, Carl Cocroft of Wakulla Station, and Shane Cocroft and wife Nikki of North Carolina; three grandchildren, Brandi Cocroft of Kissimmee, Lexi Cocroft of Longwood and Kevin Odom of Longwood; a nephew, Gary Estes of Monticello; three stepchildren, James McMullen, Tom McMullen and Janice Clarke; eight step-grandchildren; ve great-grandchildren; as well as his lifetime friend Mike Corley; and his rat terrier Jack. Funeral Services were held at Wacissa United Methodist Church on Friday, Dec. 7, 2012 at 3 p.m. with Pastor Jim Gamble of ciating. Interment was held in Beth Page Cemetery. The family received friends on Thursday, Dec. 6, 2012, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at Wacissa United Methodist Church. In lieu of owers, memorial donations may be made to the Wacissa United Methodist Church Building Fund, P.O. Box 411, Wacissa FL 32341. All arrangements are under the care of Joe P. Burns Funeral Home. Sign the guestbook at www.joepburnsfuneralhomes.com.Charles Sanford Cocroft James Monroe SandersThomas Charles Sanders, 71, of Waycross, Ga., formerly of Bloomsburg, Penn., died Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, at the Hospice Satilla Hospice House after an extended illness. He was born in Youngwood, Penn., to Thomas D. Sanders and Florence Cressler Sanders. At the age of 2, he and his family moved to Bloomsburg, Penn., where he lived and worked until moving to Waycross, Ga., in 1996. He graduated from Bloomsburg High School in 1959, and then began working for the Textron Corporation where he worked as a hydraulic mechanic building blades for military aircraft. After the closing of the Textron plant he moved to Waycross where he worked for Carlton Caterpillar until his retirement in 2004. Sanders also owned and operated T.C. Leasing Company. In Bloomsburg, he was active in the Bloomsburg Town Park, the Elks Lodge, Moose Lodge, American Legion and the VFW. He served as a volunteer re ghter and worked part time at the Bloomsburg Airport. He, along with ve others, founded the Demolition Derby held every year at the Bloomsburg Fair. Growing up with NASCAR driver Jimmy Spencer, he loved NASCAR racing and collected NASCAR diecast cars. He was a member of St. Matthew Lutheran Church in Bloomsburg. Survivors include his wife, Gail Sanders of Waycross; a daughter, Tara C. Sanders of Tallahassee; a grandson, Kayden Thomas Carraway-Sanders of Tallahassee; three sisters-in-law, Cookie Sanders of Orangeville, Penn., Carol McCloskey and her husband Mike of Waycross, and Sherrell Fruit and her husband Bob of Bloomsburg, Penn.; and numerous nieces, nephews and other relatives. Along with his parents, he was predeceased by two daughters, Tammy C. Sanders and Tonya C. Sanders; and two brothers, Edward Sanders and Calvin Bud Sanders. A service celebrating the life of Thomas Charles Sanders will be held at a later date in Bloomsburg, Penn. In lieu of owers the family requests memorial contributions be sent to the Hospice Satilla Hospice House, 808 Evergreen Way, Waycross, GA 31501. The Miles-Odum Funeral Home in Waycross is in charge of arrangements. Sympathy may be expressed by signing online at www.milesodumfuneralhome.com. Deloris Devota Dee McCranie Gerrell, daughter of John A. and Sarah Kate McCranie, lived 76 inspirational years, spending 60 wonderful years married to Walter Dale Gerrell. She was one of eight children of which three survived, Iola, Kathlene and RitaSue. She raised three children, Jim (Brenda), Melanie (Clay) and Mark (Deborah) and spoiled six grandchildren, Tony, Jarrett, Tammie, Michael, Mindy and Leah. She lived to enjoy the birth of 14 greatgrandchildren, Morgan, Brody, Dalton, Cole, Madyson, Colby, Conner, Cole, Carly, Macy, Claire, Grayson, Haley and Leaston. She was also loved by her many nieces and nephews. Dee was a loving and active member of the Woodville First Baptist Church where she enjoyed worshipping, singing in the choir for the last 50 years and faithfully serving as the church secretary for many years. She worked with the Department of Agriculture and served as the State of Floridas Rural Mail carriers auxiliary president. She also volunteered as a Pink Lady working at Tallahassee Memorial Hospital and at local elementary schools. She enjoyed traveling, cooking and ensured that her family was provided for. She always had a smile on her face, looked for the positive in any situation and most of all loved God, her Lord and Savior. Funeral Services were held on Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2012, at 11 a.m. at Woodville First Baptist Church with burial at Woodville Cemetery. A visitation was held from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10, 2012, at the church. In lieu of owers, memorial contributions may be made to Woodville First Baptist Church, 9500 Woodville Highway, Tallahassee FL 32305. Beggs Funeral Home, 3322 Apalachee Parkway, Tallahassee, FL 32311, (850) 9422929 was in charge of arrangements.Deloris Devota Dee McCrainie Gerrell Thomas Charles SandersSpecial to The NewsBishop Gregory Parks is visiting every parish in the diocese to meet the people and see what we provide to our parish. Before mass he was humored as one of the second graders came in the front door to the church and the bishop was in the foyer. The youngster looked up and could only say, wow! You see, the bishop is 6-feet, 8-inches in stocking feet. During Mass, the bishop commented on his height as being the tallest bishop in the United States. He had an opportunity to speak with many of St. Elizabeth parishioners and to visit with the youth. It happened that they were learning the Rosary that day. While in the area, the bishop also attended Sacred Heart Parish in Lanark, which is also pastored by Father Eddie. That mass was Saturday evening. From Crawfordville, the bishop went to the Tallahassee airport where he ew on to Washington, D.C., to meet with all of the U.S. bishops. This was a great day for St. Elizabeth Ann Seton parishioners. The good Lord willing, Bishop Parks will return in person for our young folks con rmation. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSBishop Gregory Parks of Pensacola celebrates Mass with Father Eddie and Father Paul at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton in Medart.Bishop visits, celebrates Mass at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Catholic Church Special to The NewsHolidays are about the memories, so how can you make yours merry and bright? Here are some tips to get you started from Deanna Brann, PhD, weddings blogger with The Huffington Post and author of the new book, Reluctantly Related: Secrets To Getting Along With Your Mother-inLaw or Daughter-in-Law. Talk with the parents about the gift-giving rules for the grandchildren. Know what they want and dont want for their children in the way of gifts, money spent, number of gifts, etc. If it isnt clear, ask. Explore the holiday plans in advance so you know what is happening when and by whom dont assume anything. Get clarity so you know in advance how the holidays will be and where you t into them. Dont take things personally holidays are stressful. Parents are trying to please everyone, plus they want to create their own holiday traditions. Think of some things you can do with your grandchildren that dont include monetary gifts. Create the memories by doing, not necessarily by buying. The grandkids will remember what you did long after the holidays, but they wont remember what you bought them. Create a family tradition of your own with your grandchildren. Create something that your grandchildren will not only remember, but also look forward to year after year.Tips to make holiday memories merry and bright 000CV38 Help Big Bend Hospice Honor Those Who Are No Longer With Us Big Bend HospiceTree of Remembrance 2012 2889C Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327 850.926.9308 www.bigbendhospice.orgVisit our Wakulla County Tree at Ameris Bank, Capital City Bank & Centennial Bank in Crawfordville Phone 926-8245926-2396As always, client service is our ultimate priority. Frances Casey Lowe, Attorney Guilday, Tucker, Schwartz & Simpson, P.A. Estate Planning-Wills, Power of Attorney, Living Wills, Trusts Probate and Heir Land Resolution Real Estate Transactions (Residential and Commercial) Title Insurance Business Planning and Incorporations General PracticeCrawfordville Of ce3042 Crawfordville Highway Crawfordville, FL 32327Tallahassee Of ce1983 Centre Pointe Blvd Suite 200 Tallahassee, FL 32308850.224.4960www.fsucu.org HAVE YOU LOST YOUR WAY? Gena Davis Personal Trainer 926685 or 510Gena DavisPersonal Trainer926685 or 510 I CAN HELP! I CAN HELP! PAIN HEALTH BOOST ENERGY PREVENT INJURY WEIGHT LOSS IMPROVED STRENGTH Open 9-5 Closed Sun. & Wed.Mon. Color Tag 50%OFFTues. -----Seniors 25%OFFThurs. ---Deal of the Day 3299 Crawfordville Hwy.Approx. 1 mile S. of County Courthouse www.promiselandministries.org Promise Land THRIFT STORE y 926-3281

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Page 8A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comhappenings in our community CommunityTeen asks for presents for others on birthday Special to The NewsMakayla Payne, an 11th grader at Wakulla High School, just celebrated her 17th birthday. At her party, instead of gifts, she asked everyone to bring a new unwrapped toy to be donated to Toys For Tots. She is the daughter of Scott and Shelli Payne of Medart and the granddaughter of Lessie and Terry Crum of Medart and Deborah and Mike McFadden of Woodville. Not many 17-year-olds would give up gifts to help others, said her mother. She has a big heart.PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSThe toys the party goers gave for Toys for Tots, above. Makayla Payne and her friends at her birthday party, at left. Applications sought for rst ight of Honor FlightSpecial to The NewsMore than 60 years ago, Americas Greatest Generation fought oppression around the world, and in 2004, the World War II Memorial was dedicated on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. in their honor. The veterans who lived to see that day were in their eighties or older. Even now, most of these veterans have never visited the monument that honors their sacri ce. Recently, Honor Flight Tallahassee, part of the national Honor Flight Network, hosted its official kick-off event to introduce the newly-formed Honor Flight hub to the Big Bend region. Honor Flight Tallahassee exists for one reason to send North Floridas U.S. military veterans to Washington, D.C. to re ect at the memorials built to honor their sacri ces, at no cost to the veteran. We are running out of time to honor our veterans with this special mission, said Mac Kemp, Chair of Honor Flight Tallahassee. The United States is losing its World War II veterans at the rate of approximately 900 per day, and we cannot miss the opportunity to thank our local members of the Greatest Generation for their service and sacri ce. The inaugural Tallahassee Honor Flight is scheduled for spring 2013. While the ight is free to veterans, each ight costs between $85,000 and $100,000 and is entirely funded by local fundraisers and community support. The Leon County Board of County Commissioners was among the rst to recognize the importance of this community program and unanimously approved a $10,000 donation during the Oct. 9 commission meeting. The Board commends the work that has been completed in establishing our local Honor Flight hub and we are proud to be engaged as a community partner in this initiative, said Nick Maddox, Leon County Commissioner and 2011-2012 Vice Chairman. This program is consistent with Leon Countys on-going efforts to support our local community of veterans, and we hope this nancial contribution provides a catalyst for other community partners to contribute to this important endeavor. Honor Flight Tallahassee is currently accepting applications from World War II veterans from all service branches for the inaugural ight. Additional information and application are available at www.HonorFlightTallahassee.org. During each ight, volunteer guardians support the veterans pushing wheelchairs, carrying belongings, or simply joining in a full day of celebration and re ection. Guardians are critical to the success of each Honor Flight and applications are currently being accepted for the inaugural ight. Healthcare professionals and active military are especially encouraged to apply. Donations are critical to ensure Honor Flight Tallahassee can honor veterans with a trip to Washington, D.C. Donations can be made by visiting HonorFlightTallahassee.org and clicking Donate. Checks may be made payable to Honor Flight Tallahassee and mailed to: P.O. Box 12033, Tallahassee, FL 32317. Honor Flight Tallahassee is a 501(c)(3) organization and all contributions are tax deductible to the extent allowed by law. Honor Flight Tallahassee was established in 2012 as a local hub of the national Honor Flight Network. Honor Flight Tallahassees mission is to transport U.S. military veterans to Washington, D.C. to visit the memorials dedicated to honor their service and sacri ces, at no cost to the veteran. The inaugural ight is scheduled for spring 2013. For more, visitwww. HonorFlightTallahassee.org. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSLeon County Commission gives donation to Honor Flight which sends military veterans to Washington, D.C. Special to The NewsCHAT of Wakulla, Inc. recently announced that nancial assistance to spay or neuter unaltered dogs is now available again through a second grant obtained by the organization this year. It is impossible to adopt out of the pet overpopulation crisis, and CHAT is committed to help families on limited income. Millions of animals get euthanized across the U.S. each year because there are just not enough homes. They are making nancial assistance available to families with unaltered companion dogs, to reduce the number of litters entering the local shelter. CHAT wants to prevent the senseless death of unwanted animals. They are grateful to the local veterinarians for agreeing to a reduced fee for procedures to be eligible for this grant. To accommodate the schedule of local veterinarian clinics, only a certain number of vouchers will be available each month. The vouchers must be used within 30 days of issuance. Spay/Neuter vouchers can be obtained at the CHAT Adoption Center, 1 Oak Street in Crawfordville on Thursdays from 3 to 7 p.m. only. Applicants may then schedule appointments with Crawfordville Animal Hospital, Shepherd Spring Animal Hospital or VAC Wakulla Animal Hospital. They currently have a waiting list, so call (850) 926-0890 during the hours mentioned above for more information and requirements.Special to The NewsFAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, Wakulla County Extension and local small farmers have worked together to provide a capacity building workshop and farm tour examining concepts of hydroponics as a sustainable farming strategy for farmers and urban gardeners in the region. This workshop will take place at Sopchoppy Farms, a local small farm that features heirloom hydroponic tomatoes, on Dec. 16. This is the second workshop in the integrated agricultural systems series examining successful alternative small farm strategies. The focus areas are: How to build a hydroponic system, How to build an affordable greenhouse or high tunnel and Organic integrated pest management strategies for high tunnels and greenhouses. Facilitators for this session include Tim Carroll of Sopchoppy Farms, Jody Bedgood and Derek Helms of Tallahassees Evershine Hydroponics, Trevor Hylton of FAMU/Wakulla County Extension, and Neal Miller of FAMU/USDA-ARS. The hands-on learning session and farm tour will be held from 1:30 to 5 p.m. on Dec. 16. The Integrated Agricultural Systems Workshop will highlight several local small farmers and their organically grown and sustainably grown produce for purchase, including greens, lettuce, onions, purslane, sugar cane stalks, sugar cane syrup, fresh baked bread and honey. Delicious local heirloom Cherokee Purple, Brandywine, and German Johnson tomatoes from Sopchoppy Farms will also be available for purchase. Cost of the workshop is $15 per person. For additional information contact: Jennifer Taylor, of FAMU StateWide Small Farm Programs, at famu. register@gmail.com.Small farms workshop and tour is this Sunday Help available at CHAT for spay/neuterSpecial to The NewsThere are three upcoming Tools to Quit classes that will be held in January. These tobacco cessation classes will be held on Jan. 8, Jan. 15 and Jan. 29. There is no cost to attend. Free nicotine patches and nicotine gum are provided to participants who complete each one time class, while supplies last. All classes begin at 6 p.m. at the Wakulla County Public Library (Conference Room), 4330 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville. There will be additional classes offered throughout 2013. For additional information, please Calandra Portalatin by telephone at 850-224-1177 or by e-mail at cportalatin@bigbendahec.org.Tobacco quit classes o ered Find us on Community News: Email your community news and announcements to jjensen@thewakullanews.net. Announcements are edited for style, clarity and grammar and runs when space becomes available. News: Advertising: Christmas (Dec. 27 edition)HOLIDAYAdvertising Deadlines

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 9Aeducation news SchoolBruce, Saulter win spelling bee at CESSpecial to The NewsOn Friday, Nov. 16, Crawfordville Elementary School held its annual fourth and fth grade Spelling Bee. Twenty-four students from eight homeroom classes were selected to participate and battled their counterparts for two first and second place positions from each grade level. First place winner from fth grade was second year participant, Wilson Bruce, representing Mrs. Kellys class and second place winner was Lynne Carnes from Mrs. Adkison and Mrs. Strickland class. Fourth grade winners included Tyler Saulter, rst place, and Cameron Lee, second place, both from Mrs. Hat elds class. Cougar Media Specialist, Cindy Burse was the moderator. Mary Fort, District Elementary Staf ng Specialist and Tracy Dempsey, former Crawfordville Elementary ESE teacher and current District Secondary Staf ng Specialist, and Tammy Peltier, Cougar administrative secretary, served as panel judges. Other contestants from the fifth grade classes included Morgan Carter, Crystal Jedziniak, Jason Rogers, Lilly Simons, Bryan Smith and Emily Thomas. Danielle Beaulieu, Elizabeth Dubois, Katarina Gunnarsson and Ally Harden were absent and did not compete. Fourth grade contestants included Hannah Babcock, Aden Barksdale, Kaitlin Campbell, Kyle Campbell, Keira Cushard, Rachel Freeman, Dawson Hooker, Caleb Tillman and Melody White. Zachary Neel was absent and did not compete. Advancing on to the District Spelling Bee on Friday, Jan. 11, 2013, at Wakulla Middle School will be Bruce, Carnes, Saulter and Lee. Barbara Mingledorff, fth grade teacher served as the Spelling Bee Sponsor. Other fth and fourth grade teachers include Alisa Adkison, Renee Kelly, Brandi Panzarino, Trish Strickland, Holly Harden, Frankie Harvey, Heather Hatfield, Louann Hames and Sherry Parks. PHOTOS SPECIAL TO THE NEWSFifth grade contestants in the spelling bee Fourth grade spelling bee contestants By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 6...A day after the Florida Department of Education issued and then pulled back information on teacher evaluations across the state, interim Commissioner Pam Stewart told lawmakers that the rst year of a new attempt to pay teachers according to performance was painful. Stewarts appearance Thursday followed the agencys decision to pull down information about teacher evaluations for the 2011-12 school year, saying a relatively small number of teachers had mistakenly been counted multiple times in certain categories in the states overall numbers. I think this is a painful year, Stewart said at a meeting of the Senate Education Appropriations Subcommittee. I think any time you implement something this large for the rst time, there are growing pains. I think that the 2-3 year will be much more telling, and how we do as we move forward. By late Thursday afternoon, a corrected version of the information originally released by the department was available. And the agency pointed out that the percentages of teachers rated in each category changed only slightly. But Stewart and lawmakers also discussed a looming change for the 201415 year, when local school districts are supposed to develop ways to assess the growth in student performance -the basis of teacher pay under the new regime -in courses that dont currently have state-backed tests available. Currently, many teachers for those courses are being evaluated based on other numbers; kindergarten teachers, for example, are sometimes evaluated based on an entire schools performance on state tests, despite the fact that kindergarten students do not take state tests. Thats one of the things that we are facing that is problematic for us, that is one of the biggest concerns that we hear and will be corrected each year as we move forward through this system, as those assessments are developed and used in districts, Stewart said. But some lawmakers sounded skeptical, noting that a curriculum based on a national model, tests matching that curriculum and other changes are also slated to take effect at the same time. Senate Education Committee Chairman John Legg, R-New Port Richey, said he supported each change on its own. But when you add them all together, it looks like we have one runway in 2014 coming up. ... Should we maybe look at the ight path of all these different planes that are coming and maybe adjust some of the timetables for some of these ight paths to land correctly on that year? he asked. Stewart didnt directly answer. I think that as we move forward, time is going to tell us whether or not we did this in the right sequence or not, and we need to be looking along the way incrementally to determine whether or not we need to make shifts, she said. Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, said after the meeting that he was less concerned with the correction of the evaluation numbers than with the deadline for the local tests -and that the state should delay some of the changes. Im of the opinion now that we cannot get done in a year and a half what needs to be done to implement the programs and changes the way we should do them, said Montford, a former Leon County superintendent of schools. We should not do them halfway.Stewart: First year of teacher evaluations painfulEarly learning formula under review By MARGIE MENZEL THE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDAResponding to the unanimous request of Floridas 31 early learning coalitions, Gov. Rick Scott Friday announced that recent controversial changes to the funding formula for the states subsidized school readiness programs would be frozen and reviewed. In a letter to Roseann Fricks, chair of the Association of Early Learning Coalitions, Scott said he had asked the state Of ce of Early Learning to establish a work group of lawmakers, coalitions, child care providers and local governments to gather input and re ne a funding formula by January 1, 2014. A quality early learning system is critical to providing Florida children the tools they need to succeed, Scott wrote. OEL Director Mel Jurado resigned the day before Scotts announcement, but OEL Director of Governmental Relations Allen Mortham said he was unaware of a connection between the two events. The governor was responding to an uproar that ensued when, in late June, OEL noti ed the coalitions that their funding would change on July 1, less than a week later. Some coalitions would get more money, others less. The changes blind-sided not only the coalitions but their local legislative delegations. Its a win for the families. Its a win for the providers, said a jubilant Evelio Torres, director of the Early Learning Coalition of Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties, on Friday. That coalition lost $3.7 million this year and stood to lose $22.3 million more over the next ve years. That is the right way to do thisto ensure that we end up with a formula that takes into consideration everyone at the table. Early learning guru David Lawrence, who was copied on Scotts letter, agreed. I think the governor is right on target in promising a fair process as well as underscoring how critical high-quality early learning is to the future of children and of Florida. The wisest course Florida could possibly take is to help parents help their children have the best possible chance to succeed in school and in life. The Early Learning Coalition of the Big Bend lost more $650,000 this year. Its board chair, Bryan Desloge, president of the Florida Association of Counties, also applauded the governors move. This is an important issue and a purposeful conversation needs to occur between all the stakeholders before additional changes occur, Desloge said. The early learning system connects lowincome working families with subsidized child care that, in turn, promotes school readiness. Florida has 68,000 children waiting for services. Early learning issues roiled the 2012 legislative session, which saw a clash between those who wanted to loosen the standards for providers and those who argued for higher quality child care. After a scathing report by the Auditor Generals Of ce, four lawmakers proposed early learning measures and a compromise bill was hammered out and passed. Scott vetoed the measure, saying the state could implement the changes by rule. Among them was an equity funding formula.Character building tips for parents with teens Special to The NewsParents today contend not only with yesterdays worries drug abuse, bullying, teenage sex and delinquency but new challenges. The digital age has introduced adult predators and other online hazards, and body-altering decorating such as tattoos and piercings are popular temptations, said James G. Wellborn, a clinical psychologist with 18 years of experience working with parents and teens. The teenage years are unlike any other in a persons life its a unique in-between period from childhood to adulthood, and its helpful to remember that problems during this time are actually normal, says Wellborn, author of the new book Raising Teens in the 21st Century: A Practical Guide to Effective Parenting, A universally admired trait, spanning all cultures, religion and philosophy, is compassion. A truly compassionate teen will inevitably have a host of other positive qualities, Wellborn said. Parents can encourage compassion in the following ways: Model it: Compassion is largely learned, so be aware of how you act around your children. How did you respond to the request for money from that panhandler on the street? What comment did you make behind his back, in the presence of your kid? Your teens are watching and listening. Notice it: Point out examples of compassion that occur around you. It comes in many forms. Relevant to our daily lives are the people who quietly, and without recognition, help others in need, including volunteers of all types. Teach it: Compassion has to be taught, so be prepared to provide direct instruction on how your teen needs to think and act in order to develop that quality. One important component empathy. If your teens cant see things from anothers perspective, it is dif cult for them to appreciate what that person is going through. Anticipate it: Character can be fostered by projecting moral strength into their future. Say things like: By the time youre an adult, you will be such a person of strong character. Guilt it: A personal value system serves as a means of accountability to oneself (and your family and community). If they ful ll the promise of personal values it is a source of justi able pride. Violating personal values should result in guilt for not doing whats right and shame for letting other people down. Repeat it: Once is not enough when it comes to character. Find every opportunity to work it into the conversation. News: Advertising: New Years (Jan. 3 edition)HOLIDAYAdvertising Deadlines all akullas inest Sandy Lott 850 926-1010 Mary Applegate 850-926-3787 David Rossetti 850 591-6161 850926-1011734 Shadeville Rd, Crawfordville FL, 32327 Scan Mereo and short sale specialistsour ome own ealtor

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Page 10A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comoutdoor sports and shing reports OutdoorsWell, so much for winter. Folks are starting to put away their annel shirts and breaking out the shortsleeve shirts and shorts. I was shing on Thursday and there was a guy out shing with a pair of shorts and no shirt. Its almost the middle of December and youre supposed to be wearing coats and sock caps or at least longsleeve shirts and sweatshirts. The water temperature when I was out yesterday was in the high 60s. Right now Im sure the sh are confused and keep moving. I just talked with JR at the Aucilla and he said shing was still good but the patterns have changed. Most of the sh moved from deep in the creeks in the holes to the mouth of the creeks and out onto the ats. He did say you could still catch trout in the river. He said once the trout move into the river those sh are gonna stay until we get a lot of rain and the salinity of the river changes drastically. There are plenty of reds in the river and are biting on everything. Live shimp, cut bait, Gulp and top water baits. There are still plenty of pinfish around so youre gonna loose a lot of shrimp to them. Jimmy Bevis at Shell Island Fish Camp in St. Marks said shing continues to be good. He went way up East River yesterday and said there were plenty of trout there. Kenny Davis who guides for Jimmy took his family about a week ago and limited on trout and caught some real nice reds. They shed the mouth of the St. Marks for the trout and East River for the reds. Bucky and one of the other employees there went the other day and went east of the lighthouse. They were shing the creeks and came back with their limit of trout and reds. He said they threw back a lot of legal trout because they forgot a tape and if they werent at least 17 or 18 inches long they didnt keep them. Jimmy said hes still seeing some sheepshead but not like a couple of weeks ago and plenty of ounder are being caught. Capt. Randy Peart said he just got back from shing down around Pine Island. They were strictly y- shing and he said shing was fair. They caught trout, jacks, lady sh, mangrove snapper and 7 or 8 snook. He took his 23-year-old son Wes who is getting ready to go in the army. On Jan. 23 he will report to Ft. Benning for basic and after that hes going to Ranger school. We wish him all the best. Randy said last week he took Harold Fulford and Bruce Johnson to the Econ na for two days and he said they had incredible shing. They caught their limit of 19 to 20 inch trout both days but only had one red. He said trout shing was fantastic but just didnt know where the reds were. Two weeks ago Randy and his son were at the Econ na and had trailer trouble. Wes pulled the trailer to Perry to have it welded and while he was gone R andy said he eased down the river fishing. Using a y he caught 10 nice tr out. When Wes got back they continued catching and releasing trout and then went out to 8 feet of water and caught big sea bass on a y. According to Capt. Pat McGriff fishing down around the Keaton Beach area is fantastic. Everyone is getting their limit of trout and the sh are back on the ats in 2 and a half to 3 and a half feet of water. Live shrimp, pin sh, Gulp and topwater baits are all producing. Last Wednesday and Thursday I shed with Dalbert and Lonnie Fitch from Kennesaw, Ga. We shed up in the creeks and in Spring Creek. They had 10 trout on Wednesday and probably threw back 50 or 60 that were shorts. On Thursday they also had 10 trout, one nice flounder and a 26-inch red which is the rst nice red I have seen in a while. Dalbert is 85 and has been shing down in this area for a long time. I asked about when he rst started coming down here and he said they shed with a Mr. Crum but he couldnt remember his rst name. He said they shed with him quite a few times and then came down one w eek and Mr. Crum wasnt going to be able to take them. Dalbert asked if he could nd them someone else and he told them that his son was a good sherman and could take them. His sons name was Harley Crum and was 16 years old at the time. He kept his son out of school those two days and Harley took them and continued taking them when they came down until he got married and moved away. He said they always caught a lot of sh with them. I asked Dalbert late in the afternoon of the rst day we shed if he was getting tired. He said he was but would never tell me he was. He stood up and shed all day casting a rod and I told him I hoped I could do t hat at 85. He said he hopes he can do it at 86. Sunday afternoon Dwayne Broadway and I went for a couple of hours because someone had told me where they had caught several nice trout. It was a spot I sh quite often and have caught a lot of sh from and wanted to see if they were still there. We caught and released at least 50 trout and probably half of them were over 15 inches. We used strictly the pearl white grub and caught sh non-stop for two hours. We also caught and released two reds and two ounder. Its supposed to cool off a little this week but I dont think it will do anything except maybe move some sh off the ats to the mouth of the creeks again. Good luck and good shing!Warm weather has moved the sh to the mouth of creek and onto the ats From The DockBY CAPT. JODY CAMPBELL Dylan Raker, son of April Zanco, is pictured with his rst 4-point buck shot while hunting with his grandfather, Bo Zanco, and step-brother Ethan Vonier in Sumatra on Thanksgiving weekend. Brag BookSPECIAL TO THE NEWSDylan Raker bags his rst buck, a four-pointerFor the week of Nov. 30 Dec. 6. This report represents some events the FWC handled over the past week, but does not include all actions taken by the Division of Law Enforcement. SANTA ROSA COUNTY: Officer Kenneth Manning and Lt. Dan Hahr were on foot patrol within the Blackwater WMA when they heard a ri e shot west of their location. The of cers knew of a tree stand in that area and walked to its location. When they got close to the location, they heard a person dragging something through the brush. A man walked up to them carrying a muzzleloader with blood on his hands and pants. He admitted that he had shot a deer and that it was a doe. He then told them that he had seen a cow-horn buck walking the same trail the past weekend, so he assumed it was the same deer even though he could not see antlers. The of cers followed the man back down the trail to a freshly killed doe deer. They issued the man a notice to appear for taking an antlerless deer out of season and seized the ri e and deer. Of cer Kenneth Manning led charges of possession of a rearm by a convicted felon on a subject who was hunting with a modern muzzleloader over the Thanksgiving weekend. The man was hunting over bait within Blackwater WMA with a muzzleloader that was not an antique or a replica. The man was also charged with hunting over bait within a WMA. OKALOOSA COUNTY: Of cer Alan Kirchinger was working on the Yellow River within the Yellow River WMA when he observed a vessel pull up at an area where he knew some corn had been scattered. After a short while, he approached the area and observed a man hunting over a baited area. Of cer Kirchinger issued him a notice to appear for hunting over bait within a WMA.FWC Law Enforcement Bevis at S h e ll Is l an d Fis h S t. Mar k s sai d s h in g conb e g ood. He went w ay R iver yestera id e w h o r Jimmy too k y about a week ag o and n trout an d cau gh t some rea l t h e rive r fis h in g Ui h h t10 but would never tell me he s too d up an d s h e d a ll i n g a ro d an d I to ld h i m I c o uld d o t h H h Dwa y ne B a nd I went f o r a h o urs because s o me o ne me w h ere t h e y h a d cau g Spotted sea trout St. MarksRIVER CANTINA We Have The Best Hamburgers AroundPrize for Best Dressed Golf Kart Dress Up Your Golf Kart & Join The Parade Call for FREE registration925-9908 6th Annual Golf Kart Christmas ParadeFriday, Dec. 14 @ 6:30 p.m. St. Marks Toy DriveBring an unwrapped giftgifts will be distributed by St. Marks Volunteer Fire Department Join the Cantina for Thanksgiving Dinner on Thanksgiving at 1 p.m. Bring a covered dish If you cant Join us Anyway! Tucker Life-Health Insurance, Inc.RATED A+ BY BETTER BUSINESS BUREAUTOP QUALITY COMPANYMEDICARE PLANSExcellent Coverage Anyone Can Afford Ross E. Tucker, Agent Since 1981Chartered Life Underwriter Registered Health Underwrighter850926-2200www.tuckerlifehealth.com www.WakullaDiving.com Wakulla Diving Center, Inc. TO DIVELEARN Buy Your Scuba Equipment Here & Class Tuition is FREE!*2784 Coastal Hwy., Crawfordville850745-8208 2 Highest Rated Training Blended Gasses Scuba Equipment Sales & Service Family owned and operated boarding facility with over 10 years experience and a veterinary technician on-site. Indoor and outdoor boarding facilities for dogs small and large, cats and birds. Large and secure play areas with hands-on attention daily and friendly service we are sure to accommodate your needs. Whether you and your family are going on vacation, an extended stay or just away for the day, we are here for you. No duration is too long or short and our rates cant be beat! Livestock care at your farm or home is available!Personal care is given to each and every animal every day. Play time is our favorite time!(We do not make breed restrictions)Proud supporter of local rescues! Stefan Pedler, Owner1886 Bloxham Cutoff Rd. Crawfordville, FL 32327 www.BloxhamBoardingKennel.com (850) 597-1739 P.O. Box 429 Hwy. 98 Panacea, FL MIKES MARINE SUPPLY SEA HUNTBOATS www.mikesmarineorida.comMarine Supplies & Accessories (850) 984-5637 (850) 984-5693Mike Falk OwnerFax: (850) 984-5698

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 11AAs the year draws to a close we are tying up loose ends and preparing to look ahead to the coming year. Flotilla Commander Elect Duane Treadon and Flotilla Vice Commander Elect Norma Hill have been working hard to make the transition from our current elected leadership seamless. Our Flotilla has done well with Flotilla Commander Bob Asztalos and Vice Commander Bill Wannall at the helm. We are very lucky to have such dedicated members who are willing to take on such important positions. It has been said you are only as strong as your weakest link. Flotilla 12 has been fortunate to have a host of dedicated individuals who are willing to come together and make a lot happen each and every year. Given that the Auxiliary is a volunteer organization, it is amazing how invested everyone is along with the support provided from the community! With the slow down, Flotilla 12 was not on the water this past weekend, but we will be out this coming weekend! Bringing back navigation rules, we are up to Rule 15: Crossing Situation. When two power-driven vessels are crossing so as to involve risk of collision, the vessel which has the other on her starboard side shall keep out of the way and shall, if the circumstances of the case admit, avoid crossing ahead of the other vessel. A good interpretation of this rule is that if you are coming into a crossing situation and you see the red portside navigation light of the other boat, you should make adjustments to avoid hitting them. Many thanks to Flotilla 13-06 for the informative graphic. However, even if you are the boat that has the right of way, and you see that the other boat is not adjusting to avoid the risk of hitting you, you must make corrections. Rule 7: Risk of Collision addresses this in greater detail. This rule, and all of the Navigation Rules are available at: www.uscg.mil/directives/cim/16000-16999/ cim_16672_2d.pdf. And as Sherrie says, safe boating is no accident. Knowing the rules of the waterways can make the difference in making it home safely! Coast Guard Station Panama City ......................................................... (850) 234-4228 Coast Guard Station Yankeetown .......................................................... (352) 447-6900 Coast Guard Auxiliary St. Marks (Flotilla 12) ........................................... (850) 942-7500 or ............................................................................(850) 284-1166 Boating Emergencies Coast Guard Auxiliary ReportsBy Carolyn Brown Treadon AUXILIARY U.S.COAST GUARD a peek into life on and under the water Water Ways Water Ways Water Ways The Road Trip. Winter training continues now that we are back from a 7,500 mile, month long road trip. We set out at the beginning of November to attend the Diving Equipment Manufacturers Association (DEMA) in Las Vegas, Nev. I hate ying, encourage staff to join me on the road, and visit collaborating facilities along the way. So I drive whenever I can. Not surprisingly, I drive a diesel Jetta, which has wonderful mileage and plenty of room. Two years ago I drove our diesel Sprinter because I needed to get all our DOT banks hydrostatically tested at one of the oldest stations in the country, in Oklahoma City, at City Carbonics, half way to Las Vegas. I picked them up on the way back. This year we expanded our hydrotestatic test facility to service these larger cylinders ourselves. Joerg Hess and I took our technician, Travis, to DEMA this year and then ew him back to Wakulla. After test diving a new rebreather in Lake Meade, we continued west to spend Thanksgiving with my brother in Oregon. By Monday, we were at Innerspace Systems Corporation in Washington State, the folks who make the most successful rebreather in this country, the Megalodon. We were visiting to become quali ed to repair their newest rebreather, one half the size, cost and still as capable a rig as the Megalodon. Rebreathers have changed the way we dive the caves. This new platform will change the way we dive the ocean from Wakulla County. Mechanical repairs to the Jetta held us in Oregon for a few extra days, forcing us to work outside in dreary weather. But rain in the Siuslaw Valley means mushrooms spring forth from their forests. During a brief break in the weather, I found a huge Boletus mushroom that tasted delicious! Eating eggs from range-fed chickens and organic vegetables during our stay made up for the layover. My brother is a back-to-the-basics farmer now. He even heats his house with used vegetable oil. A road trip is a time for imaginering. Days and miles on end between visits to manufacturer facilities, Dr. Hess and I brainstormed topics that will shape where Wakulla Diving will go in the coming years. We visited American Underwater Products (second largest dive manufacturer in the world) near San Francisco for a day of training on their new rebreather, the Prism2. We stayed with Mike Menduno, legendary Tech diver, visionary and editor of Aquacore Magazine. Then we drove over the Donavan Pass to Reno and eastbound to Salt Lake to visit our Russian colleague, Konstatine Kovalenko. Theres a chance he may join us, dramatically adding new dimensions to diving support in Wakulla. In Boulder, Colo., we visited Spark Fun. Three newly graduated engineers from the local university loved to play with electronics, and shared their enthusiasm. They still do, but now employ 130 employees to help them do it. We toured their facility, and were amazed at how they pulled it off (lessons learned there). We have returned with new plans, toys and renewed enthusiasm, to re-engage with the Madison County Police Dive Team for another two weeks of training. We introduced an inexpensive remotely operated vehicle (ROV), that they loved (almost as much as we do!). It will be an exciting new year underwater in Wakulla County. UnderwaterWakullaBy Gregg Stanton A huge Boletus mushroom that tasted delicious! Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.8 ft. 12:50 AM 3.9 ft. 1:37 AM 3.8 ft. 2:24 AM 3.6 ft. 3:11 AM 3.3 ft. 4:00 AM 2.9 ft. 4:55 AM Hi g h -1.4 ft. 8:05 AM -1.3 ft. 8:51 AM -1.0 ft. 9:35 AM -0.6 ft. 10:18 AM -0.2 ft. 10:58 AM 0.3 ft. 11:38 AM 0.8 ft. 12:01 AM L ow 3.3 ft. 2:38 PM 3.2 ft. 3:21 PM 3.1 ft. 4:01 PM 3.0 ft. 4:39 PM 2.9 ft. 5:16 PM 2.8 ft. 5:54 PM 2.5 ft. 6:02 AM Hi g h 1.3 ft. 7:43 PM 1.2 ft. 8:29 PM 1.1 ft. 9:15 PM 1.0 ft. 10:04 PM 0.9 ft. 10:58 PM 0.8 ft. 12:19 PM L ow 2.7 ft. 6:35 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:42 AM 2.9 ft. 1:29 AM 2.8 ft. 2:16 AM 2.7 ft. 3:03 AM 2.5 ft. 3:52 AM 2.2 ft. 4:47 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 8:16 AM -0.9 ft. 9:02 AM -0.7 ft. 9:46 AM -0.5 ft. 10:29 AM -0.1 ft. 11:09 AM 0.2 ft. 11:49 AM 0.6 ft. 12:12 AM L ow 2.5 ft. 2:30 PM 2.4 ft. 3:13 PM 2.3 ft. 3:53 PM 2.2 ft. 4:31 PM 2.2 ft. 5:08 PM 2.1 ft. 5:46 PM 1.8 ft. 5:54 AM Hi g h 0.9 ft. 7:54 PM 0.8 ft. 8:40 PM 0.8 ft. 9:26 PM 0.7 ft. 10:15 PM 0.7 ft. 11:09 PM 0.6 ft. 12:30 PM L ow 2.0 ft. 6:27 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.6 ft. 1:26 AM 3.6 ft. 2:13 AM 3.5 ft. 3:00 AM 3.3 ft. 3:47 AM 3.0 ft. 4:36 AM Hi g h -1.2 ft. 9:09 AM -1.2 ft. 9:55 AM -0.9 ft. 10:39 AM -0.6 ft. 11:22 AM -0.2 ft. 12:02 PM 0.8 ft. 12:02 AM 0.8 ft. 1:05 AM L ow 3.1 ft. 3:14 PM 3.0 ft. 3:57 PM 2.9 ft. 4:37 PM 2.8 ft. 5:15 PM 2.7 ft. 5:52 PM 2.7 ft. 5:31 AM 2.3 ft. 6:38 AM Hi g h 1.1 ft. 8:47 PM 1.0 ft. 9:33 PM 1.0 ft. 10:19 PM 0.9 ft. 11:08 PM 0.3 ft. 12:42 PM 0.7 ft. 1:23 PM L ow 2.6 ft. 6:30 PM 2.5 ft. 7:11 PM Hi g h Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.0 ft. 12:34 AM 3.0 ft. 1:21 AM 3.0 ft. 2:08 AM 2.8 ft. 2:55 AM 2.6 ft. 3:44 AM 2.2 ft. 4:39 AM 1.9 ft. 5:46 AM Hi g h -1.3 ft. 7:44 AM -1.3 ft. 8:30 AM -1.0 ft. 9:14 AM -0.6 ft. 9:57 AM -0.2 ft. 10:37 AM 0.3 ft. 11:17 AM 0.8 ft. 11:58 AM L ow 2.6 ft. 2:22 PM 2.5 ft. 3:05 PM 2.4 ft. 3:45 PM 2.3 ft. 4:23 PM 2.2 ft. 5:00 PM 2.2 ft. 5:38 PM 2.1 ft. 6:19 PM Hi g h 1.2 ft. 7:22 PM 1.1 ft. 8:08 PM 1.0 ft. 8:54 PM 0.9 ft. 9:43 PM 0.9 ft. 10:37 PM 0.8 ft. 11:40 PM L ow Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 3.9 ft. 12:47 AM 4.0 ft. 1:34 AM 3.9 ft. 2:21 AM 3.7 ft. 3:08 AM 3.3 ft. 3:57 AM 2.9 ft. 4:52 AM 2.5 ft. 5:59 AM Hi g h -1.5 ft. 8:02 AM -1.4 ft. 8:48 AM -1.1 ft. 9:32 AM -0.7 ft. 10:15 AM -0.2 ft. 10:55 AM 0.3 ft. 11:35 AM 0.8 ft. 12:16 PM L ow 3.4 ft. 2:35 PM 3.3 ft. 3:18 PM 3.2 ft. 3:58 PM 3.0 ft. 4:36 PM 2.9 ft. 5:13 PM 2.8 ft. 5:51 PM 2.8 ft. 6:32 PM Hi g h 1.4 ft. 7:40 PM 1.2 ft. 8:26 PM 1.1 ft. 9:12 PM 1.0 ft. 10:01 PM 1.0 ft. 10:55 PM 0.9 ft. 11:58 PM L ow Thu Dec 13, 12 Fri Dec 14, 12 Sat Dec 15, 12 Sun Dec 16, 12 Mon Dec 17, 12 Tue Dec 18, 12 Wed Dec 19, 12 D ate 2.9 ft. 12:36 AM 2.8 ft. 1:31 AM 2.6 ft. 2:27 AM 2.3 ft. 3:26 AM 2.0 ft. 4:31 AM 1.7 ft. 5:47 AM Hi g h -1.0 ft. 7:40 AM -0.9 ft. 8:26 AM -0.8 ft. 9:11 AM -0.6 ft. 9:53 AM -0.3 ft. 10:32 AM 0.0 ft. 11:09 AM 0.3 ft. 11:44 AM L ow 2.2 ft. 4:01 PM 2.2 ft. 4:37 PM 2.1 ft. 5:09 PM 2.0 ft. 5:37 PM 2.0 ft. 6:03 PM 2.0 ft. 6:28 PM 2.1 ft. 6:54 PM Hi g h 1.5 ft. 6:52 PM 1.4 ft. 7:41 PM 1.3 ft. 8:34 PM 1.1 ft. 9:34 PM 0.9 ft. 10:41 PM 0.7 ft. 11:57 PM L ow Gulf Coast Weekly AlmanacDec. 6 Dec. 12First Dec. 19 Full Dec. 28 Last Jan. 7 New Jan. 13Major Times 12:24 AM 2:24 AM 12:56 PM 2:56 PM Minor Times 7:33 AM 8:33 AM 6:18 PM 7:18 PM Major Times 1:27 AM 3:27 AM 1:58 PM 3:58 PM Minor Times 8:32 AM 9:32 AM 7:26 PM 8:26 PM Major Times 2:28 AM 4:28 AM 2:58 PM 4:58 PM Minor Times 9:25 AM 10:25 AM 8:33 PM 9:33 PM Major Times 3:26 AM 5:26 AM 3:53 PM 5:53 PM Minor Times 10:10 AM 11:10 AM 9:38 PM 10:38 PM Major Times 4:19 AM 6:19 AM 4:44 PM 6:44 PM Minor Times 10:51 AM 11:51 AM 10:40 PM 11:40 PM Major Times 5:08 AM 7:08 AM 5:32 PM 7:32 PM Minor Times 11:29 AM 12:29 PM 11:40 PM 12:40 AM Major Times 5:55 AM 7:55 AM 6:18 PM 8:18 PM Minor Times --:---:-12:03 PM 1:03 PM SEASONS BEST Better Good Average Average Average Average+7:24 am 5:38 pm 7:34 am 6:19 pmMoon rise/set Sun rise/set Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Brightness Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set Moon rise/set Sun rise/set7:25 am 5:38 pm 8:33 am 7:26 pm 7:26 am 5:39 pm 9:26 am 8:34 pm 7:26 am 5:39 pm 10:12 am 9:39 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 10:52 am 10:41 pm 7:27 am 5:40 pm 11:30 am 11:40 pm 7:28 am 5:40 pm 12:04 pm --:--1% 7% 15% 23% 30% 37% 44% City of St. Marks St. Teresa, Turkey Pt. Alligator Point, Ochlockonee BayDog Island West End Shell Point, Spring CreekTide charts by Zihua Software, LLCFor tides at the following points add to Dog Island Listings: High Tide Low Tide Carrabelle 28 Min. 25 Min. Apalachicola 1 Hr., 53 Min. 2 Hrs., 38 Min. Cat Point 1 Hr., 13 Min. 2 Hrs., 31 Min. Lower Anchorage 1 Hr., 36 Min. 2 Hrs., 3 Min. West Pass 1 Hr., 26 Min. 2 Hrs., 39 Min. St. Marks River Entrance 866-314-3769AIRLINES ARE HIRING Donate A Boatsponsored by boat angel outreach centers STOP CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN www.boatangel.com2-Night Free Vacation!or Car Today! 800 1 CAR L ANGE

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Green Scene Page 12A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Sustainability practices focus on finding ways to reduce consumption in addition to reusing, repurposing, and repairing items. These values also fit with holiday celebrations, making it a time of sustaining traditions as well as helping the environment. According to the Green American magazine, a periodical that embraces small, easily implemented sustainability ideas, The United States landfills see a 24 percent increase in their garbage intake during the holiday season. There have to be ways to change this statistic. Here are some ideas for greening your holiday season. If you have already made all of your preparations for this holiday season, look around your home, yard and purchased gifts to decide if you can make some improvements for the next year. Perhaps the after-holiday sales will allow you to make some good, sustainable choices at a reasonable price in preparation for the holidays, 2013. DECORATIONS Use LED lights. They use up to 80 percent less energy than incandescent lights and they last longer, so they are worth the splurge. Consider solar holiday lights; they only use the energy they soak up from the sun. If you have old incandescent lights lurking in your attic or basement, recycle them at one of the large box stores during the months they are collecting and properly disposing of them. Inquire about the details of their program the next time you are in the store; dont make a special trip. Reduce the amount of lights or strands used for decorating and use a timer on your lights to save electricity. Make table centerpieces and other decorations out of collected natural objects such as acorns, holy or oak trimmings, berries, or other harvested fruits and vegetables. GIFTS Wrap gifts with brown paper bags, newspaper, or reused wrapping paper. Create personal wrapping paper with stamps, collages, or drawing on the remaining paper bags from your grocery shopping stash. I know you have no use for them now that you started carrying your own fabric, reusable bags to the store. Avoid wrapping altogether and tie a large bow around the item instead. Alternatively, make the wrapping a part of the gift such a using reusable tins, planting pots or new towels. Give presents or gift certificate from local businesses. Focus on homemade or non-traditional gifts such as baked goods, plants, fishing licenses, dance classes, travel mugs, local art, or battery chargers. If you are giving appliances or electronics, make sure they are Energy Star certified. This is your guarantee that they have been evaluated for energy efficiency. Make a donation in someones name to charities or conservation organizations. I attended an alternative holiday giving event last weekend and purchased charitable donations for 15 of my friends who I want to remember but who need nothing in tangible items. Give time. Help older relative with difficult chores, take children to a park for a mother or dad who live in the neighborhood, or teach someone a skill or talent you have. It is like receiving a stocking stuffed with sentiment. FOOD Check stores for special sauces, jams, cider or meat. Use cloth napkins in your table settings. Buy in bulk to reduce grocery trips and packaging. Compost your food waste. TREES Instead of a traditional tree, use locally grown, live trees that can be planted outside after the holiday. Consider an out-of-the-ordinary tree like a palm or citrus. Be aware that even through artificial trees can be reused each year, they may contain materials such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and are made overseas. Again buy local and be aware of potentially toxic chemicals. Wouldnt it be wonderful if Wakulla County could start a tree recycling program that will turn used trees into chip mulch? MISCELLANEOUS I have to accept that I am beginning to receive emailed holiday cards. I know it is a sign of the times but for me, I will continue to send cards but will always utilize cards made from recycled paper. Carpool with friends or family for shopping trips. Encourage recycling for bottles and cans at holiday parties and events by having containers visible and clearly marked. For those parties you host, use cloth napkins, biodegradable, disposable dishes or your pottery or china. Having a green holiday benefits us much more than just through the environment. Creating homemade gifts and decorations or reusing items from previous years also means spending less money than buying new items. Investing time and creativity in the holiday can help make it more fulfilling and meaningful for you, your family and your friends. Shelley Swenson is FCS/EFNEP Agent II with the UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office. She can be reached at 926-3931. By SHELLEY SWENSONWakulla Extension ServiceGREEN LIVING Tips for a green holiday seasonWant your holidays wrapped in more meaning and less stuff? The holiday season is meant to be a time of peace, re ection, and celebration, but too often exhaust rather than uplift us. If you sometimes feel trapped by the shopping, spending, crass displays, and frenzied preparations, you arent alone. Our national surveys consistently show that Americans feel put upon by the commercialization of the season and want more of what matters not just more stuff. This year, you dont have to rack up credit card debt or get swept up in the seasons commercialism. Instead, consider creating holidays that instill more meaning into the season and encourage more sharing, laughter, creativity, and personal renewal. With our Simplify the Holidays campaign, New Dream is here to help you get started. We hope the tips and activities outlined here will help you reduce stress and increase personal ful llment during this holiday season. TAKE THE PLEDGE! The holiday season is arguably our greatest cultural paradox. Tradition, family, and faith are obscured by the pressures to spend. We all want to show our loved ones that we care about them, but we dont want to go broke in the process. And isnt it possible to celebrate without leaving a trail of trash that will stay in the land lls long after the season has passed? Heres a list of ideas to help you celebrate the holidays with more joy and less stuff. Pledge to 5 actions or more! that you will adopt this year: GIVE THE GIFT OF TIME by creating your own gift card for a service (e.g., babysitting, carwashing, petsitting, chores, making dinner, organizing an outing). GIVE A HANDMADE GIFT like a memoir of cherished memories with that person, a book of family recipes, a collage of pictures and mementos, or a calendar lled with the birthdays and anniversaries of friends and family. OFFER TO TEACH A SKILL YOU POSSESS (e.g., knitting, photography, computer skills, nancial planning, a foreign language, music lessons, canning tomatoes, cooking a favorite recipe). CONSIDER LESS GIMMICKY, LESS COMMERCIAL GIFTS for children, such as arts/crafts supplies, books, a magnifying glass, or building blocks. CREATE A PAPERLESS HOLIDAY LETTER on the computer and email it to friends and family. HAVE A WHITE ELEPHANT PARTY at the of ce instead of a traditional gift exchange, where each person brings a wrapped secondhand item in good condition. DRAW NAMES IN YOUR FAMILY FOR GIFT-GIVING (for extra fun and surprise, make it Secret Santas), so that you can put more time and thought into one gift instead of having to give to several people. SHOP FOR USED ITEMS for all or most of your holiday gifts (e.g., local thrift store, Craigslist, Freecycle, used products on Amazon or eBay). SHARE THE GIFT OF MUSIC by caroling, and include visits to elderly neighbors or a nursing home. Or, gather friends and family for an in-home holiday sing-a-long. GIVE BACK TO YOUR COMMUNITY by preparing care packages for the homeless, or volunteering at an organization to help those in need during the holiday season. ADOPT A LESS IS MORE ATTITUDE toward holiday decorating. Opt for natural trimmings such as clippings from local evergreens and holly bushes. SAVE PAPER by wrapping gifts in newspaper comics, junk mail, paper bags decorated with markers, old maps, phone books, or other reused paper. PREPARE YOUR HOLIDAY MEALS with as many seasonal, locally grown, and/or organic foods as possible. REDUCE JUNK MAIL by removing your name from mailing lists of unwanted holiday catalogs. PHOTO BY BRANDPOINT(BPT) With homes adorned in holiday hues of silver, gold and red, these are colorful times. This year, why not green your holiday by adopting some eco-friendly traditions? From making holiday meals with organic ingredients to wrapping gifts in recycled paper, its easy to nd ways to celebrate the season and be kind to Mother Nature at the same time. EARTH-FRIENDLY FEASTING Americans are embracing organic foods for many reasons, from better taste on their plates and improved health in their homes, to the gentler impact on the environment associated with the production of organic produce and meats. If youve never tried organic dining before, give your family and the earth the gift of going organic this holiday season. And if you prefer organic foods throughout the year, theres no need to set the habit aside just because of the holidays. From main dishes of responsibly raised poultry and line-caught sh, to side dishes of sustainably grown vegetables and grains, its easy to serve a holiday meal thats good for your family and the environment. Companies like Simply Organic offer options for every aspect of holiday feasting, including mixes for gravies, dips and dressings, organic spices, avorings, extracts and sauces. You can nd holidayappropriate organic products and recipes at www.simplyorganic.com. Decorating with heart Some traditional holiday decorations can be less than friendly for the environment, but a cut tree is not necessarily one of them. Consider that the production of arti cial trees consumes large quantities of resources and creates wasted by-product. Also, keep in mind most tree lots sell trees raised on farms, so natural forests are not impacted by the tree you buy off the lot. When it comes time to dispose of your tree, consider mulching it yourself, rather than just setting it out on the curb. What would the holidays be without bright lights? But those little bulbs can consume lots of energy. Switching to LED lights will reduce the amount of power it takes to keep your home twinkling brightly this holiday season. And a bonus of LED lights: they last longer, so you wont have to buy new strands every season. GUILT-FREE GIVING Gift-giving and the goodwill it brings are at the heart of the holidays, but that good feeling often also comes with ripped wrapping paper, pounds of packaging materials and a lot of energy consumed in shopping. It is possible, however, to give gifts with minimal impact on the environment and your conscience. Handmade gifts are not only more ecofriendly, they show the recipient that you cared enough to invest time and effort in creating something unique. But if youre not handy, look for gifts that are energy-ef cient (like solar-powered items or gadgets that use rechargeable batteries), come with minimal packaging, are made of sustainably harvested natural materials, or that are locally produced. Intangible gifts can also be green. Instead of gifting the cooking enthusiast in your life with a new set of pots and pans, sign him up for a cooking class and attend together. Give your gardening fan a gift certi cate redeemable for your help when spring planting season arrives. Greening your holiday season will take some thought and time, but giving yourself and your loved ones a more environmentally responsible holiday season will be something you can celebrate throughout the year.More ways to green your season Simplify the holidays with less stu

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 13ADear EarthTalk: What is perchlorate in our drinking water supply and why is it controversial? David Sparrow Chico, Calif. Perchlorate is both a naturally occurring and man-made chemical used in the production of rocket fuel, missiles, reworks, ares and explosives. It is also sometimes present in bleach and in some fertilizers. Its widespread release into the environment is primarily associated with defense contracting, military operations and aerospace programs. Perchlorate can be widespread in ground water, soils and plants, and makes its way up the food chain accordingly even into organically grown foods. To wit, a 2005 Journal of Environmental Science and Technology study using ion chromatography to nd contaminants in agricultural products found quantifiable levels of perchlorate in 16 percent of conventionally produced lettuces and other leafy greens and in 32 percent of otherwise similar but organically produced samples. Today, traces of perchlorate are found in the bloodstreams of just about every human on the planet. Perchlorate in the environment is a health concern because it can disrupt the thyroids ability to produce hormones needed for normal growth and development. Besides its potential to cause endocrine system and reproductive problems, perchlorate is considered a likely human carcinogen by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Some 11 million Americans live in areas where concentrations of perchlorate in public drinking water supplies are signi cantly higher than what is considered safe. Per the mandate of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the EPA is currently working on setting national standards for how much perchlorate can be allowed in drinking water without putting people at risk. As part of the process, the agency is studying the available science on the health effects of perchlorate exposure and evaluating laboratory methods for measuring, treating and removing perchlorate in drinking water. The EPA will publish a proposed rule on the matter for public review at some point in 2013. We are happy that the EPA is moving ahead with a drinking water standard...but we are concerned that it wont be strict enough, reports Renee Sharp of the nonprofit Environmental Working Group (EWG). The group would like to see the U.S. adopt a truly health-protective drinking water standard lower than 1 ppb [parts per billion] for perchlorate. Insiders dont believe federal policymakers will go that low, however, since the EPA says it cannot detect perchlorate below 2 ppb. But EWG point out that Massachusetts is already testing for it with a 1 ppb cut-off, per the mandate of its statewide standard set back in 2006. The only other state to have a drinking water standard for perchlorate is California, which set 6 ppb or less as an allowable concentration back in 2004. But that states Of ce of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment recently proposed lowering the standard to 1 ppb based on new data regarding environmental exposure, possible effects of perchlorate and consideration of infants as a susceptible population. If the EPA develops a tough new standard, almost every state will need to readjust its water monitoring systems to take into account how much perchlorate is making its way to our taps and into the foods we eata no doubt costly process but one that will greatly bene t both current and future generations. Dear EarthTalk: I heard about a group called the Womens Earth Alliance that works on environmental projects in many parts of the world. What kinds of projects? Judy Stack Barre, Vt. The Womens Earth Alliance (WEA) supports community groups around the world that work at the intersection of womens rights and the environment. A project of the Berkeley, Calif.-based David Brower Center, WEA partners with local women-led community groups engaged in nding solutions to vexing environmental problems. WEA helps women secure their rights and safety and remove barriers to full participation in society by supporting them in addressing the environmental issues impacting their lives. By bringing womens leadership to these critical environmental issues, WEA helps bring vital voices, perspectives and participation to addressing the greatest and most basic challenges of our time. The idea for WEA emerged from a 2006 meeting in Mexico City where 30 women leaders from 26 countries gathered to address how women can do more to address todays environmental challenges. WEA offers training and resources around issues of water, land, food and climate change, operating on the guiding principle that when women thrive, communities, the environment and future generations thrive. Of utmost importance to WEA is securing womens access to basic resources (food, land and water) so they can enjoy economic, social and political security. Since women in many societies are responsible for the management of food and water, the group reports, they can experience both the unequal burden of work to secure and prepare the familys food and water as well as the vulnerability which results from traditional gender roles at home and gender discrimination in society. Women also tend to be particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change, says WEA: Women in underserved communities nd themselves on the front lines of climate impacts, often witnessing their water sources and traditional land bases shift or disappear because of a dangerous mix of changing temperatures and structural inequalities. Currently WEA focuses on three geographic areas: India, North America and Africa. Its India Program supports small and emerging womens groups that are promoting food sovereignty, traditional knowledge and advocating for the rights of women farmers. The groups trainings, advocacy and movement building have enabled thousands of poor Indian women to become environmental leaders in their communities. In North America, WEA links pro bono legal, policy and business advocates across the continent with Indigenous women leading environmental campaigns. Through rapid response advocacy, longterm policy working groups, trainings and delegations, WEAs innovative advocacy partnerships protect sacred sites, promote energy justice, and ensure environmental health on Indigenous lands, the group reports. And in Africa, WEA partnered with Crabgrass, a California-based human rights group, to create the Global Womens Water Initiative (GWWI) that provides training to help people implement water related strategies to improve their communities health, self reliance and resilience to climate change. With GWWI, WEA and Crabgrass are building a cadre of advanced female trainers skilled in applying holistic solutions with appropriate technology to environmental problems regarding water, sanitation and hygiene. Send questions to earthtalk@emagazine. com.EarthTalk is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E The Environmental Magazine (www. emagazine.com). Subscribe www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue www.emagazine.com/trial. e danger of perchlorate in drinking water Eleven million Americans live in areas where concentrations of perchlorate a chemical used in the production of rocket fuel, missiles, reworks, ares and explosives are signi cantly higher in public drinking water supplies than what is considered safe.PHOTO BY COMSTOCK/THINKSTOCKThe Womens Earth Alliance helps women around the world secure their rights and safety and remove barriers to full participation in society by supporting them in addressing the environmental issues impacting their lives. Pictured: A female farmer in India.ISTOCKPHOTO/THINKSTOCK Renance rate reduction up to 2.0% with a oor rate of 2.50% for up to 72 months. *Rates as low as 2.50% for 72 months on new and used auto purchases. Rates and terms are subject to change and based on credit score. Excludes current SCORE FCU loans. Federally In sured by NCUA.Mahan Ofce: 850.488.1015 | North Monroe Ofce: 850.562.6702 | Crawfordville Ofce: 850.926.1960 EmployFlorida.com1-866-352-2345 Employ Florida is an equal opportunity program. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to individuals with disabilities. The Employ Florida telephone number may be reached by persons using TTY/TTD equipment via the Florida Relay Service at 711. Disponible en Espanol. JOB RESOURCES at EmployFlorida.com helped me nd a new job I enjoy earning higher pay than I did before I was laid off. You too can discover REAL RESULTS with Employ Florida. HIRED.RANDAL HARDBOWER Industrial Electrician Green Circle Bio Energy Inc.

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Page 14A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comreports Law Enforcement and CourtsSheri s ReportOn Dec. 5, Phillip Vause of Crawfordville reported an illegal dumping. The victim met Deputy Randy Phillips at his hunting property and discovered a berglass boat dumped in the wood line 30 feet from Old Plank Road. The boat was missing a motor. The vessel was registered to a man in Archer but the registration expired in 2001. The litter control crew was noti ed to remove the vessel from the Vause property. In other activity reported by the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce this week: NOVEMBER 27 Debra Range of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim reported the unauthorized use of her bank card at several retail establishments in the Miami area. The charges totaled $1,510. Lt. Sherrell Morrison investigated. NOVEMBER 29 Thomas Askins of the Sopchoppy Education Center reported a narcotics violation. A plastic bag with suspected marijuana inside was taken from a student. The 15-year-old male student had the plastic bag in his pants pocket. The juvenile was issued a notice to appear in court and turned over to his mother. The marijuana weighed 4.7 grams. Sgt. Ray Johnson investigated. Kimberly Ruiz of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim reported receiving mail from a reemployment assistance program in Orlando. The letter contained unemployment information despite the fact that the victim is fully employed. Deputy Mike Zimba investigated. Lt. Mike Kemp and Deputy Gibby Gibson were contacted about two male subjects looking into parked vehicles at the Bridlewood Apartments in Crawfordville. Two juveniles were observed walking in the area with a bag lled with boxing equipment. One of the juveniles admitted stealing the property. The victim, Martin Valencia, was able to recover the bag and equipment as well as several other personal items that were discarded in a wooded area. More stolen property was recovered on the second suspect. The two juveniles were charged with burglary and grand theft in the case. They were booked into the Wakulla County Jail and released to the custody of their parents. NOVEMBER 30 Gene Darby of the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Maintenance Department reported a criminal mischief to WCSO property. Someone slashed the tires of a digital warning sign trailer while it was posted at FH 13 and FH 365. Damage to the tires was estimated at $200. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. Rebecca Holton of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. Pry marks were observed on multiple doors at the victims home. Evidence was collected at the scene. Damage to the home was estimated at less than $250. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Judith Smith of Panacea reported the theft of an aluminum wheelchair ramp, valued at $100. The property was taken from the victims carport. The next day the victim reported that the ramp reappeared on her property and the case was closed. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. DECEMBER 1 A vehicle was observed on Whiddon Lake Road that was an obstruction hazard. The property owner was located and asked to remove the vehicle from the scene. When WCSO Dispatch received another complaint about the vehicle two hours later, a wrecker was contacted to remove the vehicle. Deputy Cole Wells investigated. Norman Jones of Crawfordville reported a hitand-run traf c crash with a mailbox. Jones mailbox and boxes owned by three neighbors were damaged by a vehicle. Damage was estimated at $50. Deputy Elisee Colin investigated. DECEMBER 2 Garland Landers of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported that a laptop computer and charger were taken from his home. The missing property is valued at $220 and a suspect has been identified. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Jacqueline Butler of Crawfordville reported locating a mens bicycle on a wooded lot near High Drive and Audubon Forest in Crawfordville. The bike had not been reported stolen and it was taken to the WCSO Impound Yard. It is valued at $150. Deputy Randy Phillips investigated. Jonathan Stalvey of Winn-Dixie reported a business burglary. The outdoor propane tank case was damaged and seven propane tanks were stolen. The missing propane tanks and padlock are valued at $449. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. Linda Miller of Crawfordville reported a grand theft of a lawn mower and tin from her home. A suspect has been identified. The missing property is valued at $545. Deputy Nick Gray investigated. DECEMBER 3 Deputy Ian Dohme investigated a report of a false child abuse claim being led against a Crawfordville victim. Three reports were led against the victim over a seven year period. An investigator from the Florida Department of Children and Families investigated the complaints and found them to be unfounded. The false claims investigation was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Wal-Mart Loss Prevention staff reported a retail theft involving a male and two females operating a golf cart which was parked in front of the store. While in the store, the male allegedly stole two jackets and a laptop computer. One of the females allegedly also took a jacket. The trio stopped to pay for some food items before leaving. The value of the stolen items was estimated at $658. Deputy Ian Dohme investigated. Detective Derek Lawhon recovered stolen property from a 16-year-old Crawfordville male who admitted breaking into vehicles in The Farm subdivision. Heather Mercer of Crawfordville was contacted by Detective Lawhon through her stolen GPS unit. The GPS and a phone charger were recovered from the juvenile. They are valued at $130. The victim decided not to press charges against the juvenile since he cooperated with Detective Lawhons investigation. Stuart Korte of Crawfordville reported a grand theft at his residence. Jewelry, rearms, coins, electronics and other miscellaneous property, valued at $6,500, was reported missing. A suspect has been identi- ed. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. DECEMBER 4 William Gene McDowell, 72, of Crawfordville was arrested for failure to register as a sex offender as required by Florida Statute. A search of law enforcement data bases determined that the suspect missed four required registrations over two years. Deputy Ian Dohme, Detective Josh Langston and Criminal Investigations Analyst Angie Gardner investigated. Brenda Sanders of Sopchoppy reported the possible theft of a vehicle tag. The tag was entered into the FCIC/NCIC data base as lost or stolen. Deputy Billy Metcalf investigated. Gregory Marr of Crawfordville reported the theft of $30 cash from Winn-Dixie. The victim paid for groceries in the self checkout line and also requested an additional $30. He left the store without removing the cash from the machine. He returned a short time later and the cash was missing. Evidence was collected at the scene and a female suspect was observed putting the money into her purse. The case was turned over to the Criminal Investigations Division. Deputy Gibby Gibson investigated. Detective Nick Boutwell served a search warrant at a Crawfordville home in connection with a felony retail theft that occurred at WalMart the day before. Benjamin Delaney Millership, 43, of Brattleboro, Vt., was contacted by individuals at the home and requested to return to the residence. Millership was arrested for felony retail theft when Detective Boutwell discovered two of the stolen items at the home. Detective Josh Langston, Captain Randall Taylor, Detective Ryan Muse, Sgt. Andy Curles and Deputy Ian Dohme also took part in the execution of the search warrant. DECEMBER 5 Alphonso Andrew Williams, 45, of Crawfordville was arrested for failure to register as a sex offender. Williams was required to register during the month of November, but failed to do so. Deputy Stephen Simmons, Detective Josh Langston and Criminal Investigations Analyst Angie Gardner investigated. Stacy Cody of Crawfordville reported a grand theft. The victim reported the theft of $5,000 worth of jewelry from her home. A suspect has been identi ed in the case. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Matthew Jalbert of Crawfordville reported a credit card offense. The victim discovered four unauthorized charges which were made to his bank account. The charges were created at Wal-Mart stores and a Whataburger in three different Texas locations. The charges totaled $217. Deputy Mike Crum investigated. A 17-year-old male was issued a civil citation after Wakulla High School officials discovered that the male student was in possession of marijuana on campus. The marijuana weighed .3 of a gram and the civil citation was issued for possession of less than 20 grams of marijuana. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. A 17-year-old Wakulla High School student was issued a notice to appear for possession of marijuana on the school campus. Two baggies of marijuana were discovered on the male student. Deputy Scott Rojas investigated. Marian Smith of Crawfordville reported a fraud. The victim discovered that someone in Yuma, Ariz., used her bank card without authorization. The transactions were made at a truck stop and totaled $450. Deputy Stephen Simmons investigated. Tamara Ingram of Crawfordville reported a criminal mischief. The victims home and property was shot with a paint ball gun. No damage was reported to the home. A 14-year-old suspect was identi ed, but no charges were led. Lt. Jimmy Sessor investigated. DECEMBER 6 W al-Mart asset protection staff reported a retail theft. Martin Quinn Fretterd, 27, of Crawfordville was reportedly observed taking an electronics item from the store without paying for it. The suspect left the scene without stopping for store of cials but was contacted by Lt. Dale Evans at his home. The value of the stolen item is $64. The suspect was also issued a trespass warning for the store. He was arrested for retail theft and transported to the Wakulla County Jail. Deputy Sean Wheeler and Deputy Elisee Colin also investigated. The Wakulla County Sheriffs Office received 776 calls for service during the past week including16 residential and business alarms; 58 citizen contacts; 13 disturbances; 13 abandoned E-911 cell calls; 20 regular E-911 telephone calls; 55 investigations; 36 medical emergencies; 196 residential and business security checks; 15 reports of shots red; 27 special details; 42 subpoena services; 13 thefts; 12 traf c enforcements; 54 traf c stops; 11 reckless vehicles and 14 watch orders.Special to The NewsWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized three members of the St. Marks Powder (SMP) crew as local heroes Thursday, Nov. 29 after their fast action saved the life of a vendor who was servicing machines at the powder plant. Sheriff Crum presented the two men and one woman plaques thanking them for being heroes in their workplace. The three St. Marks Powder employees were not aware they were going to be recognized until they gathered in one of their buildings in front of their peers who applauded their efforts. On Oct. 30, a vendor was at the plant replenishing goodies in machines when he lost consciousness. Hearing commotion in a break room, Terri Neal, Zan Henry and Stan Harrison investigated and discovered the vendor unresponsive. The team assisted the victim by placing him at on the oor before administering CPR. The plants emergency alert was activated to report a CPR in progress. Stan and Zan knelt close to the vendors body and began giving chest compressions. Although they had not had a CPR class in many years, they remembered the basic techniques of pushing straight down on the chest using great pressure and repeated motion. CPR was continued until the St. Marks Powder First Responders arrived at the scene and an Automated External De brillator (AED) was also used. The vendor regained consciousness prior to being transported to a Tallahassee hospital by Emergency Medical Services for continued medical management. His doctor informed us that not only did CPR/AED save this persons life, but due to the timely response this person did not suffer any heart damage, said Patrick Hutto, Human Resources for St. Marks Powder. We appreciate their efforts and want to recognize these Wakulla County heroes who have gone above and beyond the call of duty to help their fellow man, said Crum. In saving a human life, they have gone well above their regular duties. Thank you for what you did. SMP of cials said they have several AED units available around the company property with plans to add more in the future. We had two choices, said Harrison of hearing the commotion in the break room. We could do something or we could do nothing. Harrison, Henry and Neal chose to do something. Heroes recognized at St. Marks PowderSPECIAL TO THE NEWSZan Henry, Stan Harrison, Wakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum and Terri Neal. YARD SALEFRI & SAT DEC 14 & 15 8AM 2PMMini-Warehouses Boats RVs 2 MILES SOUTH OF THE COURTHOUSE NO EARLY BIRDS!CHRISTMAS HARRISON BAIL BONDS850-926-2299Franklin County 850-670-3333Locally Owned & Operated by Mike Harrison Since 1995 3039 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville www.wakullabailbonds.comA-AAA

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Send us your holiday photosSend by Dec. 20 to be included in the Christmas issue Email pictures to editor@thewakullanews.net or bring them to e Wakulla News o ce www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 15AWakulla County Sheriff Donnie Crum recognized Assistant State Attorney Eddie D. Evans with a Distinguished Service Award for contributing to the Florida Sheriffs Association for 25 years. Sheriff Crum made his presentation on Tuesday, Nov. 27. Evans received a certi cate for contributing to better law enforcement. Evans is a resident of Sopchoppy and works for State Attorney Willie Meggs in the Tallahassee of ce. We appreciate the regular contributions from people like Eddie who care deeply about outstanding law enforcement, said Sheriff Crum. I knew it was a long time but I didnt realize it had been 25 years, said Evans. SPECIAL TO THE NEWSEddie Evans and Sheriff Donnie Crum.Prosecutor Eddie Evans receives Distinguished Service AwardBy JIM SAUNDERSTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 5 With a fierce drought sparking wild res across the state, then-Gov. Lawton Chiles took the extraordinary step in 1998 of banning the sale and use of fireworks around the Fourth of July holiday. And Wednesday, Dec. 5, more than 14 years after the smoke cleared, an appeals court snuffed out a reworks companys arguments that it should receive more than $1 million from the state because of the ban. The 2nd District Court of Appeal overturned a Hillsborough County circuit court ruling that found Galaxy Fireworks, Inc., should be compensated because the ban amounted to a government taking of property. A three-judge panel said both sides in the case agreed that an executive order issued by Chiles was a valid exercise of the states police power. But in rejecting the arguments of Galaxy and siding with the state, it said the ban did not eliminate the value of the companys property. Appellees (Galaxy) maintained their ownership of their fireworks inventories, had the right to transfer their inventories to an out-of-state location where sales were permitted, and in fact did sell the same inventories after the expiration of the two-week ban on sales, the ruling said. Appellees were not denied the value of their property, only the profits that might have been earned in the state of Florida during that speci c time period --pro ts that ultimately were realized by the subsequent sale of the assets. In the case, Galaxy argued that it makes about 70 percent of its annual pro ts during the Fourth of July holiday season, which follows about two months of preparation. The ruling said Galaxy argued that the ban deprived them of the economic bene t of their inventories. This, they argue, was a compensable taking in violation of the Fifth Amendment of the United States Constitution. The ruling, which came after years of litigation, overturned a circuit-court decision that would have led to Galaxy receiving about $1.1 million. Of that amount, the company would have recouped $1 million in damages, along with interest. Chiless executive order banned the sale and use of reworks and sparklers from June 25 through July 9, 1998, amid wildfires that burned hundreds of thousands of acres across Florida and caused evacuations of areas such as Palm Coast in Flagler County. Crews spent weeks trying to corral the res, while shielding homes and residents from damage. In the ruling Wednesday, appeals-court judges Charles Davis, Nelly Khouzam and Marva Crenshaw pointed to the dangerous conditions at the time Chiles issued the order. The need for the limitation was the dangerous conditions that temporarily existed in the state at that particular time, they said in the seven-page ruling, written by Davis. Such a temporary limitation on the right to sell required by the widespread dangerous conditions mitigates against this being considered a compensable taking. Also, regardless of the executive order, it said the reworks industry is heavily regulated because of potential dangers. Appellees voluntarily invested in their inventories knowing that the regulation of the sale and use of such was subject to change from time to time and from locality to locality, the ruling said. The temporary limitation on the sale of the reworks under these facts does not rise to such an interference with investment-backed expectations as to constitute a compensable taking.Court stamps out reworks rms case from wild res DR. DAVID A. KEEN, M.D., M.P.H.BOARD CERTIFIED FAMILY PRACTICE ELIZABETH HEULER, ARNP-C VALERIE RUSSELL, ARNP-C2615 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY, SUITE 103, CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327PH 850-926-3140 FX 850-926-3163 (Next to the Winn-Dixie Shopping Plaza) www.wakullaurgentcare.comCOME VISIT US FOR ALL OF YOUR HEALTHCARE NEEDSWE NOW ACCEPT We are an approved Medically Supervised Weight Loss ProgramFAMILY PRIMARY CARE URGENT CARE/WALK INS Pulmonary Function Testing Pediatrics/Immunizations X-Ray, EKG, Labs Sleep Study DEXA Bone Density Testing Workers Comp Injury Overnight Pulse Ox Holter/Event Monitor Pre-Employment Drug Screening School/Bus/DOT/Sports PhysicalsCapital HealthPLAN By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 11 The tough housing market is expected to continue to be a drag on the states tax collections even after the economy begins to pick up in future years, according to forecasters. There were few changes Tuesday in what state economists believe will happen with property values for the coming scal year, which begins July 1. Forecasters met and moved the expected growth rate for taxable property values up to 0.83 percent. Thats a few ticks up from 0.75 percent -and both are negligible changes that arent expected to produce much revenue. That number will be used to gure out how much counties are likely to pay the state in the required local effort that is distributed as part of the main formula for public school funding. And forecasters also anticipate slow growth in property values over the next two or three years, with things picking up to somewhere around 3 percent a year. The lag is caused by a surge in foreclosure lings that have swamped the courts; properties that go into foreclosure now take as much as two and a half years to go from ling to the market. Many of the foreclosures that happened as the housing crisis was roiling Florida still arent showing up in the numbers. The worst years are really ahead of us in terms of hitting the marketplace, said Amy Baker, coordinator for the Legislatures Of ce of Economic and Demographic Research. She suggested during the meeting that foreclosures could still be putting pressure on property tax revenues as late as the 2016-17 budget year. After the meeting, Baker told reporters that more homeowners could also use short sales to try to get rid of homes instead of going through foreclosure. At some point we think short-sales in Florida are going to pick up, she said. They havent yet. Short sales can sometimes drive down the assessed values of homes. But the forecasters also took into account factors that could offset the increase in foreclosures, including new residents moving into the state and the so-far slow recovery. Migration is going to be picking up, said Don Langston, an economist with the House, during the meeting. The demand side is going to be ... notably stronger.Foreclosures still a ecting state budget

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Page 16A THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comRecent temperatures notwithstanding, winter is of- cially eight days away. Dec. 21 is the winter solstice, the shortest day of the year in the northern hemisphere which heralds the start of winter. On the winter solstice, the Suns path has reached its southernmost position in the sky. This is a celestial event often missed by 21st century inhabitants who are otherwise occupied with modern distractions. The native flora and fauna do not, for the most part, have these same distractions. Most indigenous plants gradually react to the waning hours of light and the moderating temperatures by sheading leaves and shifting to a dormant state. However, some plants react to this seasonal transference by getting a jumpstart on their competition. Wakulla Countys thistles are one such plant. This is prime time for thistles to start growing and become established for the upcoming spring days. The head start gives the thistles a major advantage for colonizing new ground and pushing out other plants. The lush green leaves are an enticing target for livestock and wildlife which seek every grazing opportunity during winter. Unfortunately, at least for the herbivores, the leaves are covered with sharp, stiff spines which make consumption painful. There are at least nine different species of thistle in Florida which include tall thistle, Lecontes thistle, swamp thistle, Nutalls thistle, purple or yellow thistle, bull thistle, Virginia thistle. They are distinguished by their owers color and the general shape of the plant, but several are rare to encounter. All Florida thistles are biennials, with the exception of Lecontes thistle which is a perennial. Biennial plants are those growing from seed in the rst year and which produce seeds the second year. There are three distinct life stages pertaining to all native thistles. During the rst year the plant will grow as a rosette, a taproot with a cluster of leaves on or near the soil surface. The rosette growth stage occurs primarily during the winter months in Wakulla County. During the second year, a stalk with a bloom bud will elongate from the rosette, which is referred to as bolting. Bolting frequently begins in late January and goes through July, depending on the species and environmental conditions. Once the biennial plant owers, it can produce up to 4,000 seeds per plant. The tiny seed are dispersed by wind with the aid of thistledown, a soft feathery material easily transported on the breeze. As the seed are scattered the biennial thistles are dying. Throughout history thistles have used in folk medicine. Roman naturalist, philosopher and military commander Pliny the Elder believed thistle to be a cure for baldness. Other early herbalists considered it a treatment for the plague, vertigo and headaches. The most likely verifiable and legitimate use for thistle in antiquity was as an early warning system. An invading Viking force was attempting a surprise attack on Scotsmen, when one of the barefoot Norsemen stepped on a thistle. The reaction to the sharp spines alerted the Scots who were able to then successfully defend themselves. The appreciative Scots incorporated the thistle in their national crest, where it remains to this day. Contact your UF/IFAS Wakulla County Extension Office at 850-926-3931 or http://wakulla.ifas.u .edu/ to learn more about the areas thistles. Les Harrison is the Wakulla County Extension Director. He can be reached by email at harrisog@u edu or at (850) 926-3931.Thistles use winter to push out other plants Natural WakullaBy Les Harrison PHOTO BY LES HARRISON PHOTOS BY LES HARRISONA thistle bloom. A thistle early bolt. By FEATUREHUB For gardeners, the winter months are made for dreaming a time for planning, paging through seed catalogs and envisioning the wonders theyll see in the gardening season to come. For them, here are holiday gift ideas to help while away the winter months: Plant a terrarium: When gardening outdoors isnt an option, give the gift of a tabletop garden. These mini greenhouses offer the perfect glimpse into nature in the middle of winter. Best yet theyre easy to make; you neednt be a gardener to assemble. Get creative with a large glass container (keep your eyes peeled for them at craft stores and flea markets). Fill with stones, planting medium and plants. Look to the internet for various how-to guides on planting terrariums. Stuff a stocking: Tis the season to stock up on gardening gifts to make life in the garden even more pleasant. Help keep pesky insects away from busy gardeners with BugBand natural insect repellent wristbands. The colorful plastic DEET-free wristbands contain Geraniol; these vapors form a protective shield around the immediate area, keeping insects a safe distance away. The wristband keeps working, up to 120 hours. Starting at $4.95. Order at www.bugband.net. Create a backyard focal point: Whether in bloom or dormant, a backyard garden offers the best place to linger and watch the changing landscape of each season. Extend the use of your favorite gardeners favorite place with the Walden Ring Convertible Firepit. Simply stack your own stones in a circle and insert a Walden Ring. Additional inserts are available to transform the ring from repit to fountain to garden planter to heated birdbath to table to barbecue. Base ring available online for $595, inserts from $150. Go to www.waldenbackyards. com. Give a public garden visit. When cabin fever sets in, give your gardener the perfect getaway: a gift certi cate, day pass or membership to the nearest public garden, many of which have events and offerings year-round. More than 500 botanic gardens, arboreta, educational gardens, farm gardens, historical landscapes, zoos, museum gardens and other gardens are members of the American Public Gardens Association. To locate one near you, go to www.garden.org/public_gardens/.Gardening gift ideas Ace tools make the perfect gift for the do-it-yourselfer. Theyve been engineered to the highest standards of durability and performance and theyre guaranteed to equal or exceed the quality of the big national brands. So stock their workshop with the tools they can always count on Ace. Store Hours: Mon-Fri 8-7, Sat 8-6, Sun 10-5 Apply Today! Visit www.acerewardsvisa.com/ar93110 or see your local participating Ace Rewards retailer for more details.The creditor and issuer of the Ace Rewards Platinum Visa Card is U.S. Bank National Association ND.The best tools for saving money.SM FIND US ON: Visit acehardware.com for store services, hours, directions and more... SATURDAY ONLY!20% oLimit 1 per household.Power tools and small appliances qualify for 10% off. Offer valid at Crawfordville Ace Hardware store. See details on right.all regular-priced itemsDecember 15,2012 only. Must present coupon to receive offer. Cant be combined with other offers. LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLE! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST! Ace Home Center / NAPA2709 Crawfordville Hwy Crawfordville, FL 323272158 (850) 926-3141 www.acehardware.com

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Section B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012sports news and team views Sports WILLIAM SNOWDEN WILLIAM SNOWDENLady War Eagles pass the ball against Rickards last week. War Eagle Markell Rawls prepares to shoot a free throw against Rickards.Lady War Eagles fall to RickardsBASKETBALLWar Eagles fall to Rickards, Florida HighBy WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Lady War Eagles were outgunned by the Rickards Lady Raiders last week, 59-14. The Lady War Eagles did score rst in the game, held Thursday, Dec. 6 in Tallahassee, but the girls trailed at halftime 37-11. A freethrow with 10 seconds left accounted for Wakullas 1 point in the third quarter and the score was 52-12. Top scorers for Wakulla were Ashley Carr with 4 points, including a 3-point shot; and J. Webster with 4 points and 7 rebounds. By WILLIAM SNOWDENeditor@thewakullanews.netThe Wakulla War Eagles got into a battle on Thursday, Dec. 6, against the Rickards Raiders in Tallahassee, falling by a score of 64-32 in a hard-fought game. The next night, the War Eagles were battling Florida High and fell by a score of 73-66. At Rickards, Wakulla was leading at the end of the rst quarter 14-11. But the game started getting away in the second period, with some Wakulla fans questioning some calls. At the half, Rickards was leading 35-23. In the third, Wakulla Coach Sean Crowe was called for a technical after a referee heard him telling his players to use their elbows when making rebounds. At the end of the third, Wakulla trailed 51-28. Top scorers for Wakulla were Zach Nordlof with 15 points, Corion Knight 8, and Malik Thomas, Sheldon Johnson, Caleb Fell, Vonte Ervin and Patrick Harvey each had 2. Continued on Page 3B Its the holidays and time to wear elastic-waisted pantsPam Chichester, GET FITPage 2BStaring at the scal cliff, looking back at the electionWEEKLY ROUNDUPPage 2B TH E Complete Medical Care. Here in Wakulla. Now Accepting New PatientsOur physicians have been providing comprehensive medical care for the families of Wakulla County for 15 years. Treating the entire family through all stages of life, we provide the medical care that your family needs. Infant, child, adult and geriatric care Womens healthcare Minor surgical procedures Diabetes education On site lab The support of TMH specialists and services SAME DAY Appointments Available Our medical team invites you to call to make your appointment today at (850) 926-7105. 15 Council Moore Road | Crawfordville, FL 32327 TMH Physician PartnersWAKULLA 1305 Coastal Hwy. 98, PanaceaHome of the All-U-Can Eat Seafood & Chicken www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News BREAKFAST PARTNER... Hungry Man Breakfast $5 29 Breakfast Platter $2 49 $1 99 Breakfast SpecialCoastal Restaurantursday Mornings Look for Your Complimentary copy of (free with any full Breakfast Order)984-2933Kids Eat Free on Wed.AUCE Chicken Tues. & urs. .. n t LUNCH PARTNER R R R www.thewakullanews.comServing Wakulla County For More Than A CenturyThe Wakulla News a Complimentary Copy of926-3500 Fax orders 926-35012500 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville Order the specialand receive Deli Deliof the week atFRESH MADE TO ORDER HOT OR COLD SPECIALTY SANDWICHES SALADS SEASONAL SOUP & CHILIPARTY PLATTERS Law Oce Est. 1998Foreclosures Creditor/Debtor Business Law17 High Drive, Suite C Courthouse Square Crawfordville, Florida Attorney-at Law Certified Circuit Court Mediator

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We all try to be our very best throughout the year then Halloween rolls around with all that trick-or-treat candy, and from there on it goes on and on through December. It is a constant battle, throughout the holiday season and out comes the elastic-wasted sweats as we can no longer button those skinny jeans. The number one thing that people hate about their body is their bellies. We want the at belly or chiseled six-pack abs by bikini season. In the United States alone, approximately 60 percent of adults are carrying more belly fat than we want. So what is the best strategy for banishing belly fat? There are an unimaginable number of books and websites to tell you how to do it. Just understand that thousands and thousands of sit ups will not do you any good unless you drop the weight! Again and again, I see people getting on one of the ab machines to lose their belly, or they are taking a speci c shake, or even some weird pill, that guarantees abs. Its just simply not true. There are no magic pills, super-duper ab exercises or special foods that target belly fat. The good news is that with weight loss many people notice they are losing weight in their abdominal region. But be warned, there are numerous factors that affect weight loss such as exercise, genetics, age, metabolism and where your body prefers to deposit fat. You might be one of those individuals who tend to pack it on the belly. People who drink daily, smoke cigarettes, older adult males or postmenopausal woman are at even higher risk. But dont be discouraged; try starting by changing your diet. Eat whole grains and fresh fruit. Stay away from re ned foods (white breads). Add exercise and you will actually begin to see your body take shape. We all want beautiful abdominals, but what we really need is a strong core foundation. A strong core will help us to actually do the powerful movements that are needed in abdominal exercises. Here are a few effective exercises for strengthening and rming your abdominal muscles and building core stability. These are excellent to incorporate into your daily workout routine: REVERSE CRUNCH: The reverse crunch works well as a toning, strengthening exercise because you isolate the abdominal muscles. Lie back on the oor. Flex your knees. Raise your knees against your head by crunching your abs. Remember to push your lower back against the oor on each rep. Keep your knees exed, close to your glutes. Knees move towards your head, head doesnt move towards your knees. Keep your head on the oor. OBLIQUE CRUNCH: This is an exercise use to strengthen the oblique muscles of the body to help the individual keep t and remain healthy. Lie on your back and cross the left foot over the right knee, hands behind your head. Keeping lower back pressed into the oor, lift your shoulder blades off the floor and then curl your upper body diagonally across your body towards your left knee. Switch knees and repeat for 12 to 16 reps on each side. PLANK EXERCISE: The plank exercise helps strengthen midsection, upper-body and lowerbody muscles along the front of your body. Planks also strengthen inner core muscles that support your joints. Start by lying on the oor and rest your body on your forearms with your palms flat on the floor. Shoulders are aligned directly over your elbows and legs are straight behind you with your ankles, knees and thighs touching. In push-up motion, raise your body off the oor, supporting your weight on your forearms and your toes. You can rotate your elbows to a 45 degree angle and clasp your palms together in the center. Make sure that your back is at and your head, neck and spine are in a straight line. Abdominal muscles engaged, stomach does not drop or hips to rise up. Take slow inhales and exhale steadily. Try to begin with 20 seconds at a time till you get proficient enough to complete a 60 second plank 3 to 5 sets. Start with several (3-5) abdominal exercises 3-5 times a week and repetitions that are comfortable for your tness level. As you improve, increase the number of repetitions and variation of exercises. You do not need to do all the exercises. Remember you are more likely to keep up an exercise program if it works well with you. So select exercises that you like and can perform for several weeks and if they do not feel comfortable then try another. Just dont give up. Keep trying and you will find something that will t with your lifestyle and needs. MERRY CHRISTMAS and hope your holidays will be full of health and tness!Pamela Chichester, CFT is Body-Tek Gym Manager. She can be reached at (850) 926-BFIT. Page 2B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comWHS sports schedule:TUESDAY, Dec. 11 Boys basketball at Godby at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. Girls basketball at West Gadsden at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. WEDNESDY, Dec. 12 Girls basketball at Lincoln High School at at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. THURSDAY, Dec. 13 Boys basketball at East Gadsden High School at 5:30 p.m. JV, 7 p.m. varsity. FRIDAY, Dec. 14 Girls & Boys basketball in Bainbridge Tournament in Bainbridge, Ga., Boys play at 8 p.m. Girls TBD. Wrestling at OdoBan Lethal Wrestling Invitation in Perry, Ga., with weigh-in at 2 p.m. SATURDAY, Dec. 14 Boys basketball in Bainbridge Tournament in Bainbridge, Ga., at 5 p.m. Continued from Page 1B On Friday, the War Eagles hung tough with Florida High but lost. At the end of the rst period, Wakulla trailed 22-13. At halftime, the War Eagles went into the locker room down 40-25. In the third, Wakulla dominated on a 20-10 run to close the score to 5 points, 50-45. But the Seminoles outscored Wakulla in the fourth, 23-21 to take the win. Scorers for Wakulla included Sheldon Thomas with 14 points, Zach Nordlof with 12, Corion Knight with 10, Caleb Fell with 8, Bryson Beverly with 5, Markell Rawls with 2 and Malik Thomas with 1. With the two losses, the War Eagles record falls to 2-5 for the season. They were set to play Godby on Tuesday, Dec. 11, at Godby.HEALTH & FITNESSWar Eagles fall to Rickards, Florida High Its the holidays and time to wear elastic-waisted pants GET FITBy PAMELA CHICHESTER PHOTO BY METRO GRAPHICSOne of the most common requests heard in a yoga class is hip openers today please. This request is usually followed by the other half of the class groaning. We love to hate hip openers yet our bodies crave them and often feel lighter and more open after for good reason. The majority of us sit for most of our days, shortening the hip exors at the front of the hip (psoas, rectus femoris, sartorius) and tightening the hip rotators (piriformis, obturator internus, gamellus, to name a few). The hip joint itself is a ball-and-socket type joint with the head of the femur (thigh bone) sitting in the acetabulum or socket of the pelvis. A variety of muscles attach into the femur starting from the pelvis itself, the lumbar spine, the sacrum, or other parts of the femur. In general when we stretch or open a muscle we are lengthening its position, moving the two attachment points away from each other. This is easy to assess with linear muscles like the psoas which attaches from the front of the lumbar spine, crosses through the pelvis and attaches to the head of the femur. If we flex the hip forward we are shortening the psoas, bringing the two attachments of the muscle closer together. If we extend the hip backwards (such as in the back leg of Pigeon pose) we are opening and lengthening the psoas. The effect becomes greater in King Pigeon pose if we assume an upright posture with our spine so that we lengthen the upper attachment more. In this example we can also rethink our de nition of hip openers. Suddenly, poses with a bent knee where we rotate the hip are not the only way to open our hips. If the psoas attaches into the femur, and a shortened psoas tightens our hip (not to mention the affect it has on our low back) then poses like Warrior / Virabhadrasana or Half Moon / Ardha Chandrasana become hip openers too. The rule of how to open a muscle becomes less clear with the hip rotators where the angle of the joint actually affects the action of the muscle. For example, the piriformis muscle attaches from the front of the sacrum to the back of the femur. It acts as an external or outward rotator of the hip. Except if the hip is exed, then it assists in abduction or sideways movement of the hip. So to follow the rule of opening we would want to internally rotate the femur, flex the hip and adduct or bring the femur towards midline. This can be achieved with the top leg in Marichyasana (sit with your left leg extended, bend your right knee and step the foot across your left thigh so that the femur is exed, adducted toward midline, and gently internally rotated.) Other hip openers dont seem to follow the rule of opening. We often externally rotate the hip to stretch the external rotators of the hip. Huh? The reason this works is because we typically ex the hip at the same time. To understand how hip openers work we have to picture the position of the muscle. Lets picture the obturator internus muscle, a close friend of piriformis. It attaches from our sitting bone or ischial tuberosity to the greater trochanter of the femur, a bony outcropping on the side of the hip. Our ischial tuberosities can be felt when sitting, they are the bony bits under the flesh of our buttocks. Our greater trochanter can be felt by rst nding the top of our pelvis by placing our hands at our waist, rmly pressing in and down until we feel a ledge. This is our iliac crest. Slide your hands down and with your thumb you will feel a bony prominence that is the femur. You can feel it move by slowing rotating the hip in and out. So now we can feel the attachment points for the obturator internus, between the ischial tuberosity or sitting bone, and our femur. From this observation we can see that in a neutral position the muscle wraps around the hip. So if were to flex the hip, the ischial tuberosity scoops under thus increasing the space between the two attachment points and increasing the wrapping distance of the muscle hence lengthening the muscle. This is why a simple squat (using the term simple lightly) can stretch our hip rotators and can be one of the reasons Westerners nd it so challenging to achieve. Since there are many muscles in the hip with many functions depending on the demands we place on our body, keeping these muscles supple can help us in ways that may not seem obvious at rst. Traditional yogic thought attributes many healing properties to hip openers from organ issues to sexual dysfunction. So if you are one of the groaners when hip openers are suggested, perhaps pause to wonder if they could be helping you in ways you werent even aware.Dolly Moody is a professional Kripalu Yoga teacher who teaches at Studio 88 in Crawfordville. She can be reached at 228-380-0140 or Focusyoga@yahoo.com.Hip openers what really happens YOGA FOR LIFEBy DOLLY MOODY Become a volunteer with Floridas Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. The Ombudsman Program is a statewide advocacy organiza on seeking to ensure the health, safety, welfare and rights of Floridas elders who reside in nursing homes, assisted living facili es and adult family care homes. Bene ts of volunteering with us include: Meet and interact with others who share a passion for volunteering, personal ful llment and growth. Give back to the community and seek to make a posi ve di erence in the lives of long-term care facility residents. Receive mileage reimbursement as well as support from state and local sta Apply today! To learn more call 1-888-831-0404 or visit ombudsman.m orida.com online. CLIP & CALL! 866-938-5968 www.StudyForArthritis.comCompensation up to $50.00 per visit No-cost study-related care and study medications for up to 42 months. No health insurance or referrals are required.Local doctors need volunteers for a research study comparing FDA-approved arthritis medications. DO YOU SUFFER FROM ARTHRITIS? Train ONLINE for Allied Health and Medical Management. Job placement assistance. Computer available. MEDICAL CAREERS BEGIN HERE Call 888-203-3179www.CenturaOnline.com

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Clubs, Groups, Regular MeetingsThursday, Dec. 13 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. Friday, Dec. 14 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 8 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at noon at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK CLUB meets at the public library from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS meets at St. Teresas Episcopal Church in Medart from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. PICKIN N GRINNIN JAM SESSION will be held at the senior center from 10 a.m. to noon. (Also on Tuesdays) WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. QUILTERS GUILD OF WAKULLA COUNTY will meet at 9:30 a.m. at the library. Join them for the fun of quilting. Quilters of all skill levels are invited. Contact Anne Lopez at 294-0832. Saturday, Dec. 15 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 5:30 p.m. at Mission by the Sea Church on Alligator Drive in Alligator Point. Call (850) 545-1853 for more information. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 3106 Shadeville Highway, across from the volunteer re department, at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call 224-2321. SOPCHOPPY GROWERS MARKET will be held from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. in front of Posh Java, Organics & Gifts, on the corner of Rose St. and Winthrop Ave., in downtown Sopchoppy. The market features locally grown, organic and unsprayed produce, homemade bread, and other food items. To participate in the market, contact Posh Java at (850) 9621010 or email poshjava@gmail.com for details. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM AND ARCHIVES will be open from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. Sunday, Dec. 16 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information, call ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. Monday, Dec. 17 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS FOR WOMEN will meet at 6 p.m. at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville. For more information call (850) 545-1853. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 1:30 p.m. YOGA CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 10:30 a.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. This is a gentle restorative class focusing on the breath to build exibility, restore balance with a mind/body approach. Tuesday, Dec. 18 ALANON meets at 54 Ochlockonee Street in Crawfordville at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BUNCH meets in the childrens room at the public library at 10:30 a.m. NAMI CONNECTION will meet from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. This group is for people diagnosed with a mental illness. VFW LADIES AUXILIARY BINGO will be held at the VFW Post on Arran Road from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. CRAWFORDVILLE LIONS CLUB will meet at 6 p.m. at Myra Jeans Restaurant. SARRACENIA CHAPTER of the Florida Native Plant Society will meet at 6:30 p.m. at the library. This months feature will be the Chapters traditional wreathmaking party. Grapevine wreath blanks and a variety of other native-plant materials will be provided for all attending. Participants who have their own hobby glue guns should bring them. The public is cordially invited. Social time, with holiday refreshments for all, will precede the meeting. Wednesday, Dec. 19 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at Ochlockonee Bay UMC on Surf Road at noon. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. BOOK BABIES, storytime with activities for toddlers, will be held at the public library at 10:30 a.m. BRAIN GYM CLASS will be held at the senior center at 10:30 a.m. KNITTING GROUP meets at the public library from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. For information, call 491-1684. LINE DANCING will be held at the senior center at 2 p.m. NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 6:30 p.m. at NAMI Wakulla, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. Call 224-2321 for more information. BEADING CLASSES with Tamara will be held at 12:45 p.m. at the Senior Citizens Center. Choose from glass and stone beads to create your masterpiece. There is a $3 to $5 fee for the materials. KNITTING CLUB will meet at 4 p.m. at the public library. Anyone interested in the art of knitting are encouraged to attend. Thursday, Dec. 20 ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS meets at 6 p.m. at the Panacea Womens Club on Otter Lake Road, Panacea. For more information call 524-9103. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS will meet at 8 p.m. at the Station House, 3106 Shadeville Highway. Call (850) 544-0719 for more information. COASTAL OPTIMIST CLUB will meet at noon at Poseys Steam Room in Panacea. FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce. ROTARY CLUB meets at the senior center at noon. WAKULLA COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY MUSEUM will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 High Drive, Crawfordville. NAMI FAMILY TO FAMILY SUPPORT GROUP will meet at 6 p.m. at the NAMI Wakulla of ce, 2140-C Crawfordville Highway. This group is for family members and friends of people diagnosed with mental illnesses and is free of charge. WAKULLA COUNTY CANCER SUPPORT GROUP will be having their annual Christmas dinner at 6:30 p.m. at the Wakulla Springs Lodge. This event is open to men and women, regardless of the type of cancer, bring spouses, caregivers and friends. Call 926-6050 for details.Special EventsThursday, Dec. 13 WAKULLA DEMOCRATIC EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will meet at 6 p.m. at Angelos. All Democrats are invited for a festive look back at 2012. A cocktail hour will precede the dinner program. The menu will be a la carte ordering with no ticket required. The dinner program will start at 7 p.m. The executive committee elections are scheduled at 6 p.m. Only those precinct representatives elected are eligible to vote. For more information, visit www.wakullademocrats.org/. Friday, Dec. 14 CHAMBER RIBBON CUTTING for Smokin Vapor Wakulla will be held at 11:30 a.m. at 1626 D Crawfordville Highway. CELTIC CHRISTMAS CONCERT will be held at Posh Java at 8 p.m. The string trio, Terra, will perform Celtic and traditional Christmas music. Terra is made up of award-winning ddle player, Aisha Ivey, Alex Shor on cello, and Steve Hodges on mandolin, bouzouki, and guitar. For reservations, contact Posh Java at (850) 962-1010 or email poshjava@ gmail.com. Tickets are $10. Saturday, Dec. 15 HOLIDAY SILENT AUCTION AND BOOK SIGNING will be held by the Florida Wild Mammal Association and Goose Creek Wildlife Sanctuary from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at the Tallahassee Elks Lodge located at 276 N. Magnolia Drive. Nature writer and photographer John B. Spohrer, Jr. will sign copies of his book, The Seasons of Apalachicola Bay, with part of the proceeds going to Goosecreek and FWMA. There will also be a cash bar and raf e. For more information, go to www.wakullawildlife.org or www.goosecreekwildlifesanctuary.org. PERSONAL PROTECTION AND FIREARMS SAFETY COURSE will be held from 8 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Wakulla County Sheriffs Of ce Range in Otter Creek, near Sopchoppy. The program is $65 for non-range members and $55 for range members and satis es the requirement for a conceal carry permit. For more information or to register, call the Range at 745-7290 or Lt. Fred Nichols at 251-1676. COMMUNITY FUN DAY will be held by the Wakulla Moose Lodge to celebrate their Founders Day. The public is invited. There will be childrens activities. The Ochlockonee Volunteer Fire Department will be on site to give re truck demonstrations, the sheriffs of ce will provide child identi cation kits, a guest speaker will talk about safe internet sur ng and the Southeastern Blood Bank will have a mobile on site for blood donations. Adults making a donation will receive a free hot dog lunch. Children eat for free. Santa will also be there. There will be a large indoor yard sale. The Lodge is located at 44 Jer-Be-Lou Boulevard in Panacea. For questions, call 984-2510. CHRISTMAS BOAT PARADE will be held by the St. Marks Yacht Club between 6 and 6:30 p.m. It can be viewed from Riverside Cafe and near the Old Fort. CIVIL WAR ERA CHRISTMAS will be held at the Tallahassee Museum from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Ladies Soldiers Friend Sewing Society of Tallahassee will present the celebrations and traditions of Christmas in the South in the1860s. Food and decorations of the season will be featured by ladies and gentlemen attired in clothing representing that period of history at Bellevue. For more information, call Karen Kugell, 860-562-9985. Tuesday, Dec. 18 WAKULLA COUNTY REPUBLICAN EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE will hold its monthly meeting at 6 p.m. for dinner and conversation, 7 p.m. for the executive committee meeting, at Deals Oyster House in St. Marks. This month, the meeting will be centered around organizing and electing of cers for the executive board for the coming term. Only those precinct Committeemen and Committeewomen who led a candidacy form and turned in a loyalty oath will be eligible to vote or be elected to of ce. www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 3B Government Meetings Thursday, Dec. 13 WAKULLA COUNTY TOURIST DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL will hold a public meeting at 8:30 a.m. at the Wakulla Welcome Center in Panacea, 1498 Coastal Highway. ST. MARKS CITY COMMISSION will hold its regular meeting at 7 p.m. at city hall. Monday, Dec. 17 WAKULLA COUNTY PLANNING COMMISSION will hold a special meeting at 7 p.m. in the commission chambers. By SCOTT JOYNER Library DirectorThe only thing you absolutely have to know is the location of the library. -Albert Einstein Each year as part of our State Aid to Libraries application process, I have to submit a statistical report by Dec. 1 to the State Library. This report shows in black and white, veri able facts, how the library is used by the community. Some numbers, which may interest you, are the fact that we have nearly 12,000 card holders from every section of the county, who over the past year have checked out more than 83,000 items during their more than 50,000 visits to the library. Thats an average of more than 250 people coming through our doors a day when were open! We had over 750 meetings and children/family programs here with a total attendance of over 15,000 people. Nearly half of that was due to our year round programs for infants and pre-schoolers, and our Summer Program for all children in the community. Showing that were so much more than a place where people can read magazines and books for free is the fact that there were nearly 16,000 uses of our 12 public computers over the past year. Weve also been proud to provide more than 700 hours of free computer classes which 3,200 people took advantage of. In addition to all this, over the past year we were able to assist the students of Wakulla County with their summer reading by providing multiple copies of the required books, as well as meeting their needs year around with a childrens and young adult collection that we consider second to none, and which accounted for more than 21,000 checkouts. We are also happy to be able to assist our hard working colleagues at the school libraries in the county by providing access to materials after school hours, on Saturdays and during the summer to the youth of the community. This year we also began offering e-book checkout services to those with mobile devices, and partnered with Rotary of Wakulla County to provide dictionaries to every third grader in the county. We are very proud to offer a wide range of needed services to the great citizens of Wakulla County and fully realize that we cant do all this without your support. Your generous support raised more than $14,000 for the Friends of the Library this year, a group who continues to lessen the burden on Wakulla taxpayers by funding our Summer Program for Children, as well as other library expenses. Not everyone can afford to drive to Barnes & Noble in Tallahassee or has the capability to order books, movies, etc. online or has a computer period to apply for jobs, government assistance or to do research for school in this rapidly technologically oriented world. We provide a safe place for the entire family to come to learn and to be entertained and for citizens to stay involved in their community and will do our level best to continue to do so. Please feel free to not take my word for it and come by to see all that we have to offer. In closing, the library staff and I wish everyone a safe and happy holiday season and hope to see many of you come in over the next year!! Ringling Brothers comes to the library! Mark your calendars for the afternoon of Friday, Dec. 14, as a laughter ambassador from the Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey Circus will be at the library at 4:30 p.m. for a fun- lled reading of Dr. Suess If I Ran the Circus. Please come out and kick off the weekend by welcoming the world wide famous circus to the library. The show begins at 4:30 p.m., so please bring out the whole family! Holiday Hours The library will be closed on Tuesday, Dec. 25 for Christmas Day and Tuesday, Jan. 1 for New Years Day. Materials may be turned into the Book Drop in the front parking lot.Library News... Holiday Silent Auction and book signing at Tallahassee Elk Lodge from 1 to 5 p.m. Community Fun Day at Wakulla Moose Lodge. Christmas Boat Parade in St. Marks between 6 and 6:30 p.m. Firearms Safety Course at Sheriffs Of ce Range from 8 a.m to 4 p.m. SaturdaySaturdaySaturdaySaturday Week Week in inWakulla akullaWakulla akulla Email your community events to jjensen@thewakullanews.net Join the string trio, Terra, for a Celtic Christmas Concert at Posh Java in Sopchoppy on Friday at 8 p.m.

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Page 4B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLES FLORIDA STATE SEMINOLESFLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators FLORIDA gators The Weekend Slate The Weekend Slate In The Huddle A weekly look at college football in the Sunshine State te Your ad could be here! Call 926-7102ALLSTATE SUGAR BOWL #3 Florida vs. #21 Louisvilleat Mercedes-Benz Superdome, New Orleans, LA Wednesday, Jan. 2 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. DISCOVER ORANGE BOWL #13 Florida State vs. #15 Northern Illinois at Sun Life Stadium, Miami Gardens, FL Tuesday, Jan. 1 at 8:30 p.m.The game can be seen on ESPN. Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com Subscribe online at printsubscriber.theosceola.com or call 1-800-725-4321 or call 1-800-725-4321 yeah, yeah, were were excited excited too! too! printsubscriber.theosceola.comThe All-New Osceola glossy print magazine & Osceola Express digital magazines are here! Subscribe online at printsubscriber.gatorbait.net or call 1-800-782-3216 yeah, yeah, were were excited excitedtoo! too! printsubscriber.gatorbait.netThe All-New Gator Bait glossy print magazine & Gator Bait Express digital magazines are here! FSUs Fisher: NIU belongs in Orange BowlBy TIM LINAFELTOSCEOLAJimbo Fisher isnt buying any of the talk that Northern Illinois doesnt deserve its spot in the Orange Bowl. As far as Fisher is concerned, NIU is a worthy opponent that deserves to be precisely where it is paired with Florida State Seminoles in a contest to be played Jan. 1 at Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens. By virtue of nishing 15th in the nal Bowl Championship Series standings ahead of Big East champ Louisville the Huskies automatically qualified for a berth in a BCS game. But that didnt stop a panel of ESPN analysts from debating whether NIU, which nished 11-1 and champion of the Mid-American Conference, belonged on college footballs premier stage. Fisher, though, didnt have any such questions. You dont get in this game unless youre a good football team, said Fisher, just a day removed from winning his rst conference title at FSU. Its easy for talking heads to say that (NIU doesnt belong). Theyve earned the right to be here, theyve earned the right to have this opportunity. Florida State will have some proving of its own to do, too. The Seminoles (11-2) claimed their rst Atlantic Coast Conference title since 2005 on Saturday, but struggled to put away a middling Georgia Tech team that nished 6-7 and is only in a bowl thanks to an NCAA waiver. The Seminoles can follow up that title by winning their rst BCS bowl and achieving their rst 12-win season since beating Virginia Tech in the 2000 Sugar Bowl for their second national championship. To do that, FSU will have to slow down an NIU offense that ranks ninth in the country in rushing, 15th in total offense and scores more than 40 points per game. Huskies QB Jordan Lynch has accounted for 43 touchdowns (24 passing, 19 rushing) and has amassed 2,962 passing yards to go along with an additional 1,771 yards on the ground. We know were going to get an inspired opponent, an opponent thats going to be ready to prove something, Fisher said. But more importantly, were going to play a very good opponent. Both schools will have new-look coaching staffs come New Years Day NIU just promoted offensive line coach Rod Carey to head coach following Dave Doerens departure to North Carolina State. FSU, meanwhile, still has yet to determine who will coach its defense after coordinator Mark Stoops accepted Kentuckys head coaching position. A reporter asked Carey what hed have thought had he been told at the beginning of the year that hed make his head coaching debut in the Orange Bowl. I wouldnt have believed you, Carey said. Its been crazy, but things happen for a reason. Jimbo Fisher says Northern Illinois is a worthy opponent. Huskies quarterback Jordan Lynch leads an offense ranked ninth in rushing.Expecting coaching continuity for GatorsTHOMAS GOLDKAMPGATOR BAIT STAFF WRITERIf Floridas defense this year is any indication, continuity on the coaching staff might be one of the single most important factors in a teams growth. The Gators have had more than their share of coaching changes over the past ve years, particularly on offense. Four different offensive coordinators have rolled through Gainesville, with only Steve Addazio holding the post for more than a year since 2008. Even now, theres the possibility Florida could lose offensive coordinator Brent Pease, should a handful of job opportunities pop up. Pease is on the head coaching short list for a few jobs, though he seems content in Gainesville at the moment. In any case, second-year coach Will Muschamp has contingency plans in place if any of his staff members are approached about an opportunity to move up. I always tell our staff this: If you have an opportunity for a promotion, if youre a position coach and you can go be a coordinator, if youre a coordinator and you can go be a head coach, Ill support you 1,000 percent, he said. That says what kind of job were doing here at Florida. Floridas coaches are up for a few awards, led by defensive coordinator Dan Quinn. Quinn was named one of ve nalists for the Broyles Award, given annually to the nations top coordinator. Muschamp said he would support any moves up the coaching ladder by his staff. Lateral moves? Not so much. Guys that want to make parallel moves and theyre always looking for the next job, they dont need to be here anyway, he said. Well go nd a good coach. Theres a bunch of people that want to coach here. Theres a long list at my desk. While the next few weeks could be little tense for Florida fans hoping to hold on to what seems to be a pretty solid core of assistants, Muschamp is con dent the Gators can reload with quality assistants if necessary. This is a great place to work and weve got a good, young football team, he said, and were going to be good for a long time, OK? Muschamp does not expect any other staff changes other than receivers coach, a position he is looking to ll after Aubrey Hill resigned before the 2012 season began and graduate assistant Bush Hamdan was elevated to the job on an interim basis. Injury Updates Linebacker Jelani Jenkins suffered a broken bone in his right foot and will miss the bowl game after undergoing surgery on Monday morning. True freshman linebacker Antonio Morrison is expected to replace him in the starting lineup. Backup offensive lineman Ian Silberman (shoulder) and safety DeAnte Saunders (knee) will both miss the bowl game due to injuries. Linebacker Neiron Ball, who has missed the past two games after suffering an ankle injury on the opening kickoff against Louisiana, is expected back for the bowl game. Quarterback Jeff Driskel and center Jon Harrison are both nursing ankle injuries and are currently wearing walking boots, but both are expected to play in the bowl game. Saban Silliness On an SEC Championship Game teleconference call, Alabama coach Nick Saban made it clear hes not thrilled about the possibility of the Gators going to a BCS bowl despite not winning the East Division. Florida, at 11-1, is almost certain to play in the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans ahead of the loser of Saturdays SEC title game between Alabama and Georgia, and Saban wasnt happy about it. Its not really a great scenario, he said. You play your way into the championship game, which means youre the best team in your division. It doesnt seem quite right. I dont feel good about it for our football team or their football team. Of course, Sabans memory is short, matching his stature, since Alabama did virtually the same thing just last season by nishing runner-up to SEC champ LSU in the SEC West and then playing in the national title game. In typical Muschamp fashion, Floridas coach responded with a funny line when asked about Sabans comments Monday. Well, I can switch and go to Atlanta if he doesnt want to go to Atlanta and play the Dawgs, he chimed. Be careful what you ask for, Nick. Freshman linebacker Antonio Morrison delivers this crushing hit on FSU quarterback EJ Manuel that turned the game.

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 5B YOUR AD HERE Ally Begin Blown Bought Break Chores Courts Cowboys Cubs Dads Departments Drop Ease Equated Erase Eyes Fans Fried Gain Germ Glory Glow Gone Grew Grin Hour Idea Into Ironed Lame Learn Near Neighborhood Nice This page sponsored in part by: Pace Pass Pebbles Port Rate Removed Sang Seize Shift Snack Sweater Text Thus Tide Tied Urge Wash

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Page 6B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBy MICHAEL PELTIERTHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 7, Gov. Rick Scott bid hasta la vista to Colombia and to the head of the Department of Economic Opportunity this week as state lawmakers held a meet and greet of their own in preparation for the 2013 legislative session. During a series of introductory committee sessions, lawmakers heard from a host of state agencies and a rabble of Tea Partiers who shouted down lawmakers in what was later characterized as a overzealous, and ill-mannered, exhibition of patriotic exuberance. Meanwhile, state education of cials described as painful the rst statewide teacher assessment, the rollout of which was marred by some math errors. When corrected, the evaluation found 96.5 percent of teachers were rated ef cient or higher, harking back to the mythical Minnesota hamlet of Lake Wobegon, where all the children are above average. SESSION GEARS UP FOR ANOTHER CYCLE Lawmakers officially rolled up their sleeves this week as they returned to Tallahassee to begin work for the 2013 session. Though much of the work was introductory, some committees made it clear what their priorities will be between now and May. Property insurance issues and tort reform will be among the hotly contested issues in the coming months, with Citizens Property Insurance Corp. officials expected to be under the microscope as lawmakers look for ways to depopulate the state-backed insurer. Floridas top insurance of cial Kevin McCarty was given a January deadline to come up with a series of proposals to reduce the size of Citizens and to further reduce costs in the states auto-insurance market. On the health care front, lawmakers will begin looking at how the state will implement the sweeping federal health care program, commonly known as ObamaCare, following November elections that determined that overturning the controversial initiative isnt in the cards for at least the next four years. ELECTION REVISITED Of cials have been wondering again since the early morning hours of Nov. 7 just why Florida cant ever seem to fully run a problemfree election. This time, it was particularly long lines at Election Day voting sites in a few South Florida counties and difficulty determining the final results, an embarrassment that left Florida in the uncounted column long after President Obamas re-election was reassured by the count in the rest of the nation. Some again brought out the jokes why did Florida move its primary election so early? So it would have a winner by the general election. But mostly of cials this week just wanted to know how to make the states voting process work like it seems to most everywhere else. State elections of cials went before a couple legislative committees this week and began explaining how it all works or doesnt. State elections of cials said theyll visit several counties next week to talk to local supervisors as the fact- nding truly gets under way. WHO IS FISCAL CLIFF? WHATS HIS PROBLEM? The rst positive indications about Floridas budget in many years now might be in trouble. After years of cuts, the coming scal year had been shaping up to look pretty good with it appearing that lawmakers would at least start the year in the black. Wait a minute, though. Legislators heard this week that the good news could be overtaken by events if the Florida Supreme Court strikes down changes to the state pension, or the nation plunges over the scal cliff. Speaking to the first meeting of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Amy Baker -coordinator of the Legislatures Of ce of Economic and Demographic Research said the scal cliff talks loom large. If Republicans and Democrats in Washington cant hash out a deal to avoid major automatic budget cuts, the resulting economic damage could wipe out Floridas good news budget plans. Also at issue is a looming decision in the challenge to a 2011 law that required employees to contribute 3 percent of their income to their retirement funds, along with other changes. It could cost the state around $2 billion if the Supreme Court strikes down the law. DEO CHIEF STEPS DOWN, SCOTT APPOINTS SUCCESSOR Hunting Deutsch, who until Tuesday was the head of Scotts job creating engine, the Department of Economic Opportunity, is again on the job hunt after resigning the post amid growing scrutiny of his own unemployment history. Because he resigned, the former bank manager wont be eligible to collect unemployment bene ts, which he received for nearly two years between 2009 and 2011 after he was downsized as part of a bank merger. Deutsch, who also received an undisclosed severance package from his former employer, collected 91 weeks of unemployment compensation during a period of joblessness that included a stint of European travel. First reported by the Florida Current, Deutsch said the experience of not having a job made him more empathetic of the hundreds of thousands of Floridians who were also looking for work as the states jobless rate languished in double digits. Hunt did the right thing by resigning from DEO, Scott said in a statement issued by his of ce. It is important that nothing interfere with our mission to create more jobs and opportunities for Florida families. Two days later, Scott appointed his General Counsel, Jesse Panuccio, to take over the agency that has seen three executive directors in 14 months. COURTS: TAJ MAHAL AND PRIVATE PRISONS ADDRESSED The courts again supplied news for the week, with a handful of cases that have been closely watched in the capital city. State agencies battling with local businesses agreed to a $500,000 settlement for artwork sold for the First District Court of Appeal building in Tallahassee. The out-of-court settlement included about $190,000 in attorney fees to be paid by the state. The opulent structure has brought about the downfall of at least one appellate judge, who resigned after a series of disclosures over lavish furnishings, expensive artwork and other accoutrements Meanwhile, a circuit judge in Tallahassee ruled that the Legislative Budget Commission could not on its own privatize health care services in most of the states correctional institutions. The ruling by Circuit Judge John Cooper allows the Department of Corrections to privatize health-care services in a region covering roughly the bottom third of the state; that contract was speci cally included in the ne print of the budget for t he spending year that ends June 30. But Cooper said that the other three regions of the state couldnt be privatized by the LBC, which voted in September to approve the broader initiative, that only the full Legislature could make such broad policy decisions. GENTING SAYS NO TO PUBLIC VOTE, WILL WAIT ON GAMBLING Florida voters will not be asked to weigh in on a statewide gambling initiative after the primary backer of the proposed constitutional amendment decided to see what lawmakers come up with instead. Genting executives this week disclosed that they will await action by the Legislature before determining their next step in efforts to develop resort gambling megaprojects in the state. Legislative leaders have said they dont expect an extensive gambling battle this year. Instead, lawmakers are expected to conduct an extended study of the issue, a review that could include public hearings around the state and other fact- nding activities. Earlier this year, the Malaysia-based Genting Group created a group that hired petition gatherers and attorneys with expertise in getting constitutional amendments onto the ballot essentially signaling a possible intent to circumvent the Legislature on the issue. But Genting of cials let legislative leaders know this week that the company will hold its cards for now. TEACHER EVALUATIONS PAINFUL The Florida Department of Educations interim commissioner this week told lawmakers its been a painful year as the state initiates a new teacher evaluation system that appears to have its share of problems. On Tuesday, the department posted teacher evaluations from across the state only to withdraw them shortly afterward due to errors in the data. DOE Interim Commissioner Pam Stewart appeared Thursday before lawmakers following the release of the corrected data for the 2011-12 school year, which showed that only3.5 percent of Florida teachers were not satisfactorily doing their jobs. I think this is a painful year, Stewart said at a meeting of the Senate Education Appropriations Subcommittee. I think any time you implement something this large for the rst time, there are growing pains. I think that the 2-3 year will be much more telling, and how we do as we move forward. BILLS BEING FILED With lawmakers back in town, a number of bills were led in both chambers as lawmakers gear up for the 2013 session now less than four months away. Measures to provide instate tuition to the resident children of undocumented immigrants (HB 11) and create a no-drone-zone (SB 92) in Florida banning unmanned aerial aircraft own by police were among the bills led this week. STORY OF THE WEEK: Lawmakers return to begin gearing up for 2013 session. QUOTE OF THE WEEK: Well, they probably didnt want someone on there who was going to speak up and bang their st on the table when they see something wrong thats not in the best interest of the consumer, the ratepayer. Rep. Mike Fasano, speculating this week on why he may have been left off the House Insurance CommitteeSTATE GOVERNMENT WEEKLY ROUNDUP (Recap and analysis of the week in state government)Staring at the scal cliff, looking back at the electionTALLAHASSEE Sen. William J. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, has been tapped for key leadership roles for the 2013 Legislative Session. This move by Senate President Don Gaetz clearly demonstrates his commitment to bipartisanship in the Florida Senate. I am very pleased with, and appreciative of, the committee assignments that Senator Gaetz has entrusted to me, said Sen.Montford. I am particularly proud to have been tapped as Chairman of the Agriculture Committee and Vice Chairman of two K-20 Committees, and I am humbled by Senator Gaetz con dence in me. Montford was also selected by the Senate Democratic Leader as Policy Chair for the Senate Democratic Caucus and was appointed to the following committees for the 2013 Legislative Session: Agriculture, Chair K-20 Appropriations, Vice Chair K-20 Substitute, Vice Chair Appropriations Banking & Insurance Gaming Government Operations Health & Human Services Appropriations and Rules. Many of the counties I represent are rural and farming counties, so my appointment as Agriculture Chairman is of great importance to me due to the direct impact this industry has on so many of my constituents, as well as our state, said Montford. And as a former school superintendent, principal and math teacher, I am very excited to be serving on two key K-20 committees that signi cantly impact the education of our youth, which is pivotal to the economic vitality of our state. Montford was recently reelected to his second term in November representing District 3 which includes 11 north Florida counties. Besides Wakulla, Montford also represents Calhoun, Franklin, Gadsden, Gulf, Hamilton, Jefferson, Leon, Liberty, Madison, and Taylor counties. Montford currently serves as the Chief Executive Of cer for the Florida Association of District School Superintendents. WASHINGTON, D.C. Congressman Steve Southerland applauded Gov. Rick Scotts announcement that the State of Florida has received approval for a $2.7 million National Emergency Grant (NEG) through the U.S. Department of Labor providing temporary employment for the Franklin County oystermen and shermen devastated by the impact of Tropical Storm Debby. North Floridas oyster harvesters have experienced incredible economic hardship due to natural conditions that are far beyond their control, Southerland said. Apalachicola Bays oystermen and fishermen are a rich part of our Florida heritage, and this desperately-needed disaster aid will go a long way in restoring our coastal economies and keeping these hardworking families on the water and in business, Southerland said. National Emergency Grants provide funding for a temporary expansion of training and employment programs at the state and local level in response to unforeseen economic events and natural disasters. Southerland joined Florida Sens. Marco Rubio and Bill Nelson and Florida Reps. Jeff Miller and Richard Nugent last September in authoring a letter to the U.S. Secretary of Commerce requesting a shery disaster declaration for Apalachicola Bays oyster harvesters.By BRANDON LARRABEETHE NEWS SERVICE OF FLORIDATALLAHASSEE, Dec. 4 A judge struck down a decision by the Legislative Budget Commission to privatize health-care at prisons across most of the state, one of the rst times a court has weighed in on the power of the 14-member panel. The ruling, issued Tuesday, allows the Department of Corrections to privatize health-care services in a region covering roughly the bottom third of the state; that contract was speci cally included in the ne print of the budget for the spending year that ends June 30. But Leon County Circuit Court Judge John Cooper said that the other three regions couldnt be privatized by the LBC, which voted in September to approve the broader initiative. Whether to privatize some or all of this states prison operations is a signi cant policy decision, Cooper wrote. Under existing law, the Legislature weighs in on this policy decision through its appropriations power. ... Authorizing and funding privatizing health services in Floridas prisons is the prerogative of the full Legislature and not that of the Legislative Budget Commission. Coopers opinion marks a victory for two unions -the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the Florida Nurses Association -that challenged the LBCs decision and the privatization initiative more broadly. Though Cooper sided with the state on the authority to hand over health-care services to private companies, his ruling on the LBC action would require new legislative action unless his decision is overturned on appeal. We believe that this decision will bring that issue back into the sunshine where it belongs, said Alma Gonzalez, special counsel for AFSCME Council 79. But because of the relative lack of case law in the area, a ruling from an appeals court or the Supreme Court could have broad rami cations on just how far the authority of the LBC extends. This is a precedent-setting decision, Gonzalez said. She said the union was still advising employees to keep their options open in case the services are eventually awarded to Corizon, Inc. The union expects the state to appeal. Requests for comments from the Department of Corrections were not immediately returned. UPDATE: The Florida Department of Corrections has moved forward quickly with an appeal of a circuit judges ruling last week that blocked a plan to privatize prison health services in the central and northern parts of the state. The 1st District Court of Appeal received the departments notice of appeal Thursday, two days after Leon County Circuit Judge John Cooper ruled that the Legislative Budget Commission overstepped its authority by approving the privatization plan, according to an online court docket. The appeal is not a surprise the department said it would challenge Coopers ruling. Judge: LBC cant privatize all prison health careMontford gets leadership roles Southerland applauds disaster assistance for local oystermenProsecutors will appeal a Leon County judges decision rejecting an attempt to subpoena a Florida TimesUnion reporter in a criminal case against one of Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carrolls aides, the Times-Union reported Tuesday. Circuit Court Judge Frank Sheffield quashed the subpoena last month, saying prosecutors hadnt proven that the information they want from Matt Dixon, the papers Tallahassee reporter, cant be obtained from other sources. Under a limited privilege granted to journalists, prosecutors are supposed to show that there are no other avenues for gathering evidence before they subpoena reporters. Carletha Cole has been charged with illegally sharing with Dixon a recording of a conversation with Carrolls chief of staff.State appealing decision on reporters testimony

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 7B Did you know?When you shop with local merchants more of your money stays closer to home; suppor ng your local parks, recrea on centers, libraries and other things that make this community a great place to live. Shopping local can s mulate and help restore a poor economy!Local ownership means that important decisions are made locally by people who live in the community and who will feel the impacts of those decisions. Your dollars spent in locally owned businesses have three times the impact on your community as dollars spent at national chains. When shopping locally, you simultaneously create jobs, fund more services through sales tax, invest in neighborhood improvement and promote community development.Locally owned businesses create more jobs locally and, in some sectors, provide better wages and bene ts Locally owned businesses build strong neighborhoods by giving back to the community, linking neighbors, and by contributing more to local causes.Shop local and keep your local dollars circulating in your home town! P e t S t o p Pet Stop r all your pet supply needFosFor all your pet supply needs STOP P e t Pe t Phone: (850) 926-79493016 Crawfordville Hwy., Crawfordville, FL 32327Conveniently located North of the Courthouse on Crawfordville Hwy. Holistic Select WellnessC Lbt n Pfr tf Ab n ALL Yr P Nf.Special Orders AvailableStocking Stuffers for Pets Gift Certificates 301 C S G i Construction Cleanup, Commercial, ResidentialLICENSED AND INSURED ConstructionCleanupCommercial R Re Re Re Re Re R R R R R s s si sid id ential Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly Nicholspray like its up to God, Work like its up to youMany Thanks for Many Blessings. Have a wonderful Christmas! Across the street from the courthouse, downtown Crawfordville926-3338Open 10AM-5PM or call for later appointment.15 Vendors 2 Floors The White Elephant DOWNTOWN CRAWFORDVILLE 926-5013BETWEEN HARDEES & PET STOP3010 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY. ANTIQUES C ARRIES C OVEC ARRIES C OVE C HRISTMAS ATC HRISTMAS ATToys Dolls Antiques Collectibles Jewelry Ornaments Decorations One-of-kinds Etc. A Cabin of Treasures~ Vera Bradley ~ ~ Dots Jewels ~ ~ Greenleaf Scents ~ ~ 16 Vendors ~ ~ Gifts ~ ~ Collectibles ~ ~ Jewelry ~ ~ Custom Wood Items ~ & much more... PICK A TREASURE FROM OUR TREASURE BOX w/purchase!850926-8381M-S 10-5 Downtown Crawfordville, Next to Subway 27 E AZALEA DR. NEXT TO STONE CREEK PIZZA Hair Place That 850-926-6020Gift Certicates Available t C C e C C FULL SERVICE HAIR SALONStyles for Men, Women & ChildrenCutsUpDosColor Perms HighlightsFacial Waxings Specialty Cuts Flat TopsMirandaTues-Sat545-2905RobynThurs-Sat926-6020MavisAppt. Only962-2171 Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce Shop Local Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce T H 1616-D North Pointe Center Crawfordville C hristmas D ress SALE 15-40% OFFChristmas HoursMon-Sat 10-7850926-4222

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Page 8B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Proudly Supported by the Wakulla County Chamber of Commerce OPEN Mon.Sat. 8-6(850) 926-3114 (800) 726-3104 IF WE DONT HAVE IT WE CAN GET IT! ALL YOUR MARINE SUPPLIES FOR 26 YEARSBAIT SHOP(850) 926-1162Mon. Sat. 6-6 Sun. 6-12 3026 Coastal Highway, Medart Oyster Knives Gloves Hand Held VHF Radios Rubber Boots Cast Nets Gift Certicates Create A Basket or Bucket for ALL Your Outdoor Fun! HUNTING H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H H U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U U N N N N T T T I I N N G G G G BOOTS Field Blazer Muck Boots 850745-8414 850 745-8414 HAIR SALON Merry Christmas, Happy New Year& Thank You for Another Great Year!DOREEN AND NIKKI AT3278-C Crawfordville Hwy. (next to The Ming Tree) Holiday Craft BazaarSaturday, December 8at the CRAWFORDVILLE WOMANS CLUBSecond annual holiday bazaar hosted by the Crawfordville Womans Club at the clubhouse located at 64 Ochlockonee Street behind Hudson Park.Numerous vendors will display their wares in indoor comfort.Friday night, December 7 Sneak PreviewTickets are being sold to take a sneak preview to Saturdays event and enjoy delicious hors doeuvres and a wine tasting.9 a.m. 3 p.m. FREE and open to the publicA portion of the proceeds from the bazaar will go to the Crawfordville Womans Club scholarship fund and other civic projects.294-6482 Tickets to the Friday night preview are $10 each for more info please call 850-274-8000 Modern Communications Modern CommunicationsNEXT TO EL JALISCOS2481 CRAWFORDVILLE HWY.CRAWFORDVILLE UNLIMITED TALK & TEXT$4000 PER MO.DATA CHARGES MAY APPLYNATIONWIDE PRE-PAID UNLIMITED TALK UNLIMITED TEXT Over 3000 rods & reels in stock Drawings for Prizes to be held weekly stop in and register. (NO PURCHASE NECESSARY) 850-984-5501 1321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida full line of & GIFT CARD GIFT CARD850-984-55011321 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, Florida Mens CALCUTTA Neoprene Stocking Foot/Chest Waders $6995Sale Reg. 89.99 $4995Sale Reg. 74.99 12 1/2 x 7 x 21 14 x 9 1/2 x 27 / / 2 2 2 x x 2 2 7 7 7 7 7 7 14 14 x x 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 1/ 1/ / / / / 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 $5995Sale Reg. 89.99 16 x 10 1/2 x 30 $6795Sale Reg. 99.99 CALCUTTA Dry Bags Razor Sharp Stainless Steel Knife Kit $29995Sale Reg. 319.99 Bayou Classic 4 gal. Fryer Stainless Steel $1995 Sale SAVE $40 Reg. 59.99 We have the Best Prices on Live and Frozen Bait Around! LYs (menhaden) 5lb box $3.95 Everyday. We stock Coolers! While supplies last receive a Free 125 yard spool of 15 or 20lb test Spider Wire Invisi-braid ( $21.00 value ) with purchase of a Penn reel or Penn combo. Also enter to win a FREE 125 yard spool of 15 or 20lb Spider Wire Invisi-braid. There will be one name drawn every day. As always free spooling with purchase of any line. YETI COOLERS & Re-StoreShadeville Highway926-4544Open Tues. Sat. 9 a.m. 5 p.m. Florida Wild Mammal Association To report orphaned or injured wildlife, please call 363-2351

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 9BFOOD & ENTERTAINING -Janet By JO MARSHALL Contributor, Relish magazineFrom la braise, a French term for glowing coals heaped around a closed cooking vessel, braise is a slow, moist cooking method used primarily for meats and vegetables. English cooks focused on the cooking vessel itself and came up with the less romantic term pot roast. In simple terms, braising takes the following steps: 1) Brown meat in a little oil. 2) Moisten with liquid, often stock and an acidic element such as wine. 3) Cover tightly and cook at low heat often 325F or less until meat is fork tender. Roasting was for the wealthy who could afford to fatten the calf. Braising was the peasants way to coax succulence from older, muscular animals, which were tough but very tasty. A good braise is more than the sum of its parts: Meat absorbs avor from the liquid, the liquid takes body from collagens in the meat, and a avorful sauce is an automatic byproduct. Classic braises include the coq au vin (chicken in wine) and the dish made with veal shanks, osso buco (literally, pierced bone). Some tips: Brown meat on all sides to develop flavor. Dont drown your meat in liquid. In general, add liquid no more than half way up the side of the roast. For especially fatty cuts, cool the braised dish until fat is easily skimmed, then reheat and adjust seasonings. Flavorful braising liquids produce a more avorful dish, and recipes may call for reducing a bottle of wine to a single cup. Good candidates for braising include chuck roasts, shanks and short ribs. Braising is also a great technique for cooking vegetables ranging from cabbage to fennel. Braised Chicken and Vegetables This recipe is based on a French peasant dish. It uses inexpensive avorful chicken thighs and other pantry staples. 1 tablespoon olive oil 6 bone-in chicken thighs 1 potato, peeled and chopped 1 yellow onion, nely chopped (1 cup) 2 carrots, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 3/4 cup white wine (such as Chardonnay) 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth 3 sprigs fresh thyme Juice of 1 lemon 1/2 teaspoon salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 tomato, chopped 1/2 lemon, thinly sliced (optional) 1. Heat oil in a large heavy skillet over medium heat. Add chicken, and brown on both sides, 10 to 15 minutes. Remove from pan. Add potato, onion and carrots; cook 5 minutes. 2. Return chicken to pan (with any juices). Add garlic, wine, broth, thyme, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes. Add chopped tomato and serve. Garnish with lemon slices, if desired. Serves 4. Per serving: 320 calories, 12g fat, 75mg chol., 24g prot., 21g carbs., 3g ber, 540mg sodium. For more Relish recipes and to sign up for our newsletters, log on to relish.com. To download our new Relish digital editions and Relish Daily Dish phone app, go to relish.com/mobile. RELISH THE AMERICAN TABLE WHITES WINESBraising is a slow, moist cooking methodHoliday wine gift ideasTips to enhance holiday mealsMARK BOUGHTON PHOTOGRAPHY By DAVID WHITETime is running out to nish up your Christmas shopping. For those looking to impress a wine enthusiast, these nal days are daunting. Malls and department stores offer little that would please an oenophile, and the staff at Best Buy doesnt know a thing about wine. The internet, of course, can be overwhelming! Relax. Wine lovers are easy to please, regardless of your budget. Here are my top picks. First, consider a wine club. Whether youre shopping for a complete novice or the next Iron Sommelier, everyone appreciates trying new wines. TastingRoom.com is worth checking out, as it literally brings the tasting room to your living room. Launched three years ago by a tech entrepreneur, the company transfers wine into miniature bottles, allowing consumers to sample a host of wines without having to purchase an entire bottle. Wine club memberships start at $30 per shipment. If youre shopping for someone who enjoys wines from Napa Valley, consider the Bordello Wine Club from Vintners Collective, a multi-winery tasting room in downtown Napa. While the club is expensive the average shipment runs $165 the collective is home to some of Napas most celebrated, small-production winemakers. If youre shopping for a fan of Oregon Pinot Noir, theres a similar collective in the Willamette Valley called Carlton Winemakers Studio. For novice wine drinkers, newspaper wine clubs are fun. These have proliferated in recent years, and the New York Times selections tend to get the highest marks. That said, many local retailers have their own clubs that offer a better value. Books also make good gifts. If youre shopping for a budding oenophile, pick up a copy of Kevin Zralys Windows on the World Complete Wine Course. For good reason, its been in print for nearly 30 years. If youre shopping for a wine enthusiast who already has a stocked bookcase, pick her up a copy of Wine Grapes, the justreleased guide to 1,368 grape varieties by Jancis Robinson, Julia Harding, and Jos Vouillamoz. The book is hefty it clocks in at more than seven pounds and has a price tag to match, retailing for $175. But its a reference book that every wine geek is desperate to own. A more affordable choice is How to Love Wine, by New York Times chief wine critic Eric Asimov. Part memoir and part manifesto, the book thoroughly combats the poison of wine snobbery through an honest and personal evaluation of Americas wine culture. It was my favorite book this year. Actual wine also works. To make an impression, youll want something thats recognizable but isnt easily found at the supermarket. Champagne is always memorable, and in recent years, wine enthusiasts have gone gaga over Grower Champagne, or wines made by the farmers who grow the grapes. Just as we understand why an apple grown in Virginia tastes different from an apple grown in Massachusetts, we understand why a Sonoma Chardonnay tastes different from one produced in Napa. Champagne is no different. And Grower Champagne conveys that sense of place. Egly-Ouriet, Pierre Peters, and Vilmart are three top Growers. Their wines are pricey but delicious. Of course, if you go this route, dont hesitate to ask the knowledgeable staffer at your local wine shop for advice. She might steer you toward something else thats equally impressive, like a wellknown Bordeaux or Super Tuscan. Stemware and decanters also make for great gifts. Look for brands like Riedel, Spiegelau, and Schott Zwiesel. Whatever you do, dont waste money. Ive never seen the point of a wine stopper, and no wine enthusiast wants a kitschy, hand-painted wine glass. The latest gadgets, too, are typically a waste cordless rechargeable wine bottle openers always seem more dif cult to use than traditional waiters tools.David White, a wine writer, is the founder and editor of Terroirist.com. His columns are housed at Palate Press: The Online Wine Magazine (PalatePress. com).(BPT) Thanksgiving and Christmas meals often incorporate a lot of traditional foods and avors, which as a host, may become a bit boring. But when you have friends and family visiting for several days, there are plenty of opportunities to shine with new avors and interesting meals. As a host, embrace all of the meals youll be serving, which provides you with an excellent chance to show off your culinary skills. To help you plan the menus and entertain your guests during their entire visit, Gaby Dalkin of Whats Gaby Cooking and Lindsay and Taylor Landis of Love and Olive Oil have recipes and tips to make everything much easier. I think like most people, Im not just entertaining on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day, but am making meals for my family on the days surrounding the holiday, Dalkin says. These are times when I feel like can stray from the ordinary holiday tradition and experiment with my recipes. Here are some tips to make your holidays a memorable time: Assess your ingredients including your spice cabinet to ensure all holiday essentials like cinnamon, cloves, vanilla bean, nutmeg, our and sugar are available for all recipes. Choose recipes ahead of time so you know that you have all ingredients available. Purchase the dry goods you need at least a week ahead to help reduce stress. Then purchase perishable items like meat and dairy products a day or two before guests arrive so you have everything ready to go. Make non-perishable snacks ahead of time and store them in containers to bring out when needed. Try this recipe from Dalkin to keep your guests happy: Sweet and Spice Roasted Nuts Ingredients: 1 cup raw whole cashews 1 cup raw whole walnuts 1 cup raw whole almonds 1 cup raw pepitas 1 egg white 1 teaspoon water 1/2 cup white sugar 1/4 teaspoon Spice Islands Sea Salt 1/2 teaspoon Spice Islands Cayenne Pepper 1/2 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Saigon Cinnamon Directions: Preheat the oven to 350 F. Line a baking sheet with a piece of parchment paper and set it aside. Combine the cashews, walnuts, almonds and pepitas in a large bowl and toss to combine. Whisk together the egg white, water, sugar, salt, cayenne pepper and cinnamon. Drizzle the wet mixture over the nuts and toss to combine, making sure they are evenly coated. Transfer the nuts to the baking sheet and spread in an even layer. Roast for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Remove the nuts from the oven and separate the nuts as they cool. Store in an airtight container and serve as needed. Classic Pumpkin Pie Chocolate Chip Pancakes Ingredients: 1 1/4 cup all-purpose our 1 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Saigon Cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Ginger 1/8 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Nutmeg 1/8 teaspoon Spice Islands Ground Cloves 3 tablespoons white sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/4 teaspoon Spice Islands Sea Salt 1 cup 2 percent milk 1/2 cup pumpkin puree 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 egg 1/2 cup chocolate chips butter or baking spray for skillet Directions: In a large bowl, combine the our, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, cloves, sugar, baking powder and salt and set aside. In another large bowl, whisk together the milk, pumpkin, vegetable oil and egg. Add the dry ingredients into the wet ingredients and stir until everything is just combined, being careful not to over mix. Fold the chocolate chips into the mixture. Heat a griddle or large pan to medium-low heat. Coat the pan with cooking spray. Drop 1/4 cup of batter onto heated skillet. Cook on the rst side until the edges begin to bubble, about 2 minutes. Carefully flip pancake over and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes or until golden brown. Continue this process to make the rest of the pancakes, making sure to lightly spray the pan between each pancake to ensure they do not stick. Serve the pancakes immediately with maple syrup and butter, if desired.

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High end finishes; immaculate home in equestrian community. www .centralflest ate.com for pictures/more info. 352.249.9164 Boats Sundance 16ft 25hp Evinrude w/power trim, center console, trolling motor saltwater 54lb thrust, trailer w/new tires, ready to fish, can be seen at ABC storage Crawfordville, $3,150 (850) 926-9986 (850) 566-5207 Roofing FREE ESTIMATES 850-889 -0989 Licensed and Insured #CCC1328414 www.a2zroof.com 5452-1213 TWN PUBLIC NOTICE THE SCHOOLBOARD OF WAKULLACOUNTYANNOUNCES THE FOLLOWING: EVENT: Regular School Board Meeting DATE: Monday, December 17 2012 TIME: 5:45 p.m. PLACE : School Board Room, 69 Arran Board, Crawfordville, Florida PURPOSE: Regular School Board Meeting For further information please contact: Superintendents Office, Wakulla County School, P.O. Box 100, 69 Arran Road, Crawfordville, FL32326, 850-926-0065 December 13, 2012 Meeting Notices Meeting Notices Meeting Notices 5459-1220 TWN vs. Collins, Delma Case No. 11000310CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, GENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION, CASE NO. 11000310CA CitiMortgage, Inc., Plaintiff, vs. Delma O. Collins; Unknown Spouse of Delma O. Collins; Wakulla County, Florida; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2, Defendants. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to a Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 19, 2012, entered in Case No. 11000310CA of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit, in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein CitiMortgage, Inc. is the Plaintiff and Delma O. Collins; Unknown Spouse of Delma O. Collins; Wakulla County, Florida; Unknown Tenant #1; Unknown Tenant #2 are the Defendants, that I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at, the front lobbyof the courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL 32327, beginning at 11:00 AM on the 31st day of January, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 4 AND THE WEST 1/2 OF LOT 3, BLOCK 29, OF GREINERS ADDITION TO CRAW5460-1220 TWN Vs. Isman, Timothy Case No. 11-274-CANotice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-274-CA, UCN: 652011CA000274XXXXXX THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST2006 4CB, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006 4CB, Plaintiff, vs. TIMOTHYW. ISMAN A/K/ATIMOTHYWADE ISMAN; PATRICIAELIZABETH BERNETT F/K/APATRICIAE. ISMAN; FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants. NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT T O CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of foreclosure dated December 3, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11 274 FC UCN: 652011CA000274XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON FKATHE BANK OF NEW YORK,AS TRUSTEE FOR THE CERTIFICATEHOLDERS CWALT, INC., ALTERNATIVE LOAN TRUST2006 4CB, MORTGAGE PASS THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006 4CB is Plaintiff and TIMOTHYW. ISMAN A/K/ATIMOTHYWADE ISMAN; PATRICIAELIZABETH BERNETT F/K/APATRICIAE. ISMAN; FLORIDACOMMERCE CREDITUNION; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 County, Florida, 11:00 a.m. on the 7th day of February, 2012, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 5, TOWNSHIP3 SOUTH, RANGE 1 EAST, WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDAAND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 22 EAST 1323.21 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING, FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING, THENCE NORTH 89 50 WEST ALONG THE NORTHERLYBOUNDARYOF SUMMERWOOD UNIT TWO (AN UNRECORDED PLAT), 331.56 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT THENCE RUN NORTH 00 44 EAST 658.66 FEET TO THE CENTERLINE OF A60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASEMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 89 45 EAST ALONG SAID CENTERLINE AND ITS EXTENSION 331.27 FEET TO ACONCRETE MONUMENT; THENCE RUN SOUTH 00 43 WEST 658.13 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING, SUBJECT TO A 60.00 FOOT ROADWAY, UTILITYAND DRAINAGE EASEMENT. TOGETHER WITH APERPETUALEASEMENT AND RIGHT OF WAYIN COMMON WITH OTHERS FOR INGRESS, EGRESS AND REGRESS IN THE SUMMERWOOD SUBDIVISION AS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 127, PAGE 840, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. TOGETHER WITH THE BENEFITS AND BURDENS OF ALLROAD EASMENTS AND RIGHTS OF WAYSUBJECT TO ARIGHT OF WAYIN FAVOR OF FLORIDAPOWER COMPANY, AND THE SUMMERWOOD ROAD OWNERS MAINTENANCE ASSOCIATION AS RECORDED IN OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 100, PAGE 598 AND OFFICIALRECORDS BOOK 127, PAGE 840, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA. ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUST FILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on December 3, 2012. BRENTX THURMOND, As Clerk, Circuit Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff PO BOX 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339 1438 Telephone: (954) 564 0071 Service E-mail: answers@shdlegalgroup.com December 13 & 20, 2012 5461-1220 TWN Vs. Frink, Mary Case No. 11-CA-344 PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUITIN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. CIVILDIVISION CASE NO. 11-CA-344, UCN: 652011CA000344XXXXXX BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., Plaintiff vs. MARYK. FRINK; CARLISREAL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARYK. FRINK; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARLISREAL; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 1; UNKNOWN TENANT NO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, Defendants NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO CHAPTER 45 NOTICE IS HEREBYGIVEN pursuant to an Order or Summary Final Judgment of Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices foreclosure dated December 3, 2012, and entered in Case No. 11-CA-344 UCN: 652011CA000344XXXXXX of the Circuit Court in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein BANK OF AMERICA, N.Ais Plaintiff and MARYK. FRINK; CARLISREAL; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MARYK. FRINK; THE UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF CARLISREAL; UNKNOWN TENANTNO.1; UNKNOWN TENANTNO. 2; and ALLUNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING INTERESTS BY, THROUGH, UNDER OR AGAINSTANAMED DEFENDANTTO THIS ACTION, OR HAVING OR CLAIMING TO HAVE ANYRIGHT, TITLE OR INTERESTIN THE PROPERTYHEREIN DESCRIBED, are Defendants, I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash at in the Front Foyer of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, FL32327 County Florida, 11:00 a.m on the 7th dayof February, 2013, the following described property as set forth in said Order or Final Judgment, to-wit; LOT 24, CARMEN ROCIO, ASUBDIVISON AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA ANYPERSON CLAIMING AN INTERESTIN THE SURPLUS FROM THE SALE, IF ANY, OTHER THAN THE PROPERTYOWNER AS OF THE DATE OF THE LIS PENDENS MUSTFILE ACLAIM WITHIN 60 DAYS AFTER THE SALE. DATED at Crawfordville, Florida, on December 3, 2012 (SEAL) Brent X. Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk SHD Legal Group P.A. Attorneys for Plaintiff P.O. Box 11438 Fort Lauderdale, FL33339-1438 Telephone: (954) 564-0071 December 13 & 20, 2012 1183-114402 Page 10B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.com Denises ListCall today to get your ad in our services directory!850-926-7102 Denise@TheWakullaNews.net 4Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba House $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $850mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba DWMH $650mo + Sec. Dep. 2-2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $775mo + Sec. Dep 2Br 2.5Ba TwnHs $750mo + Sec. Dep 2Br 1Ba House $595mo + Sec. Dep. 3Br 2Ba SWMH $550mo + Sec. Dep. 2Br 1Ba SWMH $425mo + Sec. Dep. 1Br 1Ba Cottage $550mo + Sec. Dep. Wakulla Realty RENTALS:Specializing in Wakulla Co.850926Sonya HallLic. Real Estate Broker A-1PRESSURE CLEANING Larry Carter, Owner/OperatorLicensed & Insured BACK FORTYTRACTOR SERVICE 850925-7931 850694-7041 FIREWOOD FOR SALEFACE CORD 4 X 8 X 16 .........43 CU. FT. $75 HALF CORD 4 X 4 X 4 .........64 CU. FT. $140 FULL CORD 4 X 4 X 8 ........128 CU. FT. $200 FREE DELIVERY WITHIN 10 MILES OF THE COURTHOUSE, STACKING AVAILABLE WITH ADDITIONAL CHARGE.CALL RODNEY TRUE AT 545-2901 Harold BurseSTUMP GRINDING926-7291 HOME COMFORT INDUSTRIESCENTRAL HEATING & AIR: Sales, Installation & Service ELECTRICAL SERVICES: Fans, Lighting, Wiring for Electrical, Phones, TV, Computer & SoundLocated in Crawfordville. Doug & Sherry Quigg, owners850-926-5790Lic. #s ER0010924, CAC1814368LLC THIS SPACE FOR RENT 926-7102 Munges Tree ServiceProfessional Work done at Affordable Rates!24-HR EMERGENCY SERVICEMike Mongeon, ISA certified arborist FL-6125850-421-8104 Special Touch Cleaning ServicePolly NicholsConstruction Cleanup, Commercial, Residential519-7238 926-3065pray like its up to God, Work like its up to you LICENSED AND INSURED STOWAWAY MARINE & MORE, Inc.OUTBOARD SPECIALIST ON DUTY4815D Coastal Hwy., www.wakullaboatsales.com Prop Service Center Interstate Battery Dealer Amsoil Dealer850-926-BOAT

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 11B FORDVILLE, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF, RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA. Dated this 19th day of November, 2012. Brent Thurmond, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact Susan Wilson, ADA Coordinator, at 850.577.4401, 301 South Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301at least 7 days before your scheduled court appearance, or immediately upon receiving this notification if the time before the scheduled appearance is less than 7 days; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. December 13 & 20, 2012 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices 5454-1220 TWN vs. Darnell, Kristine Case No. 65 2009 CA 000487 Notice of Sale PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, CASE NO.: 65-2009-CA-000487 HSBC BANK USA, NA, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE LMT 2006-7 TRUST FUND Plaintiff, v. KRISTINE ANNE DARNELL A/K/A KRISTINE DARNELL; MICHAEL CHATWOOD; ANY AND ALL UNKNOWN PARTIES CLAIMING BY, THROUGH, UNDER, AND AGAINST THE HEREIN NAMED INDIVIDUAL DEFENDANT(S) WHO ARE NOT KNOWN TO BE DEAD OR ALIVE, WHETHER SAID UNKNOWN PARTIES MAY CLAIM AN INTEREST AS SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, GRANTEES, OR OTHER CLAIMANTS; UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF MICHAEL CHATWOOD NKA ASHLEY MARIE DAVIS; THE HAMMOCKS SUBDIVISION PROPERTY OWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC. Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN pursuant to an Order of Final Summary Judgment of Foreclosure dated November 26, 2012, entered in Civil Case No. 65-2009-CA-000487 of the Circuit Court of the Second Judicial Circuit in and for Wakulla County, Florida, wherein the Clerk of the Circuit Court will sell to the highest bidder for cash on 7th day of Feburary, 2013, at 11:00 a.m. at the front lobby of the Wakulla County Courthouse, 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Florida 32327, relative to the following described property as set forth in the Final Judgment, to wit: LOT 12, THE HAMMOCKS PLASE I, A SUBDIVISION AS PER MAP OR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 44-45 OF PUBLIC RECORDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA Any person claiming an interest in the surplus from the sale, if any, other than the property owner as of the date of the Lis Pendens must file a claim within 60 days after the sale. ATTENTION: PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact: Danny Davis, Court Technology Office, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32303, Phone (850) 577-4401 DATED AT CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA THIS 26TH DAY OF NOVEMBER, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA (SEAL) 5455-1220 TWN vs. Kidwell, Jerry Case No. 12-000400-CA Notice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE 2ND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, CIVIL DIVISION, CASE NO. 12-000400-CA BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. Plaintiff, vs. JERRY L. KIDWELL A/K/A JERRY KIDWELL; STACI D. KIDWELL A/K/A STACI KIDWELL; UNKNOWN PERSON(S) IN POSSESSION OF THE SUBJECT PROPERTY; Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To the following Defendant(s): JERRY L. KIDWELL A/K/A JERRY KIDWELL (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 205 LONGLEAF Dr., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 STACI D. KIDWELL A/K/A STACI KIDWELL (RESIDENCE UNKNOWN) 205 LONGLEAF Dr., CRAWFORDVILLE, FL 32327 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Foreclosure of Mortgage on the following described property: COMMENCE AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SECTION 24, TOWNSHIP 3 SOUTH, RANGE 2 WEST, WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, SAID POINT LYING ON THE WEST BOUNDARY OF LOT 75 OF THE HARTSFIELD SURVEY OF LANDS IN WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA, AND THENCE RUN NORTH 01 DEGREES 22 MINUTES 00 SECONDS WEST ALONG SAID WEST BOUNDARY 612.04 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 72 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 42 SECONDS EAST 444.17 FEET TO THE EASTERLY BOUNDARY OF A 50.00 FOOT COUNTY ROADWAY, THENCE RUN SOUTH 03 DEGREES 04 MINUTES 59 SECONDS EAST ALONG SAID EASTERLY ROADWAY BOUNDARY 438.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 02 DEGREES 08 MINUTES 56 SECONDS WEST 350.60 FEET, THENCE RUN NORTH 78 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS EAST 331.37 FEET, THENCE RUN SOUTH 09 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 374.24 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT FOR THE POINT OF BEGINNING. FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING CONTINUE SOUTH 09 DEGREES 34 MINUTES 58 SECONDS EAST 319.15 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY OF LONGLEAF DRIVE, THENCE RUN ALONG SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY AS FOLLOWS: NORTH 77 DEGREES 45 MINUTES 07 SECONDS EAST 322.91 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE NORTH 69 DEGREES 13 MINUTES 23 SECONDS EAST 97.51 FEET, THENCE NORTH 15 DEGREES 11 MINUTES 03 SECONDS WEST 9.98 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE LEAVING SAID RIGHT-OF-WAY BOUNDARY RUN SOUTH 77 DEGREES 46 MINUTES 42 SECONDS WEST 30.00 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN NORTH 19 DEGREES 47 MINUTES 01 SECONDS WEST 293.05 FEET TO A CONCRETE MONUMENT, THENCE RUN SOUTH 78 DEGREES 25 MINUTES 55 SECONDS WEST 335.59 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING CONTAINING 2.65 ACRES, MORE OR LESS. TOGETHER WITH THAT 1991 SKYLINE CORPORTATION TRIPLEWIDE MOBILE HOME WITH VIN # H93575GK, TITLE # 61774637, VIN # H93575GL, TITLE # 61774632, VIN # H93575GR, TITLE # 61774646. a/k/a 205 LONGLEAF DR., CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA 32327has been filed against you and you are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it, on Kahane & Associates, P.A., Attorney for Plaintiff, whose address is 8201 Peters Road, Ste. 3000, Plantation, FLORIDA 33324 on or before January 14, 2012, a date which is within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this Notice in the THE WAKULLA NEWS and file the original with the Clerk of this Court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. This notice is provided pursuant to Administrative Order No.2.065. In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to provisions of certain assistance. Please contact the Court Administrator at 3056 Crawfordville Highway, Crawfordville, Fl 32327, Phone No. (850)926-1201 within 2 working days of your receipt of this notice or pleading; if you are hearing impaired, call 1-800-955-8771 (TDD); if you are voice impaired, call 1-800-995-8770 (V) (Via Florida Relay Services). WITNESS my hand and the seal of this Court this 28th day of November, 2012 BRENT X. THURMOND, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, As Deputy Clerk December 13 & 20, 2012 5457-1220 TWN Vs. Maxwell, Nathaniel Case No. 2012 303 CANotice of Action PUBLIC NOTICE 5458-1220 TWN vs. Rudegeair, Clarence Case No. 2011 309 CA PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SECOND JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN AND FOR WAKULLA COUNTYGENERAL JURISDICTION DIVISION CASE NO. 2011-309-CA DEUTSCHE BANK TRUST COMPANY AMERICAS AS TRUSTEE RALI 2005-QS14, Plaintiff, vs. CLARENCE W RUDEGEAIR, et al., Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION To: SUMMER S. KNIGHT, 167 MASHES SAND RD, PANACEA, FL 32346; 426 N RIDE, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 and 1613 N. M.L. KING JR. BLVD., TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 UNKNOWN SPOUSE OF SUMMER S KNIGHT 167 MASHES SAND ROAD, PANACEA, FL 32346; 426 N RIDE, TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 and 1613 N. M.L. KING JR. BLVD., TALLAHASSEE, FL 32303 LAST KNOWN ADDRESS STATED, CURRENT RESIDENCE UNKNOWN YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that an action to foreclose Mortgage covering the following real and personal property described as follows, to-wit: LOT 1, PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 1, AS PER PLAT OR MAP RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND THAT PART OF THE WESTERLY OF ABANDONED ALETHA DRIVE LYING ADJACENT TO LOT 1, PANACEA SHORES, UNIT 1, A SUBDIVISION AS PER PLAT OR MAP THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 1, PAGE 25, PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND LYING SOUTH OF STATE ROAD NO. S-372. has been filed against you and you are required to a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Nicholas J. Vanhook, McCalla Raymer, LLC, 225 E. Robinson St, Suite 660, Orlando, FL 32801 and file the original with the Clerk of the above-styled Court on or before 30 days from the first publication, otherwise a Judgment may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. WITNESS my hand and seal of said Court on the 24th day of January, 2012. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in a court proceeding, you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Please contact the Office of Court Administration at (850) 577-4401, or at the Leon County Courthouse, Room 225, 301 S. Monroe Street, Tallahassee, FL 32301 within 2 working days of receipt of a notice compelling you to appear at a court proceeding; if you are hearing or voice impaired, call 711. The ADA Coordinator for the courts in Leon County is Doug Smith. He may be reached at (850) 577-4444 or through the Florida Relay Service, TDD at 1800-955-8771. The address for the Office of Court Administration is: Leon County Courthouse, 301 S. Monroe Street, Room 225, Tallahassee, FL 32301. In all other counties in the circuit please contact the Clerk of the Circuit Court`s office and ask for the ADA Coordinator. The Clerk`s number is included on each county page. CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT, As Clerk of the Court (SEAL) By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk December 13 & 20 Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices Foreclosure Sale/ Action Notices IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF THE SECOND JUDICIALCIRCUIT, IN AND FOR WAKULLACOUNTY, FLORIDA, CASE NO.: 2012 303 CA AMERIS BANK, a Georgia Bank, 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 100, Jacksonville, Florida 32256 Plaintiff, v. NATHANIELMAXWELL, JR., TAWANNAMAXWELL, PROBUILD COMPANY, LLC, SEMINOLE TRUSSES, INC., GENESIS CONSTRUCTION GROUP, INC., CARMEN ROCIO HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC., and THE UNKNOWN TENANTIN POSSESSION OF 20 CARMEN ROCIO LANE, CRAWFORDVILLE, FLORIDA32327, Defendants. NOTICE OF ACTION TO:NATHANIELMAXWELL, JR. and TAWANNAMAXWELL: YOU ARE NOTIFIEDthat a civil action has been filed against you in the Circuit Court, County of Wakulla, State of Florida, to foreclose certain real property described as follows: LOT 2, CARMEN ROCIO, ASUBDIVISION AS PER MAPOR PLAT THEREOF RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK 4, PAGE 33 OF THE PUBLIC RECORDS OF WAKULLA COUNTY, FLORIDA You are required to file a written response with the Court and serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Timothy D. Padgett, Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is 2878 Remington Green Circle, Tallahassee, Florida 32308, at least thirty (30) days from the date of first publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court either before service on Plaintiffs attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise, a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Dated this 28th day of November, 2012. CLERK OF COURT (SEAL) By: /s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk December 13 & 20, 2012 By:/s/ Desiree D. Willis, Deputy Clerk FL-97002643-09 December 13 & 20, 2012 RENTALS NEEDED!!Talk to us today about managing your property! We have an experienced Property Management Team who will provide you with an excellent level of customer service and results!A New Level of Service!!!850926-8777 www.bluewaterrealtygroup.com AVAILABLE RENTALSProperty Management, Rentals & Real Estate 17 Cessna 3 BR/2BA TARPINE. Available end of December. $1,300 mo./$1,300 Security. No Smoking, No Pets. 5 Susquehanna 2 BR/2BA $750. mo./$750 Security Deposit. Pets O.K. with prior approval and $250. fee. No Smoking. 26 Manatee Lane 3BR/2BA home on Wakulla River. $1,500 mo, includes all utilities 43 Squaw Rd 3BR/2BA DWMH $750 mo., $800 Security Deposit 31 Magpie 3BR/2BA $1,400 mo. $1,400 sec. dep. Outside pets okay with approval 137 Shephard Easement 3BR/2BA MH on 6+ acres $900 mo. $900 security Lease with OPTION TO BUY! 5 Albin Live Oak Island 2BR/2BA with Lost and Dock. $950. mo. $950 Security Deposit. Long-Term & Vacation Rentals Wakulla & Franklin Counties!850-984-0001 146 Coastal Hwy. Panacea, FL 32346 obr@obrealty.com www.obrealty.com W 8 Need to rent your house?Ochlockonee Bay Realty has been in the rental management business for 25 years and has a dependable, experienced rental team.Let our experience work for you!77 Strattonwood Road Off of Wakulla Springs Hwy. 5 minute commute to Tallahassee. Large 3BR/2BA home on 5 acres. Large workshop with outbuilding. $1100. mo No Pets, no smoking. 2797 Surf Rd. 2797 Surf Rd. Ochlockonee Bay, 3 BR/1BA Bayfront Block Home. 1,444 Sq. Ft., Fireplace, Screen Porch, $700. mo. No Pets, No Smoking. 2619 Surf Rd. Bayfront 2BR/1BA $650 mo. Pets Considered Shadeville Hwy. Big White Oak Dr. 3BR/1BA Carport & Garage, Large lot near Wakulla Station. No Smoking. No Pets. $600 per month. 2669 Surf Road Ocholockonee Bay 2BR/1BA Bayfront home with replace, carport, large screened porch and utility room. No Smoking. No Pets. $750 per month. 1119 Alligator Dr. Beachfront homeAlligator Point 2BR/2BA Furnished, w/ replace, deck on the Gulf of Mexico $1,300 per month. No smoking. No Pets. 109 Frances Avenue Panacea. 3BD/2BA MH on a large 1 acre fenced lot. $625. mo. No smoking. No pets 63 Sunrise Ochlockonee Bay 3BR/3BA $1,000 mo. No Smoking. No Pets 119 Duane Street 3BR/2BA, with hardwood oors. $825. mo. 63 Suwanee Rd. 2BD/2BA, hardwood oors and very nice sun room. $850. mo. 1937 Woodville Hwy. 3BR/1BA New carpet throughout $590 mo. No Pets, No Smoking 5Congratulations! Youve successfully registered your thewakullanews.com user account. If you have any problems, please call (877) 401-6408. 1Find your 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID on the address imprint from a The Wakulla News that was delivered to your address. Also, be sure to note how your street address is printed. 2Go to http://www.TheWakullaNews.com Click on Sign up as shown below. 3Type the 4-digit Newspaper Acct. ID in the box as shown. Now, type in your street address exactly as shown on your paper and click Continue. 4Fill out the information requested in the registration form. Dont forget to enter email address and password Also, dont forget to check the box next to the user agreement. Click Continue. Register your online account today!

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Page 12B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comBrain Teaser 1 14 17 20 29 36 39 44 49 52 63 68 71 2 30 64 3 31 65 4 22 40 66 18 37 45 55 5 15 23 41 53 6 21 32 46 50 56 69 72 7 33 57 8 34 58 19 24 42 54 67 9 16 35 38 47 59 10 25 43 51 70 73 11 26 48 60 12 27 61 13 28 62 ACROSS 1. "No __, no gain" 5. Prefix with physics 9. Rattails, e.g. 14. Patron saint of sailors 15. Like the Sabin vaccine 16. Kelly Clarkson and Carrie Underwood, for two 17. Lucky Lindy's plane 20. In great shape 21. Operation Desert __ 22. __ Blo fuse 24. Is mad for 29. Popular charity 35. "Pagliacci," e.g. 36. Several reps, in the gym 37. '54-to-'77 alliance 38. "Glengarry Glen Ross" playwright David 39. "My stars!" 41. Rudely sarcastic 43. Unescorted 44. "Gesundheit!" 46. Make corrections to 48. Sturgeon delicacy 49. Ci ty on the Mohawk 50. Helen Reddy chart topper 52. It makes jelly jell 54. Source of iron 55. Actor Max von __ 59. Butler's word 63. High school subject 68. Bacall mate, familiarly 69. Beehive State natives 70. Quaker State city 71. Fowl buildings 72. Orange or Rose 73. Thieves' hauntsDOWN1. Roach or rat 2. Bowlful for Bowser 3. Chip-tosser's utterance 4. "__ for the weary" 5. Witty remark 6. Libidinous god 7. Our last mustachioed president 8. "Not to mention ..." 9. Movieland 10. Altar assent 11. Bud's comedy pal 12. Brother of Peyton 13. Draft letters 18. Runs while standing 19. La-la lead-in 23. Keats offerings 25. Australian mine find 26. Shark sucker 27. Heretofore 28. Glossy fabric 29. Exhausts 30. Make invalid 31. Right-leaning? 32. Tapered off 33. Grisham's "__ to Kill" 34. Alpine air 40. Tear carrier 42. Prefix meaning "within" 45. Oxeye and others 47. Has the guts 51. In need of body work 53. UN locale 56. Apply crudely 57. Not fooled by 58. "That's a relief!" 60. Barreled along 61. Ms. Brockovich 62. Bar selections 63. Pie equivalent? 64. Guernsey's greeting 65. Freudian topic 66. Saw with the grain 67. Christmas or Easter: Abbr.American Prole Hometown Content 12/9/2012 Each puzzle is divided into nine sections, and each section has nine blank squares. Fill in all 81 squares on the puzzle with numbers 1 to 9. You may not repeat any numbers in any one of the nine sections that youve already used elsewhere in that section. Also, you can use each number 1-9 only once in each horizontal line of nine squares, and in each vertical column of nine squares. The puzzle is completed when you correctly ll every square. Solutions 2009 HometownContent 1 2 1345 3678 3 26 289714 413 4 517 6189 39 00 9 HometownContent 175 4829 3 6 892163457 436957281 317 248695 289635714 654791823 943 526178 561879342 728314569 P E S T U S E S U P A B C A L P O N E G A T E M O O I M I N I T A L I C E G O N O R E S T D U C T R I P I D L E S D A I S I E S M O T O D E S N Y C E R O S W A N E D D A U B T A F T A T I M E O N T O A L S O Y O D E L W H E W T R A E N T O I S L F I L M D O M D A R E S I D O O P A L D E N T E D L O U R E M O R A T O R E E L I E R E N O W E R I N S S S S A T E E N R Y E S

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www.thewakullanews.com THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 Page 13B 1. PSYCHOLOGY: If you had choreophobia, what would you be afraid of? 2. COMICS: What comic hero has a nemesis named Ming the Merciless? 3. TELEVISION: Where were the characters of Laverne and Shirley employed in Milwaukee? 4. ARCHITECTURE: Who invented the geodesic dome? 5. LITERATURE: What were the names of The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas? 6. MOVIES: What male actor starred in the 1981 film Arthur, and who was his leading lady? 7. GEOGRAPHY: Where is the island country of Sri Lanka located? 8. CHEMISTRY: What is the Periodic Table symbol for zinc? 9. GENERAL KNOWLEDGE: What nickname did author Tom Wolfe give the 1970s? 10. LANGUAGE: What are corsairs? 2012 King Features Synd., Inc. Answers 1. Dancing 2. Flash Gordon 3. Shotz Brewery 4. Richard Buckminster Fuller 5. Aramis, Athos and Porthos 6. Dudley Moore and Liza Minelli 7. Off the coast of India 8. Zn 9. The Me Decade 10. Privately owned warships YOUR AD HERE

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Page 14B THE WAKULLA NEWS, Thursday, December 13, 2012 www.thewakullanews.comChristmas in Sopchoppy CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT: Visitors stroll along Rose Avenue to look at the vendors booths; Santa was visiting the railroad depot and heard the wishes of Bailee Shef eld, 5, and Isabel Brown, 5; newly elected county commissioner from Sopchoppy Richard Harden talks with members of the committee selling gift bricks to support the ongoing efforts to improve the historic depot. Evan Haddock, 2, investigates the bearskin at the FWC tent manned by Keilina Castro and Victoria Gilley, interns with the agencys bear management program. Arts and crafts vendor Sherry Balchuck helps a customer browsing her selection of jewelry. Andy Kasey with Alli Riley, 2, who just got her face painted, and Donna Riley. Members of the Sopchoppy Homemakers Association with baked goods for sale. The Waku lla News For local news and photos For local news and photoswww.thewakullanews.com www.thewakullanews.comPHOTOS BY WILLIM SNOWDENMore photos online at thewaullanews.com